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Sample records for stage iii multiple

  1. Multiple stage railgun

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Scudder, Jonathan K.; Aaland, Kristian

    1982-01-01

    A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator (10) for accelerating a projectile (15) by movement of a plasma arc (13) along the rails (11,12). The railgun (10) is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages (10a-n) which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources (14a-n) as the projectile (15) moves through the bore (17) of the railgun (10). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end (29) of the railgun (10) can be prevented by connection of the energy sources (14a-n) to the rails (11,12) through isolation diodes (34a-n). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails (11,12) into electrically isolated rail sections (11a-n, 12a-n). In such case means (55a-n) are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse (31) or laser device (61) is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage.

  2. Rituximab and Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  3. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  4. Inferring Positions of Tumor and Nodes in Stage III Lung Cancer From Multiple Anatomical Surrogates Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Pantarotto, Jason R.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of modeling Stage III lung cancer tumor and node positions from anatomical surrogates. Methods and Materials: To localize their centroids, the primary tumor and lymph nodes from 16 Stage III lung cancer patients were contoured in 10 equal-phase planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image sets. The centroids of anatomical respiratory surrogates (carina, xyphoid, nipples, mid-sternum) in each image set were also localized. The correlations between target and surrogate positions were determined, and ordinary least-squares (OLS) and partial least-squares (PLS) regression models based on a subset of respiratory phases (three to eight randomly selected) were created to predict the target positions in the remaining images. The three-phase image sets that provided the best predictive information were used to create models based on either the carina alone or all surrogates. Results: The surrogate most correlated with target motion varied widely. Depending on the number of phases used to build the models, mean OLS and PLS errors were 1.0 to 1.4 mm and 0.8 to 1.0 mm, respectively. Models trained on the 0%, 40%, and 80% respiration phases had mean ({+-} standard deviation) PLS errors of 0.8 {+-} 0.5 mm and 1.1 {+-} 1.1 mm for models based on all surrogates and carina alone, respectively. For target coordinates with motion >5 mm, the mean three-phase PLS error based on all surrogates was 1.1 mm. Conclusions: Our results establish the feasibility of inferring primary tumor and nodal motion from anatomical surrogates in 4D CT scans of Stage III lung cancer. Using inferential modeling to decrease the processing time of 4D CT scans may facilitate incorporation of patient-specific treatment margins.

  5. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

  6. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means or separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means.

  7. Bevacizumab, Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage III, Stage IVA, or Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  8. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  9. Multiple stage miniature stepping motor

    DOEpatents

    Niven, William A.; Shikany, S. David; Shira, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    A stepping motor comprising a plurality of stages which may be selectively activated to effect stepping movement of the motor, and which are mounted along a common rotor shaft to achieve considerable reduction in motor size and minimum diameter, whereby sequential activation of the stages results in successive rotor steps with direction being determined by the particular activating sequence followed.

  10. VAC protocol for treatment of dogs with stage III hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Francisco J; Hosoya, Kenji; Lara-Garcia, Ana; Kisseberth, William; Couto, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Hemangiosarcomas (HSAs) are aggressive tumors with a high rate of metastasis. Clinical stage has been considered a negative prognostic factor for survival. The study authors hypothesized that the median survival time (MST) of dogs with metastatic (stage III) HSA treated with a vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) chemotherapy protocol would not be different than those with stage I/II HSA. Sixty-seven dogs with HSA in different anatomic locations were evaluated retrospectively. All dogs received the VAC protocol as an adjuvant to surgery (n = 50), neoadjuvant (n = 3), or as the sole treatment modality (n = 14). There was no significant difference (P = 0.97) between the MST of dogs with stage III and stage I/II HSA. For dogs presenting with splenic HSA alone, there was no significant difference between the MST of dogs with stage III and stage I/II disease (P = 0.12). The overall response rate (complete response [CR] and partial response [PR]) was 86%). No unacceptable toxicities were observed. Dogs with stage III HSA treated with the VAC protocol have a similar prognosis to dogs with stage I/II HSA. Dogs with HSA and evidence of metastases at the time of diagnosis should not be denied treatment.

  11. Oblimersen Sodium and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-11

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  12. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, H.F.

    1984-06-27

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  13. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, Howard F.

    1986-01-01

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  14. MM2 LRSLA Testing Stage III Propellant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    tested Grain 70 data. This is the oldest CYR third stage pro- pellant in the OOALC inventory having been cast in June 1960. Motor serial numbers, lot ... numbers , cast dates and plot symbols are shown below. Motor S/N Lot Number Cast Date Symbol Grain 70 SR-47-60 Jun 60 0 0031064 SR-56-62 21 Oct 62

  15. Induction Charge Detector with Multiple Sensing Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamero-Castano, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An induction charge detector with multiple sensing stages has been conceived for use in characterizing sprayed droplets, dust particles, large ionized molecules, and the like. Like related prior single-stage devices, each stage yields a measurement of the electric charge and the time of flight of the particle. In effect, an n-stage sensor yields n independent sets of such measurements from the same particle. The benefit of doing this is to increase the effective signal-to-noise ratio and thereby lower the charge-detection limit and the standard error of the charge measurement.

  16. Stage III xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis treated with antibiotherapy and percutaneous drainage.

    PubMed

    Ergun, T; Akin, A; Lakadamyali, H

    2011-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XPN) is a rare inflammatory condition usually secondary to chronic obstruction caused by nephrolithiasis and resulting in infection and irreversible destruction of the renal parenchyma. Its standard therapy consists of total or partial nephrectomy. A case of stage III xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis treated with antibiotherapy and percutaneous drainage is presented in this paper.

  17. VEGF Trap in Treating Patients With Recurrent Stage III or Stage IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-02

    Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Medium/Large Size; Extraocular Extension Melanoma; Iris Melanoma; Metastatic Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  18. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  19. Cetuximab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Tongue Cancer

  20. Lenalidomide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  1. Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Progressive, Refractory, or Recurrent Stage II or Stage III Testicular or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Seminoma

  2. Vorinostat, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  3. Genomic profiling of stage II and III colon cancers reveals APC mutations to be associated with survival in stage III colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Evert; Krijgsman, Oscar; Sie, Daoud; Tijssen, Marianne; Mongera, Sandra; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Th. Belt, Eric J.; den Uil, Sjoerd H.; Bril, Herman; Stockmann, Hein B.A.C.; Ylstra, Bauke; Carvalho, Beatriz; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Fijneman, Remond J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor profiling of DNA alterations, i.e. gene point mutations, somatic copy number aberrations (CNAs) and structural variants (SVs), improves insight into the molecular pathology of cancer and clinical outcome. Here, associations between genomic aberrations and disease recurrence in stage II and III colon cancers were investigated. A series of 114 stage II and III microsatellite stable colon cancer samples were analyzed by high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to detect CNAs and CNA-associated chromosomal breakpoints (SVs). For 60 of these samples mutation status of APC, TP53, KRAS, PIK3CA, FBXW7, SMAD4, BRAF and NRAS was determined using targeted massive parallel sequencing. Loss of chromosome 18q12.1-18q12.2 occurred more frequently in tumors that relapsed than in relapse-free tumors (p < 0.001; FDR = 0.13). In total, 267 genes were recurrently affected by SVs (FDR < 0.1). CNAs and SVs were not associated with disease-free survival (DFS). Mutations in APC and TP53 were associated with increased CNAs. APC mutations were associated with poor prognosis in (5-fluorouracil treated) stage III colon cancers (p = 0.005; HR = 4.1), an effect that was further enhanced by mutations in MAPK pathway (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF) genes. We conclude that among multiple genomic alterations in CRC, strongest associations with clinical outcome were observed for common mutations in APC. PMID:27729614

  4. Aldesleukin and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Metastatic Melanoma; Stage III Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVB Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVC Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck

  5. Cisplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage IIC, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Gastrointestinal Complication; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Comparison of Two Combination Chemotherapy Regimens Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-30

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer

  7. The development and validation of a CT-based radiomics signature for the preoperative discrimination of stage I-II and stage III-IV colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Zelan; Dong, Di; Tian, Jie; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigative the predictive ability of radiomics signature for preoperative staging (I-IIvs.III-IV) of primary colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods This study consisted of 494 consecutive patients (training dataset: n=286; validation cohort, n=208) with stage I–IV CRC. A radiomics signature was generated using LASSO logistic regression model. Association between radiomics signature and CRC staging was explored. The classification performance of the radiomics signature was explored with respect to the receiver operating characteristics(ROC) curve. Results The 16-feature-based radiomics signature was an independent predictor for staging of CRC, which could successfully categorize CRC into stage I-II and III-IV (p <0.0001) in training and validation dataset. The median of radiomics signature of stage III-IV was higher than stage I-II in the training and validation dataset. As for the classification performance of the radiomics signature in CRC staging, the AUC was 0.792(95%CI:0.741-0.853) with sensitivity of 0.629 and specificity of 0.874. The signature in the validation dataset obtained an AUC of 0.708(95%CI:0.698-0.718) with sensitivity of 0.611 and specificity of 0.680. Conclusions A radiomics signature was developed and validated to be a significant predictor for discrimination of stage I-II from III-IV CRC, which may serve as a complementary tool for the preoperative tumor staging in CRC. PMID:27120787

  8. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-30

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  9. Fragmentation in specialist care and stage III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Veenstra, Christine M.; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with cancer frequently transition between different types of specialists and across care settings. We explored how frequently the medical and surgical oncologic care of stage III colon cancer patients occurs across more than one hospital and whether this is associated with mortality and costs. Methods This is a retrospective SEER-Medicare cohort study of 9,075 stage III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 receiving both surgical and medical oncologic care within one year of diagnosis. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their cancer surgery and to their oncologist's primary hospital, and then characterized according to whether these hospitals were same or different. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, subhazards for colon cancer specific mortality, and cost of care at 12 months. Results 37% of patients received their surgical and medical oncologic care from different hospitals. Rural patients were less likely than urban patients to receive medical oncologic care from the same hospital (OR 0.62, 95%CI 0.43-0.90). Care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality but resulted in lower costs at 12 months (dollars saved $5493, 95%CI $1799, $9525), 8% of median cost. Conclusions Delivery of surgical and medical oncology care at the same hospital was associated with lower costs; however, reforms which seek to improve outcomes and cost through integrating complex care will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving care across more than one hospital. PMID:26043368

  10. Effect of Population III Multiplicity on Dark Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    We numerically study the mutual interaction between dark matter (DM) and Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in order to explore the possibility of Pop III dark stars within this physical scenario. We perform a cosmological simulation, initialized at z approx. 100, which follows the evolution of gas and DM. We analyze the formation of the first mini halo at z approx. 20 and the subsequent collapse of the gas to densities of 10(exp 12)/cu cm. We then use this simulation to initialize a set of smaller-scale 'cut-out' simulations in which we further refine the DM to have spatial resolution similar to that of the gas. We test multiple DM density profiles, and we employ the sink particle method to represent the accreting star-forming region. We find that, for a range of DM configurations, the motion of the Pop III star-disk system serves to separate the positions of the protostars with respect to the DM density peak, such that there is insufficient DM to influence the formation and evolution of the protostars for more than approx. 5000 years. In addition, the star-disk system causes gravitational scattering of the central DM to lower densities, further decreasing the influence of DM over time. Any DM-powered phase of Pop III stars will thus be very short-lived for the typical multiple system, and DM will not serve to significantly prolong the life of Pop III stars.

  11. Qualification of Minuteman stage III motor for spin stabilized perigee stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. E.

    1980-06-01

    The third stage of the Minuteman III ICBM was recently qualified for Space Transportation System launch as a tailored upper stage in order to use its unique combination of performance (2.1 million lbf-sec), reliability (100% on 140 tests), and maturity (900 built). The motor was static fired while spinning at 70 rpm and 100 F, and the propellant was also tested for spin effects up to 27 g in small motors. The ignition system, propellant, and case materials were also subjected to long vacuum exposure. Analyses of carry and launch from the Shuttle showed higher margins than previous qualification on the expendable missile vehicle. Early space flights are expected by the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics PAM-A (SSUS-A) version, and for the Hughes LEASAT.

  12. Interactive Tailored Website to Promote Sun Protection and Skin Self-Check Behaviors in Patients With Stage 0-III Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Stage 0 Skin Melanoma; Stage I Skin Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage II Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma

  13. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  14. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  15. Dabrafenib and Trametinib in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV BRAF Mutant Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    BRAF V600E Mutation Present; BRAF V600K Mutation Present; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  16. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-04

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  17. CDX2 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Stage II and Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalerba, Piero; Sahoo, Debashis; Paik, Soonmyung; Guo, Xiangqian; Yothers, Greg; Song, Nan; Wilcox-Fogel, Nate; Forgó, Erna; Rajendran, Pradeep S.; Miranda, Stephen P.; Hisamori, Shigeo; Hutchison, Jacqueline; Kalisky, Tomer; Qian, Dalong; Wolmark, Norman; Fisher, George A.; van de Rijn, Matt; Clarke, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of high-risk stage II colon cancers is key to the selection of patients who require adjuvant treatment after surgery. Microarray-based multigene-expression signatures derived from stem cells and progenitor cells hold promise, but they are difficult to use in clinical practice. Methods We used a new bioinformatics approach to search for biomarkers of colon epithelial differentiation across gene-expression arrays and then ranked candidate genes according to the availability of clinical-grade diagnostic assays. With the use of subgroup analysis involving independent and retrospective cohorts of patients with stage II or stage III colon cancer, the top candidate gene was tested for its association with disease-free survival and a benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Results The transcription factor CDX2 ranked first in our screening test. A group of 87 of 2115 tumor samples (4.1%) lacked CDX2 expression. In the discovery data set, which included 466 patients, the rate of 5-year disease-free survival was lower among the 32 patients (6.9%) with CDX2-negative colon cancers than among the 434 (93.1%) with CDX2-positive colon cancers (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60 to 7.38; P = 0.002). In the validation data set, which included 314 patients, the rate of 5-year disease-free survival was lower among the 38 patients (12.1%) with CDX2 protein–negative colon cancers than among the 276 (87.9%) with CDX2 protein–positive colon cancers (hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.29; P = 0.003). In both these groups, these findings were independent of the patient's age, sex, and tumor stage and grade. Among patients with stage II cancer, the difference in 5-year disease-free survival was significant both in the discovery data set (49% among 15 patients with CDX2-negative tumors vs. 87% among 191 patients with CDX2-positive tumors, P = 0.003) and in the validation data set (51% among 15 patients with CDX2

  18. IGFBP-2 Vaccine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-29

    Stage III Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  19. Epacadostat Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Stage III Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  20. Integrin genetic variants and stage-specific tumor recurrence in patients with stage II and III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Bohanes, P; Yang, D; Loupakis, F; LaBonte, M J; Gerger, A; Ning, Y; Lenz, C; Lenz, F; Wakatsuki, T; Zhang, W; Benhaim, L; El-Khoueiry, A; El-Khoueiry, R; Lenz, H-J

    2015-06-01

    Integrins (ITGs) are key elements in cancer biology, regulating tumor growth, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis through interactions of the tumor cells with the microenvironment. Moving from the hypothesis that ITGs could have different effects in stage II and III colon cancer, we tested whether a comprehensive panel of germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ITG genes could predict stage-specific time to tumor recurrence (TTR). A total of 234 patients treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy at the University of Southern California were included in this study. Whole-blood samples were analyzed for germline SNPs in ITG genes using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism or direct DNA sequencing. In the multivariable analysis, stage II colon cancer patients with at least one G allele for ITGB3 rs4642 had higher risk of recurrence (hazard ratio (HR)=4.027, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.556-10.421, P=0.004). This association was also significant in the combined stage II-III cohort (HR=1.975, 95% CI 1.194-3.269, P=0.008). The predominant role of ITGB3 rs4642 in stage II diseases was confirmed using recursive partitioning, showing that ITGB3 rs4642 was the most important factor in stage II diseases. In contrast, in stage III diseases the combined analysis of ITGB1 rs2298141 and ITGA4 rs7562325 allowed to identify three distinct prognostic subgroups (P=0.009). The interaction between stage and the combined ITGB1 rs2298141 and ITGA4 rs7562325 on TTR was significant (P=0.025). This study identifies germline polymorphisms in ITG genes as independent stage-specific prognostic markers for stage II and III colon cancer. These data may help to select subgroups of patients who may benefit from ITG-targeted treatments.

  1. Adjuvant dendritic cell vaccination induces tumor-specific immune responses in the majority of stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Bol, Kalijn F.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Westdorp, Harm; Textor, Johannes C.; van Rossum, Michelle M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek J.; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Pots, Jeanne M.; van Oorschot, Tom G. M.; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A.; van Meeteren, Wilmy S. E. C.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Bonenkamp, Johannes J.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) vaccination to induce tumor-specific immunological responses in stage III melanoma patients. Experimental design: Retrospective analysis of stage III melanoma patients, vaccinated with autologous monocyte-derived DC loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAA) gp100 and tyrosinase after radical lymph node dissection. Skin-test infiltrating lymphocytes (SKILs) obtained from delayed-type hypersensitivity skin-test biopsies were analyzed for the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells by tetrameric MHC-peptide complexes and by functional TAA-specific T cell assays, defined by peptide-recognition (T2 cells) and/or tumor-recognition (BLM and/or MEL624) with specific production of Th1 cytokines and no Th2 cytokines. Results: Ninety-seven patients were analyzed: 21 with stage IIIA, 34 with stage IIIB, and 42 had stage IIIC disease. Tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells were present in 68 patients (70%), and 24 of them showed a response against all 3 epitopes tested (gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377) at any point during vaccinations. A functional T cell response was found in 62 patients (64%). Rates of peptide-recognition of gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377 were 40%, 29%, and 45%, respectively. Median recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival of the whole study population were 23.0 mo and 36.8 mo, respectively. Conclusions: DC vaccination induces a functional TAA-specific T cell response in the majority of stage III melanoma patients, indicating it is more effective in stage III than in stage IV melanoma patients. Furthermore, performing multiple cycles of vaccinations enhances the chance of a broader immune response. PMID:27622047

  2. Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Damien; Mishra, Mark; Onn, Amir; Dicker, Adam P.; Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael; Lawrence, Yaacov Richard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

  3. Theory of multiple-stage interband photovoltaic devices and ultimate performance limit comparison of multiple-stage and single-stage interband infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkey, Robert T.; Yang, Rui Q.

    2013-09-01

    A theoretical framework for studying signal and noise in multiple-stage interband infrared photovoltaic devices is presented. The theory flows from a general picture of electrons transitioning between thermalized reservoirs. Making the assumption of bulk-like absorbers, we show how the standard semiconductor transport and recombination equations can be extended to the case of multiple-stage devices. The electronic noise arising from thermal fluctuations in the transition rates between reservoirs is derived using the Shockley-Ramo and Wiener-Khinchin theorems. This provides a unified noise treatment accounting for both the Johnson and shot noise. Using a Green's function formalism, we derive consistent analytic expressions for the quantum efficiency and thermal noise in terms of the design parameters and macroscopic material properties of the absorber. The theory is then used to quantify the potential performance improvement from the use of multiple stages. We show that multiple-stage detectors can achieve higher sensitivities for applications requiring a fast temporal response. This is shown by deriving an expression for the optimal number of stages in terms of the absorption coefficient and absorber thicknesses for a multiple-stage detector with short absorbers. The multiple-stage architecture may also be useful for improving the sensitivity of high operating temperature detectors in situations where the quantum efficiency is limited by a short diffusion length. The potential sensitivity improvement offered by a multiple-stage architecture can be judged from the product of the absorption coefficient, α, and diffusion length, Ln, of the absorber material. For detector designs where the absorber lengths in each of the stages are equal, the multiple-stage architecture offers the potential for significant detectivity improvement when αLn ≤ 0.2. We also explore the potential of multiple-stage detectors with photocurrent-matched absorbers. In this architecture, the

  4. STAGE 64: SIMULATOR PROGRAMMING SPECIFICATIONS MANUAL. VOLUME III. DAMAGE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Damage package of the STAGE Simulator is a group of six complexes which under normal running conditions assess damage to the following five types...preliminary control routine. Under nonoptimal running conditions, the damage assessment is made by the five complexes at the end of each time period during which ground zero has occurred.

  5. Multiple-Stage Screening of Youth Depression in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morey, Melissa E.; Arora, Prerna; Stark, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Schools present a unique environment in which to conduct universal screenings for youth depression. The present study examines the efficiency of a multiple-stage assessment procedure assessing youth depression in the schools by calculating hit rates and establishing diagnostic accuracy for the measures used. Girls (N = 3318) aged 8 to 13,…

  6. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  7. Entolimod in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-10

    Mucositis; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  8. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Maintenance Therapy in Treating Elderly Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Light Chain Deposition Disease; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma

  9. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  10. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Who Have Undergone Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Spindle Cell Variant; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  11. Cisplatin, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  12. Railway network design with multiple project stages and time sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuby, Michael; Xu, Zhongyi; Xie, Xiaodong

    This paper presents a spatial decision support system for network design problems in which different kinds of projects can be built in stages over time. It was developed by the World Bank and China's Ministry of Railways to plan investment strategies for China's overburdened railway system. We first present a mixed-integer program for the single-period network design problem with project choices such as single or multiple tracks and/or electrification with economies of scale. Then, because such projects can be built all at once or in stages, we developed a heuristic backwards time sequencing procedure with a cost adjustment factor to solve the ``project staging'' problem. Other innovations include a preloading routine; coordinated modeling of arcs, paths, and corridors; and a custom-built GIS.

  13. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting.

  14. Development of a Multiple-Stage Differential Mobility Analyzer (MDMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Da-Ren; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    A new DMA column has been designed with the capability of simultaneously extracting monodisperse particles of different sizes in multiple stages. We call this design a multistage DMA, or MDMA. A prototype MDMA has been constructed and experimentally evaluated in this study. The new column enables the fast measurement of particles in a wide size range, while preserving the powerful particle classification function of a DMA. The prototype MDMA has three sampling stages, capable of classifying monodisperse particles of three different sizes simultaneously. The scanning voltage operation of a DMA can be applied to this new column. Each stage of MDMA column covers a fraction of the entire particle size range to be measured. The covered size fractions of two adjacent stages of the MDMA are designed somewhat overlapped. The arrangement leads to the reduction of scanning voltage range and thus the cycling time of the measurement. The modular sampling stage design of the MDMA allows the flexible configuration of desired particle classification lengths and variable number of stages in the MDMA. The design of our MDMA also permits operation at high sheath flow, enabling high-resolution particle size measurement and/or reduction of the lower sizing limit. Using the tandem DMA technique, the performance of the MDMA, i.e., sizing accuracy, resolution, and transmission efficiency, was evaluated at different ratios of aerosol and sheath flowrates. Two aerosol sampling schemes were investigated. One was to extract aerosol flows at an evenly partitioned flowrate at each stage, and the other was to extract aerosol at a rate the same as the polydisperse aerosol flowrate at each stage. We detail the prototype design of the MDMA and the evaluation result on the transfer functions of the MDMA at different particle sizes and operational conditions.

  15. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  16. Radiation Dose Escalation in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Terakedis, Breanne; Sause, William

    2011-01-01

    For patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer with unresectable or inoperable tumors, definitive chemoradiotherapy is often utilized. Historically, local control and overall survival rates have been poor. In an effort to improve local control, new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with higher doses of radiotherapy have been investigated. Early dose escalation trials date back to the 1980s, and the feasibility and efficacy of dose escalation for patients with inoperable stage III lung cancer continue to be topics of investigation. Herein, we review the evolution of chemotherapy as it relates to treatment of unresectable stage III lung cancer, and we outline the early and the more recent dose escalation studies. While dose escalation appears to provide a modest benefit in terms of preventing local failure and improving overall survival, advances in diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy treatment have possibly resulted in selection of a more favorable patient population. These variables make statements regarding the benefit of dose escalation challenging. PMID:22645713

  17. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  19. Tumor Heterogeneity of FIGO Stage III Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Kim, Song Yih; Kim, Jun Won; Yoon, Hong In; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Young Tae; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze tumor heterogeneity based on tumor extent and suggest reappraisal of the system of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) for Stage III carcinoma of the uterine cervix from a radiotherapeutic viewpoint. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2004, 407 patients with FIGO Stage III (FIGO Stage IIIa in 19 and IIIb in 388) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT) and high-dose rate brachytherapy. All patients were reviewed with respect to tumor extent. Patterns of failure and survival parameters were analyzed by use of the chi{sup 2} test and Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The complete response rate was 79.6%, and the 5-year overall survival rates for Stage IIIa and Stage IIIb carcinoma of the cervix were 82.1% and 54.8%, respectively. To determine which parameters of tumor extent had an influence on prognosis for Stage IIIb patients, pelvic wall (PW) extension and hydronephrosis (HD) retained significance on multivariate analysis. Stage IIIb patients were divided into three subgroups according to PW extension and HD: low risk (unilateral PW extension without HD), intermediate risk (HD without PW extension or bilateral PW extension without HD), and high risk (unilateral or bilateral PW extension with HD). The high-risk group had a remarkably low complete response rate, high locoregional failure rate, and low 5-year survival rate compared with the intermediate- and low-risk groups. Conclusions: FIGO Stage III carcinoma of the cervix covers considerably heterogeneous subgroups according to tumor extent. Before initiation of treatment, we suggest that physicians determine a tailored treatment policy based on tumor heterogeneity for each Stage III patient.

  20. Battling regional (stage III) lung cancer: bumpy road of a cancer survivor in the immunotherapy age.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhonglin; Biddinger, Paul; Schroeder, Carsten; Tariq, Khurram

    2016-07-07

    A 58-year-old woman, a heavy smoker, was diagnosed with stage III squamous cell lung cancer. She was treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with partial response. 2 months later, she had haemoptysis caused by brisk bleeding from the radiated right upper lobe. Fortunately, her bleed was self-limited. 4 months later, a rapidly enlarging renal mass was discovered and turned out to be metastatic from the lung primary. Second-line chemotherapy with docetaxel and ramucirumab did not have effects on the renal mass after 2 cycles. Despite not being eligible for a durvalumab trial because of lack of PD-L1 expression, she had a meaningful response to nivolumab. Once every 2 weeks, infusion of nivolumab resulted in rapid tumour shrinkage in multiple areas. In the next few months, she experienced a variety of side effects, some of which were potentially life-threatening. She had disease progression 9 months into treatment.

  1. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  2. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  3. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsiao, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Jao, Shu-Wen; Yang, Jen-Fu; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR) following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group), and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group). The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107). Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients. PMID:28328969

  4. Minuteman Stage III Operational Surveillance Program Seven-Year Testing Bondline Aging Study,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Liner Gel Fraction at Various Motor Locations ......... . . 25 14 Liner Moisture at Various Motor Locations ............. ... 26 6 15 Motor TC 30005 ...PageI ,,. 18 Shore A Hardness Gradient of ANB-3066 Propellant at the Forward Equator ........ ...................... .. 30 19 Motor TC 30005 ...75 I 2 Matrix for Minuteman Stage III Bondline Aging Program ........ 76 3 Motor TC 30005 Material Properties Data, Forward

  5. Efficacy of computed tomography features in predicting stage III thymic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Ye, Jianding; Fang, Wentao; Zhang, Yu; Ye, Xiaodan; Ma, Yonghong; Chen, Libo; Li, Minghua

    2017-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the invasion of intrathoracic structures by stage III thymic tumors assists their appropriate management. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography (CT) features for the prediction of stage III thymoma invasion. The pre-operative CT images of 66 patients with confirmed stage III thymic tumors were reviewed retrospectively. The CT features of invasion into the mediastinal pleura, lungs, pericardium and great vessels were analyzed, and their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value and accuracy were calculated. For mediastinal pleural and pericardial invasion, an absence of space between the tumor and the mediastinal pleura/pericardium with mediastinal pleural/pericardial thickening and pleural/pericardial effusion exhibited a specificity and PPV of 100%, respectively. For lung invasion, a multi-lobular tumor convex to the lung with adjacent lung abnormalities exhibited a specificity and PPV of 91.2 and 81.3%, respectively. For vessel invasion, the specificity and PPV were each 100% for tumors abutting ≥50% of the vessel circumference, and for tumor oppression, deformation and occlusion of the vessel. In conclusion, recognition of the appropriate CT features can serve as a guide to invasion by stage III thymic tumors, and can facilitate the selection of appropriate pre-operative treatment. PMID:28123518

  6. Revised International Staging System for Multiple Myeloma: A Report From International Myeloma Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Oliva, Stefania; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Rosinol, Laura; Richardson, Paul; Caltagirone, Simona; Lahuerta, Juan José; Facon, Thierry; Bringhen, Sara; Gay, Francesca; Attal, Michel; Passera, Roberto; Spencer, Andrew; Offidani, Massimo; Kumar, Shaji; Musto, Pellegrino; Lonial, Sagar; Petrucci, Maria T.; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Zamagni, Elena; Morgan, Gareth; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Durie, Brian G.M.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Sonneveld, Pieter; San Miguel, Jésus; Cavo, Michele; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Moreau, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The clinical outcome of multiple myeloma (MM) is heterogeneous. A simple and reliable tool is needed to stratify patients with MM. We combined the International Staging System (ISS) with chromosomal abnormalities (CA) detected by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization after CD138 plasma cell purification and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) to evaluate their prognostic value in newly diagnosed MM (NDMM). Patients and Methods Clinical and laboratory data from 4,445 patients with NDMM enrolled onto 11 international trials were pooled together. The K-adaptive partitioning algorithm was used to define the most appropriate subgroups with homogeneous survival. Results ISS, CA, and LDH data were simultaneously available in 3,060 of 4,445 patients. We defined the following three groups: revised ISS (R-ISS) I (n = 871), including ISS stage I (serum β2-microglobulin level < 3.5 mg/L and serum albumin level ≥ 3.5 g/dL), no high-risk CA [del(17p) and/or t(4;14) and/or t(14;16)], and normal LDH level (less than the upper limit of normal range); R-ISS III (n = 295), including ISS stage III (serum β2-microglobulin level > 5.5 mg/L) and high-risk CA or high LDH level; and R-ISS II (n = 1,894), including all the other possible combinations. At a median follow-up of 46 months, the 5-year OS rate was 82% in the R-ISS I, 62% in the R-ISS II, and 40% in the R-ISS III groups; the 5-year PFS rates were 55%, 36%, and 24%, respectively. Conclusion The R-ISS is a simple and powerful prognostic staging system, and we recommend its use in future clinical studies to stratify patients with NDMM effectively with respect to the relative risk to their survival. PMID:26240224

  7. Titan III Mars Explorer Transfer Orbital Stage Delivery to the PHSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center video presents live footage of the delivery of the Titan III Mars Explorer Transfer Orbital Stage (TOS) to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF). The TOS is a single-stage, solid propellant upper stage vehicle used to propel a spacecraft from low Earth orbit toward it's ultimate destination. The TOS is delivered to the PHSF where it is designed to accommodate a variety of NASA and NASA customer payloads and can be used as a payload processing facility (PPF) or a hazardous processing facility (HPF).

  8. [Update to the recommendations for management of melanoma stages I to III].

    PubMed

    Guillot, B; Dalac, S; Denis, M G; Dupuy, A; Emile, J-F; De La Fouchardière, A; Hindie, E; Jouary, T; Lassau, N; Mirabel, X; Piperno Neumann, S; De Raucourt, S; Vanwijck, R

    2016-10-01

    As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

  9. Protein signatures correspond to survival outcomes of AJCC stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Mactier, Swetlana; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Wang, Penghao; Crossett, Ben; Pupo, Gulietta M; Kohnke, Philippa L; Thompson, John F; Scolyer, Richard A; Yang, Jean Y; Mann, Graham J; Christopherson, Richard I

    2014-01-01

    Summary Outcomes for melanoma patients with stage III disease differ widely even within the same subcategory. Molecular signatures that more accurately predict prognosis are needed to stratify patients according to risk. Proteomic analyses were used to identify differentially abundant proteins in extracts of surgically excised samples from patients with stage IIIc melanoma lymph node metastases. Analysis of samples from patients with poor (n = 14, <1 yr) and good (n = 19, >4 yr) survival outcomes identified 84 proteins that were differentially abundant between prognostic groups. Subsequent selected reaction monitoring analysis verified 21 proteins as potential biomarkers for survival. Poor prognosis patients are characterized by increased levels of proteins involved in protein metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, angiogenesis, deregulation of cellular energetics and methylation processes, and decreased levels of proteins involved in apoptosis and immune response. These proteins are able to classify stage IIIc patients into prognostic subgroups (P < 0.02). This is the first report of potential prognostic markers from stage III melanoma using proteomic analyses. Validation of these protein markers in larger patient cohorts should define protein signatures that enable better stratification of stage III melanoma patients. PMID:24995518

  10. Protein signatures correspond to survival outcomes of AJCC stage III melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mactier, Swetlana; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Wang, Penghao; Crossett, Ben; Pupo, Gulietta M; Kohnke, Philippa L; Thompson, John F; Scolyer, Richard A; Yang, Jean Y; Mann, Graham J; Christopherson, Richard I

    2014-11-01

    Outcomes for melanoma patients with stage III disease differ widely even within the same subcategory. Molecular signatures that more accurately predict prognosis are needed to stratify patients according to risk. Proteomic analyses were used to identify differentially abundant proteins in extracts of surgically excised samples from patients with stage IIIc melanoma lymph node metastases. Analysis of samples from patients with poor (n = 14, <1 yr) and good (n = 19, >4 yr) survival outcomes identified 84 proteins that were differentially abundant between prognostic groups. Subsequent selected reaction monitoring analysis verified 21 proteins as potential biomarkers for survival. Poor prognosis patients are characterized by increased levels of proteins involved in protein metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, angiogenesis, deregulation of cellular energetics and methylation processes, and decreased levels of proteins involved in apoptosis and immune response. These proteins are able to classify stage IIIc patients into prognostic subgroups (P < 0.02). This is the first report of potential prognostic markers from stage III melanoma using proteomic analyses. Validation of these protein markers in larger patient cohorts should define protein signatures that enable better stratification of stage III melanoma patients.

  11. Ruxolitinib Phosphate, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  12. Prognostic and predictive significance of MSI in stages II/III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Saridaki, Zacharenia; Souglakos, John; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2014-06-14

    In colon cancer, classic disease staging remains the key prognosis and treatment determinant. Although adjuvant chemotherapy has an established role in stage III colon cancer patients, in stage II it is still a subject of controversy due to its restriction to a small subgroup of patients with high-risk histopathologic features. Patients with stage II tumors form a highly heterogeneous group, with five-year relative overall survival rates ranging from 87.5% (IIA) to 58.4% (IIC). Identifying those for whom adjuvant chemotherapy would be appropriate and necessary has been challenging, and prognostic markers which could serve in the selection of patients more likely to recur or benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy are eagerly needed. The stronger candidate in this category seems to be microsatellite instability (MSI). The recently reported European Society for Medical Oncology guidelines suggest that MSI should be evaluated in stage II colorectal cancer patients in order to contribute in treatment decision-making regarding chemotherapy administration. The hypothetical predictive role of MSI regarding its response to 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy has proven a much more difficult issue to address. Almost every possible relation between MSI and chemotherapy outcome has been described in the adjuvant colon cancer setting in the international literature, and the matter is far from being settled. In this current report we critically evaluate the prognostic and predictive impact of MSI status in patients with stage II and stage III colon cancer patients.

  13. Radiation Therapy With Cisplatin, Docetaxel, or Cetuximab After Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  14. Chemoradiotherapy with or without AE-941 in stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a randomized phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Lu, Charles; Lee, J Jack; Komaki, Ritsuko; Herbst, Roy S; Feng, Lei; Evans, William K; Choy, Hak; Desjardins, Pierre; Esparaz, Benjamin T; Truong, Mylene T; Saxman, Scott; Kelaghan, Joseph; Bleyer, Archie; Fisch, Michael J

    2010-06-16

    BACKGROUND AE-941 is a standardized aqueous shark cartilage extract with antiangiogenic properties that has previously been evaluated in phase I and II clinical trials. Our objective was to determine the effect of adding AE-941 to chemoradiotherapy on overall survival of patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial was designed to test the efficacy of AE-941 in unresectable stage III NSCLC patients who were treated with chemoradiotherapy. Between June 5, 2000, and February 6, 2006, 379 eligible patients were enrolled in community and academic oncology centers across the United States and Canada. In February 2006, the trial was closed to new patient entry before meeting the target sample size because of insufficient accrual. All subjects received induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy with chest radiotherapy. Each participating center administered one of the two chemotherapy regimens, either carboplatin and paclitaxel, or cisplatin and vinorelbine. The primary endpoint was overall survival, and secondary endpoints were time to progression, progression-free survival, tumor response rate, and toxic effects. Event-time distributions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival between the chemoradiotherapy plus AE-941 group (n = 188; median survival = 14.4 months, 95% confidence interval = 12.6 to 17.9 months) and the chemoradiotherapy plus placebo group (n = 191; median survival = 15.6 months, 95% confidence interval = 13.8 to 18.1 months) (P = .73). Time to progression, progression-free survival, and tumor response rates were not statistically significantly different between the AE-941 and the placebo groups. No differences between the two groups were observed in common grade 3 or higher toxic effects attributable to

  15. Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Matthew; Goloubeva, Olga; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

  16. S-1 as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer: a randomized phase III study (ACTS-CC trial)

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, M.; Ishiguro, M.; Ikejiri, K.; Mochizuki, I.; Nakamoto, Y.; Kinugasa, Y.; Takagane, A.; Endo, T.; Shinozaki, H.; Takii, Y.; Mochizuki, H.; Kotake, K.; Kameoka, S.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Watanabe, M.; Boku, N.; Tomita, N.; Nakatani, E.; Sugihara, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine whose antitumor effects have been demonstrated in treating various gastrointestinal cancers, including metastatic colon cancer, when administered as monotherapy or in combination chemotherapy. We conducted a randomized phase III study investigating the efficacy of S-1 as adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer by evaluating its noninferiority to tegafur–uracil plus leucovorin (UFT/LV). Patients and methods Patients aged 20–80 years with curatively resected stage III colon cancer were randomly assigned to receive S-1 (80–120 mg/day on days 1–28 every 42 days; four courses) or UFT/LV (UFT: 300–600 mg/day and LV: 75 mg/day on days 1–28 every 35 days; five courses). The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS) at 3 years. Results A total of 1518 patients (758 and 760 in the S-1 and UFT/LV group, respectively) were included in the full analysis set. The 3-year DFS rate was 75.5% and 72.5% in the S-1 and UFT/LV group, respectively. The stratified hazard ratio for DFS in the S-1 group compared with the UFT/LV group was 0.85 (95% confidence interval: 0.70–1.03), demonstrating the noninferiority of S-1 (noninferiority stratified log-rank test, P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, no significant interactions were identified between the major baseline characteristics and the treatment groups. Conclusion Adjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 for stage III colon cancer was confirmed to be noninferior in DFS compared with UFT/LV. S-1 could be a new treatment option as adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00660894. PMID:24942277

  17. Dabrafenib and Trametinib Followed by Ipilimumab and Nivolumab or Ipilimumab and Nivolumab Followed by Dabrafenib and Trametinib in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV BRAFV600 Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-03

    BRAF V600E Mutation Present; BRAF V600K Mutation Present; Metastatic Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  18. On Two-Stage Multiple Comparison Procedures When There Are Unequal Sample Sizes in the First Stage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Rand R.

    1984-01-01

    Two stage multiple-comparison procedures give an exact solution to problems of power and Type I errors, but require equal sample sizes in the first stage. This paper suggests a method of evaluating the experimentwise Type I error probability when the first stage has unequal sample sizes. (Author/BW)

  19. Standard treatment option in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: case against trimodal therapy and consolidation drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Jeremić, Branislav

    2015-03-01

    Prospective randomized trials and meta-analyses established concurrent radiochemotherapy (RT-CHT) as standard treatment approach in patients with inoperable, locally advanced (stage IIIA and B) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In patients with either clinically (c) or pathologically (p) staged disease (stage IIIA), including those with pN2 disease, trimodal therapy was also frequently practiced in the past and is currently still advocated by large cooperative groups and organizations. Similarly, consolidation CHT provided after concurrent RT-CHT was suggested to be feasible and effective in inoperable stage III NSCLC. Contrasting these practices and suggestions, there is no evidence that trimodal therapy in stage IIIA (clinically or pathologically staged) or consolidation CHT in inoperable stage III NSCLC plays any role in its treatment. In both cases, evidence clearly demonstrates that concurrent RT-CHT is of similar efficacy and less toxic, and it should be considered a standard treatment option for all patients with stage III NSCLC.

  20. Methylation of MGMT Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Stage III Duodenal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sharmab, Anup; Xie, Fei; Liu, Yanliang; Li, Kai; Wan, Weiwei; Baylin, Stephen B.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Ahuja, Nita

    2016-01-01

    Background O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation status has not been extensively investigated in duodenal adenocarcinoma (DA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the MGMT methylation status and examine its possible prognostic value in patients with stage III DA. Methods Demographics, tumor characteristics and survival were available for 64 patients with stage III DA. MGMT methylation was detected by using MethyLight. A Cox proportional hazard model was built to predict survival, adjusted for clinicopathological characteristics and tumor molecular features, including the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), microsatellite instability (MSI), and KRAS mutations. Results MGMT methylation was detected in 17 of 64 (26.6%) patients, and was not correlated with sex, age, tumor differentiation, CIMP, MSI, or KRAS mutations. MGMT methylation was the only one factor associated with both overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) on both univariate and multivariate analyses. In patients treated with surgery alone, MGMT-methylated group had worse OS and DFS when compared with MGMT-unmethylated group. However, in patients treated with chemotherapy/radiotherapy, outcomes became comparable between the two groups. Conclusions Our results demonstrate MGMT methylation is a reliable and independent prognostic factor in DAs. Methylation of MGMT is associated with poor prognosis in patients with stage III DAs. PMID:27643594

  1. Efficacy of docetaxel combined with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil against stage III/IV gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao-Jun; Sun, Wei-Jian; Lu, Ming-Dong; Wang, Fei-Hai; Qi, Dan-Si; Zhang, Yi; Li, Pi-Hong; Huang, He; You, Tao; Zheng, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical efficacy and toxic effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using docetaxel combined with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil for treating stage III/IV gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 53 stage III/IV gastric cancer patients were enrolled into the study and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Two of the cases were excluded. The program was as follows: 75 mg/m2 docetaxel and 85 mg/m2 oxaliplatin on day 1 and 1500 mg/m2 fluorouracil on days 1 to 3 for three weeks. RESULTS: The tumour changes, postoperative remission rate, changes in the symptoms and adverse reactions were observed. The overall clinical efficacy (complete remission + partial remission) of the neoadjuvant chemotherapy was 62.7%. R0 radical resection was performed on 60.8% of the patients, with a remission rate (pathological complete response + pathological subtotal response + pathological partial response) of 74.2%. The Karnofksy score improved in 42 cases. The toxicity reactions mostly included myelosuppression, followed by gastrointestinal mucosal lesions, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. CONCLUSION: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of docetaxel combined with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil is effective for stage III/IV gastric cancer. However, the treatment is associated with a high incidence of bone marrow suppression, which should be managed clinically. PMID:25561810

  2. High-Dose Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2B, Ipilimumab, or Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV High Risk Melanoma That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Metastatic Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Stage III Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVB Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVC Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck

  3. DETERMINANTS OF ADJUVANT OXALIPLATIN RECEIPT AMONG OLDER STAGE II AND III COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Jennifer L; Stürmer, Til; Sanoff, Hanna K; Brookhart, Alan; Sandler, Robert S; Warren, Joan L

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Controversy exists regarding adjuvant oxaliplatin treatment among older stage II and III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. We sought to identify patient/tumor, physician, hospital, and geographic factors associated with oxaliplatin use among older patients. Methods Individuals diagnosed at age>65 with stage II/III CRC from 2004–2007 undergoing surgical resection and receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were identified using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program (SEER)-Medicare, a database including patient/tumor and hospital characteristics. Physician information was obtained from the American Medical Association. We used Poisson regression to identify independent predictors of oxaliplatin receipt. The discriminatory ability of each category of characteristics to predict oxaliplatin receipt was assessed by comparing the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) from logistic regression models. Results We identified 4,388 individuals who underwent surgical resection at 773 hospitals and received chemotherapy from 1,517 physicians. Adjuvant oxaliplatin use was higher among stage III (colon=56%, rectum=51%) compared to stage II patients (colon=37%, rectum=35%). Overall, patients who were older, diagnosed before 2006, separated, divorced or widowed, living in a higher poverty census tract or in the East or Midwest, or with higher levels of comorbidity were less likely to receive oxaliplatin. Patient factors and calendar year accounted for most of the variation in oxaliplatin receipt (AUC=75.8%). Conclusion Adjuvant oxaliplatin use increased rapidly from 2004–2007 despite uncertainties regarding its effectiveness in older patients. Physician and hospital characteristics had little influence on adjuvant oxaliplatin receipt among older patients. PMID:23512326

  4. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer or Adenoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Adenomatous Polyp; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  5. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  6. Chloroplast group III twintron excision utilizing multiple 5'- and 3'-splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Copertino, D W; Shigeoka, S; Hallick, R B

    1992-01-01

    The chloroplast genes of Euglena gracilis contain more than 60 group II and 47 group III introns. Some Euglena chloroplast genes also contain twintrons, introns-within-introns. Two types of twintrons have previously been described, a group II twintron and a mixed group II/group III twintron. We report that four introns, three within the RNA polymerase subunit gene rpoC1 and one within ribosomal protein gene rpl16, with mean lengths twice typical group III introns, are a new type of twintron. The group III twintrons are composed of group III introns within other group III introns. The splicing of the twintrons was analyzed by PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of cDNAs, and Northern hybridization. Excision of each group III twintron occurs by a two-step, sequential splicing pathway. Removal of the internal introns precedes excision of the external introns. Splicing of internal introns in three of the four group III twintrons involves multiple 5'- and/or 3'-splice sites. With two of the twintrons the proximal 5'-splice site can be spliced to an internal 3'-splice site, yielding alternative 'pseudo' fully spliced mRNAs. Excised group III introns of the rpl16 twintron are not linear RNA molecules but either lariat or circular RNAs, probably a lariat. The origins of alternative splicing and a possible evolutionary relationship between group II, group III and nuclear pre-mRNA introns are discussed. Images PMID:1464326

  7. Lack of acute toxicity associated with a multimodality treatment of stage III ovarian epithelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Belch, R.Z.; Coughlin, C.T.; Cooney, L.C.; Forcier, R.J.; Maurer, L.H. )

    1990-04-01

    Eleven patients with advanced stage III ovarian epithelial carcinoma were treated primarily according to an aggressive multimodality plan utilizing cytoreductive surgery, chemotherapy (high-dose cisplatin and Cytoxan), and consolidative radiation therapy (abdominopelvic bath plus pelvic boost). The treatment was tolerated remarkably well. There was no evidence of progressive disease during treatment, and all patients showed a positive response. There was a notable lack of significant acute morbidity, with the exception of a severe symptomatic peripheral neuropathy associated with cisplatin doses of 200 mg/m2. This was not evident with doses of cisplatin up to 150 mg/m2.

  8. The multimodal approach to the treatment of stage III ovarian carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fuks, Z.; Rizel, S.; Anteby, S.O.; Biran, S.

    1982-05-01

    A multimodal therapy which consists of aggressive sequential surgery, combination chemotherapy, second look laparotomy and whole abdominal radiotherapy is described. Side effects of the irradiation, which was administered in fractionated doses over seven weeks, included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and a mild and transient leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. One patient developed an obstruction two months after completion of radiotherapy. Third-look laparotomy revealed small bowel adhesions. Actuarial survival at 2.5 years from initiation of chemotherapy was 84%, a significant improvement compared to a control group of Stage III patients treated with adriamycin and cyclophosphamide. (JMT)

  9. Epacadostat and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-18

    Mucosal Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uveal Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Progressive Staging of Pilot Studies to Improve Phase III Trials for Motor Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the suboptimal research pathways that finally led to multicenter randomized clinical trials (MRCTs) of treadmill training with partial body weight support and of robotic assistive devices, strategically planned successive stages are proposed for pilot studies of novel rehabilitation interventions Stage 1, consideration-of-concept studies, drawn from animal experiments, theories, and observations, delineate the experimental intervention in a small convenience sample of participants, so the results must be interpreted with caution. Stage 2, development-of-concept pilots, should optimize the components of the intervention, settle on most appropriate outcome measures, and examine dose-response effects. A well-designed study that reveals no efficacy should be published to counterweight the confirmation bias of positive trials. Stage 3, demonstration-of-concept pilots, can build out from what has been learned to test at least 15 participants in each arm, using random assignment and blinded outcome measures. A control group should receive an active practice intervention aimed at the same primary outcome. A third arm could receive a substantially larger dose of the experimental therapy or a combinational intervention. If only 1 site performed this trial, a different investigative group should aim to reproduce positive outcomes based on the optimal dose of motor training. Stage 3 studies ought to suggest an effect size of 0.4 or higher, so that approximately 50 participants in each arm will be the number required to test for efficacy in a stage 4, proof-of-concept MRCT. By developing a consensus around acceptable and necessary practices for each stage, similar to CONSORT recommendations for the publication of phase III clinical trials, better quality pilot studies may move quickly into better designed and more successful MRCTs of experimental interventions. PMID:19240197

  12. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Before Radiation Therapy With Paclitaxel in Treating HPV-Positive Patients With Stage III-IV Oropharynx, Hypopharynx, or Larynx Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Human Papilloma Virus Infection; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx

  13. Combined modality treatment for stage I-II non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: CVP versus BACOP chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bajetta, E.; Valagussa, P.; Bonadonna, G.; Lattuada, A.; Buzzoni, R.; Rilke, F.; Banfi, A.

    1988-07-01

    This paper reports the 5-year results of a prospective randomized study beginning in 1976 on 177 evaluable patients with pathologic Stage I-IE and II-IIE non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with diffuse histology according to the Rappaport classification. Treatment consisted of either CVP or BACOP chemotherapy (3 cycles) followed by regional radiotherapy (40 to 50 Gy) and further cycles of either combination. In both arms, complete remission at the end of combined treatment was high (CVP 93%, BACOP 98%) regardless of age, stage or bulky disease. At 5 years, the comparative freedom from first progression was 62% for CVP vs 78% for BACOP (p = 0.02), respectively. Clinically relevant differences favoring BACOP chemotherapy were essentially documented in patients with large cell lymphomas (International Working Formulation), those with Stage II having more than three involved anatomical sites, bulky disease and age over 60 years. Recurrence within radiation fields was documented in only 5% of complete responders. Combined treatment was, in general, well tolerated particularly when BACOP was used. In only 2 patients given CVP post radiation cutaneous fibrosis was documented. Second solid tumors were detected in 4 patients. One patient started on CVP died because of brain stem necrosis after 45 Gy. We conclude that in Stage I-II patients with nodal and extranodal diffuse non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, particularly large cell lymphomas, combined modality approach with primary Adriamycin and bleomycin containing regimen, such as BACOP, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy offers high chances of cure with minimal toxicity.

  14. Therapeutic management options for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Stephanie M; Shaikh, Talha; Hallman, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Majority of newly diagnosed lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), of which up to half are considered locally advanced at the time of diagnosis. Patients with locally advanced stage III NSCLC consists of a heterogeneous population, making management for these patients complex. Surgery has long been the preferred local treatment for patients with resectable disease. For select patients, multi-modality therapy involving systemic and radiation therapies in addition to surgery improves treatment outcomes compared to surgery alone. For patients with unresectable disease, concurrent chemoradiation is the preferred treatment. More recently, research into different chemotherapy agents, targeted therapies, radiation fractionation schedules, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and proton therapy have shown promise to improve treatment outcomes and quality of life. The array of treatment approaches for locally advanced NSCLC is large and constantly evolving. An updated review of past and current literature for the roles of surgery, chemotherapeutic agents, radiation therapy, and targeted therapy for stage III NSCLC patients are presented. PMID:28246582

  15. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Meier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose-escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation; and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife). Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After 5 years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  16. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  17. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  18. Heterogeneity of Disease Classified as Stage III in Wilms Tumor: A Report From the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP)

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Filippo; Gandola, Lorenza; Terenziani, Monica; Collini, Paola; Bianchi, Maurizio; Provenzi, Massimo; Indolfi, Paolo; Pession, Andrea; Nantron, Marilina; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Marchiano, Alfonso; Piva, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed whether the prognosis can differ among Wilms tumors (WT) labeled as Stage III according to currently adopted classification systems. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonanaplastic Stage III WT consecutively registered in two Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) trials (CNR-92, TW-2003) were the subjects in the present analysis. The steady mainstay of therapy was primary nephrectomy, followed by three-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, doxorubicin, and abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Results: Ninety-nine WT patients met the criteria for classification as Stage III according to a revised version of the National Wilms Tumor Study-3 staging system (51 patients in CNR-92, 48 patients in TW-2003). Regional lymph nodes (LN) were not biopsied in 16 patients. After a median follow-up of 66 months, the 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 85% {+-} 4% and 92% {+-} 3%, respectively, for the whole group. For 38 children with positive LN, the 4-year DFS rate was 73% {+-} 7%, as opposed to 98% {+-} 2% for the 45 children with Stage III WT according to the other criteria but with negative biopsied LN (p = 0.001). The subgroup with the worst prognosis consisted of children more than 2 years old with positive LN (DFS 67% {+-} 8%). A delay between surgery and RT > 30 days had an adverse impact on the abdominal tumor relapse rate. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence that Stage III tumors with LN metastases might be distinguished from WTs meeting the other criteria for classification as Stage III. The worse outcome of the former may warrant a prospective study on the effects of intensified therapy. A subclassification of Stage III tumors is discussed.

  19. High-Dose Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Kurishima, Koichi; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of high-dose conformal radiotherapy to the involved field for patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between May 1999 and April 2006, a total of 100 consecutive patients with inoperable Stage IIIA or IIIB NSCLC with a performance score of 0 to 2 and treatment by radical radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy were included. Up to August 2002, 33 patients underwent conventional radiotherapy of 56 Gy to 66 Gy using anteroposterior opposite ports to the primary tumor and elective lymph nodes (conventional group). After September 2002, the remaining 67 patients underwent high-dose radiotherapy of 66 Gy to 84 Gy to the involved volume with three-dimensional (3-D) conformal radiotherapy (conformal group). Results: The median survival was 13.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-18.5 months) in the conventional group and 17.3 months (95% CI, 10.7- 24.0 months) in the conformal group. The overall survival at 3 years were 9.1% (95% CI, -0.7-18.9%) in the conventional group and 31.0% (95% CI, 18.9-43.1%) in the conformal group; the conformal group had a significantly better overall survival (p < 0.05). The radiotherapy method (hazard ratio = 0.55, p < 0.05) and performance status (hazard ratio = 1.48, p < 0.05) were shown to be statistically significant independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Based on the practical experience reported here, 3-D conformal radiotherapy allowed dose escalation without excessive toxicity, and may improve overall survival rates for patients with Stage III NSCLC.

  20. Microsatellite instability & survival in patients with stage II/III colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Srdjan, Markovic; Jadranka, Antic; Ivan, Dimitrijevic; Branimir, Zogovic; Daniela, Bojic; Petar, Svorcan; Velimir, Markovic; Zoran, Krivokapic

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The two key aspects associated with the microsatellite instability (MSI) as genetic phenomenon in colorectal cancer (CRC) are better survival prognosis, and the varying response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. This study was undertaken to measure the survival of surgically treated patients with stages II and III CRC based on the MSI status, the postoperative 5-FU treatment as well as clinical and histological data. Methods: A total of 125 consecutive patients with stages II and III (American Joint Committee on Cancer, AJCC staging) primary CRCs, were followed prospectively for a median time of 31 months (January 2006 to December 2009). All patients were assessed, operated and clinically followed. Tumour samples were obtained for cytopathological verification and MSI grading. Results: Of the 125 patients, 21 (20%) had high MSI (MSI-H), and 101 patients (80%) had MSI-L or MSS (low frequency MSI or stable MSI). Patients with MSS CRC were more likely to have recurrent disease (P=0.03; OR=3.2; CI 95% 1-10.2) compared to those with MSI-H CRC. Multi- and univariate Cox regression analysis failed to show a difference between MSI-H and MSS groups with respect to disease-free, disease-specific and overall survival. However, the disease-free survival was significantly lower in patients with MSI-H CRC treated by adjuvant 5-FU therapy (P=0.03). Interpretation & conclusions: MSI-H CRCs had a lower recurrence rate, but the prognosis was worse following adjuvant 5-FU therapy. PMID:27748284

  1. Reducing the Time From Diagnosis to Treatment of Patients With Stage II/III Rectal Cancer at a Large Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Lori A.; Jacobs, Ryan W.; Millas, Stefanos; Surabhi, Venkateswar; Mok, Henry; Jhaveri, Pavan; Kott, Marylee M.; Jackson, Lymesia; Rieber, Alyssa; Bhadkamkar, Nishin A.

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent therapy for stage II/III rectal cancer is necessarily complex. Current guidelines by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommend preoperative concurrent chemoradiation followed by resection and additional adjuvant chemotherapy. We used standard quality improvement methodology to implement a cost-effective intervention that reduced the time from diagnosis to treatment of patients with stage II/III rectal cancer by approximately 30% in a large public hospital in Houston, Texas. Implementation of the program resulted in a reduction in time from pathologic diagnosis to treatment of 29% overall, from 62 to 44 days. These gains were cost neutral and resulted from improvements in scheduling and coordination of care alone. Our results suggest that: (1) quality improvement methodology can be successfully applied to multidisciplinary cancer care, (2) effective interventions can be cost neutral, and (3) effective strategies can overcome complexities such as having multiple sites of care, high staff turnover, and resource limitations. PMID:26869658

  2. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy improves survival in patients with stage II–III esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: An analysis of clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Bingwen; Pang, Jing; Liu, Yongmei; Xu, Yong; Li, Lu; Zhou, Lin; Zhu, Jiang; Huang, Meijuan; Wang, Jin; Ren, Li; Gong, Youlin; Lu, You; Chen, Longqi

    2016-01-01

    Background We compared the efficacy of postoperative chemoradiation (POCRT) and surgery alone (SA) in patients with stage II–III esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods We analyzed the records of 265 patients with stage II–III ESCC who had undergone transthoracic esophagectomy and lymphadenectomy; 105 patients received POCRT, while 160 had SA. Results The median disease‐free survival (DFS) of the whole cohort was 22 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 19.2–24.8), while the median overall survival (OS) was 29 months (95% CI 25.5–32.5). The median DFS of the SA group was 21 months (95% CI 17.9–24.0), while that of the POCRT group was 29 months (95% CI 18.8–31.2; P = 0.048). Consistently, patients in the POCRT group had significantly longer median OS than patients in the SA group (34 vs. 26 months, respectively). Subgroup analysis showed that in patients with positive lymph nodes, pathological stage III, T3–4 stage, and poorly differentiated carcinoma, POCRT was apparently more effective than SA at improving OS and decreasing the rates of local recurrence and distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that lymph node involvement and treatment with POCRT were independent prognostic factors. Conclusion Compared with SA, POCRT may be more effective in improving OS and decreasing the rates of local recurrence and distant metastasis, particularly in stage III or positive lymph node stage II–III ESCC patients. PMID:27766781

  3. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Plasma Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  4. Postoperative prophylactic hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for stage III colorectal cancer: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao; Sun, Xin Rong; Feng, Wen Ming; Bao, Ying; Zheng, Yin Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Radical resection is the main treatment for colorectal cancer (CRC), but metastasis or recurrence is common in which liver metastasis accounted for 83% of the cases. Therefore, the prognosis of patients with advanced CRC may be improved if liver metastasis is prevented. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) on liver metastases of stage III CRC patients after curative resection. Methods Between 2002 and 2008, 287 stage III CRC patients who had undergone radical resection were included in this study. According to postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy modality, these patients were divided into two groups. Patients in the combined therapy group received two cycles of HAIC plus four cycles of systemic chemotherapy, while patients in the monotherapy group received six cycles of systemic chemotherapy alone. The HAIC regimen consisted of hepatic arterial infusion of oxaliplatin (OXA, 85 mg/m2) on day 1 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, 2,400 mg/m2) on days 2 and 3 followed by a vein infusion of folinic acid (FA, 200 mg/m2) as a 2-hour infusion on days 2 and 3. The systemic chemotherapy regimen consisted of a 2-hour infusion of OXA (85 mg/m2) on day 1 followed by FA (200 mg/m2) as a 2-hour infusion on days 2 and 3, and by 5-FU (2,400 mg/m2) as a 48-hour infusion. This was repeated every 4 weeks. All cases were followed up for 5 years or until death. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, liver metastases-free survival, and the overall liver metastases rates were retrospectively compared. Results Significant differences were found in the 5-year overall survival (combined therapy, 70.71%; monotherapy, 57.14%; P=0.014), disease-free survival (combined therapy, 69.29%; monotherapy, 55.78%; P=0.021), and liver metastases-free survival rates (combined therapy, 70%; monotherapy, 56.46%; P=0.019). Conclusion Prophylactic adjuvant HAIC can prevent metachronous liver metastases and improve the prognosis of patients

  5. SU-E-J-269: Tracking of Tumor Regression for Stage III Lung Cancer Using CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, K; Biswas, T; Podder, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to evaluate the tumor regression over the course of EBRT treatment and to determine the difference of tumor reduction for stage III lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) and adenocarcinoma using CBCT. Methods: Twenty three stage III lung cancer patients treated in our clinic who had daily cone beam CT (CBCT) were selected for this study (16 adenocarcinoma and 7 SCC cases). Patients received prescription dose in the range of 50Gy–71.4Gy (mean =60.3Gy, median =50Gy) at 1.8Gy or 2Gy per fraction. Treatments spanned over a minimum of five weeks. Initial mean volume of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 123cc (range = 14.7cc–353.3cc). For this study, we choose six sets of CBCTs at an interval of one week, starting from the first fraction of treatment. Daily CBCTs from treatment linac computer were transferred to MIM Software version 6.0. An experienced physician contoured the primary GTV on each slices of the CBCT for these patients. Results: A consistent regression of the GTVs was observed in all patients, except in one patient (adeno case) where GTV did not change. Weekly volumetric reduction was in the range of 11.2%–16.6%. Maximum reductions were noticed in the first two weeks of the treatment cycle; mean overall (for adeno+SCC) reductions were 16.6%, 14.2% in week-1 and week-2, respectively. Mean reduction over five weeks of treatment was 49.8% (range = 0.1%–75.5%). Higher reduction was observed in SCC patients as compare to adenocarcinoma cases (54.9% vs. 47.6%); however, the difference was not statistically significant (p-value > 0.05). Conclusion: Large regression of tumors over the course of EBRT for stage III lung cancer patients was observed. Both SCC and adenocarcinoma responded well; overall reduction for SCC cases was higher. A future study is warranted for determining the co-relation between tumor volume reduction and treatment outcome.

  6. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Multiple-stage structure transformation of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qiong; Liu, Henan; Kim, Hui -Seon; ...

    2016-09-15

    In this study, by performing spatially resolved Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy with varying excitation wavelength, density, and data acquisition parameters, we achieve a unified understanding towards the spectroscopy signatures of the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite, transforming from the pristine state (CH3NH3PbI3) to the fully degraded state (i.e., PbI2) for samples with varying crystalline domain size from mesoscopic scale (approximately 100 nm) to macroscopic size (centimeters), synthesized by three different techniques. We show that the hybrid perovskite exhibits multiple stages of structure transformation occurring either spontaneously or under light illumination, with exceptionally high sensitivity to the illumination conditions (e.g., power, illumination time,more » and interruption pattern). We highlight four transformation stages (stages I-IV, with stage I being the pristine state) along either the spontaneous or photoinduced degradation path exhibiting distinctly different Raman spectroscopy features at each stage, and point out that previously reported Raman spectra in the literature reflect highly degraded structures of either stage III or stage IV. Additional characteristic optical features of partially degraded materials under the joint action of spontaneous and photodegradation are also given. This study offers reliable benchmark results for understanding the intrinsic material properties and structure transformation of this unique category of hybrid materials, and the findings are pertinently important to a wide range of potential applications where the hybrid material is expected to function in greatly different environment and light-matter interaction conditions.« less

  8. Veliparib With or Without Radiation Therapy, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-03

    Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma, Mixed Subtype; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. [First case described of isolated, complete and fluctuating cranial nerve III palsy heralding multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    León-Ruiz, Moisés; Benito-León, Julián; Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando; García-Soldevilla, Miguel Ángel; Izquierdo-Esteban, Laura; Tejeiro-Martínez, José; Cabrera-Valdivia, Francisco; García-Albea Ristol, Esteban

    2015-02-01

    Introduccion. El mieloma multiple es la neoplasia de celulas plasmaticas mas frecuente. Al ser incurable, el tratamiento persigue obtener el mayor tiempo de supervivencia libre de clinica. Constituye una causa extremadamente rara de afectacion de los nervios craneales y es producido habitualmente por un plasmocitoma intracraneal. Presentamos un caso de mieloma multiple, que asociaba un plasmocitoma intracraneal y que comenzo clinicamente con paralisis aislada, completa y fluctuante del III nervio craneal. Caso clinico. Mujer de 63 años que acudio a urgencias por presentar un cuadro clinico oscilante, consistente en diplopia binocular horizontal y, posteriormente, cefalea. La exploracion neurooftalmologica revelo una paralisis completa del III nervio craneal derecho. Se solicito una tomografia axial computarizada craneal urgente, que revelo multiples lesiones osteoliticas diploicas, asociando una de ellas componente de partes blandas en la hendidura esfenoidal derecha. La paciente fue ingresada, y se le diagnostico posteriormente un mieloma multiple IgA-kappa. Tras recibir induccion quimioterapica y ser sometida a un trasplante autologo de progenitores hematopoyeticos, alcanzo la remision completa. Conclusiones. El mieloma multiple es un trastorno raro de los nervios craneales, una causa muy infrecuente de paralisis aislada y completa del III nervio craneal y menos aun fluctuante, y no se ha encontrado ningun caso publicado con este inicio clinico. Tener en cuenta las posibles manifestaciones neurooftalmologicas del mieloma multiple puede contribuir a un diagnostico precoz y a una incidencia positiva sobre el curso de esta enfermedad.

  10. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-21

    Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  12. Collaboration Between Surgeons and Medical Oncologists and Outcomes for Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Veenstra, Christine M.; Pollack, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Collaboration between specialists is essential for achieving high-value care in patients with complex cancer needs. We explore how collaboration between oncologists and surgeons affects mortality and cost for patients requiring multispecialty cancer care. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with stage III colon cancer from SEER-Medicare diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. Patients were assigned to a primary treating surgeon and oncologist. Collaboration between surgeon and oncologist was measured as the number of patients shared between them; this has been shown to reflect advice seeking and referral relationships between physicians. Outcomes included hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazards for colon cancer–specific mortality, and cost of care at 12 months. Results: A total of 9,329 patients received care from 3,623 different surgeons and 2,319 medical oncologists, representing 6,827 unique surgeon–medical oncologist pairs. As the number of patients shared between specialists increased from to one to five (25th to 75th percentile), patients experienced an approximately 20% improved survival benefit from all-cause and colon cancer–specific mortalities. Specifically, for each additional patient shared between oncologist and surgeon, all-cause mortality improved by 5% (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.92 to 0.97), and colon cancer–specific mortality improved by 5% (subhazard ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91 to 0.97). There was no association with cost. Conclusion: Specialist collaboration is associated with lower mortality without increased cost among patients with stage III colon cancer. Facilitating formal and informal collaboration between specialists may be an important strategy for improving the care of patients with complex cancers. PMID:25873063

  13. Predictive and Prognostic Analysis of PIK3CA Mutation in Stage III Colon Cancer Intergroup Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaoyun; Imamura, Yu; Yamauchi, Mai; McCleary, Nadine J.; Ng, Kimmie; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Benson, Al B.; Mowat, Rex B.; Spiegelman, Donna; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations in PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphonate 3-kinase [PI3K], catalytic subunit alpha gene) activate the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway and contribute to pathogenesis of various malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Methods We examined associations of PIK3CA oncogene mutation with relapse, survival, and treatment efficacy in 627 stage III colon carcinoma case subjects within a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (5-fluorouracil and leucovorin [FU/LV] vs irinotecan [CPT11], fluorouracil and leucovorin [IFL]; Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803 [Alliance]). We detected PIK3CA mutation in exons 9 and 20 by polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess prognostic and predictive role of PIK3CA mutation, adjusting for clinical features and status of routine standard molecular pathology features, including KRAS and BRAF mutations and microsatellite instability (mismatch repair deficiency). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Compared with PIK3CA wild-type cases, overall status of PIK3CA mutation positivity or the presence of PIK3CA mutation in either exon 9 or 20 alone was not statistically significantly associated with recurrence-free, disease-free, or overall survival (log-rank P > .70; P > .40 in multivariable regression models). There was no statistically significant interaction between PIK3CA and KRAS (or BRAF) mutation status in survival analysis (P interaction > .18). PIK3CA mutation status did not appear to predict better or worse response to IFL therapy compared with FU/LV therapy (P interaction > .16). Conclusions Overall tumor PIK3CA mutation status is not associated with stage III colon cancer prognosis. PIK3CA mutation does not appear to serve as a predictive tumor molecular biomarker for response to irinotecan-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:24231454

  14. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    PubMed Central

    Oberije, Cary; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Houben, Ruud; van de Heuvel, Michel; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Deasy, Joseph O.; Belderbos, Jose; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient’s survival probability (www.predictcancer.org). The data set can be downloaded at https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048. Conclusions The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system. PMID:25936599

  15. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Oberije, Cary; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Houben, Ruud; Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Deasy, Joseph O.; Belderbos, Jose; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  16. [Is there alternative to FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colorectal cancer patients?].

    PubMed

    Esch, Anouk; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2012-01-01

    Being the second cancer for men and the third cancer for women in France, colorectal cancer represents a serious public health issue. Its incidence has increased these last years and despite new therapeutics being developed, it still has a bad prognostic. Thanks in part to Hemoccult national mass screening program, its diagnosis is made possible at an earlier stage, which makes a surgical curative resection and the carrying out of adjuvant chemotherapy possible. For stage III colic cancer that has been surgically removed, adjuvant chemotherapy by FOLFOX 4 has to be offered. Nevertheless, because of its toxicities, the patient's high age, important comorbidities or post-surgical complications, this chemotherapy occasionally cannot be done. What are the colorectal cancer prognostic factors which would guide the chemotherapy? TNM classification, number of examined lymph nodes, MSI status, and presence or not of a perforation or a perinervous, lymphatic or venous invasion is recognized prognostic factors. Also, what are the alternatives of FOLFOX 4 regimen as colorectal cancer adjuvant treatment?

  17. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  18. The role of induction chemotherapy before radiation therapy in non-operative management of stage III NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Green, M R

    1994-11-01

    Radiation therapy alone has been 'standard' management of patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer for several decades. Palliative benefits are routinely achieved but significant survival benefits have not been documented. Patterns of failure in Stage III patients emphasize the need to pursue better treatment for both local macroscopic disease and distant micrometastatic sites. Improved control in both areas will be necessary to meaningfully enhance outcome for the universe of Stage III NSCLC patients. Several randomized trials show a significant survival benefit when cisplatin-containing induction chemotherapy is administered prior to locoregional treatment. In the favorable subset of Stage III patients selected for study by CALGB, the surviving fraction at 2-5 years post-therapy was > or = 2-fold larger in the chemoradiation group than in the cohort treated with radiation alone. The French trial documented a significant decrease in distant metastases rate among the chemotherapy treated patients. In all the trials where patterns of failure are discussed, local disease persistence is the overwhelming rule. Future trials must evaluate improved induction chemotherapy approaches. Stage III patients are an ethical population in which to test induction therapy with new drug combinations randomized against already 'active' regimens for comparative efficacy. End points would be initial response rates, patterns of failure, and overall survival. The feasibility of high-dose chemotherapy regimens with growth factor and hematopoietic support followed by aggressive radiation must be tested. If feasible, trials randomizing high dose versus conventional dose induction programs within the context of sequential multimodality therapy should follow. Intensified radiation approaches such as hyperfractionation or CHART should be paired with active concurrent chemotherapy following induction chemotherapy alone. Pursuit of these approaches over the next several years will

  19. A comparative analysis and guidance for individualized chemotherapy of stage II and III colorectal cancer patients based on pathological markers

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yang; Lu, Su; Yu, Fudong; Liu, Xisheng; Sun, Huimin; Wang, Jingtao; Zhu, Xingwu; Lu, Huijun; Yue, Hao; Wang, Jing; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Chongzhi; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with colorectal cancer after curative resection. Although current guidelines provide clear instructions for chemotherapy for stage II high-risk and stage III colorectal cancer, it is insufficient to individualize therapy. We analyzed the outcomes of 902 patients with colorectal cancer treated with or without chemotherapy in our hospital. We found Chinese survival benefit for chemotherapy was consistent with current guidelines. Moreover, our data added to the evidence that chemotherapy might be used for elderly patients with stage II high-risk colorectal cancer. Pathological markers could predict response to individualize therapy in a convenient, fast and inexpensive way. We compared survivals of patients with stage II high-risk and stage III colorectal cancer with chemotherapy in different pathological markers expression, and furthermore used 458 colon adenocarcinoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas to verify our preliminary results. We confirmed TOPIIα, EGFR and P170 may be sufficiently predictive markers to individualize chemotherapy. FOLFOX was the optimal adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage II high-risk and stage III colorectal cancer when TOPIIα was positive or EGFR or P170 was negative. PMID:27845412

  20. Multiple ionization in the earlier stages of water radiolysis.

    PubMed

    Olivera, G H; Caraby, C; Jardin, P; Cassimi, A; Adoui, L; Gervais, B

    1998-08-01

    We have studied the fragmentation of water vapour molecules induced by collision with a Xe44+ beam at 6.7 MeV/u. From the measurement of the fragment time of flight, we show that the amount of fragmentation due to multiple ionization is very large. In the case of single ionization, we are able to reproduce accurately the experimental cross sections by calculating for each molecular level the single-ionization cross section in the framework of the CDW-EIS theory and with a diagram of dissociation modified with respect to the diagram obtained in the case of dipolar ionization. By using qualitative arguments based on the ability of the medium to neutralize a charged species, we tentatively extend our result to liquid water. From our analysis, we show that ionizations involving three or more ejected electrons could enhance the oxygen production. For the physicochemical phase we estimate that the rate of oxygen production by multiple ionization represents approximately 18% of the OH rate produced by single ionization.

  1. Two-stage polling system with multiple servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wai Sum; Houck, David J.; Fuhrmann, Steven W.

    1997-10-01

    We investigate the impact of scheduling policies on the tail distribution of sojourn times experienced by various unevenly-loaded queues in a two-stage polling system served by a symmetric multiprocessor system running under a Unix- like operating system. The queues are statically divided into groups, with each group being managed by a process. A process can run on any of the available processors. Service to a customer is thus scheduled first at the process level and then at the queue level. Assuming that all customers have the same service requirement, and for Poisson arrivals and exponentially distributed service times and setup times, it is shown by simulation that the earliest-customer policy outperforms both 1-limited and exhaustive policies in the sense of providing equitable service to the queues.

  2. Deriving stage at diagnosis from multiple population-based sources: colorectal and lung cancer in England

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Majano, S; Fowler, H; Maringe, C; Di Girolamo, C; Rachet, B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stage at diagnosis is a strong predictor of cancer survival. Differences in stage distributions and stage-specific management help explain geographic differences in cancer outcomes. Stage information is thus essential to improve policies for cancer control. Despite recent progress, stage information is often incomplete. Data collection methods and definition of stage categories are rarely reported. These inconsistencies may result in assigning conflicting stage for single tumours and confound the interpretation of international comparisons and temporal trends of stage-specific cancer outcomes. We propose an algorithm that uses multiple routine, population-based data sources to obtain the most complete and reliable stage information possible. Methods: Our hierarchical approach derives a single stage category per tumour prioritising information deemed of best quality from multiple data sets and various individual components of tumour stage. It incorporates rules from the Union for International Cancer Control TNM classification of malignant tumours. The algorithm is illustrated for colorectal and lung cancer in England. We linked the cancer-specific Clinical Audit data (collected from clinical multi-disciplinary teams) to national cancer registry data. We prioritise stage variables from the Clinical Audit and added information from the registry when needed. We compared stage distribution and stage-specific net survival using two sets of definitions of summary stage with contrasting levels of assumptions for dealing with missing individual TNM components. This exercise extends a previous algorithm we developed for international comparisons of stage-specific survival. Results: Between 2008 and 2012, 163 915 primary colorectal cancer cases and 168 158 primary lung cancer cases were diagnosed in adults in England. Using the most restrictive definition of summary stage (valid information on all individual TNM components), colorectal cancer stage

  3. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  4. Parkinsonism in multiple system atrophy: natural history, severity (UPDRS-III), and disability assessment compared with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tison, François; Yekhlef, Farid; Chrysostome, Virginie; Balestre, Eric; Quinn, Niall P; Poewe, Werner; Wenning, Gregor K

    2002-07-01

    We analyzed parkinsonian features in multiple system atrophy (MSA) compared with age- and disease duration-matched Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and assessed the applicability of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) -III motor scale as a means of rating their severity. Cross-sectional analysis of parkinsonism was done using UPDRS-III, International Cerebellar Atatia Rating Scale, and disability scales (Hoehn and Yahr [H&A], Schwab and England, Katz and Lawton) in 50 unselected MSA patients and in 50 matched PD patients. At symptom onset, falls occurred 10 times more frequently in MSA, whereas limb tremor was 10 times more common in PD. At first visit (10.2 months), hemiparkinsonism and pill-rolling rest tremor were less common in MSA. Hypomimia, atypical rest, postural or action tremor, as well as postural instability were more frequent in MSA. At study examination (62.4 months), parkinsonian signs in MSA patients were more frequently symmetrical and associated with axial rigidity, antecollis and postural instability. A levodopa response of >50% was seen in <10% of MSA patients. Modified H&Y stages (3.2 +/- 1.3 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.78) and UPDRS-III scores (48.14 +/- 19.5 vs. 31.74 +/- 12.9) were significantly (P = 0.0001) higher in MSA. The internal consistency of the UPDRS-III was fair in MSA patients (Cronbach's alpha >0.90), and correlated well with marked dependency on the Schwab and England and Katz and Lawton scales. Factor structure analysis of UPDRS-III in MSA showed five clinically distinct subscores accounting for 74% of the variance, differing from PD by the dependency of the face-speech and limb bradykinesia items and independence of the postural-action tremor from the rest tremor items. There was a significant correlation (R(2) = 0.70, P = 0.001) between ICARS ataxia and UPDRS-III scores in MSA patients. Results confirm a distinct profile of parkinsonism in MSA and greater severity and disability compared with PD. It also indicates that

  5. A two-strain TB model with multiple latent stages.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Azizeh; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos; Nazari, Fereshteh; Song, Baojun; Kheiri, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    A two-strain tuberculosis (TB) transmission model incorporating antibiotic-generated TB resistant strains and long and variable waiting periods within the latently infected class is introduced. The mathematical analysis is carried out when the waiting periods are modeled via parametrically friendly gamma distributions, a reasonable alternative to the use of exponential distributed waiting periods or to integral equations involving ``arbitrary'' distributions. The model supports a globally-asymptotically stable disease-free equilibrium when the reproduction number is less than one and an endemic equilibriums, shown to be locally asymptotically stable, or l.a.s., whenever the basic reproduction number is greater than one. Conditions for the existence and maintenance of TB resistant strains are discussed. The possibility of exogenous re-infection is added and shown to be capable of supporting multiple equilibria; a situation that increases the challenges faced by public health experts. We show that exogenous re-infection may help established resilient communities of actively-TB infected individuals that cannot be eliminated using approaches based exclusively on the ability to bring the control reproductive number just below 1.

  6. Trace elements and heavy metals in hair of stage III breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Benderli Cihan, Yasemin; Sözen, Selim; Oztürk Yıldırım, Sema

    2011-12-01

    This prospective study was designed to compare the hair levels of 36 elements in 52 patients with stage III breast cancer to those of an equal number of healthy individuals. Principal component and cluster analysis were used for source of identification and apportionment of heavy metals and trace elements in these two groups. A higher average level of iron was found in samples from patients while controls had higher levels of calcium. Both patients and controls had elevated levels of tin, magnesium, zinc, and sodium. Almost all element values in cancer patients showed higher dispersion and asymmetry than in healthy controls. Between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of silver, arsenic, gold, boron, barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, cesium, gadolinium, manganese, nickel, lead, antimony, scandium, selenium, and zinc (p < 0.05). Strong positive correlations were found between lead and gold (r = 0.785) in the cancer group and between palladium and cobalt (r = 0.945) in the healthy individuals. Our results show that there are distinct patterns of heavy metals and trace elements in the hair of breast cancer patients in comparison to healthy controls. These results could be of significance in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  7. Late Closure of a Stage III Idiopathic Macular Hole after Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Afrashi, Filiz; Öztaş, Zafer; Nalçacı, Serhad

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old female presented to our hospital with decreased vision in her right eye. Detailed ocular examination was performed, and a macular hole was detected in the right eye. The presence of a full-thickness stage III macular hole was confirmed with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Pars plana vitrectomy followed by long-acting gas tamponade (C3F8) was performed as treatment. One month after surgery, clinical examination revealed a persistent macular hole, confirmed by an OCT scan. Although the patient was scheduled for reoperation, the surgery was postponed due to personal reasons of the patient. Surprisingly, after five months, a closure pattern with accompanying epiretinal membrane was observed in the macular hole area. The closure of the macular hole was completed without any further intervention 8 months post-surgery. In cases of unclosed macular hole after the first surgery, if a second surgery cannot be performed, follow-up with OCT recommended due to the possibility of spontaneous closure. However, spontaneous closure of a persistent macular hole following PPV is rare, so early diagnosis and surgical repair of unclosed macular holes must remain the primary goal. PMID:27800248

  8. Treatment of stage III carcinoma of the uterine cervix with telecobalt irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Souhami, L.; Melo, J.A.; Pareja, G.

    1987-11-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 148 patients with histologically proven carcinoma of the cervix, stage III, treated with irradiation. All patients received external irradiation with cobalt 60 followed by intracavitary radium application. The median age was 55 years. Squamous cell carcinoma was found in 96.5% of the cases. The 8-year actuarial survival rate was 41%. Bilateral parametrial invasion proved to be a strong prognostic factor. Patients with unilateral disease had a survival rate of 43% whereas in those with bilateral involvement it was only 15% (P less than 0.005). The total pelvic failure rate was 29.5%. The overall incidence of distant metastasis was 11%. The complication rate (minor and major complications) was high, with vaginal stenosis (22.5%), proctitis (21.5%), cystitis (13.5%), and fistulae (4%) occurring in 33, 32, 20, and 6 patients, respectively. New treatment modalities are urgently needed for advanced carcinoma of the cervix. Bilateral parametrial involvement is an unfavorable prognostic factor and this should be kept in mind when designing new protocols.

  9. Evaluation of NEXRDA Stage III precipitation data over Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge: a semiarid region in Central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H.; Zhou, X.; Hendrickx, J.; Guan, H.

    2006-05-01

    This study examines NEXRAD Stage III product (hourly, cell size 4 km by 4 km) for its ability in estimating precipitation over Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge: a semiarid region in Central New Mexico. A GIS-based NEXRAD data processing and visualization method is also presented. A comparison between Stage III and a network of gauge precipitation estimates during 1995 to 2001 indicates that Stage III (1) overestimates the hourly conditional mean precipitation (CM) by 33 percent in monsoon season and 55 percent in non-monsoon season; (2) overestimates the hourly CM for concurrent radar-gauge pairs (non-zero value) by 13 percent in monsoon season and 6 percent in non-monsoon season; (3) overestimates the seasonal precipitation accumulation by 11 to 88 percent in monsoon season and underestimates by 18 to 89 percent in non- monsoon season; and (4) either overestimates annual precipitation accumulation up to 28.2 percent or underestimates it up to 11.9 percent. More caution is suggested in using Stage III data for nonmonsoonal (stratiform) rainfall events (prior to the truncation fixed algorithm deployed in 2002), as the truncation error can be a significant drawback. While overestimates may suppress the truncation caused underestimates in the monsoon seasons.

  10. Georgetown University Integrated Community Energy System (GU-ICES). Phase III, Stage I: feasibility analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Victor

    1980-10-01

    Candidate energy alternatives are analyzed in Phase III, Stage I, and the appendices are presented for the feasibility analysis. Information in eight appendices includes the following: detailed statement of work; PEPCO rate schedules; cogeneration schemes; added coal, limestone, and ash storage; hot and cold thermal storage; absorption refrigeration; high temperature heat pumps; and life cycle cost analysis. (MCW)

  11. Desmoplasia Influenced Recurrence of Disease and Mortality in Stage III Colorectal Cancer within Five Years after Surgery and Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zippi, Maddalena; De Toma, Giorgio; Minervini, Giovanni; Cassieri, Claudio; Pica, Roberta; Colarusso, Diodoro; Stock, Simon; Crispino, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: In patients with colon cancer who undergo resection for potential cure, 40–60% have advanced locoregional disease (stage III). Those who are suitable for adjuvant treatment had a definite disease-free-survival benefit. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether the presence of desmoplasia influenced the mortality rate of stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) within 5 years from the surgery and adjuvant therapy. Patients and Methods: Sixty-five patients with stage III CRC underwent resection and adjuvant therapy. Qualitative categorization of desmoplasia was obtained using Ueno's stromal CRC classification. Desmoplasia was related to mortality using Spearman correlation and stratified with other histological variables (inflammation, grading) that concurred to the major determinant of malignancy (venous invasion and lymph nodes) using the Chi-square test. Result: The 5-year survival rate was 65% and the relapse rate was 37%. The mortality rate in patients with immature desmoplasia was 86%, 27% in intermediate desmoplasia, and 0% in mature desmoplasia (Spearman correlation coefficient: −0.572, P = 0.05). Conclusion: Immature desmoplasia appears to be associated with disease recurrence and mortality in stage III CRC patients. PMID:28139499

  12. Preoperative serum markers for individual patient prognosis in stage I-III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Giessen-Jung, Clemens; Nagel, Dorothea; Glas, Maria; Spelsberg, Fritz; Lau-Werner, Ulla; Modest, Dominik Paul; Schulz, Christoph; Heinemann, Volker; Di Gioia, Dorit; Stieber, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) remains the only recommended biomarker for follow-up care of colorectal cancer (CRC), but besides CEA, several other serological parameters have been proposed as prognostic markers for CRC. The present retrospective analysis investigates a comprehensive set of serum markers with regard to cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). A total of 472 patients with colon cancer underwent surgery for curative intent between January 1988 and June 2007. Preoperative serum was analyzed for the following parameters: albumin, alkaline phosphatase (aP), beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG), bilirubin, cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), CA 72-4, CEA, C-reactive protein (CRP), cytokeratin-19 soluble fragment (CYFRA 21-1), ferritin, gamma-glutamyltransferase (γGT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), hemoglobin, haptoglobin, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum amyloid A (SAA), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. After a median follow-up period of 5.9 years, the overall 3- and 5-year CSS was 91.7 and 84.9 % and DFS rates were 82.7 % (3 years) and 77.6 % (5 years). Multivariate analyses confirmed preoperative CEA as an independent prognostic factor with regard to CSS and DFS. CA 19-9 and γGT also provided prognostic value for CSS and DFS, respectively. Younger age was negatively associated with DFS. According to UICC stage, CEA provided significant prognostic value with regard to CSS and DFS, while CA 19-9 was only prognostic for CSS. Combined analysis is able to identify patients with favorable prognosis. In addition to tumor baseline parameters, preoperative CEA could be confirmed as prognostic marker in colon cancer. CA 19-9 and γGT also provide additional prognostic value with regard to survival and recurrence in stage III and stage I disease, respectively. The combined use of CEA together with CA 19-9 and γGT improve

  13. 125I Seed Permanent Implantation as a Palliative Treatment for Stage III and IV Hypopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Yang, Jie; Li, Xiaojiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Ren, Yanxin; Fei, Jimin; Xi, Yan; Sun, Ruimei; Ma, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of percutaneous 125I seed permanent implantation for advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma from toxicity, tumor response, and short-term outcome. Methods. 125I seeds implant procedures were performed under computed tomography for 34 patients with advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma. We observed the local control rate, overall survival, and acute or late toxicity rate. Results. In the 34 patients (stage III, n=6; stage IV, n=28), the sites of origin were pyriform sinus (n=29) and postcricoid area (n=5). All patients also received one to four cycles of chemotherapy after seed implantation. The post-plan showed that the actuarial D90 of 125I seeds ranged from 90 to 158 Gy (median, 127 Gy). The mean follow-up was 12.3 months (range, 3.4 to 43.2 months). The local control was 2.1–31.0 months with a median of 17.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4 to 22.0 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local controls were 65.3%, 28.6%, and 9.5% respectively. Twelve patients (35%) died of local recurrence, fourteen patients (41%) died of distant metastases, and three patients (9%) died of recurrence and metastases at the same time. Five patients (15%) still survived to follow-up. At the time of analysis, the median survival time was 12.5 months (95% CI, 9.5 to 15.4 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates were 55.2%, 20.3%, and 10.9%, respectively. Five patients (15%) experienced grade 3 toxic events and nine patients (26%) have experienced grade 2 toxic events. Conclusion. This review shows relatively low toxicity for interstitial 125I seed implantation in the patients with advanced stage hypopharyngeal cancer. The high local control results suggest that 125I seed brachytherapy implant as a salvage or palliative treatment for advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma merit further investigation. PMID:27440132

  14. Dasatinib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-22

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  15. Motivational and Volitional Variables Associated with Stages of Change for Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis: A Multiple Discriminant Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Chung-Yi; Fitzgerald, Sandra D.; Strand, David M.; Muller, Veronica; Brooks, Jessica; Chan, Fong

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine whether motivational and volitional variables identified in the health action process approach (HAPA) model can be used to successfully differentiate people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in different stages of change for exercise and physical activity. Ex-post-facto design using multiple…

  16. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  17. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  18. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy for stages II and III colon cancer after complete resection: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, B.M.; Cosby, R.; Quereshy, F.; Jonker, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Updated practice guidelines on adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected colon cancer are lacking. In 2008, Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care developed a guideline on adjuvant therapy for stages ii and iii colon cancer. With newer regimens being assessed in this patient population and older agents being either abandoned because of non-effectiveness or replaced by agents that are more efficacious, a full update of the original guideline was undertaken. Methods Literature searches (January 1987 to August 2015) of medline, embase, and the Cochrane Library were conducted; in addition, abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress were reviewed (the latter for January 2007 to August 2015). A practice guideline was drafted that was then scrutinized by internal and external reviewers whose comments were incorporated into the final guideline. Results Twenty-six unique reports of eighteen randomized controlled trials and thirteen unique reports of twelve meta-analyses or pooled analyses were included in the evidence base. The 5 recommendations developed included 3 for stage ii colon cancer and 2 for stage iii colon cancer. Conclusions Patients with completely resected stage iii colon cancer should be offered adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5fu)–based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin (based on definitive data for improvements in survival and disease-free survival). Patients with resected stage ii colon cancer without “high-risk” features should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients with “high-risk” features, 5fu-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin should be offered, although no clinical trials have been conducted to conclusively demonstrate the same benefits seen in stage iii colon cancer. PMID:28050138

  19. Randomized phase III trial comparing biweekly infusional fluorouracil/leucovorin alone or with irinotecan in the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer: PETACC-3.

    PubMed

    Van Cutsem, Eric; Labianca, Roberto; Bodoky, György; Barone, Carlo; Aranda, Enrique; Nordlinger, Bernard; Topham, Claire; Tabernero, Josep; André, Thierry; Sobrero, Alberto F; Mini, Enrico; Greil, Richard; Di Costanzo, Francesco; Collette, Laurence; Cisar, Laura; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Khayat, David; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Roth, Arnaud D; Cunningham, David

    2009-07-01

    PURPOSE The primary objective of this randomized, multicenter, phase III trial was to investigate whether the addition of irinotecan to the de Gramont infusional fluorouracil (FU)/leucovorin (LV) adjuvant regimen (LV5FU2) would improve disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with stage III colon cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS After curatively intentioned surgery, patients with stage II and III colon cancer were randomly allocated surgery to receive LV5FU2 (LV 200 mg/m(2) as a 2-hour infusion, followed by FU; as a 400 mg/m(2) bolus and then a 600 mg/m(2) continuous infusion over 22 hours, days 1 and 2, every 2 weeks for 12 cycles: de Gramont regimen) with or without irinotecan (180 mg/m(2) as a 30- to 90-minute infusion, day 1, every 2 weeks). In total, 260 (7.9%) of 3,278 patients received an alternative high-dose infusional FU/LV regimen (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internische Onkologie regimen) with or without irinotecan. Results The principal efficacy analysis was based on 2,094 treated patients with stage III disease, randomly allocated in the LV5FU2 strata. After a median follow-up of 66.3 months, the 5-year DFS rate was 56.7% with irinotecan/LV5FU2 and 54.3% with LV5FU2 alone (primary end point: log-rank P = .106). Combining irinotecan with LV5FU2 did not significantly improve overall survival in this patient group compared with LV5FU2 alone (5-year rate 73.6% v 71.3%, respectively; log-rank P = .094). The addition of irinotecan to LV5FU2 was associated with an increased incidence of grade 3 to 4 GI events and neutropenia. CONCLUSION Irinotecan added to LV5FU2 as adjuvant therapy did not confer a statistically significant improvement in DFS or overall survival in patients with stage III colon cancer compared with LV5FU2 alone.

  20. Intraperitoneal Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  1. International Staging System predicts prognosis of Chinese patients with multiple myeloma across different calendar periods with application of novel agents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Hsiang; Teng, Hao-Wei; Hong, Ying-Chung; Liu, Chun-Yu; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Yang, Ching-Fen; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Chang, Tai-Jay; Yen, Jeffrey J Y; Chen, Po-Min; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of the International Staging System (ISS) for Chinese patients with multiple myeloma (MM) has not been demonstrated, especially with respect to treatments with novel agents. Newly diagnosed MM patients at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled between 1996 and 2007. Data regarding clinical features, laboratory tests, and outcome at last follow-up were collected. A total of 389 MM patients (71% male) were enrolled, with median age of 71 years. At diagnosis, 72.7% had Durie-Salmon (DS) stage III disease, 56.2% had ISS stage III disease, and 34% had serum creatinine ≧2.0 mg/dL. Compared with patients diagnosed in the first calendar period 1996-2001, the patients of the second calendar period 2002-2007 were older and more of these patients had received novel agents, especially thalidomide. The median overall survival period was 20.5 months, with a significant increase of patients in the second calendar period (15.3 and 28.2 months, respectively; P = 0.002), especially for those with ISS stages I and II. In the Cox proportion model, elevated serum β(2) microglobulin at diagnosis (≧3.5 mg/L), old age (≧65 years), and impaired renal function were found to be independently associated with poor survival. Over the entire period, the ISS was found to be effective in providing an accurate prognosis with respect to different ages and calendar periods. This is the first study to show the applicability of ISS for Chinese patients with MM, especially for those who had received thalidomide.

  2. Analysis of dynamic behavior of multiple-stage planetary gear train used in wind driven generator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jungang; Wang, Yong; Huo, Zhipu

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic model of multiple-stage planetary gear train composed of a two-stage planetary gear train and a one-stage parallel axis gear is proposed to be used in wind driven generator to analyze the influence of revolution speed and mesh error on dynamic load sharing characteristic based on the lumped parameter theory. Dynamic equation of the model is solved using numerical method to analyze the uniform load distribution of the system. It is shown that the load sharing property of the system is significantly affected by mesh error and rotational speed; load sharing coefficient and change rate of internal and external meshing of the system are of obvious difference from each other. The study provides useful theoretical guideline for the design of the multiple-stage planetary gear train of wind driven generator.

  3. Analysis of Dynamic Behavior of Multiple-Stage Planetary Gear Train Used in Wind Driven Generator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jungang; Wang, Yong; Huo, Zhipu

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic model of multiple-stage planetary gear train composed of a two-stage planetary gear train and a one-stage parallel axis gear is proposed to be used in wind driven generator to analyze the influence of revolution speed and mesh error on dynamic load sharing characteristic based on the lumped parameter theory. Dynamic equation of the model is solved using numerical method to analyze the uniform load distribution of the system. It is shown that the load sharing property of the system is significantly affected by mesh error and rotational speed; load sharing coefficient and change rate of internal and external meshing of the system are of obvious difference from each other. The study provides useful theoretical guideline for the design of the multiple-stage planetary gear train of wind driven generator. PMID:24511295

  4. Why adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer was not given: Reasons for non-recommendation by clinicians or patient refusal.

    PubMed

    Gilbar, Peter; Lee, Andrew; Pokharel, Khageshwor

    2017-03-01

    Aim The aim of our study was to evaluate stage III colon cancer patients discussed at a multidisciplinary team meeting to identify reasons for clinicians not recommending adjuvant chemotherapy and reasons for patients declining recommended chemotherapy. Methods A retrospective, single institution Australian study was conducted on all surgically managed stage III colon cancer patients diagnosed at the regional cancer centre at Toowoomba Hospital between July 2010 and December 2014. Reasons why adjuvant chemotherapy was not recommended by the multidisciplinary team or following referral to a medical oncologist and patients' reasons for refusing chemotherapy despite medical oncology recommendation were determined. Results One hundred and nine patients were suitable for evaluation. Overall, 72 (66.1%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Chemotherapy was not recommended in 25 (23.4%) of patients, with the majority (68%) having more than one cited reason. Multiple comorbidities and advanced age were the most common reasons for non-recommendation ( p < 0.01). Age alone was not a reason for not recommending chemotherapy. Twelve (11%) patients declined offered chemotherapy. The reasons for refusal were not detailed in the majority of patient charts (63.6%). Travel distance was not a factor in accepting or refusing chemotherapy. Conclusion Discussion at a multidisciplinary team meeting facilitates the identification of patients unsuitable for adjuvant treatment. The reasons for declining offered chemotherapy need to be assessed fully to ensure that patients' treatment preferences are balanced against the proven benefits of chemotherapy. Attendance at a regional cancer centre provides the opportunity for high standard care in the management of stage III colon cancer.

  5. Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin With Radiotherapy for Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneyasu, Yuko Nagai, Nobutaka; Nagata, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Yuki, Shintaro; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Toyota, Naoyuki; Fujiwara, Hisaya; Kudo, Yoshiki; Ito, Katsuhide

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the effectiveness of concomitant intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) using cisplatin (CDDP) with radiotherapy for Stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 29 cases of Stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with radiotherapy and IAIC of CDDP from 1991 to 2006. External-beam therapy was given to the whole pelvis using four opposing parallel fields with an 18-MV linear accelerator unit. A central shield was used after 30-40 Gy with external whole-pelvic irradiation, and the total dose was 50 Gy. High-dose-rate brachytherapy was given with {sup 192}Ir microSelectron. The dose at Point A was 6 Gy per fraction, 2 fractions per week, and the total number of fractions was either 3 or 4. Two or three courses of IAIC were given concomitantly with CDDP 120 mg or carboplatin 300 mg. Results: We confirmed excellent medicine distribution directly by using computed tomographic angiography. The 5-year overall survival rate for Stage III patients was 62%, the cause-specific survival rate was 70%, and the local relapse-free survival rate was 89%. Local recurrence, distant metastasis, and occurrences of both were 7%, 38%, and 3%, respectively. The incidence of severe acute hematologic adverse reactions (Grade {>=}3) was 27% for all patients; however, all recovered without interruption of radiotherapy. Severe nonhematologic effects (Grade {>=}3) were 3%, including nausea and ileus. Only 1 patient's radiotherapy was interrupted for a period of 1 week because of ileus. Severe late complication rates (Grade {>=}3) for the bladder, rectum, and intestine were 3%, 3%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusion: A combination of IAIC and systemic chemotherapy should be considered to improve the prognosis of patients with Stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

  6. Learning Multiple Band-Pass Filters for Sleep Stage Estimation: Towards Care Support for Aged Persons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takadama, Keiki; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Matsushima, Hiroyasu; Hattori, Kiyohiko; Nakajima, Nobuo

    This paper proposes the sleep stage estimation method that can provide an accurate estimation for each person without connecting any devices to human's body. In particular, our method learns the appropriate multiple band-pass filters to extract the specific wave pattern of heartbeat, which is required to estimate the sleep stage. For an accurate estimation, this paper employs Learning Classifier System (LCS) as the data-mining techniques and extends it to estimate the sleep stage. Extensive experiments on five subjects in mixed health confirm the following implications: (1) the proposed method can provide more accurate sleep stage estimation than the conventional method, and (2) the sleep stage estimation calculated by the proposed method is robust regardless of the physical condition of the subject.

  7. Pharmacogenetic predictors of outcome in patients with stage II and III colon cancer treated with oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Ana; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Aparicio, Jorge; Gallego-Plazas, Javier; Yaya, Ricardo; Maurel, Joan; Rodríguez-Salas, Nuria; Burgos, Emilio; Ramos, David; Calatrava, Ana; Andrada, Encarna; Díaz-López, Esther; Sánchez, Antonio; Madero, Rosario; Cejas, Paloma; Feliu, Jaime

    2014-09-01

    Identifying molecular markers for tumor recurrence is critical in successfully selecting patients with colon cancer who are more likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. We investigated the effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) within genes involved in oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines metabolism, DNA repair mechanisms, drug transport, or angiogenesis pathways on outcome for patients with stage II and III colon cancer treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of 202 patients with stage II and III colon cancer receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy from January 2004 to December 2009. Genotyping was performed for 67 SNPs in 32 genes using the MassARRAY (SEQUENOM) technology. Our results were validated in an independent cohort of 177 patients treated with the same chemotherapy regimens. The combination of the selectin E (SELE) rs3917412 G>A G/G and the methylentetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) rs1801133 T/T genotypes was associated with a significantly increased risk for recurrence in both the training [RR = 4.103; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.803-9.334; P = 0.001] and the validation cohorts (RR = 3.567; 95% CI, 1.253-10.151; P = 0.017) in the multiple regression analysis considering the stage, lymphovascular invasion, and bowel perforation as covariates. The combined analysis of these polymorphisms was also significantly associated with overall survival in both cohorts (RR = 3.388; 95% CI, 0.988-11.623; P = 0.052, and RR = 3.929; 95% CI, 1.144-13.485; P = 0.020, respectively). Our findings suggest that the SELE rs3917412 and MTHFR rs1801133 SNPs could serve as pharmacogenetic predictors of tumor recurrence in patients with early-stage colon cancer treated with oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy, thus allowing personalized selection of treatment to optimize clinical outcomes.

  8. A robust two-stage design identifying the optimal biological dose for phase I/II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yong; Lee, J Jack

    2017-01-15

    We propose a robust two-stage design to identify the optimal biological dose for phase I/II clinical trials evaluating both toxicity and efficacy outcomes. In the first stage of dose finding, we use the Bayesian model averaging continual reassessment method to monitor the toxicity outcomes and adopt an isotonic regression method based on the efficacy outcomes to guide dose escalation. When the first stage ends, we use the Dirichlet-multinomial distribution to jointly model the toxicity and efficacy outcomes and pick the candidate doses based on a three-dimensional volume ratio. The selected candidate doses are then seamlessly advanced to the second stage for dose validation. Both toxicity and efficacy outcomes are continuously monitored so that any overly toxic and/or less efficacious dose can be dropped from the study as the trial continues. When the phase I/II trial ends, we select the optimal biological dose as the dose obtaining the minimal value of the volume ratio within the candidate set. An advantage of the proposed design is that it does not impose a monotonically increasing assumption on the shape of the dose-efficacy curve. We conduct extensive simulation studies to examine the operating characteristics of the proposed design. The simulation results show that the proposed design has desirable operating characteristics across different shapes of the underlying true dose-toxicity and dose-efficacy curves. The software to implement the proposed design is available upon request. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The local treatment modalities in FIGO stage I-II small-cell carcinoma of the cervix are determined by disease stage and lymph node status.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juan; Yang, Hong-Yi; Wu, San-Gang; He, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Huan-Xin; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Qun; Guo, Zhan-Wen

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the optimal local treatment modalities for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I-II small-cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC), including cancer-directed surgery (CDS) and/or radiotherapy (RT). The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify SCCC patients from 1988 to 2012, and analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression proportional hazard methods to determine factors significant for cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall (OS). A total of 208 patients of SCCC were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 31 months. Fifty-eight (27.9%) patients were treated with primary CDS, 88 (42.3%) patients underwent CDS combined with RT, and 62 (29.8%) patients were treated with primary RT. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that local treatment modalities were independent prognostic factors for CSS and OS. Patients who had undergone CDS had better CSS and OS, compared with patients who had been treated with combined CDS and RT or RT alone. The 5-year CSS and OS of entire group was 49.8% and 46.4%, respectively. The 5-year CSS in the groups of patients receiving CDS, CDS combined with RT, and RT alone were 67.9%, 49.7%, and 32.6%, respectively (P < 0.001). The 5-year OS in patients treated with CDS, CDS combined with RT, and RT alone were 64.9%, 46.2%, and 28.8% (P < 0.001). Primary surgery was associated with improved CSS and OS for FIGO stage I and lymph node negative disease. Primary surgery is the most effective local treatment for FIGO stage I-II SCCC, as adjuvant RT or radical RT does not improve survival compared to radical surgery, especially in patients with FIGO stage I and lymph node negative disease.

  10. Multiple-path dissociation mechanism for mono- and dinuclear tris(hydroxamato)iron(III) complexes with dihydroxamic acid ligands in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Boukhalfa, H; Crumbliss, A L

    2000-09-18

    Linear synthetic dihydroxamic acids ([CH3N(OH)C=O)]2(CH2)n; H2Ln) with short (n = 2) and long (n = 8) hydrocarbon-connecting chains form mono- and dinuclear complexes with Fe(III) in aqueous solution. At conditions where the formation of Fe2(Ln)3 is favored, complexes with each of the two ligand systems undergo [H+]-induced ligand dissociation processes via multiple sequential and parallel paths, some of which are common and some of which are different for the two ligands. The pH jump induced ligand dissociation proceeds in two major stages (I and II) where each stage is shown to be comprised of multiple components (Ix, where x = 1-3 for L2 and L8, and IIy, where y = 1-3 for L2 and y = 1-4 for L8). A reaction scheme consistent with kinetic and independent ESI-MS data is proposed that includes the tris-chelated complexes (coordinated H2O omitted for clarity) (Fe2(Ln)3, Fe2(L2)2(L2H)2, Fe(LnH)3, Fe(L8)(L8H)), bis-chelated complexes (Fe2(Ln)2(2+), Fe(LnH)2+, Fe(L8)+), and monochelated complexes (Fe(LnH)2+). Analysis of kinetic data for ligand dissociation from Fe2(Ln)(LnH)3+ (n = 2, 4, 6, 8) allows us to estimate the dielectric constant at the reactive dinuclear Fe(III) site. The existence of multiple ligand dissociation paths for the dihydroxamic acid complexes of Fe(III) is a feature that distinguishes these systems from their bidentate monohydroxamic acid and hexadentate trihydroxamic acid counterparts and may be a reason for the biosynthesis of dihydroxamic acid siderophores, despite higher environmental molar concentrations necessary to completely chelate Fe(III).

  11. Cellular factors required for multiple stages of SV40 DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, M P; Stillman, B

    1988-01-01

    Plasmids containing the SV40 origin replicate in the presence of SV40 T antigen and a cell free extract derived from human 293 cells. Upon fractionation of this extract, two essential replication factors have been identified. One of these is a multi-subunit DNA binding protein containing polypeptides of 70,000, 34,000 and 11,000 daltons which may function as a eukaryotic single strand DNA binding protein (SSB). The other partially purified fraction is required with T antigen for the first stage of DNA replication, the formation of a pre-synthesis complex at the replication origin. These results, and others, define multiple stages of SV40 DNA replication in vitro which are analogous to multiple stages of Escherichia coli and phage lambda replication, and may reflect similar events in the replication of cellular chromosomes. Images PMID:2841119

  12. CYTOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF ANTIMICROBIAL ANTIBIOSIS. III. CYTOLOGICALLY DISTINGUISHABLE STAGES IN ANTIBIOTIC ACTION OF COLISTIN SULFATE ON ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    KAYE, J J; CHAPMAN, G B

    1963-09-01

    Kaye, Jeremy J. (Cornell University Medical College, New York, N.Y.) and George B. Chapman. Cytological aspects of antimicrobial antibiosis. III. Cytologically distinguishable stages in antibiotic action of colistin sulfate on Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 86:536-543. 1963.-Broth cultures of Escherichia coli were subjected to a constant concentration of colistin sulfate for varying periods of time. Controls and treated cells were fixed, dehydrated, and embedded in methacrylate, and ultrathin sections were examined in an electron microscope. Three stages in the antibiotic process were discerned. Stage 1 was characterized by a disruption of the axial orientation of the nuclear material and by an invasion of nuclear areas by tufts of material presumably of cytoplasmic origin; no loss of cellular contents could be detected cytologically. Stage 2 was characterized by the loss of nuclear material and by a loss of typical cytoplasmic granularity, an increase in cytoplasmic electron density, and an agglomeration of the cytoplasm into packed tufts of material; in contrast to the nuclear material, there was no loss of cytoplasmic material in this stage. Stage 3 was characterized by the loss of the altered cytoplasmic material but with the persistence of mesosomes, plasma membrane, and cell wall. Speculation that each and all of these changes might have resulted from an altered intracellular milieu secondary to a primary effect of the antibiotic on the plasma membrane is presented.

  13. Phase I/II Study of Postoperative Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Advanced-Stage Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck (cSCCHN)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-17

    Recurrent Skin Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity

  14. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors, Multiple Myeloma, or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma With or Without Impaired Liver or Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. The Frontier of Molecular Spintronics Based on Multiple-Decker Phthalocyaninato Tb(III) Single-Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Keiichi; Komeda, Tadahiro; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Ever since the first example of a double-decker complex (SnPc2) was discovered in 1936, MPc2 complexes with π systems and chemical and physical stabilities have been used as components in molecular electronic devices. More recently, in 2003, TbPc2 complexes were shown to be single-molecule magnets (SMMs), and researchers have utilized their quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) and magnetic relaxation behavior in spintronic devices. Herein, recent developments in Ln(III)-Pc-based multiple-decker SMMs on surfaces for molecular spintronic devices are presented. In this account, we discuss how dinuclear Tb(III)-Pc multiple-decker complexes can be used to elucidate the relationship between magnetic dipole interactions and SMM properties, because these complexes contain two TbPc2 units in one molecule and their intramolecular Tb(III)-Tb(III) distances can be controlled by changing the number of stacks. Next, we focus on the switching of the Kondo signal of Tb(III)-Pc-based multiple-decker SMMs that are adsorbed onto surfaces, their characterization using STM and STS, and the relationship between the molecular structure, the electronic structure, and the Kondo resonance of Tb(III)-Pc multiple-decker complexes.

  17. Phage idiotype vaccination: first phase I/II clinical trial in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is characterized by clonal expansion of B cells producing monoclonal immunoglobulins or fragments thereof, which can be detected in the serum and/or urine and are ideal target antigens for patient-specific immunotherapies. Methods Using phage particles as immunological carriers, we employed a novel chemically linked idiotype vaccine in a clinical phase I/II trial including 15 patients with advanced multiple myeloma. Vaccines composed of purified paraproteins linked to phage were manufactured successfully for each patient. Patients received six intradermal immunizations with phage idiotype vaccines in three different dose groups. Results Phage idiotype was well tolerated by all study participants. A subset of patients (80% in the middle dose group) displayed a clinical response indicated by decrease or stabilization of paraprotein levels. Patients exhibiting a clinical response to phage vaccines also raised idiotype-specific immunoglobulins. Induction of a cellular immune response was demonstrated by a cytotoxicity assay and delayed type hypersensitivity tests. Conclusion We present a simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible patient-specific therapy for patients with advanced multiple myeloma and produced promising anti-tumor activity in a subset of patients. PMID:24885819

  18. Single-stage bilateral pulmonary resections by video-assisted thoracic surgery for multiple small nodules

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Feng; Yang, Haitang

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment is thought to be the most effective strategy for multiple small nodules. However, in general, one-stage bilateral resection is not recommended due to its highly invasive nature. Methods Clinical records of patients undergoing one-stage bilateral resections of multiple pulmonary nodules between January 2009 and September 2014 in a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Results Simultaneous bilateral pulmonary resection by conventional video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was undertaken in 29 patients. Ground glass opacity (GGO) accounted for 71.9% (46/64) of total lesions, including 26 pure GGO and 20 mixed GGO lesions. One case underwent bilateral lobectomy that was complicated by postoperative dyspnea. Lobar-sublobar (L/SL) resection and bilateral sublobar resection (SL-SL) were conducted in 16 and 12 cases, respectively, and most of these cases had uneventful postoperative courses. There was no significant difference with regard to postoperative complications (P=0.703), duration of use of chest drains (P=0.485), between one- and two-stage groups. Mean postoperative follow-up in cases of primary lung cancer was 31.4 (range, 10–51) months. There was neither recurrence nor deaths at final follow-up. Conclusions Single-stage bilateral surgery in selected cases with synchronous bilateral multiple nodules (SBMNs) is feasible and associated with satisfactory outcomes. PMID:27076942

  19. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  20. Endoderm/mesoderm multiplication rates in stage 5-12 chick embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenquist, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    Multiplication rates for the endoderm/mesoderm layer of the head-process to 17-somite-stage chick embryo were studied by implanting essentially identical transplants labeled with tritiated thymidine into paired recipient embryos. One recipient was fixed as soon as the transplant had healed (after 30 min) and the other was reincubated an additional 3.5 to 22.5 hr; the ratios of labeled cells in the paired embryos provided points on a graph that indicated that doubling of endoderm/mesoderm cells in head-process-stage chick embryos occurs at approximately 4.0 and 17.2 hr of reincubation.

  1. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Jeremy P.; Murphy, James D.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Loo, Billy W.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  2. [Postoperative Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage III Colon Cancer--Drug Selection, Tolerability, and Safety in Clinical Practice].

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazutake; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Saito, Gota; Tanaka, Akira; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, oxaliplatin (L-OHP)-based chemotherapeutic regimens, including 5-fluorouracil, Leucovorin (LV), and L-OHP (FOLFOX); capecitabine and L-OHP (CapeOX); and 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid, and L-OHP (FLOX) are designated as category 1 recommendations for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage III colon cancer, followed by capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil plus LV as category 2A recommendations. We studied the selection of drugs for adjuvant chemotherapy and assessed the tolerability and safety of CapeOX and tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus LV (UFT/LV) in patients with Stage III colon cancer. The study group included 104 consecutive patients with Stage III colon cancer who underwent curative surgery. One patient changed hospitals immediately after surgery. Among the remaining 103 patients, 82 (80%) received adjuvant chemotherapy and 21 (20%) did not. CapeOX was administered to 32 patients (31%), UFT/LV to 49 patients (48%), and capecitabine to 1 patient (1%). In 59 patients, the treatment choice was determined according to the patient's preference; 32 patients (54%) selected CapeOX, 26 (44%) selected UFT/LV, and 1 (2%) selected no chemotherapy. The treatment completion rate was 80% for CapeOX and 84% for UFT/LV. Among patients who completed chemotherapy, dose reduction and drug withdrawal were not required in 22% of patients who received CapeOX and 80% of those who received UFT/LV. Neither CapeOX nor UFT/LV was associated with any serious adverse events. The tolerability and safety of CapeOX and UFT/LV were acceptable. However, CapeOX dose had to be carefully adjusted according to each patient's condition.

  3. Serological immune response against ADAM10 pro-domain is associated with favourable prognosis in stage III colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Fernández, Sheila María; Barbariga, Marco; Cannizzaro, Luca; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Hurley, Laura; Zanardi, Alan; Conti, Antonio; Sanvito, Francesca; Innocenzi, Anna; Pecorelli, Nicolò; Braga, Marco; Alessio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    A humoral immune response against aberrant tumor proteins can be elicited in cancer patients, resulting in the production of auto-antibodies (Abs). By serological proteome analysis we identified the surface membrane protein ADAM10, a metalloproteinase that has a role in epithelial-tumor progression and invasion, as a target of the immune response in colorectal cancer (Crc). A screening carried out on the purified protein using testing cohorts of sera (Crc patients n = 57; control subjects n = 39) and validation cohorts of sera (Crc patients n = 49; control subjects n = 52) indicated that anti-ADAM10 auto-Abs were significantly induced in a large group (74%) of colon cancer patients, in particular in patients at stage II and III of the disease. Interestingly, in Crc patients classified as stage III disease, the presence of anti-ADAM10 auto-Abs in the sera was associated with a favourable follow-up with a significant shifting of the recurrence-free survival median time from 23 to 55 months. Even though the ADAM10 protein was expressed in Crc regardless the presence of auto-Abs, the immature/non-functional isoform of ADAM10 was highly expressed in the tumor of anti-ADAM10-positive patients and was the isoform targeted by the auto-Abs. In conclusion, the presence of anti-ADAM10 auto-Abs seems to reflect the increased tumor expression of the immunogenic immature-ADAM10 in a group of Crc patients, and is associated with a favourable prognosis in patients at stage III of the disease. PMID:27517630

  4. Validity of Adjuvant! Online in Older Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer Based on 2,967 Patients from the ACCENT Database

    PubMed Central

    Papamichael, Demetris; Renfro, Lindsay A.; Matthaiou, Christiana; Yothers, Greg; Saltz, Leonard; Guthrie, Katherine; Van Cutsem, Eric; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Labianca, Roberto; André, Thierry; O’Connell, Michael; Alberts, Steven R.; Haller, Daniel G.; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjuvant! Online is a tool used for clinical decision making in patients with early stage colon cancer. As details of the tool’s construction are not published, the ability of Adjuvant! Online to accurately predict outcomes for older patients (age 70+) with node positive colon cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy is unclear. Methods Individual data from older patients with stage III colon cancer who enrolled into multiple trials within the ACCENT database were entered into the Adjuvant! Online program to obtain predicted probabilities of 5-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Median predictions were compared with known rates. As co-morbidities were not known for ACCENT patients, but required for calculator entry, patients were assumed to have either “minor” or “average for age” co-morbidities. Results 2,967 older patients from 10 randomized studies were included. When “minor” co-morbidities were assumed, the median predicted 5-year OS rate of 64% nearly matched the actual rate of 65%; when “average for age” co-morbidities were assumed, the median prediction dropped to 58%, outside the CI for the actual rate. On the other hand, assuming “minor” co-morbidities gave a median 5-year RFS prediction of 62%, outside the 95% CI for the actual rate of 58%, while assuming “average for age” co-morbidities yielded a better median prediction of 57%. Conclusion Adjuvant! Online is reasonably accurate overall for predicting outcomes in older trial patients with stage III colon cancer, though accuracy may differ between 5-year RFS and 5-year OS predictions when a fixed degree of co-morbidities is assumed. PMID:27468630

  5. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  6. Epoetin alfa improves survival after chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer: Final results of a prospective observational study

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Tribius, Silke; Yekebas, Emre F.; Bahrehmand, Roia; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Kilic, Ergin; Muellerleile, Ulrich; Gross, Eberhard; Schild, Steven E.; Alberti, Winfried

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: This prospective, nonrandomized study evaluates the effectiveness of epoetin alfa to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to14 g/dL (optimal range for tumor oxygenation) during chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer and its impact on overall survival (OS), metastatic-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients were included. Forty-two patients received epoetin alfa (150 IU/kg, 3 times a week) during radiotherapy, which was started at hemoglobin less than 13 g/dL and stopped at 14 g/dL or higher. Hemoglobin levels were measured weekly during RT. Results: Both groups were balanced for age, sex, performance status, tumor length/location, histology, grading, T-stage/N-stage, chemotherapy, treatment schedule, and hemoglobin before RT. Median change of hemoglobin was +0.3 g/dL/wk with epoetin alfa and -0.5 g/dL/wk without epoetin alfa. At least 60% of hemoglobin levels were 12 to 14 g/dL in 64% and 17% of the patients, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who received epoetin alfa had better OS (32% vs. 8% at 2 years, p = 0.009) and LC (67% vs. 15% at 2 years, p = 0.001). MFS was not significantly different (42% vs. 18% at 2 years, p = 0.09). Conclusions: The findings suggest that epoetin alfa when used to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to 14 g/dL can improve OS and LC of Stage III esophageal cancer patients.

  7. Removal of River-Stage Fluctuations from Well Response Using Multiple-Regression

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, Frank A.; Mackley, Rob D.

    2011-11-01

    Many contaminated unconfined aquifers are located in proximity to river systems. In groundwater studies, the physical presence of a river is commonly represented as a transient-head boundary that imposes hydrologic responses within the intersected unconfined aquifer. The periodic fluctuation of river-stage height at the boundary produces associated responses within the adjacent aquifer system, the magnitude of which is a function of the existing well, aquifer, boundary conditions, and river-stage fluctuation characteristics. The presence of well responses induced by the river stage can significantly limit characterization and monitoring of remedial activities within the stress-impacted area. This paper demonstrates the use of a time-domain, multiple-regression, convolution (superposition) method to develop well/aquifer river response function (RRF) relationships. Following RRF development, a multiple-regression deconvolution correction approach can be applied to remove river-stage effects from well water-level responses. Corrected well responses can then be analyzed to improve local aquifer characterization activities in support of optimizing remedial actions, assessing the area-of-influence of remediation activities, and determining mean groundwater flow and contaminant flux to the river system.

  8. Two-stage path planning approach for solving multiple spacecraft reconfiguration maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoude, Georges S.; How, Jonathan P.; Garcia, Ian M.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presents a two-stage approach for designing optimal reconfiguration maneuvers for multiple spacecraft in close proximity. These maneuvers involve well-coordinated and highly-coupled motions of the entire fleet of spacecraft while satisfying an arbitrary number of constraints. This problem is complicated by the nonlinearity of the attitude dynamics, the non-convexity of some of the constraints, and the coupling that exists in some of the constraints between the positions and attitudes of all spacecraft. While there has been significant research to solve for the translation and/or rotation trajectories for the multiple spacecraft reconfiguration problem, the approach presented in this paper is more general and on a larger scale than the problems considered previously. The essential feature of the solution approach is the separation into two stages, the first using a simplified planning approach to obtain a feasible solution, which is then significantly improved using a smoothing stage. The first stage is solved using a bidirectional Rapidly-exploring Random Tree (RRT) planner. Then the second step optimizes the trajectories by solving an optimal control problem using the Gauss pseudospectral method (GPM). Several examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach for designing spacecraft reconfiguration maneuvers.

  9. Removal of river-stage fluctuations from well response using multiple regression.

    PubMed

    Spane, Frank A; Mackley, Rob D

    2011-01-01

    Many contaminated unconfined aquifers are located in proximity to river systems. In groundwater studies, the physical presence of a river is commonly represented as a transient-head boundary that imposes hydrologic responses within the intersected unconfined aquifer. The periodic fluctuation of river-stage height at the boundary produces associated responses within the adjacent aquifer system, the magnitude of which is a function of the existing well, aquifer, boundary conditions, and characteristics of river-stage fluctuations. The presence of well responses induced by the river stage can significantly limit characterization and monitoring of remedial activities within the stress-impacted area. This article demonstrates the use of a time-domain, multiple-regression, convolution (superposition) method to develop well/aquifer river response function (RRF) relationships. Following RRF development, a multiple-regression deconvolution correction approach can be applied to remove river-stage effects from well water-level responses. Corrected well responses can then be analyzed to improve local aquifer characterization activities in support of optimizing remedial actions, assessing the area-of-influence of remediation activities, and determining mean groundwater flow and contaminant flux to the river system.

  10. Treatment of Severe (Stage III and IV) Chronic Pressure Ulcers Using Pulsed Radio Frequency Energy in a Quadriplegic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Porreca, Eugene G.; Giordano-Jablon, Gina M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To report an adjuvant treatment to basic wound care of stage III and IV pressure ulcers in a patient with quadriplegia. Methods: Pulsed radio frequency energy was used as an adjunct to basic wound care of 3 large, long-standing (6 years) stage III and IV pressure ulcers that were unresponsive to conventional therapy in a 59-year-old man with quadriplegia. Results: The ulcers (on right foot, left heel, and sacrum) markedly decreased in size (16.7, 28.5, and 13.1 mm2 per day, respectively). The ulcer on the right foot healed within 4 weeks, the left heel ulcer reduced in size by 95% at 7 months, and the large sacral ulcer healed to closure in 11 months. Conclusion: Pulsed radio frequency energy treatment with basic wound care, if administered early in the course of pressure ulcer therapy, might avoid the lengthy hospitalizations and repeated surgical procedures necessary for treatment of uncontrolled ulcers, reducing the overall cost of treatment and improving the quality of life for chronically ill or injured patients. PMID:19008935

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of a simple planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Zhu; Zheng, Jing; Lin, Pei-Xian; Cheung, Michael Lok-Man; Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric outcomes of a base-dose-plan-compensation (BDPC) planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for stage III lung cancer. For each of the thirteen included patients, three types of planning methods were applied to obtain clinically acceptable plans: (1) the conventional optimization method (CO); (2) a split-target optimization method (STO), in which the optimization objectives were set higher dose for the target with lung density; (3) the BDPC method, which compensated for the optimization-convergence error by further optimization based on the CO plan. The CO, STO and BDPC methods were then compared regarding conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the target, organs at risk (OARs) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The BDPC method provided better HI/CI by 54%/7% on average compared to the CO method and by 38%/3% compared to the STO method. The BDPC method also spared most of the OARs by up to 9%. The average MUs of the CO, STO and BDPC plans were 890, 937 and 1023, respectively. Our results indicated that the BDPC method can effectively improve the dose distribution in IMRT for stage III lung cancer, at the expense of more MUs. PMID:27009235

  12. Prognostic value of tumor infiltrating NK cells and macrophages in stage II+III esophageal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao; Shi, Liangrong; Wu, Changping; Jiang, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the immunobiology of tumor microenvironment has recently translated into new therapeutic approach against human cancers. Besides the role of immune cells mediating adaptive immune responses, the tumor infiltrating components of the innate immune system including, neutrophils, mast cells, NK cells, and macrophages, also role importantly in anti-tumor immunity. In our present study, we retrospectively analyzed the prognostic value of the densities of tumor infiltrating NK cells and macrophages in esophageal cancer tissues derived from stage II+III patients. Our results showed that the density of the infiltrating NK cells in tumor stroma was significantly associated with nodal status. In addition, the densities of the infiltrating NK cells in tumor nest, and the infiltrating macrophages in tumor nest as well as in tumor stroma, were significantly associated with patients' postoperative prognoses. Furthermore, the combination of infiltrating NK cells in tumor nest and stroma, or the combination of infiltrating macrophages in tumor nest and stroma, could also be used as important prognostic tool in predicting the survival of the stage II+III esophageal cancer patients. PMID:27736796

  13. Intra-Abdominal Complications after Curative Gastrectomies Worsen Prognoses of Patients with Stage II–III Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    A.T.M. Abdul, Kader; Murakami, Yuki; Yoshimoto, Miwa; Onishi, Kazunari; Kuroda, Hirohiko; Matsunaga, Tomoyuki; Fukumoto, Yoji; Takano, Shuichi; Tokuyasu, Naruo; Osaki, Tomohiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Ikeguchi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative complications have been shown to worsen prognoses of various cancer types. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 265 patients with stage II-III gastric cancer who underwent curative gastrectomies between 1991 and 2010 at Tottori University Hospital to determine the effect of postoperative intra-abdominal complication (IAC) on prognosis. Results Of the 265 patients, 38 (14.3%) developed postoperative IACs of grade ≥ 2, of whom significantly more patients were male. Patients in the IAC group were significantly older than patients in the non-complication (NC) group. The NC group had significantly better survival than did the IAC group (P < 0.0001). Within the IAC group, 5-year survival rates did not significantly differ between patients with infectious complication subgroup (24.6%) and the non-infectious subgroup (46.2%). Grade of complication was not related to prognosis. Lengths of time before starting adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) after surgery were significantly longer for the IAC group (55.3 ± 34.7 days) than for the NC group: (26.6 ± 11.9 days; P = 0.0023). Prognosis of patients who took AC within 6 weeks after surgery tended to be better than that of patients who took AC > 6 weeks after surgery (P = 0.071). In multivariate analysis, IAC was an independent predictor of prognosis, as were age, invasion depth, and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion Postoperative IACs were related to poorer survival for patients with stage II–III gastric cancer. PMID:27708536

  14. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF) prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]). The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001) than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively). Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response. PMID:26989635

  15. Single-item vs multiple-item measures of stage of change in compliance with prescribed medications.

    PubMed

    Cook, Christopher L; Perri, Matthew

    2004-02-01

    The Stage of Change construct from the Transtheoretical Model of behavioral change has been widely utilized in the assessment of various health behaviors. The majority of these tests measure the Stage of Change construct using the single-item. multiple-choice format. This study validated the use of a single-item measure in measuring readiness to comply with taking a prescribed medication. A sample of 161 subjects tested the multiple-item Stage of Change measure, then a refined multiple-item survey was tested with 59 subjects. With the latter survey, discriminating subjects at the differing stages of change dimensions was difficult. A correlation of .91 was found for stage classifications between ratings on the single-item and multiple-item scales. The use of the single-item measure seems reasonable when assessing stage of change in compliance with prescribed medication.

  16. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  17. Yeast ribonuclease III uses a network of multiple hydrogen bonds for RNA binding and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Mathieu; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2008-08-19

    Members of the bacterial RNase III family recognize a variety of short structured RNAs with few common features. It is not clear how this group of enzymes supports high cleavage fidelity while maintaining a broad base of substrates. Here we show that the yeast orthologue of RNase III (Rnt1p) uses a network of 2'-OH-dependent interactions to recognize substrates with different structures. We designed a series of bipartite substrates permitting the distinction between binding and cleavage defects. Each substrate was engineered to carry a single or multiple 2'- O-methyl or 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions to prevent the formation of hydrogen bonds with a specific nucleotide or group of nucleotides. Interestingly, introduction of 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides near the cleavage site increased the rate of catalysis, indicating that 2'-OH are not required for cleavage. Substitution of nucleotides in known Rnt1p binding site with 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides inhibited cleavage while single 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions did not. This indicates that while no single 2'-OH is essential for Rnt1p cleavage, small changes in the substrate structure are not tolerated. Strikingly, several nucleotide substitutions greatly increased the substrate dissociation constant with little or no effect on the Michaelis-Menten constant or rate of catalysis. Together, the results indicate that Rnt1p uses a network of nucleotide interactions to identify its substrate and support two distinct modes of binding. One mode is primarily mediated by the dsRNA binding domain and leads to the formation of stable RNA/protein complex, while the other requires the presence of the nuclease and N-terminal domains and leads to RNA cleavage.

  18. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. Egg Size Effects across Multiple Life-History Stages in the Marine Annelid Hydroides diramphus

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Richard M.; Marshall, Dustin

    2014-01-01

    The optimal balance of reproductive effort between offspring size and number depends on the fitness of offspring size in a particular environment. The variable environments offspring experience, both among and within life-history stages, are likely to alter the offspring size/fitness relationship and favor different offspring sizes. Hence, the many environments experienced throughout complex life-histories present mothers with a significant challenge to optimally allocate their reproductive effort. In a marine annelid, we tested the relationship between egg size and performance across multiple life-history stages, including: fertilization, larval development, and post-metamorphosis survival and size in the field. We found evidence of conflicting effects of egg size on performance: larger eggs had higher fertilization under sperm-limited conditions, were slightly faster to develop pre-feeding, and were larger post-metamorphosis; however, smaller eggs had higher fertilization when sperm was abundant, and faster planktonic development; and egg size did not affect post-metamorphic survival. The results indicate that egg size effects are conflicting in H. diramphus depending on the environments within and among life-history stages. We suggest that offspring size in this species may be a compromise between the overall costs and benefits of egg sizes in each stage and that performance in any one stage is not maximized. PMID:25036850

  20. Genetic analysis of Upland cotton dynamic heterosis for boll number per plant at multiple developmental stages

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Lianguang; Wang, Yumei; Cai, Shihu; Ma, Lingling; Liu, Fang; Chen, Zhiwen; Su, Ying; Wang, Kunbo; Hua, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Yield is an important breeding target. As important yield components, boll number per plant (BNP) shows dynamic character and strong heterosis in Upland cotton. However, the genetic basis underlying the dynamic heterosis is poorly understood. In this study, we conducted dynamic quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis for BNP and heterosis at multiple developmental stages and environments using two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and two corresponding backcross populations. By the single-locus analysis, 23 QTLs were identified at final maturity, while 99 QTLs were identified across other three developmental stages. A total of 48 conditional QTLs for BNP were identified for the adjacent stages. QTLs detected at later stage mainly existed in the partial dominance to dominance range and QTLs identified at early stage mostly showed effects with the dominance to overdominance range during plant development. By two-locus analysis, we observe that epistasis played an important role not only in the variation of the performance of the RIL population but also in the expression of heterosis in backcross population. Taken together, the present study reveals that the genetic basis of heterosis is dynamic and complicated, and it is involved in dynamic dominance effect, epistasis and QTL by environmental interactions. PMID:27748451

  1. Sleep stage classification by body movement index and respiratory interval indices using multiple radar sensors.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Sasaki, Noriyuki; Suzumura, Kazuki; Matsui, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed sleep has become more common in recent years. To increase the quality of sleep, undergoing sleep observation has gained interest as an attempt to resolve possible problems. In this paper, we evaluate a non-restrictive and non-contact method for classifying real-time sleep stages and report on its potential applications. The proposed system measures body movements and respiratory signals of a sleeping person using a multiple 24-GHz microwave radar placed beneath the mattress. We determined a body-movement index to identify wake and sleep periods, and fluctuation indices of respiratory intervals to identify sleep stages. For identifying wake and sleep periods, the rate agreement between the body-movement index and the reference result using the R&K method was 83.5 ± 6.3%. One-minute standard deviations, one of the fluctuation indices of respiratory intervals, had a high degree of contribution and showed a significant difference across the three sleep stages (REM, LIGHT, and DEEP; p <; 0.001). Although the degree that the 5-min fractal dimension contributed-another fluctuation index-was not as high as expected, its difference between REM and DEEP sleep was significant (p <; 0.05). We applied a linear discriminant function to classify wake or sleep periods and to estimate the three sleep stages. The accuracy was 79.3% for classification and 71.9% for estimation. This is a novel system for measuring body movements and body-surface movements that are induced by respiration and for measuring high sensitivity pulse waves using multiple radar signals. This method simplifies measurement of sleep stages and may be employed at nursing care facilities or by the general public to increase sleep quality.

  2. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathological negative nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: an analysis from the NCDB

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuai; Jiang, Wen; Chen, Kai; Kim, Betty Y.S.; Liu, Qiang; Jacobs, Lisa K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathological negative nodes (ypN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) remains controversial. Methods A total of 1560 clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients treated with NAC and mastectomy who achieved ypN0 between 1998 and 2009 in the National Cancer Database were analyzed. The effects of PMRT on overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort and multiple subgroups were evaluated. Imputation and propensity score matching were used as sensitivity analyses to minimize biases. Results Of the entire 1560 eligible patients, 903 (57.9%) received PMRT and 657 (42.1%) didn’t. At a median follow-up of 56.0 months, no statistical difference was observed for OS between two groups by univariate and multivariate analyses (P = 0.120; HR 1.571, 95% CI 0.839-2.943). On subgroup analyses, PMRT significantly improved OS in patients with clinical stage IIIB/IIIC disease, T3/T4 tumor, or residual invasive breast cancer after NAC (P < 0.05). This improvement in OS remained significant after sensitivity analyses for the propensity score-matched patients. Conclusions This study demonstrated that PMRT showed a heterogeneous effect in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with ypN0 following NAC. PMRT improved OS for patients with clinical stage IIIB/IIIC disease, T3/T4 tumor, or residual invasive breast tumor after NAC. In the absence of definitive conclusions from prospective studies, including the ongoing NSABP B-51 trial, our findings may help identify specific groups of women with clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancers who could benefit from PMRT after NAC. PMID:26709538

  3. Intravenous Chemotherapy or Oral Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage III-IV HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma

  4. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  5. Neurophysiological Evidence of Compensatory Brain Mechanisms in Early-Stage Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    López-Góngora, Mariana; Escartín, Antonio; Martínez-Horta, Saul; Fernández-Bobadilla, Ramón; Querol, Luis; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Riba, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic central nervous system disorder characterized by white matter inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration. Although cognitive dysfunction is a common manifestation, it may go unnoticed in recently-diagnosed patients. Prior studies suggest MS patients develop compensatory mechanisms potentially involving enhanced performance monitoring. Here we assessed the performance monitoring system in early-stage MS patients using the error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related brain potential (ERP) observed following behavioral errors. Twenty-seven early-stage MS patients and 31 controls were neuropsychologically assessed. Electroencephalography recordings were obtained while participants performed: a) a stop task and b) an auditory oddball task. Behavior and ERP measures were assessed. No differences in performance were found between groups in most neuropsychological tests or in behavior or ERP components in the auditory oddball task. However, the amplitude of the ERN associated with stop errors in the stop task was significantly higher in patients. ERN amplitude correlated positively with scores on the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score, and negatively with the time since last relapse. Patients showed higher neuronal recruitment in tasks involving performance monitoring. Results suggest the development of compensatory brain mechanisms in early-stage MS and reflect the sensitivity of the ERN to detect these changes. PMID:26322632

  6. The thyroxine inactivating gene, type III deiodinase, suppresses multiple signaling centers in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi Prakash; Dhakshinamoorthy, Ranjani; Jaiswal, Pundrik; Schmidt, Stefanie; Thewes, Sascha; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2014-12-15

    Thyroxine deiodinases, the enzymes that regulate thyroxine metabolism, are essential for vertebrate growth and development. In the genome of Dictyostelium discoideum, a single intronless gene (dio3) encoding type III thyroxine 5' deiodinase is present. The amino acid sequence of D. discoideum Dio3 shares 37% identity with human T4 deiodinase and is a member of the thioredoxin reductase superfamily. dio3 is expressed throughout growth and development and by generating a knockout of dio3, we have examined the role of thyroxine 5' deiodinase in D. discoideum. dio3(-) had multiple defects that affected growth, timing of development, aggregate size, cell streaming, and cell-type differentiation. A prominent phenotype of dio3(-) was the breaking of late aggregates into small signaling centers, each forming a fruiting body of its own. cAMP levels, its relay, photo- and chemo-taxis were also defective in dio3(-). Quantitative RT-PCR analyses suggested that expression levels of genes encoding adenylyl cyclase A (acaA), cAMP-receptor A (carA) and cAMP-phosphodiesterases were reduced. There was a significant reduction in the expression of CadA and CsaA, which are involved in cell-cell adhesion. The dio3(-) slugs had prestalk identity, with pronounced prestalk marker ecmA expression. Thus, Dio3 seems to have roles in mediating cAMP synthesis/relay, cell-cell adhesion and slug patterning. The phenotype of dio3(-) suggests that Dio3 may prevent the formation of multiple signaling centers during D. discoideum development. This is the first report of a gene involved in thyroxine metabolism that is also involved in growth and development in a lower eukaryote.

  7. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  8. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-28

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  10. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  12. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. We describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties, and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along mRNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery. PMID:26085270

  13. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul A.; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-06-01

    There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. Here we describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the Plasmodium parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single-dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood-stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along messenger RNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery.

  14. Correlates of stages of change for physical activity in adults with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plow, Matthew A; Finlayson, Marcia; Cho, Chi

    2011-10-01

    The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) is commonly used to understand physical activity (PA) behavior in the general population; however, few researchers have explored its relevance for persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). We examined the relative importance of health (symptoms and mobility impairments) and TTM constructs (behavioral and cognitive processes of change) in influencing stages of change placement for PA in a sample of 303 persons with MS using discriminant function analysis. The overall accuracy of predicting stages of change was 58.75%. Behavioral (r(2)  = .35) and cognitive processes (r(2)  = .17) accounted for the most variance, followed by mobility (r(2)  = .11) and self-efficacy (r(2)  = .05). Results provide support for evaluating whether TTM-based interventions can promote PA in adults with MS.

  15. Sequential testing over multiple stages and performance analysis of data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Gaurav

    2013-05-01

    We describe a methodology for modeling the performance of decision-level data fusion between different sensor configurations, implemented as part of the JIEDDO Analytic Decision Engine (JADE). We first discuss a Bayesian network formulation of classical probabilistic data fusion, which allows elementary fusion structures to be stacked and analyzed efficiently. We then present an extension of the Wald sequential test for combining the outputs of the Bayesian network over time. We discuss an algorithm to compute its performance statistics and illustrate the approach on some examples. This variant of the sequential test involves multiple, distinct stages, where the evidence accumulated from each stage is carried over into the next one, and is motivated by a need to keep certain sensors in the network inactive unless triggered by other sensors.

  16. PET Imaging for Initial Staging and Therapy Assessment in Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Clément; Leforestier, Rodolphe; Jamet, Bastien; Carlier, Thomas; Bourgeois, Mickael; Guérard, François; Touzeau, Cyrille; Moreau, Philippe; Chérel, Michel; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Bodet-Milin, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological neoplasm characterized by the clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. MM results in diffuse or focal bone infiltration and extramedullary lesions. Over the past two decades, advances have been made with regard to the diagnosis, staging, treatment, and imaging of MM. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are currently recommended as the most effective imaging modalities at diagnostic. Yet, recent data from the literature suggest that positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG) is a promising technique for initial staging and therapeutic monitoring in this pathology. This paper reviews the recent advances as well as the potential place of a more specific radiopharmaceutical in MM. PMID:28218709

  17. Mathematical modeling of the heat treatment and combustion of a coal particle. III. Volatile escape stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkhjargal, Kh.; Salomatov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    The present paper is a continuation of previous publications of the authors in this journal in which two phases of the multistage process of combustion of a coal particle were considered in detail with the help of mathematical modeling: its radiation-convection heating and drying. In the present work, the escape dynamics of volatiles is investigated. The physico-mathematical model of the thermodestruction of an individual coal particle with a dominant influence of endothermal effects has been formulated. Approximate-analytical solutions of this model that are of paramount importance for detailed analysis of the influence of the physical and regime parameters on the escape dynamics of volatiles have been found. The results obtained form the basis for engineering calculations of the volatile escape stage and can be used successfully in the search for effective regimes of burning of various solid fuels, in particular, Shivé-Ovoos coal of Mongolia.

  18. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fowble, Barbara L.; Einck, John P.; Kim, Danny N.; McCloskey, Susan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Yashar, Catheryn; Chen, Steven L.; Hwang, E. Shelley

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  19. Predicting performance of candidates to replace Halon 2402 (Freon 114B2) in the Minuteman III Second Stage LITVC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, D. E.

    1992-07-01

    Halon 2402 is the liquid injectant currently used in the Liquid Injection Thrust Vector Control (LITVC) system of the Minuteman III Second Stage motor. A replacement for Halon is required which provides comparable performance in terms of maximum side force and total impulse without detrimental environmental effects. The search for a replacement requires identification of desired thermochemical properties and prediction of performance. The method and procedures used for prediction of injection performance are described. Results of tests performed on benchmark liquids and an initial list of possible injectants using the Walker-Shandor and CFD models are presented and compared. Results from future live motor tests will be compared with the present predictions and used to validate the approach taken to select and predict the performance of new LITVC fluids.

  20. Microstructural study of the lunate in stage III Kienböck's disease with micro-computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiong, G; Xiao, Z; Wang, H; Guo, S; Tao, J

    2016-08-24

    Seventeen fresh lunates with stage III Kienböck's disease were scanned with micro-computed tomography. Four regions of interest were selected to measure trabecular parameters, which were compared with those from normal lunates. Within the three regions in the distal surface, there was more compact trabecular bone in the middle region when compared with the palmar and dorsal regions. In the central part, the trabeculae of the Kienböck's lunates were much thicker than those in normal lunates. The diameters of the palmar nutrient foramina of the Kienböck's lunates were significantly smaller than those in normal lunates. In affected lunates, the bony disruptions were mostly located in the palmar or dorsal areas, which were shown from trabecular bone structure analysis to be structurally weaker. This leads to separation of the distal part of the fractured bone, disruption of the blood supply, poor bone remodelling and proneness to secondary fracture and eventual collapse.

  1. Monolithic in-based III-V compound semiconductor focal plane array cell with single stage CCD output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Krabach, Timothy N. (Inventor); Staller, Craig O. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A monolithic semiconductor imager includes an indium-based III-V compound semiconductor monolithic active layer of a first conductivity type, an array of plural focal plane cells on the active layer, each of the focal plane cells including a photogate over a top surface of the active layer, a readout circuit dedicated to the focal plane cell including plural transistors formed monolithically with the monolithic active layer and a single-stage charge coupled device formed monolithically with the active layer between the photogate and the readout circuit for transferring photo-generated charge accumulated beneath the photogate during an integration period to the readout circuit. The photogate includes thin epitaxial semiconductor layer of a second conductivity type overlying the active layer and an aperture electrode overlying a peripheral portion of the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer, the aperture electrode being connectable to a photogate bias voltage.

  2. Monolithic in-based III-V compound semiconductor focal plane array cell with single stage CCD output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Krabach, Timothy N. (Inventor); Staller, Craig O. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A monolithic semiconductor imager includes an indium-based III-V compound semiconductor monolithic active layer of a first conductivity type, an array of plural focal plane cells on the active layer, each of the focal plane cells including a photogate over a top surface of the active layer, a readout circuit dedicated to the focal plane cell including plural transistors formed monolithically with the monolithic active layer and a single-stage charge coupled device formed monolithically with the active layer between the photogate and the readout circuit for transferring photo-generated charge accumulated beneath the photogate during an integration period to the readout circuit. The photogate includes thin epitaxial semiconductor layer of a second conductivity type overlying the active layer and an aperture electrode overlying a peripheral portion of the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer, the aperture electrode being connectable to a photogate bias voltage.

  3. Phase I-II clinical trial of Californium-252. Treatment of stage IB carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Y; VanNagell, J R; Yoneda, J; Donaldson, E; Gallion, H; Rowley, K; Kryscio, R; Beach, J L

    1987-04-15

    Intracavitary Californium-252 combined with whole-pelvis photon radiotherapy was tested as the sole form of treatment for 22 patients with Stage IB carcinoma of the cervix. Californium-252 (Cf) is a fast neutron-emitting radioisotope currently being tested in trials of neutron brachytherapy (NT). The outcomes of the treated group of patients were traced for local tumor control, survival, patterns of failure, and complications. The Cf intracavitary therapy combined with whole-pelvis photon radiotherapy resulted in 95% 2-year and 91% 5-year actuarial survival. There were 9% Grade II-III complications by the Stockholm scale and 4% local failures. These results were obtained in an early clinical trial with a group of largely poor-risk patients with tumors of mean diameter of 4.3 cm.

  4. Phase I-II clinical trial of Californium-252. Treatment of stage IB carcinoma of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; VanNagell, J.R.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.; Gallion, H.; Rowley, K.; Kryscio, R.; Beach, J.L.

    1987-04-15

    Intracavitary Californium-252 combined with whole-pelvis photon radiotherapy was tested as the sole form of treatment for 22 patients with Stage IB carcinoma of the cervix. Californium-252 (Cf) is a fast neutron-emitting radioisotope currently being tested in trials of neutron brachytherapy (NT). The outcomes of the treated group of patients were traced for local tumor control, survival, patterns of failure, and complications. The Cf intracavitary therapy combined with whole-pelvis photon radiotherapy resulted in 95% 2-year and 91% 5-year actuarial survival. There were 9% Grade II-III complications by the Stockholm scale and 4% local failures. These results were obtained in an early clinical trial with a group of largely poor-risk patients with tumors of mean diameter of 4.3 cm.

  5. MGL ligand expression is correlated to BRAF mutation and associated with poor survival of stage III colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lenos, Kristiaan; Goos, Jeroen A C M; Vuist, Ilona M; den Uil, Sjoerd H; Delis-van Diemen, Pien M; Belt, Eric J Th; Stockmann, Hein B A C; Bril, Herman; de Wit, Meike; Carvalho, Beatriz; Giblett, Susan; Pritchard, Catrin A; Meijer, Gerrit A; van Kooyk, Yvette; Fijneman, Remond J A; van Vliet, Sandra J

    2015-09-22

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent cancer type worldwide with a mortality rate of approximately 50%. Elevated cell-surface expression of truncated carbohydrate structures such as Tn antigen (GalNAcα-Ser/Thr) is frequently observed during tumor progression. We have previously demonstrated that the C-type lectin macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), expressed by human antigen presenting cells, can distinguish healthy tissue from CRC through its specific recognition of Tn antigen. Both MGL binding and oncogenic BRAF mutations have been implicated in establishing an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Here we aimed to evaluate whether MGL ligand expression has prognostic value and whether this was correlated to BRAF(V600E) mutation status. Using a cohort of 386 colon cancer patients we demonstrate that high MGL binding to stage III tumors is associated with poor disease-free survival, independent of microsatellite instability or adjuvant chemotherapy. In vitro studies using CRC cell lines showed an association between MGL ligand expression and the presence of BRAF(V600E). Administration of specific BRAF(V600E) inhibitors resulted in decreased expression of MGL-binding glycans. Moreover, a positive correlation between induction of BRAF(V600E) and MGL binding to epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract was found in vivo using an inducible BRAF(V600E) mouse model. We conclude that the BRAF(V600E) mutation induces MGL ligand expression, thereby providing a direct link between oncogenic transformation and aberrant expression of immunosuppressive glycans. The strong prognostic value of MGL ligands in stage III colon cancer patients, i.e. when tumor cells disseminate to lymph nodes, further supports the putative immune evasive role of MGL ligands in metastatic disease.

  6. Stage III Melanoma in the Axilla: Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Surgery With and Without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkham, Mark B.; Foote, Matthew C.; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Thomas, Janine; Meakin, Janelle; Smithers, B. Mark; Burmeister, Bryan H.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To describe the anatomic distribution of regionally recurrent disease in patients with stage III melanoma in the axilla after curative-intent surgery with and without adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 277 patients undergoing curative-intent treatment for stage III melanoma in the axilla between 1992 and 2012 was completed. For patients who received radiation therapy and those who did not, patterns of regional recurrence were analyzed, and univariate analyses were performed to assess for potential factors associated with location of recurrence. Results: There were 121 patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy because their clinicopathologic features conferred a greater risk of regional recurrence. There were 156 patients who received no radiation therapy. The overall axillary control rate was 87%. There were 37 patients with regional recurrence; 17 patients had received adjuvant radiation therapy (14%), and 20 patients (13%) had not. The likelihood of in-field nodal recurrence was significantly less in the adjuvant radiation therapy group (P=.01) and significantly greater in sites adjacent to the axilla (P=.02). Patients with high-risk clinicopathologic features who did not receive adjuvant radiation therapy also tended to experience in-field failure rather than adjacent-field failure. Conclusions: Patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy were more likely to experience recurrence in the adjacent-field regions rather than in the in-field regions. This may not simply reflect higher-risk pathology. Using this data, it may be possible to improve outcomes by reducing the number of adjacent-field recurrences after adjuvant radiation therapy.

  7. Pre-treatment platelet counts as a prognostic and predictive factor in stage II and III rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Morgan; Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate if pre-treatment platelet counts could provide prognostic information in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma that received neo-adjuvant treatment. METHODS Platelet number on diagnosis of stage II and III rectal cancer was evaluated in 51 patients receiving neo-adjuvant treatment and for whom there were complete follow-up data on progression and survival, as well as pathologic outcome at the time of surgery. Pathologic responses on the surgical specimen of patients with lower platelet counts (150-300 × 109/L) were compared with these of patients with higher platelet counts (> 300 × 109/L) by the χ2 test. Overall and progression free survival Kaplan-Meier curves of the two groups were constructed and compared with the Log-Rank test. RESULTS A significant difference was present between the two groups in regards to pathologic response with patients with lower platelet counts being more likely to exhibit a good or complete response to neo-adjuvant treatment than patients with higher platelet counts (P = 0.015). Among other factors evaluated, there was also a significant difference between the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) at presentation of patients that exhibited a good or complete response and those that had no response or a minimal to moderate response. Patients with a good or complete response were more likely to present with a CEA of less than 5 μg/L (P = 0.00066). There was no significant difference in overall and progression free survival between the two platelet count groups (Log-Rank tests P = 0.42 and P = 0.35, respectively). CONCLUSION In this retrospective analysis of stage II and III rectal cancer patients, platelet counts at the time of diagnosis had prognostic value for neo-adjuvant treatment pathologic response. Pre-treatment CEA also held prognostic value in regards to treatment effect. PMID:28144399

  8. Value of DNA Ploidy and S-Phase Fraction as Prognostic Factors in Stage III Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ginette; Halwani, Fawaz; Shibata, Henry; Meterissian, Sarkis

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the prognostic value of flow cytometric analysis (S-phase fraction and DNA index) performed on lymph-node metastases of patients with stage III melanoma. Design A retrospective chart review with flow cytometric analysis of paraffin-embedded tissues. Setting A university teaching hospital. Patients Among 332 patients with cutaneous melanoma, 33 with stage III were identified. Distant metastases developed in 16 patients; 17 had no further recurrence. Charts were reviewed to obtain clinicopathologic parameters such as sex, age, location of the primary tumour, histologic features, presence or absence of ulceration, and Clark’s and Breslow’s levels. Intervention DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction were determined on the paraffin-embedded nodes. Main outcome measures The groups with or without recurrence were compared in terms of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). These survival parameters were correlated with DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction. Results By univariate analysis, clinicopathologic factors did not predict OS. A higher Clark’s level of invasion and more than 3 positive lymph nodes were associated with shorter DFS (p < 0.05). Tumour thickness and S-phase fraction did not correlate with either DFS or OS. Patients with diploid lymph-node metastases had an 87% 12-month survival compared with 41% for those with aneuploid tumours. Conclusions DNA ploidy may be used as a prognostic index in patients with lymph-node metastases. This could be particularly useful in the context of sentinel lymph-node mapping by which more patients are being identified with single microscopic lymph-node involvement. PMID:10714254

  9. Effects of selenomethionine on acute toxicities from concurrent chemoradiation for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Michael; Ramnath, Nithya; Gomez, Jorge; de Groot, Charles; Rajan, Saju; Dibaj, Shiva; Tan, Wei; Rustum, Youcef; Jameson, Michael B; Singh, Anurag K

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively determine the safety and tolerability of oral L-selenomethionine (SLM) with concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) for Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and estimate if the incidence and/or severity of adverse events could be reduced by its use. METHODS: Sixteen patients with stage III NSCLC were accrued to this single arm, phase II study. CCRT consisted of radiation given at 2 Gy per fraction for 30-33 fractions, 5 d per week with concurrent weekly IV paclitaxel 50 mg/m2 followed by carboplatin dosed at an area under the time-concentration curve of 2. SLM was dosed in a loading phase at 4800 μg twice daily for one week prior to CCRT followed by once daily dosing during treatment. RESULTS: No selenium-related toxicity was observed. Analysis revealed grade 3 or higher esophagitis in 3 of 16 patients (19%), pneumonitis in 0, leukopenia in 2 (12.5%), and anemia in 1 (6%); the latter two were significantly reduced when compared to the protocol-stated expected rate of 35% (P = 0.045 for leukopenia, and P < 0.01 for anemia). Median overall survival was 14.9 mo and median failure-free survival was 9 mo (95%CI: 3.3-21.5). CONCLUSION: There may be some protective benefit of selenium in the setting of CCRT for inoperable NSCLC. The data suggests decreased rates of myelosuppression when compared to similarly-treated historical and contemporary controls. Further evaluation of selenium in this setting may be warranted. PMID:26468452

  10. TP53 Mutational Status and Prediction of Benefit from Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kandioler, Daniela; Mittlböck, Martina; Kappel, Sonja; Puhalla, Harald; Herbst, Friedrich; Langner, Cord; Wolf, Brigitte; Tschmelitsch, Jörg; Schippinger, Walter; Steger, Günther; Hofbauer, Friedrich; Samonigg, Hellmut; Gnant, Michael; Teleky, Bela; Kührer, Irene

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that the varying treatment efficacy of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5FU) in stage III colon cancer is linked to the TP53 mutational status. ABCSG-90 was a prospective randomized trial in which effect of adjuvant 5FU was studied in stage III colon cancer patients. Tumor material of 70% of these patients (389/572) was available for analysis of the biomarker TP53 using a TP53-gene-specific Sanger sequencing protocol. Median follow-up was 88 months. TP53 mutation frequency was 33%. A significant interaction between TP53 status, outcomes and nodal category was found (P = 0.0095). In the N1 category, TP53 wildtype patients had significantly better overall survival than TP53 mutated (81.0% vs. 62.0% overall survival at 5 years; HR = 2.131; 95% CI: 1.344-3.378; P = 0.0010). In the N2 category, the TP53 status did not affect survival (P = 0.4992). In TP53 wildtype patients, the prognostic significance of N category was significantly enhanced (P = 0.0002). In TP53 mutated patients, survival curves of N1 and N2 patients overlapped and nodal category was no longer prognostic. The biomarker TP53 independently predicted effect of adjuvant 5FU in N1 colon cancer patients. TP53 was not predictive in N2 patients, in whom 5FU is known to have no effect.

  11. Mutations in Nonconserved Domains of Ty3 Integrase Affect Multiple Stages of the Ty3 Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Nymark-McMahon, M. Henrietta; Sandmeyer, Suzanne B.

    1999-01-01

    Ty3, a retroviruslike element of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transposes into positions immediately upstream of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes. The Ty3 integrase (IN) protein is required for integration of the replicated, extrachromosomal Ty3 DNA. In retroviral IN, a conserved core region is sufficient for strand transfer activity. In this study, charged-to-alanine scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the roles of the nonconserved amino- and carboxyl-terminal regions of Ty3 IN. Each of the 20 IN mutants was defective for transposition, but no mutant was grossly defective for capsid maturation. All mutations affecting steady-state levels of mature IN protein resulted in reduced levels of replicated DNA, even when polymerase activity was not grossly defective as measured by exogenous reverse transcriptase activity assay. Thus, IN could contribute to nonpolymerase functions required for DNA production in vivo or to the stability of the DNA product. Several mutations in the carboxyl-terminal domain resulted in relatively low levels of processed 3′ ends of the replicated DNA, suggesting that this domain may be important for binding of IN to the long terminal repeat. Another class of mutants produced wild-type amounts of DNA with correctly processed 3′ ends. This class could include mutants affected in nuclear entry and target association. Collectively, these mutations demonstrate that in vivo, within the preintegration complex, IN performs a central role in coordinating multiple late stages of the retrotransposition life cycle. PMID:9847351

  12. Two-stage hierarchical group testing for multiple infections with application to the Infertility Prevention Project

    PubMed Central

    Tebbs, Joshua M.; McMahan, Christopher S.; Bilder, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Screening for sexually transmitted diseases has benefited greatly from the use of group testing (pooled testing) to lower costs. With the development of assays that detect multiple infections, screening practices now involve testing pools of individuals for multiple infections simultaneously. Building on the research for single infection group testing procedures, we examine the performance of group testing for multiple infections. Our work is motivated by chlamydia and gonorrhea testing for the Infertility Prevention Project (IPP), a national program in the United States. We consider a two-stage pooling algorithm currently used to perform testing for the IPP. We first derive the operating characteristics of this algorithm for classification purposes (e.g., expected number of tests, misclassification probabilities, etc.) and identify pool sizes that minimize the expected number of tests. We then develop an expectation-maximization algorithm to estimate probabilities of infection using both group and individual retest responses. Our research shows that group testing can offer large cost savings when classifying individuals for multiple infections and can provide prevalence estimates that are actually more efficient than those from individual testing. PMID:24117173

  13. The CYP19 RS4646 Polymorphism IS Related to the Prognosis of Stage I–II and Operable Stage III Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiying; Guo, Yong; Xu, Xiaohong; Zheng, Yabing; Wang, Jiwen; Chen, Zhanhong; Huang, Jian; Huang, Ping; Cai, Jufen; Wang, Xiaojia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Aromatase, encoded by the CYP19 gene, catalyzes the final step of the conversion of androgens to estrogens. Given the critical role of CYP19 in estrogen synthesis, the potential influence of CYP19 rs4646 polymorphism on breast cancer survival, deserves further study. Methods Genotyping for CYP19 rs4646 variants was performed on 406 Chinese women with stage I–II and operable stage III breast cancer. Associations were evaluated between CYP19 rs4646 genotypes and disease-free survival (DFS). Results In premenopausal patients, women who are homozygous for the minor allele (AA) have a longer DFS compared with those carrying the major allele (CC or AC) (87 months versus 48.7 months; Hazard ratio (HR) = 0.56, 95 % CI = 0.318-0.985, P = 0.041). These differences were further demonstrated by a multivariate analysis (HR = 0.456, 95 % CI = 0.249-0.836, P = 0.011). Conversely, the same variant (AA) was estimated to be associated with a poorer DFS in postmenopausal women (AA versus AC or CC: 13.7 months versus 56.3 months; HR = 2.758, 95 % CI = 1.432-5.313, P = 0.002). Furthermore, the differences were confirmed by the COX proportional hazards model (HR = 2.983, 95% CI =1.494-5.955, P = 0.002). Conclusions The present study indicates that CYP19 rs4646 polymorphism is related to DFS in early breast cancer and that the prognosis index of the homozygous for the minor allele (AA) may depend on menopause status. The findings are novel, if confirmed, rs4646 genotypes may provide useful information for routine management in breast cancer. PMID:25793413

  14. Elevated Th22 as well as Th17 cells associated with therapeutic outcome and clinical stage are potential targets in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Chen, Ping; Jia, Yan; He, Na; Li, Daqi; Ji, Chunyan; Ma, Daoxin

    2015-07-20

    T helper (Th) cell imbalance plays important roles in tumor development and their effects in Multiple myeloma (MM) remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the levels and clinical significance of Th22, Th17 and Th1 cells in patients with MM. Th subsets were examined by flow cytometry. Plasma IL-22, IL-17A and IFN-γ concentrations were measured by ELISA. AHR and RORC mRNA expression was examined by RT-PCR. Here, we found that the frequency of Th22 cells was significantly elevated in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) of newly-diagnosed MM patients, and recovered in complete remission patients after chemotherapy. The circulating Th17 cells accompanied by IL-17A levels were also up-regulated in MM patients and decreased after remission. We also found that there was a significantly positive correlation between Th22 and Th17 cells in MM patients. Moreover, the frequencies of Th22 and Th17 cells were higher in stage III than in stage I+II of MM. Our data demonstrated that Th22 and Th17 cells might be important therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma and could facilitate the effect of antitumor immunotherapy.

  15. Telomere Length in Predicting Toxicity in Older Patients With Stage III-IV Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-25

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  16. Multiple Stages of Learning in Perceptual Categorization: Evidence and Neurocomputational Theory

    PubMed Central

    Cantwell, George; Crossley, Matthew J.; Ashby, F. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all current theories of category learning assume that humans learn new categories by gradually forming associations directly between stimuli and responses. In information-integration category-learning tasks, this purported process is thought to depend on procedural learning implemented via dopamine-dependent cortical-striatal synaptic plasticity. This article proposes a new, neurobiologically detailed model of procedural category learning that, unlike previous models, does not assume associations are made directly from stimulus to response. Rather, the traditional stimulus-response (S-R) models are replaced with a two-stage learning process. Multiple streams of evidence (behavioral, as well as anatomical and fMRI) are used as inspiration for the new model, which synthesizes evidence of multiple distinct cortical-striatal loops into a neurocomputational theory. An experiment is reported to test a priori predictions of the new model that: (1) recovery from a full reversal should be easier than learning new categories equated for difficulty, and (2) reversal learning in procedural tasks is mediated within the striatum via dopamine-dependent synaptic plasticity. The results confirm the predictions of the new two-stage model and are incompatible with existing S-R models. PMID:25917141

  17. LC-high-resolution multiple stage spectrometric analysis of diuretic compounds Unusual mass fragmentation pathways.

    PubMed

    Giancotti, Valeria; Medana, Claudio; Aigotti, Riccardo; Pazzi, Marco; Baiocchi, Claudio

    2008-09-29

    The analysis of diuretic compounds has become of great concern because of their extensive use both in therapy and in illicit treatments (such as masking agents in sport doping and drug abuse). The variety of chemical structures of this class of drugs encouraged the development of new methods and techniques of analysis, especially as regards to acidic compounds. LC/MS has so grown to be the reference technique for this kind of analysis in forensic and anti-doping confirmation purposes. Multiple stage MS permits identification of single drugs with high selectivity, but some unexpected pathways could weaken the entire process. In this work we aim to explain some unusual fragmentation steps using high-resolution MSn. For example, in the case of amiloride an intense product ion in MS3 analysis generates an apparent loss of 10Da. Water adduct formation and successive carbon monoxide elimination can explain this uncommon behavior, which was studied using different ion traps. Bendroflumethiazide MSn spectra show instead three successive HF losses, in spite of the presence of a radical site in the parent structure. Homolytic cleavages with radical ion production occur also in the case of protonated positive ion of ethacrynic acid (loss of chlorine radical) showing that such fragmentation behavior is not so rare as generally reported. Different ionization modes were studied and a tentative correlation with acidic-base properties was done. Multiple stage high-resolution mass spectra of positive and negative ions were discussed.

  18. A Novel Approach for Ganglioside Structural Analysis Based on Electrospray Multiple-Stage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zamfir, Alina D.; Vukelić, Željka; Schneider, Andrea; Sisu, Eugen; Dinca, Nicolae; Ingendoh, Arnd

    2007-01-01

    A powerful method for detailed structural analysis based on electrospray ionization high-capacity ion-trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS) is for the first time introduced in glycolipidomics. The method was optimized for accurate structural elucidation of human brain gangliosides and specifically applied to normal adult human hippocampus-associated structures. The multiple-stage MS experiments reported here allowed for a complete structural characterization of the oligosaccharide moiety of a GM1 ganglioside species. This was achieved by elucidating the sequence and identification of the GM1a structural isomer from the sialic acid attachment site at the neutral oligosaccharide chain. Moreover, the determination of the d18:1/18:0 sphingoid base/fatty acid composition of the ceramide moiety could be confirmed by this method. The novel protocol developed here proves high potential for rapid, reliable, and reproducible investigation of complex lipid-linked carbohydrates such as polysialylated gangliosides or species carrying some other groups that easily cleave off. PMID:17916791

  19. Multiple stages of learning in perceptual categorization: evidence and neurocomputational theory.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, George; Crossley, Matthew J; Ashby, F Gregory

    2015-12-01

    Virtually all current theories of category learning assume that humans learn new categories by gradually forming associations directly between stimuli and responses. In information-integration category-learning tasks, this purported process is thought to depend on procedural learning implemented via dopamine-dependent cortical-striatal synaptic plasticity. This article proposes a new, neurobiologically detailed model of procedural category learning that, unlike previous models, does not assume associations are made directly from stimulus to response. Rather, the traditional stimulus-response (S-R) models are replaced with a two-stage learning process. Multiple streams of evidence (behavioral, as well as anatomical and fMRI) are used as inspiration for the new model, which synthesizes evidence of multiple distinct cortical-striatal loops into a neurocomputational theory. An experiment is reported to test a priori predictions of the new model that: (1) recovery from a full reversal should be easier than learning new categories equated for difficulty, and (2) reversal learning in procedural tasks is mediated within the striatum via dopamine-dependent synaptic plasticity. The results confirm the predictions of the new two-stage model and are incompatible with existing S-R models.

  20. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Concomitant 5-fluorouracil infusion and high-dose radiation for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lokich, J.; Chaffey, J.; Neptune, W. )

    1989-09-01

    Thirty patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer were entered on a trial to evaluate the feasibility of combined radiation and concomitant 5-fluorouracil infusion. Patients had received prior debulking surgery (nine), induction chemotherapy (16), or no therapy (five). Radiation employed standard fractionation (180-200 rad/day) administered to a median cumulative dose of 5500 rad (range, 4500-6200 rad). 5-Fluorouracil was infused 24 hours per day throughout the period of radiation at a dose of 300 mg/m2/day for a median of 42 days (range, 28-56 days). Radiation complications included pneumonitis three of 30 (10%) and esophagitis (27%). Chemotherapy complications included stomatitis, two of 27 (7%), and hand-foot syndrome, three of 30 (10%). Treatment interruptions were necessary in six of 30 (20%) and four of 30 required parenteral nutrition. At a median follow-up of 12 months 26/30 (87%) maintained local control and eight had distant metastases (three of whom presented with Stage IV disease). 5-Fluorouracil delivered continuously throughout standard fractionation radiation to high cumulative doses is feasible and practical. Comparative clinical trials of the various combined radiation and chemotherapy schedules employed are in order. One additional clinical observation was the identification of six of 30 (20%) with brain metastases at presentation or after 12 months, all of whom had adenocarcinoma histologic subtype.

  2. Preoperative Lymphocyte-Monocyte Ratio Is a Predictor of Suboptimal Cytoreduction in Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Wankyu; Kim, Hong-Bae; Lee, Yong Joo; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hyung; Kim, Heungyeol

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (LMR) is a predictor of suboptimal cytoreduction in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: Preoperative clinico-pathologic and hematologic parameters were reviewed in a total of 154 patients with EOC submitted to primary cytoreductive surgery. Patients were categorized into two different groups according to the results of cytoreductive surgery: optimal and suboptimal cytoreduction. Continuous variables were categorized into two groups using the best cutoff points selected on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for suboptimal cytoreduction. Results: Based on data collected from the 154 patients, 133 (86.4%) and 21 (13.6%) patients presented with stage III and IV disease, respectively. One hundred seventeen (76.0%) patients had serous adenocarcinoma, and 92 (59.7%) had histologic tumor grade 3. The optimal and suboptimal cytoreduction groups included 96 (62.3%) and 58 patients (37.7%), respectively. The best LMR cutoff point for suboptimal cytoreduction was 3.75. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, age, cancer antigen 125, white blood cell count, and LMR were found to be the strongest predictors for suboptimal cytoreduction (P=0.0037, 0.0249, 0.0062, and 0.0015, respectively). Conclusion: Preoperative LMR is an independent predictor of suboptimal cytoreduction. It provides additional prognostic information beyond the biological parameters of the tumor. PMID:27698915

  3. Two-Stage Path Planning Approach for Designing Multiple Spacecraft Reconfiguration Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoude, Georges S.; How, Jonathan P.; Garcia, Ian M.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents a two-stage approach for designing optimal reconfiguration maneuvers for multiple spacecraft. These maneuvers involve well-coordinated and highly-coupled motions of the entire fleet of spacecraft while satisfying an arbitrary number of constraints. This problem is particularly difficult because of the nonlinearity of the attitude dynamics, the non-convexity of some of the constraints, and the coupling between the positions and attitudes of all spacecraft. As a result, the trajectory design must be solved as a single 6N DOF problem instead of N separate 6 DOF problems. The first stage of the solution approach quickly provides a feasible initial solution by solving a simplified version without differential constraints using a bi-directional Rapidly-exploring Random Tree (RRT) planner. A transition algorithm then augments this guess with feasible dynamics that are propagated from the beginning to the end of the trajectory. The resulting output is a feasible initial guess to the complete optimal control problem that is discretized in the second stage using a Gauss pseudospectral method (GPM) and solved using an off-the-shelf nonlinear solver. This paper also places emphasis on the importance of the initialization step in pseudospectral methods in order to decrease their computation times and enable the solution of a more complex class of problems. Several examples are presented and discussed.

  4. A randomised phase III study comparing high-dose chemotherapy to conventionally dosed chemotherapy for stage III ovarian cancer: the Finnish Ovarian Cancer (FINOVA) study.

    PubMed

    Grénman, Seija; Wiklund, Tom; Jalkanen, Jyrki; Kuoppala, Tapio; Mäenpää, Johanna; Kuronen, Arja; Leminen, Arto; Puistola, Ulla; Vuolo-Merilä, Päivi; Salmi, Tuula; Vuento, Maarit; Yliskoski, Merja; Itälä, Maija; Helenius, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lehtovirta, Pentti

    2006-09-01

    Women with stage III ovarian cancer and with < or = 2 cm residual tumour were randomly assigned to receive either conventionally dosed chemotherapy (group A) or HDCT (group B). Patients allocated to group A received 6 cycles of paclitaxel (T) 135 mg/m2 and cisplatin (P) 75 mg/m2 every 3 weeks, and those allocated to HDCT received 3 TP cycles followed by peripheral blood stem cell mobilisation with cyclophosphamide (C) 3000 mg/m2 and T 175 mg/m2, and subsequently HDCT with carboplatin 1500 mg/m2, C 120 mg/kg, and mitoxantrone 75 mg/m2. The trial was closed early after 42 patients were entered due to slow accrual. The median follow-up time of patients who were alive was 81 months. The median progression-free survival time was 15.9 and 16.6 months (hazard ratio, HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.41-1.69, P = 0.61) and the median overall survival time was 43.7 and 64.3 months (HR, 0.74; 95% CI 0.34-1.61, P = 0.44) in groups A and B, respectively. Although one patient died of HDCT-related toxicity, the regimen was otherwise relatively well tolerated. We conclude that the HDCT regimen used was feasible, but did not result in significantly improved survival in this prematurely closed trial. A clinically important survival benefit cannot be excluded due to the small sample size.

  5. Class I versus Class III radical hysterectomy in stage IB1 (tumor ≤ 2 cm) cervical cancer: a matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Shang, Chun-liang; Du, Qi-qiao; Wu, Di; Liang, Yan-chun; Liu, Tian-yu; Huang, Jia-ming; Yao, Shu-zhong

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims: The long-term oncological outcome of Class I hysterectomy to treat stage IB1 cervical cancer is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare the surgical and long-term oncological outcomes of Class I hysterectomy and Class III radical hysterectomy for treatment of stage IB1 cervical cancer (tumor ≤ 2 cm). Methods: Seventy stage IB1 cervical cancer patients (tumor ≤ 2 cm) underwent Class I hysterectomy and 577 stage IB1 cervical cancer patients (tumor ≤ 2 cm) underwent Class III radical hysterectomy were matched with known risk factors for recurrence by greedy algorithm. Clinical, pathologic and follow-up data were retrospectively collected. Five-year survival outcomes were assessed using Kaplan-Meier model. Results: After matching, a total of 70 patient pairs (Class I - Class III) were included. The median follow-up times were 75 (range, 26-170) months in the Class III group and 75 (range, 27-168) months in the Class I group. The Class I and Class III group had similar 5-year recurrence-free survival rates (RFS) (98.6% vs. 97.1%, P = 0.56) and overall survival rates (OS) (100.0% vs. 98.5%, P = 0.32). Compared with the Class III group, the Class I group resulted in significantly shorter operating time, less intra-operative blood loss, less intraoperative complications, less postoperative complications, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusions: These findings suggest that Class I hysterectomy is an oncological safe alternative to Class III radical hysterectomy in treatment of stage IB1 cervical cancer (tumor ≤ 2 cm) and Class I hysterectomy is associated with fewer perioperative complication and earlier recovery.

  6. Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab or Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Temsirolimus or Ixabepilone, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III, Stage IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  7. Resolving Early Stages of Homogeneous Iron(III) Oxyhydroxide Formation from Iron(III) Nitrate Solutions at pH 3 Using Time-Resolved SAXS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements coupled to a stopped-flow device has permitted the observation of the kinetics of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide (FeOx) formation and transformation from around 1 s to 30 min after initiation under environmentally relevant conditions at pH 3. The Unified Model approach was used to determine the evolution of multiple key parameters (particle scattering mass, mean particle volume, particle concentration, particle dimensionality, and particle size) for two separate structural levels as a function of time, with the results obtained enabling clarification of the mechanisms underlying FeOx formation and transformation under these conditions. Colloidal primary particles (radius of gyration 2–10 nm) that were observable by SAXS formed within 1 s of stopping the flow and subsequently grew over several minutes, first by cluster–cluster addition and then by a monomer-addition mechanism. Aggregation of these primary particles via a secondary cluster–cluster addition mechanism simultaneously resulted in a distinct population of larger (25–40 nm radius of gyration) secondary particles. The primary particles evolved into compact spheroidal forms with fractally rough surfaces, while the secondary particles were relatively open mass fractal structures. Comparison of the observed rates of these processes with those predicted for Fe polymerization indicates that kinetics of primary particle formation were likely controlled initially by rates of exchange between water molecules coordinated with Fe and those in the bulk solution. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying FeOx formation and transformation, and the kinetics of these mechanisms, at pH 3. PMID:24601665

  8. Dynamics of an HIV Model with Multiple Infection Stages and Treatment with Different Drug Classes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Song, Xinyu; Tang, Sanyi; Rong, Libin

    2016-02-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy can effectively control HIV replication in infected individuals. Some clinical and modeling studies suggested that viral decay dynamics may depend on the inhibited stages of the viral replication cycle. In this paper, we develop a general mathematical model incorporating multiple infection stages and various drug classes that can interfere with specific stages of the viral life cycle. We derive the basic reproductive number and obtain the global stability results of steady states. Using several simple cases of the general model, we study the effect of various drug classes on the dynamics of HIV decay. When drugs are assumed to be 100% effective, drugs acting later in the viral life cycle lead to a faster or more rapid decay in viremia. This is consistent with some patient and experimental data, and also agrees with previous modeling results. When drugs are not 100% effective, the viral decay dynamics are more complicated. Without a second population of long-lived infected cells, the viral load decline can have two phases if drugs act at an intermediate stage of the viral replication cycle. The slopes of viral load decline depend on the drug effectiveness, the death rate of infected cells at different stages, and the transition rate of infected cells from one to the next stage. With a second population of long-lived infected cells, the viral load decline can have three distinct phases, consistent with the observation in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy containing the integrase inhibitor raltegravir. We also fit modeling prediction to patient data under efavirenz (a nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor) and raltegravir treatment. The first-phase viral load decline under raltegravir therapy is longer than that under efavirenz, resulting in a lower viral load at initiation of the second-phase decline in patients taking raltegravir. This explains why patients taking a raltegravir-based therapy were faster to achieve

  9. Fulvestrant With or Without Lapatinib in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Stage III or Stage IV Breast Cancer That is Hormone Receptor-Positive

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-11

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  10. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. Is there role of additional chemotherapy after definitive local treatment for stage I/II marginal zone lymphoma?: Consortium for Improving Survival of Lymphoma (CISL) study.

    PubMed

    Koh, Myeong Seok; Kim, Won Seog; Kim, Seok Jin; Oh, Sung Yong; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Soon Il; Hong, Junshik; Song, Moo Kon; Shin, Ho-Jin; Kwon, Jung Hye; Kim, Hyo Jung; Do, Yong Rok; Suh, Cheolwon; Kim, Hyo Jin

    2015-10-01

    Even though local stage (Ann Arbor stage I/II) marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) is well controlled with local treatment-based therapy, no data exist on the role of additional chemotherapy after local treatment for stage I/II MZL. Patients with biopsy-confirmed Ann Arbor stage I/II MZL (n = 210) were included for analysis in this study. Of these, 180 patients (85.7 %) were stage I and 30 (14.3 %) were stage II. Most patients (n = 182, 86.7 %) were treated with a local modality including radiation therapy or surgery and 28 (13.3 %) received additional systemic chemotherapy after local treatment. The overall response rate was 98.3 % (95 % CI 96-100 %), with 187 complete responses and 20 partial responses. In the local treatment group, the mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 147.4 months (95 % CI 126.7-168.1 months) and the overall survival (OS) was 188.2 months (95 % CI 178.8-197.7 months). In the additional chemotherapy group, the mean PFS was 103.4 months (95 % CI 84.9-121.9 months) and the OS was 137.3 months (95 % CI 127.9-146.7 months). There was no difference between the two groups in OS (p = 0.836) and PFS (p = 0.695). Local stage MZL has a good clinical course and is well controlled with a local treatment modality without additional chemotherapy.

  13. Long-term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic vs open surgery for stages II and III rectal cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen-Xu; Zhao, Li-Ying; Lin, Tian; Liu, Hao; Deng, Hai-Jun; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Yan, Jun; Li, Guo-Xin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the 5-year survival after laparoscopic surgery vs open surgery for stages II and III rectal cancer. METHODS: This study enrolled 406 consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for stages II and III rectal cancer between January 2000 and December 2009 [laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR), n = 152; open rectal resection (ORR), n = 254]. Clinical characteristics, operative outcomes, pathological outcomes, postoperative recovery, and 5-year survival outcomes were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Most of the clinical characteristics were similar except age (59 years vs 55 years, P = 0.033) between the LRR group and ORR group. The proportion of anterior resection was higher in the LRR group than that in the ORR group (81.6% vs 66.1%, P = 0.001). The LRR group had less estimated blood loss (50 mL vs 200 mL, P < 0.001) and a lower rate of blood transfusion (4.6% vs 11.8%, P = 0.019) compared to the ORR group. The pathological outcomes of the two groups were comparable. The LRR group was associated with faster recovery of bowel function (2.8 d vs 3.7 d, P < 0.001) and shorter postoperative hospital stay (11.7 d vs 13.7 d, P < 0.001). The median follow-up time was 63 mo in the LRR group and 65 mo in the ORR group. As for the survival outcomes, the 5-year local recurrence rate (16.0% vs 16.4%, P = 0.753), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate (63.0% vs 63.1%, P = 0.589), and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate (68.1% vs 63.5%, P = 0.682) were comparable between the LRR group and the ORR group. Stage by stage, there were also no statistical differences between the LRR group and the ORR group in terms of the 5-year local recurrence rate (stage II: 6.3% vs 8.7%, P = 0.623; stage III: 26.4% vs 23.2%, P = 0.747), 5-year DFS rate (stage II: 77.5% vs 77.6%, P = 0.462; stage III: 46.5% vs 50.9%, P = 0.738), and 5-year OS rate (stage II: 81.4% vs 74.3%, P = 0.242; stage III: 53.9% vs 54.1%, P = 0.459). CONCLUSION: LRR for stages II and III rectal

  14. Postoperative radiotherapy and tumor recurrence after complete resection of stage II/III thymic tumor: a meta-analysis of cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jietao; Sun, Xin; Huang, Letian; Xiong, Zhicheng; Yuan, Meng; Zhang, Shuling; Han, Cheng-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) is effective for reducing the recurrence risk in patients who received complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors has not been determined. A meta-analysis was performed by combining the results of all available controlled trials. Methods PubMed, Cochrane’s Library, and the Embase databases were searched for studies which compared the recurrence data for patients with complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors assigned to an observing group, or a PORT group. A random effect model was applied to combine the results. Results Nineteen studies, all designed as retrospective cohort studies were included. These studies included 663 patients of PORT group and 617 patients of observing group. The recurrence rate for the patients in PORT group and observing group were 12.4% and 11.5%, respectively. Results of our study indicated that PORT has no significant influence on recurrent risk in patients with stage II or III thymic tumor after complete resection (odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.55–1.90, P=0.96). When stratified by stages, our meta-analyses did not indicate any significant effects of PORT on recurrent outcomes in either the stage II or the stage III patients. Moreover, subsequent analysis limited to studies only including patients with thymoma or thymic carcinoma also did not support the benefits of PORT on recurrent outcomes. Conclusion Although derived from retrospective cohort studies, current evidence did not support any benefit of PORT on recurrent risk in patients with complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors. PMID:27524907

  15. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  16. Clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with stage III esophageal carcinoma: a single-center experience from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Vahide I; Kara, Sakire P; Kucukplakci, Bulent; Demirkasimoglu, Taciser; Misirlioglu, Cem; Ozgen, Aytul; Elgin, Yesim; Sanri, Ergun; Altundag, Kadri; Ozdamar, Nadi

    2008-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is an extremely deadly disease, and prognosis is poor. We retrospectively evaluated stage III esophageal carcinoma patients in our center. Median age of the patients was 52. Men to women ratio were 3/1. Epidermoid carcinoma was the major histology. Incidence of esophageal carcinoma was higher in the distal and middle third of the esophagus. In 19 patients tumor size was more than 5 cm. In total of 17 of the patients were operated. About 58 patients were irradiated. About 45 of the patients were irradiated with curative intent, 31 of them were primarily irradiated and 14 of them were irradiated postoperatively. Only 13 of the patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Overall 1, 2, 3, and 4 year survival rates were 38.9%, 11.1%, 5.6%, and %1.9, respectively and median survival was 12 months. Median survival for tumors located in cervical esophageal, middle esophagus, and distal esophagus were 23, 8, and 14 months, respectively. One, 2, 3, 4 year survival rates of operated patients were 58.8%, 29.4%, 17.6%, 5.9%, respectively and median survival was 23 months. For inoperable patients 1 and 2 year survival rates were 29.7% and 2.7% and median survival was 8 months. Differences between operable and inoperable patients were statistically significant (P: 0.0003). One, 2, 3, 4 years survival results of patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was 62.5%, 25%, 12.5%, 12.5% and median survival was 21 months, 1, 2, 3, 4 years survival results of patients treated with surgery and concurrent chemoradiotherapy was 55.6%, 33.3%, 22.2%, and 0% and median survival was 27 months. There was no statistically significant difference between groups (P: 0.5390). During the therapy, disphagia was the major side effect observed in seven patients. Fatigue, pain, and mild weight loss were the other side effects. Three patients could not tolerate the treatment and left the therapy. We demonstrated that stage III esophageal carcinoma is an extremely

  17. Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (CPS) Configuration in Support of NASA's Multiple Design Reference Missions (DRMs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Stephen G.; Jones, David L.; Creech, Stephen D.; Lawrence, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), the Space Launch System (SLS) is being designed for safe, affordable, and sustainable human and scientific exploration missions beyond Earth's or-bit (BEO). The SLS Team is tasked with developing a system capable of safely and repeatedly lofting a new fleet of spaceflight vehicles beyond Earth orbit. The Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (CPS) is a key enabler for evolving the SLS capability for BEO missions. This paper reports on the methodology and initial recommendations relative to the CPS, giving a brief retrospective of early studies on this promising propulsion hardware. This paper provides an overview of the requirements development and CPS configuration in support of NASA's multiple Design Reference Missions (DRMs).

  18. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of a Morphing Wingtip Concept with Multiple Morphing Stages at Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Michael

    Morphing an aircraft wingtip can provide substantial performance improvement. Most civil transport aircraft are optimized for range but for other flight conditions such as take-off and climb they are used as constraints. These constraints could potentially reduce the performance of an aircraft at cruise. By altering the shape of the wingtip, we can force the load distribution to adapt to the required flight condition to improve performance. Using a Variable Geometry Truss Mechanism (VGTM) concept to morph the wingtip of an aircraft with a Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) framework, the current work will attempt to find an optimal wing and wingtip shape to minimize fuel consumption for multiple morphing stages during cruise. This optimization routine was conducted with a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm using different fidelity tools to analyze the aerodynamic and structural disciplines.

  19. Adaptation of a stage-projection model for species with multiple year reproductive cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, James R.; Udevitz, Mark S.

    1997-01-01

    We apply stage projection matrices to multiple age and reproductive categories, deriving the stable age - reproductive category distribution for populations with multi-year reproductive cycles and identifying conditions for the existence of a dominant latent root. Given the stable distribution of age and reproductive category and the number of female young for each reproductive category, the age specific fecundity rates can be calculated. For species with multi-year reproductive cycles, the fecundity rate associated with the stable age distribution is often not a smooth function of age, but fluctuates as a larger or smaller fraction of females becomes available to breed. We suggest that fecundity rates for species with multi-year reproductive cycles be defined in terms of litter size and probabilities of conception and successful gestation rather than average fecundity.

  20. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-28

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  2. Veliparib and Atezolizumab Either Alone or in Combination in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-15

    BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  3. Space Shuttle guidance for multiple main engine failures during first stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sponaugle, Steven J.; Fernandes, Stanley T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents contingency abort guidance schemes recently developed for multiple Space Shuttle main engine failures during the first two minutes of flight (first stage). The ascent and entry guidance schemes greatly improve the possibility of the crew and/or the Orbiter surviving a first stage contingency abort. Both guidance schemes were required to meet certain structural and controllability constraints. In addition, the systems were designed with the flexibility to allow for seasonal variations in the atmosphere and wind. The ascent scheme guides the vehicle to a desirable, lofted state at solid rocket booster burnout while reducing the structural loads on the vehicle. After Orbiter separation from the solid rockets and the external tank, the entry scheme guides the Orbiter through one of two possible entries. If the proper altitude/range/velocity conditions have been met, a return-to-launch-site 'Split-S' maneuver may be attempted. Otherwise, a down-range abort to an equilibrium glide and subsequent crew bailout is performed.

  4. Stage-Specific Role of Interferon-Gamma in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Gabriel; Ottum, Payton A.; Reyes, Lilian I.; Burgos, Paula I.; Naves, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    The role of interferon (IFN)-γ in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), has remained as an enigmatic paradox for more than 30 years. Several studies attribute this cytokine a prominent proinflammatory and pathogenic function in these pathologies. However, accumulating evidence shows that IFN-γ also plays a protective role inducing regulatory cell activity and modulating the effector T cell response. Several innate and adaptive immune cells also develop opposite functions strongly associated with the production of IFN-γ in EAE. Even the suppressive activity of different types of regulatory cells is dependent on IFN-γ. Interestingly, recent data supports a stage-specific participation of IFN-γ in EAE providing a plausible explanation for previous conflicting results. In this review, we will summarize and discuss such literature, emphasizing the protective role of IFN-γ on immune cells. These findings are fundamental to understand the complex role of IFN-γ in the pathogenesis of these diseases and can provide basis for potential stage-specific therapy for MS targeting IFN-γ-signaling or IFN-γ-producing immune cells. PMID:26483787

  5. Lanthanide-containing polymer microspheres by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization for highly multiplexed bioassays.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed I; Dai, Sheng; Thickett, Stuart C; Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Baranov, Vladimir; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2009-10-28

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of metal-encoded polystyrene microspheres by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization with diameters on the order of 2 mum and a very narrow size distribution. Different lanthanides were loaded into these microspheres through the addition of a mixture of lanthanide salts (LnCl(3)) and excess acrylic acid (AA) or acetoacetylethyl methacrylate (AAEM) dissolved in ethanol to the reaction after about 10% conversion of styrene, that is, well after the particle nucleation stage was complete. Individual microspheres contain ca. 10(6)-10(8) chelated lanthanide ions, of either a single element or a mixture of elements. These microspheres were characterized one-by-one utilizing a novel mass cytometer with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry detection. Microspheres containing a range of different metals at different levels of concentration were synthesized to meet the requirements of binary encoding and enumeration encoding protocols. With four different metals at five levels of concentration, we could achieve a variability of 624, and the strategy we report should allow one to obtain much larger variability. To demonstrate the usefulness of element-encoded beads for highly multiplexed immunoassays, we carried out a proof-of-principle model bioassay involving conjugation of mouse IgG to the surface of La and Tm containing particles and its detection by an antimouse IgG bearing a metal-chelating polymer with Pr.

  6. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis. In mammals, hedgehog signaling is known to be essential for multiple stages of odontogenesis; however, potential roles for the pathway during initiation of tooth development or in later morphogenesis are incompletely understood. Results We have identified mRNA expression of the hedgehog ligands shha and the receptors ptc1 and ptc2 during zebrafish pharyngeal tooth development. We looked for, but did not detect, tooth germ expression of the other known zebrafish hedgehog ligands shhb, dhh, ihha, or ihhb, suggesting that as in mammals, only Shh participates in zebrafish tooth development. Supporting this idea, we found that morphological and gene expression evidence of tooth initiation is eliminated in shha mutant embryos, and that morpholino antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of shha, but not shhb, function prevents mature tooth formation. Hedgehog pathway inhibition with the antagonist compound cyclopamine affected tooth formation at each stage in which we applied it: arresting development at early stages and disrupting mature tooth morphology when applied later. These results suggest that hedgehog signaling is required continuously during odontogenesis. In contrast, over-expression of shha had no effect on the developing dentition, possibly because shha is normally extensively expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal region. Conclusion We have identified previously unknown requirements for hedgehog signaling for early tooth initiation and later morphogenesis. The similarity of our results with data from mouse and other vertebrates suggests that despite gene duplication and changes in the location of where teeth form, the roles of hedgehog signaling in tooth development have been largely conserved during evolution. PMID:21118524

  8. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia in patients with stage III colon cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the pre-treatment presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection on chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia (CIT) were investigated in patients with stage III colon cancer (CC). A cohort of 74 patients with early stage CC was analysed through a review of clinical records and personal interviews. Helicobacter pylori infections were diagnosed in these patients prior to chemotherapy. The subjects were divided into two groups according to H. pylori infection status: Group 1, H. pylori-positive and Group 2, H. pylori-negative. In all patients, bone marrow toxicity and other study variables were compared. Helicobacter pylori infections were detected in 31 of the 74 CC patients. Helicobacter pylori-infected patients (Group 1) showed significantly higher incidences of CIT than did non-infected patients (Group 2; p = 0.029). Helicobacter pylori infection status correlated significantly with tumour location (r = 0.547; p = 0.043) and the most common location of CC in H. pylori-infected patients was the ascending colon (n = 13, 42%) in comparison to non-infected patients (n = 6, 14%; p= 0.042). The relationship between CIT and H. pylori infection status in CC was determined to be independent from the other study variables (p = 0.037; OR = 3.32, CI 95% = 1.16-9.70). In this study, the small number of patients resulted in an inadequate demonstration of the relationship between H. pylori infection and CIT. Therefore, clinical and molecular studies that include more patients are warranted.

  9. Stage II/III rectal cancer with intermediate response to preoperative radiochemotherapy: Do we have indications for individual risk stratification?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is very heterogeneous. Pathologic complete response (pCR) is accompanied by a favorable outcome. However, most patients show incomplete response. The aim of this investigation was to find indications for risk stratification in the group of intermediate responders to RCT. Methods From a prospective database of 496 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, 107 patients with stage II/III cancers and intermediate response to preoperative 5-FU based RCT (ypT2/3 and TRG 2/3), treated within the German Rectal Cancer Trials were studied. Surgical treatment comprised curative (R0) total mesorectal excision (TME) in all cases. In 95 patients available for statistical analyses, residual transmural infiltration of the mesorectal compartment, nodal involvement and histolologic tumor grading were investigated for their prognostic impact on disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Residual tumor transgression into the mesorectal compartment (ypT3) did not influence DFS and OS rates (p = 0.619, p = 0.602, respectively). Nodal involvement after preoperative RCT (ypN1/2) turned out to be a valid prognostic factor with decreased DFS and OS (p = 0.0463, p = 0.0236, respectively). Persistent tumor infiltration of the mesorectum (ypT3) and histologic tumor grading of residual tumor cell clusters were strongly correlated with lymph node metastases after neoadjuvant treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions Advanced transmural tumor invasion after RCT does not affect prognosis when curative (R0) resection is achievable. Residual nodal status is the most important predictor of individual outcome in intermediate responders to preoperative RCT. Furthermore, ypT stage and tumor grading turn out to be additional auxiliary factors. Future clinical trials for risk-adapted adjuvant therapy should be based on a synopsis of clinicopathologic parameters. PMID:20388220

  10. A lymph node ratio of 10% is predictive of survival in stage III colon cancer: a French regional study.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Charles; Mauvais, François; Cosse, Cyril; Rebibo, Lionel; Joly, Jean-Paul; Dromer, Didier; Aubert, Christine; Carton, Sophie; Dron, Bernard; Dadamessi, Innocenti; Maes, Bernard; Perrier, Guillaume; Manaouil, David; Fontaine, Jean-François; Gozy, Michel; Panis, Xavier; Foncelle, Pierre Henri; de Fresnoy, Hugues; Leroux, Fabien; Vaneslander, Pierre; Ghighi, Caroline; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node ratio (LNR) (positive lymph nodes/sampled lymph nodes) is predictive of survival in colon cancer. The aim of the present study was to validate the LNR as a prognostic factor and to determine the optimum LNR cutoff for distinguishing between "good prognosis" and "poor prognosis" colon cancer patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, patients with TNM stage III colon cancer operated on with at least of 3 years of follow-up and not lost to follow-up were included in this retrospective study. The two primary endpoints were 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) as a function of the LNR groups and the cutoff. One hundred seventy-eight patients were included. There was no correlation between the LNR group and 3-year OS (P=0.06) and a significant correlation between the LNR group and 3-year DFS (P=0.03). The optimal LNR cutoff of 10% was significantly correlated with 3-year OS (P=0.02) and DFS (P=0.02). The LNR was not an accurate prognostic factor when fewer than 12 lymph nodes were sampled. Clarification and simplification of the LNR classification are prerequisites for use of this system in randomized control trials. An LNR of 10% appears to be the optimal cutoff.

  11. Image analysis-derived metrics of histomorphological complexity predicts prognosis and treatment response in stage II-III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mezheyeuski, Artur; Hrynchyk, Ina; Karlberg, Mia; Portyanko, Anna; Egevad, Lars; Ragnhammar, Peter; Edler, David; Glimelius, Bengt; Östman, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of tumor histomorphology reflects underlying tumor biology impacting on natural course and response to treatment. This study presents a method of computer-aided analysis of tissue sections, relying on multifractal (MF) analyses, of cytokeratin-stained tumor sections which quantitatively evaluates of the morphological complexity of the tumor-stroma interface. This approach was applied to colon cancer collection, from an adjuvant treatment randomized study. Metrics obtained with the method acted as independent markers for natural course of the disease, and for benefit of adjuvant treatment. Comparative analyses demonstrated that MF metrics out-performed standard histomorphological features such as tumor grade, budding and configuration of invasive front. Notably, the MF analyses-derived “αmax” –metric constitutes the first response-predictive biomarker in stage II-III colon cancer showing significant interactions with treatment in analyses using a randomized trial-derived study population. Based on these results the method appears as an attractive and easy-to-implement tool for biomarker identification. PMID:27805003

  12. Adjuvant Autologous Melanoma Vaccine for Macroscopic Stage III Disease: Survival, Biomarkers, and Improved Response to CTLA-4 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Michal; Merims, Sharon; Frank, Stephen; Hamburger, Tamar; Nissan, Aviram; Kadouri, Luna; Cohen, Jonathan; Straussman, Ravid; Eisenberg, Galit; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Carmon, Einat; Alaiyan, Bilal; Shneibaum, Shlomo; Ozge Ayyildiz, Zeynep; Isbilen, Murat; Mert Senses, Kerem; Ron, Ilan; Steinberg, Hanna; Smith, Yoav; Shiloni, Eitan; Gure, Ali Osmay; Peretz, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is not yet an agreed adjuvant treatment for melanoma patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages III B and C. We report administration of an autologous melanoma vaccine to prevent disease recurrence. Patients and Methods. 126 patients received eight doses of irradiated autologous melanoma cells conjugated to dinitrophenyl and mixed with BCG. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to unmodified melanoma cells was determined on the vaccine days 5 and 8. Gene expression analysis was performed on 35 tumors from patients with good or poor survival. Results. Median overall survival was 88 months with a 5-year survival of 54%. Patients attaining a strong DTH response had a significantly better (p = 0.0001) 5-year overall survival of 75% compared with 44% in patients without a strong response. Gene expression array linked a 50-gene signature to prognosis, including a cluster of four cancer testis antigens: CTAG2 (NY-ESO-2), MAGEA1, SSX1, and SSX4. Thirty-five patients, who received an autologous vaccine, followed by ipilimumab for progressive disease, had a significantly improved 3-year survival of 46% compared with 19% in nonvaccinated patients treated with ipilimumab alone (p = 0.007). Conclusion. Improved survival in patients attaining a strong DTH and increased response rate with subsequent ipilimumab suggests that the autologous vaccine confers protective immunity. PMID:27294163

  13. A Lymph Node Ratio of 10% Is Predictive of Survival in Stage III Colon Cancer: A French Regional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Charles; Mauvais, François; Cosse, Cyril; Rebibo, Lionel; Joly, Jean-Paul; Dromer, Didier; Aubert, Christine; Carton, Sophie; Dron, Bernard; Dadamessi, Innocenti; Maes, Bernard; Perrier, Guillaume; Manaouil, David; Fontaine, Jean-François; Gozy, Michel; Panis, Xavier; Foncelle, Pierre Henri; de Fresnoy, Hugues; Leroux, Fabien; Vaneslander, Pierre; Ghighi, Caroline; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node ratio (LNR) (positive lymph nodes/sampled lymph nodes) is predictive of survival in colon cancer. The aim of the present study was to validate the LNR as a prognostic factor and to determine the optimum LNR cutoff for distinguishing between “good prognosis” and “poor prognosis” colon cancer patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, patients with TNM stage III colon cancer operated on with at least of 3 years of follow-up and not lost to follow-up were included in this retrospective study. The two primary endpoints were 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) as a function of the LNR groups and the cutoff. One hundred seventy-eight patients were included. There was no correlation between the LNR group and 3-year OS (P = 0.06) and a significant correlation between the LNR group and 3-year DFS (P = 0.03). The optimal LNR cutoff of 10% was significantly correlated with 3-year OS (P = 0.02) and DFS (P = 0.02). The LNR was not an accurate prognostic factor when fewer than 12 lymph nodes were sampled. Clarification and simplification of the LNR classification are prerequisites for use of this system in randomized control trials. An LNR of 10% appears to be the optimal cutoff. PMID:25058763

  14. Validating NEXRAD MPE and Stage III precipitation products for uniform rainfall on the Upper Guadalupe River Basin of the Texas Hill Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei; Xie, Hongjie; Sharif, Hatim; Zeitler, Jon

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThis study examines the performance of the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and Stage III precipitation products, using a high-density rain gauge network located on the Upper Guadalupe River Basin of the Texas Hill Country. As point-area representativeness error of gauge rainfall is a major concern in assessment of radar rainfall estimation, this study develops a new method to automatically select uniform rainfall events based on coefficient of variation criterion of 3 by 3 radar cells. Only gauge observations of those uniform rainfall events are used as ground truth to evaluate radar rainfall estimation. This study proposes a new parameter probability of rain detection (POD) instead of the conditional probability of rain detection (CPOD) commonly used in previous studies to assess the capability that a radar or gauge detects rainfall. Results suggest that: (1) gauge observations of uniform rainfall better represent ground truth of a 4 × 4 km 2 radar cell than non-uniform rainfall; (2) the MPE has higher capability of rain detection than either gauge-only or Stage III; (3) the MPE has much higher linear correlation and lower mean relative difference with gauge measurements than the Stage III does; (4) the Stage III tends to overestimate precipitation (20%), but the MPE tends to underestimate (7%).

  15. Quantitative proteomics reveals that distant recurrence-associated protein R-Ras and Transgelin predict post-surgical survival in patients with Stage III colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanyu; Xiao, Yi; He, Qingzhong; Qiu, Huizhong; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection supplemented with adjuvant chemotherapy is the current preferred treatment for Stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). However, as many as 48% of patients who undergo curative resection eventually suffer from incurable distant recurrence. To investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in Stage III CRC post-surgical distant recurrence, we identified a total of 146 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) associated with distant recurrence in Stage III CRC using TMT-based quantitative mass spectrometry. Among these DEPs, the altered expressions of R-Ras and Transgelin were then validated in 192 individual specimens using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the levels of R-Ras and Transgelin were significantly associated with 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), and multivariate Cox-regression analyses revealed that R-Ras and Transgelin were independent prognostic factors for OS and DFS, respectively. In conclusion, this study identified potential biochemical players involved in distant recurrence and indicates that R-Ras and Transgelin are potential post-surgical prognostic biomarkers for Stage III CRC. This proteomics data have been submitted to Proteome Xchange under accession number PXD002903. PMID:27270312

  16. Immune-related Adverse Events of Dendritic Cell Vaccination Correlate With Immunologic and Clinical Outcome in Stage III and IV Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Westdorp, Harm; Koornstra, Rutger H.T.; Aarntzen, Erik H.J.G.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Creemers, Jeroen H.A.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Figdor, Carl G.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Bol, Kalijn F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the toxicity profile of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in stage III and IV melanoma patients, and to evaluate whether there is a correlation between side effects and immunologic and clinical outcome. This is a retrospective analysis of 82 stage III and 137 stage IV melanoma patients, vaccinated with monocyte-derived or naturally circulating autologous DCs loaded with tumor-associated antigens gp100 and tyrosinase. Median follow-up time was 54.3 months in stage III patients and 12.9 months in stage IV patients. Treatment-related adverse events occurred in 84% of patients; grade 3 toxicity was present in 3% of patients. Most common adverse events were flu-like symptoms (67%) and injection site reactions (50%), and both correlated with the presence of tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells (both P<0.001). In stage III melanoma patients experiencing flu-like symptoms, median overall survival (OS) was not reached versus 32.3 months in patients without flu-like symptoms (P=0.009); median OS in patients with an injection site reaction was not reached versus 53.7 months in patients without an injection site reaction (P<0.05). In stage IV melanoma patients (primary uveal and mucosal melanomas excluded), median OS in patients with or without flu-like symptoms was 13.1 versus 8.9 months, respectively (P=0.03); median OS in patients with an injection site reaction was 15.7 months versus 9.8 months in patients without an injection site reaction (P=0.003). In conclusion, DC vaccination is safe and tolerable and the occurrence of the immune-related side effects, such as flu-like symptoms and injection site reactions, correlates with immunologic and clinical outcome. PMID:27227325

  17. Effect of Laparoscopic-Assisted Resection vs Open Resection of Stage II or III Rectal Cancer on Pathologic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fleshman, James; Branda, Megan; Sargent, Daniel J.; Boller, Anne Marie; George, Virgilio; Abbas, Maher; Peters, Walter R.; Maun, Dipen; Chang, George; Herline, Alan; Fichera, Alessandro; Mutch, Matthew; Wexner, Steven; Whiteford, Mark; Marks, John; Birnbaum, Elisa; Margolin, David; Larson, David; Marcello, Peter; Posner, Mitchell; Read, Thomas; Monson, John; Wren, Sherry M.; Pisters, Peter W. T.; Nelson, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Evidence about the efficacy of laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer is incomplete, particularly for patients with more advanced-stage disease. OBJECTIVE To determine whether laparoscopic resection is noninferior to open resection, as determined by gross pathologic and histologic evaluation of the resected proctectomy specimen. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A multicenter, balanced, noninferiority, randomized trial enrolled patients between October 2008 and September 2013. The trial was conducted by credentialed surgeons from 35 institutions in the United States and Canada. A total of 486 patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer within 12 cm of the anal verge were randomized after completion of neoadjuvant therapy to laparoscopic or open resection. INTERVENTIONS Standard laparoscopic and open approaches were performed by the credentialed surgeons. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome assessing efficacy was a composite of circumferential radial margin greater than 1 mm, distal margin without tumor, and completeness of total mesorectal excision. A 6%noninferiority margin was chosen according to clinical relevance estimation. RESULTS Two hundred forty patients with laparoscopic resection and 222 with open resection were evaluable for analysis of the 486 enrolled. Successful resection occurred in 81.7%of laparoscopic resection cases (95%CI, 76.8%–86.6%) and 86.9%of open resection cases (95%CI, 82.5%–91.4%) and did not support noninferiority (difference, −5.3%; 1-sided 95%CI, −10.8%to ∞; P for noninferiority = .41). Patients underwent low anterior resection (76.7%) or abdominoperineal resection (23.3%). Conversion to open resection occurred in 11.3%of patients. Operative time was significantly longer for laparoscopic resection (mean, 266.2 vs 220.6 minutes; mean difference, 45.5 minutes; 95%CI, 27.7–63.4; P < .001). Length of stay (7.3 vs 7.0 days; mean difference, 0.3 days; 95%CI, −0.6 to 1.1), readmission within 30

  18. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III, IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  19. Effect of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients With Clinical Stage II and III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Groheux, David Moretti, Jean-Luc; Baillet, Georges; Espie, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Hindie, Elif; Hennequin, Christophe; Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert; Cuvier, Caroline; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel; Sarandi, Farid; Misset, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential effect of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial assessment of patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: During 14 consecutive months, 39 patients (40 tumors) who presented with Stage II or III breast cancer on the basis of a routine extension assessment were prospectively included in this study. PET/CT was performed in addition to the initial assessment. Results: In 3 cases, PET/CT showed extra-axillary lymph node involvement that had not been demonstrated with conventional techniques. Two of these patients had hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the subpectoral and infraclavicular regions, and the third had a hypermetabolic internal mammary node. PET/CT showed distant uptake in 4 women. Of these 4 women, 1 had pleural involvement and 3 had bone metastasis. Overall, of the 39 women, the PET/CT results modified the initial stage in 7 (18%). The modified staging altered the treatment plan for 5 patients (13%). It led to radiotherapy in 4 patients (bone metastasis, pleural lesion, subpectoral lymph nodes, and internal mammary nodes) and excision of, and radiotherapy to, the infraclavicular lymph nodes in 1 patient. Conclusions: PET/CT can provide information on extra-axillary lymph node involvement and can uncover occult distant metastases in a significant percentage of patients. Therefore, initial PET/CT could enable better treatment planning for patients with Stage II and III breast cancer.

  20. Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay for prediction of recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer: A review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    You, Y Nancy; Rustin, Rudolph B; Sullivan, James D

    2015-06-01

    Advances in molecular biology have enabled identification of tumor biomarkers that allow for individualized risk assessment for patients with cancer. Molecular predictors of clinical outcome can help inform discussion regarding the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with resected colon cancer, such as those with stage II colon cancer in which the benefit of adjuvant therapy is controversial or those with stage III colon cancer who may have a lower risk of recurrence and less absolute benefit from oxaliplatin therapy. This article summarizes the data surrounding the development, validation, and clinical and economic utility of the Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay, a multigene expression assay validated to independently predict recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer beyond traditional factors.

  1. Comparative investigations on the biological effects of As (III) and As (V) in clam Ruditapes philippinarum using multiple biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Xu, Hai'e; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a known pollutant with two chemical forms, arsenite (As (III)) and arsenate (As (V)), in marine environment. Clam Ruditapes philippinarum is an important fishery species along the Bohai coast. In this study, the biological effects induced by the two arsenic chemical forms (arsenite and arsenate) were compared using multiple biochemical indices in the digestive glands of clam R. philippinarum. The production of reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzyme activities and metabolic responses exhibited that both As (III) and As (V) induced immune, oxidative and osmotic stresses in clam digestive glands. The differential metabolic biomarkers, histidine and taurine, indicated the differential responsive mechanisms in osmotic regulation in clam digestive glands. In addition, both arsenic treatments enhanced the anaerobiosis metabolism in clam digestive glands. Overall, this work illustrated that arsenite and arsenate induced similar biological effects in clams, which might be accounted for the biological transformation of arsenate to arsenite in clams.

  2. Oxygen isotopic variability associated with multiple stages of serpentinization, Duke Island Complex, southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakurta, Joyashish; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi

    2009-10-01

    Ultramafic rocks of the Duke Island Complex in southeastern Alaska crystallized in a supra-subduction zone setting, but the serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks involved the incursion of late-stage meteoric waters. Three textural types of serpentine (primarily lizardite) have been identified which in part reflect progress in reactions during multiple stages of fluid infiltration. The overall mesh texture of serpentine has been subdivided into a massive-type, found in dunites and wehrlites, and a dendritic-type found in wehrlites and olivine clinopyroxenites. Serpentine veins represent a late-stage in the hydrothermal alteration process. Both FeO contents and δ 18O values of the three textural types of serpentine are variable at the centimeter scale. Magnetite abundance in association with serpentine is also variable with up to 5 vol% of magnetite found in samples with dendritic serpentine. Continued reaction of FeO-bearing serpentine with fluid appears to control the formation of most magnetite. Oxygen isotope ratios of the three textural types of serpentine are distinct, with the massive variety characterized by δ 18O values between -3‰ and 3‰, the dendritic variety showing values between 2‰ and 6‰ and the veins having the highest values between 4‰ and 10‰. Although the δ 18O values may vary by as much as 5‰ on the centimeter scale, δ D values tend to show relatively less variation with over 90% of the measured values between -100‰ and -120‰. The O and H isotopic values are consistent with the involvement of meteoric water that had undergone variable degrees of isotopic exchange with country rocks prior to reacting with olivine in the Duke Island Complex. Small-scale variability in both serpentine FeO content and δ 18O values suggests that chemical and isotopic equilibria may have not been attained at larger than centimeter scales. Oxygen isotopic variability in serpentine produced during relatively low-temperature hydrothermal

  3. Sentinel lymph node dissection in stage I/II melanoma patients: surgical management and clinical follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Macripò, Giuseppe; Quaglino, Pietro; Caliendo, Virginia; Ronco, Anna Maria; Soltani, Shoreh; Giacone, Elena; Pau, Stefano; Fierro, Maria Teresa; Bernengo, Maria Grazia

    2004-04-01

    -positive patient OS (5-year survival 69%) seems to be superior to that historically reported for stage III patients treated with curative nodal dissection only after the clinical evidence of palpable adenopathies (5-year survival 36%). The prognostic relevance of the pattern of SLN invasion (micrometastases/macrometastases) could be the basis for the planning of adjuvant treatment trials on selected groups of patients.

  4. Dose escalation study of proton beam therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hideyuki; Fuji, Hiroshi; Ono, Akira; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki; Yamashita, Haruo; Asakura, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Murayama, Shigeyuki

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the recommended dose (RD) of proton beam therapy (PBT) for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We tested two prescribed doses of PBT: 66 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) in 33 fractions and 74 Gy (RBE) in 37 fractions in arms 1 and 2, respectively. The planning target volume (PTV) included the primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes with adequate margins. Concurrent chemotherapy included intravenous cisplatin (60 mg/m(2) , day 1) and oral S-1 (80, 100 or 120 mg based on body surface area, days 1-14), repeated as four cycles every 4 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as grade 3 or severe toxicities related to PBT during days 1-90. Each dose level was performed in three patients, and then escalated to the next level if no DLT occurred. When one patient developed a DLT, three additional patients were enrolled. Overall, nine patients (five men, four women; median age, 72 years) were enrolled, including six in arm 1 and three in arm 2. The median follow-up time was 43 months, and the median progression-free survival was 15 months. In arm 1, grade 3 infection occurred in one of six patients, but no other DLT was reported. Similarly, no DLT occurred in arm 2. However, one patient in arm 2 developed grade 3 esophageal fistula at 9 months after the initiation of PBT. Therefore, we determined that 66 Gy (RBE) is the RD from a clinical viewpoints. (Clinical trial registration no. UMIN000005585).

  5. Race and Insurance Differences in the Receipt of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Among Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Harlan, Linda C.; Warren, Joan L.; Geiger, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although the incidence and mortality of colon cancer in the United States has declined over the past two decades, blacks have worse outcomes than whites. Variations in treatment may contribute to mortality differentials. Methods Patients diagnosed with stage III colon cancer were randomly sampled from the SEER program from the years 1990, 1991, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010. Patients were categorized as non-Hispanic white (n = 835) or black (n = 384). Treatment data were obtained from a review of the medical records, and these data were verified through contact with the original treating physicians. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the association between race and receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy. Effect modification by insurance was assessed with use of single referent models. Results Receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy among both white and black patients increased from the period encompassing the years 1990 and 1991 (white, 58%; black, 45%) to the year 2005 (white, 72%; black, 71%) and then decreased in the year 2010 (white, 66%; black, 57%). There were marked racial disparities in the time period of 1990 to 1991 and again in 2010, with black patients less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy as compared with white patients (risk ratio [RR], .82; 95% CI, .72 to .93). For black patients, receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy did not differ across insurance categories (RR for private insurance, .80; 95% CI, .69 to .93; RR for Medicare, .84; 95% CI, .69 to 1.02; and RR for Medicaid, .84; 95% CI, .69 to 1.02), although a larger proportion had Medicaid in all years of the study as compared with white patients. Conclusion The chemotherapy differential narrowed after the time period of 1990 to 1991, but our findings suggest that the disparity reemerged in 2010. Recent decreases in chemotherapy use may be due, in part, to the economic downturn and an increase in Medicaid coverage. PMID:26150445

  6. Clinicopathologic Significance of Survivin Expression in Relation to CD133 Expression in Surgically Resected Stage II or III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanlu; Lee, Mi-Ra; Choi, EunHee; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2017-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells have been investigated as new targets for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment. We recently reported that CD133+ colon cancer cells showed chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil through increased survivin expression and proposed the survivin inhibitor YM155 as an effective therapy for colon cancer in an in vitro study. Here, we investigate the relationship between survivin and CD133 expression in surgically resected CRC to identify whether the results obtained in our in vitro study are applicable to clinical samples. Methods We performed immunohistochemical staining for survivin and CD133 in surgically resected tissue from 187 stage II or III CRC patients. We also comparatively analyzed apoptosis according to survivin and CD133 expression using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling. Results The results of the Mantel-Haenszel test established a linear association between nuclear survivin and CD133 expression (p = .018), although neither had prognostic significance, according to immunohistochemical expression level. No correlation was found between survivin expression and the following pathological parameters: invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, or histologic differentiation (p > .05). The mean apoptotic index in survivin+ and CD133+ tumors was higher than that in negative tumors: 5.116 ± 4.894 in survivin+ versus 4.103 ± 3.691 in survivin– (p = .044); 5.165 ± 4.961 in CD133+ versus 4.231 ± 3.812 in CD133– (p = .034). Conclusions As observed in our in vitro study, survivin expression is significantly related to CD133 expression. Survivin may be considered as a new therapeutic target for chemoresistant CRC. PMID:27989099

  7. Gli activity is critical at multiple stages of embryonic mammary and nipple development.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Anupama; Hatsell, Sarah J; Pinderhughes, Alicia; Koetz, Lisa; Cowin, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Gli3 is a transcriptional regulator of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling that functions as a repressor (Gli3(R)) or activator (Gli3(A)) depending upon cellular context. Previously, we have shown that Gli3(R) is required for the formation of mammary placodes #3 and #5. Here, we report that this early loss of Gli3 results in abnormal patterning of two critical regulators: Bmp4 and Tbx3, within the presumptive mammary rudiment (MR) #3 zone. We also show that Gli3 loss leads to failure to maintain mammary mesenchyme specification and loss of epithelial Wnt signaling, which impairs the later development of remaining MRs: MR#2 showed profound evagination and ectopic hairs formed within the presumptive areola; MR#4 showed mild invagination defects and males showed inappropriate retention of mammary buds in Gli3(xt/xt) mice. Importantly, mice genetically manipulated to misactivate Hh signaling displayed the same phenotypic spectrum demonstrating that the repressor function of Gli3(R) is essential during multiple stages of mammary development. In contrast, positive Hh signaling occurs during nipple development in a mesenchymal cuff around the lactiferous duct and in muscle cells of the nipple sphincter. Collectively, these data show that repression of Hh signaling by Gli3(R) is critical for early placodal patterning and later mammary mesenchyme specification whereas positive Hh signaling occurs during nipple development.

  8. Improved accuracy of acute graft-versus-host disease staging among multiple centers.

    PubMed

    Levine, John E; Hogan, William J; Harris, Andrew C; Litzow, Mark R; Efebera, Yvonne A; Devine, Steven M; Reshef, Ran; Ferrara, James L M

    2014-01-01

    The clinical staging of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) varies significantly among bone marrow transplant (BMT) centers, but adherence to long-standing practices poses formidable barriers to standardization among centers. We have analyzed the sources of variability and developed a web-based remote data entry system that can be used by multiple centers simultaneously and that standardizes data collection in key areas. This user-friendly, intuitive interface resembles an online shopping site and eliminates error-prone entry of free text with drop-down menus and pop-up detailed guidance available at the point of data entry. Standardized documentation of symptoms and therapeutic response reduces errors in grade assignment and allows creation of confidence levels regarding the diagnosis. Early review and adjudication of borderline cases improves consistency of grading and further enhances consistency among centers. If this system achieves widespread use it may enhance the quality of data in multicenter trials to prevent and treat acute GVHD.

  9. Metabolomics Identifies Multiple Candidate Biomarkers to Diagnose and Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Isabel M.; Daly, Rónán; Courtioux, Bertrand; Cattanach, Amy M.; Biéler, Sylvain; Ndung’u, Joseph M.; Bisser, Sylvie; Barrett, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for human African trypanosomiasis is dependent on the species of trypanosome causing the disease and the stage of the disease (stage 1 defined by parasites being present in blood and lymphatics whilst for stage 2, parasites are found beyond the blood-brain barrier in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)). Currently, staging relies upon detecting the very low number of parasites or elevated white blood cell numbers in CSF. Improved staging is desirable, as is the elimination of the need for lumbar puncture. Here we use metabolomics to probe samples of CSF, plasma and urine from 40 Angolan patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, at different disease stages. Urine samples provided no robust markers indicative of infection or stage of infection due to inherent variability in urine concentrations. Biomarkers in CSF were able to distinguish patients at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 with absolute specificity. Eleven metabolites clearly distinguished the stage in most patients and two of these (neopterin and 5-hydroxytryptophan) showed 100% specificity and sensitivity between our stage 1 and advanced stage 2 samples. Neopterin is an inflammatory biomarker previously shown in CSF of stage 2 but not stage 1 patients. 5-hydroxytryptophan is an important metabolite in the serotonin synthetic pathway, the key pathway in determining somnolence, thus offering a possible link to the eponymous symptoms of “sleeping sickness”. Plasma also yielded several biomarkers clearly indicative of the presence (87% sensitivity and 95% specificity) and stage of disease (92% sensitivity and 81% specificity). A logistic regression model including these metabolites showed clear separation of patients being either at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 or indeed diseased (both stages) versus control. PMID:27941966

  10. Amelogenesis imperfecta with multiple impacted teeth and skeletal class III malocclusion: complete mouth rehabilitation of a young adult.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Patil, Smita P

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal dominant disorder. It is a group of hereditary diseases showing abnormal enamel density and crown malformation. This clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of a young adult diagnosed with a variant of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with multiple impacted teeth and skeletal class III malocclusion. The treatment procedures of teeth extractions, endodontic treatment of remaining teeth followed by post and core restorations, esthetic and functional crown lengthening, and metal ceramic fixed dental prostheses were performed sequentially in the maxillary arch. The mandibular arch was restored with an overdenture. One-year follow-up revealed satisfactory results.

  11. Bacterial type III secretion systems are ancient and evolved by multiple horizontal-transfer events.

    PubMed

    Gophna, Uri; Ron, Eliora Z; Graur, Dan

    2003-07-17

    Type III secretion systems (TTSS) are unique bacterial mechanisms that mediate elaborate interactions with their hosts. The fact that several of the TTSS proteins are closely related to flagellar export proteins has led to the suggestion that TTSS had evolved from flagella. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of four conserved type III secretion proteins and their phylogenetic relationships with flagellar paralogs. Our analysis indicates that the TTSS and the flagellar export mechanism share a common ancestor, but have evolved independently from one another. The suggestion that TTSS genes have evolved from genes encoding flagellar proteins is effectively refuted. A comparison of the species tree, as deduced from 16S rDNA sequences, to the protein phylogenetic trees has led to the identification of several major lateral transfer events involving clusters of TTSS genes. It is hypothesized that horizontal gene transfer has occurred much earlier and more frequently than previously inferred for TTSS genes and is, consequently, a major force shaping the evolution of species that harbor type III secretion systems.

  12. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  13. Predictors of Local Recurrence After Rituximab-Based Chemotherapy Alone in Stage III and IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Guiding Decisions for Consolidative Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jegadeesh, Naresh; Rajpara, Raj; Esiashvili, Natia; Shi, Zheng; Liu, Yuan; Okwan-Duodu, Derrick; Flowers, Christopher R.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The role of consolidative radiation therapy (RT) for stage III and IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the era of rituximab is not well defined. There is evidence that some patients with bulky disease may benefit, but patient selection criteria are not well established. We sought to identify a subset of patients who experienced a high local failure rate after receiving rituximab-based chemotherapy alone and hence may benefit from the addition of consolidative RT. Methods and Materials: Two hundred eleven patients with stage III and IV DLBCL treated between August 1999 and January 2012 were reviewed. Of these, 89 had a complete response to systemic therapy including rituximab and received no initial RT. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed, with local recurrence (LR) as the primary outcome. Results: The median follow-up time was 43.9 months. Fifty percent of patients experienced LR at 5 years. In multivariate analysis, tumor ≥5 cm and stage III disease were associated with increased risk of LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 47.4% for patients with ≥5-cm lesions versus 74.7% for patients with <5-cm lesions (P=.01). In patients with <5-cm tumors, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was ≥15 in all patients with LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 100% in SUV<15 versus 68.8% in SUV≥15 (P=.10). Conclusions: Advanced-stage DLBCL patients with stage III disease or with disease ≥5 cm appear to be at an increased risk for LR. Patients with <5-cm disease and SUVmax ≥15 may be at higher risk for LR. These patients may benefit from consolidative RT after chemoimmunotherapy.

  14. The role of postoperative radiotherapy for stage I/II/III thymic tumor—results of the ChART retrospective database

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qianwen; Gu, Zhitao; Yang, Fu; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Xiang, Jin; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for thymic tumor is still controversial. The object of the study is to evaluate the role of PORT for stage I to III thymic tumors. Methods The Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) was searched for patients with stage I to III thymic tumors who underwent surgical resection without neoajuvant therapy between 1994 and 2012. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were performed. Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the hazard ratio for death. Result From the ChART database, 1,546 stage I to III patients were identified. Among these patients, 649 (41.98%) received PORT. PORT was associated with gender, histological type (World Health Organization, WHO), thymectomy extent, resection status, Masaoka-Koga stage and adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates and disease-free survival (DFS) rates for patients underwent surgery followed by PORT were 90% and 80%, 81% and 63%, comparing with 96% and 95%, 92% and 90% for patients underwent surgery alone (P=0.001, P<0.001) respectively. In univariate analysis, age, histological type (WHO), Masaoka-Koga stage, completeness of resection, and PORT were associated with OS. Multivariable analysis showed that histological type (WHO) (P=0.001), Masaoka-Koga stage (P=0.029) and completeness of resection (P=0.003) were independently prognostic factors of OS. In univariate analysis, gender, myasthenia gravis, histological subtype, Masaoka-Koga stage, surgical approach, PORT and completeness of resection were associated with DFS. Multivariate analysis showed that histological subtype (P<0.001), Masaoka-Koga stage (P=0.005) and completeness of resection (P=0.006) were independent prognostic factors for DFS. Subgroup analysis showed that patients with incomplete resection underwent PORT achieved better OS and DFS (P=0.010, 0.017, respectively). However, patients with complete resection underwent PORT had the worse OS and DFS (P<0

  15. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-21

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  16. Gene-expression signature of tumor recurrence in patients with stage II and III colon cancer treated with 5'fluoruracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, María Dolores; Lozano, Juan José; Cuatrecasas, Míriam; Alonso-Espinaco, Virginia; Maurel, Joan; Mármol, Maribel; Hörndler, Carlos; Ortego, Javier; Alonso, Vicente; Escudero, Pilar; Ramírez, Gina; Petry, Christoph; Lasalvia, Luis; Bohmann, Kerstin; Wirtz, Ralph; Mira, Aurea; Castells, Antoni

    2013-03-01

    Although receiving adjuvant chemotherapy after radical surgery, a disappointing proportion of patients with colorectal cancer will develop tumor recurrence. Probability of relapse is currently predicted from pathological staging, there being a need for additional markers to further select high-risk patients. This study was aimed to identify a gene-expression signature to predict tumor recurrence in patients with Stages II and III colon cancer treated with 5'fluoruracil (5FU)-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Two-hundred and twenty-eight patients diagnosed with Stages II-III colon cancer and treated with surgical resection and 5FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy were included. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples and expression of 27 selected candidate genes was analyzed by RT-qPCR. A tumor recurrence predicting model, including clinico-pathological variables and gene-expression profiling, was developed by Cox regression analysis and validated by bootstrapping. The regression analysis identified tumor stage and S100A2 and S100A10 gene expression as independently associated with tumor recurrence. The risk score derived from this model was able to discriminate two groups with a highly significant different probability of tumor recurrence (HR, 2.75; 95%CI, 1.71-4.39; p = 0.0001), which it was maintained when patients were stratified according to tumor stage. The algorithm was also able to distinguish two groups with different overall survival (HR, 2.68; 95%CI, 1.12-6.42; p = 0.03). Identification of a new gene-expression signature associated with a high probability of tumor recurrence in patients with Stages II and III colon cancer receiving adjuvant 5FU-based chemotherapy, and its combination in a robust, easy-to-use and reliable algorithm may contribute to tailor treatment and surveillance strategies.

  17. The influence of postoperative lymph node radiation therapy on overall survival of patients with stage III melanoma, a National Cancer Database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Danish, Hasan H.; Patel, Kirtesh R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Gillespie, Theresa W.; Jhaveri, Jaymin; Chowdhary, Mudit; Abugideiri, Mustafa; Delman, Keith A.; Lawson, David H.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, TROG 02.01 results showed that in stage III melanoma patients with nodal metastasis, adjuvant radiation to lymph node basin after nodal dissection improves lymph node field relapse without an overall survival (OS) benefit. However, this trial was neither designed nor powered to detect an OS difference. In the present study, we analyzed patients in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) with stage III melanoma with pathologically involved nodes and compared survival outcomes of adjuvant radiation and no-radiation cohorts. Inclusion criteria were as follows: age at least 18 years; diagnosed 2003–2011; surgery to regional lymph nodes; pathologically involved lymph nodes; and American Joint Committee on Cancer stage (IIIA-C). We used propensity score matching analysis to compare the OS of patients with similar baseline demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics who received adjuvant radiation and no adjuvant radiation. Overall, 912 patients were analyzed with an average age at diagnosis of 54.4 years and a median follow-up time of 5.5 years. In this cohort, the 5-year OS was 69.0, 51.1, and 30.6% for stage IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC, respectively. On propensity score-adjusted multivariate analysis, we found that adjuvant radiation had no statistically significant impact on OS (hazard ratio: 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 0.75–1.58, P=0.640). Furthermore, age older than 60 years, number of nodes, increasing pathologic stage, and absence of immunotherapy correlated with worse OS. In this NCDB analysis, we found that the adjuvant radiotherapy for node-positive, stage III melanoma patients did not improve OS. This is consistent with TROG 02.01; however, there may be patient selection bias not accounted for by the NCDB. PMID:27575390

  18. [State temperature-pain sensitivity and morphological features of the skin back in patients with idiopathic scoliosis with stage III-IV].

    PubMed

    Gorbach, E N; Shchurova, E N; Kobyzev, A E; Ryabykh, S O; Ochirova, P V

    2015-03-01

    This study was aimed at revealing the features condition of thermal, pain sensitivity and morphological pattern of the skin of the human back at the apex of spinal deformity in the thoracic area in patients with idiopathic scoliosis with stage III-IV. The study included 41 adolescent with idiopathic scoliosis with stage III-IV. Temperature-pain sensitivity was studied in Th6-Th10 dermatomes on the right and the left. Biopsies (skin) for histological examination were taken intraoperatively in projection corresponding to the apex of the arc scoliosis of the spine. Significant disorders of the sensitivity to temperature and pain were found in the dermatomes to the apex of the thoracic spine deformity that were hyperesthesia, hypoesthesia, or absent thermal sensitivity. Histostrukturnye changes of the skin are significantly decreasing the thickness of the epidermis and dermis, reduction of capillaries and changing the structure of the small vessels, destruction of individual nerve fibers and free nerve endings.

  19. Use of CD-ROM-based tool for analyzing contouring variations in involved-field radiotherapy for Stage III NSCLC

    SciTech Connect

    Soernsen De Koste, John R. van . E-mail: j.vansornsendekoste@vumc.nl; Senan, Suresh; Underberg, Rene W.M.; Oei, Swie Swat; Elshove, Dionne; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2005-10-01

    Background: Interclinician variability in defining target volumes is a problem in conformal radiotherapy. A CD-ROM-based contouring tool was used to conduct a dummy run in an international trial of involved-field chemoradiotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The CT scan of an eligible patient was installed on an 'auto-run' CD-ROM incorporating a contouring program based on ImageJ for Windows, which runs on any personal computer equipped with a CD-ROM drive. This tool was initially piloted at four academic centers and was subsequently mailed, together with all relevant clinical, radiologic, and positron emission tomography findings, to all participating centers in the international trial. Clinicians were instructed to contour separate gross tumor volumes (GTVs) for the tumor and two enlarged nodes and a clinical target volume for the hilus. A reference 'consensus' target volume for each target was jointly generated by three other clinicians. Results: The data received from the four academic centers and 16 study participants were suitable for analysis. Data from one center was unsuitable for detailed analysis because the target volumes were contoured at 1.2-cm intervals. GTVs were available for a total of 21 tumors and 19 nodes, and 15 hilar clinical target volumes were available. The mean GTV of the primary tumor was 13.6 cm{sup 3} (SD, 5.2; median, 12.3; range, 8.3-26.9). The variation in the center of the mass relative to the mean center of the mass in the left-right, ventrodorsal, and craniocaudal axes was 1.5, 0.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The largest volume variation was observed for the right hilar clinical target volume (mean, 33.7 cm{sup 3}; SD, 31.2; median, 20.3; range, 4.8-109.9). Smaller variations were observed for the subcarinal node (mean, GTV, 1.9 cm{sup 3}; SD, 1.2; median, 1.7; range, 0.5-5.3), except caudally where the node was difficult to distinguish from the pericardium. The 'consensus' volumes for all

  20. Preclinical and Pilot Clinical Studies of Docetaxel Chemoradiation for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau; Pandya, Kishan J.; Hyrien, Ollivier; Keng, Peter C.; Smudzin, Therese; Anderson, Joy; Qazi, Raman; Smith, Brian; Watson, Thomas J.; Feins, Richard H.; Johnstone, David W.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Local and distant failure rates remain high despite aggressive chemoradiation (CRT) treatment for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. We conducted preclinical studies of docetaxel's cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects on lung cancer cell lines and designed a pilot study to target distant micrometastasis upfront with one-cycle induction chemotherapy, followed by low-dose radiosensitizing docetaxel CRT. Methods and Materials: A preclinical study was conducted in human lung cancer cell lines NCI 520 and A549. Cells were treated with two concentrations of docetaxel for 3 h and then irradiated immediately or after a 24-h delay. A clonogenic survival assay was conducted and analyzed for cytotoxic effects vs. radiosensitizing effects of docetaxel. A pilot clinical study was designed based on preclinical study findings. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a median follow-up of 4 years. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 75 mg/m{sup 2} of docetaxel and 75 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin on Day 1 and 150 mg/m{sup 2} of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on Days 2 through 10. Concurrent CRT was started 3 to 6 weeks later with twice-weekly docetaxel at 10 to 12 mg/m{sup 2} and daily delayed radiation in 1.8-Gy fractions to 64.5 Gy for gross disease. Results: The preclinical study showed potent cytotoxic effects of docetaxel and subadditive radiosensitizing effects. Delaying radiation resulted in more cancer cell death. The pilot clinical study resulted in a median survival of 32.6 months for the entire cohort, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 50% and 19%, respectively, and a distant metastasis-free survival rate of 61% for both 3 and 5 years. A pattern-of-failure analysis showed 75% chest failures and 36% all-distant failures. Therapy was well tolerated with Grade 3 esophagitis observed in 23% of patients. Conclusions: One-cycle full-dose docetaxel/cisplatin induction chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

  1. Phase I Trial of Erlotinib-Based Multimodality Therapy for Inoperable Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Nicholas W.; Mauer, Ann M.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Lester, Eric; Hoffman, Philip C.; Kozloff, Mark; Lin, Shang; Dancey, Janet E.; Szeto, Livia; Grushko, Tatyana; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Salgia, Ravi; Vokes, Everett E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This Phase I trial aimed to determine the maximum-tolerated-dose of erlotinib administered with two standard chemoradiotherapy regimens for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods Unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients were enrolled in this 2-arm dose-escalation study. Erlotinib, given only during chemoradiotherapy, was escalated from 50 to 150 mg/d in 3 to 6 patient cohorts. Arm A: erlotinib with cisplatin (50 mg/m2 IV days 1, 8, 29, 36), etoposide (50 mg/m2 IV days 1–5, 29–33) and chest radiotherapy (66 Gy, 2 Gy/d) followed by docetaxel (75 mg/m2 IV Q21 d) for 3 cycles. Arm B: induction carboplatin (AUC 6) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m2) for two 21-d cycles then radiotherapy with erlotinib, carboplatin (AUC = 2/wk) and paclitaxel (50 mg/m2/wk). Results Seventeen patients were treated in each arm. Patient characteristics: performance status 0 to 24 patients, 1 to 10 patients, median age 63 years, adenocarcinoma 21% and female 14 patients. Dose-escalation of erlotinib to 150 mg/d was possible on both chemoradiotherapy regimens. Grade 3/4 leukopenia and neutropenia were predominant toxicities in both arms. Grade 3 chemoradiotherapy toxicities in arm A were esophagitis (3 patients), vomiting (1), ototoxicity (1), diarrhea (2), dehydration (3), pneumonitis (1); and arm B was esophagitis (6). Seven patients (21%) developed rash (all grade 1/2). Median survival times for patients on Arm A and B were 10.2 and 13.7 months, respectively. Three-year overall survival in patients with and without rash were 53% and 10%, respectively (log-rank P = 0.0807). Epidermal growth factor receptor IHC or FISH positive patients showed no significant overall survival difference. Conclusion Addition of standard-dose erlotinib to chemoradiotherapy is feasible without evident increase in toxicities. However, the survival data are disappointing in this unselected patient population and does not support further investigation of this approach. PMID:18758303

  2. Concurrent pemetrexed and radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review of completed and ongoing studies.

    PubMed

    Choy, Hak; Gerber, David E; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Iyengar, Puneeth; Monberg, Matthew; Treat, Joseph; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Koustensis, Andrew; Barker, Scott; Obasaju, Coleman

    2015-03-01

    Current standard for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is combined concurrent therapy with a platinum-based regimen. Preclinical synergistic activity of pemetrexed with radiation therapy (RT) and favorable toxicity profile has led to clinical trials evaluating pemetrexed in chemoradiation regimens. This literature search of concurrent pemetrexed and RT treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC included MEDLINE database, meeting abstracts, and the clinical trial registry database. Nineteen unique studies were represented across all databases including 11 phase I studies and eight phase II studies. Of the six phase II trials with mature data available, median overall survival ranged from 18.7 to 34 months. Esophagitis and pneumonitis occurred in 0-16% and 0-23% of patients, respectively. Of the ongoing trials, there is one phase III and four phase II trials with pemetrexed in locally advanced NSCLC. Pemetrexed can be administered safely at full systemic doses with either cisplatin or carboplatin concomitantly with radical doses of thoracic radiation therapy. While results from the ongoing phase III PROCLAIM trial are needed to address definitively the efficacy of pemetrexed-cisplatin plus RT in stage III NSCLC, available results from phase II trials suggest that this regimen has promising activity with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  3. Semi-longitudinal Study of the Mcnamara Cephalometric Triangle in Class II and Class III Subjects Grouped by Cervical Vertebrae Maturation Stage.

    PubMed

    Arriola-Guillén, Luis E; Fitzcarrald, Fernando D; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to compare the McNamara cephalometric triangle values in untreated normodivergent Class II and Class III malocclusion subjects of Latin American origin grouped by cervical vertebrae maturation stage to an untreated Class I malocclusion normodivergent control group. The study was conducted on a sample of 610 pretreatment lateral cephalograms (250 male, 360 female), examined and grouped according to their anteroposterior skeletal relationship (Class I, II or III), cervical vertebrae maturation stage (Pre Pubertal Peak P1 = CS1 and CS2, Pubertal Peak P2= CS3 and CS4, and Post Pubertal Peak P3 = CS5 and CS6) and sex. Co-A, Co-Gn and ENA-Me were measured in each lateral cephalogram. ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests were performed to determine differences between the groups. The results showed that in males, the greatest maxillary and mandibular dimensional increases occurred during the P3 stage (CS5 to CS6), while in females, they occurred in the P2 stage (CS3 to CS4). The Co-A and Co-Gn showed significant differences between the malocclusion classes (p<0.05). The maxillary lengths in Class II subjects and the mandibular lengths in Class III subjects were already higher at the beginning of the period evaluated (P1). A worsening trend for the Class II and III malocclusions was identified during the period evaluated. Finally, changes in the McNamara cephalometric triangle values were markedly different in the three normodivergent skeletal malocclusion classes. In these Latin American subjects the pubertal growth spurt occurred at different times with respect to the Caucasian and Asian norms.

  4. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Stage II-III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: JCOG Trial (JCOG 9906)

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Ken; Muro, Kei; Minashi, Keiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Boku, Narikazu; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Komatsu, Yoshito; Miyata, Yoshinori; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: In this Phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for Stage II-III esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Patients and Methods: Patients with clinical Stage II-III (T1N1M0 or T2-3N0-1M0) thoracic ESCC were enrolled between April 2000 and March 2002. Chemotherapy comprised two courses of protracted infusion of 5-FU (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and 8-12, and 2-h infusion of CDDP (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8; this regimen was repeated every 5 weeks. Concurrent radiotherapy involved 60-Gy irradiation (30 fractions) for 8 weeks with a 2-week break. Responders received two courses of 5-FU (800 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and CDDP (80 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1. Final analysis was conducted in March 2007. Survival and late toxicities were monitored for 5 years. Results: The characteristics of the 76 patients enrolled were as follows: median age, 61 years; male/female, 68/8; performance status 0/1, 59/17 patients; Stage IIA/IIB/III, 26/12/38 patients. Of the 74 eligible patients, 46 (62.2%) achieved complete response. Median survival time was 29 months, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 44.7% and 36.8%, respectively. Acute toxicities included Grade 3/4 esophagitis (17%), nausea (17%), hyponatremia (16%), and infection without neutropenia (12%). Late toxicities comprised Grade 3/4 esophagitis (13%), pericardial (16%) and pleural (9%) effusion, and radiation pneumonitis (4%), causing 4 deaths. Conclusions: CRT is effective for Stage II-III ESCC with manageable acute toxicities and can provide a nonsurgical treatment option. However, further improvement is required for reduction in late toxicity.

  5. Phase 3 Trial of Postoperative Chemotherapy Alone Versus Chemoradiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Gastric Cancer Treated With R0 Gastrectomy and D2 Lymph Node Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sook Ryun; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Bae, Jae-Moon; Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Dae Yong

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare chemotherapy alone with chemoradiation therapy in stage III-IV(M0) gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. Methods and Materials: The chemotherapy arm received 5 cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL), and the chemoradiation therapy arm received 1 cycle of FL, then radiation therapy of 45 Gy concurrently with 2 cycles of FL, followed by 2 cycles of FL. Intent-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analyses were performed. Results: Between May 6, 2002 and June 29, 2006, a total of 90 patients were enrolled. Forty-four were randomly assigned to the chemotherapy arm and 46 to the chemoradiation therapy arm. Treatment was completed as planned by 93.2% of patients in the chemotherapy arm and 87.0% in the chemoradiation therapy arm. Overall intent-to-treat analysis showed that addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) but not disease-free survival. In subgroup analysis for stage III, chemoradiation therapy significantly prolonged the 5-year LRRFS and disease-free survival rates compared with chemotherapy (93.2% vs 66.8%, P=.014; 73.5% vs 54.6%, P=.056, respectively). Conclusions: Addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy could improve the LRRFS in stage III gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection.

  6. Hard to heal pressure ulcers (stage III-IV): efficacy of injected activated macrophage suspension (AMS) as compared with standard of care (SOC) treatment controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zuloff-Shani, Adi; Adunsky, Abraham; Even-Zahav, Aviva; Semo, Haim; Orenstein, Arie; Tamir, Jeremy; Regev, Eli; Shinar, Eilat; Danon, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare local injections of AMS with SOC treatments for stage III and IV pressure ulcers in elderly patients. It was designed as historically prospective 2-arms non-parallel open controlled trial, and conducted in a department of geriatric medicine and rehabilitation of a university affiliated tertiary hospital. We studied 100 consecutive elderly patients with a total of 216 stage III or IV pressure ulcers, 66 patients were assigned to the AMS group and had their wounds injected, while 38 patients were assigned to the SOC group. Primary outcome was rate of complete wound closure. Time to complete wound closure and 1-year mortality served as secondary outcomes. Statistical analyses were performed at both patient and wound levels. Percentage of completely closed wounds (wound level and patient level) were significantly better (p<0.001/p<0.001, respectively) in all patients in favor of AMS, as well as in the subset of diabetic patients (p<0.001/p<0.001). Similarly, AMS proved significantly better for the subset of those with leg ulcers and with baseline wounds ≤15 cm(2), compared with SOC. There were no statistically significant differences with regard to time to complete closure or 1-year mortality rates in the two groups. It is concluded that there is a significant difference in favor of stage III and IV wound closure rates by AMS, as compared with SOC treatments.

  7. Clinical significance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene expression in stage II/III gastric cancer with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akio; Oshima, Takashi; Yoshihara, Kazue; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Aoyama, Toru; Suganuma, Nobuyasu; Yamamoto, Naoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Rino, Yasushi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Imada, Toshio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Overall survival remains unsatisfactory in stage II/III gastric cancer, even after curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) is associated with the proliferation of cancer cells. The present study therefore investigated the association of PDGFR-β gene expression with patient outcome in 134 stage II/III gastric cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. Relative PDGFR-β gene expression was measured in surgical cancer tissue and adjacent normal mucosa specimens by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The PDGFR-β gene expression levels were found to be significantly higher in the cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal mucosa. A high level of PDGFR-β gene expression was associated with a significantly poorer 5-year overall survival rate compared with a low level of PDGFR-β expression. Upon multivariate analysis, PDGFR-β gene expression was found to be an independent predictor of survival. Overall, the study indicates that PDGFR-β overexpression in gastric cancer tissues is a useful independent predictor of outcome in patients with stage II/III gastric cancer who receive adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

  8. Prognostic value of metabolic parameters on preoperative 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with stage III gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Na, Sae Jung; O, Joo Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Han Hee; Lee, Sung Hak; Song, Kyo Young; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Park, Cho Hyun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the prognostic value of metabolic parameters determined by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with stage III gastric cancer. Patients with pre-operative PET/CT and confirmed stage III after curative surgical resection were retrospectively enrolled. Parameters evaluated from pre-operative PET/CTwere maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and peak SUV (SUVpeak) of primary tumor, SUVmax or SUVpeak of tumor to liver ratio (TLRmax and TLRpeak). Volumetric parameters, metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), were also evaluated. These PET/CT parameters were compared with the overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). From total of 133 consecutive patients, tumor recurrence was found in 54 patients (40.6%) and 53 died during the follow-up period (median, 43 mo; range 5-62). In univariate analysis, SUVmax, SUVpeak, TLRmax and TLRpeak were significantly associated with the OS and RFS. In multivariate analysis, high TLRmax and TLRpeak were significantly unfavorable prognostic factors for RFS (both P<0.05) even after adjusting for age, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, and chemotherapy. MTV and TLG showed no statistically significant correlation with outcome. In conclusion, glucose metabolism of primary tumor measured by pre-operative PET/CT provides prognostic information, especially for recurrence, in stage III gastric cancer. PMID:27564108

  9. Prognostic factors for survival in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy: Impact of tumor volume

    SciTech Connect

    Basaki, Kiyoshi . E-mail: basaki-rad@umin.ac.jp; Abe, Yoshinao; Aoki, Masahiko; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Nakaji, Shigeyuki

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of tumor volume on overall survival in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between May 1997 and February 2003, 71 patients with Stage III NSCLC were treated with radiation therapy of 60 Gy or more. The total target dose was between 60 and 77 Gy (average, 66.3 Gy). Chemotherapy was used in 45 cases. The primary tumor and nodal volume were identified in pretreatment computed tomography scans. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the impact of tumor volume on survival after RT. Results: The overall 2-year survival rate was 23%, with a median survival time of 14 months. The median survival times were 10 months and 19 months with large primary tumor volume more than median volume and smaller primary tumor volume, respectively. At a univariate analysis, the total tumor volume (TTV) (p < 0.0003) and the primary tumor volume (p < 0.00008) were significant and the nodal volume was not. At multivariate analyses, both the TTV and the primary tumor volume were significant prognostic factors. Conclusion: The primary tumor volume as well as TTV is a significant prognostic factor on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with RT and should be recorded in clinical results when the survivals are compared among clinical studies.

  10. Pretreatment Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio Is Associated with Poor Survival in Patients with Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Kalhor, Neda; Hu, Jianhua; Wang, Baocheng; Chu, Huili; Zhang, Bicheng; Guan, Yaping; Wu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been shown to be a prognostic indicator in several types of cancer. We aimed to investigate the association between NLR and survival in surgery-treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Study Design This large retrospective study included 1,245 patients who underwent initial surgery for stage I–III NSCLC at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between December 2002 and November 2010. We analyzed the relationship of NLR with clinicopathological variables, local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant recurrence-free survival (DRFS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) in patients with high or low NLR using Kaplan-Meier method. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the prognostic strength of NLR. Results There was a statistically significant association between the pretreatment NLR and histology type (P = 0.003) and tumor grade (P = 0.028). At a median follow-up time of 50.6 months, high NLR was associated with reduced DRFS (P = 0.011), OS (P < 0.0001) and DSS (P = 0.004); it was not associated with LRFS and RFS. Multivariable Cox analysis further revealed that NLR (P = 0.027), pathologic stage (P < 0.0001) and lymphovascular invasion (P < 0.0001) were strong independent predictors for DRFS. NLR was also an independent marker predicting poor OS (P = 0.002) and DSS (P = 0.017). Conclusion The pretreatment NLR can serve as a biomarker to predict distant recurrence and death in stage I–III NSCLC patients. Combination of NLR and pathologic stage can better predict the OS and DSS in stage I-II NSCLC patients. PMID:27695079

  11. Serum exosomal miR-4772-3p is a predictor of tumor recurrence in stage II and III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Eng, Cathy; Shen, Jianjun; Lu, Yue; Takata, Yoko; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Chang, George J.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Li, Yanan; Chang, Ping; Mao, Yixiang; Hassan, Manal M.; Wang, Fangyu; Li, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The study was aimed to evaluate the prognostic or predictive value of serum exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) for tumor recurrence and response to adjuvant therapy in stage II and stage III colon cancer. Results 145 differentially expressed mature miRNAs were identified (P<0.05) and 10 top hits were carried forward in validation test. MiR-4772-3p was significantly under-expressed in 27 patients with recurrence compared to in 57 patients without recurrence (P=0.002). The reduced expression was significantly related to increased risk of tumor recurrence and risk of death. As a predictor for tumor recurrence, ROC analysis revealed the AUC (95% CI) was 0.72 (0.59-0.85, P=0.001) for lower level of miR-4772-3p compared to 0.63 (0.51-0.75, P=0.062) for tumor site and 0.65 (0.51-0.78,P=0.034) for lymph node status. Among 66/84 patients who received FOLFOX adjuvant therapy, 9/10 (90%) patients with a lower level and 10/56 (18%) patients with a higher level of miR-4772-3p had tumor recurrence (P<0.001). Materials and Methods Blood samples were prospectively collected from84 patients with stage II/III colon cancer after tumor resection and before adjuvant therapy. Serum exosomal miRNA profiles were determined by RNA sequencing. Differentially expressed mature miRNAs were identified between patients with or without tumor recurrence. The top hits were validated in individual RNA samples using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. Conclusions Reduced expression of serum exosomal miR-4772-3p is a prognostic biomarker for tumor recurrence in stage II and stage III colon cancer patients. The predictive value of this marker for response to FOLFOX adjuvant therapy needs further investigation. PMID:27788488

  12. Combined Orthodontic-surgical Treatment for Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Multiple Impacted Permanent and Supernumerary Teeth: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dai Juan and Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this report we describe a combined orthodontic and surgical treatment for a 14-year-old boy with severe skeletal class III deformity and dental problem. His upper posterior primary teeth in the left side were over-retained and 6 maxillary teeth (bilateral central incisors and canines, left first and second premolars) were impacted, together with 5 supernumerary teeth in both arches. The treatment protocol involved extraction of all the supernumerary and deciduous teeth, surgical exposure and orthodontic traction of the impacted teeth, a bimaxillary orthognathic approach including Lefort I osteotomy. Bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO) and genioplasty was performed to correct skeletal problem. After treatment, all of the impacted teeth were brought to proper alignment in the maxillary arch. A satisfied profile and good posterior occlusion was achieved. Treatment mechanics and consideration during different stages are discussed. PMID:24893948

  13. Multiple Stages of Weekend Field Trips To Expose Students to Nature: Emphasis on Discovery and Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupa, James J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the three stages of a field trip and reviews stage 1, weekend field trips, which focuses on an organism's morphology, behavior, and ecology. Presents activities on salamanders, small mammals, fish, birds, and bats. Explains the difficulties of weekend trips. (YDS)

  14. Reducing bias in population and landscape genetic inferences: the effects of sampling related individuals and multiple life stages.

    PubMed

    Peterman, William; Brocato, Emily R; Semlitsch, Raymond D; Eggert, Lori S

    2016-01-01

    In population or landscape genetics studies, an unbiased sampling scheme is essential for generating accurate results, but logistics may lead to deviations from the sample design. Such deviations may come in the form of sampling multiple life stages. Presently, it is largely unknown what effect sampling different life stages can have on population or landscape genetic inference, or how mixing life stages can affect the parameters being measured. Additionally, the removal of siblings from a data set is considered best-practice, but direct comparisons of inferences made with and without siblings are limited. In this study, we sampled embryos, larvae, and adult Ambystoma maculatum from five ponds in Missouri, and analyzed them at 15 microsatellite loci. We calculated allelic richness, heterozygosity and effective population sizes for each life stage at each pond and tested for genetic differentiation (F ST and D C ) and isolation-by-distance (IBD) among ponds. We tested for differences in each of these measures between life stages, and in a pooled population of all life stages. All calculations were done with and without sibling pairs to assess the effect of sibling removal. We also assessed the effect of reducing the number of microsatellites used to make inference. No statistically significant differences were found among ponds or life stages for any of the population genetic measures, but patterns of IBD differed among life stages. There was significant IBD when using adult samples, but tests using embryos, larvae, or a combination of the three life stages were not significant. We found that increasing the ratio of larval or embryo samples in the analysis of genetic distance weakened the IBD relationship, and when using D C , the IBD was no longer significant when larvae and embryos exceeded 60% of the population sample. Further, power to detect an IBD relationship was reduced when fewer microsatellites were used in the analysis.

  15. Outcome Study of Cobalt Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients with Inoperable Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjie; Lan, Fengming; Kang, Xiaoli; Shao, Yinjian; Li, Hongqi; Li, Ping; Wu, Weizhang; Wang, Jidong; Chang, Dongshu; Wang, Yong; Xia, Tingyi

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this paper is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of specialized Body Cobalt based system (BCBS) treatment in the senior patients group (.65 years) with Stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 49 patients (41 males and 8 females) with Stage III NSCLC according to UICC TNM classification (6(th) edition) were treated using OUR-QGD™ BCBS which was designed and manufactured in China. Post treatment evaluation with follow-up information was collected from April 2001 to December 2006 in our department. Median age of enrolled patients was 71 years old (65-85). Among those patients, 36 patients were pathologically identified with squamous cell carcinoma, and the other 13 patients were confirmed as adenocarcinoma. All patients were immobilized by vacuum based immobilization mold and then performed slow CT scan without any respiration gating devices. The daily radiation prescription dose was defined at 50% isodose line covering primary lesions and metastatic lymph nodes with doses from 2.5 to 6 Gy in 5 fractions per week according to the tumor stage and internally approved treatment protocols by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Median daily dose and total delivery dose of 50% isodose line were 4 Gy and 41 Gy, respectively. In this study group, total of 3 patients received neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Tumor response evaluated 12 weeks after radiation has demonstrated 13 complete responses (26.5%), 21 partial responses (42.9%). The overall survival (OS) rate of 1-year, 2-year and 3-year was 63.3%, 40.8% and 20.4%, respectively. The median and mean survival time was 22 and 24 months. All 49 patients tolerated the treatment well and have completed the planned therapy regiment. Body Cobalt based system treatment of those over 65 years old patients with Stage III NSCLC had reasonable and superior curative effect as well as local control, and at the same time without severe radiation side effects.

  16. Predicting Individualized Postoperative Survival for Stage II/III Colon Cancer Using a Mobile Application Derived from the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Emmanuel; Attwood, Kristopher; Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Al-Sukhni, Eisar; Boland, Patrick; Nurkin, Steven

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prediction calculators estimate postoperative survival and assist the decision-making process for adjuvant treatment. The objective of this study was to create a postoperative overall survival (OS) calculator for patients with stage II/III colon cancer. Factors that influence OS, including comorbidity and postoperative variables, were included. STUDY DESIGN The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with stage II/III colon cancer, diagnosed between 2004 and 2006, who had surgical resection. Patients were randomly divided to a testing (nt) cohort comprising 80% of the dataset and a validation (nv) cohort comprising 20%. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression of nt was performed to identify factors associated with 5-year OS. These were used to build a prediction model. The performance was assessed using the nv cohort and translated into mobile software. RESULTS A total of 129,040 patients had surgery. After exclusion of patients with carcinoma in situ, non-adenocarcinoma histology, more than 1 malignancy, stage I or IV disease, or missing data, 34,176 patients were used in the development of the calculator. Independent predictors of OS included patient-specific characteristics, pathologic factors, and treatment options, including type of surgery and adjuvant therapy. Length of postoperative stay and unplanned readmission rates were also incorporated as surrogates for postoperative complications (1-day increase in postoperative stay, hazard ratio [HR] 1.019, 95% CI 1.018 to 1.021, p < 0.001; unplanned readmission vs no readmission HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.45, p < 0.001). Predicted and actual 5-year OS rates were compared in the nv cohort with 5-year area under the curve of 0.77. CONCLUSIONS An individualized, postoperative OS calculator application was developed for patients with stage II/III colon cancer. This prediction model uses nationwide data, culminating in a highly comprehensive, clinically useful tool. PMID:26922599

  17. Nomogram and recursive partitioning analysis to predict overall survival in patients with stage IIB-III thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma after esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shufei; Zhang, Wencheng; Ni, Wenjie; Xiao, Zefen; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Zongmei; Feng, Qinfu; Chen, Dongfu; Liang, Jun; Fang, Dekang; Mao, Yousheng; Gao, Shugeng; Li, Yexiong; He, Jie

    2016-01-01

    We have developed statistical models for predicting survival in patients with stage IIB–III thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and assessing the efficacy of adjuvant treatment. From a retrospective review of 3,636 patients, we created a database of 1,004 patients with stage IIB–III thoracic ESCC who underwent esophagectomy with or without postoperative radiation. Using a multivariate Cox regression model, we assessed the prognostic impact of clinical and histological factors on overall survival (OS). Logistic analysis was performed to identify factors to include in a recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) to predict 5-year OS. The nomogram was evaluated internally based on the concordance index (C-index) and a calibration plot. The median survival time in the training dataset was 30.9 months, and the 5-year survival rate was 33.9%. T stage, differentiated grade, adjuvant treatment, tumor location, lymph node metastatic ratio (LNMR), and the presence of vascular carcinomatous thrombi were statistically significant predictors of 5-year OS. The C-index of the nomogram was 0.70 (95% CI 0.67–0.73). RPA resulted in a three-class stratification: class 1, LNMR ≤ 0.15 with adjuvant treatment; class 2, LNMR ≤ 0.15 without adjuvant treatment and LNMR > 0.15 with adjuvant treatment; and class 3, LNMR > 0.15 without adjuvant treatment. The three classes were statistically significant for OS (P < 0.001). Thus, the nomogram and RPA models predicted the prognosis of stage IIB–III ESCC patients and could be used in decision-making and clinical trials. PMID:27487146

  18. Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dorth, Jennifer A.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Broadwater, Gloria; Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W.; Coleman, R. Edward; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

  19. Long-term results of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the primary treatment of medically inoperable stage I-II endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Souhami, Luis . E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Portelance, Lorraine; Bahoric, Boris; Gilbert, Lucy; Stanimir, Gerald

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Total-abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) is the gold-standard therapy for patients with endometrial carcinoma. However, patients with high operative risks are usually treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone. The goal of this study was to update our experience of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with or without external-beam irradiation (EBRT), for such patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 38 patients with Stage I and Stage II adenocarcinoma of the endometrium considered high operative risk received RT as the primary treatment. The median age was 74.1 years. Before 1996, the local extent of the disease was assessed by an examination under anesthesia (EUA) and by EUA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thereafter. Eight patients (21%) were treated with combined HDRB and EBRT, and 30 patients (79%) were treated with with HDRB alone. The median HDRB dose was 23.9 Gy, typically delivered in 3 fractions in a weekly schedule. The median EBRT dose was 42 Gy. Results: At a median follow-up of 57.5 months for patients at risk, 11 patients (29%) have failed: 6 patients (16%) locally, 4 patients (10.5%) distantly, and 1 patient (3%) locally and distantly. Local failure was established by biopsy, and 4 patients were salvaged by TAHBSO. Higher stage and higher grade were both associated with increased failure rate. The 15-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 78% for all stages, 90% for Stage I, and 42% for Stage II (p < 0.0001). The 15-year DSS was 91% for Grade I and 67% for Grade II and III combined (p = 0.0254). Patients with Stage I disease established by MRI (11 patients) and who received a total HDRB dose of 30 Gy had a DSS rate of 100% at 10 years. Four patients experienced late toxicities: 1 Grade II and 3 Grade III or IV. Conclusion: Medically inoperable Stage I endometrial carcinoma may be safely and effectively treated with HDRB as the primary therapy. In selected Stage I patients, our results are

  20. [The BCTRIMS Expanded Consensus on treatment of multiple sclerosis: III. Evidence and recommendation-based guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Moreira, Marcos Aurélio; Campos, Gilberto Belisário; Marchiori, Paulo Eurípedes; Gabbai, Alberto Alain; Bacheschi, Luiz Alberto; Arruda, Walter Oleschko; Gama, Paulo Diniz; Melo, Aílton Souza; Rocha, Fernando Coronetti Gomes; Lino, Angelina Maria Martins; Ferreira, Maria Lúcia Brito; Ataide, Luiz

    2002-09-01

    There has been unprecedented advances in knowledge of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the last few years. A new set of criteria for its diagnosis and a bunch of recent clinical trials with disease-modifying agents (DMA) have been published. All of that has made it necessary to update and expand the previous consensus for MS treatment as formulated by the Brazilian Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (BCTRIMS) two years ago. The BCTRIMS Expanded Consensus emphasizes the need to (1) consider MS treatment on an individual basis; (2) educate patients about the potential benefits and risks of treatment; (3) monitor drugs side effects; (4) have a signed Informed Consent Form; (5) consider the relative cost of the drug. The various clinical possibilities and the indications of the DMA and other immunointerventions are considered according to classes of evidences and types of recommendations. The BCTRIMS Expanded Consensus on Treatment of MS may turn out to be a model to other developing countries.

  1. Highly efficient multiple-layer CdS quantum dot sensitized III-V solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Chung; Han, Hau-Vei; Chen, Hsin-Chu; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lin, Wein-Yi; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Yu, Peichen

    2014-02-01

    In this review, the concept of utilization of solar spectrum in order to increase the solar cell efficiency is discussed. Among the three mechanisms, down-shifting effect is investigated in detail. Organic dye, rare-earth minerals and quantum dots are three most popular down-shift materials. While the enhancement of solar cell efficiency was not clearly observed in the past, the advances in quantum dot fabrication have brought strong response out of the hybrid platform of a quantum dot solar cell. A multiple layer structure, including PDMS as the isolation layer, is proposed and demonstrated. With the help of pulse spray system, precise control can be achieved and the optimized concentration can be found.

  2. Coherent nanocavity structures for enhancement in internal quantum efficiency of III-nitride multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.; Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T.

    2014-04-21

    A “coherent” nanocavity structure has been designed on two-dimensional well-ordered InGaN/GaN nanodisk arrays with an emission wavelength in the green spectral region, leading to a massive enhancement in resonance mode in the green spectra region. By means of a cost-effective nanosphere lithography technique, we have fabricated such a structure on an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well epiwafer and have observed the “coherent” nanocavity effect, which leads to an enhanced spontaneous emission (SE) rate. The enhanced SE rate has been confirmed by time resolved photoluminescence measurements. Due to the coherent nanocavity effect, we have achieved a massive improvement in internal quantum efficiency with a factor of 88, compared with the as-grown sample, which could be significant to bridge the “green gap” in solid-state lighting.

  3. Prognostic significance of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with stage III and IV colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jun Yeop; Kim, Hae Koo; Lee, Jin Wook; Jung, Sung Gyu; Jung, Kyoungwon; Kim, Sung Eun; Moon, Won; Park, Moo In; Park, Seun Ja

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the prognostic value of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS Between April 1996 and December 2010, medical records from a total of 1868 patients with CRC were retrospectively reviewed. The values of simple inflammatory markers including NLR and PLR in predicting the long-term outcomes of these patients were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression models. RESULTS The median follow-up duration was 46 mo (interquartile range, 22-73). The estimation of NLR and PLR was based on the time of diagnosis. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, high NLR (≥ 3.0) and high PLR (≥ 160) were independent risk factors predicting poor long-term outcomes in patients with stage III and IV CRC. However, high NLR and high PLR were not prognostic factors in patients with stage I and II CRC. CONCLUSION In this study, we identified that high NLR (≥ 3.0) and high PLR (≥ 160) are useful prognostic factors to predict long-term outcomes in patients with stage III and IV CRC. PMID:28210087

  4. PAK6 increase chemoresistance and is a prognostic marker for stage II and III colon cancer patients undergoing 5-FU based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongwang; Cui, Feifei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Fudong; Xue, Yingming; Feng, Xiaodong; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Senlin; Yu, Yang; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2015-01-01

    p21-Activated kinase 6 (PAK6) has been implicated in radiotherapy and docetaxel resistance. We have further evaluated PAK6 as a predictor of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment response in colon cancer. Here we report that in colon cancer PAK6 promotes tumor progression and chemoresistance both in vitro and in vivo. In the clinical analysis, PAK6 was overexpressed in 104 of 147 (70.75%) stage II and III patients who received 5-FU based chemotherapy after surgery. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that PAK6 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (P < 0.001). Colon cancer cell lines showed increased PAK6 expression upon 5-FU treatment. In PAK6-knockdown cells treated with 5-FU, cell viability and phosphorylation of BAD decreased, and the number of apoptotic cells, levels of cleaved caspase 3 and PARP increased compared to control cells. The opposite was observed in PAK6 overexpressing cells. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of PAK6 blocked cells in G2-M phase. Furthermore, Animal experiments results in vivo are consistent with outcomes in vitro. This study demonstrates that PAK6 is an independent prognostic factor for adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with stage II and stage III colon cancer. PMID:25426562

  5. Optical modes within III-nitride multiple quantum well microdisk cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, R. A.; Zeng, K. C.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Zhang, B.; Dai, L.; Botchkarev, A.; Kim, W.; Morkoç, H.; Khan, M. A.

    1998-03-01

    Optical resonance modes have been observed in optically pumped microdisk cavities fabricated from 50 Å/50 Å GaN/AlxGa1-xN(x˜0.07) and 45 Å/45 Å InxGa1-xN/GaN(x˜0.15) multiple quantum well structures. Microdisks, approximately 9 μm in diameter and regularly spaced every 50 μm, were formed by an ion beam etch process. Individual disks were pumped at 300 and 10 K with 290 nm laser pulses focused to a spot size much smaller than the disk diameter. Optical modes corresponding to (i) the radial mode type with a spacing of 49-51 meV (both TE and TM) and (ii) the Whispering Gallery mode with a spacing of 15-16 meV were observed in the GaN microdisk cavities. The spacings of these modes are consistent with those expected for modes within a resonant cavity of cylindrical symmetry, refractive index, and dimensions of the microdisks under investigation. The GaN-based microdisk cavity is compared with its GaAs counterpart and implications regarding future GaN-based microdisk lasers are discussed.

  6. Impact of biexcitons on the relaxation mechanisms of polaritons in III-nitride based multiple quantum well microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corfdir, P.; Levrat, J.; Rossbach, G.; Butté, R.; Feltin, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Christmann, G.; Lefebvre, P.; Ganière, J.-D.; Grandjean, N.; Deveaud-Plédran, B.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the direct observation of biexcitons in a III-nitride based multiple quantum well microcavity operating in the strong light-matter coupling regime by means of nonresonant continuous wave and time-resolved photoluminescence at low temperature. First, the biexciton dynamics is investigated for the bare active medium (multiple quantum wells alone) evidencing localization on potential fluctuations due to alloy disorder and thermalization between both localized and free excitonic and biexcitonic populations. Then, the role of biexcitons is considered for the full microcavity: in particular, we observe that for specific detunings the bottom of the lower polariton branch is directly fed by the radiative dissociation of either cavity biexcitons or excitons mediated by one LO-phonon. Accordingly, minimum polariton lasing thresholds are observed, when the bottom of the lower polariton branch corresponds in energy to the exciton or cavity biexciton first LO-phonon replica. This singular observation highlights the role of excitonic molecules in the polariton condensate formation process as being a more efficient relaxation channel when compared to the usually assumed acoustical phonon emission one.

  7. Feasibility of sequential adjuvant chemotherapy with a 3-month oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine in patients with stage III and high-risk stage II colorectal cancer: JSWOG-C2 study

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruta, Atsushi; Yamashita, Kazuki; Tanioka, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Akihito; Inukai, Michio; Yamakawa, Toshiki; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Yoshimitsu, Masanori; Toyota, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Taketoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Okajima, Masazumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Six months of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is the standard adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). Also, patients with stage II CRC who are considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence often receive the same adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. We prospectively investigated the extent and degree of neuropathy suffered by stage III and high-risk stage II resectable CRC patients who underwent sequential approach involving 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine. Patients and methods Patients with completely resected stage III and high-risk stage II CRC aged ≥20 years were eligible. Patients were treated with folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) for 3 months followed by capecitabine (2,500 mg/m2 on days 1–14 every 3 weeks) for 3 months. Primary end points were frequency and the grade of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity as evaluated using the physician-based Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE) grading and the patient-based scale, self-reported Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire. Results Ninety-one patients were enrolled and 86 patients assessed. Eighty-four percent of patients completed the planned oxaliplatin-based therapy for 3 months, and 63% of patients completed all treatments for the full 6 months. Overall incidences of grade 3 or 4 peripheral sensory or motor neuropathy according to the CTCAE were 3.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Regarding the peripheral sensory neuropathy, the proportion of Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (grade C–E) and CTCAE (grade 2–4) at months 1.5/3/6 were 11.3/22.1/29.4% and 5.3/4.4/11.3%, respectively (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.47). Conclusion A sequential approach to adjuvant chemotherapy with 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine was tolerated by patients and associated with a low incidence of

  8. Two-Stage Separation of V(IV) and Al(III) by Crystallization and Solvent Extraction from Aluminum-Rich Sulfuric Acid Leaching Solution of Stone Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qihua; Zhang, Yimin; Liu, Tao; Huang, Jing; Liu, Hong

    2016-12-01

    To improve separation of V(IV) and Al(III) from aluminum-rich sulfuric acid leaching solution of stone coal, the two-stage separation by crystallization and solvent extraction methods have been developed. A co-extraction coefficient (k) was put forward to evaluate comprehensively co-extraction extent in different solutions. In the crystallization stage, 68.2% of aluminum can be removed from the solution. In the solvent extraction stage, vanadium was selectively extracted using di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid/tri-n-butyl phosphate from the crystalline mother solution, followed by H2SO4 stripped efficiently. A V2O5 product with purity of 98.39% and only 0.10% Al was obtained after oxidation, precipitation, and calcination. Compared with vanadium extraction from solution without crystallization, the counter-current extraction stage of vanadium can be decreased from 6 to 3 and co-extraction coefficient (k) decreased from 2.51 to 0.58 with two-stage separation. It is suggested that the aluminum removal by crystallization can evidently weaken the influence of aluminum co-extraction on vanadium extraction and improve the selectivity of solvent extraction for vanadium.

  9. Screening for a Chronic Disease: A Multiple Stage Duration Model with Partial Observability.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Thomas A; Picone, Gabriel; Sloan, Frank; Yashkin, Arseniy P

    2016-08-01

    We estimate a dynamic multi-stage duration model to investigate how early detection of diabetes can delay the onset of lower extremity complications and death. We allow for partial observability of the disease stage, unmeasured heterogeneity, and endogenous timing of diabetes screening. Timely diagnosis appears important. We evaluate the effectiveness of two potential policies to reduce the monetary costs of frequent screening in terms of lost longevity. Compared to the status quo, the more restrictive policy yields an implicit value for an additional year of life of about $50,000, while the less restrictive policy implies a value of about $120,000.

  10. Improved Survival in Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy as Primary Local Treatment Modality

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Raben, David; Chen Changhu

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the overall and cause-specific survival in patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy (RT) as the primary local treatment modality. Methods and Materials: The survival of patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT was queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. The effect of the year of treatment on overall and cause-specific survival was analyzed as a categorical and continuous variable. The patterns of care for these patients were also evaluated. Results: Between 1988 and 2004, 6,759 patients were identified. Survival was significantly improved in patients treated more recently. When analyzed as a continuous variable, each year was associated with a 3% and 4.1% reduction in the relative risk of overall and cause-specific mortality, respectively (p < 0.0001). Patients treated after 1998 had a 7.6% and 6.1% absolute improvement in overall and cause-specific survival, respectively, compared with patients treated before 1998 (overall survival, hazard ratio, 0.81; cause-specific survival, hazard ratio, 0.77; p < 0.0001). This benefit in survival was limited to tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. The use of RT increased among patients treated more recently. This shift in patterns of care was most pronounced for tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Conclusions: The overall and cause-specific survival of patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT has improved with time. The improvement is consistent with that observed in a large meta-analysis of randomized patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  11. Histology of the Oral Mucosa in Patients With BRONJ at III Stage: A Microscopic Study Proves the Unsuitability of Local Mucosal Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Sara Di; Trapassi, Alberto; Corradino, Bartolo; Cordova, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonate Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (BRONJ) is a newly recognized condition reported in patients treated with aminobisphosphonates (BF). BRONJ is defined as the presence of exposed necrotic alveolar bone that does not resolve over a period of 8 weeks in a patient taking bisphosphonates who has not had radiotherapy to the jaw. Treatment protocols have been outlined, but trials and outcomes of treatment and long-term follow-up data are not yet available. In 2004 an expert panel outlined recommendations for the management of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws. Through the histological study of the oral mucosa over the bone necrosis and around the osteonecrosis area in 8 patients affected by BRONJ at III stage, the authors highlight the inappropriateness of the local mucosal flaps to cover the losses of substance of the jaw, BF-related. Methods Mucosa tissue was taken from 8 patients, affected by BRONJ, III stage. The samples taken from the mucosa around and over the osteonecrosis area were fixed with formalin and an ematossilina-eosin dichromatic coloring was carried out. Results The samples of mucosa showed pathognomonic signs of cell suffering that prove that in these patients using local mucosa flaps is inappropriate. Conclusions The authors suggest that only a well vascularized flap as free flap must be used to cover the osteonecrosis area in patients with BRONJ stage III. Because of the structural instability of the mucosa in patients suffering of osteonecrosis Bf related the local flaps are prone to ulceration and to relapse. PMID:23390472

  12. Survival outcomes improved in contemporary cohort of patients with pelvic or abdominal recurrence after treatment for Stage I/II endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Melody J.; Chu, Christina; Rubin, Stephen; Lin, Lilie L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pelvic and abdominal recurrences in Stage I/II endometrial carcinoma are associated with poor outcomes, yet prognostic factors for survival after recurrence are not well-described. Herein we identify patients with pelvic or abdominal recurrence after surgery for Stage I/II endometrial carcinoma and describe symptoms at presentation, prognostic factors, and salvage treatment toxicity. Methods This is a retrospective cohort of 20 consecutively treated patients with recurrence after treatment for Stage I/II endometrial carcinoma followed by our Institution’s Radiation Oncology Department from 1998-2015. Results The median time to pelvic or abdominal recurrence was 18.1 months (range, 4.2-59.6 months), with 50% of recurrences at extra-nodal locations. Two year progression-free survival (PFS) was 44% and 2 year overall survival (OS) was 82%. Salvage treatments varied widely, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) (7), surgery and RT (3), and surgery, chemotherapy, and RT (3). On univariate analysis of PFS, symptoms at recurrence (p=0.04) and extra-nodal recurrences (p<0.01) were found to be statistically significant negative prognosticators for PFS. On univariate analysis of OS, increasing age at recurrence and presence of symptoms were found to have a trend toward statistically significant association with negative OS outcomes (p=0.08 and p=0.10, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrates long-term survival for pelvic or abdominal recurrences is possible with curative salvage therapy. The presence of symptoms is a negative prognostic factor in treatment outcome and imaging may be effective for diagnosis in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Larger studies need to be performed to confirm these findings. PMID:26237194

  13. A Prospective Study of Comparing Multi-Gene Biomarker Chip and Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen in the Postoperative Surveillance for Patients with Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Tang; Huang, Ming-Yii; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating biomarkers can predict clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of our multigene biomarker chip for detecting circulating tumor cells for postoperative surveillance of stage I–III colorectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods In total, 298 stage I–III colorectal cancer patients were analyzed after curative resection between June 2010 and October 2014. During each follow-up, a postoperative surveillance strategy, including ESMO Guidelines Working Group recommendations and the biochip, was used. Results After a 28.4-month median follow-up, 48 (16.1%) patients had postoperative relapse. Univariate analysis revealed that the postoperative relapse risk factors were rectal tumor, perineural invasion, elevated preoperative and postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, and positive biochip results (all P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that postoperative relapse correlated significantly with elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (odds ratio = 4.136, P = 0.008) and positive biochip results (odds ratio = 66.878, P < 0.001). However, the sensitivity (P = 0.003), specificity (P = 0.003), positive (P = 0.002) and negative (P = 0.006) predictive values, and accuracy (P < 0.001) of the biochip for predicting postoperative relapse were significantly higher than those of elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Moreover, the median lead time between positive biochip result and postoperative relapse detection was significantly earlier than that between elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and postoperative relapse detection (10.7 vs. 2.8 months, P < 0.001). Furthermore, positive biochip results correlated strongly with lower disease-free survival and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients (both P < 0.001). Conclusion Compared with conventional serum carcinoembryonic antigen detection, our multigene

  14. TOPoS. III. An ultra iron-poor multiple CEMP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Monaco, L.; Sbordone, L.; François, P.; Gallagher, A. J.; Plez, B.; Zaggia, S.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Cayrel, R.; Koch, A.; Steffen, M.; Salvadori, S.; Klessen, R.; Glover, S.; Christlieb, N.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: One of the primary objectives of the TOPoS survey is to search for the most metal-poor stars. Our search has led to the discovery of one of the most iron-poor objects known, SDSS J092912.32+023817.0. This object is a multiple system, in which two components are clearly detected in the spectrum. Methods: We have analysed 16 high-resolution spectra obtained using the UVES spectrograph at the ESO 8.2 m VLT telescope to measure radial velocities and determine the chemical composition of the system. Results: Cross correlation of the spectra with a synthetic template yields a double-peaked cross-correlation function (CCF) for eight spectra, and in one case there is evidence for the presence of a third peak. Chemical analysis of the spectrum obtained by averaging all the spectra for which the CCF showed a single peak found that the iron abundance is [Fe/H] = -4.97. The system is also carbon enhanced with [C/Fe] = +3.91 (A(C) = 7.44). From the permitted oxygen triplet we determined an upper limit for oxygen of [O/Fe] < +3.52 such that C/O > 1.3. We are also able to provide more stringent upper limits on the Sr and Ba abundances ([Sr/Fe] < +0.70, and [Ba/Fe] < +1.46, respectively). Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 094.D-0488 and 096.D-0616.

  15. Iii-V Compound Multiple Quantum Well Based Modulator and Switching Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Songcheol

    A general formalism to study the absorption and photocurrent in multiple quantum well is provided with detailed consideration of quantum confined Stark shift, exciton binding energy, line broadening, tunneling, polarization, and strain effects. Results on variation of exciton size, binding energies and transition energies as a function electric field and well size have been presented. Inhomogeneous line broadening of exciton lines due to interface roughness, alloy disorder and well to well size fluctuation is calculated. The potential of material tailoring by introducing strain for specific optical response is discussed. Theoretical and experimental results on excitonic and band-to-band absorption spectra in strained multi-quantum well structures are shown. I also report on polarization dependent optical absorption for excitonic and interband transitions in lattice matched and strained multiquantum well structures in presence of transverse electric field. Photocurrent in a p-i(MQW)-n diode with monochromatic light is examined with respect to different temperatures and intensities. The negative resistance of I-V characteristic of the p-i-n diode is based on the quantum confined Stark effect of the heavy hole excitonic transition in a multiquantum well. This exciton based photocurrent characteristic allows efficient switching. A general purpose low power optical logic device using the controller-modulator concept bas been proposed and realized. The controller is a heterojunction phototransistor with multiquantum wells in the base-collector depletion region. This allows an amplified photocurrent controlled voltage feedback with low light intensity levels. Detailed analysis of the sensitivity of this device in various modes of operation is studied. Studies are also presented on the cascadability of the device as well as its integrating -thresholding properties. A multiquantum well heterojunction bipolar transistor (MHBT), which has N^+ -p^+-i(MQW)-N structure has been

  16. Chemotherapeutic and surgical induction of pathological complete remission and whole abdominal irradiation for consolidation does not enhance the cure of stage III ovarian carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fuks, Z.; Rizel, S.; Biran, S.

    1988-03-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III ovarian carcinoma were treated with a protocol consisting of an initial phase of induction of remission with cyclophosphamide, hexamethylmelamine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (CHAD) combination chemotherapy and a second laparotomy for resection of residual tumors, followed by a consolidation phase with curative doses of whole abdominal radiation. Six patients (16%) had stage IIIA disease, ten (26%) IIIB, and 22 (58%) had stage IIIC disease. All patients received three to 14 courses of CHAD chemotherapy with a clinical response rate (complete (CR) and partial (PR)) of 91%. Thirty-three patients underwent the second operation. In 14 patients no residual tumor was found, and in another 11 residual tumors found were totally resected. Thus, 25 of 33 (76%) were classified as in pathological complete remission (PCR) after this operation. Whole abdominal irradiation was well tolerated, although 12 of 29 (42%) of the irradiated patients required more than a 2-week interruption of the treatment course because of leukopenia and/or thrombocytopenia. The actuarial 5-year survival and disease-free survival rates for the whole group were 27% and 17%, respectively, and for the 29 patients who received the complete sequence of the prescribed protocol treatments, 35% and 20%, respectively. A univariate analysis of clinical parameters showed that inherent biological features, such as histology and grade, were the most dominant factors affecting prognosis, and that neither the aggressive surgical approach employed, nor the high-dose whole abdominal irradiation, significantly affected the outcome. The long-term results suggest that although our combined modality protocol was well tolerated, it failed to enhance the cure of stage III ovarian carcinoma. The possible biological and therapeutic vectors affecting this outcome are discussed.

  17. Study protocol of the SACURA trial: a randomized phase III trial of efficacy and safety of UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer is internationally accepted as standard treatment with established efficacy, but the usefulness of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer remains controversial. The major Western guidelines recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for “high-risk stage II” cancer, but this is not clearly defined and the efficacy has not been confirmed. Methods/design SACURA trial is a multicenter randomized phase III study which aims to evaluate the superiority of 1-year adjuvant treatment with UFT to observation without any adjuvant treatment after surgery for stage II colon cancer in a large population, and to identify “high-risk factors of recurrence/death” in stage II colon cancer and predictors of efficacy and adverse events of the chemotherapy. Patients aged between 20 and 80 years with curatively resected stage II colon cancer are randomly assigned to a observation group or UFT adjuvant therapy group (UFT at 500–600 mg/day as tegafur in 2 divided doses after meals for 5 days, followed by 2-day rest. This 1-week treatment cycle is repeated for 1 year). The patients are followed up for 5 years until recurrence or death. Treatment delivery and adverse events are entered into a web-based case report form system every 3 months. The target sample size is 2,000 patients. The primary endpoint is disease-free survival, and the secondary endpoints are overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and incidence and severity of adverse events. In an additional translational study, the mRNA expression of 5-FU-related enzymes, microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability, and histopathological factors including tumor budding are assessed to evaluate correlation with recurrences, survivals and adverse events. Discussion A total of 2,024 patients were enrolled from October 2006 to July 2010. The results of this study will provide important information that help to improve the therapeutic strategy for

  18. Single-stage repair of aortic coarctation and multiple concomitant cardiac lesions through a median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Kervan, Umit; Yurdakok, Okan; Genc, Bahadir; Ozen, Anil; Saritas, Ahmet; Kucuker, Seref Alp; Pac, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Through a median sternotomy, we performed a single-stage repair of severe aortic coarctation, ventricular septal defect, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve insufficiency. The severe aortic coarctation was repaired by interposing a synthetic graft between the distal ascending aorta and the descending aorta. We first repaired the coarctation with the 38-year-old man on cardiopulmonary bypass, before aortic cross-clamping, in order to shorten the cross-clamp time.

  19. Solar coronal temperature diagnostics using emission line from multiple stages of ionization of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Davila, Joseph M.; Thomas, Roger J.; Thompson, William T.

    1994-01-01

    We obtained spatially resolved extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectra of AR 6615 on 1991 May 7 with NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center's Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS). Included are emission lines from four different stages of ionization of iron: Fe(+15) lambda 335 A, Fe(+14) lambda 327 A, Fe(+13) lambda 334 A, and Fe(+12) lambda 348 A. Using intensity ratios from among these lines, we have calculated the active region coronal temperature along the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) slit. Temperatures derived from line ratios which incorporate adjacent stages of ionization are most sensitive to measurement uncertainties and yield the largest scatter. Temperatures derived from line ratios which incorporate nonadjacent stages of ionization are less sensitive to measurement uncertainties and yield little scatter. The active region temperature derived from these latter ratios has an average value of 2.54 x 10(exp 6) K, with a standard deviation approximately 0.12 x 10(exp 6) K, and shows no significant variation with position along the slit.

  20. Melphalan, prednisone, thalidomide and defibrotide in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: results of a multicenter phase I/II trial

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Larocca, Alessandra; Genuardi, Mariella; Kotwica, Katarzyna; Gay, Francesca; Rossi, Davide; Benevolo, Giulia; Magarotto, Valeria; Cavallo, Federica; Bringhen, Sara; Rus, Cecilia; Masini, Luciano; Iacobelli, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Mitsiades, Constantine; Anderson, Kenneth; Boccadoro, Mario; Richardson, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Defibrotide is a novel orally bioavailable polydisperse oligonucleotide with anti-thrombotic and anti-adhesive effects. In SCID/NOD mice, defibrotide showed activity in human myeloma xenografts. This phase I/II study was conducted to identify the most appropriate dose of defibrotide in combination with melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide in patients with relapsed and relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, and to determine its safety and tolerability as part of this regimen. Design and Methods This was a phase I/II, multicenter, dose-escalating, non-comparative, open label study. Oral melphalan was administered at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg on days 1–4, prednisone at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg also on days 1–4 and thalidomide at a dose of 50–100 mg/day continuously. Defibrotide was administered orally at three dose-levels: 2.4, 4.8 or 7.2 g on days 1–4 and 1.6, 3.2, or 4.8 g on days 5–35. Results Twenty-four patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. In all patients, the complete response plus very good partial response rate was 9%, and the partial response rate was 43%. The 1-year progression-free survival and 1-year overall survival rates were 34% and 90%, respectively. The most frequent grade 3–4 adverse events included neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia and fatigue. Deep vein thrombosis was reported in only one patient. Conclusions This combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide together with defibrotide showed anti-tumor activity with a favorable tolerability. The maximum tolerated dose of defibrotide was identified as 7.2 g p.o. on days 1–4 followed by 4.8 g p.o. on days 5–35. Further trials are needed to confirm the role of this regimen and to evaluate the combination of defibrotide with new drugs (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00406978). PMID:20053869

  1. Total Gross Tumor Volume Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients Treated With Selective Nodal Irradiation for Stage I to III Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reymen, Bart; Van Loon, Judith; Baardwijk, Angela van; Wanders, Rinus; Borger, Jacques; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Bootsma, Gerben; Pitz, Cordula; Lunde, Ragnar; Geraedts, Wiel; Lambin, Philippe; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: In non-small cell lung cancer, gross tumor volume (GTV) influences survival more than other risk factors. This could also apply to small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Analysis of our prospective database with stage I to III SCLC patients referred for concurrent chemo radiation therapy. Standard treatment was 45 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions twice daily concurrently with carboplatin-etoposide, followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in case of non-progression. Only fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-positive or pathologically proven nodal sites were included in the target volume. Total GTV consisted of post chemotherapy tumor volume and pre chemotherapy nodal volume. Survival was calculated from diagnosis (Kaplan-Meier ). Results: A total of 119 patients were included between May 2004 and June 2009. Median total GTV was 93 ± 152 cc (7.5-895 cc). Isolated elective nodal failure occurred in 2 patients (1.7%). Median follow-up was 38 months, median overall survival 20 months (95% confidence interval = 17.8-22.1 months), and 2-year survival 38.4%. In multivariate analysis, only total GTV (P=.026) and performance status (P=.016) significantly influenced survival. Conclusions: In this series of stage I to III small cell lung cancer patients treated with FDG-PET-based selective nodal irradiation total GTV is an independent risk factor for survival.

  2. Dose-finding study of irinotecan and cisplatin plus concurrent radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer [seecomments

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, A.; Kurita, Y.; Saijo, N.; Tamura, T.; Noda, K.; Shimokata, K.; Matsuda, T.

    1998-01-01

    Irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11) shows marked anti-tumour activity alone and in combination with cisplatin in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is necessary to investigate combined-modality therapy including novel effective anti-cancer agents to improve long-term survival of patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC. A phase I/II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with CPT-11 and cisplatin was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy in this group of patients. Thirteen previously untreated patients with unresectable stage IIIA/B NSCLC were enrolled and efficacy and toxicity was evaluated in 12 of them; one patient was ineligible. Chemotherapy was repeated every 4 weeks for three courses. Radiation therapy was started on day 2 of the first course of chemotherapy and 60 Gy in 30 fractions was given over 6 weeks. Four of six patients enrolled at level 1 completed the scheduled treatment. Another two received only one and two courses of chemotherapy as a result of persistent leucopenia and neutropenic fever respectively. Three of six patients given level 2 therapy completed the scheduled treatment. Another three received only one and two courses of chemotherapy, two refused treatment because of diarrhoea and one died of pneumonia. Radiation therapy was inadequate in these three patients. As the CPT-11 dose intensity in this trial was low, because of the necessity of omitting CPT-11 administration on days 8 and/or 15 as a result of leucopenia or diarrhoea, and the low radiation therapy completion rate, the trial was discontinued at level 2. Five patients at level 1 and three at level 2 showed partial responses, an overall response rate of 67%. Although neither MTD nor dose-limiting toxicity could be identified, chemotherapy with CPT-11 and cisplatin plus concurrent radiation therapy was deemed unacceptable. We are now conducting a phase I/II study of chemotherapy using CPT-11 as a single agent in combination with radiation therapy

  3. Phylogenetic analysis with multiple markers indicates repeated loss of the adult medusa stage in Campanulariidae (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Annette F; Boero, Ferdinando; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2006-03-01

    The Campanulariidae is a group of leptomedusan hydroids (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria) that exhibit a diverse array of life cycles ranging from species with a free medusa stage to those with a reduced or absent medusa stage. Perhaps the best-known member of the taxon is Obelia which is often used as a textbook model of hydrozoan life history. However, Obelia medusae have several unique features leading to a hypothesis that Obelia arose, in a saltational fashion, from an ancestor that lacked a medusa, possibly representing an example of a rare evolutionary reversal. To address the evolution of adult sexual stages in Campanulariidae, a molecular phylogenetic approach was employed using two nuclear (18S rDNA and calmodulin) and two mitochondrial (16S rDNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I) genes. Prior to the main analysis, we conducted a preliminary analysis of leptomedusan taxa which suggests that Campanulariidae as presently considered needs to be redefined. Campanulariid analyses are consistent with morphological understanding in that three major clades are recovered. However, several recognized genera are not monophyletic calling into question some "diagnostic" features. Furthermore, ancestral states were reconstructed using parsimony, and a sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate possible evolutionary transitions in life-history stages. The results indicate that life-cycle transitions have occurred multiple times, and that Obelia might be derived from an ancestor with Clytia-like features.

  4. Activation status of human microglia is dependent on lesion formation stage and remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peferoen, Laura A N; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Ummenthum, Kimberley; Breur, Marjolein; Heijnen, Priscilla D A M; Gerritsen, Wouter H; Peferoen-Baert, Regina M B; van der Valk, Paul; Dijkstra, Christine D; Amor, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Similar to macrophages, microglia adopt diverse activation states and contribute to repair and tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, we show that in vitro M1-polarized (proinflammatory) human adult microglia express the distinctive markers CD74, CD40, CD86, and CCR7, whereas M2 (anti-inflammatory) microglia express mannose receptor and the anti-inflammatory cytokine CCL22. The expression of these markers was assessed in clusters of activated microglia in normal-appearing white matter (preactive lesions) and areas of remyelination, representing reparative multiple sclerosis lesions. We show that activated microglia in preactive and remyelinating lesions express CD74, CD40, CD86, and the M2 markers CCL22 and CD209, but not mannose receptor. To examine whether this intermediate microglia profile is static or dynamic and thus susceptible to changes in the microenvironment, we polarized microglia into M1 or M2 phenotype in vitro and then subsequently treated them with the opposing polarization regimen. These studies revealed that expression of CD40, CXCL10, and mannose receptor is dynamic and that microglia, like macrophages, can switch between M1 and M2 phenotypic profiles. Taken together, our data define the differential activation states of microglia during lesion development in multiple sclerosis-affected CNS tissues and underscore the plasticity of human adult microglia in vitro.

  5. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Comparison of the methods of fibrinolysis by tube thoracostomy and thoracoscopic decortication in children with stage II and III empyema: a prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Ufuk; Sayir, Fuat; Bilici, Salim; Melek, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Today, in spite of the developments in imaging methods and antibiotherapy, childhood pleural empyema is a prominent cause of morbidity and mortality. In recent years, it has been shown that there has been an increase in the frequency of pleural empyema in children, and antibiotic resistance in microorganisms causing pleural empyema has made treatment difficult. Despite the many studies investigating thoracoscopic debridement and fibrinolytic treatment separately in the management of this disease, there is are not enough studies comparing these two treatments. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the efficacy of two different treatment methods in stage II and III empyema cases and to present a perspective for treatment options. We excluded from the study cases with: i) thoracoscopic intervention and fibrinolytic agent were contraindicated; ii) immunosuppression or additional infection focus; iii) concomitant diseases, those with bronchopleural fistula diagnosed radiologically, and Stage I cases. This gave a total of 54 cases: 23 (42.6%) in stage II, and 31 (57.4%) cases in stage III. These patients were randomized into two groups of 27 cases each for debridement or fibrinolytic agent application by video-assisted thoracoscopic decortication (VATS). The continuity of symptoms after the operation, duration of thoracic tube in situ, and the length of hospital stay in the VATS group were of significantly shorter duration than in the streptokinase applications (P=0.0001). In 19 of 27 cases (70.37%) in which fibrinolytic treatment was applied and in 21 cases of 27 (77.77%) in which VATS was applied, the lung was fully expanded and the procedure was considered successful. There was no significant difference with respect to success rates between the two groups (P=0.533). The complication rate in our cases was 12.96% and no mortality was observed. Similar success rates in thoracoscopic drainage and enzymatic debridement, and the low cost of enzymatic drainage

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas, common hepatic artery, and portal vein. Also shown ... and superior mesenteric artery. Stage III pancreatic cancer. Cancer ... near the pancreas. These include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, ...

  8. Severe NDE1-mediated microcephaly results from neural progenitor cell cycle arrests at multiple specific stages

    PubMed Central

    Doobin, David J.; Kemal, Shahrnaz; Dantas, Tiago J.; Vallee, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Microcephaly is a cortical malformation disorder characterized by an abnormally small brain. Recent studies have revealed severe cases of microcephaly resulting from human mutations in the NDE1 gene, which is involved in the regulation of cytoplasmic dynein. Here using in utero electroporation of NDE1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in embryonic rat brains, we observe cell cycle arrest of proliferating neural progenitors at three distinct stages: during apical interkinetic nuclear migration, at the G2-to-M transition and in regulation of primary cilia at the G1-to-S transition. RNAi against the NDE1 paralogue NDEL1 has no such effects. However, NDEL1 overexpression can functionally compensate for NDE1, except at the G2-to-M transition, revealing a unique NDE1 role. In contrast, NDE1 and NDEL1 RNAi have comparable effects on postmitotic neuronal migration. These results reveal that the severity of NDE1-associated microcephaly results not from defects in mitosis, but rather the inability of neural progenitors to ever reach this stage. PMID:27553190

  9. Complete structural characterization of ceramides as [M-H](-) ions by multiple-stage linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Fong-Fu

    2016-11-01

    Ceramide is a huge lipid family consisting of diversified structures including various modifications in the fatty acyl chain and the long chain base (LCB). In this contribution, negative-ion ESI linear ion-trap multiple-stage mass spectrometric method (LIT MS(n)) towards complete structural determination of ceramides in ten major families characterized as the [M-H](-) ions is described. Multiple sets of fragment ions reflecting the fatty acyl chain and LCB were observed in the CID MS(2) spectrum, while the sequential MS(3) and MS(4) spectra contain structural information for locating the double bond and the functional groups, permitting realization of the fragmentation processes. Thereby, differentiation of ceramide molecules varied by chain length, the LCB (sphingosine, phytosphigosine, 6-hydroxy-sphingosine), and by the modification (α-hydroxy-, β-hydroxy-, ω-hydroxy-FA) can be achieved; and many isomeric structures in the biological specimen can be revealed in detail.

  10. Comparison of NEXRAD Stage III and MPE precipitation products with constraints from high quality and density of raingauge networks in the Upper Guadalupe River Basin, Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H.; Wang, X.

    2006-05-01

    NEXRAD's Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) product replaced the Stage III product started in October 2003 at the West Gulf River Forecast Center (WGRFC) where includes most of the Texas and New Mexico. The MPE is an integrated product of rain gauge, NEXRAD, and satellite (GOES) precipitation estimates. The main objective of MPE is to reduce both areal-mean bias error and local bias error. The overall improved quality of MPE over Stage 3 is evident at the WGRFC. However, so far, there is no quantitative evaluation in a relative long period (one year or more) of a large area. In this study, high quality and density of 50 raingauge networks (6 minutes temporal resolution) in the Upper Guadalupe River Basin, Central Texas are used to evaluate both the Stage III (years 2001 and 2002) and MPE (year 2004) products. In this study, we propose two types of comparison (1) directly compare collocated radar cell and gauge of all rainfall events and (2) only compare collocated radar cell and gauge of homogeneous/uniform rainfall events. To find uniform rainfall events, 6-mintutes raingauge rainfall were used to calculate the correlation coefficient (CC) and coefficient of variation (CV) of a hour among one central gauge and its surrounding gauges (>= 4). For a particular rainfall hour, when CV is < 0.5 and CC is > 0.5, or CV is <0.1, the rainfall event of this hour is thus selected as a uniform or homogeneous rainfall event. Our preliminary results of CC from all rainfall events and homogeneous rainfall events for year 2004 (MPE) are 0.79 and 0.96, respectively. This indicates an overall good quality of MPE product in comparison with raingauge rainfall, especially for the homogeneous rainfall events. Work is in progress.

  11. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Hudis, Clifford; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  12. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen; Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Fasola, Carolina; O'Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia; Torres, Mylin

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  13. Multiple-stage decisions in a marine central-place forager.

    PubMed

    Friedlaender, Ari S; Johnston, David W; Tyson, Reny B; Kaltenberg, Amanda; Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Stimpert, Alison K; Curtice, Corrie; Hazen, Elliott L; Halpin, Patrick N; Read, Andrew J; Nowacek, Douglas P

    2016-05-01

    Air-breathing marine animals face a complex set of physical challenges associated with diving that affect the decisions of how to optimize feeding. Baleen whales (Mysticeti) have evolved bulk-filter feeding mechanisms to efficiently feed on dense prey patches. Baleen whales are central place foragers where oxygen at the surface represents the central place and depth acts as the distance to prey. Although hypothesized that baleen whales will target the densest prey patches anywhere in the water column, how depth and density interact to influence foraging behaviour is poorly understood. We used multi-sensor archival tags and active acoustics to quantify Antarctic humpback whale foraging behaviour relative to prey. Our analyses reveal multi-stage foraging decisions driven by both krill depth and density. During daylight hours when whales did not feed, krill were found in deep high-density patches. As krill migrated vertically into larger and less dense patches near the surface, whales began to forage. During foraging bouts, we found that feeding rates (number of feeding lunges per hour) were greatest when prey was shallowest, and feeding rates decreased with increasing dive depth. This strategy is consistent with previous models of how air-breathing diving animals optimize foraging efficiency. Thus, humpback whales forage mainly when prey is more broadly distributed and shallower, presumably to minimize diving and searching costs and to increase feeding rates overall and thus foraging efficiency. Using direct measurements of feeding behaviour from animal-borne tags and prey availability from echosounders, our study demonstrates a multi-stage foraging process in a central place forager that we suggest acts to optimize overall efficiency by maximizing net energy gain over time. These data reveal a previously unrecognized level of complexity in predator-prey interactions and underscores the need to simultaneously measure prey distribution in marine central place forager

  14. Biodegradation of the energetic compound TNT through a multiple-stage treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Davel, J; Suidan, M T; Adrian, N

    2003-01-01

    Biodegradation of the energetic compound 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its intermediate 2,4,6-triaminotoluene (TAT) was investigated in this study. From previous investigations, a relationship between the biological utilization of ethanol as co-substrate for the reduction of TNT under anaerobic conditions was proposed using an anaerobic fluidized-bed reactor (AFBR). In this study, the theoretical co-substrate requirement for reduction of TNT to TAT was further investigated through the systematic lowering of the ethanol loading to the reactor. Near complete reduction to TAT was observed up to a critical ethanol loading point, as well as the production of methane from the limited excess available ethanol. Once ethanol deficient loading conditions were established, the increased presence of incompletely reduced degradation intermediates, such as 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene, and even TNT, was observed. The cessation of methanogenesis confirmed that no excess ethanol was available. Degradation of the TAT intermediate in the reactor effluent was investigated using two second-stage reactors under oxidizing conditions. The first was an aerobic activated sludge reactor, and the second was a denitrifying fluidized-bed reactor (DenFBR). The aerobic reactor was successful in lowering the chemical oxygen demand (COD), but complete removal of TAT was not accomplished. Because of TAT polymerization and auto-oxidation under aerobic conditions, it was difficult to confirm to what extent of TAT removal was biological. In the DenFBR, incompletely reduced TNT intermediates were not successfully degraded, but strong evidence existed for the degradation of TAT. This is the first known report of second stage degradation of TAT under denitrifying conditions.

  15. Multiple roles for the endocannabinoid system during the earliest stages of life: pre- and postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Fride, E

    2008-05-01

    The endocannabinoid system, including its receptors (CB(1) and CB(2)), endogenous ligands ('endocannabinoids'), synthesising and degrading enzymes, as well as transporter molecules, has been detected from the earliest stages of embryonic development and throughout pre- and postnatal development. In addition, the endocannabinoids, notably 2-arachidonyl glycerol, are also present in maternal milk. During three distinct developmental stages (i.e. embryonic implantation, prenatal brain development and postnatal suckling), the endocannabinoid system appears to play an essential role for development and survival. Thus, during early pregnancy, successful embryonic passage through the oviduct and implantation into the uterus both require critical enzymatic control of optimal anandamide levels at the appropriate times and sites. During foetal life, the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor plays a major role in brain development, regulating neural progenitor differentiation into neurones and glia and guiding axonal migration and synaptogenesis. Postnatally, CB(1) receptor blockade interferes with the initiation of milk suckling in mouse pups, by inducing oral motor weakness, which exposes a critical role for CB(1) receptors in the initiation of milk suckling by neonates, possibly by interfering with innervation of the tongue muscles. Manipulating the endocannabinoid system by pre- and/or postnatal administration of cannabinoids or maternal marijuana consumption, has significant, yet subtle effects on the offspring. Thus, alterations in the dopamine, GABA and endocannabinoid systems have been reported while enhanced drug seeking behaviour and impaired executive (prefrontal cortical) function have also been observed. The relatively mild nature of the disruptive effects of prenatal cannabinoids may be understood in the framework of the intricate timing requirements and frequently biphasic effects of the (endo)cannabinoids. In conclusion, the endocannabinoid system plays several key roles

  16. Multiple-stage decisions in a marine central-place forager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlaender, Ari S.; Johnston, David W.; Tyson, Reny B.; Kaltenberg, Amanda; Goldbogen, Jeremy A.; Stimpert, Alison K.; Curtice, Corrie; Hazen, Elliott L.; Halpin, Patrick N.; Read, Andrew J.; Nowacek, Douglas P.

    2016-05-01

    Air-breathing marine animals face a complex set of physical challenges associated with diving that affect the decisions of how to optimize feeding. Baleen whales (Mysticeti) have evolved bulk-filter feeding mechanisms to efficiently feed on dense prey patches. Baleen whales are central place foragers where oxygen at the surface represents the central place and depth acts as the distance to prey. Although hypothesized that baleen whales will target the densest prey patches anywhere in the water column, how depth and density interact to influence foraging behaviour is poorly understood. We used multi-sensor archival tags and active acoustics to quantify Antarctic humpback whale foraging behaviour relative to prey. Our analyses reveal multi-stage foraging decisions driven by both krill depth and density. During daylight hours when whales did not feed, krill were found in deep high-density patches. As krill migrated vertically into larger and less dense patches near the surface, whales began to forage. During foraging bouts, we found that feeding rates (number of feeding lunges per hour) were greatest when prey was shallowest, and feeding rates decreased with increasing dive depth. This strategy is consistent with previous models of how air-breathing diving animals optimize foraging efficiency. Thus, humpback whales forage mainly when prey is more broadly distributed and shallower, presumably to minimize diving and searching costs and to increase feeding rates overall and thus foraging efficiency. Using direct measurements of feeding behaviour from animal-borne tags and prey availability from echosounders, our study demonstrates a multi-stage foraging process in a central place forager that we suggest acts to optimize overall efficiency by maximizing net energy gain over time. These data reveal a previously unrecognized level of complexity in predator-prey interactions and underscores the need to simultaneously measure prey distribution in marine central place forager

  17. Multiple-stage decisions in a marine central-place forager

    PubMed Central

    Friedlaender, Ari S.; Johnston, David W.; Tyson, Reny B.; Kaltenberg, Amanda; Goldbogen, Jeremy A.; Stimpert, Alison K.; Curtice, Corrie; Hazen, Elliott L.; Halpin, Patrick N.; Read, Andrew J.; Nowacek, Douglas P.

    2016-01-01

    Air-breathing marine animals face a complex set of physical challenges associated with diving that affect the decisions of how to optimize feeding. Baleen whales (Mysticeti) have evolved bulk-filter feeding mechanisms to efficiently feed on dense prey patches. Baleen whales are central place foragers where oxygen at the surface represents the central place and depth acts as the distance to prey. Although hypothesized that baleen whales will target the densest prey patches anywhere in the water column, how depth and density interact to influence foraging behaviour is poorly understood. We used multi-sensor archival tags and active acoustics to quantify Antarctic humpback whale foraging behaviour relative to prey. Our analyses reveal multi-stage foraging decisions driven by both krill depth and density. During daylight hours when whales did not feed, krill were found in deep high-density patches. As krill migrated vertically into larger and less dense patches near the surface, whales began to forage. During foraging bouts, we found that feeding rates (number of feeding lunges per hour) were greatest when prey was shallowest, and feeding rates decreased with increasing dive depth. This strategy is consistent with previous models of how air-breathing diving animals optimize foraging efficiency. Thus, humpback whales forage mainly when prey is more broadly distributed and shallower, presumably to minimize diving and searching costs and to increase feeding rates overall and thus foraging efficiency. Using direct measurements of feeding behaviour from animal-borne tags and prey availability from echosounders, our study demonstrates a multi-stage foraging process in a central place forager that we suggest acts to optimize overall efficiency by maximizing net energy gain over time. These data reveal a previously unrecognized level of complexity in predator–prey interactions and underscores the need to simultaneously measure prey distribution in marine central place

  18. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Oh, Julia L. Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hahn, Karin; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.

  19. Structural Characterization of Unsaturated Glycerophospholipids by Multiple-stage Linear Ion-trap Mass Spectrometry with Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fong-Fu; Turk, John

    2008-01-01

    Structural elucidation of glycerophospholipids (GPLs), including the polar head group, the position of double bond(s) along the fatty acyl substituents, and the positions of acyl groups on the glycerol backbone using multiple-stage liner ion-trap (LIT) mass spectrometric approach is described in this paper. While the product-ion spectra from MSn (n = 2, 3) on the [M + Li]+ or [M − H + 2Li]+ ions of GPL are readily applicable for discerning the phospholipid classes and for identifying and locating the fatty acid substituents on the glycerol backbone, the structural information from further dissociation of the dilithiated fatty acid cations produced from MSn (n = 3,4) on the [M − H + 2Li]+ ion of GPLs, as well as from further dissociation of the monolithiated fragment ion that bears the unsaturated fatty acid moiety produced from subsequent MSn (n= 3,4) on the [M + Li]+ ions of GPLs affords assignment of the position of double bond(s) along the fatty acyl groups. The application of the present method in the structural characterization of GPL molecules from the lipid extracts of biological origin, including mixtures of phosphatidylglycerol and of phosphatidylserine without prior chromatographic separation, is also demonstrated. Since lithiated molecular species of GPL are readily formed by ESI, this multiple-stage LIT mass spectrometric approach provides a direct means for the near-complete structural characterization of all the GPLs, including the molecules in the lysophospholipid and plasmalogen subclasses. PMID:18771936

  20. Mass Spectral Charting of Neuropeptidomic Expression in the Stomatogastric Ganglion at Multiple Developmental Stages of the Lobster Homarus americanus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) of the American lobster Homarus americanus serves as a useful model for studies of neuromodulatory substances such as peptides and their roles in the generation of rhythmic behaviors. As a central component of the STNS, the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) is rich in neuropeptides and contains well-defined networks of neurons, serving as an excellent model system to study the effect of neuropeptides on the maturation of neural circuits. Here, we utilize multiple mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques to study the neuropeptide content and abundance in the STG tissue as related to the developmental stage of the animal. Capillary electrophoresis (CE)-MS was employed to unambiguously identify low abundance neuropeptide complements, which were not fully addressed using previous methods. In total, 35 neuropeptides from 7 different families were detected in the tissue samples. Notably, 10 neuropeptides have been reported for the first time in this study. In addition, we utilized a relative quantitation method to compare neuropeptidomic expression at different developmental stages and observed sequential appearance of several neuropeptides. Multiple isoforms within the same peptide family tend to show similar trends of changes in relative abundance during development. We also determined that the relative abundances of tachykinin peptides increase as the lobster grows, suggesting that the maturation of circuit output may be influenced by the change of neuromodulatory input into the STG. Collectively, this study expands our knowledge about neuropeptides in the crustacean STNS and provides useful information about neuropeptide expression in the maturation process. PMID:22860213

  1. Myelinosome formation represents an early stage of oligodendrocyte damage in multiple sclerosis and its animal model

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Elisa; Merkler, Doron; Mezydlo, Aleksandra; Weil, Marie-Theres; Weber, Martin S.; Nikić, Ivana; Potz, Stephanie; Meinl, Edgar; Matznick, Florian E. H.; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Ghanem, Alexander; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Metz, Imke; Brück, Wolfgang; Routh, Matthew; Simons, Mikael; Bishop, Derron; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte damage is a central event in the pathogenesis of the common neuroinflammatory condition, multiple sclerosis (MS). Where and how oligodendrocyte damage is initiated in MS is not completely understood. Here, we use a combination of light and electron microscopy techniques to provide a dynamic and highly resolved view of oligodendrocyte damage in neuroinflammatory lesions. We show that both in MS and in its animal model structural damage is initiated at the myelin sheaths and only later spreads to the oligodendrocyte cell body. Early myelin damage itself is characterized by the formation of local myelin out-foldings—‘myelinosomes'—, which are surrounded by phagocyte processes and promoted in their formation by anti-myelin antibodies and complement. The presence of myelinosomes in actively demyelinating MS lesions suggests that oligodendrocyte damage follows a similar pattern in the human disease, where targeting demyelination by therapeutic interventions remains a major open challenge. PMID:27848954

  2. Family history of colorectal cancer and its impact on survival in patients with resected stage III colon cancer: results from NCCTG Trial N0147 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Jansson-Knodell, Claire L.; Foster, Nathan R.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Limburg, Paul J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Sinicrope, Frank A.; Jahagirdar, Balkrishna; Goldberg, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Family history of colon cancer often portends increased risk of disease development; however, the prognostic significance of family history related to disease and survival outcomes is unclear. Methods To investigate the relationship between family history of colorectal cancer and survival outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients, a prospective cohort of 1,935 patients with resected stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (N0147), comparing the standard of care FOLFOX to FOLFOX with cetuximab, was studied. Patients completed a baseline questionnaire on family history and were followed every 6 months until death or 5 years after randomization. Results We examined the endpoints of disease-free survival (DFS), time to recurrence (TTR) and overall survival (OS), comparing patients with a positive versus negative family history of colorectal cancer. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for patients with a positive family history were 0.95 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.78–1.16] for DFS, 0.94 (95% CI, 0.76–1.16) for TTR, and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.74–1.15) for OS (all adjusted P>0.47). A non-significant trend toward improved DFS (P=0.17; adjusted P=0.34) was observed when 2 or more relatives were affected as compared to 0 relatives (multivariate HR: 0.72; 95% CI, 0.45–1.15), whereas subjects with histories of 0 or 1 affected relatives had similar DFS (multivariate HR for 1 vs. 0: 1.00; 95% CI, 0.81–1.24). Interactions of the molecular factors KRAS, BRAF, and MMR with family history were also explored. The only significant interaction was for deficient MMR (dMMR) and first-degree relatives with a family history of colorectal cancer (0 vs. 1 vs. 2+ relatives) for a benefit on OS (univariate P=0.001), which remained significant after adjusting for other factors (P=0.029). Conclusions Among patients with stage III resected colon cancer treated with adjuvant FOLFOX, a family history of colorectal cancer did not significantly impact DFS

  3. The interaction of alphavirus E1 protein with exogenous domain III defines stages in virus-membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Kielian, Margaret

    2011-12-01

    Alphaviruses such as Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are enveloped viruses that infect cells through a low-pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction mediated by the transmembrane fusion protein E1. E1 drives fusion by insertion of its hydrophobic fusion loop into the cell membrane and refolding to a stable trimeric hairpin. In this postfusion conformation, the immunoglobulin-like domain III (DIII) and the stem region pack against the central core of the trimer. Membrane fusion and infection can be specifically inhibited by exogenous DIII, which binds to an intermediate in the E1 refolding pathway. Here we characterized the properties of the E1 target for interaction with exogenous DIII. The earliest target for DIII binding was an extended membrane-inserted E1 trimer, which was not detectable by assays for the stable postfusion hairpin. DIII binding provided a tool to detect this extended trimer and to define a series of SFV fusion-block mutants. DIII binding studies showed that the mutants were blocked in distinct steps in fusion protein refolding. Our results suggested that formation of the initial extended trimer was reversible and that it was stabilized by the progressive fold-back of the DIII and stem regions.

  4. Effective multiple stages continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by immobilized bioreactors: Making full use of fresh corn stalk.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhen; Cai, Di; Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Fu, Chaohui; Wang, Guoqing; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-04-01

    In order to make full use of the fresh corn stalk, the sugar containing juice was used as the sole substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol production without any nutrients supplement, and the bagasse after squeezing the juice was used as the immobilized carrier. A total 21.34g/L of ABE was produced in batch cells immobilization system with ABE yield of 0.35g/g. A continuous fermentation containing three stages with immobilized cells was conducted and the effect of dilution rate on fermentation was investigated. As a result, the productivity and ABE solvents concentration reached 0.80g/Lh and 19.93g/L, respectively, when the dilution rate in each stage was 0.12/h (corresponding to a dilution rate of 0.04/h in the whole system). And the long-term operation indicated the continuous multiple stages ABE fermentation process had good stability and showed the great potential in future industrial applications.

  5. Targeting multiple chorismate-utilizing enzymes with a single inhibitor: validation of a three-stage design.

    PubMed

    Ziebart, Kristin T; Dixon, Seth M; Avila, Belem; El-Badri, Mohamed H; Guggenheim, Kathryn G; Kurth, Mark J; Toney, Michael D

    2010-05-13

    Chorismate-utilizing enzymes are attractive antimicrobial drug targets due to their absence in humans and their central role in bacterial survival and virulence. The structural and mechanistic homology of a group of these inspired the goal of discovering inhibitors that target multiple enzymes. Previously, we discovered seven inhibitors of 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase (ADCS) in an on-bead, fluorescent-based screen of a 2304-member one-bead-one-compound combinatorial library. The inhibitors comprise PAYLOAD and COMBI stages, which interact with active site and surface residues, respectively, and are linked by a SPACER stage. These seven compounds, and six derivatives thereof, also inhibit two other enzymes in this family, isochorismate synthase (IS) and anthranilate synthase (AS). The best binding compound inhibits ADCS, IS, and AS with K(i) values of 720, 56, and 80 microM, respectively. Inhibitors with varying SPACER lengths show the original choice of lysine to be optimal. Lastly, inhibition data confirm the PAYLOAD stage directs the inhibitors to the ADCS active site.

  6. Tailored design of electrospun composite nanofibers with staged release of multiple angiogenic growth factors for chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lai, Huan-Ju; Kuan, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Tsai, Jui-Che; Chen, Tim-Mo; Hsieh, Dar-Jen; Wang, Tzu-Wei

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research study is to develop a collagen (Col) and hyaluronic acid (HA) inter-stacking nanofibrous skin equivalent substitute with the programmable release of multiple angiogenic growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and endothelial growth factor (EGF)) either directly embedded in the nanofibers or encapsulated in the gelatin nanoparticles (GNs) by electrospinning technology. The delivery of EGF and bFGF in the early stage is expected to accelerate epithelialization and vasculature sprouting, while the release of PDGF and VEGF in the late stage is with the aim of inducing blood vessels maturation. The physiochemical characterizations indicate that the Col-HA-GN nanofibrous membrane possesses mechanical properties similar to human native skin. The design of a particle-in-fiber structure allows growth factors for slow controlled release up to 1month. Cultured on biodegradable Col-HA membrane with four kinds of growth factors (Col-HA w/4GF), endothelial cells not only increase in growth rate but also form a better network with a thread-like tubular structure. The therapeutic effect of Col-HA w/4GF membrane on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats reveals an accelerated wound closure rate, together with elevated collagen deposition and enhanced maturation of vessels, as revealed by Masson's trichrome stain and immunohistochemical analysis, respectively. From the above, the electrospun Col-HA-GN composite nanofibrous skin substitute with a stage-wise release pattern of multiple angiogenic factors could be a promising bioengineered construct for chronic wound healing in skin tissue regeneration.

  7. Design and evaluation of multiple level data staging for Blue Gene systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Isaila, F.; Blas, J. G.; Carretero, J.; Latham, R.; Ross, R.

    2011-06-01

    Parallel applications currently suffer from a significant imbalance between computational power and available I/O bandwidth. Additionally, the hierarchical organization of current Petascale systems contributes to an increase of the I/O subsystem latency. In these hierarchies, file access involves pipelining data through several networks with incremental latencies and higher probability of congestion. Future Exascale systems are likely to share this trait. This paper presents a scalable parallel I/O software system designed to transparently hide the latency of file system accesses to applications on these platforms. Our solution takes advantage of the hierarchy of networks involved in file accesses, to maximize the degree of overlap between computation, file I/O-related communication, and file system access. We describe and evaluate a two-level hierarchy for Blue Gene systems consisting of client-side and I/O node-side caching. Our file cache management modules coordinate the data staging between application and storage through the Blue Gene networks. The experimental results demonstrate that our architecture achieves significant performance improvements through a high degree of overlap between computation, communication, and file I/O.

  8. A multi-stage genome-wide association study of bladder cancer identifies multiple susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Nathaniel; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Malats, Nuria; Wu, Xifeng; Figueroa, Jonine; Real, Francisco X; Van Den Berg, David; Matullo, Giuseppe; Baris, Dalsu; Thun, Michael; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Vineis, Paolo; De Vivo, Immaculata; Albanes, Demetrius; Purdue, Mark P; Rafnar, Thorunn; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Kiltie, Anne E; Cussenot, Olivier; Golka, Klaus; Kumar, Rajiv; Taylor, Jack A; Mayordomo, Jose I; Jacobs, Kevin B; Kogevinas, Manolis; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Zhaoming; Fu, Yi-Ping; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Burdette, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Wheeler, William; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R; Schned, Alan; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Eric J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Cortessis, Victoria K; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Pike, Malcolm C; Stern, Mariana C; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hunter, David; McGrath, Monica; Dinney, Colin P; Czerniak, Bogdan; Chen, Meng; Yang, Hushan; Vermeulen, Sita H; Aben, Katja K; Witjes, J Alfred; Makkinje, Remco R; Sulem, Patrick; Besenbacher, Soren; Stefansson, Kari; Riboli, Elio; Brennan, Paul; Panico, Salvatore; Navarro, Carmen; Allen, Naomi E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Canzian, Federico; Ljungberg, Borje; Tjonneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Bishop, David T; Teo, Mark T W; Knowles, Margaret A; Guarrera, Simonetta; Polidoro, Silvia; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Allione, Alessandra; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G; Dietrich, Holger; Fletcher, Tony; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Bolick, Sophia C E; Godfrey, Ashley; Xu, Zongli; Sanz-Velez, José I; García-Prats, María D; Sanchez, Manuel; Valdivia, Gabriel; Porru, Stefano; Benhamou, Simone; Hoover, Robert N; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Silverman, Debra T; Chanock, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a multi-stage, genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer with a primary scan of 589,299 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3,532 cases and 5,120 controls of European descent (5 studies) followed by a replication strategy, which included 8,381 cases and 48,275 controls (16 studies). In a combined analysis, we identified three new regions associated with bladder cancer on chromosomes 22q13.1, 19q12 and 2q37.1; rs1014971, (P=8×10−12) maps to a non-genic region of chromosome 22q13.1; rs8102137 (P=2×10−11) on 19q12 maps to CCNE1; and rs11892031 (P=1×10−7) maps to the UGT1A cluster on 2q37.1. We confirmed four previous GWAS associations on chromosomes 3q28, 4p16.3, 8q24.21 and 8q24.3, validated previous candidate associations for the GSTM1 deletion (P=4×10−11) and a tag SNP for NAT2 acetylation status (P=4×10−11), as well as demonstrated smoking interactions with both regions. Our findings on common variants associated with bladder cancer risk should provide new insights into mechanisms of carcinogenesis. PMID:20972438

  9. Multiple life stage sensitivity of a deposit-feeding polychaete to chemical toxicants in sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.A.; Sibley, T.; Ylitalo, G.M.; Casillas, E.

    1995-12-31

    By focusing on acute toxicity in species with habitat and food preferences often quite different from the environments of primary interest; that is, the depositional, fine-grained, organically enriched benthos, standard methods of testing sediment toxicity using single species have important problems of relevance in terms of test endpoints and target species. This study addresses these issues by building a set of baseline toxicity data that emphasizes critical life stage sensitivity over a wide range of toxicant concentrations in long-term sediment exposures for an animal with a model life history. The opportunistic, deposit-feeding polychaete Armandia brevis was exposed to sediments supplemented with fluoranthene, cadmium, copper, lead, and mercury, alone and in a model mixture, for 60 days. Mortality and emergence from sediment were recorded daily, and growth and maturity were measured at 20, 40, and 60d. To measure recruitment, cultured larvae were presented with the same sediments and allowed to settle and complete metamorphosis. Differential endpoint sensitivity, and differential chemical toxicity were evaluated. In addition, sediment and tissue concentrations of organic toxicants were used to link toxic responses to body burdens, and to consider the role of benthic infauna as contaminant vectors in the marine environment.

  10. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M.; Tripathi, Rati M.; Layer, Justin H.; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P.

    2015-01-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis. PMID:25968920

  11. Two-stage subduction history under North America inferred from multiple-frequency tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigloch, Karin; McQuarrie, Nadine; Nolet, Guust

    2008-07-01

    Eastward subduction of oceanic tectonic plates has shaped the geologic history of western North America over the past 150million years. The mountain-building and volcanism that brought forth the spectacular landscapes of the West are credited to the vast ancient Farallon plate, which interacted mechanically and chemically with the overlying continent as it plunged back into the mantle. Here, we use finite-frequency travel-time and amplitude measurements of teleseismic P-waves in seven frequency bands to obtain a high-resolution tomographic image to ~1,800km depth. We discover several large, previously unknown pieces of the plate which show that two distinct stages of whole-mantle subduction are present under North America. The currently active one descends from the Pacific northwest coast to 1,500km depth beneath the Great Plains, whereas its stalled predecessor occupies the transition zone and lower mantle beneath the eastern half of the continent. We argue that the separation between them is linked to the Laramide era 70-50Myr ago, a time of unusual volcanism and mountain-building far inland generally explained by an episode of extremely flat subduction.

  12. 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer: locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, W E E; De Ruysscher, D; Weder, W; Le Péchoux, C; De Leyn, P; Hoffmann, H; Westeel, V; Stahel, R; Felip, E; Peters, S

    2015-08-01

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organises consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. The 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference on Lung Cancer was held on 11-12 May 2013 in Lugano. A total of 35 experts met to address several questions on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in each of four areas: pathology and molecular biomarkers, first-line/second and further lines of treatment in advanced disease, early-stage disease and locally advanced disease. For each question, recommendations were made including reference to the grade of recommendation and level of evidence. This consensus paper focuses on locally advanced disease.

  13. Stage IB carcinoma of the cervix, the Norwegian Radium Hospital: results and complications. III. Urinary and gastrointestinal complications

    SciTech Connect

    Kjorstad, K.E.; Martimbeau, P.W.; Iversen, T.

    1983-02-01

    The combination of surgery and radiotherapy for early cases of cancer of the cervix has been accused of producing prohibitive complication rates. In a series of 612 patients with cancer of the cervix, Stage IB, the frequency of major complications from the urinary and gastrointestinal tract has been studied, and an attempt has been made in determining the most probable etiology of these complications. No significant increase in complications can be attributed to the use of preoperative intracavitary irradiation. In patients with pelvic lymph node metastases the combination of radical surgery and a full course of radiotherapy is associated with a high complication risk, as 12% of these patients developed major complications. Their 5-year survival, however, was high: 54%.

  14. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p < 0.048), surgery (p < 0.042), no smoking during radiotherapy (p = 0.024), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). A trend was observed for a KPS of >70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of tumor cells

  15. SWOG S0221: A Phase III Trial Comparing Chemotherapy Schedules in High-Risk Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Budd, George T.; Barlow, William E.; Moore, Halle C.F.; Hobday, Timothy J.; Stewart, James A.; Isaacs, Claudine; Salim, Muhammad; Cho, Jonathan K.; Rinn, Kristine J.; Albain, Kathy S.; Chew, Helen K.; Burton, Gary V.; Moore, Timothy D.; Srkalovic, Gordan; McGregor, Bradley A.; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Livingston, Robert B.; Lew, Danika L.; Gralow, Julie R.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the optimal dose and schedule of anthracycline and taxane administration as adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Patients and Methods A 2 × 2 factorial design was used to test two hypotheses: (1) that a novel continuous schedule of doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide was superior to six cycles of doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide once every 2 weeks and (2) that paclitaxel once per week was superior to six cycles of paclitaxel once every 2 weeks in patients with node-positive or high-risk node-negative early-stage breast cancer. With 3,250 patients, a disease-free survival (DFS) hazard ratio of 0.82 for each randomization could be detected with 90% power with two-sided α = .05. Overall survival (OS) was a secondary outcome. Results Interim analyses crossed the futility boundaries for demonstrating superiority of both once-per-week regimens and once-every-2-weeks regimens. After a median follow-up of 6 years, a significant interaction developed between the two randomization factors (DFS P = .024; OS P = .010) in the 2,716 patients randomly assigned in the original design, which precluded interpretation of the two factors separately. Comparing all four arms showed a significant difference in OS (P = .040) but not in DFS (P = .11), with all treatments given once every 2 weeks associated with the highest OS. This difference in OS seemed confined to patients with hormone receptor–negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) –negative tumors (P = .067), with no differences seen with hormone receptor–positive/HER2-negative (P = .90) or HER2-positive tumors (P = .40). Conclusion Patients achieved a similar DFS with any of these regimens. Subset analysis suggests the hypothesis that once-every-2-weeks dosing may be best for patients with hormone receptor–negative/HER2-negative tumors. PMID:25422488

  16. Multiple-stage ambiguity in motion perception reveals global computation of local motion directions.

    PubMed

    Rider, Andrew T; Nishida, Shin'ya; Johnston, Alan

    2016-12-01

    The motion of a 1D image feature, such as a line, seen through a small aperture, or the small receptive field of a neural motion sensor, is underconstrained, and it is not possible to derive the true motion direction from a single local measurement. This is referred to as the aperture problem. How the visual system solves the aperture problem is a fundamental question in visual motion research. In the estimation of motion vectors through integration of ambiguous local motion measurements at different positions, conventional theories assume that the object motion is a rigid translation, with motion signals sharing a common motion vector within the spatial region over which the aperture problem is solved. However, this strategy fails for global rotation. Here we show that the human visual system can estimate global rotation directly through spatial pooling of locally ambiguous measurements, without an intervening step that computes local motion vectors. We designed a novel ambiguous global flow stimulus, which is globally as well as locally ambiguous. The global ambiguity implies that the stimulus is simultaneously consistent with both a global rigid translation and an infinite number of global rigid rotations. By the standard view, the motion should always be seen as a global translation, but it appears to shift from translation to rotation as observers shift fixation. This finding indicates that the visual system can estimate local vectors using a global rotation constraint, and suggests that local motion ambiguity may not be resolved until consistencies with multiple global motion patterns are assessed.

  17. ATR acts stage specifically to regulate multiple aspects of mammalian meiotic silencing.

    PubMed

    Royo, Hélène; Prosser, Haydn; Ruzankina, Yaroslava; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Cloutier, Jeffrey M; Baumann, Marek; Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Höög, Christer; Tóth, Attila; de Rooij, Dirk G; Bradley, Allan; Brown, Eric J; Turner, James M A

    2013-07-01

    In mammals, homologs that fail to synapse during meiosis are transcriptionally inactivated. This process, meiotic silencing, drives inactivation of the heterologous XY bivalent in male germ cells (meiotic sex chromosome inactivation [MSCI]) and is thought to act as a meiotic surveillance mechanism. The checkpoint protein ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) localizes to unsynapsed chromosomes, but its role in the initiation and maintenance of meiotic silencing is unknown. Here we show that ATR has multiple roles in silencing. ATR first regulates HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2) domain protein HORMAD1/2 phosphorylation and localization of breast cancer I (BRCA1) and ATR cofactors ATR-interacting peptide (ATRIP)/topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TOPBP1) at unsynapsed axes. Later, it acts as an adaptor, transducing signaling at unsynapsed axes into surrounding chromatin in a manner that requires interdependence with mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and H2AFX. Finally, ATR catalyzes histone H2AFX phosphorylation, the epigenetic event leading to gene inactivation. Using a novel genetic strategy in which MSCI is used to silence a chosen gene in pachytene, we show that ATR depletion does not disrupt the maintenance of silencing and that silencing comprises two phases: The first is dynamic and reversible, and the second is stable and irreversible. Our work identifies a role for ATR in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and presents a new technique for ablating gene function in the germline.

  18. [A Patient with Early-Stage Multiple System Atrophy Showing Augmented Nystagmus in Light].

    PubMed

    Oguri, Masayoshi; Nakamura, Yousuke; Hara, Ayako; Kitano, Hiroya; Motokura, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The ability to fix the eyes on a target, visual fixation, is important for the maintenance of equilibrium. The visual suppression (VS) test is one method of measuring the function of visual fixation. The test records caloric nystagmus by electrooculography, and the maximum slow phase velocity of caloric nystagmus in darkness is compared with the slow phase velocity in light with eyes fixed. Lesions of the cerebellum, brain stem, and cerebrum cause abnormalities of VS. We report a patient whose VS became a clue in the diagnosis of a disorder of the central nervous system. A 54-year-old man complained of dizziness, which gradually increased in frequency over 5 months. He visited several clinics, where vestibular neutritis and cervical spondylosis were suspected and treated without improvement. Although a pure-tone auditory test revealed bilateral normal hearing, a caloric test showed a weak response and VS was lost with augmentation of caloric nystagmus in light on both sides. Both eye tracking and optokinetic nystagmus tests were abnormal. Although magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities, single photon emission computed tomography revealed decreased blood flow in the parietal area. VS of caloric nystagmus towards the side of a lesion is reduced or abolished after unilateral flocculus damage, and is abolished bilaterally after bilateral flocculus damage. In the case of a parietal lobe or pontine lesion, VS is strongly abolished, and even augmentation of caloric nystagmus may be observed. In the present case, the patient was diagnosed with multiple-system atrophy after onset of dizziness.

  19. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Son, Eui-Sun; Kim, Tong Soo

    2001-01-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce the expression of GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli by IPTG. The bacterial cell extracts were separated on 10% SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis with patient sera which was confirmed by blood smear examination. When applied with patient sera, 147 (91.9%) out of 160 vivax malaria, 12 (92.3%) out of 13 falciparum malaria, and all 9 vivax/falciparum mixed malaria reacted with at least one antigen, while no reactions occurred with 20 normal uninfected sera. In the case of vivax malaria, CSP-1 reacted with 128 (80.0%) sera, MSP-1 with 102 (63.8%), AMA-1 with 128 (80.0%), SERA with 115 (71.9%), and EXP-1 with 89 (55.6%), respectively. We obtained higher detection rates when using 5 antigens (91.9%) rather than using each antigen solely (55.6-80%), a combination of 2 (76.3-87.5%), 3 (85.6-90.6%), or 4 antigens (89.4-91.3%). This method can be applied to serological diagnosis, mass screening in endemic regions, or safety test in transfusion of prevalent vivax malaria. PMID:11441504

  20. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Son, E S; Kim, T S; Nam, H W

    2001-06-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce the expression of GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli by IPTG. The bacterial cell extracts were separated on 10% SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis with patient sera which was confirmed by blood smear examination. When applied with patient sera, 147 (91.9%) out of 160 vivax malaria, 12 (92.3%) out of 13 falciparum malaria, and all 9 vivax/falciparum mixed malaria reacted with at least one antigen, while no reactions occurred with 20 normal uninfected sera. In the case of vivax malaria, CSP-1 reacted with 128 (80.0%) sera, MSP-1 with 102 (63.8%), AMA-1 with 128 (80.0%), SERA with 115 (71.9%), and EXP-1 with 89 (55.6%), respectively. We obtained higher detection rates when using 5 antigens (91.9%) rather than using each antigen solely (55.6-80%), a combination of 2 (76.3-87.5%), 3 (85.6-90.6%), or 4 antigens (89.4-91.3%). This method can be applied to serological diagnosis, mass screening in endemic regions, or safety test in transfusion of prevalent vivax malaria.

  1. Multiple melting stages and refertilization as indicators for ridge to subduction formation: The New Caledonia ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Marc; Picard, Christian; Guillot, Stéphane; Chauvel, Catherine; Cluzel, Dominique; Meffre, Sébastien

    2010-03-01

    The origin of the New Caledonia ophiolite (South West Pacific), one of the largest in the world, is controversial. This nappe of ultramafic rocks (300 km long, 50 km wide and 2 km thick) is thrust upon a smaller nappe (Poya terrane) composed of basalts from mid-ocean ridges (MORB), back arc basins (BABB) and ocean islands (OIB). This nappe was tectonically accreted from the subducting plate prior and during the obduction of the ultramafic nappe. The bulk of the ophiolite is composed of highly depleted harzburgites (± dunites) with characteristic U-shaped bulk-rock rare-earth element (REE) patterns that are attributed to their formation in a forearc environment. In contrast, the origin of spoon-shaped REE patterns of lherzolites in the northernmost klippes was unclear. Our new major element and REE data on whole rocks, spinel and clinopyroxene establish the abyssal affinity of these lherzolites. Significant LREE enrichment in the lherzolites is best explained by partial melting in a spreading ridge, followed by near in-situ refertilization from deeper mantle melts. Using equilibrium melting equations, we show that melts extracted from these lherzolites are compositionally similar to the MORB of the Poya terrane. This is used to infer that the ultramafic nappe and the mafic Poya terrane represent oceanic lithosphere of a single marginal basin that formed during the late Cretaceous. In contrast, our spinel data highlights the strong forearc affinities of the most depleted harzburgites whose compositions are best modeled by hydrous melting of a source that had previously experienced depletion in a spreading ridge. The New Caledonian boninites probably formed during this second stage of partial melting. The two melting events in the New Caledonia ophiolite record the rapid transition from oceanic accretion to convergence in the South Loyalty Basin during the Late Paleocene, with initiation of a new subduction zone at or near the ridge axis.

  2. Multiple heavy metals extraction and recovery from hazardous electroplating sludge waste via ultrasonically enhanced two-stage acid leaching.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuncheng; Xie, Fengchun; Ma, Yang; Cai, Tingting; Li, Haiying; Huang, Zhiyuan; Yuan, Gaoqing

    2010-06-15

    An ultrasonically enhanced two-stage acid leaching process on extracting and recovering multiple heavy metals from actual electroplating sludge was studied in lab tests. It provided an effective technique for separation of valuable metals (Cu, Ni and Zn) from less valuable metals (Fe and Cr) in electroplating sludge. The efficiency of the process had been measured with the leaching efficiencies and recovery rates of the metals. Enhanced by ultrasonic power, the first-stage acid leaching demonstrated leaching rates of 96.72%, 97.77%, 98.00%, 53.03%, and 0.44% for Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr, and Fe respectively, effectively separated half of Cr and almost all of Fe from mixed metals. The subsequent second-stage leaching achieved leaching rates of 75.03%, 81.05%, 81.39%, 1.02%, and 0% for Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr, and Fe that further separated Cu, Ni, and Zn from mixed metals. With the stabilized two-stage ultrasonically enhanced leaching, the resulting over all recovery rates of Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr and Fe from electroplating sludge could be achieved at 97.42%, 98.46%, 98.63%, 98.32% and 100% respectively, with Cr and Fe in solids and the rest of the metals in an aqueous solution discharged from the leaching system. The process performance parameters studied were pH, ultrasonic power, and contact time. The results were also confirmed in an industrial pilot-scale test, and same high metal recoveries were performed.

  3. Industrial Application of an Improved Multiple Injection and Multiple Staging Combustion Technology in a 600 MWe Supercritical Down-Fired Boiler.

    PubMed

    Song, Minhang; Zeng, Lingyan; Chen, Zhichao; Li, Zhengqi; Zhu, Qunyi; Kuang, Min

    2016-02-02

    To solve the water wall overheating in lower furnace, and further reduce NOx emissions and carbon in fly ash, continuous improvement of the previously proposed multiple injection and multiple staging combustion (MIMSC) technology lies on three aspects: (1) along the furnace arch breadth, changing the previously centralized 12 burner groups into a more uniform pattern with 24 burners; (2) increasing the mass ratio of pulverized coal in fuel-rich flow to that in fuel-lean flow from 6:4 to 9:1; (3) reducing the arch-air momentum by 23% and increasing the tertiary-air momentum by 24%. Industrial-size measurements (i.e., adjusting overfire air (OFA) damper opening of 20-70%) uncovered that, compared with the prior MIMSC technology, the ignition distance of fuel-rich coal/air flow shortened by around 1 m. The gas temperature in the lower furnace was symmetric and higher, the flame kernel moved upward and therefore made the temperature in near-wall region of furnace hopper decrease by about 400 °C, the water wall overheating disappeared completely. Under the optimal OFA damper opening (i.e, 55%), NOx emissions and carbon in fly ash attained levels of 589 mg/m(3) at 6% O2 and 6.18%, respectively, achieving NOx and carbon in fly ash significant reduction by 33% and 37%, respectively.

  4. Improving combustion characteristics and NO(x) emissions of a down-fired 350 MW(e) utility boiler with multiple injection and multiple staging.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Min; Li, Zhengqi; Xu, Shantian; Zhu, Qunyi

    2011-04-15

    Within a Mitsui Babcock Energy Limited down-fired pulverized-coal 350 MW(e) utility boiler, in situ experiments were performed, with measurements taken of gas temperatures in the burner and near the right-wall regions, and of gas concentrations (O(2) and NO) from the near-wall region. Large combustion differences between zones near the front and rear walls and particularly high NO(x) emissions were found in the boiler. With focus on minimizing these problems, a new technology based on multiple-injection and multiple-staging has been developed. Combustion improvements and NO(x) reductions were validated by investigating three aspects. First, numerical simulations of the pulverized-coal combustion process and NO(x) emissions were compared in both the original and new technologies. Good agreement was found between simulations and in situ measurements with the original technology. Second, with the new technology, gas temperature and concentration distributions were found to be symmetric near the front and rear walls. A relatively low-temperature and high-oxygen-concentration zone formed in the near-wall region that helps mitigate slagging in the lower furnace. Third, NO(x) emissions were found to have decreased by as much as 50%, yielding a slight decrease in the levels of unburnt carbon in the fly ash.

  5. Randomized Trial of Postoperative Adjuvant Therapy in Stage II and III Rectal Cancer to Define the Optimal Sequence of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: 10-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Yu, Chang-Sik; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ahn, Seung-Do; Kim, Woo-Kun; Kim, Jin-Cheon; Lee, Jung-Shin

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal sequence of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 308 patients were randomized to early (n = 155) or late (n = 153) radiotherapy (RT). Treatment included eight cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of fluorouracil 375 mg/m{sup 2}/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, at 4-week intervals, and pelvic radiotherapy of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Radiotherapy started on Day 1 of the first chemotherapy cycle in the early RT arm and on Day 1 of the third chemotherapy cycle in the late RT arm. Results: At a median follow-up of 121 months for surviving patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 10 years was not statistically significantly different between the early and late RT arms (71% vs. 63%; p = 0.162). A total of 36 patients (26.7%) in the early RT arm and 49 (35.3%) in the late RT arm experienced recurrence (p = 0.151). Overall survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups. However, in patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection, the DFS rate at 10 years was significantly greater in the early RT arm than in the late RT arm (63% vs. 40%; p = 0.043). Conclusions: After the long-term follow-up duration, this study failed to show a statistically significant DFS advantage for early radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy after resection of Stage II and III rectal cancer. Our results, however, suggest that if neoadjuvant chemoradiation is not given before surgery, then early postoperative chemoradiation should be considered for patients requiring an abdominoperineal resection.

  6. The Effects of Comorbidity and Age on RTOG Study Enrollment in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Are Eligible for RTOG Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Firat, Selim; Byhardt, Roger W.; Gore, Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of measured comorbidity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) combined modality therapy (CMT) study enrollment in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: One hundred and seventy-one patients with a Karnofsky Performance Score {>=}70 and clinical Stage III NSCLC were analyzed retrospectively for comorbidity, RTOG study eligibility, and enrollment at initial consultation. Effect of comorbidity scores (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) were tested on patient selection for CMT, RTOG enrollment, and overall survival. Results: Comorbidity (Grade 4; p < 0.005) and use of radiation only (p {<=} 0.001) were associated with inferior survival independent of other factors. Patient selection for CMT was affected by age ({>=}70, p < 0.001), comorbidity (severity index [SI]> 2, p = 0.001), and weight loss (>5%, p = 0.001). Thirty-three patients (19%) were enrolled in a CMT RTOG study (Group 1). Forty-nine patients (29%) were eligible but not enrolled (Group 2), and 57 (33%) were ineligible (Group 3). The most common ineligibility reasons were weight loss (67%) and comorbidity in the exclusion criteria of the RTOG studies (63%). Group 1 patients were the youngest (p = 0.02), with the lowest comorbidity scores (p < 0.001) and SI (p < 0.001) compared with Groups 2 and 3. Group 3 patients were the oldest with the most unfavorable comorbidity profile. Comorbidity scores (SI >2; p = 0.006) and age ({>=}70; p = 0.05) were independent factors influencing RTOG study enrollment in patients meeting study eligibility requirements (Groups 1 and 2). Conclusions: Comorbidity scales could be useful in stratification of patients in advanced lung cancer trials and interpretation of results particularly regarding the elderly population.

  7. Thyroid Function in Women after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer Stage II/III: Comparison With Controls From a Population Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Reinertsen, Kristin Valborg; Cvancarova, Milada; Wist, Erik; Bjoro, Trine; Dahl, Alv A.; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: A possible association between thyroid diseases (TD) and breast cancer (BC) has been debated. We examined prevalence and development of TD in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC compared with women from a general population. Secondarily, we explored the impact of two different radiotherapy (RT) techniques (standardized field arrangements vs. computed tomography [CT]-based dose planning) on TD in BC patients examined 35-120 months after primary BC treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 403 BC patients completed a questionnaire about TD and had blood samples taken for analyses of thyroid function. All had undergone postoperative RT with or without (2%) adjuvant systemic treatment. The results in the BC patients were compared with a cancer-free, age-matched control group from a general population (CGr). Results: There was higher prevalence of self-reported hypothyroidism in the BC patients as compared with the CGr (18% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). The raised prevalence was predominantly due to a substantial increase in the development of hypothyroidism after BC diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of hypothyroidism before BC diagnosis was similar to that observed in the CGr. Patients treated with CT-based RT showed a trend for increased post-BC development of hypothyroidism as compared with those treated with standardized field arrangements (p = 0.08). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is significantly increased in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC. Radiation to the thyroid gland may be a contributing factor. BC patients should be routinely screened for hypothyroidism.

  8. [Stage III and IV cancers of the oropharynx: results of a randomized study of Gortec comparing radiotherapy alone with concomitant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Calais, G; Alfonsi, M; Bardet, E; Sire, C; Germain, T; Bergerot, P; Rhein, B; Tortochaux, J; Oudinot, P; Bertrand, P

    2000-08-01

    The aim of the study was to test whether the addition of three cycles of chemotherapy during standard radiation therapy would improve disease-free survival in patients with stages III and IV oropharynx carcinoma. A total of 226 patients have been entered in a phase III multicentric randomized trial comparing radiotherapy alone (arm A) to radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy (arm B). Radiotherapy was identical in the two arms, delivering, with conventional fractionation, 70 Gy in 35 fractions. In arm B patients received simultaneously 3 cycles of a four-day regimen containing carboplatin (70 mg/m2/d) and 5 fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/d) continuous infusion. The two arms were equally balanced regarding to age, gender, stage, performance status, histology, and primary tumor site. Radiotherapy compliance was similar in the two arms regarding to total dose, treatment duration and treatment interruption. Grade 3 and 4 mucositis rate was significantly higher in arm B (67% versus 36%). Skin toxicity was not different. Haematologic toxicity was higher in arm B on neutrophil count and hemoglobin level. Three-year overall actuarial survival and disease-free survival rates were respectively 51% versus 31% and 42% versus 20% for patients treated with combined modality versus radiation alone (p = 0.022 and 0.043). Local and regional control rate has been improved in arm B (66% versus 42%). The statistically significant improvement in overall survival obtained support the use of concomitant chemotherapy as an adjunct to radiotherapy in the management of carcinoma of the oropharynx.

  9. Predictors of Long-Term Quality of Life for Survivors of Stage II/III Rectal Cancer in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Mary E.; Stitzenberg, Karyn B.; Lin, Chi; Schlichting, Jennifer A.; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Juarez, Grelda Yazmin; Pendergast, Jane F.; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A.; Wallace, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Many patients do not receive guideline-recommended neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for resectable rectal cancer. Little is known regarding long-term quality of life (QOL) associated with various treatment approaches. Our objective was to determine patient characteristics and subsequent QOL associated with treatment approach. Methods: Our study was a geographically diverse population- and health system–based cohort study that included adults age 21 years or older with newly diagnosed stage II/III rectal cancer who were recruited from 2003 to 2005. Eligible patients were contacted 1 to 4 months after diagnosis and asked to participate in a telephone survey and to consent to medical record review, with separate follow-up QOL surveys conducted 1 and 7 years after diagnosis. Results: Two hundred thirty-nine patients with stage II/III rectal cancer were included in this analysis. Younger age (< 65 v ≥ 65 years: odds ratio, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.65) was significantly associated with increased odds of receiving neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The adjuvant chemoradiotherapy group had significantly worse mean EuroQol-5D (range, 0 to 1) and Short Form-12 physical health component scores (standardized mean, 50) at 1-year follow-up than the neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy group (0.75 v 0.85; P = .002; 37.2 v 43.3; P = .01, respectively) and the group that received only one or neither form of treatment (0.75 v 0.85; P = .02; 37.2 v 45.1; P = .008, respectively). Conclusion: Neoadjuvant treatment may result in better QOL and functional status 1 year after diagnosis. Further evaluation of patient and provider reasons for not pursuing neoadjuvant therapy is necessary to determine how and where to target process improvement and/or education efforts to ensure that patients have access to recommended treatment options. PMID:26080831

  10. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-21

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III, dyskinesia scales, and timed motor tests in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: an argument against multiple baseline assessments.

    PubMed

    Metman, Leo Verhagen; Myre, Brian; Verwey, Niek; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Arzbaecher, Jean; Sierens, Diane; Bakay, Roy

    2004-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of the motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The secondary objective was to assess the intra-rater reliability of standard timed motor tests and dyskinesia scales to determine the necessity of multiple baseline core evaluations before surgery for PD. We carried out two standardized preoperative core evaluations of patients with advanced PD scheduled to undergo deep brain stimulation. Patients were examined in the defined off and on conditions by the same rater. UPDRS-III, timed tests, and dyskinesia scores from the two evaluations were compared using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Differences in UPDRS-III scores for the two visits were clinically and statistically nonsignificant, and the ICC was 0.9. Similarly, there were no significant differences in timed motor tests or dyskinesia scores, with a median ICC of 0.8. The results indicate that previous findings of high test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III in early untreated PD patients can now be extended to those with advanced disease complicated by motor fluctuations. In addition, test-retest reliability of dyskinesia scales and timed motor tests was high. Taken together, these findings challenge the need for multiple baseline assessments as currently stipulated in core assessment protocols for surgical intervention in PD.

  12. Analysis of mRNA decay and rRNA processing in Escherichia coli multiple mutants carrying a deletion in RNase III.

    PubMed

    Babitzke, P; Granger, L; Olszewski, J; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    RNase III is an endonuclease involved in processing both rRNA and certain mRNAs. To help determine whether RNase III (rnc) is required for general mRNA turnover in Escherichia coli, we have created a deletion-insertion mutation (delta rnc-38) in the structural gene. In addition, a series of multiple mutant strains containing deficiencies in RNase II (rnb-500), polynucleotide phosphorylase (pnp-7 or pnp-200), RNase E (rne-1 or rne-3071), and RNase III (delta rnc-38) were constructed. The delta rnc-38 single mutant was viable and led to the accumulation of 30S rRNA precursors, as has been previously observed with the rnc-105 allele (P. Gegenheimer, N. Watson, and D. Apirion, J. Biol. Chem. 252:3064-3073, 1977). In the multiple mutant strains, the presence of the delta rnc-38 allele resulted in the more rapid decay of pulse-labeled RNA but did not suppress conditional lethality, suggesting that the lethality associated with altered mRNA turnover may be due to the stabilization of specific mRNAs. In addition, these results indicate that RNase III is probably not required for general mRNA decay. Of particular interest was the observation that the delta rnc-38 rne-1 double mutant did not accumulate 30S rRNA precursors at 30 degrees C, while the delta rnc-38 rne-3071 double mutant did. Possible explanations of these results are discussed.

  13. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Oberije, Cary; Senan, Suresh; Tsujino, Kayoko; Wiersma, Terry; Moreno-Jimenez, Marta; Kim, Tae Hyun; Marks, Lawrence B.; Rengan, Ramesh; De Petris, Luigi; Ramella, Sara; DeRuyck, Kim; De Dios, Núria Rodriguez; Warner, Andrew; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Palma, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  14. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cisplatin, and Paclitaxel or Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  15. Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 and Anastrozole With or Without Goserelin Acetate in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-26

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Atezolizumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Stage II-III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  17. Combined assays for serum carcinoembryonic antigen and microRNA-17-3p offer improved diagnostic potential for stage I/II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, JINHAI; DONG, HUIMING; ZHANG, QIONG; ZHANG, SHANGWU

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the leading causes of cancer-related mortality, one of the main reasons for which is the lack of an effective screening method for early-stage disease. The levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and microRNA (miR)-17-3p in the serum of 70 patients with stage I/II colon cancer and 70 healthy volunteers were determined, and the diagnostic value of CEA plus miR-17-3p detection for colon cancer was assessed. The levels of CEA were measured by a radioimmunoassay method, and those of miR-17-3p using the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. miR-16 was used as the endogenous control, as it displayed high stability, high abundance and low variability in the analyzed serum samples. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated the potential diagnostic value of the two markers and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for CEA and miR-17-3p was 0.719 (95% CI: 0.658–0.843) and 0.807 (95% CI: 0.748–0.906), respectively. At a threshold of 9.6 ng/ml for CEA, the optimal sensitivity and specificity were 74.6 and 84.3%, respectively, in discriminating colon cancer patients from healthy controls. At a threshold of 2.98 for miR-17-3p, the sensitivity and the specificity were 83.6 and 72.9%, respectively. A combined ROC analysis using CEA and miR-17-3p revealed an AUC of 0.929 (95% CI: 0.834–0.978) with a sensitivity of 96.4% and a specificity of 95.7% in discriminating colon cancer patients from healthy controls. In conclusion, both CEA and miR-17-3p were highly expressed in the serum of our series of colon cancer patients. CEA plus miR-17-3p detection significantly increased the sensitivity and specificity in discriminating stage I/II colon cancer patients from healthy controls. Therefore, combined detection of serum CEA and miR-17-3p levels may have the potential to become a new laboratory method for the early clinical diagnosis of colon cancer. PMID:26807240

  18. Association of global levels of histone modifications with recurrence-free survival in stage IIB and III esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Cho, Eun Yoon; Han, Joungho; Park, Joobae; Kim, Kwhanmien; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Shim, Young Mog

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the effects of histone modifications on recurrence-free survival (RFS) after esophagectomy in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The acetylation of histone H3 lysine (H3K9Ac), histone H3 lysine 18 (H3K18Ac), and histone H4 lysine 12 (H4K12Ac), and the dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9diMe) and histone H4 arginine 3 (H4R3diMe) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 237 ESCCs. The K-means clustering algorithm was used to identify unique patterns of histone modifications. At a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 109 (46%) of 237 patients had developed recurrence of disease. Mean global levels of H3K9Ac, H3K18Ac, H3K9diMe, H4K12Ac, and H4R3diMe were 81.5%, 65.1%, 80.3%, 45.9%, and 27.4%, respectively. In the analysis of individual histones, a 1% increase in the global level of H3K18Ac in pathologic stage III worsened RFS at 1.009 times [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.001-1.016; P = 0.03], after adjusting for age, sex, and operative method. Cluster analysis also showed significant effects of histone modifications on RFS. For stage IIB cancers, Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that RFS of cluster 1, with high global levels of H3K18Ac and H4R3diMe, was 2.79 times poorer (95% CI, 1.14-6.27; P = 0.008) than that of cluster 2, with low levels. RFS for stage III cancers was also poorer in cluster 1 than cluster 2 (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.10-5.34; P = 0.02). In conclusion, the present study suggests that global levels of histone modifications in ESCC may be an independent prognostic factor of RFS.

  19. Safety of zoledronic acid and incidence of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) during adjuvant therapy in a randomised phase III trial (AZURE: BIG 01-04) for women with stage II/III breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Coleman, R; Woodward, E; Brown, J; Cameron, D; Bell, R; Dodwell, D; Keane, M; Gil, M; Davies, C; Burkinshaw, R; Houston, S J; Grieve, R J; Barrett-Lee, P J; Thorpe, H

    2011-06-01

    The AZURE trial is an ongoing phase III, academic, multi-centre, randomised trial designed to evaluate the role of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in the adjuvant therapy of women with stage II/III breast cancer. Here, we report the safety and tolerability profile of ZOL in this setting. Eligible patients received (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and/or endocrine therapy and were randomised to receive neither additional treatment nor intravenous ZOL 4 mg. ZOL was administered after each chemotherapy cycle to exploit potential sequence-dependent synergy. ZOL was continued for 60 months post-randomisation (six doses in the first 6 months, eight doses in the following 24 months and five doses in the final 30 months). Serious (SAE) and non-serious adverse event (AE) data generated during the first 36 months on study were analysed for the safety population. 3,360 patients were recruited to the AZURE trial. The safety population comprised 3,340 patients (ZOL 1,665; control 1,675). The addition of ZOL to standard treatment did not significantly impact on chemotherapy delivery. SAE were similar in both treatment arms. No significant safety differences were seen apart from the occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in the ZOL group (11 confirmed cases; 0.7%; 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.1%). ZOL in the adjuvant setting is well tolerated, and can be safely administered in addition to adjuvant therapy including chemotherapy. The adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of ZOL, with a low incidence of ONJ.

  20. Extended culture up to the blastocyst stage: a strategy to avoid multiple pregnancies in assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Soledad J; Portella, Jimmy R; Noriega, Luis P; Escudero, Ernesto L; Noriega, Luis H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the experience and outcomes of assisted reproduction cycles with embryos grown up to day 5 of development, comparing different parameters according to the ages of the patients. We retrospectively studied 1,874 assisted reproduction cycles where embryo culture was extended up to the fifth or sixth day of development. All IVF and ICSI cycles were included, comparing, according to patient age, the following rates: blastocyst formation, pregnancy, implantation and abortion. As control, we analyzed cycles with donated oocytes from young donors (OD). The number of embryos reaching the blastocyst stage is similar in all groups of patients. Only the OD group was different in terms of blastocyst formation, pregnancy and implantation rates. Patients over 39 years of age had an abortion rate of 59.1 %, which is significantly higher than the other groups. Extended embryo culture up to the blastocyst stage can be implemented in programs of assisted reproduction in order to increase the pregnancy rate. The potential of blastocyst implantation is high, allowing us to transfer fewer embryos and reduce the probability of multiple pregnancies.

  1. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. Treatment outcomes of and prognostic factors for definitive radiotherapy with and without chemotherapy for Stage I/II nasal extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Claire Wen-Chi; Wang, Chun-Wei; Hong, Ruey-Long; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Yao, Ming; Tang, Jih-Luh; Lin, Chung-Wu; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    Treatment strategies for nasal extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL), including sequential chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (SCRT), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), or radiotherapy alone (RT), remain varied. The purpose of this study was to assess the treatment outcome, the toxicity, and the potential prognostic factors for patients with early-stage nasal ENKTL treated using definitive RT (minimum of 50 Gy) with or without chemotherapy. From 1998 to 2014, 37 patients were included in the study. Eight patients were treated with RT alone, 1 with CCRT, and 28 with SCRT. Local regional control (LRC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. RT resulted in an overall response rate of 91.2%, with a complete response rate of 78.4%. After a median follow-up time of 36.8 months, the 3-year LRC, PFS and OS were 87.4%, 64.0% and 76.3%, respectively. Acute severe toxicity (Grade 3) of mucositis was observed in 6 (16.2%) of the 37 patients. In univariate analyses, extensive disease (Stage I/II with local invasiveness) and the presence of B symptoms were significantly associated with a poor PFS, whereas extensive disease was significantly associated with a poor OS. Multivariate analysis identified the presence of extensive disease as an independent predictor of PFS (P < 0.001) and OS (P = 0.015). High-dose RT with or without chemotherapy reported promising locoregional control and a favorable outcome for patients with early-stage nasal ENKTL without local invasiveness. Further investigation of new treatment strategies for patients with local invasiveness is warranted. PMID:27534792

  3. Tolerability of intensified intravenous interferon alfa-2b versus the ECOG 1684 schedule as adjuvant therapy for stage III melanoma: a randomized phase III Italian Melanoma Inter-group trial (IMI – Mel.A.) [ISRCTN75125874

    PubMed Central

    Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Del Bianco, Paola; Romanini, Antonella; Guida, Michele; Paccagnella, Adriano; Dalla Palma, Maurizio; Naglieri, Emanuele; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Silvestri, Barbara; Michiara, Maria; De Salvo, Gian Luca

    2006-01-01

    Background High-dose interferon alfa-2b (IFNalfa-2b), according to the ECOG 1684 schedule, is the only approved adjuvant treatment for stage III melanoma patients by the FDA and EMEA. However, the risk/benefit profile has been questioned limiting its world-wide use. In the late nineties, the Italian Melanoma Inter-group started a spontaneous randomized clinical trial (RCT) to verify if a more intense, but shorter than the ECOG 1684 regimen, could improve survival without increasing the toxicity profile. The safety analysis in the first 169 patients who completed the treatment is here described. Methods Stage III melanoma patients were randomized to receive IFNalfa-2b 20 MU/m2/d intravenously (IV) 5 days/week × 4 weeks, repeated for three times on weeks 9 to 12, 17 to 20, 25 to 28 (Dose-Dense/Dose-Intense, DD/DI, arm), or IFNalfa-2b 20 MU/m2/d IV 5 days/week × 4 weeks followed by 10 MU/m2 subcutaneously (SC) three times per week × 48 weeks (High Dose Interferon, HDI, arm). Toxicity was recorded and graded, according to the WHO criteria, as the worst grade that occurred during each cycle. Results The most common toxicities in both arms were flu-like and gastrointestinal symptoms, leukopenia, liver and neuro-psichiatric morbidities; with regard to severe toxicity, only leukopenia was statistically more frequent in DD/DI arm than in HDI arm (24% vs 9%) (p = 0.0074), yet, this did not cause an increase in the infection risk. Discontinuation of treatment, due to toxicity, was observed in 13 and 17% of the patients in the DD/DI and HDI arm, respectively. The median actual dose intensity delivered in the DD/DI arm (36.4 MU/m2/week) was statistically higher than that delivered in the HDI arm (30.7 MU/m2/week) (p = 0.003). Conclusion Four cycles of intravenous high-dose IFNalfa-2b can be safely delivered with an increase in the median dose intensity. Efficacy results from this trial are eagerly awaited. PMID:16504154

  4. SAGETTARIUS: a program to reduce the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts and to plan SAGE sequencing stages

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Laurent; Wu, Yan; Guerin, Eric; Plewniak, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    SAGE (Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) experiments generate short nucleotide sequences called ‘tags’ which are assumed to map unambiguously to their original transcripts (1 tag to 1 transcript mapping). Nevertheless, many tags are generated that do not map to any transcript or map to multiple transcripts. Current bioinformatics resources, such as SAGEmap and TAGmapper, have focused on reducing the number of unmapped tags. Here, we describe SAGETTARIUS, a new high-throughput program that performs successive precise Nla3 and Sau3A tag to transcript mapping, based on specifically designed Virtual Tag (VT) libraries. First, SAGETTARIUS decreases the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts. Among the various mapping resources compared, SAGETTARIUS performed the best in this respect by decreasing up to 11% the number of multiply mapped tags. Second, SAGETTARIUS allows the establishment of a guideline for SAGE experiment sequencing efforts through efficient mapping of the CRT (Cytoplasmic Ribosomal protein Transcripts)-specific tags. Using all publicly available human and mouse Nla3 SAGE experiments, we show that sequencing 100 000 tags is sufficient to map almost all CRT-specific tags and that four sequencing stages can be identified when carrying out a human or mouse SAGE project. SAGETTARIUS is web interfaced and freely accessible to academic users. PMID:17884916

  5. SAGETTARIUS: a program to reduce the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts and to plan SAGE sequencing stages.

    PubMed

    Bianchetti, Laurent; Wu, Yan; Guerin, Eric; Plewniak, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    SAGE (Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) experiments generate short nucleotide sequences called 'tags' which are assumed to map unambiguously to their original transcripts (1 tag to 1 transcript mapping). Nevertheless, many tags are generated that do not map to any transcript or map to multiple transcripts. Current bioinformatics resources, such as SAGEmap and TAGmapper, have focused on reducing the number of unmapped tags. Here, we describe SAGETTARIUS, a new high-throughput program that performs successive precise Nla3 and Sau3A tag to transcript mapping, based on specifically designed Virtual Tag (VT) libraries. First, SAGETTARIUS decreases the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts. Among the various mapping resources compared, SAGETTARIUS performed the best in this respect by decreasing up to 11% the number of multiply mapped tags. Second, SAGETTARIUS allows the establishment of a guideline for SAGE experiment sequencing efforts through efficient mapping of the CRT (Cytoplasmic Ribosomal protein Transcripts)-specific tags. Using all publicly available human and mouse Nla3 SAGE experiments, we show that sequencing 100,000 tags is sufficient to map almost all CRT-specific tags and that four sequencing stages can be identified when carrying out a human or mouse SAGE project. SAGETTARIUS is web interfaced and freely accessible to academic users.

  6. Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. LAPTM4B-35, a Cancer-Related Gene, Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in TNM Stages I-III Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Lianhai; Xing, Xiaofang; Wang, Xiaohong; Hu, Ying; Du, Hong; Li, Lin; Li, Shen; Zhou, Rouli; Wen, Xian-Zi; Ji, Jia-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Background Lysosome-associated transmembrane protein 4β-35 (LAPTM4B-35), a member of the mammalian 4-tetratransmembrane spanning protein superfamily, has been reported to be overexpressed in several cancers. However the expression of LAPTM4B-35 and its role in the progression of gastric cancer (GC) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate LAPTM4B-35 expression in GC, its potential relevance to clinicopathologic parameters and role of LAPTM4B-35 during gastric carcinogenesis. Methods In the present study, paraffin-embedded specimens with GC (n = 240, including 180 paired specimens) and 24 paired fresh frozen tissues were analyzed. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to analyze the expression of LAPTM4B-35 in GC. The effects of LAPTM4B-35 on GC cell proliferation, migration and invasion were determined by overexpression and knockdown assays. Results IHC showed that LAPTM4B-35 was expressed in 68.3% (123/180) of GC tissues, while in 16.1% (29/180) of their paired adjacent noncancerous gastric tissues (P = 0.000). LAPTM4B-35 mRNA levels in GC tissues were also significantly elevated when compared with their paired adjacent noncancerous tissues (P = 0.017). Overexpression of LAPTM4B-35 was significantly associated with degree of differentiation, depth of invasion, lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with LAPTM4B-35 expression had a significant decrease in overall survival (OS) in stages I-III GC patients (P = 0.006). Multivariate analysis showed high expression of LAPTM4B-35 was an independent prognostic factor for OS in stage I-III GC patients (P = 0.025). Conclusion These findings indicate that LAPTM4B-35 overexpression may be related to GC progression and poor prognosis, and thus may serve as a new prediction marker of prognosis in GC patients. PMID:25849595

  8. A clinical study of shrinking field radiation therapy based on (18)F-FDG PET/CT for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiuping; Li, Hongsheng; Wang, Zhongtang; Huang, Wei; Li, Baosheng; Zang, Rukun; Sun, Hongfu; Yi, Yan

    2013-06-01

    The aim is to investigate the feasibility of shrinking field technique after 40 Gy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during radiation therapy. Eighty-seven consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy or three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy were enrolled in this study. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) scanning was performed prior to treatment and repeated after 40 Gy, and the delineation of target volume was based on fused images of PET and CT. After 40 Gy of conventional fractionated radiotherapy to the initial planning target volume (PTV), a boost of 19.6-39.2 Gy was delivered to the shrunken PTV through late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy, and the median total dose was 66.0 Gy (range, 59.6-79.2 Gy). Gross tumor volume (GTV) and PTV regressions were recorded, and prescription doses with or without shrinking field were calculated. Local recurrence patterns were investigated through follow-up. The tumor volumes regressed in 84 (96.6%) patients and increased in 3 (3.4%) patients after 40 Gy. The mean GTV and PTV reduction was 38% (range, -13-95%) and 30% (range, -5-95%). Mean total prescription dose escalated from 62.0 Gy to 68.5 Gy through shrinking field technique. The median follow-up was 17 months, ranging from 5 to 46 months, and the 1- and 2-year overall survival rates in our study were 74.7% and 34.6%. The response rate was 79.5%, and radiation toxicity was acceptable. Tumor progression occurred in 67.8% (59/87) patients. Numbers of patients who had outfield, infield and both infield and outfield recurrences were 3 (3.4%), 26 (29.5%), and 3 (3.4%), respectively. In conclusion, significant tumor regression was observed after 40 Gy, and radiation dose escalated after shrinking field with acceptable toxicity and outfield relapse. Shrinking field radiotherapy based on (18)F-FDG PET/CT after 40 Gy was safe and

  9. Combined detection of the expression of Nm23-H1 and p53 is correlated with survival rates of patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yinying; Li, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoai; Dong, Danfeng; Tang, Chunhui; Li, Enxiao; Geng, Qianqian

    2017-01-01

    Molecular tumor markers hold considerable promise for accurately predicting the recurrence and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients. However, in the majority of cases, single marker analysis has been found to have low accuracy, and is of little practical use in clinical practice. The present study investigated the prognostic value of the combined detection of the protein expression of metastasis suppressor 23-H1 (Nm23-H1) and p53 using immunohistochemical analysis, and the mRNA expression levels were analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 110 cases of stage II and III CRC. The results revealed that the expression levels of Nm23-H1 in CRC tissues were lower, compared with those in normal tissues (χ2=18.249; P<0.001), and the protein expression levels of p53 were higher in the CRC tissues (χ2=23.940; P<0.001); although the mRNA expression levels of Nm23-H1 and p53 presented with the same trend. The protein expression of Nm23-H1 was correlated with lymph node metastases (χ2=11.847; P=0.001) and pathological patterns (χ2=6.911; P=0.032). However, it did not correlate with patient gender or age, or with tumor World Health Organization classification or invasive depth (P>0.05). No significant correlation was observed between the expression of p53 and clinicopathological features (P>0.05). Patients with CRC with Nm23-H1(+)/p53(−) tumors had increased survival rates, with a five-year overall survival rate of 83.8% and a five-year disease-free survival rate of 70.2%. The five-year overall survival rates in other study cohorts were lower, compared with the Nm23-H1(+)/p53(−) group (P<0.0125), and this was the same for the five-year disease-free survival rate (P<0.0125). In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the combined detection of the protein expression of Nm23-H1 and p53 was associated with the long term survival rates of patients with stage II and III CRC; and this may offer potential for use as a

  10. The Nonanuclear [Mo(IV){(CN)Fe(III)(3-ethoxy-saldptn)}8]Cl4 Complex Compound Exhibits Multiple Spin Transitions Observed by Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, F.; Kerep, P.

    2004-12-01

    The pentadentate ligand 3-EO-5LH2= 3-ethoxy-saldptn = N,N‧-bis(3-ethoxy-1-hydroxy-2-benzyliden)-1,7-diamino-4-azaheptane has been prepared by a Schiff base condensation between 1,7-diamino-4-azaheptane and the corresponding 3-ethoxy-salicyaldehyde. 3-EO-5LH2 is a sterical extention to 5LH2. Its complexation with Fe(III) gave the high-spin (S=5/2) complex of [Fe(III)(3-EO-5L)Cl]. This precursor was combined with [Mo(CN)8]4- and a blue nonanuclear cluster [Mo(IV){(CN)Fe(III)(3-EO-5L)}8]Cl4 resulted. This starshaped nonanuclear compound is a high-spin system at room temperature. On cooling to 10 K some of the eight iron(III) centers switched to the low-spin state as proven by Mössbauer spectra, i.e. multiple electronic transitions.

  11. Inducing humoral and cellular responses to multiple sporozoite and liver-stage malaria antigens using exogenous plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, B; Talbott, K T; Balakrishnan, A; Cisper, N; Morrow, M P; Hutnick, N A; Myles, D J; Shedlock, D J; Obeng-Adjei, N; Yan, J; Kayatani, A K K; Richie, N; Cabrera, W; Shiver, R; Khan, A S; Brown, A S; Yang, M; Wille-Reece, U; Birkett, A J; Sardesai, N Y; Weiner, D B

    2013-10-01

    A vaccine candidate that elicits humoral and cellular responses to multiple sporozoite and liver-stage antigens may be able to confer protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria; however, a technology for formulating and delivering such a vaccine has remained elusive. Here, we report the preclinical assessment of an optimized DNA vaccine approach that targets four P. falciparum antigens: circumsporozoite protein (CSP), liver stage antigen 1 (LSA1), thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP), and cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS). Synthetic DNA sequences were designed for each antigen with modifications to improve expression and were delivered using in vivo electroporation (EP). Immunogenicity was evaluated in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs) and assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assay, and flow cytometry. In mice, DNA with EP delivery induced antigen-specific IFN-γ production, as measured by ELISpot assay and IgG seroconversion against all antigens. Sustained production of IFN-γ, interleukin-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha was elicited in both the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell compartments. Furthermore, hepatic CD8(+) lymphocytes produced LSA1-specific IFN-γ. The immune responses conferred to mice by this approach translated to the NHP model, which showed cellular responses by ELISpot assay and intracellular cytokine staining. Notably, antigen-specific CD8(+) granzyme B(+) T cells were observed in NHPs. Collectively, the data demonstrate that delivery of gene sequences by DNA/EP encoding malaria parasite antigens is immunogenic in animal models and can harness both the humoral and cellular arms of the immune system.

  12. Targeting multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways with a resorcinol derivative leads to inhibition of advanced stages of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Rumi; Singer, Eric; Pakdel, Arash; Sarma, Pranamee; Judkins, Jonathon; Elwakeel, Eiman; Dayal, Sonali; Martinez-Martinez, Esther; Amere, Mukkanti; Gujjar, Ramesh; Mahadevan, Anu; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The psychoactive cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) can both reduce cancer progression, each through distinct anti-tumour pathways. Our goal was to discover a compound that could efficiently target both cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways. Experimental Approach To measure breast cancer cell proliferation/viability and invasion, MTT and Boyden chamber assays were used. Modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis was measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein and annexin/propidium iodide, respectively, in combination with cell flow cytometry. Changes in protein levels were evaluated using Western analysis. Orthotopic and i.v. mouse models of breast cancer metastasis were used to test the activity of cannabinoids in vivo. Key Results CBD reduced breast cancer metastasis in advanced stages of the disease as the direct result of down-regulating the transcriptional regulator Id1. However, this was associated with moderate increases in survival. We therefore screened for analogues that could co-target cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways (CBD- and THC-associated) and discovered the compound O-1663. This analogue inhibited Id1, produced a marked stimulation of ROS, up-regulated autophagy and induced apoptosis. Of all the compounds tested, it was the most potent at inhibiting breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in culture and metastasis in vivo. Conclusions and Implications O-1663 prolonged survival in advanced stages of breast cancer metastasis. Developing compounds that can simultaneously target multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways efficiently may provide a novel approach for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer. PMID:24910342

  13. Prospective evaluation of concurrent paclitaxel and radiation therapy after adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy for Stage II or III breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, Harold J. . E-mail: hburstein@partners.org; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Galper, Sharon; Lu, H.-M.; Kuter, Irene; Wong, Julia; Gelman, Rebecca; Bunnell, Craig A.; Parker, Leroy M.; Garber, Judy E.; Winer, Eric P.; Harris, Jay R.; Powell, Simon N.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of concurrent radiation therapy and paclitaxel-based adjuvant chemotherapy, given either weekly or every 3 weeks, after adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC). Methods and Materials: After definitive breast surgery and AC chemotherapy, 40 patients with operable Stage II or III breast cancer received protocol-based treatment with concurrent paclitaxel and radiation therapy. Paclitaxel was evaluated on 2 schedules, with treatment given either weekly x 12 weeks (60 mg/m{sup 2}), or every 3 weeks x 4 cycles (135-175 mg/m{sup 2}). Radiation fields and schedules were determined by the patient's surgery and pathology. The tolerability of concurrent therapy was evaluated in cohorts of 8 patients as a phase I study. Results: Weekly paclitaxel treatment at 60 mg/m{sup 2} per week with concurrent radiation led to dose-limiting toxicity in 4 of 16 patients (25%), including 3 who developed pneumonitis (either Grade 2 [1 patient] or Grade 3 [2 patients]) requiring steroids. Efforts to eliminate this toxicity in combination with weekly paclitaxel through treatment scheduling and CT-based radiotherapy simulation were not successful. By contrast, dose-limiting toxicity was not encountered among patients receiving concurrent radiation with paclitaxel given every 3 weeks at 135-175 mg/m{sup 2}. However, Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis not requiring steroid therapy was seen in 2 of 24 patients (8%) treated in such a fashion. Excessive radiation dermatitis was not observed with either paclitaxel schedule. Conclusions: Concurrent treatment with weekly paclitaxel and radiation therapy is not feasible after adjuvant AC chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Concurrent treatment using a less frequent paclitaxel dosing schedule may be possible, but caution is warranted in light of the apparent possibility of pulmonary injury.

  14. Impact of 18F-Fluoro-2-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography on Treatment Strategy and Radiotherapy Planning for Stage I-II Hodgkin Disease: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pommier, Pascal; Dussart, Sophie; Girinsky, Theodore; Chabaud, Sylvie; Lagrange, Jean Leon; Nguyen, Tan Dat; Beckendorff, Veronique; D'Hombres, Anne; Artignan, Xavier; Bondiau, Pierre Yves; Carrie, Christian; Giammarile, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of preradiotherapy 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) on treatment strategy and radiotherapy planning for patients with Stage I/II Hodgkin disease included in a large prospective multicenter study. Patients and Methods: Conventional computed tomography and FDG-PET were performed just before the planned radiotherapy. The radiotherapy plan was first elaborated under blinded conditions for FDG-PET data. Then, the medical staff was asked to confirm or not confirm the treatment strategy and, if appropriate, to modify the radiotherapy plan based on additional information from FDG-PET. Results: Between January 2004 and January 2006, 137 patients were included (124 were available for analysis) in 11 centers (108 adults, 16 children). All but 1 patient had received chemotherapy before inclusion. Prechemotherapy work-up included FDG-PET for 61 patients, and data were available for elaboration of the first radiotherapy plan. Based on preradiotherapy FDG-PET data, the radiotherapy was cancelled in 6 patients (4.8%), and treatment plan modifications occurred in 16 patients (12.9%): total dose (11 patients), CTV volume (5 patients), number of beam incidences (6 patients), and number of CTV (6 patients). The concordance between the treatment strategies with or without preradiotherapy FDG-PET was 82.3%. Concordance results were not significantly different when prechemotherapy PET-CT information was available. Conclusion: Preradiotherapy FDG-PET for treatment planning in Hodgkin lymphoma may lead to significant modification of the treatment strategy and the radiotherapy planning in patients with Stage I or II Hodgkin disease, even in those who have undergone FDG-PET as part of the prechemotherapy work-up.

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-A Predictor of Outcome for Patients Irradiated for Stage II-III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of tumor cell expression of FGF-2 on the outcome of 60 patients irradiated for Stage II-III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: The effect of FGF-2 expression and 13 additional factors on locoregional control (LRC), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated. These additional factors included age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic type, histologic grade, T and N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack-years, smoking during radiotherapy, and hemoglobin during radiotherapy. Locoregional failure was identified by endoscopy or computed tomography. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the Wilcoxon test and multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: On univariate analysis, improved LRC was associated with surgery (p = .017), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .036), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of LRC, surgery (relative risk [RR], 2.44; p = .037), and FGF-2 expression (RR, 5.06; p <.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, improved MFS was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (p = .020), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .007), and FGF-2 negativity (p = .001). On multivariate analysis of MFS, the hemoglobin levels (RR, 2.65; p = .019) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.05; p = .004) were significant. On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with a lower N category (p = .048), greater hemoglobin levels (p <.001), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of OS, greater hemoglobin levels (RR, 4.62; p = .002) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.25; p = .002) maintained significance. Conclusions: Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 appeared to be an independent negative predictor

  16. Radiation Therapy Administration and Survival in Stage I/II Extranodal Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, Adam J. Desai, Amrita

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the factors associated with the use of radiation therapy and associated survival outcomes in early-stage marginal zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Methods and Materials: We extracted data on adult patients with stage I/II MALT lymphoma diagnoses between 1998 and 2010 recorded in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. We studied factors associated with radiation therapy administration in a logistic regression model and described the cumulative incidence of lymphoma-related death (LRD) according to receipt of the treatment. The association of radiation therapy with survival was explored in multivariate models with adjustment for immortal time bias. Results: Of the 7774 identified patients, 36% received radiation therapy as part of the initial course of treatment. Older patients; black or Hispanic men; white, Hispanic, and black women; and socioeconomically disadvantaged and underinsured patients had a significantly lower chance of receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy administration was associated with a lower chance of LRD in most sites. In cutaneous, ocular, and salivary MALT lymphomas, the 5-year estimate of LRD after radiation therapy was 0%. The association of radiation therapy with overall survival in different lymphoma sites was heterogeneous, and statistically significant in cutaneous (hazard ratio 0.45, P=.009) and ocular (hazard ratio 0.47, P<.0001) locations after multivariate adjustment. Conclusions: Demographic factors are associated with the use of radiation therapy in MALT lymphoma. Clinicians should be sensitive to those disparities because the administration of radiation therapy may be associated with improved survival, particularly in cutaneous and ocular lymphomas.

  17. A phase II prospective study of the "Sandwich" protocol, L-asparaginase, cisplatin, dexamethasone and etoposide chemotherapy combined with concurrent radiation and cisplatin, in newly diagnosed, I/II stage, nasal type, extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming; Zhang, Li; Xie, Li; Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Yu; Liu, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Rong; Deng, Yao-Tiao; Zhao, Sha; Zou, Li-Qun

    2017-03-17

    Nasal-type, extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKTCL) is a special type of lymphomas with geographic and racial specificity. Up to now, the standard first-line treatment is still not unified. In our previous report, the "sandwich" protocol produced good results. Continuing to use the "sandwich" mode, a new chemotherapy composed of L-asparaginase, cisplatin, etoposide and dexamethasone (LVDP) plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was conducted in more patients with newly diagnosed, I/II stage ENKTCL. The results showed that 66 patients were enrolled. Overall response rate was 86.4% including 83.3% complete response and 3.0% partial remission. With the median follow-up of 23.5 months, 3-year overall survival and 3-year progression-free survival were 70.1% and 67.4%, respectively. The survival rate in stage II and extra-cavity stage I was significantly less than that in limited stage I (p < 0.05). Therefore, we thought that the "sandwich" mode was worthy of being generalized and LVDP combined with CCRT was an effective protocol for I/II stage ENKTCL. But this regimen was not suitable for all stage I/II patients and warrants larger sample and layering investigation. This study was a registered clinical trial with number ChiCTR-TNC-12002353.

  18. The Drosophila Transcription Factor Dimmed Affects Neuronal Growth and Differentiation in Multiple Ways Depending on Neuron Type and Developmental Stage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiting; Luo, Jiangnan; Nässel, Dick R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of postmitotic neurons occurs during different stages of development, including metamorphosis, and may also be part of neuronal plasticity and regeneration. Recently we showed that growth of post-mitotic neuroendocrine cells expressing the basic helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factor Dimmed (Dimm) in Drosophila could be regulated by insulin/IGF signaling and the insulin receptor (dInR). Dimm is also known to confer a secretory phenotype to neuroendocrine cells and can be part of a combinatorial code specifying terminal differentiation in peptidergic neurons. To further understand the mechanisms of Dimm function we ectopically expressed Dimm or Dimm together with dInR in a wide range of Dimm positive and Dimm negative peptidergic neurons, sensory neurons, interneurons, motor neurons, and gut endocrine cells. We provide further evidence that dInR mediated cell growth occurs in a Dimm dependent manner and that one source of insulin-like peptide (DILP) for dInR mediated cell growth in the CNS is DILP6 from glial cells. Expressing both Dimm and dInR in Dimm negative neurons induced growth of cell bodies, whereas dInR alone did not. We also found that Dimm alone can regulate cell growth depending on specific cell type. This may be explained by the finding that the dInR is a direct target of Dimm. Conditional gene targeting experiments showed that Dimm alone could affect cell growth in certain neuron types during metamorphosis or in the adult stage. Another important finding was that ectopic Dimm inhibits apoptosis of several types of neurons normally destined for programmed cell death (PCD). Taken together our results suggest that Dimm plays multiple transcriptional roles at different developmental stages in a cell type-specific manner. In some cell types ectopic Dimm may act together with resident combinatorial code transcription factors and affect terminal differentiation, as well as act in transcriptional networks that participate in long term maintenance

  19. Comparative analysis of BRAF, NRAS and c-KIT mutation status between tumor tissues and autologous tumor cell-lines of stage III/IV melanoma.

    PubMed

    Knol, Anne-Chantal; Pandolfino, Marie-Christine; Vallée, Audrey; Nguyen, Frédérique; Lella, Virginie; Khammari, Amir; Denis, Marc; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Dréno, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, advances in molecular biology have provided evidence of the genotypic heterogeneity of melanoma. We analysed BRAF, NRAS and c-KIT alterations in tissue samples from 63 stage III/IV melanoma patients and autologous cell-lines, using either allele-specific or quantitative PCR. The expression of BRAF V600E protein was also investigated using an anti-BRAF antibody in the same tissue samples. 81% of FFPE samples and tumor cell-lines harboured a genetic alteration in either BRAF (54%) or NRAS (27%) oncogenes. There was a strong concordance (100%) between tissue samples and tumor cell-lines. The BRAF V600E mutant-specific antibody showed high sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%) for detecting the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. The correlation was of 98% between PCR and immunohistochemistry results for BRAF mutation. These results suggest that BRAF and NRAS mutation status of tumor cells is not affected by culture conditions.

  20. Comparison of in-person and digital photograph assessment of stage III and IV pressure ulcers among veterans with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Terris, Darcey D; Woo, Christine; Jarczok, Marc N; Ho, Chester H

    2011-01-01

    Digital photographs are often used in treatment monitoring for home care of less advanced pressure ulcers. We investigated assessment agreement when stage III and IV pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury were evaluated in person and with the use of digital photographs. Two wound-care nurses assessed 31 wounds among 15 participants. One nurse assessed all wounds in person, while the other used digital photographs. Twenty-four wound description categories were applied in the nurses' assessments. Kappa statistics were calculated to investigate agreement beyond chance (p < or = 0.05). For 10 randomly selected "double-rated wounds," both nurses applied both assessment methods. Fewer categories were evaluated for the double-rated wounds, because some categories were chosen infrequently and agreement could not be measured. Interrater agreement with the two methods was observed for 12 of the 24 categories (50.0%). However, of the 12 categories with agreement beyond chance, agreement was only "slight" (kappa = 0-0.20) or "fair" (kappa = 0.21-0.40) for 6 categories. The highest agreement was found for the presence of undermining (kappa = 0.853, p < 0.001). Interrater agreement was similar to intramethod agreement (41.2% of the categories demonstrated agreement beyond chance) for the nurses' in-person assessment of the double-rated wounds. The moderate agreement observed may be attributed to variation in subjective perception of qualitative wound characteristics.

  1. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanoff, Hanna K.; Stitzenberg, Karyn B.; Baron, John A.; Lund, Jennifer L.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age < 50) populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age < 50) and older (age 50–69, age ≥ 70) CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13%) and Hispanic (15%) than patients aged 50–69 years (11% and 10%, resp.) and ≥70 years (7% each). A larger proportion of young white (41%) and Hispanic (33%) patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%). The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%). Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years. PMID:28239395

  2. Gefitinib in Combination With Irradiation With or Without Cisplatin in Patients With Inoperable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rothschild, Sacha; Bucher, Stephan E.; Bernier, Jacques; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Zouhair, Aberrahim; Ries, Gerhard; Lombrieser, Norbert; Lippuner, Thomas; Luetolf, Urs M.; Glanzmann, Christoph; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and tolerability of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa) with radiation (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter Phase I study, 5 patients with unresectable NSCLC received 250 mg gefitinib daily starting 1 week before RT at a dose of 63 Gy (Step 1). After a first safety analysis, 9 patients were treated daily with 250 mg gefitinib plus CRT in the form of RT and weekly CDDP 35 mg/m{sup 2} (Step 2). Gefitinib was maintained for up to 2 years until disease progression or toxicity. Results: Fourteen patients were assessed in the two steps. In Step 1 (five patients were administered only gefitinib and RT), no lung toxicities were seen, and there was no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Adverse events were skin and subcutaneous tissue reactions, limited to Grade 1-2. In Step 2, two of nine patients (22.2%) had DLT. One patient suffered from dyspnea and dehydration associated with neutropenic pneumonia, and another showed elevated liver enzymes. In both steps combined, 5 of 14 patients (35.7%) experienced one or more treatment interruptions. Conclusions: Gefitinib (250 mg daily) in combination with RT and CDDP in patients with Stage III NSCLC is feasible, but CDDP likely enhances toxicity. The impact of gefitinib on survival and disease control as a first-line treatment in combination with RT remains to be determined.

  3. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for stage I/II breast cancer using lung density correction: 10-year and 15-year results

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Griffith, Kent A.; Hayman, James A.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) planning for breast cancer using lung density correction improves dose homogeneity. Its use obviates the need for a medial wedge, thus reducing scatter to the opposite breast. Although lung density correction is used at many centers in planning for early-stage breast cancer, long-term results of local control and survival have not been reported. Since 1984, we have used lung density correction for dose calculations at the University of Michigan. We now present our 10-year and 15-year results. Methods and Materials: The records of 867 patients with Stage I/II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT with or without systemic therapy were reviewed. Tangential fields delivering 45-50 Gy to the whole breast calculated using lung density correction were used. A boost was added in 96.8% of patients for a total median dose of 61.8 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.6 years (range, 0.2-18.9 years), 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial rates of in-breast tumor recurrence as only first failure were 2.2%, 3.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. With surgical salvage, the 15-year cumulative rate of local control was 99.7%. Factors that significantly predicted for increased rate of local recurrence in multivariate analysis were age {<=} 35 years, hazard ratio 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-13.9) p = 0.004; negative progesterone receptor status, hazard ratio 6.8 (95% CI, 2.3-20.3) p = < 0.001; negative estrogen receptor status, hazard ratio 4.0 (95% CI, 1.5-11.1) p = 0.007; and lack of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, hazard ratio 7.7 (95% CI, 1.7-33.3) p = 0.008. Relapse-free survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 84.6%, 70.8%, and 55.9%, respectively; breast cancer-specific survival rates were 94.4%, 90.5%, and 86.9%, respectively; and corresponding estimates for overall survival were 89.7%, 75.7%, and 61.3%. Conclusions: Use of lung density correction was associated with high rates of local control, relapse-free survival, breast

  4. In Silico Repositioning-Chemogenomics Strategy Identifies New Drugs with Potential Activity against Multiple Life Stages of Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Bruno J.; Braga, Rodolpho C.; Bezerra, José C. B.; Cravo, Pedro V. L.; Andrade, Carolina H.

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality caused by schistosomiasis are serious public health problems in developing countries. Because praziquantel is the only drug in therapeutic use, the risk of drug resistance is a concern. In the search for new schistosomicidal drugs, we performed a target-based chemogenomics screen of a dataset of 2,114 proteins to identify drugs that are approved for clinical use in humans that may be active against multiple life stages of Schistosoma mansoni. Each of these proteins was treated as a potential drug target, and its amino acid sequence was used to interrogate three databases: Therapeutic Target Database (TTD), DrugBank and STITCH. Predicted drug-target interactions were refined using a combination of approaches, including pairwise alignment, conservation state of functional regions and chemical space analysis. To validate our strategy, several drugs previously shown to be active against Schistosoma species were correctly predicted, such as clonazepam, auranofin, nifedipine, and artesunate. We were also able to identify 115 drugs that have not yet been experimentally tested against schistosomes and that require further assessment. Some examples are aprindine, gentamicin, clotrimazole, tetrabenazine, griseofulvin, and cinnarizine. In conclusion, we have developed a systematic and focused computer-aided approach to propose approved drugs that may warrant testing and/or serve as lead compounds for the design of new drugs against schistosomes. PMID:25569258

  5. In silico repositioning-chemogenomics strategy identifies new drugs with potential activity against multiple life stages of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Neves, Bruno J; Braga, Rodolpho C; Bezerra, José C B; Cravo, Pedro V L; Andrade, Carolina H

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality caused by schistosomiasis are serious public health problems in developing countries. Because praziquantel is the only drug in therapeutic use, the risk of drug resistance is a concern. In the search for new schistosomicidal drugs, we performed a target-based chemogenomics screen of a dataset of 2,114 proteins to identify drugs that are approved for clinical use in humans that may be active against multiple life stages of Schistosoma mansoni. Each of these proteins was treated as a potential drug target, and its amino acid sequence was used to interrogate three databases: Therapeutic Target Database (TTD), DrugBank and STITCH. Predicted drug-target interactions were refined using a combination of approaches, including pairwise alignment, conservation state of functional regions and chemical space analysis. To validate our strategy, several drugs previously shown to be active against Schistosoma species were correctly predicted, such as clonazepam, auranofin, nifedipine, and artesunate. We were also able to identify 115 drugs that have not yet been experimentally tested against schistosomes and that require further assessment. Some examples are aprindine, gentamicin, clotrimazole, tetrabenazine, griseofulvin, and cinnarizine. In conclusion, we have developed a systematic and focused computer-aided approach to propose approved drugs that may warrant testing and/or serve as lead compounds for the design of new drugs against schistosomes.

  6. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. YKL-40 in Serum Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Neoplasm; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Transitional Cell Tumor; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Phase 2 Study of Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Concurrent Radiation for Technically Resectable Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Inohara, Hidenori; Takenaka, Yukinori; Yoshii, Tadashi; Nakahara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tomiyama, Yoichiro; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Sumida, Iori; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We investigated the efficacy and safety of weekly low-dose docetaxel and cisplatin therapy concurrent with conventionally fractionated radiation in patients with technically resectable stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and October 2011, we enrolled 117 patients, of whom 116 were analyzable (43 had oropharyngeal cancer, 54 had hypopharyngeal cancer, and 19 had laryngeal cancer), and 85 (73%) had stage IV disease. Radiation consisted of 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Docetaxel, 10 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by cisplatin, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, administered on the same day were given once a week for 6 cycles. The primary endpoint was overall complete response (CR) rate after chemoradiation therapy. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oropharyngeal cancer was examined by PCR. Results: Of 116 patients, 82 (71%) completed treatment per protocol; 102 (88%) received the full radiation therapy dose; and 90 (78%) and 12 (10%) patients received 6 and 5 chemotherapy cycles, respectively. Overall CR rate was 71%. After median follow-up of 50.9 months (range: 15.6-113.9 months for surviving patients), 2-year and 4-year overall survival rates were 82% and 68%, respectively. Cumulative 2-year and 4-year local failure rates were 27% and 28%, respectively, whereas distant metastasis rates were 15% and 22%, respectively. HPV status in oropharyngeal cancer was not associated with treatment efficacy. Acute toxicity included grade 3 and 4 in-field mucositis in 73% and 5% of patients, respectively, whereas myelosuppression and renal injury were minimal. No patients died of toxicity. Feeding tube dependence in 8% and tracheostomy in 1% of patients were evident at 2 years postchemoradiation therapy in patients who survived without local treatment failure. Conclusions: Local control and survival with this regimen were satisfactory. Although acute toxicity, such as mucositis, was common, late toxicity, such as laryngoesophageal

  9. Spatial patterns of density at multiple life stages in protected and fished conditions: An example from a Mediterranean coastal fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Franco, A.; Di Lorenzo, M.; Guidetti, P.

    2013-02-01

    Settlement and recruitment are well known to have critical influences on the demography of most marine fishes. Few studies have compared processes like larval supply, settlement and recruitment of fishes between protected (i.e. in marine protected areas, MPAs) and unprotected conditions and little information is available about the potential influence of early life history traits (e.g. pelagic larval duration, PLD) on these processes. In the present study, using the white sea bream Diplodus sargus sargus as a model species in the south-western Adriatic Sea, we investigated: 1) potential differences in the densities of adults, settlers, recruits and 1-YOs (one year old specimens) within an MPA and in unprotected areas, at multiple spatial scales; 2) the existence of local relationships between densities of adults (i.e. spawners), settlers, recruits and 1-YOs; and 3) the possible relationships between PLD and density of settlers. Both in 2009 and 2010 the density of settlers was higher at sites down-current to the MPA and showed a significant variability at the scale of sites (kms). Density of recruits only revealed variability among sites (both in 2009 and 2010), while density of 1-YOs was variable at the scale of sites and was higher in protected condition in 2011, but not in 2010. No significant relationships were found between the densities of adults, settlers, recruits and 1-YOs at the site scale, nor between PLD and the density of settlers. Results suggest a possible decoupling in space between the sequential life history stages of fish (from settlers to 1-YOs) due to dispersal (through sea currents or active fish movements). Further study may help better understand the actual contribution of MPAs to larval supply and recruitment in both MPAs and adjacent sites.

  10. A two-stage inter-rater approach for enrichment testing of variants associated with multiple traits

    PubMed Central

    Asimit, Jennifer L; Payne, Felicity; Morris, Andrew P; Cordell, Heather J; Barroso, Inês

    2017-01-01

    Shared genetic aetiology may explain the co-occurrence of diseases in individuals more often than expected by chance. On identifying associated variants shared between two traits, one objective is to determine whether such overlap may be explained by specific genomic characteristics (eg, functional annotation). In clinical studies, inter-rater agreement approaches assess concordance among expert opinions on the presence/absence of a complex disease for each subject. We adapt a two-stage inter-rater agreement model to the genetic association setting to identify features predictive of overlap variants, while accounting for their marginal trait associations. The resulting corrected overlap and marginal enrichment test (COMET) also assesses enrichment at the individual trait level. Multiple categories may be tested simultaneously and the method is computationally efficient, not requiring permutations to assess significance. In an extensive simulation study, COMET identifies features predictive of enrichment with high power and has well-calibrated type I error. In contrast, testing for overlap with a single-trait enrichment test has inflated type I error. COMET is applied to three glycaemic traits using a set of functional annotation categories as predictors, followed by further analyses that focus on tissue-specific regulatory variants. The results support previous findings that regulatory variants in pancreatic islets are enriched for fasting glucose-associated variants, and give insight into differences/similarities between characteristics of variants associated with glycaemic traits. Also, despite regulatory variants in pancreatic islets being enriched for variants that are marginally associated with fasting glucose and fasting insulin, there is no enrichment of shared variants between the traits. PMID:28000695

  11. Identification of new oxycodone metabolites in human urine by capillary electrophoresis-multiple-stage ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baldacci, A; Caslavska, J; Wey, A B; Thormann, W

    2004-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization multiple-stage ion-trap mass spectrometry (CE-MSn) and computer simulation of fragmentation are demonstrated to be effective tools to detect and identify phase I and phase II metabolites of oxycodone (OCOD) in human urine. OCOD is a strong analgesic used for the management of moderate to severe mainly postoperative or cancer-related pain whose metabolism in man is largely unknown. Using an aqueous pH 9 ammonium acetate buffer and CE-MSn (n < or = 5), OCOD and its phase I metabolites produced by O-demethylation, N-demethylation, 6-ketoreduction and N-oxidation (such as oxymorphone, noroxycodone, noroxymorphone, 6-oxycodol, nor-6-oxycodol, oxycodone-N-oxide and 6-oxycodol-N-oxide) and phase II conjugates with glucuronic acid of several of these compounds could be detected in alkaline solid-phase extracts of a patient urine that was collected during a pharmacotherapy episode with daily ingestion of 240-320 mg of OCOD chloride. The data for three known OCOD metabolites for which the standards had to be synthesized in-house, 6-oxycodol, nor-6-oxycodol and oxycodone-N-oxide, were employed to identify two new metabolites, the N-oxidized derivative of 6-oxycodol and an O-glucuronide of this compound. CE-MSn and computer simulation of fragmentation also led to the identification of the N-glucuronide of noroxymorphone, another novel OCOD metabolite for which no standard compound or mass spectra library data were available.

  12. Phase II Trial of Combined Modality Therapy With Concurrent Topotecan Plus Radiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy for Unresectable Stage III and Selected Stage IV Non-Small-Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seung, Steven K. Ross, Helen J.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The optimal combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) and the role of consolidation chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unknown. Topotecan is active against NSCLC, can safely be combined with RT at effective systemic doses, and can be given by continuous infusion, making it an attractive study agent against locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In this pilot study, 20 patients were treated with infusion topotecan 0.4 mg/m{sup 2}/d with three-dimensional conformal RT to 63 Gy both delivered Monday through Friday for 7 weeks. Patients without progression underwent consolidation chemotherapy with etoposide and a platinum agent for one cycle followed by two cycles of docetaxel. The study endpoints were treatment response, time to progression, survival, and toxicity. Results: Of the 20 patients, 19 completed induction chemoradiotherapy and 13 completed consolidation. Of the 20 patients, 18 had a partial response and 1 had stable disease after induction chemoradiotherapy. The 3-year overall survival rate was 32% (median, 18 months). The local and distant progression-free survival rate was 30% (median, 21 months) and 58% (median, not reached), respectively. Three patients developed central nervous system metastases, 1 within 228 days, 1 within 252 days, and 1 within 588 days. Three patients had pulmonary emboli. Therapy was well tolerated with 1 of 20 developing Grade 4 lymphopenia. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was seen in 17 of 20 patients but was not clinically significant. Other Grade 3 toxicities included esophagitis in 3, esophageal stricture in 2, fatigue in 8, and weight loss in 1. Grade 3 pneumonitis occurred in 6 of 20 patients. Conclusion: Continuous infusion topotecan with RT was well tolerated and active in the treatment of poor-risk patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC.

  13. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2-4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Ende, Piet van den; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  14. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  15. Lack of XAGE-1b and NY-ESO-1 in metastatic lymph nodes may predict the potential survival of stage III melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mariko; Funakoshi, Takeru; Kameyama, Kaori; Kawakami, Yutaka; Sato, Eiichi; Nakayama, Eiichi; Amagai, Masayuki; Tanese, Keiji

    2017-01-20

    The cancer-testis antigens (CTA) are a large family of tumor-associated antigens expressed by a variety of cancer cells and primitive germ cells of the adult testis and placenta. These tumor-restricted expressing patterns suggest that CTA would be ideal targets for tumor-specific immunotherapy. XAGE-1 is a CTA that was originally identified by computer-based screening, and four transcription variants, XAGE-1a, -1b, -1c and -1d, have been characterized to date. Although the presence of XAGE-1 transcripts has been reported in various cancers, the expression of XAGE-1b in melanoma has not been fully characterized. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical staining of XAGE-1b together with NY-ESO-1, a well-known CTA, in 113 melanoma samples obtained from 84 patients and evaluated their expression in tumor cells. The effects of expression on tumor progression and patient prognosis were analyzed. Both XAGE-1b and NY-ESO-1 were expressed at high levels in lymph node metastasis and skin metastasis samples compared with the primary site (P < 0.01 in XAGE-1b and P < 0.05 in NY-ESO-1). In a subgroup analysis of 22 patients with stage III lymph node metastasis, overall survival was significantly higher in the XAGE-1b and NY-ESO-1 double-negative group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). These results suggest that lack of XAGE-1b and NY-ESO-1 expression could have a positive influence on clinical outcome in patients with melanoma.

  16. Cisplatin and Etoposide Versus Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of Veterans Health Administration Data

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Davila, Rafael; Devisetty, Kiran; Szabo, Aniko; Sparapani, Rodney; Arce-Lara, Carlos; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Moran, Amy; Williams, Christina D.; Kelley, Michael J.; Whittle, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The optimal chemotherapy regimen to use with radiotherapy in stage III non–small-cell lung cancer is unknown. Here, we compare the outcome of patents treated within the Veterans Health Administration with either etoposide-cisplatin (EP) or carboplatin-paclitaxel (CP). Methods We identified patients treated with EP and CP with concurrent radiotherapy from 2001 to 2010. Survival rates were compared using Cox proportional hazards regression models with adjustments for confounding provided by propensity score methods and an instrumental variables analysis. Comorbidities and treatment complications were identified through administrative data. Results A total of 1,842 patients were included; EP was used in 27% (n = 499). Treatment with EP was not associated with a survival advantage in a Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio [HR], 0.97; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.10), a propensity score matched cohort (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.24), or a propensity score adjusted model (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.10). In an instrumental variables analysis, there was no survival advantage for patients treated in centers where EP was used more than 50% of the time as compared with centers where EP was used in less than 10% of the patients (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.26). Patients treated with EP, compared with patients treated with CP, had more hospitalizations (2.4 v 1.7 hospitalizations, respectively; P < .001), outpatient visits (17.6 v 12.6 visits, respectively; P < .001), infectious complications (47.3% v 39.4%, respectively; P = .0022), acute kidney disease/dehydration (30.5% v 21.2%, respectively; P < .001), and mucositis/esophagitis (18.6% v 14.4%, respectively; P = .0246). Conclusion After accounting for prognostic variables, patients treated with EP versus CP had similar overall survival, but EP was associated with increased morbidity. PMID:25422491

  17. Stages III and IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Mouth: Three-Year Experience with Superselective Intraarterial Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin Prior to Definitive Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshinori; Korogi, Yukunori; Hamatake, Satoshi; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Baba, Yuji; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Uji, Yasuyoshi; Taen, Akira

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the 3-year experience with superselective intraarterial chemotherapy prior to definitive treatment for stages III and IV squamous cell carcinomas of the mouth. Methods: Twenty-two patients prospectively received superselective intraarterial chemotherapy using relatively low-dose cisplatin via a transfemoral approach. The locations of the tumors were the tongue (n= 12), gingiva (n= 5), buccal mucosa (n= 2), hard palate (n= 1), floor of the mouth (n= 1), and lip (n= 1). After intraarterial chemotherapy, 21 patients underwent surgery (n= 14), radiation therapy (n= 6), or both (n= 1). The survival rate of 25 patients who underwent surgery with/without radiation therapy until 1992 at Kumamoto University Hospital was also evaluated as a historical control. The survival curve was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method, and the statistical difference between survival curves was determined with the generalized Wilcoxon test. Results: The overall response rate was 95% [complete response (tumor completely resolved), 24%; partial response (tumor reduction {>=}50%), 71%]. Fifty-two intraarterial infusions were performed without any catheter-related complications. Mild and transient local toxicity such as edema or mucositis of the infused area was relatively common. One patient died of renal failure from cisplatin. After a median follow-up of 20 months (range 2-41 months), the estimated 3-year survival rate for patients who underwent intraarterial chemotherapy plus surgery was 91%. The survival of the patients who underwent intraarterial chemotherapy plus surgery tended to be longer than that of the historical control. Conclusions: Early tumor reduction without delay of subsequent treatments can be obtained by intraarterial chemotherapy while minimizing complications and possibly improving survival. Further investigations of long-term survival with larger series need to be performed.

  18. Associations between serum CA724 and HER2 overexpression among stage II–III resectable gastric cancer patients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin-Zu; Liu, Jian-Ping; He, Du; Liu, Yang; Liu, Kai; Chen, Xiao-Long; Mo, Xian-Ming; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Associations between serum tumor biomarkers and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression among locally advanced gastric cancer patients were yet to be determined and therefore warranted investigation. Results A total of 318 patients were analyzed. The odds ratios of CA724 were 4.79 (95% CI 1.55–14.79) and 6.29 (1.40–28.19) in comparing the HER2 (2+/3+) and HER2 (3+) with the negative group, respectively (p < 0.05). A combination of the four biomarkers yielded slightly but not significantly greater areas under the curve (AUC = 0.83; 0.71–0.94) than that of serum CA724 alone (0.80; 0.68–0.91); however, an index generated from the combination had better diagnostic performance with 85.7% sensitivity, 80.4% specificity and 97.8% negative predictive value to predict the strong overexpression of HER2 (3+). CA199, CEA or CA125 alone was not associated with HER2 overexpression. Leave-one-out cross-validation found a consistent association between serum CA724 and HER2 (2+/3+) overexpression. Methods Patients undergoing radical gastrectomy from 8/2012 to 12/2013 and with pathological stage II–III gastric cancer were retrospectively analyzed. HER2 expression of the surgical samples was estimated using immunohistochemistry; serum CA724, CA199, CEA and CA125 were preoperatively tested. Internal validation was performed using the leave-one-out approach. Conclusions Serum CA724 is significantly associated with the overexpression of HER2 among locally advanced gastric cancer patients. The combination of CA724, CA199, CEA and CA125 is better than serum CA724 alone in predicting HER2 overexpression. External validation and further investigation of the biological mechanisms of these associations are required. PMID:27027339

  19. The C-Reactive Protein to Albumin Ratio as a Predictor of Severe Side Effects of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage III Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Takashi; Sumida, Yorihisa; Hidaka, Shigekazu; Sawai, Terumitsu; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) has been reported to improve the prognosis for patients with Stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). However, some patients experience severe side effects and must stop AC. The C-reactive protein (CRP) to albumin ratio (CAR) is a novel inflammation-based score that could reflect the patient’s general condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of the CAR for side effects of AC in CRC. Methods A total of 136 CRC patients who received AC were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were subdivided into two groups by the CAR level (CAR ≥0.1, n = 30; CD < 0.1, n = 106). Results The presence of lymphatic invasion, severe side effects, and discontinuation of AC were associated with high CAR levels (p = 0.02, <0.01, and 0.02; respectively). High levels of the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) and the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) appeared to be associated with the CAR (p = 0.04, p<0.01; respectively). Multivariate analysis identified CAR≥0.1 (HR: 7.06, 95% CI: 2.51–19.88, p<0.01) as a significant determinant of severe side effects of AC. CAR had the highest area under the curve (0.79) among several inflammation-based scores. Conclusion The present study showed that the CAR is a novel and promising inflammation-based score for ≥ grade 3 side effects of AC in node-positive CRC. PMID:27930703

  20. Analysis of Molecular Markers by Anatomic Tumor Site in Stage III Colon Carcinomas from Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial NCCTG N0147 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Sinicrope, Frank A.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Yoon, Harry H.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Nelson, Garth D.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Alberts, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the frequency and prognostic association of molecular markers by anatomic tumor site in patients with stage III colon carcinomas. Experimental Design In a randomized trial of adjuvant FOLFOX + cetuximab, BRAFV600E and KRAS (exon 2) mutations and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins were analyzed in tumors (N=3,018) in relationship to tumor location including subsite. Cox models were used to assess clinical outcome including overall survival (OS). RESULTS KRAS codon 12 mutations were most frequent at the splenic flexure and cecum; codon 13 mutations were evenly distributed. BRAF mutation frequency sharply increased from transverse colon to cecum in parallel with deficient (d) MMR. Non-mutated BRAF or KRAS tumors progressively decreased from sigmoid to transverse (all p<0.0001). Significantly poorer OS was found for mutant KRAS in distal [HR, 1.98 (1.49–2.63); p<.0001] vs proximal [1.25 (0.97–1.60), p=.079] cancers. BRAF status and outcome were not significantly associated with tumor site. Proximal vs distal dMMR tumors had significantly better outcome. An interaction test was significant for tumor site by KRAS (padjusted=.043) and MMR (padjusted=.010) for OS. Significant prognostic differences for biomarkers by tumor site were maintained in the FOLFOX arm. Tumor site was independently prognostic with a stepwise improvement from cecum to sigmoid (OS: padjusted=0.001). CONCLUSIONS Mutations in BRAF or KRAS codon 12 were enriched in proximal cancers whereas non-mutated BRAF/KRAS were increased in distal tumors. Significant differences in outcome for KRAS mutations and dMMR were found by tumor site, indicating that their interpretation should occur in the context of tumor location. PMID:26187617

  1. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 in stage III gastric cancer and the correlation with DcR3 and ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruyi; Liu, Wenming; Qiu, Xingfeng; Lin, Zhenghe; Xie, Yan; Hong, Xingya; Paerhati, Reyila; Qi, Zhongquan; Zhuang, Guohong; Liu, Zhongchen

    2016-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) is a recently identified protein that is considered to be associated with various malignancies, including esophageal, breast and pancreatic cancer; however, the importance of TIPE in gastric cancer (GC) remains unknown. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that is expressed in digestive system neoplasms. The expression of DcR3 is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression of TIPE, ERK and DcR3 in the pathological and tumor-adjacent normal gastric tissues of 30 patients that demonstrated stage III gastric adenocarcinoma. The expression and distribution of the TIPE protein was examined using immunohistochemistry, and the clinical significance and expression levels of DcR3 and ERK1/2 were evaluated. The expression of TIPE, ERK1/2 and DcR3 in the tumor tissues of GC was significantly increased compared with paracarcinoma tissues (P<0.05). In addition, TIPE expression positively correlated with DcR3 and ERK1 levels (r=0.538 and r=0.462, respectively; P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between tumor tissues from patients with varying age, gender, differentiation or lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). TIPE may be vital in the progression of GC. TIPE may be associated with the expression of DcR3 and ERK1/2, which may be involved in the cell apoptosis of GC. The present study elucidates the potential function of TIPE as a novel marker and therapeutic target for GC.

  2. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 in stage III gastric cancer and the correlation with DcR3 and ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    HU, RUYI; LIU, WENMING; QIU, XINGFENG; LIN, ZHENGHE; XIE, YAN; HONG, XINGYA; PAERHATI, REYILA; QI, ZHONGQUAN; ZHUANG, GUOHONG; LIU, ZHONGCHEN

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) is a recently identified protein that is considered to be associated with various malignancies, including esophageal, breast and pancreatic cancer; however, the importance of TIPE in gastric cancer (GC) remains unknown. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that is expressed in digestive system neoplasms. The expression of DcR3 is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression of TIPE, ERK and DcR3 in the pathological and tumor-adjacent normal gastric tissues of 30 patients that demonstrated stage III gastric adenocarcinoma. The expression and distribution of the TIPE protein was examined using immunohistochemistry, and the clinical significance and expression levels of DcR3 and ERK1/2 were evaluated. The expression of TIPE, ERK1/2 and DcR3 in the tumor tissues of GC was significantly increased compared with paracarcinoma tissues (P<0.05). In addition, TIPE expression positively correlated with DcR3 and ERK1 levels (r=0.538 and r=0.462, respectively; P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between tumor tissues from patients with varying age, gender, differentiation or lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). TIPE may be vital in the progression of GC. TIPE may be associated with the expression of DcR3 and ERK1/2, which may be involved in the cell apoptosis of GC. The present study elucidates the potential function of TIPE as a novel marker and therapeutic target for GC. PMID:26998086

  3. Oral nutritional supplements containing (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the nutritional status of patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer during multimodality treatment.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Barbara S; Langius, Jacqueline A E; Smit, Egbert F; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Paul, Marinus A; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2010-10-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), (n-3) fatty acids from fish oil, have immune-modulating effects and may improve nutritional status in cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of an oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids on nutritional status and inflammatory markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing multimodality treatment. In a double-blind experiment, 40 patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive 2 cans/d of a protein- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids (2.0 g EPA + 0.9 g DHA/d) or an isocaloric control supplement. EPA in plasma phospholipids, energy intake, resting energy expenditure (REE), body weight, fat free mass (FFM), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), and inflammatory markers were assessed. Effects of intervention were analyzed by generalized estimating equations and expressed as regression coefficients (B). The intervention group (I) had a better weight maintenance than the control (C) group after 2 and 4 wk (B = 1.3 and 1.7 kg, respectively; P < 0.05), a better FFM maintenance after 3 and 5 wk (B = 1.5 and 1.9 kg, respectively; P < 0.05), a reduced REE (B = -16.7% of predicted; P = 0.01) after 3 wk, and a trend for a greater MUAC (B = 9.1; P = 0.06) and lower interleukin-6 production (B = -27.9; P = 0.08) after 5 wk. After 4 wk, the I group had a higher energy and protein intake than the C group (B = 2456 kJ/24 h, P = 0.03 and B = 25.0 g, P = 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, a protein- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids beneficially affects nutritional status during multimodality treatment in patients with NSCLC.

  4. [A case of multiple liver metastases from colon cancer treated with complete resection via two-stage hepatectomy after regeneration of the liver].

    PubMed

    Sugishita, Toshiya; Ganno, Hideaki; Hataji, Kenichiro; Ami, Katunori; Nagahama, Takeo; Fukuda, Akira; Ando, Masayuki; Arai, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman underwent low anterior resection for sigmoid colon cancer with multiple bilobar metastases. She then received 23 courses of Leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX) plus bevacizumab and 13 courses of Leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) plus bevacizumab as down staging chemotherapy. A two-stage hepatectomy was planned to avoid the risk of hepatic failure due to radial resection of bilobar metastases. Therefore, a right lobectomy was performed, and curative resection was achieved 54 days after the first hepatectomy. Two-stage hepatectomy as well as a combination of induction chemotherapy and portal vein embolization may have contributed to the improved prognosis of the initially unresectable multiple bilobar liver metastases.

  5. A DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification-bridged two-stage exonuclease III-assisted recycling strategy for label-free multi-amplified biosensing of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Lv, Yanqin; Cui, Hui; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng

    2015-01-26

    An autonomous DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification (RCA)-bridged two-stage exonuclease III (Exo III)-induced recycling amplification (Exo III-RCA-Exo III) was developed for label-free and highly sensitive homogeneous multi-amplified detection of DNA combined with sensitive fluorescence detection technique. According to the configuration, the analysis of DNA is accomplished by recognizing the target to a unlabeled molecular beacon (UMB) that integrates target-binding and signal transducer within one multifunctional design, followed by the target-binding of UMB in duplex DNA removed stepwise by Exo III accompanied by the releasing of target DNA for the successive hybridization and cleavage process and autonomous generation of the primer that initiate RCA process with a rational designed padlock DNA. The RCA products containing thousands of repeated catalytic sequences catalytically hybridize with a hairpin reporter probe that includes a "caged" inactive G-quadruplex sequence (HGP) and were then detected by Exo III-assisted recycling amplification, liberating the active G-quadruplex and generating remarkable ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex fluorescence signals with the help of zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX). The proposed strategy showed a wide dynamic range over 7 orders of magnitude with a low limit of detection of 0.51 aM. In addition, this designed protocol can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA, and holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  6. [Study of the multiplication in cell cultures of two strains of para-influenza virus type 3. III. Multiplication in BHK 21 cells].

    PubMed

    Isaia, G; Athanasiu, P; Teodosiu, O

    1987-01-01

    Study was conducted on the multiplication of two strains (C243 and D) of parainfluenza virus type 3 in BHK 21 cells. Multiplication curve of the virus was established and immunohistochemical aspects of the process were investigated. Chronological study of successive steps of the formation and development of viral components allowed to see that the virus multiplication rate is low in this cell system. The parainfluenza antigen became detectable by immunofluorescence in the infected cell perinuclear region after a relatively long eclipse period (18 h) and synthetized virus has few RNA and induced no inclusion information in the cytoplasm or the nucleus. However, an important nuclear participation was noted: 72 h after inoculation, nuclear fluorescence was observed, as well as a nuclear DNA rising and frequent aberrant mitoses. Comparison between the two investigated strains led to the observation that the autochthonous D strain induced more frequent aberrant mitoses and more important cell destruction than the C243 one. Differences were also noted as regards the infecting and hemagglutinating titers.

  7. Overall evaluation of combustion and NO(x) emissions for a down-fired 600 MW(e) supercritical boiler with multiple injection and multiple staging.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Min; Li, Zhengqi; Liu, Chunlong; Zhu, Qunyi

    2013-05-07

    To achieve significant reductions in NOx emissions and to eliminate strongly asymmetric combustion found in down-fired boilers, a deep-air-staging combustion technology was trialed in a down-fired 600 MWe supercritical utility boiler. By performing industrial-sized measurements taken of gas temperatures and species concentrations in the near wing-wall region, carbon in fly ash and NOx emissions at various settings, effects of overfire air (OFA) and staged-air damper openings on combustion characteristics, and NOx emissions within the furnace were experimentally determined. With increasing the OFA damper opening, both fluctuations in NOx emissions and carbon in fly ash were initially slightly over OFA damper openings of 0-40% but then lengthened dramatically in openings of 40-70% (i.e., NOx emissions reduced sharply accompanied by an apparent increase in carbon in fly ash). Decreasing the staged-air declination angle clearly increased the combustible loss but slightly influenced NOx emissions. In comparison with OFA, the staged-air influence on combustion and NOx emissions was clearly weaker. Only at a high OFA damper opening of 50%, the staged-air effect was relatively clear, i.e., enlarging the staged-air damper opening decreased carbon in fly ash and slightly raised NOx emissions. By sharply opening the OFA damper to deepen the air-staging conditions, although NOx emissions could finally reduce to 503 mg/m(3) at 6% O2 (i.e., an ultralow NOx level for down-fired furnaces), carbon in fly ash jumped sharply to 15.10%. For economical and environment-friendly boiler operations, an optimal damper opening combination (i.e., 60%, 50%, and 50% for secondary air, staged-air, and OFA damper openings, respectively) was recommended for the furnace, at which carbon in fly ash and NOx emissions attained levels of about 10% and 850 mg/m(3) at 6% O2, respectively.

  8. Development and evaluation of a novel contamination device that targets multiple life-stages of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing global threat of Dengue demands new and easily applicable vector control methods. Ovitraps provide a low-tech and inexpensive means to combat Dengue vectors. Here we describe the development and optimization process of a novel contamination device that targets multiple life-stages of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Special focus is directed to the diverse array of control agents deployed in this trap, covering adulticidal, larvicidal and autodissemination impacts. Methods Different trap prototypes and their parts are described, including a floater to contaminate alighting gravid mosquitoes. The attractiveness of the trap, different odor lures and floater design were studied using fluorescent powder adhering to mosquito legs and via choice tests. We demonstrate the mosquitocidal impacts of the control agents: a combination of the larvicide pyriproxyfen and the adulticidal fungus Beauveria bassiana. The impact of pyriproxyfen was determined in free-flight dissemination experiments. The effect on larval development inside the trap and in surrounding breeding sites was measured, as well as survival impacts on recaptured adults. Results The developmental process resulted in a design that consists of a black 3 Liter water-filled container with a ring-shaped floater supporting vertically placed gauze dusted with the control agents. On average, 90% of the mosquitoes in the fluorescence experiments made contact with the gauze on the floater. Studies on attractants indicated that a yeast-containing tablet was the most attractive odor lure. Furthermore, the fungus Beauveria bassiana was able to significantly increase mortality of the free-flying adults compared to controls. Dissemination of pyriproxyfen led to >90% larval mortality in alternative breeding sites and 100% larval mortality in the trap itself, against a control mortality of around 5%. Conclusion This ovitrap is a promising new tool in the battle against Dengue. It has proven to be attractive

  9. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis of Three-Dimensional Reconstructions of Unbiased Sampled Microglia Shows not Continuous Morphological Changes from Stage 1 to 2 after Multiple Dengue Infections in Callithrix penicillata

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Daniel G.; Silva, Geane O.; Naves, Thaís B.; Fernandes, Taiany N.; Araújo, Sanderson C.; Diniz, José A. P.; de Farias, Luis H. S.; Sosthenes, Marcia C. K.; Diniz, Cristovam G.; Anthony, Daniel C.; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro F.; Picanço Diniz, Cristovam W.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that microglial morphology and function are related, but few studies have explored the subtleties of microglial morphological changes in response to specific pathogens. In the present report we quantitated microglia morphological changes in a monkey model of dengue disease with virus CNS invasion. To mimic multiple infections that usually occur in endemic areas, where higher dengue infection incidence and abundant mosquito vectors carrying different serotypes coexist, subjects received once a week subcutaneous injections of DENV3 (genotype III)-infected culture supernatant followed 24 h later by an injection of anti-DENV2 antibody. Control animals received either weekly anti-DENV2 antibodies, or no injections. Brain sections were immunolabeled for DENV3 antigens and IBA-1. Random and systematic microglial samples were taken from the polymorphic layer of dentate gyrus for 3-D reconstructions, where we found intense immunostaining for TNFα and DENV3 virus antigens. We submitted all bi- or multimodal morphological parameters of microglia to hierarchical cluster analysis and found two major morphological phenotypes designated types I and II. Compared to type I (stage 1), type II microglia were more complex; displaying higher number of nodes, processes and trees and larger surface area and volumes (stage 2). Type II microglia were found only in infected monkeys, whereas type I microglia was found in both control and infected subjects. Hierarchical cluster analysis of morphological parameters of 3-D reconstructions of random and systematic selected samples in control and ADE dengue infected monkeys suggests that microglia morphological changes from stage 1 to stage 2 may not be continuous. PMID:27047345

  10. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil adjuvant chemotherapy following three-field lymph node dissection for stage II/III N1, 2 esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Tadasuke; Nasu, Motomi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kuniyasu, Tetsuji; Inoue, Hirohumi; Sakai, Noritaka; Ouchi, Kazutomo; Amano, Takayuki; Isayama, Fuyumi; Tomita, Natsumi; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Tsurumaru, Masahiko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki

    2014-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel + cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (DCF) in lymph node metastasis-positive esophageal cancer, we retrospectively analyzed 139 patients with stage II/III (non-T4) esophageal cancer with lymph node metastasis (1-6 nodes), who did not receive preoperative treatment and underwent three-field lymph node dissection in the Juntendo University Hospital between December, 2004 and December, 2009. The tumors were histologically diagnossed as squamous cell carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups, a surgery alone group (S group, 88 patients) and a group that received postoperative DCF therapy (DCF group, 51 patients). The disease-free and overall survival were compared between the groups and a multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was performed. The same analysis was performed for cases classified as N1 and N2, according to the TNM classification. There were no significant differences between the S and DCF groups regarding clinicopathological factors other than intramural metastasis and main tumor location. The presence of intramural metastasis, blood vessel invasion and the number of lymph nodes were identified as prognostic factors. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival were 55.8 and 57.3%, respectively, in the S group and 52.8 and 63.0%, respectively, in the DCF group. These differences were not considered to be statistically significant (P=0.789 and 0.479 for disease-free and overall survival, respectively). Although there were no significant differences in disease-free and overall survival between the S and DCF groups in N1 cases, both disease-free and overall survival were found to be better in the DCF group (54.2 and 61.4%, respectively) compared to the S group (29.6 and 28.8%, respectively) in N2 cases (P=0.029 and 0.020 for disease-free and overall survival, respectively). Therefore, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with DCF was shown to improve disease-free and

  11. Erlotinib Hydrochloride With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Effect of Various Blade Modifications on Performance of a 16-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor. III - Effect on Over-All Performance Characteristics on Increasing Stator-Blade Angles in Inlet Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medeiros, Arthur A.; Hatch, James E.

    1952-01-01

    The stator-blade angles in the first four stages of a 16-stage axial-flow compressor were increased in order to decrease the angles of attack of these stages, and thereby to improve part-speed performance. The performance of this modified compressor was compared with that of the same compressor with original blade angles.

  14. Temporal uncertainty analysis of human errors based on interrelationships among multiple factors: a case of Minuteman III missile accident.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hao; Tian, Jin; Zhao, Tingdi

    2016-01-01

    In traditional approaches of human reliability assessment (HRA), the definition of the error producing conditions (EPCs) and the supporting guidance are such that some of the conditions (especially organizational or managerial conditions) can hardly be included, and thus the analysis is burdened with incomprehensiveness without reflecting the temporal trend of human reliability. A method based on system dynamics (SD), which highlights interrelationships among technical and organizational aspects that may contribute to human errors, is presented to facilitate quantitatively estimating the human error probability (HEP) and its related variables changing over time in a long period. Taking the Minuteman III missile accident in 2008 as a case, the proposed HRA method is applied to assess HEP during missile operations over 50 years by analyzing the interactions among the variables involved in human-related risks; also the critical factors are determined in terms of impact that the variables have on risks in different time periods. It is indicated that both technical and organizational aspects should be focused on to minimize human errors in a long run.

  15. Phase I/II study of the combination of panobinostat and carfilzomib in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Berdeja, Jesus G; Hart, Lowell L; Mace, Joseph R; Arrowsmith, Edward R; Essell, James H; Owera, Rami S; Hainsworth, John D; Flinn, Ian W

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of the combination of panobinostat and carfilzomib in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Patients with multiple myeloma who had relapsed after at least one prior treatment were eligible to participate. In the dose escalation part of the study a standard 3+3 design was used to determine the maximum tolerated dose of four planned dose levels of the combination of carfilzomib and panobinostat. Panobinostat was administered on days 1, 3, 5, 15, 17, and 19. Carfilzomib was administered on days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16 of each 28-day cycle. Treatment was continued until progression or intolerable toxicity. Forty-four patients were accrued into the trial, 13 in the phase I part and 31 in the phase II part of the study. The median age of the patients was 66 years and the median number of prior therapies was five. The expansion dose was established as 30 mg panobinostat, 20/45 mg/m(2) carfilzomib. The overall response rate was 67% for all patients, 67% for patients refractory to prior proteasome inhibitor treatment and 75% for patients refractory to prior immune modulating drug treatment. At a median follow up of 17 months, median progression-free survival was 7.7 months, median time to progression was 7.7 months, and median overall survival had not been reached. The regimen was well tolerated, although there were several panobinostat dose reductions. In conclusion, the combination of panobinostat and carfilzomib is feasible and effective in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. (Trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01496118).

  16. Molecular spintronics based on single-molecule magnets composed of multiple-decker phthalocyaninato terbium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Keiichi; Isshiki, Hironari; Komeda, Tadahiro; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2012-06-01

    Unlike electronics, which is based on the freedom of the charge of an electron whose memory is volatile, spintronics is based on the freedom of the charge, spin, and orbital of an electron whose memory is non-volatile. Although in most GMR, TMR, and CMR systems, bulk or classical magnets that are composed of transition metals are used, this Focus Review considers the growing use of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) that are composed of multinuclear metal complexes and nanosized magnets, which exhibit slow magnetic-relaxation processes and quantum tunneling. Molecular spintronics, which combines spintronics and molecular electronics, is an emerging field of research. Using molecules is advantageous because their electronic and magnetic properties can be manipulated under specific conditions. Herein, recent developments in [LnPc]-based multiple-decker SMMs on surfaces for molecular spintronic devices are presented. First, we discuss the strategies for preparing single-molecular-memory devices by using SMMs. Next, we focus on the switching of the Kondo signal of [LnPc]-based multiple-decker SMMs that are adsorbed onto surfaces, their characterization by using STM and STS, and the relationship between the molecular structure, the electronic structure, and the Kondo resonance of [TbPc(2)]. Finally, the field-effect-transistor (FET) properties of surface-adsorbed [LnPc(2)] and [Ln(2)Pc(3)] cast films are reported, which is the first step towards controlling SMMs through their spins for applications in single-molecular memory and spintronics devices.

  17. A Phase III Study of Conventional Radiation Therapy Plus Thalidomide Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases (RTOG 0118)

    SciTech Connect

    Knisely, Jonathan P.S. Berkey, Brian; Chakravarti, Arnab; Yung, Al W.K.; Curran, Walter J.; Robins, H. Ian; Movsas, Benjamin; Brachman, David G.; Henderson, Randall H.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To compare whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) with WBRT combined with thalidomide for patients with brain metastases not amenable to resection or radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Patients with Zubrod performance status 0-1, MRI-documented multiple (>3), large (>4 cm), or midbrain brain metastases arising from a histopathologically confirmed extracranial primary tumor, and an anticipated survival of >8 weeks were randomized to receive WBRT to a dose of 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions with or without thalidomide during and after WBRT. Prerandomization stratification used Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA) Class and whether post-WBRT chemotherapy was planned. Endpoints included overall survival, progression-free survival, time to neurocognitive progression, the cause of death, toxicities, and quality of life. A protocol-planned interim analysis documented that the trial had an extremely low probability of ever showing a significant difference favoring the thalidomide arm given the results at the time of the analysis, and it was therefore closed on the basis of predefined statistical guidelines. Results: Enrolled in the study were 332 patients. Of 183 accrued patients, 93 were randomized to receive WBRT alone and 90 to WBRT and thalidomide. Median survival was 3.9 months for both arms. No novel toxicities were seen, but thalidomide was not well tolerated in this population. Forty-eight percent of patients discontinued thalidomide because of side effects. Conclusion: Thalidomide provided no survival benefit for patients with multiple, large, or midbrain metastases when combined with WBRT; nearly half the patients discontinued thalidomide due to side effects.

  18. Broad-spectrum Antibiotic Plus Metronidazole May Not Prevent the Deterioration of Necrotizing Enterocolitis From Stage II to III in Full-term and Near-term Infants: A Propensity Score-matched Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li-Juan; Li, Xin; Yang, Kai-Di; Lu, Jiang-Yi; Li, Lu-Quan

    2015-10-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common and frequently dangerous neonatal gastrointestinal disease. Studies have shown broad-spectrum antibiotics plus anaerobic antimicrobial therapy did not prevent the deterioration of NEC among very low birth preterm infants. However, few studies about this therapy which focused on full-term and near-term infant with NEC has been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of broad-spectrum antibiotic plus metronidazole in preventing the deterioration of NEC from stage II to III in full-term and near-term infants.A retrospective cohort study based on the propensity score (PS) 1:1 matching was performed among the full-term and near-term infants with NEC (Bell stage ≥II). All infants who received broad-spectrum antibiotics were divided into 2 groups: group with metronidazole treatment (metronidazole was used ≥4 days continuously, 15 mg/kg/day) and group without metronidazole treatment. The depraved rates of stage II NEC between the 2 groups were compared. Meanwhile, the risk factors associated with the deterioration of stage II NEC were analyzed by case-control study in the PS-matched cases.A total of 229 infants met the inclusion criteria. Before PS-matching, we found the deterioration of NEC rate in the group with metronidazole treatment was higher than that in the group without metronidazole treatment (18.1% [28/155] vs 8.1% [6/74]; P = 0.048). After PS-matching, 73 pairs were matched, and the depraved rate of NEC in the group with metronidazole treatment was not lower than that in the group without metronidazole treatment (15.1% vs 8.2%; P = 0.2). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that sepsis after NEC (odds ratio [OR] 3.748, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.171-11.998, P = 0.03), the need to use transfusion of blood products after diagnosis of NEC (OR 8.003, 95% CI 2.365-27.087, P = 0.00), and the need of longer time for nasogastric suction were risk factors for stage II NEC progressing to

  19. Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A 21st Century Perspective and Review of Multiple Randomized Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita Paltiel, Ora; Glatstein, Eli

    2008-12-01

    The treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma has improved dramatically over the past decades. Over the last half century, Hodgkin's lymphoma has become one of the most curable cancers of adulthood. More than 90% of the patients with localized stages of the disease can be cured with modern treatment strategies. Long-term toxicities are now the major concern for survivors of early-stage disease. Contemporary therapeutic approaches for Hodgkin's lymphoma attempt to preserve the high cure rate achieved, while reducing treatment-related acute and late toxicities. The aim of this review is to re-examine the historical and the current role of radiotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma, given the latest evidence of an increasing role of chemotherapy for the treatment of this malignancy. The literature search was performed in PubMed Plus. Studies on children were excluded.

  20. Multiple-stage structure transformation of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiong; Liu, Henan; Kim, Hui -Seon; Liu, Yucheng; Yang, Mengjin; Yue, Naili; Ren, Gang; Zhu, Kai; Liu, Shengzhong; Park, Nam -Gyu; Zhang, Yong

    2016-09-15

    In this study, by performing spatially resolved Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy with varying excitation wavelength, density, and data acquisition parameters, we achieve a unified understanding towards the spectroscopy signatures of the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite, transforming from the pristine state (CH3NH3PbI3) to the fully degraded state (i.e., PbI2) for samples with varying crystalline domain size from mesoscopic scale (approximately 100 nm) to macroscopic size (centimeters), synthesized by three different techniques. We show that the hybrid perovskite exhibits multiple stages of structure transformation occurring either spontaneously or under light illumination, with exceptionally high sensitivity to the illumination conditions (e.g., power, illumination time, and interruption pattern). We highlight four transformation stages (stages I-IV, with stage I being the pristine state) along either the spontaneous or photoinduced degradation path exhibiting distinctly different Raman spectroscopy features at each stage, and point out that previously reported Raman spectra in the literature reflect highly degraded structures of either stage III or stage IV. Additional characteristic optical features of partially degraded materials under the joint action of spontaneous and photodegradation are also given. This study offers reliable benchmark results for understanding the intrinsic material properties and structure transformation of this unique category of hybrid materials, and the findings are pertinently important to a wide range of potential applications where the hybrid material is expected to function in greatly different environment and light-matter interaction conditions.

  1. Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Multiple Merger, Extended Massive Star Formation, Galactic Wind, and Nuclear Inflow in NGC 3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lípari, S.; Díaz, R.; Taniguchi, Y.; Terlevich, R.; Dottori, H.; Carranza, G.

    2000-08-01

    We report detailed evidence for multiple merger, extended massive star formation, galactic wind, and circular/noncircular motions in the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 3256, based on observations of high-resolution imaging (Hubble Space Telescope, ESO NTT), and extensive spectroscopic data (more than 1000 spectra, collected at Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre, Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito, Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory, and IUE observatories). We find in a detailed morphological study (resolution ~15 pc) that the extended massive star formation process detected previously in NGC 3256 shows extended triple asymmetrical spiral arms (r~5 kpc), emanating from three different nuclei. The main optical nucleus shows a small spiral disk (r~500 pc), which is a continuation of the external one and reaches the very nucleus. The core shows blue elongated structure (50 pc×25 pc) and harbors a blue stellar cluster candidate (r~8 pc). We discuss this complex morphology in the framework of an extended massive star formation driven by a multiple merger process (models of Hernquist et al. and Taniguchi et al.). We study the kinematics of this system and present a detailed Hα velocity field for the central region (40''×40'' rmax~30''~5 kpc), with a spatial resolution of 1" and errors of +/-15 km s-1. The color and isovelocity maps show mainly (1) a kinematic center of circular motion with ``spider'' shape, located between the main optical nucleus and the close (5") mid-IR nucleus and (2) noncircular motions in the external parts. We obtained three ``sinusoidal rotation curves'' (from the Hα velocity field) around position angle (P.A.) ~55°, ~90°, and ~130°. In the main optical nucleus we found a clear ``outflow component'' associated with galactic winds plus an ``inflow radial motion.'' The outflow component was also detected in the central and external regions (r<=5-6 kpc). The main axis of the inflow region (P.A.~80deg) is practically perpendicular to the

  2. Validation of Kepler's multiple planet candidates. III. Light curve analysis and announcement of hundreds of new multi-planet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Mullally, Fergal; Howell, Steve B.; Borucki, William J.; Haas, Michael; Huber, Daniel; Thompson, Susan E.; Quintana, Elisa; Barclay, Thomas; Still, Martin; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Issacson, Howard; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Ford, Eric; Steffen, Jason H.; Gautier, T. N. III; and others

    2014-03-20

    The Kepler mission has discovered more than 2500 exoplanet candidates in the first two years of spacecraft data, with approximately 40% of those in candidate multi-planet systems. The high rate of multiplicity combined with the low rate of identified false positives indicates that the multiplanet systems contain very few false positive signals due to other systems not gravitationally bound to the target star. False positives in the multi-planet systems are identified and removed, leaving behind a residual population of candidate multi-planet transiting systems expected to have a false positive rate less than 1%. We present a sample of 340 planetary systems that contain 851 planets that are validated to substantially better than the 99% confidence level; the vast majority of these have not been previously verified as planets. We expect ∼two unidentified false positives making our sample of planet very reliable. We present fundamental planetary properties of our sample based on a comprehensive analysis of Kepler light curves, ground-based spectroscopy, and high-resolution imaging. Since we do not require spectroscopy or high-resolution imaging for validation, some of our derived parameters for a planetary system may be systematically incorrect due to dilution from light due to additional stars in the photometric aperture. Nonetheless, our result nearly doubles the number verified exoplanets.

  3. Expression and prognostic significance of APAF-1, caspase-8 and caspase-9 in stage II/III colon carcinoma: caspase-8 and caspase-9 is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Sträter, Jörn; Herter, Ines; Merkel, Gaby; Hinz, Ulf; Weitz, Jürgen; Möller, Peter

    2010-08-15

    Apoptosis protease activating factor-1 (APAF-1), caspase-8 and caspase-9 are important factors in the execution of death signals. To study their prognostic influence in colon carcinoma, expression of APAF-1, caspase-8 and caspase-9 was determined by immunohistochemistry in normal colon mucosa (n = 8) and R0-resected stage II/III colon carcinomas (n >or= 124) using a semiquantitative score. Staining results were correlated with disease-free survival by Kaplan-Meier estimates, and multivariate Cox analyses were performed. In normal colon, APAF-1 and caspase-8 are most strongly expressed in the luminal surface epithelium, whereas caspase-9 is expressed all along the crypt axis. In colon carcinomas, there is considerable variability in the expression of these proapoptotic factors, although complete loss of caspase-8 and caspase-9 is rare. APAF-1 expression did not correlate with disease-free survival. Instead, both expression of caspase-9 and high-level expression of caspase-8 in a majority of tumor cells were significantly associated with adverse prognosis (p = 0.004 and p = 0.029, respectively). The influence of caspase-8 expression was mainly seen in patients with stage III colon carcinoma (p = 0.011), whereas the prognostic influence of caspase-9 expression was significant in stage II cases (p = 0.037) and just failed to be significant in stage III tumors (p = 0.0581). After adjusting for confounding factors in a multivariate Cox analysis, the effect of caspase-9 in predicting disease-free survival was confirmed (p = 0.003). Our data suggest that, in colon carcinomas, expression of caspase-8 and caspase-9 is significantly associated with poor survival. Caspase-9 may be an independent prognosticator in colon carcinoma.

  4. A phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by thoracic radiotherapy and erlotinib in poor risk stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Results of CALGB 30605 (Alliance)/RTOG 0972 (NRG)

    PubMed Central

    Lilenbaum, Rogerio; Samuels, Michael; Wang, Xiaofei; Kong, Feng Ming; Jänne, Pasi A.; Masters, Gregory; Katragadda, Sreedhar; Hodgson, Lydia; Bogart, Jeffrey; Bradley, Jeffrey; Vokes, Everett

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and poor performance status (PS) and/or weight loss (WL) do not seem to benefit from standard therapy. Based on the pre-clinical interaction between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and radiation, we designed a trial of induction chemotherapy followed by thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) and concurrent erlotinib. Methods Patients with poor risk unresectable stage III NSCLC received 2 cycles of carboplatin at an AUC of 5 and nab-paclitaxel at 100 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 every 21 days, followed by erlotinib administered concurrently with TRT. Maintenance was not permitted. Molecular analysis was performed in available specimens. Seventy-two eligible patients were required to test whether the 1-year survival rate was <50% or ≥65% with approximately 90% power at a significance level of 0.10. Results From March 2008 to October 2011, 78patients were enrolled, 3 of which were ineligible. The median age was 68 (range, 39 to 88) and 32% were ≥75 years of age. Patients were evenly distributed between stage IIIA and IIIB and the majority had PS 2. The overall response rate was 67% and the disease control rate was 93%. Treatment was well tolerated. The median PFS and OS were 11 and 17 months, respectively. The overall 12-month OS was 57%, which narrowly missed the pre-specified target for significance. Conclusions Patients with poor risk stage III NSCLC had better than expected outcomes with a regimen of induction carboplatin/nab-paclitaxel followed by TRT and erlotinib. However, as per the statistical design, the 12-month OS was not sufficiently high to warrant further studies. PMID:25384173

  5. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. The influence of baseline characteristics and disease stage on health-related quality of life in multiple myeloma: findings from six randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Don; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Regnault, Antoine; Meunier, Juliette; Liu, Kevin; van de Velde, Helgi

    2016-08-01

    This descriptive, cross-sectional analysis evaluated the impact of baseline characteristics on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) at different stages of multiple myeloma (MM). The bortezomib clinical-trial programme evaluated HR-QoL early and consistently, producing a large multi-study dataset. Baseline data, captured using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality-of-life questionnaire (QLQ-C30), were pooled from six bortezomib randomized trials conducted in different disease-stage categories: 'New' (previously untreated; n = 753), 'Early' (1-3 prior therapies; n = 1569) and 'Late' (≥4 prior therapies; n = 239) disease. Mean EORTC global health scores were similar across the three stages. Unexpectedly, emotional, physical and role functioning were higher in the later stages, indicating better perceived health. Symptom scores, including pain, were largely similar or lower in the later versus earlier stages, signifying a lower symptom burden/better symptom control with more advanced disease. Notable variation in HR-QoL was observed by age and clinical parameters within and across stages. Multivariate modelling indicated that opioid use and performance status were key factors driving overall HR-QoL across stages. Using an age-restricted analysis, transplant eligibility had little impact on HR-QoL in New disease patients. Thus, changes in HR-QoL over the treatment course of MM are complex and impacted by baseline factors. A prospective observational international inception cohort study that captures key clinical, HR-QoL and demographic characteristics, along with safety and supportive care information, is needed.

  7. Regional Office Procedures. Stage I Final Report for the Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. (Volume III).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.

    Volume III of a study of program management procedures in the campus-based and Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) programs provides a description of procedures employed within the U.S. Office of Education regional offices to administer the Basic Grant and campus-based student financial assistance programs. The objective of the report is to…

  8. Molecular basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, mucolipidosis II/III and Niemann-Pick C1 disease - Lysosomal storage disorders caused by defects of non-lysosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Schlotawa, Lars; Frese, Marc-André; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2009-04-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), mucolipidosis (ML) II/III and Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease are rare but fatal lysosomal storage disorders caused by the genetic defect of non-lysosomal proteins. The NPC1 protein mainly localizes to late endosomes and is essential for cholesterol redistribution from endocytosed LDL to cellular membranes. NPC1 deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of a broad range of lipids. The precise functional mechanism of this membrane protein, however, remains puzzling. ML II, also termed I cell disease, and the less severe ML III result from deficiencies of the Golgi enzyme N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphotransferase leading to a global defect of lysosome biogenesis. In patient cells, newly synthesized lysosomal proteins are not equipped with the critical lysosomal trafficking marker mannose 6-phosphate, thus escaping from lysosomal sorting at the trans Golgi network. MSD affects the entire sulfatase family, at least seven members of which are lysosomal enzymes that are specifically involved in the degradation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, sulfolipids or other sulfated molecules. The combined deficiencies of all sulfatases result from a defective post-translational modification by the ER-localized formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE), which oxidizes a specific cysteine residue to formylglycine, the catalytic residue enabling a unique mechanism of sulfate ester hydrolysis. This review gives an update on the molecular bases of these enigmatic diseases, which have been challenging researchers since many decades and so far led to a number of surprising findings that give deeper insight into both the cell biology and the pathobiochemistry underlying these complex disorders. In case of MSD, considerable progress has been made in recent years towards an understanding of disease-causing FGE mutations. First approaches to link molecular parameters with clinical manifestation have been described and even therapeutical options have been

  9. Programmed cell death‐ligand 1 (PD‐L1) expression and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) amplification in stage III/IV lung squamous cell carcinoma (SQC)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qinxiang; Sun, Yu; Yu, Sifan; Bai, Hua; Zhao, Jun; Zhuo, Minglei

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to explore programmed cell death‐ligand‐1 (PD‐L1) expression and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) amplification in stage IIIB/IV lung squamous cell carcinoma (SQC). Correlations between PD‐L1 and FGFR1, and with clinicopathological characteristics, efficacy of platinum‐based chemotherapy, and prognosis were analyzed. Methods One hundred and twenty‐eight consecutive stage III/IV SQC patients were enrolled in this study from 2009 to 2014. Seventy‐eight patients received platinum‐based chemotherapy. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess PD‐L1 expression and fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to detect FGFR1 amplification. Results PD‐L1 expression was detected in 61.7% (79/128) of lung SQC patients. Smokers had significantly higher PD‐L1 expression rates than non‐smokers (66.1% vs. 44.0%, P = 0.042, respectively). The objective response and disease control rates for platinum‐based chemotherapy were not significantly different between PD‐L1 negative and positive patients (43.3% vs. 36.2%, P = 0.434; 80.0% vs. 78.7% P = 0.840, respectively); however, overall survival in PD‐L1‐negative patients was significantly longer than in PD‐L1‐positive patients (41.5 vs. 19.3 months, P = 0.001). Twenty‐five percent (32/128) of patients displayed FGFR1 amplification, with a lower rate in stage III patients compared to stage IV (17.1% vs. 36.5%, P = 0.013, respectively). There was no significant difference in FGFR1 amplification levels between overall response, disease control or overall survival rates. No correlation was observed between PD‐L1 expression and FGFR1 amplification (P = 0.916). Conclusion PD‐L1 expression may function as a prognostic factor in Chinese stage III/IV SQC patients. FGFR1 amplification is more prevalent in late stage SQC patients but does not predict chemotherapy response. There is no apparent correlation between PD‐L1 expression

  10. Radiotherapy With 8-MHz Radiofrequency-Capacitive Regional Hyperthermia for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Radiofrequency-Output Power Correlates With the Intraesophageal Temperature and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ohguri, Takayuki Imada, Hajime; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Terashima, Hiromi; Korogi, Yukunori

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with regional hyperthermia (HT) guided by radiofrequency (RF)-output power and intraesophageal temperature and evaluate the potential contribution of HT to clinical outcomes in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with RT plus regional HT were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-two of the 35 patients underwent intraesophageal temperature measurements. Patients with subcutaneous fat of 2.5 cm or greater, older age, or other serious complications did not undergo this therapy. The 8-MHz RF-capacitive heating device was applied, and in all patients, both the upper and lower electrodes were 30 cm in diameter, placed on opposite sides of the whole thoracic region, and treatment posture was the prone position. The HT was applied within 15 minutes after RT once or twice a week. Results: All thermal parameters, minimum, maximum, and mean of the four intraesophageal temperature measurements at the end of each session and the proportion of the time during which at least one of the four intraesophageal measurements was 41{sup o}C or higher in the total period of each session of HT, of the intraesophageal temperature significantly correlated with median RF-output power. Median RF-output power ({>=}1,200 W) was a statistically significant prognostic factor for overall, local recurrence-free, and distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusions: The RT combined with regional HT using a higher RF-output power could contribute to better clinical outcomes in patients with Stage III NSCLC. The RF-output power thus may be used as a promising parameter to assess the treatment of deep regional HT if deep heating using this device is performed with the same size electrodes and in the same body posture.

  11. Factors predicting the response to oral fluoropyrimidine drugs: a phase II trial on the individualization of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy using oral fluorinated pyrimidines in stage III colorectal cancer treated by curative resection (ACT-01 Study).

    PubMed

    Mori, Takeo; Ohue, Masayuki; Takii, Yasumasa; Hashizume, Tadashi; Kato, Tomoyuki; Kotake, Kenjiro; Sato, Toshihiko; Tango, Toshiro

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the predictive relevance of several biomarkers on the survival of patients with stage III colorectal cancer treated with adjuvant chemotherapy of oral fluoropyrimidines. This was a multicenter phase II trial on adult patients with histologically confirmed resected stage III (Dukes' C) colorectal cancer. Patients received oral doxifluridine (800 mg/m2/day) in 3 divided doses, or oral uracil/tegafur (UFT) (400 mg/m2/day) in 2 divided doses for 5 days, every 7 days for 12 months with a 5-year follow-up. Outcome measures were disease-free survival and tissue markers [thymidine phosphorylase (TP), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) protein levels and TP, DPD, thymidylate synthase (TS) and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) mRNA levels in tumor samples and TS tandem-repeat type in blood samples]. There was a significant association between the intratumoral TP/DPD enzyme ratio and disease-free survival when the model included the drug, the parameter and the interactions between them [hazard ratio (HR)=2.76; P=0.00469]. The 5-year disease-free survival rate was statistically significantly higher in patients with high TP/DPD ratios [median ≥2.63: 71.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 61.4-80.0] compared to patients with low TP/DPD ratios (<2.63: 57.0%; 95% CI 46.3-66.3) (log-rank P=0.0277) following adjuvant therapy with oral fluoropyrimidines. No significant association was observed between the intratumoral TP/DPD enzyme ratio (cut-off value 2.0) and the disease-free survival rate in the doxifluridine group; primary endpoint (log-rank P=0.6850). The magnitude of the intratumoral TP/DPD enzyme ratio may be a potential indicator for the individualization of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidines for stage III colorectal cancer.

  12. Serial Assessment of Therapeutic Response to a New Radiosensitization Treatment, Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II), in Patients with Stage I/II Breast Cancer Using Breast Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yaogawa, Shin; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Morita-Tokuhiro, Shiho; Tsuzuki, Akira; Akima, Ryo; Itoh, Kenji; Morio, Kazuo; Yasunami, Hiroaki; Onogawa, Masahide; Kariya, Shinji; Nogami, Munenobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: We have developed a new radiosensitization treatment called Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II). Using KORTUC II, we performed breast-conserving treatment (BCT) without any surgical procedure for elderly patients with breast cancer in stages I/II or patients refusing surgery. Since surgery was not performed, histological confirmation of the primary tumor region following KORTUC II treatment was not possible. Therefore, to precisely evaluate the response to this new therapy, a detailed diagnostic procedure is needed. The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic response to KORTUC II treatment in patients with stage I/II breast cancer using annual breast contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Twenty-one patients with stage I/II breast cancer who were elderly and/or refused surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent MRI prior to and at 3 to 6 months after KORTUC II, and then approximately biannually thereafter. Findings from MRI were compared with those from other diagnostic modalities performed during the same time period. Results: KORTUC II was well tolerated, with minimal adverse effects. All of 21 patients showed a clinically complete response (cCR) on CE MRI. The mean period taken to confirm cCR on the breast CE MRI was approximately 14 months. The mean follow-up period for the patients was 61.9 months at the end of October 2014. Conclusions: The therapeutic effect of BCT using KORTUC II without surgery could be evaluated by biannual CE MRI evaluations. Approximately 14 months were required to achieve cCR in response to this therapy. PMID:26703733

  13. A comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of Stage I-II nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xianfeng; Yang, Yong; Jin, Fu; He, Yanan; Zhong, Mingsong; Luo, Huanli; Qiu, Da; Li, Chao; Yang, Han; He, Guanglei; Wang, Ying

    2016-04-01

    This article is aimed to compare the dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Stage I-II nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NNKTL). Ten patients with Stage I-II NNKTL treated with IMRT were replanned with VMAT (2 arcs). The prescribed dose of the planning target volume (PTV) was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The VMAT plans with the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (Version 8.6.15) were based on an Eclipse treatment planning system; the monitor units (MUs) and treatment time (T) were scored to measure the expected treatment efficiency. All the 10 patients under the study were subject to comparisons regarding the quality of target coverage, the efficiency of delivery, and the exposure of normal adjacent organs at risk (OARs). The study shows that VMAT was associated with a better conformal index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) (both p < 0.05) but slightly higher dose to OARs than IMRT. The MUs with VMAT (650.80 ± 24.59) were fewer than with IMRT (1300.10 ± 57.12) (relative reduction of 49.94%, p = 0.00) when using 2-Gy dose fractions. The treatment time with VMAT (3.20 ± 0.02 minutes) was shorter than with IMRT (7.38 ± 0.18 minutes) (relative reduction of 56.64%, p = 0.00). We found that VMAT and IMRT both provide satisfactory target dosimetric coverage and OARs sparing clinically. Likely to deliver a bit higher dose to OARs, VMAT in comparison with IMRT, is still a better choice for treatment of patients with Stage I-II NNKTL, thanks to better dose distribution, fewer MUs, and shorter delivery time.

  14. Multiple periodic solutions of a delayed predator-prey model with non-monotonic functional response and stage structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingyuan; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhou, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    The paper studies a periodic and delayed predator-prey system with non-monotonic functional responses and stage structure. In the system, both the predator and prey are divided into immature individuals and mature individuals by two fixed ages. It is assumed that the immature predators cannot attack preys, and the case of the mature predators attacking the immature preys is also ignored. Based on Mawhin's coincidence degree, sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence of two positive periodic solutions of the system. An example is presented to illustrate the feasibility of the main results.

  15. Associations between poor sleep quality and stages of change of multiple health behaviors among participants of employee wellness program

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Siu-kuen Azor; Grandner, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Using the Transtheoretical Model of behavioral change, this study evaluates the relationship between sleep quality and the motivation and maintenance processes of healthy behavior change. Methods The current study is an analysis of data collected in 2008 from an online health risk assessment (HRA) survey completed by participants of the Kansas State employee wellness program (N = 13,322). Using multinomial logistic regression, associations between self-reported sleep quality and stages of change (i.e. precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance) in five health behaviors (stress management, weight management, physical activities, alcohol use, and smoking) were analyzed. Results Adjusted for covariates, poor sleep quality was associated with an increased likelihood of contemplation, preparation, and in some cases action stage when engaging in the health behavior change process, but generally a lower likelihood of maintenance of the healthy behavior. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that poor sleep quality was associated with an elevated likelihood of contemplating or initiating behavior change, but a decreased likelihood of maintaining healthy behavior change. It is important to include sleep improvement as one of the lifestyle management interventions offered in EWP to comprehensively reduce health risks and promote the health of a large employee population. PMID:26046013

  16. Chemically mediated interactions between macroalgae Dictyota spp. and multiple life-history stages of the coral Porites astreoides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, V.J.; Kuffner, I.B.; Walters, L.J.; Ritson-Williams, R.; Beach, K.S.; Becerro, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Competition between corals and macroalgae is often assumed to occur on reefs, especially those that have undergone shifts from coral to algal dominance; however, data examining these competitive interactions, especially during the early life-history stages of corals, are scarce. We conducted a series of field and outdoor seawater-table experiments to test the hypothesis that allelopathy (chemical inhibition) mediates interactions between 2 common brown macroalgae, Dictyota pulchella and D. pinnatifida, and the coral Porites astreoides at different life-history stages of the coral. D. pinnatifida significantly reduced larval survival and larval recruitment. The extracts of both D. pinnatifida and D. pulchella significantly reduced larval survival, and the extract of D. pulchella also negatively influenced larval recruitment. There was no measurable effect of the crude extracts from Dictyota spp. on the photophysiology of adult corals. Our results provide evidence that these Dictyota species chemically compete with P. astreoides by negatively affecting larval settlement and recruitment as well as the survival of larvae and new recruits. Macroalgae may perpetuate their dominance on degraded reefs by chemically inhibiting the process of coral recruitment. ?? 2011 Inter-Research.

  17. Toxicity of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol tested at multiple stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio) development.

    PubMed

    Suvarchala, Gonuguntla; Philip, Gundala Harold

    2016-08-01

    Organophosphate compounds (OP) are widely used throughout the world for pest control. 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) is a primary metabolite of two OP compounds namely CP and triclopyr. This study is carried out to know whether a metabolite of parent compound is doing well or harm to biota. The potential effect of TCP was evaluated on development as destabilization of any events transpiring during embryogenesis could be deleterious. To determine this, 4-hpf zebrafish embryos were exposed to five concentrations of TCP (200, 400, 600, 800, 1000 μg/L) or 99.5 % acetone (solvent control). Different early life-stage parameters were observed at four different developmental stages, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hpf. TCP-treated embryo/larvae showed increased mortality, delay in hatching time and decrease in percentage of hatched embryos. Reduction in heartbeat rate, blood flow and body and eye pigmentation was noticed in a dose-dependent manner. Pericardial and yolk sac edema were most severe malformations caused by TCP. Along with this crooked spine/notochord, tail deformation was noticed in hatched and unhatched embryos. The malformations observed provide a good starting point for examination of the molecular mechanisms that are affected during development by TCP. Results gain significance as TCP, which is a breakdown product, appears to be more toxic during development compared to parent compound, CP (our earlier publication).

  18. Chemically-mediated interactions between macroalgae Dictyota spp. and multiple life-history stages of the coral Porites astreoides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, Valerie J.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Walters, Linda J.; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Beach, Kevin S.; Becerro, Mikel A.

    2011-01-01

    Competition between corals and macroalgae is often assumed to occur on reefs, especially those that have undergone shifts from coral to algal dominance; however, data examining these competitive interactions, especially during the early life-history stages of corals, are scarce. We conducted a series of field and outdoor seawater-table experiments to test the hypothesis that allelopathy (chemical inhibition) mediates interactions between 2 common brown macroalgae, Dictyota pulchella and D. pinnatifida, and the coral Porites astreoides at different life-history stages of the coral. D. pinnatifida significantly reduced larval survival and larval recruitment. The extracts of both D. pinnatifida and D. pulchella significantly reduced larval survival, and the extract of D. pulchella also negatively influenced larval recruitment. There was no measurable effect of the crude extracts from Dictyota spp. on the photophysiology of adult corals. Our results provide evidence that these Dictyota species chemically compete with P. astreoides by negatively affecting larval settlement and recruitment as well as the survival of larvae and new recruits. Macroalgae may perpetuate their dominance on degraded reefs by chemically inhibiting the process of coral recruitment.

  19. Guide to using Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX v.1.1) for Removal of River Stage Effects from Well Water Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Rob D.; Spane, Frank A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2010-09-01

    A software tool was created in Fiscal Year 2010 (FY11) that enables multiple-regression correction of well water levels for river-stage effects. This task was conducted as part of the Remediation Science and Technology project of CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). This document contains an overview of the correction methodology and a user’s manual for Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX) v.1.1. It also contains a step-by-step tutorial that shows users how to use MRCX to correct river effects in two different wells. This report is accompanied by an enclosed CD that contains the MRCX installer application and files used in the tutorial exercises.

  20. A randomized phase III study of carfilzomib vs low-dose corticosteroids with optional cyclophosphamide in relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (FOCUS).

    PubMed

    Hájek, R; Masszi, T; Petrucci, M T; Palumbo, A; Rosiñol, L; Nagler, A; Yong, K L; Oriol, A; Minarik, J; Pour, L; Dimopoulos, M A; Maisnar, V; Rossi, D; Kasparu, H; Van Droogenbroeck, J; Yehuda, D B; Hardan, I; Jenner, M; Calbecka, M; Dávid, M; de la Rubia, J; Drach, J; Gasztonyi, Z; Górnik, S; Leleu, X; Munder, M; Offidani, M; Zojer, N; Rajangam, K; Chang, Y-L; San-Miguel, J F; Ludwig, H

    2017-01-01

    This randomized, phase III, open-label, multicenter study compared carfilzomib monotherapy against low-dose corticosteroids and optional cyclophosphamide in relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). Relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma patients were randomized (1:1) to receive carfilzomib (10-min intravenous infusion; 20 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 2 of cycle 1; 27 mg/m(2) thereafter) or a control regimen of low-dose corticosteroids (84 mg of dexamethasone or equivalent corticosteroid) with optional cyclophosphamide (1400 mg) for 28-day cycles. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Three-hundred and fifteen patients were randomized to carfilzomib (n=157) or control (n=158). Both groups had a median of five prior regimens. In the control group, 95% of patients received cyclophosphamide. Median OS was 10.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 8.4-14.4) vs 10.0 months (95% CI 7.7-12.0) with carfilzomib vs control (hazard ratio=0.975; 95% CI 0.760-1.249; P=0.4172). Progression-free survival was similar between groups; overall response rate was higher with carfilzomib (19.1 vs 11.4%). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were anemia (25.5 vs 30.7%), thrombocytopenia (24.2 vs 22.2%) and neutropenia (7.6 vs 12.4%) with carfilzomib vs control. Median OS for single-agent carfilzomib was similar to that for an active doublet control regimen in heavily pretreated RRMM patients.

  1. A randomized phase III study of carfilzomib vs low-dose corticosteroids with optional cyclophosphamide in relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (FOCUS)

    PubMed Central

    Hájek, R; Masszi, T; Petrucci, M T; Palumbo, A; Rosiñol, L; Nagler, A; Yong, K L; Oriol, A; Minarik, J; Pour, L; Dimopoulos, M A; Maisnar, V; Rossi, D; Kasparu, H; Van Droogenbroeck, J; Yehuda, D B; Hardan, I; Jenner, M; Calbecka, M; Dávid, M; de la Rubia, J; Drach, J; Gasztonyi, Z; Górnik, S; Leleu, X; Munder, M; Offidani, M; Zojer, N; Rajangam, K; Chang, Y-L; San-Miguel, J F; Ludwig, H

    2017-01-01

    This randomized, phase III, open-label, multicenter study compared carfilzomib monotherapy against low-dose corticosteroids and optional cyclophosphamide in relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). Relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma patients were randomized (1:1) to receive carfilzomib (10-min intravenous infusion; 20 mg/m2 on days 1 and 2 of cycle 1; 27 mg/m2 thereafter) or a control regimen of low-dose corticosteroids (84 mg of dexamethasone or equivalent corticosteroid) with optional cyclophosphamide (1400 mg) for 28-day cycles. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Three-hundred and fifteen patients were randomized to carfilzomib (n=157) or control (n=158). Both groups had a median of five prior regimens. In the control group, 95% of patients received cyclophosphamide. Median OS was 10.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 8.4–14.4) vs 10.0 months (95% CI 7.7–12.0) with carfilzomib vs control (hazard ratio=0.975; 95% CI 0.760–1.249; P=0.4172). Progression-free survival was similar between groups; overall response rate was higher with carfilzomib (19.1 vs 11.4%). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were anemia (25.5 vs 30.7%), thrombocytopenia (24.2 vs 22.2%) and neutropenia (7.6 vs 12.4%) with carfilzomib vs control. Median OS for single-agent carfilzomib was similar to that for an active doublet control regimen in heavily pretreated RRMM patients. PMID:27416912

  2. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation With Paclitaxel/Carboplatin for Selected Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Trimodality Phase II Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Hehr, Thomas; Friedel, Godehard; Steger, Volker; Spengler, Werner; Eschmann, Susanne M.; Bamberg, Michael; Budach, Wilfried

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a Phase II trial conducted August 1998 through January 2001, the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and definitive surgery in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), Stages IIIA bulky and selected Stage IIIB. Patients and Methods: Staging of LA-NSCLC included computed tomography of cranium, thorax, and abdomen, whole-body positron emission tomography, and video mediastinoscopy. Induction chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin was followed by hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy (45 Gy) with simultaneous weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin. Four to six weeks after completion of induction therapy, restaging and resection of primary tumor and lymph nodes was intended. Results: A total of 59 consecutive patients were enrolled, 25% with Stage IIIA bulky disease, 65% with Stage IIIB, and 10% with Stage IV (excluded from further analysis). Forty-one patients completed induction therapy; in 52.4% a functional (positron emission tomography) downstaging was proven. Thirty-two patients (59.3%) underwent complete tumor resection, and 5 patients had an exploratory thoracotomy only. Histopathologic downstaging was proven in 59.4% and complete response in 21.9%. Hospital mortality was 5.4%. Median duration of follow-up for living patients was 62.1 months. Overall median survival was 22.6 months, 58.2 months for completely resected patients. During induction chemotherapy, Grade 3/4 granulocytopenia occurred in 8% of patients; the most common Grade 3/4 toxicity of chemoradiation was esophagitis, in 26.4% of patients. Conclusions: Induction paclitaxel/carboplatin with hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiotherapy followed by complete tumor resection demonstrates high efficacy in LA-NSCLC and offers a promising chance of long-term survival.

  3. Hybrid maize breeding with doubled haploids: III. Efficiency of early testing prior to doubled haploid production in two-stage selection for testcross performance.

    PubMed

    Longin, C Friedrich H; Utz, H Friedrich; Reif, Jochen C; Wegenast, Thilo; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2007-08-01

    Early testing prior to doubled haploid (DH) production is a promising approach in hybrid maize breeding. We (1) determined the optimum allocation of the number of S(1) families, DH lines, and test locations for two different breeding schemes, (2) compared the maximum selection gain achievable under both breeding schemes, and (3) investigated limitations in the current method of DH production. Selection gain was calculated by numerical integration in two-stage breeding schemes with evaluation of testcross progenies of (1) DH lines in both stages (DHTC), or (2) S(1) families in the first and DH lines within S(1) families in the second stage (S(1)TC-DHTC). Different assumptions were made regarding the budget, variance components, and time of DH production within S(1) families. Maximum selection gain in S(1)TC-DHTC was about 10% larger than in DHTC, indicating the large potential of early testing prior to DH production. The optimum allocation of test resources in S(1)TC-DHTC involved similar numbers of test locations and test candidates in both stages resulting in a large optimum number of S(1) families in the first stage and DH lines within the best two S(1) families in the second stage. The longer cycle length of S(1)TC-DHTC can be compensated by haploid induction of individual S(1) plants instead of S(1) families. However, this reduces selection gain largely due to the current limitations in the DH technique. Substantial increases in haploid induction and chromosome doubling rates as well as reduction in costs of DH production would allow early testing of S(1) lines and subsequent production and testing of DH lines in a breeding scheme that combines high selection gain with a short cycle length.

  4. Hypofractionated High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Preliminary Results of A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Masaharu . E-mail: mhata@syd.odn.ne.jp; Tokuuye, Koichi; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm) in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade {>=}3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC.

  5. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinical Stage II-III Breast Cancer Patients With pN0: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study (KROG 12-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Su Jung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Nam Kwon; Suh, Chang-Ok; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Su Ssan; Ha, Sung W.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pN0. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 417 clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients who achieved an ypN0 at surgery after receiving NAC between 1998 and 2009. Of these, 151 patients underwent mastectomy after NAC. The effect of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log–rank test and Cox proportional regression analysis. Results: Of the 151 patients who underwent mastectomy, 105 (69.5%) received PMRT and 46 patients (30.5%) did not. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 5 patients (3.3%) developed LRR (8 sites of recurrence) and 14 patients (9.3%) developed distant metastasis. The 5-year DFS, LRRFS, and OS rates were 91.2, 98.1, and 93.3% with PMRT and 83.0%, 92.3%, and 89.9% without PMRT, respectively (all P values not significant). By univariate analysis, only age (≤40 vs >40 years) was significantly associated with decreased DFS (P=.027). By multivariate analysis, age (≤40 vs >40 years) and pathologic T stage (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) were significant prognostic factors affecting DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.353, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.135-0.928, P=.035; HR 2.223, 95% CI 1.074-4.604, P=.031, respectively). PMRT showed no correlation with a difference in DFS, LRRFS, or OS by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: PMRT might not be necessary for pN0 patients after NAC, regardless of clinical stage. Prospective randomized clinical trial data are needed to assess whether PMRT can be safely omitted in pN0 patients after NAC and mastectomy for clinical stage II-III breast cancer.

  6. A cell protection screen reveals potent inhibitors of multiple stages of the hepatitis C virus life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Karuppiah; Simeon, Rudo L.; Rice, Charles M.; Chen, Zhilei

    2010-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle involves multiple steps, but most current drug candidates target only viral replication. The inability to systematically discover inhibitors targeting multiple steps of the HCV life cycle has hampered antiviral development. We present a simple screen for HCV antivirals based on the alleviation of HCV-mediated cytopathic effect in an engineered cell line—n4mBid. This approach obviates the need for a secondary screen to avoid cytotoxic false-positive hits. Application of our screen to 1280 compounds, many in clinical trials or approved for therapeutic use, yielded >200 hits. Of the 55 leading hits, 47 inhibited one or more aspects of the HCV life cycle by >40%. Six compounds blocked HCV entry to levels similar to an antibody (JS-81) targeting the HCV entry receptor CD81. Seven hits inhibited HCV replication and/or infectious virus production by >100-fold, with one (quinidine) inhibiting infectious virus production by 450-fold relative to HCV replication levels. This approach is simple and inexpensive and should enable the rapid discovery of new classes of HCV life cycle inhibitors. PMID:20142494

  7. Multiple Off-Ice Performance Variables Predict On-Ice Skating Performance in Male and Female Division III Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Janot, Jeffrey M; Beltz, Nicholas M; Dalleck, Lance D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if off-ice performance variables could predict on-ice skating performance in Division III collegiate hockey players. Both men (n = 15) and women (n = 11) hockey players (age = 20.5 ± 1.4 years) participated in the study. The skating tests were agility cornering S-turn, 6.10 m acceleration, 44.80 m speed, modified repeat skate, and 15.20 m full speed. Off-ice variables assessed were years of playing experience, height, weight and percent body fat and off-ice performance variables included vertical jump (VJ), 40-yd dash (36.58m), 1-RM squat, pro-agility, Wingate peak power and peak power percentage drop (% drop), and 1.5 mile (2.4km) run. Results indicated that 40-yd dash (36.58m), VJ, 1.5 mile (2.4km) run, and % drop were significant predictors of skating performance for repeat skate (slowest, fastest, and average time) and 44.80 m speed time, respectively. Four predictive equations were derived from multiple regression analyses: 1) slowest repeat skate time = 2.362 + (1.68 x 40-yd dash time) + (0.005 x 1.5 mile run), 2) fastest repeat skate time = 9.762 - (0.089 x VJ) - (0.998 x 40-yd dash time), 3) average repeat skate time = 7.770 + (1.041 x 40-yd dash time) - (0.63 x VJ) + (0.003 x 1.5 mile time), and 4) 47.85 m speed test = 7.707 - (0.050 x VJ) - (0.01 x % drop). It was concluded that selected off-ice tests could be used to predict on-ice performance regarding speed and recovery ability in Division III male and female hockey players. Key pointsThe 40-yd dash (36.58m) and vertical jump tests are significant predictors of on-ice skating performance specific to speed.In addition to 40-yd dash and vertical jump, the 1.5 mile (2.4km) run for time and percent power drop from the Wingate anaerobic power test were also significant predictors of skating performance that incorporates the aspect of recovery from skating activity.Due to the specificity of selected off-ice variables as predictors of on-ice performance, coaches can

  8. Multiple Off-Ice Performance Variables Predict On-Ice Skating Performance in Male and Female Division III Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Janot, Jeffrey M.; Beltz, Nicholas M.; Dalleck, Lance D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if off-ice performance variables could predict on-ice skating performance in Division III collegiate hockey players. Both men (n = 15) and women (n = 11) hockey players (age = 20.5 ± 1.4 years) participated in the study. The skating tests were agility cornering S-turn, 6.10 m acceleration, 44.80 m speed, modified repeat skate, and 15.20 m full speed. Off-ice variables assessed were years of playing experience, height, weight and percent body fat and off-ice performance variables included vertical jump (VJ), 40-yd dash (36.58m), 1-RM squat, pro-agility, Wingate peak power and peak power percentage drop (% drop), and 1.5 mile (2.4km) run. Results indicated that 40-yd dash (36.58m), VJ, 1.5 mile (2.4km) run, and % drop were significant predictors of skating performance for repeat skate (slowest, fastest, and average time) and 44.80 m speed time, respectively. Four predictive equations were derived from multiple regression analyses: 1) slowest repeat skate time = 2.362 + (1.68 x 40-yd dash time) + (0.005 x 1.5 mile run), 2) fastest repeat skate time = 9.762 - (0.089 x VJ) - (0.998 x 40-yd dash time), 3) average repeat skate time = 7.770 + (1.041 x 40-yd dash time) - (0.63 x VJ) + (0.003 x 1.5 mile time), and 4) 47.85 m speed test = 7.707 - (0.050 x VJ) - (0.01 x % drop). It was concluded that selected off-ice tests could be used to predict on-ice performance regarding speed and recovery ability in Division III male and female hockey players. Key points The 40-yd dash (36.58m) and vertical jump tests are significant predictors of on-ice skating performance specific to speed. In addition to 40-yd dash and vertical jump, the 1.5 mile (2.4km) run for time and percent power drop from the Wingate anaerobic power test were also significant predictors of skating performance that incorporates the aspect of recovery from skating activity. Due to the specificity of selected off-ice variables as predictors of on-ice performance, coaches