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Sample records for staggered tube bundle

  1. Heat transfer characteristics of staggered wing-shaped tubes bundle at different angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Ibrahiem, Emad Z.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2014-08-01

    An experimental and numerical study has been conducted to clarify heat transfer characteristics and effectiveness of a cross-flow heat exchanger employing staggered wing-shaped tubes at different angels of attack. The water-side Rew and the air-side Rea were at 5 × 102 and at from 1.8 × 103 to 9.7 × 103, respectively. The tubes arrangements were employed with various angles of attack θ1,2,3 from 0° to 330° at the considered Rea range. Correlation of Nu, St, as well as the heat transfer per unit pumping power (ɛ) in terms of Rea and design parameters for the studied bundle were presented. The temperature fields around the staggered wing-shaped tubes bundle were predicted by using commercial CFD FLUENT 6.3.26 software package. Results indicated that the heat transfer increased with the angle of attack in the range from 0° to 45°, while the opposite was true for angles of attack from 135° to 180°. The best thermal performance and hence the efficiency η of studied bundle occurred at the lowest Rea and/or zero angle of attack. Comparisons between the experimental and numerical results of the present study and those, previously, obtained for similar available studies showed good agreements.

  2. Influence of the angle of inclination of round-finned tubes in a staggered tube bundle on the free convective heat exchange between it and an unbounded air space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntysh, V. B.; Samorodov, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    Results of experimental investigations of the average heat transfer from five-row staggered bundles of tubes with knurled spiral fins, operating in the free air-convection regime, in the case where the angel of inclination of the longitudinal axis of the tubes changed from 0 to 60° are presented. The investigations were carried out by the method of complete heat simulation. The average heat transfer was measured in the direction of a free air flow in each row of a tube bundle. The experimental data were generalized by similarity equations for calculating the average heat transfer from the tube bundles and their individual rows in the range of change in the Rayleigh number characteristic of the operating conditions of industrial heat exchangers assembled from finned tubes of the type of the above-indicated tubes.

  3. Tube bundle system

    PubMed Central

    Marchewka, W.; Mohamed, K.; Addis, J.; Karnack, F.

    2015-01-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine. The gas samples are drawn via vacuum pump to the surface and are typically analyzed for oxygen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Results of the gas analyses are displayed and recorded for further analysis. Trends in the composition of the mine atmosphere, such as increasing methane or carbon monoxide concentration, can be detected early, permitting rapid intervention that prevents problems, such as a potentially explosive atmosphere behind seals, fire or spontaneous combustion. TBS is a well-developed technology and has been used in coal mines around the world for more than 50 years. Most longwall coal mines in Australia deploy a TBS, usually with 30 to 40 monitoring points as part of their atmospheric monitoring. The primary uses of a TBS are detecting spontaneous combustion and maintaining sealed areas inert. The TBS might also provide mine atmosphere gas composition data after a catastrophe occurs in an underground mine, if the sampling tubes are not damaged. TBSs are not an alternative to statutory gas and ventilation airflow monitoring by electronic sensors or people; rather, they are an option to consider in an overall mine atmosphere monitoring strategy. This paper describes the hardware, software and operation of a TBS and presents one example of typical data from a longwall coal mine PMID:26306052

  4. Vertical, Bubbly, Cross-Flow Characteristics over Tube Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    2005-12-01

    Two-phase flow over tube bundles is commonly observed in shell and tube-type heat exchangers. However, only limited amount of data concerning flow pattern and void fraction exists due to the flow complexity and the difficulties in measurement. The detailed flow structure in tube bundles needs to be understood for reliable and effective design. Therefore, the objective of this study was to clarify the two-phase structure of cross-flow in tube bundles by PIV. Experiments were conducted using two types of models, namely in-line and staggered arrays with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. Each test section contains 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The experiment’s data were obtained under very low void fraction (α<0.02). Liquid and gas velocity data in the whole flow field were measured successfully by optical filtering and image processing. The structures of bubbly flow in the two different configurations of tube bundles were described in terms of the velocity vector field, turbulence intensity and void fraction.

  5. PIV measurement of the vertical cross-flow structure over tube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    Shell and tube heat exchangers are among the most commonly used types of heat exchangers. Shell-side cross-flow in tube bundles has received considerable attention and has been investigated extensively. However, the microscopic flow structure including velocity distribution, wake, and turbulent structure in the tube bundles needs to be determined for more effective designs. Therefore, in this study, in order to clarify the detailed structure of cross-flow in tube bundles with particle image velocimetry (PIV), experiments were conducted using two types of model; in-line and staggered bundles with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5, containing 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The velocity data in the whole flow field were measured successfully by adjusting the refractive index of the working fluid to that of the tube material. The flow features were characterized in different tube bundles with regards to the velocity vector field, vortex structure, and turbulent intensity.

  6. Advanced tube-bundle rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced rocket thrust chamber for future space application is described along with an improved method of fabrication. Potential benefits of the concept are improved cyclic life, reusability, and performance. Performance improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced heat transfer into the coolant which will enable higher chamber pressure in expander cycle engines. Cyclic life, reusability and reliability improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced structural compliance inherent in the construction. The method of construction involves the forming of the combustion chamber with a tube-bundle of high conductivity copper or copper alloy tubes, and the bonding of these tubes by an electroforming operation. Further, the method of fabrication reduces chamber complexity by incorporating manifolds, jackets, and structural stiffeners while having the potential for thrust chamber cost and weight reduction.

  7. Method of pressure pulse cleaning a tube bundle heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Scharton, T.D.; Taylor, G.B.

    1987-04-07

    A method is described of removing the products of corrosion, oxidation, sedimentation and comparable chemical reactions collectively known as sludge which settle on the bottom of a tube bundle heat exchange and form a pile of sludge. The tube bundle heat exchanger is characterized by a tube bundle heat exchanger wall and a thick metal plate known as a tube sheet near the lower portion of the tube bundle heat exchanger wall's interior surface. The tube sheet serves to support the lower ends of a multiplicity of heat exchanger tubes within the tube bundle heat exchanger. The tube bundle heat exchange wall further comprises a multiplicity of small holes known as hand holes, manways, drain lines and vents, located around its circumference and above the tube sheet. The method is described of removing the pile of sludge which settles on the tube sheet comprising: a. locating at least one air-gun type pressure pulse shock wave source outside the tube bundle heat exchanger so as to be able to introduce pressure pulse shock waves through one or more of the multiplicity of hand holes, manways, drain lines and vents; and b. filling the tube bundle heat exchanger with a liquid to a level above the pile of sludge.

  8. A thermal mixing model of crossflow in tube bundles for use with the porous body approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashcroft, J.; Kaminski, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    Diffusive thermal mixing in a heated tube bundle with a cooling fluid in crossflow was analyzed numerically. From the results of detailed two-dimensional models, which calculated the diffusion of heat downstream of one heated tube in an otherwise adiabatic flow field, a diffusion model appropriate for use with the porous body method was developed. The model accounts for both molecular and turbulent diffusion of heat by determining the effective thermal conductivity in the porous region. The model was developed for triangular shaped staggered tube bundles with pitch to diameter ratios between 1.10 and 2.00 and for Reynolds numbers between 1,000 and 20,000. The tubes are treated as nonconducting. Air and water were considered as working fluids. The effective thermal conductivity was found to be linearly dependent on the tube Reynolds number and fluid Prandtl number, and dependent on the bundle geometry. The porous body thermal mixing model was then compared against numerical models for flows with multiple heated tubes with very good agreement.

  9. Combustor having mixing tube bundle with baffle arrangement for directing fuel

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Michael John; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin

    2016-08-23

    A combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The tube bundle includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface, and a plurality of tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface to provide fluid communication through the tube bundle. A barrier extends radially inside the tube bundle between the upstream and downstream surfaces, and a baffle extends axially inside the tube bundle between the upstream surface and the barrier.

  10. System for supporting bundled tube segments within a combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2016-03-01

    A system for supporting bundled tube segments within a combustor includes an annular sleeve that extends circumferentially and axially within the combustor, a support lug that extends radially inward from the annular sleeve and an annular support frame that is disposed within the annular sleeve. The annular support frame includes an inner ring portion, an outer ring portion and a plurality of spokes that extend radially between the inner and outer ring portions. The inner ring portion, the outer ring portion and the plurality of spokes define an annular array of openings for receiving a respective bundled tube segment. The inner ring portion is connected to each bundled tube segment and the outer ring portion is coupled to the support lug.

  11. Heat transfer and flow characteristics of fin-tube bundles with and without winglet-type vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, K. M.; Torii, K.; Nishino, K.

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the effect of longitudinal vortices that can be applied to the heat transfer enhancement for fin-tube heat exchangers such as air-cooled condensers. A multichannel test core was designed and fabricated for the determination of overall heat transfer and pressure loss with circular tubes and winglet vortex generators. Heat transfer results were obtained using a transient method referred to as the modified single-blow method. For a three-row tube bundle in an in-line arrangement without winglets, the heat transfer and the pressure loss were 72% and 210% higher, respectively, than for a multichannel test core without any built-in tube or winglet. These increases were caused by vortices around the tube banks. The corresponding increases for a staggered tube bundle are 95% and 310%, respectively. The triangular winglets recommended by the previous studies in a fin-tube bundle in an in-line arrangement increase the overall heat transfer 10-25% and the pressure loss 20-35% for the Reynolds numbers ranging from 300 to 2700.

  12. Cap assembly for a bundled tube fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Westmoreland, III, James Harold; Flanagan, James Scott

    2016-04-26

    A cap assembly for a bundled tube fuel injector includes an impingement plate and an aft plate that is disposed downstream from the impingement plate. The aft plate includes a forward side that is axially separated from an aft side. A tube passage extends through the impingement plate and the aft plate. A tube sleeve extends through the impingement plate within the tube passage towards the aft plate. The tube sleeve includes a flange at a forward end and an aft end that is axially separated from the forward end. A retention plate is positioned upstream from the impingement plate. A spring is disposed between the retention plate and the flange. The spring provides a force so as to maintain contact between at least a portion of the aft end of the tube sleeve and the forward side of the aft plate.

  13. Corrosion of Palo Verde 2 upper bundle steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, T.P.; Molkenthin, J.P.; Hall, J.F.; Melton, M.A.; Sachs, D.E.; Sweeney, K.M.; Begley, J.

    1995-12-31

    Palo Verde Unit-2 (PV-2) has experienced degradation in the upper bundle region of some of its Alloy 600 steam generator (SG) tubes. Arizona Public Service (APS) initiated several mitigating actions, including a 1994 chemical cleaning to remove tube deposits. Eddy current tests (ECT) conducted after chemical cleaning showed an increase in the number of indications. To detail the bend region indications, APS elected to remove the hot leg bend portion of 21 tubes for laboratory examination. The examination showed that the degradation mode was outside diameter initiated intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The most severe corrosion occurred beneath ridge-like deposits, although shallow IGA was discovered on large areas of free-span tubing. In some cases, degradation was associated with scratches or gouges on the tubes. Some wear was apparently caused by periodic tube-to-tube contact. Degradation was found in tubing with both poor and partial correspondence between grain boundaries and carbides. The chemical conditions that caused the tube degradation were likely neutral to alkaline solutions containing residual sulfur (sulfide) species. The burst strength of all tubes tested significantly exceeded Regulatory Guide 1.121 requirements. These results confirmed past PV-2 tube corrosion examination results.

  14. Heat transfer from a horizontal finned tube bundle in bubbling fluidized beds of small and large particles

    SciTech Connect

    Devaru, C.B.; Kolar, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Steady state average heat transfer coefficient measurements were made by the local thermal simulation technique in a cold, square, bubbling air-fluidized bed (0.305 m x 0.305 m) with immersed horizontal finned tube bundles (in-line and staggered) with integral 60{degree} V-thread. Studies were conducted using beds of small (average particle diameter less than 1 mm) sand particles and of large (average particle diameter greater thin 1 mm) particles (raagi, mustard, millet and coriander). The fin pitch varied from 0.8 to 5.0 mm and the fin height varied from 0.69 to 4.4 mm. The tube pitch ratios used were 1.75 and 3.5. The influence of bed particle diameter, fluidizing velocity, fin pitch, and tube pitch ratio on average heat transfer coefficient was studied. Fin pitch and bed particle diameter are the most significant parameters affecting heat transfer coefficient within the range of experimental conditions. Bed pressure drop depends only on static bed height. New direct correlations, incorporating easily measurable quantities, for average heat transfer coefficient for finned tube bundles (in-line and staggered) are proposed.

  15. Convective heat transfer in foams under laminar flow in pipes and tube bundles.

    PubMed

    Attia, Joseph A; McKinley, Ian M; Moreno-Magana, David; Pilon, Laurent

    2012-12-01

    The present study reports experimental data and scaling analysis for forced convection of foams and microfoams in laminar flow in circular and rectangular tubes as well as in tube bundles. Foams and microfoams are pseudoplastic (shear thinning) two-phase fluids consisting of tightly packed bubbles with diameters ranging from tens of microns to a few millimeters. They have found applications in separation processes, soil remediation, oil recovery, water treatment, food processes, as well as in fire fighting and in heat exchangers. First, aqueous solutions of surfactant Tween 20 with different concentrations were used to generate microfoams with various porosity, bubble size distribution, and rheological behavior. These different microfoams were flowed in uniformly heated circular tubes of different diameter instrumented with thermocouples. A wide range of heat fluxes and flow rates were explored. Experimental data were compared with analytical and semi-empirical expressions derived and validated for single-phase power-law fluids. These correlations were extended to two-phase foams by defining the Reynolds number based on the effective viscosity and density of microfoams. However, the local Nusselt and Prandtl numbers were defined based on the specific heat and thermal conductivity of water. Indeed, the heated wall was continuously in contact with a film of water controlling convective heat transfer to the microfoams. Overall, good agreement between experimental results and model predictions was obtained for all experimental conditions considered. Finally, the same approach was shown to be also valid for experimental data reported in the literature for laminar forced convection of microfoams in rectangular minichannels and of macrofoams across aligned and staggered tube bundles with constant wall heat flux.

  16. Convective heat transfer in foams under laminar flow in pipes and tube bundles

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Joseph A.; McKinley, Ian M.; Moreno-Magana, David; Pilon, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports experimental data and scaling analysis for forced convection of foams and microfoams in laminar flow in circular and rectangular tubes as well as in tube bundles. Foams and microfoams are pseudoplastic (shear thinning) two-phase fluids consisting of tightly packed bubbles with diameters ranging from tens of microns to a few millimeters. They have found applications in separation processes, soil remediation, oil recovery, water treatment, food processes, as well as in fire fighting and in heat exchangers. First, aqueous solutions of surfactant Tween 20 with different concentrations were used to generate microfoams with various porosity, bubble size distribution, and rheological behavior. These different microfoams were flowed in uniformly heated circular tubes of different diameter instrumented with thermocouples. A wide range of heat fluxes and flow rates were explored. Experimental data were compared with analytical and semi-empirical expressions derived and validated for single-phase power-law fluids. These correlations were extended to two-phase foams by defining the Reynolds number based on the effective viscosity and density of microfoams. However, the local Nusselt and Prandtl numbers were defined based on the specific heat and thermal conductivity of water. Indeed, the heated wall was continuously in contact with a film of water controlling convective heat transfer to the microfoams. Overall, good agreement between experimental results and model predictions was obtained for all experimental conditions considered. Finally, the same approach was shown to be also valid for experimental data reported in the literature for laminar forced convection of microfoams in rectangular minichannels and of macrofoams across aligned and staggered tube bundles with constant wall heat flux. PMID:25552745

  17. Experiments on condensation over in-line and staggered condenser tubes in the presence of non-condensable gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Abdulghani; Yamali, Cemil

    2013-12-01

    The problem of the forced film condensation heat transfer of pure steam and steam-air mixture flowing downward a tier of horizontal cylinders is investigated experimentally. An experimental setup was manufactured and mounted at Middle East Technical University workshop. A set of experiments were conducted to observe the condensation heat transfer phenomenon and to verify the theoretical results. The results of the experimental investigation are presented to show the effect of different parameters on the film condensation heat transfer phenomenon over bundle of tubes. These parameters include; free stream velocity, free stream non-condensable gas (air) mass fractions, free stream temperature to wall temperature difference, the angle of inclination. heat transfer coefficients are evaluated at different working conditions for both inline and staggered arrangements. Results show that; a remarked reduction in the vapor side heat transfer coefficient is noticed when very small amounts of air mass fractions present in the vapor. In addition, it decreases by increasing the temperature difference. On the other hand, it increases by increasing the free stream velocity (Reynolds number). Average heat transfer coefficient at the middle and the bottom cylinders increases by increasing the angle of inclination, whereas, no significant change is observed for that of the upper cylinder. Although some discrepancies are noticed, the present study results are inline and in a reasonable agreement with the theory and experiment in the literature.

  18. Maximum allowable heat flux for a submerged horizontal tube bundle

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.

    1995-08-14

    For application to industrial heating of large pools by immersed heat exchangers, the socalled maximum allowable (or {open_quotes}critical{close_quotes}) heat flux is studied for unconfined tube bundles aligned horizontally in a pool without forced flow. In general, we are considering boiling after the pool reaches its saturation temperature rather than sub-cooled pool boiling which should occur during early stages of transient operation. A combination of literature review and simple approximate analysis has been used. To date our main conclusion is that estimates of q inch chf are highly uncertain for this configuration.

  19. Tube bundle system: for monitoring of coal mine atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zipf, R Karl; Marchewka, W; Mohamed, K; Addis, J; Karnack, F

    2013-05-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine. The gas samples are drawn via vacuum pump to the surface and are typically analyzed for oxygen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Results of the gas analyses are displayed and recorded for further analysis. Trends in the composition of the mine atmosphere, such as increasing methane or carbon monoxide concentration, can be detected early, permitting rapid intervention that prevents problems, such as a potentially explosive atmosphere behind seals, fire or spontaneous combustion. TBS is a well-developed technology and has been used in coal mines around the world for more than 50 years. Most longwall coal mines in Australia deploy a TBS, usually with 30 to 40 monitoring points as part of their atmospheric monitoring. The primary uses of a TBS are detecting spontaneous combustion and maintaining sealed areas inert. The TBS might also provide mine atmosphere gas composition data after a catastrophe occurs in an underground mine, if the sampling tubes are not damaged. TBSs are not an alternative to statutory gas and ventilation airflow monitoring by electronic sensors or people; rather, they are an option to consider in an overall mine atmosphere monitoring strategy. This paper describes the hardware, software and operation of a TBS and presents one example of typical data from a longwall coal mine.

  20. Gas flow and thermal mixing in a helically wound tube bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Chiger, H.D.

    1980-07-01

    The thermal dissipation of a hot gas streak flowing across a segment of a helically wound tube bundle and the bypass flow streaming between the tubes and the bundle wall were investigated experimentally in the range of 8000 < Re < 50,000. Two different modes of creating a hot streak were employed. A planar hot streak was (1) injected at the entrance to the tube bundle and (2) generated by electrically heating several tubes past the bundle inlet. In the first case the mixing occurs in a region of lower turbulence since it occurs near the bundle inlet. In the second case the mixing occurs in a region of higher turbulence since the flow has already passed over several tube rows before the hot streak is generated.

  1. a Numerical Study of Unsteady Fluid Flow in In-Line and Staggered Tube Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, S. B.; Spalding, D. B.

    1999-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the results of numerical calculations for transient flow in in-line-square and rotated-square tube banks with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 2:1, in the Reynolds number range of 30-3000. Transient-periodic behaviour is induced by the consideration of two or more modules, with a sinusoidal span-wise perturbation being applied in the upstream module. There is a triode-like effect, whereby the downstream response to the stimulus is amplified, and there is a net gain in the crosswise flow component. When an appropriate feedback mechanism is provided, a stable transient behaviour is obtained, with alternate vortices being shed from each cylinder. Flow visualization studies of the results of the calculations are presented together with quantitative details of pressure drop, lift, drag and heat transfer. For the staggered bank, a wake-switching or Coanda effect was observed as the serpentine-shaped wake attached to alternate sides of the downstream cylinder. The induced response is independent of the amplitude and frequency of the applied disturbance, including the case of spontaneous behaviour with no excitation mechanism. For the in-line case where each cylinder is in the shadow of the previous one, the motion is less pronounced; however, a shear-layer instability associated with the alternating spin of shed vortices was observed. In this case, the response was found to be somewhat dependent on the frequency of the applied disturbance, and a transient motion could not be induced spontaneously in the absence of an explicit feedback mechanism. Calculated Strouhal numbers were in fair agreement with experimental data: for the staggered geometry, they had values of between 0.26 and 0.35, or from -21 to +6% higher than measured values, while for the in-line geometry, the Strouhal numbers ranged between 0.09 and 0.12, or about 20-40% lower than experimental values.

  2. Redesign and replacement of Connecticut Yankee moisture separator/reheater (MSR) tube bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the various aspects of the tube bundle redesign and replacement coordinated by Northeast Utilities Service Company for the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company during the plant's 1980 refueling outage. The main objective of the replacement was to improve the operating reliability along with secondary plant chemistry through the use of new bundle design and tube material. The considerations leading to the selection of material and design of the new bundles, the highlights of fabrication and bundle change-out, and the eddy current test experience and performance monitoring techniques and results are presented. 6 refs.

  3. Some recent developments in the theory of acoustic transmission in tube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, Maria A.; Mulholland, L. S.

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model for acoustic transmission in a tube bundle is presented. The tube bundle is considered as a series of diffraction gratings. Each grating consists of periodically spaced cylindrical tubes which obey the equations of motion of a cylindrical shell. Fluid loading is included. The model can be used for numerical simulations to calculate the sound field at any point in a tube bundle. Various phenomena can be predicted which are of interest for the development of acoustic diagnostics in heat exchangers. These include diffraction of a plane incident wave into several directions, the occurrence of passing and stopping bands in the transmission spectrum, features specific to oblique waves and the effect of dissipative losses. Tube bundles with baffle plates are also examined. The validity of the theoretical model is confirmed by comparison with experimental results.

  4. Reynolds number effects on pressure loss and turbulence characteristics of four tube-bundle heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, L., Jr.; Gentry, C. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of pressure loss and turbulence on four tube-bundle configurations representing heat-exchanger geometries with nominally the same heat capacity were measured as a function of Reynolds numbers from about 4000 to 400,000 based on tube hydraulic diameter. Two configurations had elliptical tubes, the other two had round tubes, and all four had plate fins. The elliptical-tube configurations had lower pressure loss and turbulence characteristics than the round-tube configurations over the entire Reynolds number range.

  5. System for supporting a bundled tube fuel injector within a combustor

    SciTech Connect

    LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Westmoreland, III, James Harold; Flanagan, James Scott

    2016-06-21

    A combustor includes an end cover having an outer side and an inner side, an outer barrel having a forward end that is adjacent to the inner side of the end cover and an aft end that is axially spaced from the forward end. An inner barrel is at least partially disposed concentrically within the outer barrel and is fixedly connected to the outer barrel. A fluid conduit extends downstream from the end cover. A first bundled tube fuel injector segment is disposed concentrically within the inner barrel. The bundled tube fuel injector segment includes a fuel plenum that is in fluid communication with the fluid conduit and a plurality of parallel tubes that extend axially through the fuel plenum. The bundled tube fuel injector segment is fixedly connected to the inner barrel.

  6. Determining the tube bundle streamlining critical parameters using the numerical experiment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunov, S. M.; Val'es, N. G.; Samolysov, A. V.; Marchevskaya, O. A.

    2015-08-01

    The article is devoted to development and application of mathematical models describing the most dangerous mechanisms through which vibrations are excited in tube bundles and blunt cylindrically shaped structures, and to development of reliable calculation methods for describing these models, which would make it possible to obtain prompt data for designing and subsequent operation of the considered structural elements. For solving such problems, a comprehensive approach is required, which should be based on a combined use of numerical experiments on computers and experimental investigations on full-scale equipment. The authors have developed a procedure for numerically investigating the hydrodynamic forces arising during stalled streamlining and the tube bundle vibrations caused by these forces. The procedure is based on using the developed mathematical model describing fluid-elastic excitation of vibrations in a bundle of elastic tubes placed in external cross flow. The problem of studying fluid-elastic excitation is brought to stability analysis, which is carried out with the assumption about a linear behavior of destabilizing forces for undisturbed state of elastic tubes. A theoretical investigation of the developed mathematical model was carried out, from which the necessary and sufficient condition of system stability has been obtained in terms of system dimensionless parameters (mass, damping, and velocity). An algorithm for numerically determining the matrices of linear hydrodynamic coupling coefficients for particular tube bundles is developed. The validity of the algorithm and the computer programs developed on its basis are checked by comparing the results of test calculations with the bank of known experimental data. A procedure is proposed for determining the matrices of linear hydrodynamic coupling coefficients in bundles having a regular layout of their cross section and a large number of tubes through calculating these matrices for a relatively small

  7. Evaluation following staggered implementation of the ‘Rethinking Critical Care’ ICU care bundle in a multi-center community setting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Vincent; Herbert, David; Foss-Durant, Anne; Marelich, Gregory P.; Patel, Anandray; Whippy, Alan; Turk, Benjamin J; Ragins, Arona I; Kipnis, Patricia; Escobar, Gabriel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate process metrics and outcomes following implementation of the ‘Rethinking Critical Care’ (RCC) ICU care bundle in a community setting. Design, Setting, and Patients Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at three hospitals in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California integrated healthcare delivery system between January 1, 2009 and August 30, 2013. Interventions and Measurements The RCC ICU care bundle is designed to reduce potentially preventable complications by focusing on the management of delirium, sedation, mechanical ventilation, mobility, ambulation, and coordinated care. RCC implementation occurred in a staggered fashion between October 2011 and November 2012. We measured implementation metrics based on electronic medical record data and evaluated the impact of implementation on mortality with multivariable regression models. Main Results We evaluated 24,886 first ICU episodes in 19,872 patients. After implementation, some process metrics (e.g., ventilation start and stop times) were achieved at high rates while others (e.g., ambulation distance), available late in the study period, showed steep increases in compliance. Unadjusted mortality decreased from 12.3% to 10.9% (p-value<0.01) before and after implementation, respectively. The adjusted odds ratio for hospital mortality after implementation was 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.73–0.99) and for thirty-day mortality was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.80–0.97) compared with before implementation. However, the mortality rate trends were not significantly different before and after RCC implementation. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay also did not demonstrate incrementally greater declines after implementation. Conclusions RCC implementation was associated with changes in practice and a 12% to 15% reduction in the odds of short-term mortality. However, these findings may represent an evaluation of changes in practices and outcomes still in the mid

  8. High-fin staggered tube banks: Heat transfer and pressure drop for turbulent single phase gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-10-01

    This Data Item ESDU 86022 is an addition to the Heat Transfer Sub-series. New correlations are presented for external heat transfer coefficient and static pressure loss for single phase flow over plain circular fins of either retangular or tapered cross section on round tubes. The correlations were derived by a regression analysis of experimental results extracted from the literature for a wide range of tube bundle configurations. Fin densities of 4 to 11 per inch (equivalent to fin pitches of 6.4 to 2.3 mm) tube outside diameters of 3/8 to 2 inch (10 to 51 mm), fin heights of 1/4 to 5/8 inch (6 to 16 mm), and ratios of fin tip to fin root diameter of 1.2 to 2.4 were covered. For heat transfer the range of Reynolds number based on tube outer diameter was from 2,000 to 40,000 and for pressure drop from 5,000 to 50,000. Comparison of the prediction with experiment shows that for heat transfer 85% of the data points were within 10% of estimated and for pressure drop 72% were within 10%. A comprehensive worked example showing the use of the method for an air cooled heat exchanger bundle is included. The applicability of this method to nonintegral fins is considered and factors influencing the thermal resistance of the interface are discussed. Effects of fouling are also briefly covered.

  9. Pool boiling of distilled water over tube bundle with variable heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Abhilas; Mohanty, Rajiva Lochan; Das, Mihir Kumar

    2017-02-01

    The experimental investigation of saturated pool boiling heat transfer of distilled water over plain tube bundle, under uniform and varying heat flux condition along the height are presented in this article. Experiments are carried out under various heat flux configurations applied to rows of tube bundles and pitch distance to diameter ratios of 1.25, 1.6 and 1.95. The wall superheats and pool boiling heat transfer coefficients over individual rows are determined. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients for variable heat flux and uniform heat flux conditions are compared. The results indicate that the bundle effect is found to exist for uniform as well as variable heat flux under all operating conditions in the present investigation. The variable heat flux resulted in range of wall superheat being highest for decreasing heat flux from bottom to top and lowest for increasing heat flux from bottom to top.

  10. Effects of oil on boiling of replacement refrigerants flowing normal to a tube bundle -- Part 1: R-123

    SciTech Connect

    Tatara, R.A.; Payvar, P.

    2000-07-01

    Local experimental heat transfer coefficients have been obtained for boiling refrigerant flowing up and across a tube bundle segment representing a full flooded evaporator tube bundle. R-123 data with a structured enhanced boiling tube are available.The refrigerant enters at 15% vapor quality and exits at nearly 100% vapor in order to simulate an actual flooded evaporator bundle. Both heat flux, 2,607 to 10,427 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2} (8,224 to 32,893 W/m{sup 2}), and oil content, 0--15% (by weight), are varied; the mass flux is not varied independently but set by the heat flux. Local tube and bulk fluid temperatures are measured directly, by thermocouples, to calculate the refrigerant-side heat transfer coefficients. The bundle segment saturation temperature set point (taken at the top of the tube bundle) is 40 F (4.4 C).

  11. Experimental and theoretical study of horizontal tube bundle for passive condensation heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong Jae

    The research in this thesis supports the design of a horizontal tube bundle condenser for passive heat removal system in nuclear reactors. From nuclear power plant containment, condensation of steam from a steam/noncondensable gas occurs on the primary side and boiling occurs on the secondary side; thus, heat exchanger modeling is a challenge. For the purpose of this experimental study, a six-tube bundle is used, where the outer diameter, inner diameter, and length of each stainless steel tube measures 38.10mm (1.5 inches), 31.75mm (1.25 inches) and 3.96m (156 inches), respectively. The pitch to diameter ratio was determined based on information gathered from literature surveys, and the dimensions were determined from calculations and experimental data. The objective of the calculations, correlations, and experimental data was to obtain complete condensation within the tube bundle. Experimental conditions for the tests in this thesis work were determined from Design Basis Accident (DBA). The applications are for an actual Passive Containment Cooling Systems (PCCS) condenser under postulated accident conditions in future light water reactors. In this research, steady state and transient experiments were performed to investigate the effect of noncondensable gas on steam condensation inside and boiling outside a tube bundle heat exchanger. The condenser tube inlet steam mass flow rate varied from 18.0 to 48.0 g/s, the inlet pressure varied from 100 kPa to 400 kPa, and the inlet noncondensable gas mass fraction varied from 1% to 10%. The effect of the noncondensable gas was examined by comparing the tube centerline temperatures for various inlet and system conditions. As a result, it was determined that the noncondensable gas accumulated near the condensate film causing a decrease of mass and energy transfer. In addition, the effect of the inlet steam flow rate gas was investigated by comparing the tube centerline temperatures, the conclusion being that, as the inlet

  12. Experimental study on cross-flow induced vibrations in heat exchanger tube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khushnood, Shahab; Nizam, Luqman Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    Vibration in heat exchangers is one of the main problems that the industry has faced over last few decades. Vibration phenomenon in heat exchangers is of major concern for designers and process engineers since it can lead to the tube damage, tube leakage, baffle damage, tube collision damage, fatigue, creep etc. In the present study, vibration response is analyzed on single tube located in the centre of the tube bundle having parallel triangular arrangement (60°) with P/ D ratio of 1.44. The experiment is performed for two different flow conditions. This kind of experiment has not been reported in the literature. Under the first condition, the tube vibration response is analyzed when there is no internal flow in the tube and under the second condition, the response is analyzed when the internal tube flow is maintained at a constant value of 0.1 m/s. The free stream shell side velocity ranges from 0.8 m/s to 1.3 m/s, the reduced gap velocity varies from 1.80 to 2.66 and the Reynolds number varies from 44500 to 66000. It is observed that the internal tube flow results in larger vibration amplitudes for the tube than that without internal tube flow. It is also established that over the current range of shell side flow velocity, the turbulence is the dominant excitation mechanism for producing vibration in the tube since the amplitude varies directly with the increase in the shell side velocity. Damping has no significant effect on the vibration behavior of the tube for the current velocity range.

  13. Effects of oil on boiling R-123 and R-134a flowing normal to an integral-finned tube bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Tatara, R.A.; Payvar, P.

    1999-07-01

    Local, experimental heat transfer coefficients have been measured for boiling refrigerant flowing up and across a tube bundle segment representing a full flooded evaporator tube bundle. R-123 and R-134a data with 26 fins per inch (1,024 fins per meter) tubes have been obtained. The refrigerant enters at 15% vapor quality and exits at nearly 100% vapor in order to simulate an actual flooded evaporator bundle. The nominal area heat flux was varied from 2,607 to 10,427 Btu/h{center{underscore}dot}ft{sup 2} (8,224 to 32,893 W/m{sup 2}) as the tube bundle oil content ranged from 0 to 15% (by weight) for each refrigerant/tube combination. The performance of R-22 without oil has also been determined. Local tube and bulk fluid temperatures were measured directly by thermocouples to calculate the refrigerant-side heat transfer coefficients. The bundle segment saturation temperature set point (taken at the top of the tube bundle) is 40 F (4.4 C).

  14. Nucleate Pool Boiling Performance of Smooth and Finned Tube Bundles in R-113 and R-114/Oil Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    tube bundles. Empirical and semi- empiribal equations have been proposed. Payvar [Ref. 21] used a one dimensional model derived from basic conservation... Payvar , P., "Analysis of Performance of Full Bundle Submerged Boilers," ASME HTD, Vol. 44, pp. 11-18, 1985. 22. Hahne, E. and Muller, J., "Boiling on a

  15. New method of making advanced tube-bundle rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.; Malone, Glenn A.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fabrication rocket chambers for future space applications is described. Included are fabrication demonstrator and test chambers produced by this method. This concept offers the promise of improved cyclic life, reusability, and performance. The performance is improved because of the enhanced enthalpy extraction. The improved cyclic life, reusability, and reliability is improved because of the structural compliance inherent in the construction. The method of construction involves the forming of the combustion chamber by a tube-bundle of high conductivity copper or copper alloy tubes and the bonding of these tubes by a unique electroforming operation. Furthermore, the method of fabrication reduces chamber complexity by incorporating manifolds, and structural stiffeners while having the potential for thrust chamber cost and weight reduction.

  16. Effects of oil on boiling of replacement refrigerants flowing normal to a tube bundle -- Part 2: R-134a

    SciTech Connect

    Tatara, R.A.; Payvar, P.

    2000-07-01

    Local, experimental heat transfer coefficients have been obtained for boiling refrigerant flowing up and across a tube bundle segment representing a full flooded evaporator tube bundle. R-134a data with a structured enhanced boiling tube are available. This tube has reentrant cavities designed for higher saturation pressure of refrigerants. The refrigerant enters at 15% vapor quality and exits at nearly 100% vapor in order to simulate an actual evaporator bundle. Both heat flux, 2,607 to 10,427 Btu/h{center_dot}f{sup 2} (8,224 to 32,893 W/m{sup 2}), and oil content, 0--12% (by weight), are varied; the mass flux is not an independent variable but determined by the heat flux. Local tube and bulk fluid temperatures are measured directly, by thermocouples, to calculate the refrigerant-side heat transfer coefficients. The bundle segment saturation temperature setpoint (taken at the top of the tube bundle) is 40 F (4.4 C).

  17. Effect of the sequence of tube rolling in a tube bundle of a shell and tube heat exchanger on the stress-deformed state of the tube sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselishchev, M. F.; Plotnikov, P. N.; Brodov, Yu. M.

    2015-11-01

    Rolling the tube sheet of a heat exchanger with U-shaped tubes, as exemplified by the vapor cooler GP-24, was simulated. The simulation was performed using the finite element method with account of elas- tic-plastic properties of the tube and tube sheet materials. The simulation consisted of two stages; at the first stage, maximum and residual contact stress in the conjunction of a separate tube and the tube sheet was determined using the "equivalent sleeve" model; at the second stage, the obtained contact stress was applied to the hole surface in the tube sheet. Thus, different tube rolling sequences were simulated: from the center to the periphery of the tube sheet and from the periphery to the center along a spiral line. The studies showed that the tube rolling sequence noticeably influences the value of the tube sheet residual deflection for the same rolling parameters of separate tubes. Residual deflection of the tube sheet in different planes was determined. It was established that the smallest residual deflection corresponds to the tube rolling sequence from the periphery to the center of the tube sheet. The following dependences were obtained for different rolling sequences: maximum deformation of the tube sheet as a function of the number of rolled tubes, residual deformation of the tube sheet along its surface, and residual deflection of the tube sheet as a function of the rotation angle at the periphery. The preferred sequence of tube rolling for minimizing the tube sheet deformation is indicated.

  18. Assessment of CCFL model of RELAP5/MOD3 against simple vertical tubes and rod bundle tests. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.; Arne, N.; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    The CCFL model used in RELAP5/MOD3 version 5m5 has been assessed against simple vertical tubes and bundle tests performed at a facility of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The effect of changes in tube diameter and nodalization of tube section were investigated. The roles of interfacial drags on the flooding characteristics are discussed. Differences between the calculation and the experiment are also discussed. A comparison between model assessment results and the test data showed that the calculated value lay well on the experimental flooding curve specified by user, but the pressure jump before onset of flooding was not calculated.

  19. Tube bundle system studies at Signal Peak Energy Bull Mountains #1 Mine.

    PubMed

    Zipf, R K; Ochsner, R; Krog, R; Marchewka, W; Valente, M; Jensen, R

    2014-03-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine for analysis and display on the surface. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), in collaboration with Signal Peak Energy (SPE), LLC, Bull Mountains No. 1 Mine, operated a TBS during mining of two bleederless, longwall panels. This paper describes the gas analysis data and its interpretation. As verified by the TBS, coal at the SPE mine tends to oxidize slowly. It was known that a reservoir of low-oxygen concentration atmosphere developed about 610 m (2,000 ft) behind the longwall face. A bleederless ventilation system facilitates formation of an inert atmosphere in this longwall gob and decreases the likelihood of spontaneous combustion. Connections of the mine atmosphere to the surface through subsidence cracks could allow airflow into the longwall gob, revive coal oxidation and increase spontaneous combustion risk. The atmospheric composition of the sealed areas was homogeneous, except in the immediate vicinity of suspected ingassing points. The TBS verified that gases within the partially sealed, bleederless longwall gob expanded into the longwall tailgate area when barometric pressure decreased. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the back return airflow at the longwall tailgate was observed to increase by a factor of three and possibly up to 10 times the typical background concentration of 0.5 to 1.0%, depending on the size of the longwall gob and the magnitude of barometric pressure decrease. TBS have the inherent disadvantage of slow response time due to travel time of the gas samples and sequential gas analyses. A TBS or similar continuous monitoring system could be beneficial in detecting and providing warning of potentially hazardous gas concentrations, if the slow response time of the system is always understood.

  20. Ensemble phase averaging equations for multiphase flows in porous media, part I: the bundle-of-tubes model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Zhang, Duan; Currier, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A bundle-of-tubes construct is used as a model system to study ensemble averaged equations for multiphase flow in a porous material. Momentum equations for the fluid phases obtained from the method are similar to Darcy's law, but with additional terms. We study properties of the additional terms, and the conditions under which the averaged equations can be approximated by the diffusion model or the extended Darcy's law as often used in models for multiphase flows in porous media. Although the bundle-of-tubes model is perhaps the simplest model for a porous material, the ensemble averaged equation technique developed in this paper assumes the very same form in more general treatments described in Part 2 of the present work (Zhang 2009). Any model equation system intended for the more general cases must be understood and tested first using simple models. The concept of ensemble phase averaging is dissected here in physical terms, without involved mathematics through its application to the idealized bundle-of-tubes model for multiphase flow in porous media.

  1. Nucleate Boiling Characteristics of R-113 in a Small Enhanced Tube Bundle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-26

    kettle reboilers and full bundle boilers. The difference is described in detail in Payvar [Ref. 5]. To summarize, in the kettle type reboiler the...Liquid levels", BuilleinJME, Vol. 10, p.3 2 8 . 5. Payvar , P., "Analysis of Performance of Full Bundle Submerged Boilers," ASME HMII , Vol. 44, pp. 11

  2. Experimental investigation of heat transfer performance coefficient in tube bundle of shell and tube heat exchanger in two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaś, Marcin; Zając, Daniel; Ulbrich, Roman

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents the results of studies in two phase gasliquid flow around tube bundle in the model of shell tube heat exchanger. Experimental investigations of heat transfer coefficient on the tubes surface were performed with the aid of electrochemical technique. Chilton-Colburn analogy between heat and mass transfer was used. Twelve nickel cathodes were mounted on the outside surface of one of the tubes. Measurement of limiting currents in the cathodic reduction of ferricyanide ions on nickel electrodes in aqueous solution of equimolar quantities of K3Fe(CN)6 and K4Fe(CN)6 in the presence of NaOH basic solution were applied to determine the mass transfer coefficient. Controlled diffusion from ions at the electrode was observed and limiting current plateau was measured. Measurements were performed with data acquisition equipment controlled by software created for this experiment. Mass transfer coefficient was calculated on the basis of the limiting current measurements. Results of mass transfer experiments (mass transfer coefficient) were recalculated to heat transfer coefficient. During the experiments, simultaneously conducted was the the investigation of two-phase flow structures around tubes with the use of digital particle image velocimetry. Average velocity fields around tubes were created with the use of a number of flow images and compared with the results of heat transfer coefficient calculations.

  3. A single flexible tube in a rigid array as a model for fluidelastic instability in tube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Ahmed; Weaver, David; Ziada, Samir

    2012-10-01

    Fluidelastic instability is considered the most critical flow induced vibration mechanism in tube and shell heat exchangers, and as such has received the most attention. The present study examines the concept of using a single flexible tube in a rigid array for predicting fluidelastic instability. The experimental work published in the open literature involving the use of a single flexible tube in a rigid array is critically reviewed. Based on this, an experiment is designed to facilitate precise control of the system parameters and to study tube response at different locations in the array. Experiments were conducted using a fully flexible array as well as a single flexible tube in the same rigid array. It is found that a single flexible tube located in the third row of a rigid parallel triangular array becomes fluidelastically unstable at essentially the same threshold as for the fully flexible array. However, when the single flexible tube is located in the first, second, fourth, or fifth rows, no instability behavior is detected. Thus, tube location inside the array significantly affects its fluidelastic stability behavior when tested as a single flexible tube in a rigid array. It is concluded that, in general, fluidelastic instability in tube arrays is caused by a combination of the damping and stiffness mechanisms. In certain cases, a single flexible tube in a rigid array will become fluidelastically unstable and provide a useful model for fundamental research and developing physical insights. However, it must be cautioned that this behavior is a special case and not generally useful for determining the stability limit of tube arrays.

  4. Detailed flow and force measurements in a rotated triangular tube bundle subjected to two-phase cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Zhang, C.; Mureithi, N. W.; Pamfil, D.

    2005-05-01

    Two-phase cross-flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers. A detailed knowledge of the characteristics of two-phase cross-flow in tube bundles is required to understand and formulate flow-induced vibration parameters such as damping, fluidelastic instability, and random excitation due to turbulence. An experimental program was undertaken with a rotated-triangular array of cylinders subjected to air/water flow to simulate two-phase mixtures. The array is made of relatively large diameter cylinders (38 mm) to allow for detailed two-phase flow measurements between cylinders. Fiber-optic probes were developed to measure local void fraction. Local flow velocities and bubble diameters or characteristic lengths of the two-phase mixture are obtained by using double probes. Both the dynamic lift and drag forces were measured with a strain gauge instrumented cylinder.

  5. Characterization of flaws in a tube bundle mock-up for reliability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Bakhtiari, S.

    1997-02-01

    As part of an assessment of in-service inspection of steam generator tubes, the authors will assemble a steam generator mock-up for round robin studies and use as a test bed in evaluating emerging technologies. Progress is reported on the characterization of flaws that will be part of the mock-up. Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques are being evaluated as a means to characterize the flaws in the mock-up tubes before final assembly. Twenty Inconel 600 tubes with laboratory-grown cracks, typical of those to be used in the mock-up, were provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for laboratory testing. After the tubes were inspected with eddy current and ultrasonic techniques, they were destructively analyzed to establish the actual depths, lengths, and profiles of the cracks. The analysis of the results will allow the best techniques to be used for characterizing the flaws in the mock-up tubes.

  6. Enhanced Condensation of R-113 on a Small Bundle of Horizontal Tubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Figure 3. Schematic diagram of condenser showing shroud .................. 19 Figure 4. Twisted tape insert and HEATEX radial mixing element...this study, increased pressure drop was not important. In this thesis, two types of mixing elements were investigated. The first was a twisted tape insert... twisted tape and HEATEX inserts. These tubes are shown in Figure 5. One point must be mentioned with regard to the finned tubes. The use of fins on

  7. Empirical models for liquid metal heat transfer in the entrance region of tubes and rod bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Wadim

    2016-10-01

    Experiments focusing on liquid metals heat transfer in pipes and rod bundles with thermally and hydraulically developing flow are reviewed. Empirical heat transfer correlations are developed for engineering applications. In the developing regions the heat transfer is in-stationary. The heat transfer at the entrance is around 100 % higher due to the developing process including the lateral exchange of energy and momentum than for developed flow. Developing flow is not physically considered in the framework of system codes, which are used for thermal-hydraulic analysis of power and process plants with a multitude of components like pipes, tanks, valves and heat exchangers. Therefore, the application to liquid metal flows is limited to developed flow, which is independent of the distance from the flow entrance. The heat transfer enhancement in developing flows is important for the optimization of components like heat exchangers and helps to reduce unnecessary conservatism. In this work, empirical models are developed to account for developing flows in pipes and rod bundles. A literature review is performed to collect available experimental data for developing flow in liquid metal heat transfer. The evaluation shows that the length for pure thermally developing pipe flow is much larger (20-30 hydraulic diameters) than for combined thermally and hydraulically developing flow (10-15 hydraulic diameters). In rod bundles, fully combined developed flow is established after 30-40 hydraulic diameters downstream of the entrance. The derived empirical models for the heat transfer enhancement in the developing regions are implemented into a best estimate system code. The validation of these models by means of post-test analyses of 16 experiments shows that they are very well able to represent the heat transfer in developing regions.

  8. Effects of Condensate Inundation and Vapor Velocity on Heat Transfer in a Condenser Tube Bundle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    meter and the tank’s recirculation valve, the flow rate to the porous tube could be controlled with reasonable accuracy. The system was used to supply... flow rate of water to the desuper- heater spray nozzles via the rotameter. 150 5. Porous Tube Water Supply System a. Once steady state conditions have... system operated at test condenser pressures of approximately 2 and 15 DD ~T 1413 EmnTOw OF, I Nov o Is S OSLITe S/N 612.814-61 9CIT CLAGNIFICATIOM OF TNIS

  9. Fluid-elastic excitation in heat exchanger tube bundles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, P.M.

    1995-07-01

    The present research is concerned with the instability of flow around a single cylinder, a normal cylinder pair, a tube row, and four-row tube arrays in cross flow. Flow visualization by dye injection technique was used to highlight the important features and structures of the flow field. A hot-film anemometer with the help of high speed data acquisition was used to perform measurements of the time-mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and vortex shedding frequency in the flow field of interest. Complex instability was observed in and behind closely-spaced tube rows and tube arrays. It was caused by the emerging jets grouping, with the flow pattern switching from one quasi-stable pattern to another one at irregular time intervals. Lock-in behavior of a single cylinder and a normal cylinder pair was also investigated. Slanted onion-shaped lock-in boundaries for a single cylinder with transverse force vibration were discovered. The lock-in behavior of a large pitch-ratio cylinder pair is similar to that of the single cylinder. For closely spaced cylinder pair, the lock-in region for even-numbered superharmonic of the shedding frequency are dominant. This phenomenon is in contrast to the single cylinder case, which has lock-in for odd-number superharmonic.

  10. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  11. Nucleate Pool Boiling of R-114/Oil Mixtures in a Small Enhanced Tube Bundle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    for public release; distribution is unlimited. 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) S. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) 6a. NAME OF... PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION Naval Postgraduate School (If applicable) Naval Postgraduate School 69 6c...Experimentation 37 Figure 12. Performance of Test One For Preliminary Experiments 59 Figure 13. Performance of Test One at Various Tube Positions for

  12. Staggered eigenvalue mimicry

    SciTech Connect

    Duerr, Stephan; Hoelbling, Christian; Wenger, Urs

    2004-11-01

    We study the infrared part of the spectrum for UV-filtered staggered Dirac operators and compare them to the overlap counterpart. With sufficient filtering and at small enough lattice spacing the staggered spectra manage to 'mimic' the overlap version. They show a 4-fold near degeneracy, and a clear separation between would-be zero modes and nonzero modes. This suggests an approximate index theorem for filtered staggered fermions and a correct sensitivity to the topology of QCD. Moreover, it supports square-rooting the staggered determinant to obtain dynamical ensembles with N{sub f}=2.

  13. Comparison of thermal and hydraulic performances of eccentric and concentric annular-fins of heat exchanger tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmachiche, Abdelmoumène Hakim; Tahrour, Farouk; Aissaoui, Faris; Aksas, Mounir; Bougriou, Cherif

    2017-02-01

    The present study is an experimental and 3-D computational fluid dynamics. It is used to compare between the heat transfer characteristics and pressure drops of eccentric and concentric annular-finned tube bundles. The RNG k-ɛ turbulence model of fluent is used to determine the optimum tube position in the circular fin that gives the highest thermal and hydraulic performances for both staggered and aligned arrangements. Then, experiments and numerical simulations were performed to examine the effects of bundle configurations, the Reynolds number (ranging from 5500 to 29,700) and the tube location inside the heat exchangers. A satisfactory qualitative and quantitative agreement was obtained between the numerical and experimental results. For both aligned and staggered heat exchangers, the thermal characteristics of the eccentric annular-finned tube are greater than that of the concentric ones. This gain is associated with reduction in pressure drop.

  14. GMDH-type neural network modeling and genetic algorithm-based multi-objective optimization of thermal and friction characteristics in heat exchanger tubes with wire-rod bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Masoud; Beigzadeh, Reza; Parvizi, Mehdi; Eiamsa-ard, Smith

    2016-08-01

    The group method of data handling (GMDH) technique was used to predict heat transfer and friction characteristics in heat exchanger tubes equipped with wire-rod bundles. Nusselt number and friction factor were determined as functions of wire-rod bundle geometric parameters and Reynolds number. The performance of the developed GMDH-type neural networks was found to be superior in comparison with the proposed empirical correlations. For optimization, the genetic algorithm-based multi-objective optimization was applied.

  15. Enhanced shell-and-tube heat eschangers for the power and process industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bergles, A.E.; Jensen, M.K.; Somerscales, E.F.; Curcio, L.A. Jr.; Trewin, R.R.

    1994-08-01

    Single-tube pool boiling tests were performed with saturated pure refrigerants and binary mixtures of refrigerants. Generally, with pure refrigerants, the High Flux surface performed better at the higher heat fluxes compared to the Turbo-B tube, and both enhanced surfaces performed significantly better than smooth surface. In tests of R-11/R-113 mixtures, the enhanced surfaces had much less degradation in heat transfer coefficient due to mixture effects compared to smooth tubes; the largest degradation occurred at a mixture of 25% R-11/75% R-113. Under boiling in saturated aqueous solution of calcium sulfate, with a single tube, effects of fouling were more pronounced at the higher heat fluxes for all surfaces. Two staggered tube bundles were tested with tube pitch-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.50. For the pure refrigerant, tests on the smooth-tube bundle indicated that the effects on the heat transfer coefficient of varying mass flux, quality, and tube-bundle geometry were small, except at low heat fluxes. Neither enhanced surface showed any effect with changing mass flux or quality. The binary mixture bundle-boiling tests had results that were very similar to those obtained with the pure refrigerants. When boiling a refrigerant-oil mixture, all three surfaces (smooth, High Flux, and Turbo-B) experienced a degradation in its heat transfer coefficient; no surface studied was found to be immune or vulnerable to the presence of oil than another surface.

  16. Staggered Costas signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Avraham; Levanon, Nadav

    1986-11-01

    A radar signal, based on coherent processing of a train of staggered Costas (1984) bursts is based on a minimum number of collocation of their individual ambiguity function sidelobe peaks. The resulting ambiguity function combines qualities of both 'thumbtack' and 'bed of nails' signals. Comparison with linear-FM, V-FM, and complementary phase coded signals is given, as well as comparison with hybrid signals consisting of both phase and frequency coding.

  17. Staggered chiral random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, James C.

    2011-02-01

    We present a random matrix theory for the staggered lattice QCD Dirac operator. The staggered random matrix theory is equivalent to the zero-momentum limit of the staggered chiral Lagrangian and includes all taste breaking terms at their leading order. This is an extension of previous work which only included some of the taste breaking terms. We will also present some results for the taste breaking contributions to the partition function and the Dirac eigenvalues.

  18. Test results for the APL/JHU folded-tube aluminum condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfini, P. P.; Dugger, G. L.; Funk, J. A.

    1981-12-01

    A 1.1-MWt heat exchanger modeling a concept proposed for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plants has been tested as a condenser and performance has exceeded predictions. The overall heat transfer coefficient at design conditions was measured near 2900 W/sq m-K, varied with water flow rate, but was nearly independent of ammonia flow rate. The unit tested comprises three full-diameter (76-mm), full-length (183-m), folded aluminum tubes operated in parallel in a staggered (by vertical offset) configuration. Water flowed downward by gravity over the tube bundle at 0.4-1.2 m/s; two-phase ammonia flowed downward inside the tubes at 0.22-1.00 kg/s per tube. The experimental results are discussed in terms of stratified and annular flow regimes. The stratified model is found to produce better agreement with the measurement in the range of conditions of greatest interest of OTEC applications.

  19. Staggered quantum walks with Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portugal, R.; de Oliveira, M. C.; Moqadam, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum walks are recognizably useful for the development of new quantum algorithms, as well as for the investigation of several physical phenomena in quantum systems. Actual implementations of quantum walks face technological difficulties similar to the ones for quantum computers, though. Therefore, there is a strong motivation to develop new quantum-walk models which might be easier to implement. In this work we present an extension of the staggered quantum walk model that is fitted for physical implementations in terms of time-independent Hamiltonians. We demonstrate that this class of quantum walk includes the entire class of staggered quantum walk model, Szegedy's model, and an important subset of the coined model.

  20. Taste changing in staggered quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Quentin Mason et al.

    2004-01-05

    The authors present results from a systematic perturbative investigation of taste-changing in improved staggered quarks. They show one-loop taste-changing interactions can be removed perturbatively by an effective four-quark term and calculate the necessary coefficients.

  1. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  2. On staggered indecomposable Virasoro modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytölä, Kalle; Ridout, David

    2009-12-01

    In this article, certain indecomposable Virasoro modules are studied. Specifically, the Virasoro mode L0 is assumed to be nondiagonalizable, possessing Jordan blocks of rank 2. Moreover, the module is further assumed to have a highest weight submodule, the "left module," and that the quotient by this submodule yields another highest weight module, the "right module." Such modules, which have been called staggered, have appeared repeatedly in the logarithmic conformal field theory literature, but their theory has not been explored in full generality. Here, such a theory is developed for the Virasoro algebra using rather elementary techniques. The focus centers on two different but related questions typically encountered in practical studies: How can one identify a given staggered module, and how can one demonstrate the existence of a proposed staggered module. Given just the values of the highest weights of the left and right modules, themselves subject to simple necessary conditions, invariants are defined which together with the knowledge of the left and right modules uniquely identify a staggered module. The possible values of these invariants form a vector space of dimension 0, 1, or 2, and the structures of the left and right modules limit the isomorphism classes of the corresponding staggered modules to an affine subspace (possibly empty). The number of invariants and affine restrictions is purely determined by the structures of the left and right modules. Moreover, in order to facilitate applications, the expressions for the invariants and restrictions are given by formulas as explicit as possible (they generally rely on expressions for Virasoro singular vectors). Finally, the text is liberally peppered throughout with examples illustrating the general concepts. These have been carefully chosen for their physical relevance or for the novel features they exhibit.

  3. Bundled monocapillary optics

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    A plurality of glass or metal wires are precisely etched to form the desired shape of the individual channels of the final polycapillary optic. This shape is created by carefully controlling the withdrawal speed of a group of wires from an etchant bath. The etched wires undergo a subsequent operation to create an extremely smooth surface. This surface is coated with a layer of material which is selected to maximize the reflectivity of the radiation being used. This reflective surface may be a single layer of material, or a multilayer coating for optimizing the reflectivity in a narrower wavelength interval. The collection of individual wires is assembled into a close-packed multi-wire bundle, and the wires are bonded together in a manner which preserves the close-pack configuration, irrespective of the local wire diameter. The initial wires are then removed by either a chemical etching procedure or mechanical force. In the case of chemical etching, the bundle is generally segmented by cutting a series of etching slots. Prior to removing the wire, the capillary array is typically bonded to a support substrate. The result of the process is a bundle of precisely oriented radiation-reflecting hollow channels. The capillary optic is used for efficiently collecting and redirecting the radiation from a source of radiation which could be the anode of an x-ray tube, a plasma source, the fluorescent radiation from an electron microprobe, a synchrotron radiation source, a reactor or spallation source of neutrons, or some other source.

  4. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; DePoy, D.

    1998-06-30

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell. 8 figs.

  5. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ashcroft, John; Campbell, Brian; DePoy, David

    1998-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  6. Fuel bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, C.K.

    1989-04-04

    This patent describes a method of forming a fuel bundle of a nuclear reactor. The method consists of positioning the fuel rods in the bottom plate, positioning the tie rod in the bottom plate with the key passed through the receptacle to the underside of the bottom plate and, after the tie rod is so positioned, turning the tie rod so that the key is in engagement with the underside of the bottom plate. Thereafter mounting the top plate is mounted in engagement with the fuel rods with the upper end of the tie rod extending through the opening in the top plate and extending above the top plate, and the tie rod is secured to the upper side of sid top plate thus simultaneously securing the key to the underside of the bottom plate.

  7. Substantial reduction of the heat losses to ambient air by natural convection from horizontal in-tube flows: impact of an axial bundle of passive baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, A.; Cortés, C.

    This paper is concerned with a distinct and effective technique to insulate horizontal tubes carrying hot fluids without using the variety of insulating materials traditionally utilized in industry. The tubes transport hot fluids and are exposed to a natural convection environment of air at standard atmospheric temperature and pressure. Essentially, an ``equivalent quantity of insulation'' is provided by an envelope of straight symmetric baffles made from a low conductivity material that is affixed to the outer surface of the horizontal tubes. A simple 1-D lumped model of comparable precision to the customary 2-D differential model serves to regulate the thermal interaction between the two perpendicular fluid streams, one horizontal due to internal forced convection and the other vertical due to external natural convection in air. All computations are algebraic and lead to a rapid determination of the two quantities that are indispensable to design engineers: the mean bulk temperatures of the internal hot fluid moving either laminarly or turbulently, together with the degraded levels of heat transfer rates.

  8. Possible Aoki phase for staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Wang Qinghai

    2004-12-01

    The phase diagram for staggered fermions is discussed in the context of the staggered chiral Lagrangian, extending previous work on the subject. When the discretization errors are significant, there may be an Aoki-like phase for staggered fermions, where the remnant SO(4) taste-symmetry is broken down to SO(3). We solve explicitly for the mass spectrum in the 3-flavor degenerate mass case and discuss qualitatively the 2+1-flavor case. From numerical results we find that current simulations are outside the staggered-Aoki phase. As for near-future simulations with more-improved versions of the staggered action, it seems unlikely that these will be in the Aoki phase for any realistic value of the quark mass, although the evidence is not conclusive.

  9. Reflooding of tight lattice bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Veteau, J.M.; Digonnet, A.; Deruaz, R. . Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble)

    1994-07-01

    Results regarding analytical bottom reflooding experiments in a 37- and a 127-heater rod bundle are presented for two different tight lattices. A comparison between these two geometries and with the standard pressurized water reactor (PWR) array shows a degradation of cooling efficiency when the cross section of the subchannels is decreased. The core heat sinks (guide thimbles and water tubes'') are seen to have a noticeable influence on the overall cooling of the bundle, and it is confirmed that a combined top/bottom injection does not significantly improve cooling efficiency. Calculations with CATHARE 1.3 code adjusted for the standard PWR array are presented (zero heat sinks), but results have to be confirmed over a wider range of parameters.

  10. Staggered heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2008-03-01

    Although taste violations significantly affect the results of staggered calculations of pseudoscalar and heavy-light mesonic quantities, those entering staggered calculations of baryonic quantities have not been quantified. Here I develop staggered chiral perturbation theory in the light-quark baryon sector by mapping the Symanzik action into heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. For 2+1 dynamical quark flavors, the masses of flavor-symmetric nucleons are calculated to third order in partially quenched and fully dynamical staggered chiral perturbation theory. To this order the expansion includes the leading chiral logarithms, which come from loops with virtual decuplet-like states, as well as terms of O(m{sub {pi}}{sup 3}), which come from loops with virtual octet-like states. Taste violations enter through the meson propagators in loops and tree-level terms of O(a{sup 2}). The pattern of taste symmetry breaking and the resulting degeneracies and mixings are discussed in detail. The resulting chiral forms are appropriate to lattice results obtained with operators already in use and could be used to study the restoration of taste symmetry in the continuum limit. I assume that the fourth root of the fermion determinant can be incorporated in staggered chiral perturbation theory using the replica method.

  11. Implementing sepsis bundles

    PubMed Central

    Jozwiak, Mathieu; Monnet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis bundles represent key elements of care regarding the diagnosis and treatment of patients with septic shock and allow ones to convert complex guidelines into meaningful changes in behavior. Sepsis bundles endorsed the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) and their implementation resulted in an improved outcome of septic shock patients. They induced more consistent and timely application of evidence-based care and reduced practice variability. These benefits mainly depend on the compliance with sepsis bundles, highlighting the importance of dedicated performance improvement initiatives, such as multifaceted educational programs. Nevertheless, the interest of early goal directed therapy in septic shock patients compared to usual care has recently been questioned, leading to an update of sepsis bundles in 2015. These new sepsis bundles may also exhibit, as the previous bundles, some limits and pitfalls and the effects of their implementation still needs to be evaluated. PMID:27713890

  12. Condensation of Refrigerants on Small Tube Bundles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    either the heat flux or temperature rise of the coolant, and the X -Y plot generated from the modified Wilson Plot results. 2. Modified Wilson Plot The...34p2. g ’Ah /r "Do ’Q"]1 / 3 (4.14) Hence, 3.2. Q/3 (4.15) 38 X and Y values are calculated from raw data and the data are fit with a least squares...iLA5 PINT USING ŚX.".2 PLOTT’NG HRAT US N". 10EI PRINT USING " X , ŗ PLOTTING WILSON’. 10ES PRIN- USING 𔄂X,"Ř PURGE cILES.""" I07 PRIN’ USING ŚX8

  13. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder.

  14. Scalar meson spectroscopy with lattice staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; DeTar, Carleton; Fu Ziwen; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2007-11-01

    With sufficiently light up and down quarks the isovector (a{sub 0}) and isosinglet (f{sub 0}) scalar meson propagators are dominated at large distance by two-meson states. In the staggered-fermion formulation of lattice quantum chromodynamics, taste-symmetry breaking causes a proliferation of two-meson states that further complicates the analysis of these channels. Many of them are unphysical artifacts of the lattice approximation. They are expected to disappear in the continuum limit. The staggered-fermion fourth-root procedure has its purported counterpart in rooted staggered chiral perturbation theory (rS{chi}PT). Fortunately, the rooted theory provides a strict framework that permits the analysis of scalar meson correlators in terms of only a small number of low-energy couplings. Thus the analysis of the point-to-point scalar meson correlators in this context gives a useful consistency check of the fourth-root procedure and its proposed chiral realization. Through numerical simulation we have measured correlators for both the a{sub 0} and f{sub 0} channels in the 'Asqtad' improved staggered-fermion formulation in a lattice ensemble with lattice spacing a=0.12 fm. We analyze those correlators in the context of rS{chi}PT and obtain values of the low-energy chiral couplings that are reasonably consistent with previous determinations.

  15. Investigation of deformation mechanisms of staggered nanocomposites using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiazhagan, S.; Anup, S.

    2016-08-01

    Biological materials with nanostructure of regularly or stair-wise staggered arrangements of hard platelets reinforced in a soft protein matrix have superior mechanical properties. Applications of these nanostructures to ceramic matrix composites could enhance their toughness. Using molecular dynamics simulations, mechanical behaviour of the bio-inspired nanocomposites is studied. Regularly staggered model shows better flow behaviour compared to stair-wise staggered model due to the symmetrical crack propagation along the interface. Though higher stiffness and strength are obtained for stair-wise staggered models, rapid crack propagation reduces the toughness. Arresting this crack propagation could lead to superior mechanical properties in stair-wise staggered models.

  16. Fan Stagger Angle for Dirt Rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Rose, Becky E. (Inventor); Brilliant, Lisa I. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, a propulsor coupled to be rotated about an axis by the turbine through the spool, and a gear assembly coupled between the propulsor and the spool such that rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extend from the hub. Each of the propulsor blades has a span between a root at the hub and a tip, and a chord between a leading edge and a trailing edge. The chord forms a stagger angle alpha with the axis, and the stagger angle alpha is less than 15 deg. at a position along the propulsor blade that is within an inboard 20% of the span.

  17. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  18. Numerical simulation of conjugate heat transfer in a tube bank of a subsea cooler based on buoyancy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, N.; Ris, V.; Tschur, N.; Zasimova, M.

    2016-09-01

    The contribution deals with a model of passive heat exchanger based on the buoyancy effects aimed at subsea processing of natural gas produced. 3D unsteady external buoyancy-induced seawater flow through a staggered tube bundle at Gr = 3 × 105 was simulated using the full Navier-Stokes equations with no turbulence model in combination with the unsteady RANS modelling of internal natural gas flow at Re = 8×105 and simulation of heat conduction through the steel pipe wall. Evolution of internal and external flow and temperature fields as well as variations in the heat output from row to row are predicted. It was found that the conjugate problem formulation resulted in dramatic changes in draft flow characteristics and external heat transfer coefficient values as compared with the simplified formulation based on the isothermal pipe wall assumption.

  19. Electron diffraction and microscopy of single-wall carbon nanotube bundles produced by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, J.-F.; Henrard, L.; Lambin, Ph.; van Tendeloo, G.

    2002-05-01

    The atomic structure of single-wall carbon nanotube bundles produced by three different techniques (laser ablation, electric arc discharge and catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD)) has been characterized by electron diffraction and microscopy. Information on the helicity and the lattice packing has been obtained. Concerning the helicity, small bundles produced by CCVD exhibit only one or two tube helicities within a single bundle. The diffraction patterns of laser-ablation produced bundles also present well-defined but more diversified chiralities within a single bundle. By contrast the data acquired on bundles formed by arc discharge show a more diffuse pattern, characteristic of a random chirality dispersion within a single bundle. Concerning the lattice packing, informations are obtained via a detailed study of the equatorial line of the diffraction pattern for bundles produced by the three techniques. This electron diffraction study is completed by high-resolution electron microscopy.

  20. Manual tube-to-tubesheet welding torch

    DOEpatents

    Kiefer, Joseph H.; Smith, Danny J.

    1982-01-01

    A welding torch made of a high temperature plastic which fits over a tube intermediate the ends thereof for welding the juncture between the tube and the back side of a tube plate and has a ballooned end in which an electrode, filler wire guide, fiber optic bundle, and blanketing gas duct are disposed.

  1. Thermal Protection System with Staggered Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Xavier D. (Inventor); Robinson, Michael J. (Inventor); Andrews, Thomas L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The thermal protection system disclosed herein is suitable for use with a spacecraft such as a reentry module or vehicle, where the spacecraft has a convex surface to be protected. An embodiment of the thermal protection system includes a plurality of heat resistant panels, each having an outer surface configured for exposure to atmosphere, an inner surface opposite the outer surface and configured for attachment to the convex surface of the spacecraft, and a joint edge defined between the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint edges of adjacent ones of the heat resistant panels are configured to mate with each other to form staggered joints that run between the peak of the convex surface and the base section of the convex surface.

  2. Power module assemblies with staggered coolant channels

    DOEpatents

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-16

    A manifold is provided for supporting a power module assembly with a plurality of power modules. The manifold includes a first manifold section. The first face of the first manifold section is configured to receive the first power module, and the second face of the first manifold section defines a first cavity with a first baseplate thermally coupled to the first power module. The first face of the second manifold section is configured to receive the second power module, and the second face of the second manifold section defines a second cavity with a second baseplate thermally coupled to the second power module. The second face of the first manifold section and the second face of the second manifold section are coupled together such that the first cavity and the second cavity form a coolant channel. The first cavity is at least partially staggered with respect to second cavity.

  3. Penguin diagrams for improved staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Weonjong

    2005-01-01

    We calculate, at the one-loop level, penguin diagrams for improved staggered fermion operators constructed using various fat links. The main result is that diagonal mixing coefficients with penguin operators are identical between the unimproved operators and the improved operators using such fat links as Fat7, Fat7+Lepage, Fat7, HYP (I) and HYP (II). In addition, it turns out that the off-diagonal mixing vanishes for those constructed using fat links of Fat7, Fat7 and HYP (II). This is a consequence of the fact that the improvement by various fat links changes only the mixing with higher dimension operators and off-diagonal operators. The results of this paper, combined with those for current-current diagrams, provide complete matching at the one-loop level with all corrections of O(g{sup 2}) included.

  4. Effect of tube pitch on heat transfer in shell-and-tube heat exchangers—new simulation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karno, A.; Ajib, S.

    2006-02-01

    A new program for simulation and optimization of the shell-and-tube heat exchangers is prepared to obtain useful results by employment of the computing technology fast and accurately. As an application of this program, the effects of transverse and longitudinal tube pitch in the in-line and staggered tube arrangements on the Nusselt numbers, heat transfer coefficients and thermal performance of the heat exchangers were investigated. The obtained values of the tube pitch were compared with literature values.

  5. Investigating the influences of two position (non-staggered and staggered) of wind turbine arrays to produce power in a wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Kamal, Samsul; Purnomo, Sarjiya

    2016-06-01

    This investigation was conducted to identify the influences of the two positions (non-staggered and staggered) of wind turbine arrays. Identification on down-scaled size wind turbine arrays was carried out in an open circuit, suction-type wind tunnel. Based on the results of the experiment, empirical relations for the centreline velocity deficit, tipline velocity deficit and wake radius are proposed. The non-staggered position results are larger power generated than that of the staggered position, this influenced by the trend deficit in velocity that makes wind turbine generated power difference between staggered position and non-stagger position. The area used non-staggered position larger than staggered position. Result staggered position has become one of the solutions to harness wind farms confined areas.

  6. Optimal Designs of Staggered Dean Vortex Micromixers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Chen, Chun Huei; Shie, Shian Ruei

    2011-01-01

    A novel parallel laminar micromixer with a two-dimensional staggered Dean Vortex micromixer is optimized and fabricated in our study. Dean vortices induced by centrifugal forces in curved rectangular channels cause fluids to produce secondary flows. The split-and-recombination (SAR) structures of the flow channels and the impinging effects result in the reduction of the diffusion distance of two fluids. Three different designs of a curved channel micromixer are introduced to evaluate the mixing performance of the designed micromixer. Mixing performances are demonstrated by means of a pH indicator using an optical microscope and fluorescent particles via a confocal microscope at different flow rates corresponding to Reynolds numbers (Re) ranging from 0.5 to 50. The comparison between the experimental data and numerical results shows a very reasonable agreement. At a Re of 50, the mixing length at the sixth segment, corresponding to the downstream distance of 21.0 mm, can be achieved in a distance 4 times shorter than when the Re equals 1. An optimization of this micromixer is performed with two geometric parameters. These are the angle between the lines from the center to two intersections of two consecutive curved channels, θ, and the angle between two lines of the centers of three consecutive curved channels, ϕ. It can be found that the maximal mixing index is related to the maximal value of the sum of θ and ϕ, which is equal to 139.82°. PMID:21747691

  7. Efficiency and optimal allocation in the staggered entry design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    The staggered entry design for survival analysis specifies that r left-truncated samples are to be used in estimation of a population survival function. The ith sample is taken at time Bi, from the subpopulation of individuals having survival time exceeding Bi. This paper investigates the performance of the staggered entry design relative to the usual design in which all samples have a common time origin. The staggered entry design is shown to be an attractive alternative, even when not necessitated by logistical constraints. The staggered entry design allows for increased precision in estimation of the right tail of the survival function, especially when some of the data may be censored. A trade-off between the range of values for which the increased precision occurs and the magnitude of the increased precision is demonstrated.

  8. Structural insight for chain selection and stagger control in collagen

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Sergei P.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    Collagen plays a fundamental role in all known metazoans. In collagens three polypeptides form a unique triple-helical structure with a one-residue stagger to fit every third glycine residue in the inner core without disturbing the poly-proline type II helical conformation of each chain. There are homo- and hetero-trimeric types of collagen consisting of one, two or three distinct chains. Thus there must be mechanisms that control composition and stagger during collagen folding. Here, we uncover the structural basis for both chain selection and stagger formation of a collagen molecule. Three distinct chains (α1, α2 and α3) of the non-collagenous domain 2 (NC2) of type IX collagen are assembled to guide triple-helical sequences in the leading, middle and trailing positions. This unique domain opens the door for generating any fragment of collagen in its native composition and stagger. PMID:27897211

  9. Topological susceptibility in staggered fermion chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Billeter, Brian; DeTar, Carleton; Osborn, James

    2004-10-01

    The topological susceptibility of the vacuum in quantum chromodynamics has been simulated numerically using the Asqtad improved staggered fermion formalism. At nonzero lattice spacing, the residual fermion doublers (fermion tastes) in the staggered fermion formalism give contributions to the susceptibility that deviate from conventional continuum chiral perturbation theory. In this brief report, we estimate the taste-breaking artifact and compare it with results of recent simulations, finding that it accounts for roughly half of the scaling violation.

  10. A staggered-grid convolutional differentiator for elastic wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Zhou, Binzhong; Fu, Li-Yun

    2015-11-01

    The computation of derivatives in governing partial differential equations is one of the most investigated subjects in the numerical simulation of physical wave propagation. An analytical staggered-grid convolutional differentiator (CD) for first-order velocity-stress elastic wave equations is derived in this paper by inverse Fourier transformation of the band-limited spectrum of a first derivative operator. A taper window function is used to truncate the infinite staggered-grid CD stencil. The truncated CD operator is almost as accurate as the analytical solution, and as efficient as the finite-difference (FD) method. The selection of window functions will influence the accuracy of the CD operator in wave simulation. We search for the optimal Gaussian windows for different order CDs by minimizing the spectral error of the derivative and comparing the windows with the normal Hanning window function for tapering the CD operators. It is found that the optimal Gaussian window appears to be similar to the Hanning window function for tapering the same CD operator. We investigate the accuracy of the windowed CD operator and the staggered-grid FD method with different orders. Compared to the conventional staggered-grid FD method, a short staggered-grid CD operator achieves an accuracy equivalent to that of a long FD operator, with lower computational costs. For example, an 8th order staggered-grid CD operator can achieve the same accuracy of a 16th order staggered-grid FD algorithm but with half of the computational resources and time required. Numerical examples from a homogeneous model and a crustal waveguide model are used to illustrate the superiority of the CD operators over the conventional staggered-grid FD operators for the simulation of wave propagations.

  11. Bundling of bacterial flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas R.; van Parys, Annemarie J.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2002-03-01

    In bacterial chemotaxis, cells such as E. coli drift up chemical gradients by means of a directed random walk. Near the beginning of each step of a walk, the rotating helical flagella which propel the cell form a bundle. Using macroscopic experiments and numerical calculations, we study the viscous flows set up by two rotating helices. Our work illustrates the importance of geometry; for example, left-handed helices rotating counter-clockwise when viewed from the distal ends will inter-penetrate and synchronize when the pitch is shorter than the circumference. When the same helices turn clockwise, they fail to inter-penetrate.

  12. Effective field theories for QCD with rooted staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2008-04-01

    Even highly improved variants of lattice QCD with staggered fermions show significant violations of taste symmetry at currently accessible lattice spacings. In addition, the 'rooting trick' is used in order to simulate with the correct number of light sea quarks, and this makes the lattice theory nonlocal, even though there is good reason to believe that the continuum limit is in the correct universality class. In order to understand scaling violations, it is thus necessary to extend the construction of the Symanzik effective theory to include rooted staggered fermions. We show how this can be done, starting from a generalization of the renormalization-group approach to rooted staggered fermions recently developed by one of us. We then explain how the chiral effective theory follows from the Symanzik action, and show that it leads to 'rooted' staggered chiral perturbation theory as the correct chiral theory for QCD with rooted staggered fermions. We thus establish a direct link between the renormalization-group based arguments for the correctness of the continuum limit and the success of rooted staggered chiral perturbation theory in fitting numerical results obtained with the rooting trick. In order to develop our argument, we need to assume the existence of a standard partially-quenched chiral effective theory for any local partially-quenched theory. Other technical, but standard, assumptions are also required.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation on liquid flow and mass transport in a bioreactor with cylinder bundle for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qiang; Yang, Yan-Xia; Zhu, Xun; Wang, Hong; Ding, Yu-Dong

    2015-06-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method is adopted to simulate hydrodynamics and mass transfer accompanying with biochemical reaction in a channel with cylinder bundle, which is the scenario of biohydrogen production by photosynthetic bacteria in the biofilm attached on the surface of cylinder bundle in photobioreactor. The effects of cylinder spacing, Reynolds number and cylinder arrangement are investigated. The numerical results reveal that highest glucose concentration and the lowest hydrogen concentration are obtained at the front of the first row cylinders for all cases. The staggered arrangement leads to an increment in average drag coefficient, Sherwood number and consumption efficiency of substrate under a given condition, and the increment in Sherwood number reaches up to 30 %, while that in drag coefficient is around 1 %, moreover, the increment in consumption efficiency reaches the maximum value of 12 %. The results indicate that the staggered arrangement is beneficial to the mass transfer and biochemical reaction.

  14. Staggered chiral perturbation theory and the fourth-root trick

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, C.

    2006-06-01

    Staggered chiral perturbation theory (S{chi}PT) takes into account the 'fourth-root trick' for reducing unwanted (taste) degrees of freedom with staggered quarks by multiplying the contribution of each sea quark loop by a factor of 1/4. In the special case of four staggered fields (four flavors, n{sub F}=4), I show here that certain assumptions about analyticity and phase structure imply the validity of this procedure for representing the rooting trick in the chiral sector. I start from the observation that, when the four flavors are degenerate, the fourth root simply reduces n{sub F}=4 to n{sub F}=1. One can then treat nondegenerate quark masses by expanding around the degenerate limit. With additional assumptions on decoupling, the result can be extended to the more interesting cases of n{sub F}=3, 2, or 1. An apparent paradox associated with the one-flavor case is resolved. Coupled with some expected features of unrooted staggered quarks in the continuum limit, in particular, the restoration of taste symmetry, S{chi}PT then implies that the fourth-root trick induces no problems (for example, a violation of unitarity that persists in the continuum limit) in the lowest energy sector of staggered lattice QCD. It also says that the theory with staggered valence quarks and rooted staggered sea quarks behaves like a simple, partially-quenched theory, not like a mixed theory in which sea and valence quarks have different lattice actions. In most cases, the assumptions made in this paper are not only sufficient but also necessary for the validity of S{chi}PT, so that a variety of possible new routes for testing this validity are opened.

  15. Repairing Hidden Cracks in Coolant Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. C., Sr.; Duesberg, J.

    1984-01-01

    Repair technique closes leaks in tubes or conduits where access limited to wall opposite crack. Technique applicable to any tubular assembly where tubes bundled together or bonded to supporting shell, such as in heat exchangers. Procedure provides structural support to area failed and uninterrupted flow without significantly altering heat-transfer profile.

  16. Bundle Security Protocol for ION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Birrane, Edward J.; Krupiarz, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This software implements bundle authentication, conforming to the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Internet Draft on Bundle Security Protocol (BSP), for the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) implementation of DTN. This is the only implementation of BSP that is integrated with ION.

  17. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1999-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 degree C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire (2) bundle of 15 or more wires (3) 70 C environment (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  18. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire; (2) bundle of 15 or more wires; (3) 70 C environment: and (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  19. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: 3.7 amps per wire, bundle of 15 or more wires, 70 C environment, and vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  20. Fiber bundle phase conjugate mirror

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Benjamin G.

    2012-05-01

    An improved method and apparatus for passively conjugating the phases of a distorted wavefronts resulting from optical phase mismatch between elements of a fiber laser array are disclosed. A method for passively conjugating a distorted wavefront comprises the steps of: multiplexing a plurality of probe fibers and a bundle pump fiber in a fiber bundle array; passing the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle array through a collimating lens and into one portion of a non-linear medium; passing the output from a pump collection fiber through a focusing lens and into another portion of the non-linear medium so that the output from the pump collection fiber mixes with the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle; adjusting one or more degrees of freedom of one or more of the fiber bundle array, the collimating lens, the focusing lens, the non-linear medium, or the pump collection fiber to produce a standing wave in the non-linear medium.

  1. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  2. Thermal conversion of bundled carbon nanotubes into graphitic ribbons.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, H R; Kim, U J; Kim, J P; Eklund, P C

    2005-11-01

    High temperature heat treatment (HTT) of bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in vacuum ( approximately 10(-5) Torr) has been found to lead to the formation of two types of graphitic nanoribbons (GNRs), as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Purified SWNT bundles were first found to follow two evolutionary steps, as reported previously, that is, tube coalescence (HTT approximately 1400 degrees C) and then massive bond rearrangement (HTT approximately 1600 degrees C), leading to the formation of bundled multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) with 3-12 shells. At HTT > 1800 degrees C, we find that these MWNTs collapse into multishell GNRs. The first type of GNR we observed is driven by the collapse of diameter-doubled single-wall nanotubes, and their production is terminated at HTT approximately 1600 degrees C when the MWNTs also start to form. We propose that the collapse is driven by van der Waals forces between adjacent tubes in the same bundle. For HTT > 2000 degrees C, the heat-treated material is found to be almost completely in the multishell GNR form.

  3. Staggered fermions, zero modes, and flavor-singlet mesons

    DOE PAGES

    Donald, Gordon C; Davies, Christine T.H.; Follana, Eduardo; ...

    2011-09-12

    We examine the taste structure of eigenvectors of the staggered-fermion Dirac operator. We derive a set of conditions on the eigenvectors of modes with small eigenvalues (near-zero modes), such that staggered fermions reproduce the 't Hooft vertex in the continuum limit. We also show that, assuming these conditions, the correlators of flavor-singlet mesons are free of contributions singular in 1/m, where m is the quark mass. This conclusion holds also when a single flavor of sea quark is represented by the fourth root of the staggered-fermion determinant. We then test numerically, using the HISQ action, whether these conditions hold onmore » realistic lattice gauge fields. We find that the needed structure does indeed emerge.« less

  4. Staggered chiral perturbation theory in the two-flavor case

    SciTech Connect

    Du Xining

    2010-07-01

    I study two-flavor staggered chiral perturbation theory in the light pseudoscalar sector. The pion mass and decay constant are calculated through next-to-leading order in the partially-quenched case. In the limit where the strange quark mass is large compared to the light quark masses and the taste splittings, I show that the SU(2) staggered chiral theory emerges from the SU(3) staggered chiral theory, as expected. Explicit relations between SU(2) and SU(3) low energy constants and taste-violating parameters are given. The results are useful for SU(2) chiral fits to asqtad data and allow one to incorporate effects from varying strange quark masses.

  5. Staggered fermions, zero modes, and flavor-singlet mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, Gordon C; Davies, Christine T.H.; Follana, Eduardo; Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2011-09-12

    We examine the taste structure of eigenvectors of the staggered-fermion Dirac operator. We derive a set of conditions on the eigenvectors of modes with small eigenvalues (near-zero modes), such that staggered fermions reproduce the 't Hooft vertex in the continuum limit. We also show that, assuming these conditions, the correlators of flavor-singlet mesons are free of contributions singular in 1/m, where m is the quark mass. This conclusion holds also when a single flavor of sea quark is represented by the fourth root of the staggered-fermion determinant. We then test numerically, using the HISQ action, whether these conditions hold on realistic lattice gauge fields. We find that the needed structure does indeed emerge.

  6. Effect of Stagger on the Vibroacoustic Loads from Clustered Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojo, Raymundo; Tinney, Charles E.; Ruf, Joseph H.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of stagger startup on the vibro-acoustic loads that form during the end- effects-regime of clustered rockets is studied using both full-scale (hot-gas) and laboratory scale (cold gas) data. Both configurations comprise three nozzles with thrust optimized parabolic contours that undergo free shock separated flow and restricted shock separated flow as well as an end-effects regime prior to flowing full. Acoustic pressure waveforms recorded at the base of the nozzle clusters are analyzed using various statistical metrics as well as time-frequency analysis. The findings reveal a significant reduction in end- effects-regime loads when engine ignition is staggered. However, regardless of stagger, both the skewness and kurtosis of the acoustic pressure time derivative elevate to the same levels during the end-effects-regime event thereby demonstrating the intermittence and impulsiveness of the acoustic waveforms that form during engine startup.

  7. B_K in unquenched QCD using improved staggered fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongjeong

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results for BK calculated using improved staggered fermions with a mixed action (HYP-smeared staggered valence quarks and AsqTad staggered sea quarks). We investigate £¡ ¢ a2¤ effect due to non- the effect of non-degenerate quarks on BK and attempt to estimate the Goldstone pions in loops. We fit the data to continuum partially quenched chiral perturbation theory. We find that the quality of fit for BK improves if we include non-degenerate quark mass combinations. We also observe, however, that the fitting curve deviates from the data points in the light quark mass region. This may indicate the need to include taste-breaking in pion loops.

  8. An improved failure criterion for biological and engineered staggered composites.

    PubMed

    Barthelat, Francois; Dastjerdi, Ahmad Khayer; Rabiei, Reza

    2013-02-01

    High-performance biological materials such as nacre, spider silk or bone have evolved a staggered microstructure consisting of stiff and strong elongated inclusions aligned with the direction of loading. This structure leads to useful combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness, and it is therefore increasingly mimicked in bio-inspired composites. The performance of staggered composites can be tuned; for example, their mechanical properties increase when the overlap between the inclusions is increased. However, larger overlaps may lead to excessive tensile stress and fracture of the inclusions themselves, a highly detrimental failure mode. Fracture of the inclusions has so far only been predicted using highly simplified models, which hinder our ability to properly design and optimize engineered staggered composites. In this work, we develop a new failure criterion that takes into account the complex stress field within the inclusions as well as initial defects. The model leads to an 'optimum criterion' for cases where the shear tractions on the inclusions is uniform, and a 'conservative' criterion for which the tractions are modelled as point forces at the ends of the overlap regions. The criterion can therefore be applied for a wide array of material behaviour at the interface, even if the details of the shear load transfer is not known. The new criterion is validated with experiments on staggered structures made of millimetre-thick alumina tablets, and by comparison with data on nacre. Formulated in a non-dimensional form, our new criterion can be applied on a wide variety of engineered staggered composites at any length scale. It also reveals new design guidelines, for example high aspect ratio inclusions with weak interfaces are preferable over inclusions with low aspect ratio and stronger interfaces. Together with existing models, this new criterion will lead to optimal designs that harness the full potential of bio-inspired staggered composites.

  9. Evaluating big deal journal bundles

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Theodore C.; Courant, Paul N.; McAfee, R. Preston; Williams, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Large commercial publishers sell bundled online subscriptions to their entire list of academic journals at prices significantly lower than the sum of their á la carte prices. Bundle prices differ drastically between institutions, but they are not publicly posted. The data that we have collected enable us to compare the bundle prices charged by commercial publishers with those of nonprofit societies and to examine the types of price discrimination practiced by commercial and nonprofit journal publishers. This information is of interest to economists who study monopolist pricing, librarians interested in making efficient use of library budgets, and scholars who are interested in the availability of the work that they publish. PMID:24979785

  10. Evaluating big deal journal bundles.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Theodore C; Courant, Paul N; McAfee, R Preston; Williams, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    Large commercial publishers sell bundled online subscriptions to their entire list of academic journals at prices significantly lower than the sum of their á la carte prices. Bundle prices differ drastically between institutions, but they are not publicly posted. The data that we have collected enable us to compare the bundle prices charged by commercial publishers with those of nonprofit societies and to examine the types of price discrimination practiced by commercial and nonprofit journal publishers. This information is of interest to economists who study monopolist pricing, librarians interested in making efficient use of library budgets, and scholars who are interested in the availability of the work that they publish.

  11. Developing new fluorescent proteins with stagger extension process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Lu, Jinling; Luo, Haiming; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2009-02-01

    The Stagger Extension Process (StEP), a recombination of DNA technique, has been used as a rapid molecular mutagenesis strategy. In this study, for obtaining the fluorescence proteins with new properties, six fluorescence proteins (EYFP, EGFP, ECFP, mCitrine, mCerulean and Venus) were used as the templates to recombine the mutation library by the Stagger Extension Process (StEP) technique. Through screening this mutation library, we have obtained some useful new FPs which are different fluorescent properties with ancestor. These protein will extend fluorescent proteins application.

  12. Boundary conditions in a meshless staggered particle code

    SciTech Connect

    Libersky, L.D.; Randles, P.W.

    1998-07-01

    A meshless method utilizing two sets of particles and generalized boundary conditions is introduced. Companion sets of particles, one carrying velocity and the other carrying stress, are employed to reduce the undesirable effects of colocation of all field variables and increase accuracy. Boundary conditions implemented within this staggered framework include contact, stress-free, stress, velocity, and symmetry constraints. Several test problems are used to evaluate the method. Of particular importance is the motion of stress particles relative to velocity particles in higher dimensions. Early results show promise, but difficulties remain that must be overcome if the staggered technique is to be successful.

  13. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media interested ... throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through the ...

  14. Ab initio study of MoS2 nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, Matthieu; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2003-07-01

    Recently, the synthesis of a new phase of MoS2I1/3 stoichiometry was reported [M. Remskar, A. Mrzel, Z. Skraba, A. Jesih, M. Ceh, J. Demšar, P. Stadelmann, F. Lévy, and D. Mihailovic, Science 292, 479 (2001)]. Electron microscope images and diffraction data were interpreted to indicate bundles of sub-nanometer-diameter single-wall MoS2 nanotubes. After experimental characterization, the structure was attributed to an assembly of “armchair” nanotubes with interstitial iodine. Using first-principles total-energy calculations, bundles of MoS2 nanotubes with different topologies and stoichiometries are investigated. All of the systems are strongly metallic. Configurations with “zigzag” structures are found to be more stable energetically than the “armchair” ones, though all of the structures have similar stabilities. After relaxation, there remain several candidates which give a lattice parameter in relative agreement with experiment. Further, spin-polarized calculations indicate that a structure with armchair tubes iodine atoms in their center acquires a very large spontaneous magnetic moment of 12μB, while the other structures are nonmagnetic. Our ab initio calculations show that in most of the other structures, the tubes are very strongly bound together, and that the compounds should be considered as a crystal, rather than as a bundle of tubes in the habitual sense.

  15. Fabrication of electrospun nanofibers bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Junjun; Sun, Daoheng

    2007-12-01

    Aligned nanofibers, filament bundle composed of large number of nanofibers have potential applications such as bio-material, composite material etc. A series of electrospinning experiments have been conducted to investigate the electrospinning process,in which some parameters such as polymer solution concentration, bias voltage, distance between spinneret and collector, solution flow rate etc have been setup to do the experiment of nanofibers bundles construction. This work firstly reports electrospun nanofiber bundle through non-uniform electrical field, and nanofibers distributed in different density on electrodes from that between them. Thinner nanofibers bundle with a few numbers of nanofiber is collected for 3 seconds; therefore it's also possible that the addressable single nanofiber could be collected to bridge two electrodes.

  16. Atrio-His bundle tracts.

    PubMed Central

    Brechenmacher, C

    1975-01-01

    The atrio-His bundle tracts are very rare; only two have been found in 687 hearts studied histologically. These tracts have a similar appearance to those of the atrioventricular bundle and form a complete bypass of the atrioventricular node. In their presence the electrocardiogram may show a short or normal PR interval. They may be responsible for some cases of very rapid ventricular response to supraventricular arrhythmias. Images PMID:1191446

  17. Connections on decorated path space bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Lahiri, Amitabha; Sengupta, Ambar N.

    2017-02-01

    For a principal bundle P → M equipped with a connection A ¯ , we study an infinite dimensional bundle PA¯ dec P over the space of paths on M, with the points of PA¯ dec P being horizontal paths on P decorated with elements of a second structure group. We construct parallel transport processes on such bundles and study holonomy bundles in this setting.

  18. Bundle Formation in Biomimetic Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Maarten; Pape, A C H; Voets, Ilja K; Rowan, Alan E; Portale, Giuseppe; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-08-08

    Bundling of single polymer chains is a crucial process in the formation of biopolymer network gels that make up the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. This bundled architecture leads to gels with distinctive properties, including a large-pore-size gel formation at very low concentrations and mechanical responsiveness through nonlinear mechanics, properties that are rarely observed in synthetic hydrogels. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we study the bundle formation and hydrogelation process of polyisocyanide gels, a synthetic material that uniquely mimics the structure and mechanics of biogels. We show how the structure of the material changes at the (thermally induced) gelation point and how factors such as concentration and polymer length determine the architecture, and with that, the mechanical properties. The correlation of the gel mechanics and the structural parameters obtained from SAXS experiments is essential in the design of future (synthetic) mimics of biopolymer networks.

  19. Future of Lattice Calculations with Staggered Sea Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, Steven

    2011-05-23

    The MILC collaboration for some years has been creating gauge ensembles with 2+1 flavors of asqtad or improved staggered quarks. There are some 40 ensembles covering a wide range of quark mass and lattice spacing, thus allowing control of the chiral and continuum limits. An extensive review of that program has been published in Reviews of Modern Physics. Recently, MILC has begun a new program using HPQCD's highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action. This action has smaller taste symmetry breaking than asqtad and improved scaling properties. We also include a dynamical charm quark in these calculations. We summarize the achievements of the asqtad program, what has been done so far with HISQ quarks, and then consider what future ensembles will be created and their impact.

  20. B{sub K} in staggered chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Water, Ruth S. van de; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the kaon B parameter, B{sub K}, to next-to-leading order in staggered chiral perturbation theory. We find expressions for partially quenched QCD with three sea quarks, quenched QCD, and full QCD with m{sub u}=m{sub d}{ne}m{sub s}. We extend the usual power counting to include the effects of using perturbative (rather than nonperturbative) matching factors. Taste breaking enters through the O(a{sup 2}) terms in the effective action, through O(a{sup 2}) terms from the discretization of operators, and through the truncation of matching factors. These effects cause mixing with several additional operators, complicating the chiral and continuum extrapolations. In addition to the staggered expressions, we present B{sub K} at next-to-leading order in continuum PQ{chi}PT for N{sub f}=3 sea quarks with m{sub u}=m{sub d}{ne}m{sub s}.

  1. Baryons with Ginsparg-Wilson quarks in a staggered sea

    SciTech Connect

    Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2005-11-01

    We determine the masses and magnetic moments of the octet baryons in chiral perturbation theory formulated for a mixed lattice action of Ginsparg-Wilson valence quarks and staggered sea quarks. Taste-symmetry breaking does not occur at next-to-leading order in the combined lattice spacing and chiral expansion. Expressions derived for masses and magnetic moments are required for addressing lattice artifacts in mixed-action simulations of these observables.

  2. Calculating weak matrix elements using HYP staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Bhattacharya; G. T. Fleming; G. Kilcup; R. Gupta; W. Lee; S. Sharpe

    2004-03-01

    We present preliminary results of weak matrix elements relevant to CP violation calculated using the HYP (II) staggered fermions. Since the complete set of matching coefficients at the one-loop level became available recently, we have constructed lattice operators with all the g{sup 2} corrections included. The main results include both {Delta}I = 3/2 and {Delta}I = 1/2 contributions.

  3. TUBE TESTER

    DOEpatents

    Gittings, H.T. Jr.; Kalbach, J.F.

    1958-01-14

    This patent relates to tube testing, and in particular describes a tube tester for automatic testing of a number of vacuum tubes while in service and as frequently as may be desired. In it broadest aspects the tube tester compares a particular tube with a standard tube tarough a difference amplifier. An unbalanced condition in the circuit of the latter produced by excessive deviation of the tube in its characteristics from standard actuates a switch mechanism stopping the testing cycle and indicating the defective tube.

  4. Staggered baryon operators with flavor SU(3) quantum numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2007-06-01

    The construction of the first baryon operators for staggered lattice QCD exploited the taste symmetry to emulate physical quark flavor; contemporary 2+1 flavor simulations explicitly include three physical quark flavors and necessitate interpreting a valence sector with 12 quarks. After discussing expected features of the resulting baryon spectrum, I consider the spectra of operators transforming irreducibly under SU(3){sub F}xGTS, the direct product of flavor SU(3){sub F} and the geometrical time-slice group of the 1-flavor staggered theory. I then describe the construction of a set of maximally local baryon operators transforming irreducibly under SU(3){sub F}xGTS and enumerate this set. In principle, the operators listed here could be used to extract the masses of all the lightest spin-(1/2) and spin-(3/2) baryon resonances of staggered QCD. Using appropriate operators from this set in partially quenched simulations should allow for particularly clean 2+1 flavor calculations of the masses of the nucleon, {delta}, {sigma}*, {xi}*, and {omega}{sup -}.

  5. Staggered chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Stephen R.; Van de Water, Ruth S.

    2005-06-01

    We study taste and Euclidean rotational symmetry violation for staggered fermions at nonzero lattice spacing using staggered chiral perturbation theory. We extend the staggered chiral Lagrangian to O(a{sup 2}p{sup 2}), O(a{sup 4}), and O(a{sup 2}m), the orders necessary for a full next-to-leading order calculation of pseudo-Goldstone boson masses and decay constants including analytic terms. We then calculate a number of SO(4) taste-breaking quantities, which involve only a small subset of these next-to-leading order operators. We predict relationships between SO(4) taste-breaking splittings in masses, pseudoscalar decay constants, and dispersion relations. We also find predictions for a few quantities that are not SO(4) breaking. All these results hold also for theories in which the fourth root of the fermionic determinant is taken to reduce the number of quark tastes; testing them will therefore provide evidence for or against the validity of this trick.

  6. Taste symmetry breaking with hypercubic-smeared staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Taegil; Adams, David H.; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Jongjeong; Kim, Kwangwoo; Lee, Weonjong; Jung, Chulwoo; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2008-05-01

    We study the impact of hypercubic (HYP) smearing on the size of taste-breaking for staggered fermions, comparing to unimproved and to asqtad-improved staggered fermions. As in previous studies, we find a substantial reduction in taste-breaking compared to unimproved staggered fermions (by a factor of 4-7 on lattices with spacing a{approx_equal}0.1 fm). In addition, we observe that discretization effects of next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion (O(a{sup 2}p{sup 2})) are markedly reduced by HYP smearing. Compared to asqtad valence fermions, we find that taste-breaking in the pion spectrum is reduced by a factor of 2.5-3, down to a level comparable to the expected size of generic O(a{sup 2}) effects. Our results suggest that, once one reaches a lattice spacing of a{approx_equal}0.09 fm, taste-breaking will be small enough after HYP smearing that one can use a modified power counting in which O(a{sup 2})<

  7. Staggered chiral perturbation theory for heavy-light mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Bernard, C.

    2006-01-01

    We incorporate heavy-light mesons into staggered chiral perturbation theory (S{chi}PT), working to leading order in 1/m{sub Q}, where m{sub Q} is the heavy-quark mass. At first nontrivial order in the chiral expansion, staggered taste violations affect the chiral logarithms for heavy-light quantities only through the light-meson propagators in loops. There are also new analytic contributions coming from additional terms in the Lagrangian involving heavy-light and light mesons. Using this heavy-light S{chi}PT, we perform the one-loop calculation of the B (or D) meson leptonic decay constant in the partially quenched and full QCD cases. In our treatment, we assume the validity both of the 'fourth root trick' to reduce four staggered tastes to one, and of the S{chi}PT prescription to represent this trick by insertions of factors of 1/4 for each sea-quark loop.

  8. Confinement effects and why carbon nanotube bundles can work as gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Rodrigo G; Fazzio, A; da Silva, Antônio J R; Rocha, Alexandre R

    2013-04-07

    Carbon nanotubes have been at the forefront of nanotechnology, leading not only to a better understanding of the basic properties of charge transport in one dimensional materials, but also to the perspective of a variety of possible applications, including highly sensitive sensors. Practical issues, however, have led to the use of bundles of nanotubes in devices, instead of isolated single nanotubes. From a theoretical perspective, the understanding of charge transport in such bundles, and how it is affected by the adsorption of molecules, has been very limited, one of the reasons being the sheer size of the calculations. A frequent option has been the extrapolation of knowledge gained from single tubes to the properties of bundles. In the present work we show that such procedure is not correct, and that there are qualitative differences in the effects caused by molecules on the charge transport in bundles versus isolated nanotubes. Using a combination of density functional theory and recursive Green's function techniques we show that the adsorption of molecules randomly distributed onto the walls of carbon nanotube bundles leads to changes in the charge density and consequently to significant alterations in the conductance even in pristine tubes. We show that this effect is driven by confinement which is not present in isolated nanotubes. Furthermore, a low concentration of dopants randomly adsorbed along a two-hundred nm long bundle drives a change in the transport regime; from ballistic to diffusive, which can account for the high sensitivity to different molecules.

  9. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1992-01-01

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

  10. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  11. Procedure for dispersing fiber bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, D.

    1974-01-01

    Fiber bundles are dispersed and fibers are cleaned within enclosed container; therefore, safety clothing, masks, and eye protection are not required. Procedure also could be used wherever materials, such as fiberglass or insulation, require dispersion, fluffing, or cleaning. Process could be automated into continuous operation for handling large quantities of fiber.

  12. HIGH CURRENT COAXIAL PHOTOMULTIPLIER TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Glass, N.W.

    1960-01-19

    A medium-gain photomultiplier tube having high current output, fast rise- time, and matched output impedance was developed. The photomultiplier tube comprises an elongated cylindrical envelope, a cylindrical anode supported at the axis of the envelope, a plurality of elongated spaced opaque areas on the envelope, and a plurality of light admitting windows. A photo-cathode is supported adjacent to each of the windows, and a plurality of secondary emissive dynodes are arranged in two types of radial arrays which are alternately positioned to fill the annular space between the anode and the envelope. The dynodes are in an array being radially staggered with respect to the dynodes in the adjacent array, the dynodes each having a portion arranged at an angle with respect to the electron path, such that electrons emitted by each cathode undergo multiplication upon impingement on a dynode and redirected flight to the next adjacent dynode.

  13. Modeling considerations for the analysis of LMFBR steam generator tube clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, D.M.; Piper, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    In the design of the Babcock and Wilcox Helical Coil Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Steam Generator, the tube bundle is connected to the feedwater and steam plenums via ''inlet/outlet tubes''. Of prime importance in the design of these tubes is the tube-to-tube and tube-to-shell clamps which are provided to prevent detrimental vibration. This paper presents a method of modeling the tube-to-tube clamps to accurately predict tube-to-clamp interaction in the finite element analysis. It also demonstrates the validity of specific modeling assumptions in determining stresses in the clamp assembly.

  14. Subroutine bundls, a fortran IV program to determine schreinemakers bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, J.; Andrew, A. S.

    Given an entire set of relevant balanced equations, BUNDLS and associated subroutines select all invariant points and order univariant lines around these points. Invariant points are formed by taking every set of m absent phases from each reaction. All revelant univariant lines are ordered around each invariant point by a direct application of the rules of Schreinemakers. The program also calculates true angular values for PT, P-μ x1 or μ y-μ x diagrams.

  15. Load sharing in the growth of bundled biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe; Carlsson, A. E.

    2014-11-01

    To elucidate the nature of load sharing in the growth of multiple biopolymers, we perform stochastic simulations of the growth of biopolymer bundles against obstacles under a broad range of conditions and varying assumptions. The obstacle motion due to thermal fluctuations is treated explicitly. We assume the ‘perfect Brownian ratchet’ model, in which the polymerization rate equals the free-filament rate as soon as the filament-obstacle distance exceeds the monomer size. Accurate closed-form formulas are obtained for the case of a rapidly moving obstacle. We find the following: (1) load sharing is usually sub-perfect in the sense that polymerization is slower than for a single filament carrying the same average force; (2) the sub-perfect behavior becomes significant at a total force proportional to the logarithm or the square root of the number of filaments, depending on the alignment of the filaments; (3) for the special case of slow barrier diffusion and low opposing force, an enhanced obstacle velocity for an increasing number of filaments is possible; (4) the obstacle velocity is very sensitive to the alignment of the filaments in the bundle, with a staggered alignment being an order of magnitude faster than an unstaggered one at forces of only 0.5 pN per filament for 20 filaments; (5) for large numbers of filaments, the power is maximized at a force well below 1 pN per filament; (6) for intermediate values of the obstacle diffusion coefficient, the shape of the force velocity relation is very similar to that for rapid obstacle diffusion.

  16. Mathematical modelling for nanotube bundle oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates the mechanics of a gigahertz oscillator comprising a nanotube oscillating within the centre of a uniform concentric ring or bundle of nanotubes. The study is also extended to the oscillation of a fullerene inside a nanotube bundle. In particular, certain fullerene-nanotube bundle oscillators are studied, namely C60-carbon nanotube bundle, C60-boron nitride nanotube bundle, B36N36-carbon nanotube bundle and B36N36-boron nitride nanotube bundle. Using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, we obtain a relation between the bundle radius and the radii of the nanotubes forming the bundle, as well as the optimum bundle size which gives rise to the maximum oscillatory frequency for both the fullerene and the nanotube bundle oscillators. While previous studies in this area have been undertaken through molecular dynamics simulations, this paper emphasizes the use of applied mathematical modelling techniques which provides considerable insight into the underlying mechanisms. The paper presents a synopsis of the major results derived in detail by the present authors in [1, 2].

  17. Observations on staggered fermions at nonzero lattice spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2006-06-01

    We show that the use of the fourth-root trick in lattice QCD with staggered fermions corresponds to a nonlocal theory at nonzero lattice spacing, but argue that the nonlocal behavior is likely to go away in the continuum limit. We give examples of this nonlocal behavior in the free theory, and for the case of a fixed topologically nontrivial background gauge field. In both special cases, the nonlocal behavior indeed disappears in the continuum limit. Our results invalidate a recent claim that at nonzero lattice spacing an additive mass renormalization is needed because of taste-symmetry breaking.

  18. Phase Transition of Bosons Driven by a Staggered Gauge Field in AN Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Min-Chul

    2013-06-01

    We have studied the ground state properties of hard-core bosons in a two-leg optical ladder in the presence of uniform and staggered frustrations due to an artificial gauge field. By calculating the ground state via the Lanczos method, we find first-order phase transitions tuned by the staggered gauge field between the Meissner and the vortex states. The momentum distributions show that the Meissner state has edge and staggered currents, while the vortex states have vortex-solid or vortex-glass phases in the presence of a staggered field.

  19. Sperm bundle and reproductive organs of carabid beetles tribe Pterostichini (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Sasakawa, Kôji

    2007-05-01

    The morphological characteristics of sperm and reproductive organs may offer clues as to how reproductive systems have evolved. In this paper, the morphologies of the sperm and male reproductive organs of carabid beetles in the tribe Pterostichini (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are described, and the morphological associations among characters are examined. All species form sperm bundles in which the head of the sperm was embedded in a rod-shaped structure, i.e., spermatodesm. The spermatodesm shape (left-handed spiral, right-handed spiral, or without conspicuous spiral structure) and the condition of the sperm on the spermatodesm surface (with the tail free-moving or forming a thin, sheetlike structure) vary among species. In all species, the spiral directions of the convoluted seminal vesicles and vasa deferentia are the same on both sides of the body; that is, they show an asymmetric structure. The species in which the sperm bundle and the seminal vesicles both have a spiral structure could be classified into two types, with significant differences in sperm-bundle length between the two types. The species with a sperm-bundle spiral and seminal-vesicle spiral of almost the same diameter have longer sperm bundles than the species with a sperm-bundle spiral and seminal-vesicle tube of almost the same diameter. In the former type, the spiral directions of the sperm bundles and seminal vesicles are inevitably the same, whereas they differ in some species with the later type. Therefore, increased sperm bundle length appears to have been facilitated by the concordance of the sperm bundle's coiling direction with the coiling direction of the seminal vesicle.

  20. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ...

  1. A practical guide to the staggered herringbone mixer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Manda S.; Longmuir, Kenneth J.; Yager, Paul

    2009-01-01

    An analytical model of mixing in the staggered herringbone mixer (SHM) was derived to estimate mixing parameters and provide practical expressions to guide mixer design and operation for a wide range of possible solutes and flow conditions. Mixing in microfluidic systems has historically been characterized by the mixing of a specific solute system or by the redistribution of flow streams; this approach does not give any insight into the ideal operational parameters of the mixer with an arbitrary real system. For Stokes-flow mixers, mixing can be computed from a relationship between solute diffusivity, flow rate, and mixer length. Confocal microscopy and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling were used to directly determine the extent of mixing for several solutes in the staggered herringbone mixer over a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) and Péclet numbers (Pe); the results were used to develop and evaluate an analytical model of its behavior. Mixing was found to be a function of only Pe and downstream position in the mixer. Required mixer length was proportional to Log(Pe); this analytical model matched well with the confocal data and CFD model for Pe < 5×104, at which point the experiments reached the limit of resolution. For particular solutes, required length and mixing time depend upon Re and diffusivity. This analytical model is applicable to other solute systems, and possibly to other embodiments of the mixer, to enable optimal design, operation, and estimation of performance. PMID:18584088

  2. Magnetic-free non-reciprocity based on staggered commutation

    PubMed Central

    Reiskarimian, Negar; Krishnaswamy, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Lorentz reciprocity is a fundamental characteristic of the vast majority of electronic and photonic structures. However, non-reciprocal components such as isolators, circulators and gyrators enable new applications ranging from radio frequencies to optical frequencies, including full-duplex wireless communication and on-chip all-optical information processing. Such components today dominantly rely on the phenomenon of Faraday rotation in magneto-optic materials. However, they are typically bulky, expensive and not suitable for insertion in a conventional integrated circuit. Here we demonstrate magnetic-free linear passive non-reciprocity based on the concept of staggered commutation. Commutation is a form of parametric modulation with very high modulation ratio. We observe that staggered commutation enables time-reversal symmetry breaking within very small dimensions (λ/1,250 × λ/1,250 in our device), resulting in a miniature radio-frequency circulator that exhibits reduced implementation complexity, very low loss, strong non-reciprocity, significantly enhanced linearity and real-time reconfigurability, and is integrated in a conventional complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor integrated circuit for the first time. PMID:27079524

  3. Compressibility enhancement in an almost staggered interacting Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Bat-el; Berkovits, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the compressibility in the almost staggered fermionic Harper model with repulsive interactions in the vicinity of half-filling. It has been shown by Kraus et al. [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161106(R) (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161106 that for spinless electrons and nearest neighbors electron-electron interactions the compressibility in the central band is enhanced by repulsive interactions. Here we would like to investigate the sensitivity of this conclusion to the spin degree of freedom and longer range interactions. We use the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation, as well as the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculation to evaluate the compressibility. In the almost staggered Harper model, the central energy band is essentially flat and separated from the other bands by a large gap and therefore, the HF approximation is rather accurate. In both cases the compressibility of the system is enhanced compared to the noninteracting case, although the enhancement is weaker due to the inclusion of Hubbard and longer ranged interactions. We also show that the entanglement entropy is suppressed when the compressibility of the system is enhanced.

  4. Magnetic-free non-reciprocity based on staggered commutation.

    PubMed

    Reiskarimian, Negar; Krishnaswamy, Harish

    2016-04-15

    Lorentz reciprocity is a fundamental characteristic of the vast majority of electronic and photonic structures. However, non-reciprocal components such as isolators, circulators and gyrators enable new applications ranging from radio frequencies to optical frequencies, including full-duplex wireless communication and on-chip all-optical information processing. Such components today dominantly rely on the phenomenon of Faraday rotation in magneto-optic materials. However, they are typically bulky, expensive and not suitable for insertion in a conventional integrated circuit. Here we demonstrate magnetic-free linear passive non-reciprocity based on the concept of staggered commutation. Commutation is a form of parametric modulation with very high modulation ratio. We observe that staggered commutation enables time-reversal symmetry breaking within very small dimensions (λ/1,250 × λ/1,250 in our device), resulting in a miniature radio-frequency circulator that exhibits reduced implementation complexity, very low loss, strong non-reciprocity, significantly enhanced linearity and real-time reconfigurability, and is integrated in a conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuit for the first time.

  5. A subzone reconstruction algorithm for efficient staggered compatible remapping

    SciTech Connect

    Starinshak, D.P. Owen, J.M.

    2015-09-01

    Staggered-grid Lagrangian hydrodynamics algorithms frequently make use of subzonal discretization of state variables for the purposes of improved numerical accuracy, generality to unstructured meshes, and exact conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. For Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian (ALE) methods using a geometric overlay, it is difficult to remap subzonal variables in an accurate and efficient manner due to the number of subzone–subzone intersections that must be computed. This becomes prohibitive in the case of 3D, unstructured, polyhedral meshes. A new procedure is outlined in this paper to avoid direct subzonal remapping. The new algorithm reconstructs the spatial profile of a subzonal variable using remapped zonal and nodal representations of the data. The reconstruction procedure is cast as an under-constrained optimization problem. Enforcing conservation at each zone and node on the remapped mesh provides the set of equality constraints; the objective function corresponds to a quadratic variation per subzone between the values to be reconstructed and a set of target reference values. Numerical results for various pure-remapping and hydrodynamics tests are provided. Ideas for extending the algorithm to staggered-grid radiation-hydrodynamics are discussed as well as ideas for generalizing the algorithm to include inequality constraints.

  6. Bundle critical power predictions under normal and abnormal conditions in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.S.; Pei, B.S. ); Lee, C.H. )

    1992-06-01

    In this paper a new approach to bundle critical power predictions is presented. In addition to a very accurate critical heat flux (CHF) model, correction factors that account for the effects of grid spacers, heat flux non-uniformities, and cold walls, which are needed for critical power predictions for practical fuel bundles, are developed. By using the subchannel analysis code COBRA IIIC/MIT-1, local flow conditions needed as input to CHF correlations are obtained. Critical power is therefore obtained iteratively to ensure that the bundle power value from the subchannel analysis will cause CHF at only one point in the bundle. Good agreement with the experimental data is obtained. The accuracy is higher than that of the W-3 and EPRI-1 correlations for the limited data base used in this study. The effects of three types of fuel abnormalities, namely, local heat flux spikes, local flow blockages, and rod bowing, on bundle critical power are also analyzed. The local heat flux spikes and flow blockages have no significant influence on critical power. However, rod bowing phenomena have some effect, the severity of which depends on system pressure, the gap closure between adjacent rods, and the presence or absence of thimble tubes (cold walls). A correlation for the influence of various rod bowing phenomena on bundle critical power is developed. Good agreement with experimental data is shown.

  7. Tracheostomy tubes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R; Altobelli, Neila P

    2014-06-01

    Tracheostomy tubes are used to administer positive-pressure ventilation, to provide a patent airway, and to provide access to the lower respiratory tract for airway clearance. They are available in a variety of sizes and styles from several manufacturers. The dimensions of tracheostomy tubes are given by their inner diameter, outer diameter, length, and curvature. Differences in dimensions between tubes with the same inner diameter from different manufacturers are not commonly appreciated but may have important clinical implications. Tracheostomy tubes can be cuffed or uncuffed and may be fenestrated. Some tracheostomy tubes are designed with an inner cannula. It is important for clinicians caring for patients with a tracheostomy tube to appreciate the nuances of various tracheostomy tube designs and to select a tube that appropriately fits the patient. The optimal frequency of changing a chronic tracheostomy tube is controversial. Specialized teams may be useful in managing patients with a tracheostomy. Speech can be facilitated with a speaking valve in patients with a tracheostomy tube who are breathing spontaneously. In mechanically ventilated patients with a tracheostomy, a talking tracheostomy tube, a deflated cuff technique with a speaking valve, or a deflated cuff technique without a speaking valve can be used to facilitate speech.

  8. Effect of initial stagger selection on the handedness of Amyloid beta helical fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Cheng, Xiaolin; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Various structural models for Amyloid $\\beta$ fibrils derived from a variety of experimental techniques are currently available. However, this data cannot differentiate between the relative position of the two arms of the $\\beta$ hairpin called the stagger. Amyloid fibrils of various heirarchical levels form left--handed helices composed of $\\beta$ sheets. However it is unclear if positive, negative and neutral staggers all form the macroscopic left--handed helices. Studying this is important since the success of computational approaches to develop drugs for amyloidic diseases will depend on selecting the physiologically relevant structure of the sheets. To address this issue we have conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations of Amyloid$\\beta$ sheets of various staggers and show that only negative staggers generate the experimentally observed left--handed helices while positive staggers generate the incorrect right--handed helices. The implications of this result extend in to all amyloidic--aggregation type diseases.

  9. Sperm bundle and reproductive organs of carabid beetles tribe Pterostichini (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasakawa, Kôji

    2007-05-01

    The morphological characteristics of sperm and reproductive organs may offer clues as to how reproductive systems have evolved. In this paper, the morphologies of the sperm and male reproductive organs of carabid beetles in the tribe Pterostichini (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are described, and the morphological associations among characters are examined. All species form sperm bundles in which the head of the sperm was embedded in a rod-shaped structure, i.e., spermatodesm. The spermatodesm shape (left-handed spiral, right-handed spiral, or without conspicuous spiral structure) and the condition of the sperm on the spermatodesm surface (with the tail free-moving or forming a thin, sheetlike structure) vary among species. In all species, the spiral directions of the convoluted seminal vesicles and vasa deferentia are the same on both sides of the body; that is, they show an asymmetric structure. The species in which the sperm bundle and the seminal vesicles both have a spiral structure could be classified into two types, with significant differences in sperm-bundle length between the two types. The species with a sperm-bundle spiral and seminal-vesicle spiral of almost the same diameter have longer sperm bundles than the species with a sperm-bundle spiral and seminal-vesicle tube of almost the same diameter. In the former type, the spiral directions of the sperm bundles and seminal vesicles are inevitably the same, whereas they differ in some species with the later type. Therefore, increased sperm bundle length appears to have been facilitated by the concordance of the sperm bundle’s coiling direction with the coiling direction of the seminal vesicle.

  10. Proposal of a Bulk HTSC Staggered Array Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kii, Toshiteru; Kinjo, Ryota; Bakr, Mahmoud A.; Sonobe, Taro; Higashimura, Keisuke; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yoshida, Kyohei; Zen, Heisyun

    2010-06-23

    We proposed a new type of undulator based on bulk high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSC) which consists of a single solenoid and a stacked array of bulk HTSC. The main advantage of this configuration is that a mechanical structure is not required to produce and control the undulator field. In order to perform a proof of principle experiment, we have developed a prototype of bulk HTSC staggered array undulator using 11 pairs of DyBaCuO bulk superconductors and a normal conducting solenoid. Experimental results obtained by using the prototype undulator and numerical results obtained by a loop current model based on the Bean mode for a type-II superconductor were compared.

  11. 't Hooft vertices, partial quenching, and rooted staggered QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the properties of 't Hooft vertices in partially quenched and rooted versions of QCD in the continuum. These theories have a physical subspace, equivalent to ordinary QCD, that is contained within a larger space that includes many unphysical correlation functions. We find that the 't Hooft vertices in the physical subspace have the expected form, despite the presence of unphysical 't Hooft vertices appearing in correlation functions that have an excess of valence quarks (or ghost quarks). We also show that, due to the singular behavior of unphysical correlation functions as the massless limit is approached, order parameters for nonanomalous symmetries can be nonvanishing in finite volume if these symmetries act outside of the physical subspace. Using these results, we demonstrate that arguments recently given by Creutz - claiming to disprove the validity of rooted staggered QCD - are incorrect. In particular, the unphysical 't Hooft vertices do not present an obstacle to the recovery of taste symmetry in the continuum limit.

  12. Persistent current in an almost staggered Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasserman, A.; Berkovits, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we study the persistent current (PC) of a staggered Harper model, close to the half-filling. The Harper model is different than other one dimensional disordered systems which are always localized, since it is a quasi-periodic system with correlated disorder resulting in the fact that it can be in the metallic regime. Nevertheless, the PC for a wide range of parameters of the Harper model does not show typical metallic behavior, although the system is in the metallic regime. This is a result of the nature of the central band states, which are a hybridization of Gaussian states localized in superlattice points. When the superlattice is not commensurate with the system length, the PC behaves as an insulator. Thus even in the metallic regime a typical finite Harper model may exhibit a PC expected from an insulator.

  13. Are central line bundles and ventilator bundles effective in critically ill neonates and children?

    PubMed

    Smulders, Charlotte A; van Gestel, Josephus P J; Bos, Albert P

    2013-08-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) are common problems in adult, pediatric (PICU) and neonatal (NICU) intensive care unit patients. Care bundles have been developed to prevent these hospital-acquired infections and to provide best possible care. Studies in adults have proven that care bundles contribute to a decrease in CLABSI and VAP rates. The purpose of this literature review was to critically appraise the known evidence of the effectiveness of central line bundles and ventilator bundles in PICU and NICU patients. The number of publications of central line bundles and ventilator bundles in PICU and NICU patients is limited compared to adults. Ten studies in PICU patients demonstrated a significant decrease in the CLABSI or VAP rate after implementation of the bundle. Two studies in neonates demonstrated a reduction in the CLABSI rate after implementation of the central line bundle. No studies on the effectiveness of the ventilator bundle in neonates were found. Bundle elements differed between studies, and their scientific basis was not as robust as in adults. Monitoring of compliance to bundle elements seems required for optimal reduction of CLABSI and VAP. Bundle components that focus on maintenance of a central line probably are important to prevent CLABSI in children.

  14. Analytical Deriving of the Field Capacity through Soil Bundle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, E.; Viola, F.; Antinoro, C.; Noto, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of field capacity as soil hydraulic parameter is widely used in many hydrological applications. Althought its recurring usage, its definition is not univocal. Traditionally, field capacity has been related to the amount of water that remains in the soil after the excess water has drained away and the water downward movement experiences a significant decresase. Quantifying the drainage of excess of water may be vague and several definitions, often subjective, have been proposed. These definitions are based on fixed thresholds either of time, pressure, or flux to which the field capacity condition is associated. The flux-based definition identifies the field capacity as the soil moisture value corresponding to an arbitrary fixed threshold of free drainage flux. Recently, many works have investigated the flux-based definition by varying either the drainage threshold, the geometry setting and mainly the description of the drainage flux. Most of these methods are based on the simulation of the flux through a porous medium by using the Darcy's law or Richard's equation. Using the above-mentioned flux-based definition, in this work we propose an alternative analytical approach for deriving the field capacity based on a bundle-of-tubes model. The pore space of a porous medium is conceptualized as a bundle of capillary tubes of given length of different radii, derived from a known distribution. The drainage from a single capillary tube is given by the analytical solution of the differential equation describing the water height evolution within the capillary tube. This equation is based on the Poiseuille's law and describes the drainage flux with time as a function of tube radius. The drainage process is then integrated for any portion of soil taking into account the tube radius distribution which in turns depends on the soil type. This methodology allows to analytically derive the dynamics of drainage water flux for any soil type and consequently to define the

  15. Evaluation of commercial enhanced tubes in pool boiling: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.; Bergles, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    In support of a study of shellside boiling with enhanced tubes, a pool boiling apparatus was developed and used to test single tubes with various structured boiling surfaces in R-113. The basic design of the tube-bundle test section was carried out and certain critical design features were tested experimentally. Copper tubes, 3/4 in. o.d. and 4 in. long, were selected with 1/4 in. diameter cartridge heaters. Four thermocouples were inserted in 3/32 in. diameter, 2 in. long holes. The pool boiling characteristics of a plain tube agree well with previous tests. Wolverine Turbo-B tubes with small, medium, and large features performed identically for a heat flux greater than 20 kW/m/sup 2/. For lower heat flux, however, the Turbo-B S was slightly superior. In general, the Wolverine Turbo-B tubes had more favorable boiling characteristics than the single Wieland Gewa-T tube that was tested. The test procedure is deemed entirely adequate for screening enhanced tubes to see which ones should be used in the tube-bundle test section. Three different ways of mounting the tubes were tested in R-113 at 65/degree/C and 5 bar gage pressure. As all three constructions sealed well, the simplest design is recommended in which a snap ring fixes the tube to the wall and an O-ring seals against the pressure. The general design features of the tube bundle test chamber are also presented. 14 refs.

  16. Delay Tolerant Networking - Bundle Protocol Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SeGui, John; Jenning, Esther

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the addition of MACHETE models needed to support DTN, namely: the Bundle Protocol (BP) model. To illustrate the useof MACHETE with the additional DTN model, we provide an example simulation to benchmark its performance. We demonstrate the use of the DTN protocol and discuss statistics gathered concerning the total time needed to simulate numerous bundle transmissions.

  17. Damping Properties of the Hair Bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Johannes; Kozlov, Andrei S.; Risler, Thomas; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2011-11-01

    The viscous liquid surrounding a hair bundle dissipates energy and dampens oscillations, which poses a fundamental physical challenge to the high sensitivity and sharp frequency selectivity of hearing. To identify the mechanical forces at play, we constructed a detailed finite-element model of the hair bundle. Based on data from the hair bundle of the bullfrog's sacculus, this model treats the interaction of stereocilia both with the surrounding liquid and with the liquid in the narrow gaps between the individual stereocilia. The investigation revealed that grouping stereocilia in a bundle dramatically reduces the total drag. During hair-bundle deflections, the tip links potentially induce drag by causing small but very dissipative relative motions between stereocilia; this effect is offset by the horizontal top connectors that restrain such relative movements at low frequencies. For higher frequencies the coupling liquid is sufficient to assure that the hair bundle moves as a unit with a low total drag. This work reveals the mechanical characteristics originating from hair-bundle morphology and shows quantitatively how a hair bundle is adapted for sensitive mechanotransduction.

  18. Confinement effects and why carbon nanotube bundles can work as gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Rodrigo G.; Fazzio, A.; da Silva, Antônio J. R.; Rocha, Alexandre R.

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been at the forefront of nanotechnology, leading not only to a better understanding of the basic properties of charge transport in one dimensional materials, but also to the perspective of a variety of possible applications, including highly sensitive sensors. Practical issues, however, have led to the use of bundles of nanotubes in devices, instead of isolated single nanotubes. From a theoretical perspective, the understanding of charge transport in such bundles, and how it is affected by the adsorption of molecules, has been very limited, one of the reasons being the sheer size of the calculations. A frequent option has been the extrapolation of knowledge gained from single tubes to the properties of bundles. In the present work we show that such procedure is not correct, and that there are qualitative differences in the effects caused by molecules on the charge transport in bundles versus isolated nanotubes. Using a combination of density functional theory and recursive Green's function techniques we show that the adsorption of molecules randomly distributed onto the walls of carbon nanotube bundles leads to changes in the charge density and consequently to significant alterations in the conductance even in pristine tubes. We show that this effect is driven by confinement which is not present in isolated nanotubes. Furthermore, a low concentration of dopants randomly adsorbed along a two-hundred nm long bundle drives a change in the transport regime; from ballistic to diffusive, which can account for the high sensitivity to different molecules.Carbon nanotubes have been at the forefront of nanotechnology, leading not only to a better understanding of the basic properties of charge transport in one dimensional materials, but also to the perspective of a variety of possible applications, including highly sensitive sensors. Practical issues, however, have led to the use of bundles of nanotubes in devices, instead of isolated single nanotubes

  19. Critical heat flux predictions in rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, S.P.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    The prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) in rod bundles has been studied with both subchannel and bundle-average methods. The correlations of Biasi, Bowring, CISE-4, and Barnett were considered. The General Electric 9-rod bundle CHF data were used in the comparisons. Calculations were performed by the two-fluid subchannel code THERMIT-2. The results indicate that the subchannel method yields more conservative CHF predictions than the bundleaverage method. This is attributed to the two-phase turbulent mixing phenomenon in the bundle, which can be modeled only on a subchannel basis. The results also indicate that the CISE-4 correlation had the smallest error in prediction of transition boiling for both subchannel and bundle-average methods.

  20. Line bundle embeddings for heterotic theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibbelin, Stefan Groot; Ruehle, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    In heterotic string theories consistency requires the introduction of a non-trivial vector bundle. This bundle breaks the original ten-dimensional gauge groups E8 × E8 or SO(32) for the supersymmetric heterotic string theories and SO(16) × SO(16) for the non-supersymmetric tachyon-free theory to smaller subgroups. A vast number of MSSM-like models have been constructed up to now, most of which describe the vector bundle as a sum of line bundles. However, there are several different ways of describing these line bundles and their embedding in the ten-dimensional gauge group. We recall and extend these different descriptions and explain how they can be translated into each other.

  1. Row effect for R-11 condensation on enhanced tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.L.; Murawski, C.G. )

    1990-08-01

    Experimental results of a condensation row effect study on enhanced tubes are presented. A test cell was constructed to condense Refrigerant-11 on the shell side of a vertical bank of five horizontal tubes. Four distinctly different commercially available tubes were tested. The tubes are a 1024-fpm integral fin, the Wolverine Tube-C, Wieland GEWA-SC, and the Tred-D. A modified Turbo-C tube was also tested. Experimental and visual observations are used to understand the row effect due to condensate loading. By plotting the data in the form of the local condensation coefficient versus condensate Reynolds number, the results may be interpreted for any number of tube rows, up to the maximum Reynolds numbers tested. Bundle average condensation coefficients may be established by integrating the h versus Re values over the number of tube rows.

  2. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  3. Adsorption site analysis of impurity embedded single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Mota, J.P.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Bundle morphology and adsorptive contributions from nanotubes and impurities are studied both experimentally and by simulation using a computer-aided methodology, which employs a small physisorbed probe molecule to explore the porosity of nanotube samples. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of nitrogen adsorption on localized sites of a bundle is carried out to predict adsorption in its accessible internal pore volume and on its external surface as a function of tube diameter. External adsorption is split into the contributions from the clean surface of the outermost nanotubes of the bundle and from the surface of the impurities. The site-specific isotherms are then combined into a global isotherm for a given sample using knowledge of its tube-diameter distribution obtained by Raman spectroscopy. The structural parameters of the sample, such as the fraction of open-ended nanotubes and the contributions from impurities and nanotube bundles to total external surface area, are determined by fitting the experimental nitrogen adsorption data to the simulated isotherm. The degree of closure between experimental and calculated adsorption isotherms for samples manufactured by two different methods, to provide different nanotube morphology and contamination level, further strengthens the validity and resulting interpretations based on the proposed approach. The average number of nanotubes per bundle and average bundle size, within a sample, are also quantified. The proposed method allows for extrapolation of adsorption properties to conditions where the purification process is 100% effective at removing all impurities and opening access to all intrabundle adsorption sites. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gap and stagger effects on the aerodynamic performance and the wake behind a biplane with endplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hantae

    Modern flow diagnostics applied to a very old aerodynamic problem has produced a number of intriguing new results and new insight into previous results. The aerodynamic performance and associated flow physics of the biplane with endplates as a function of variation in gap and stagger were analytically and experimentally investigated. A combination of vortex lattice method, integrated force measurement, streamwise PIV, and Trefftz plane Stereo PIV were used to better understand the flowfield around the biplane with endplates. This study was performed to determine the configuration with the optimal aerodynamic performance and to understand the fluid mechanics behind optimal and suboptimal performance of the configuration. The Vortex Lattice code (AVL) shows that the gap and stagger have the most dramatic effects out of the six parameters studied: gap, stagger, dihedral, decalage, sweep and overhang. The force balance measurements with fourteen biplane configurations of different gaps and staggers show that as gap and stagger increase, the lift efficiency also increases at all angles of attack tested at both Re 60,000 and 120,000. Using the force balance data, a generalized empirical method for the prediction of lift coefficient as a function of gap, stagger and angle of attack has been determined and validated when combined with existing relations for CL--α adjustments for AR and taper effects. The resulting empirical approach allows for a rapid determination of CL for a biplane having different gap, stagger, AR and taper without the need for a complete flowfield analysis. Two Dimensional PIV results show a distinctive pattern in the downwash angle for the different gap and stagger configurations tested. The downwash angle increases with increasing gap and stagger. It is also evident that the change in downwash angle is directly proportional to the change in lift coefficient as would be expected. Increasing gap spacing increases the downwash angle as well. Based on

  5. Preliminary report: NIF laser bundle review

    SciTech Connect

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Larson, D.W.; Erlandson, A.C.

    1995-08-31

    As requested in the guidance memo {sup 1}, this committe determined whether there are compelling reasons to recommend a change from the NIF CDR baseline laser. The baseline bundle design based on a tradeoff between cost and technical risk, which is replicated four times to create the required 192 beams. The baseline amplifier design uses bottom loading 1{times}4 slab and flashlamp cassettes for amplifier maintenance and large vacuum enclosures (2.5m high {times} 7m wide in cross-section for each of the two spatial filters in each of the four bundles. The laser beams are arranged in two laser bays configured in a u-shape around the target area. The entire bundle review effort was performed in a very short time (six weeks) and with limited resources (15 personnel part-time). This should be compared to the effort that produced the CDR design (12 months, 50 to 100 personnel). This committee considered three alternate bundle configurations (2{times}2, 4{times}2, and 4{times}4 bundles), and evaluated each bundle against the baseline design using the seven requested issues in the guidance memo: Cost; schedule; performance risk; maintainability/operability; hardware failure cost exposure; activation; and design flexibility. The issues were reviewed to identify differences between each alternate bundle configuration and the baseline.

  6. F actin bundles in Drosophila bristles. I. Two filament cross-links are involved in bundling

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Transverse sections though Drosophila bristles reveal 7-11 nearly round, plasma membrane-associated bundles of actin filaments. These filaments are hexagonally packed and in a longitudinal section they show a 12-nm periodicity in both the 1.1 and 1.0 views. From earlier studies this periodicity is attributable to cross-links and indicates that the filaments are maximally cross-linked, singed mutants also have 7-11 bundles, but the bundles are smaller, flattened, and the filaments within the bundles are randomly packed (not hexagonal); no periodicity can be detected in longitudinal sections. Another mutant, forked (f36a), also has 7-11 bundles but even though the bundles are very small, the filaments within them are hexagonally packed and display a 12-nm periodicity in longitudinal section. The singed-forked double mutant lacks filament bundles. Thus there are at least two species of cross-links between adjacent actin filaments. Hints of why two species of cross-links are necessary can be gleaned by studying bristle formation. Bristles sprout with only microtubules within them. A little later in development actin filaments appear. At early stages the filaments in the bundles are randomly packed. Later the filaments in the bundles become hexagonally packed and maximally cross-linked. We consider that the forked proteins may be necessary early in development to tie the filaments together in a bundle so that they can be subsequently zippered together by fascin (the singed gene product). PMID:7622563

  7. Validation of fuel bundle mechanical performance code ETOILE with bundle/duct interaction experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Masatoshi )

    1993-04-01

    Validation of the ETOILE code through a comparison with experimental bundle/duct interaction (BDI) data is discussed. ETOILE is a newly developed three-dimensional finite element program that uses a new analytical method to predict distortions and mechanical behavior in wire-wrapped-type fuel-pin bundles during irradiation in liquid-metal fast breeder reactor cores. Comparisons between the ETOILE solutions and the experimental data for bundle stiffnesses and minimum pin-to-pin and pin-to-duct clearances under bundle compression suggest that BDI performance can be predicted reasonably well with a suitable choice of friction coefficient and initial spiral wire displacement. Application of the code in the analysis of the mechanical behavior of soft bundles with distributed wireless pins is also presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of this design in reducing the interaction forces between a fuel-pin bundle and a duct wall under bundle compression. Agreement with the experimental data is fairly good for the reduction in bundle stiffness when the configuration is changed from the normal bundle to the soft bundle.

  8. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    MedlinePlus

    ... warmth at the tube site; discharge that's yellow, green, or foul-smelling; fever) excessive bleeding or drainage from the tube site severe abdominal pain persistent vomiting or diarrhea trouble passing gas or having a bowel movement pink-red tissue (called granulation tissue) coming out ...

  9. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor fuel module construction

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, Gary K.; DiGuiseppe, Carl P.

    1985-01-01

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wher the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements. The arrangements of the fissile and fertile regions in an alternating axial manner minimizes the radial power peaking factors and provides a more optional thermal-hydraulic design than is afforded by radial arrangements.

  10. Heat transfer coefficients for staggered arrays of short pin fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Short pin fins are often used to increase that heat transfer to the coolant in the trailing edge of a turbine blade. Due primarily to limits of casting technology, it is not possible to manufacture pins of optimum length for heat transfer purposes in the trailing edge region. In many cases the pins are so short that they actually decrease the total heat transfer surface area compared to a plain wall. A heat transfer data base for these short pins is not available in the literature. Heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for several staggered arrays of short pin fins. The measured Nusselt numbers when plotted versus Reynolds numbers were found to fall on a single curve for all surfaces tested. The heat transfer coefficients for the short pin fins (length to diameter ratios of 1/2 and 2) were found to be about a factor of two lower than data from the literature for longer pin arrays (length to diameter ratios of about 8).

  11. Rashba coupling amplification by a staggered crystal field

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Cottin, David; Casula, Michele; Lantz, Gabriel; Klein, Yannick; Petaccia, Luca; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Marsi, Marino; Gauzzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in materials where relativistic effects induce non-trivial electronic states with promise for spintronics applications. One example is the splitting of bands with opposite spin chirality produced by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling in asymmetric potentials. Sizable splittings have been hitherto obtained using either heavy elements, where this coupling is intrinsically strong, or large surface electric fields. Here by means of angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we give evidence of a large Rashba coupling of 0.25 eV Å, leading to a remarkable band splitting up to 0.15 eV with hidden spin-chiral polarization in centrosymmetric BaNiS2. This is explained by a huge staggered crystal field of 1.4 V Å−1, produced by a gliding plane symmetry, that breaks inversion symmetry at the Ni site. This unexpected result in the absence of heavy elements demonstrates an effective mechanism of Rashba coupling amplification that may foster spin-orbit band engineering. PMID:27089869

  12. An Adaptive Staggered Dose Design for a Normal Endpoint.

    PubMed

    Wu, Joseph; Menon, Sandeep; Chang, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In a clinical trial where several doses are compared to a control, a multi-stage design that combines both the selection of the best dose and the confirmation of this selected dose is desirable. An example is the two-stage drop-the-losers or pick-the-winner design, where inferior doses are dropped after interim analysis. Selection of target dose(s) can be based on ranking of observed effects, hypothesis testing with adjustment for multiplicity, or other criteria at interim stages. A number of methods have been proposed and have made significant gains in trial efficiency. However, many of these designs started off with all doses with equal allocation and did not consider prioritizing the doses using existing dose-response information. We propose an adaptive staggered dose procedure that allows explicit prioritization of doses and applies error spending scheme that favors doses with assumed better responses. This design starts off with only a subset of the doses and adaptively adds new doses depending on interim results. Using simulation, we have shown that this design performs better in terms of increased statistical power than the drop-the-losers design given strong prior information of dose response.

  13. Requirements for contractility in disordered cytoskeletal bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Gardel, Margaret L.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2012-03-01

    Actomyosin contractility is essential for biological force generation, and is well understood in highly organized structures such as striated muscle. Additionally, actomyosin bundles devoid of this organization are known to contract both in vivo and in vitro, which cannot be described by standard muscle models. To narrow down the search for possible contraction mechanisms in these systems, we investigate their microscopic symmetries. We show that contractile behavior requires non-identical motors that generate large-enough forces to probe the nonlinear elastic behavior of F-actin. This suggests a role for filament buckling in the contraction of these bundles, consistent with recent experimental results on reconstituted actomyosin bundles.

  14. Spectral properties and chiral symmetry violations of (staggered) domain wall fermions in the Schwinger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelbling, Christian; Zielinski, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We follow up on a suggestion by Adams and construct explicit domain wall fermion operators with staggered kernels. We compare different domain wall formulations, namely the standard construction as well as Boriçi's modified and Chiu's optimal construction, utilizing both Wilson and staggered kernels. In the process, we generalize the staggered kernels to arbitrary even dimensions and introduce both truncated and optimal staggered domain wall fermions. Some numerical investigations are carried out in the (1 +1 )-dimensional setting of the Schwinger model, where we explore spectral properties of the bulk, effective and overlap Dirac operators in the free-field case, on quenched thermalized gauge configurations and on smooth topological configurations. We compare different formulations using the effective mass, deviations from normality and violations of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation as measures of chirality.

  15. Examining B(M1) staggering as a fingerprint for chiral doublet bands

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, B.; Yao, J. M.; Zhang, S. Q.; Wang, S. Y.; Meng, J.

    2009-04-15

    The electromagnetic transitions of the doublet bands with different triaxiality parameter {gamma} are discussed in the particle rotor model with {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}h{sub 11/2}{sup -1} configuration. It is found that B(M1) staggering as well as the resulting B(M1)/B(E2) and B(M1){sub in}/B(M1){sub out} staggering are sensitive to the triaxiality parameter {gamma}, and they associate strongly with the characters of nuclear chirality for 15 deg. {<=}{gamma}{<=}30 deg., i.e., the staggering is weak in the chiral vibration region while strong in the static chirality region. For partner bands with near degenerate energy spectra and similar B(M1) and B(E2) transitions, the strong B(M1) staggering can be used as a fingerprint for the static chirality.

  16. Superconductor magnets used for stagger-tuning traveling-wave maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Superconducting materials reduce size and weight of magnets used for stagger-tuning individual traveling-wave maser crystals. The invention is useful in microwave communication systems requiring a high information rate.

  17. {Delta}I = 2 energy staggering in normal deformed dysprosium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.A.; Brown, T.B.; Archer, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Very high spin states (I{ge}50{Dirac_h}) have been observed in {sup 155,156,157}Dy. The long regular band sequences, free from sharp backbending effects, observed in these dysprosium nuclei offer the possibility of investigating the occurence of any {Delta}I = 2 staggering in normal deformed nuclei. Employing the same analysis techniques as used in superdeformed nuclei, certain bands do indeed demonstrate an apparent staggering and this is discussed.

  18. SU(5) heterotic Standard Model bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Björn; Hoffmann, Norbert

    2012-04-01

    We construct a class of stable SU(5) bundles on an elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau threefold with two sections, a variant of the ordinary Weierstrass fibration, which admits a free involution. The bundles are invariant under the involution, solve the topological constraint imposed by the heterotic anomaly equation and give three generations of Standard Model fermions after symmetry breaking by Wilson lines of the intermediate SU(5) GUT-group to the Standard Model gauge group. Among the solutions we find some which can be perturbed to solutions of the Strominger system. Thus these solutions provide a step toward the construction of phenomenologically realistic heterotic flux compactifications via non-Kähler deformations of Calabi-Yau geometries with bundles. This particular class of solutions involves a rank two hidden sector bundle and does not require background fivebranes for anomaly cancellation.

  19. Robust incoherent fiber optic bundle decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Hilary E. (Inventor); DePlachett, Charles P. (Inventor); Deason, Brent E. (Inventor); Pilgrim, Robert A. (Inventor); Sanford, Harold S. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Apparatus and method for calibrating an incoherent fiber optic bundle for use in transmitting visual or infrared coherent images. The apparatus includes a computer, a computer video monitor, an objective lens adjacent to the input end of the bundle, a second lens adjacent the output end of the bundle, and a CCD camera. The camera transmits video data to the monitor to produce an illuminated fiber optic image. The coordinates for the center of each fiber is found through an imaging process and the output fibers coordinates are related to the input fiber coordinates and processed in the computer to produce a mapping lookup-table (LUT) unique to the specific fiber bundle. Remapping of the LUT due to changes in the lens focus, CCD camera, or the addition of an infrared filter is accomplished by a software utility in the computer.

  20. Theoretical and practical considerations for staggered production of crops in a BLSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutte, G. W.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Yorio, N. C.; Wheeler, A.

    1997-01-01

    A functional Bioregenerative Life Support System (BLSS) will generate oxygen, remove excess carbon dioxide, purify water, and produce food on a continuous basis for long periods of operation. In order to minimize fluctuations in gas exchange, water purification, and yield that are inherent in batch systems, staggered planting and harvesting of the crop is desirable. A 418-d test of staggered production of potato cv. Norland (26-d harvest cycles) using nutrients recovered from inedible biomass was recently completed at Kennedy Space Center. The results indicate that staggered production can be sustained without detrimental effects on life support functions in a CELSS. System yields of H_2O, O_2 and food were higher in staggered than batch plantings. Plants growing in staggered production or batch production on ``aged'' solution initiated tubers earlier, and were shorter than plants grown on ``fresh'' solution. This morphological response required an increase in planting density to maintain full canopy coverage. Plants grown in staggered production used available light more efficiently than the batch planting due to increased sidelighting.

  1. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  2. Sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2002-01-01

    A sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough by which a multitude of fiber-optic elements may be passed through an opening or port in a wall or structure separating two environments at different pressures or temperatures while maintaining the desired pressure or temperature in each environment. The feedthrough comprises a rigid sleeve of suitable material, a bundle of individual optical fibers, and a resin-based sealing material that bonds the individual optical fibers to each other and to the rigid sleeve.

  3. Is It Complete Left Bundle Branch Block? Just Ablate the Right Bundle.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussam; Lupo, Pierpaolo; Foresti, Sara; De Ambroggi, Guido; Epicoco, Gianluca; Fundaliotis, Angelica; Cappato, Riccardo

    2017-03-01

    Complete left bundle branch block (LBBB) is established according to standard electrocardiographic criteria. However, functional LBBB may be rate-dependent or can perpetuate during tachycardia due to repetitive concealed retrograde penetration of impulses through the contralateral bundle "linking phenomenon." In this brief article, we present two patients with basal complete LBBB in whom ablating the right bundle unmasked the actual antegrade conduction capabilities of the left bundle. These cases highlight intriguing overlap between electrophysiological concepts of complete block, linking, extremely slow, and concealed conduction.

  4. Staggered Flux State in Two-Dimensional Hubbard Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Hisatoshi; Tamura, Shun; Ogata, Masao

    2016-12-01

    The stability and other properties of a staggered flux (SF) state or a correlated d-density wave state are studied for the Hubbard (t-t'-U) model on extended square lattices, as a low-lying state that competes with the dx2 - y2-wave superconductivity (d-SC) and possibly causes the pseudogap phenomena in underdoped high-Tc cuprates and organic κ-BEDT-TTF salts. In calculations, a variational Monte Carlo method is used. In the trial wave function, a configuration-dependent phase factor, which is vital to treat a current-carrying state for a large U/t, is introduced in addition to ordinary correlation factors. Varying U/t, t'/t, and the doping rate (δ) systematically, we show that the SF state becomes more stable than the normal state (projected Fermi sea) for a strongly correlated (U/t ≳ 5) and underdoped (δ ≲ 0.16) area. The decrease in energy is sizable, particularly in the area where Mott physics prevails and the circular current (order parameter) is strongly suppressed. These features are consistent with those for the t-J model. The effect of the frustration t'/t plays a crucial role in preserving charge homogeneity and appropriately describing the behavior of hole- and electron-doped cuprates and κ-BEDT-TTF salts. We argue that the SF state does not coexist with d-SC and is not a "normal state" from which d-SC arises. We also show that a spin current (flux or nematic) state is never stabilized in the same regime.

  5. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  6. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  7. Buckling behavior of individual and bundled microtubules.

    PubMed

    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Peter, Stephen J; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-04-07

    As the major structural constituent of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs) serve a variety of biological functions that range from facilitating organelle transport to maintaining the mechanical integrity of the cell. Neuronal MTs exhibit a distinct configuration, hexagonally packed bundles of MT filaments, interconnected by MT-associated protein (MAP) tau. Building on our previous work on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension, this study is focused on exploring the compression scenarios. Intracellular MTs carry a large fraction of the compressive loads sensed by the cell and therefore, like any other column-like structure, are prone to substantial bending and buckling. Various biological activities, e.g., actomyosin contractility and many pathological conditions are driven or followed by bending, looping, and buckling of MT filaments. The coarse-grained model previously developed in our lab has been used to study the mechanical behavior of individual and bundled in vivo MT filaments under uniaxial compression. Both configurations show tip-localized, decaying, and short-wavelength buckling. This behavior highlights the role of the surrounding cytoplasm and MAP tau on MT buckling behavior, which allows MT filaments to bear much larger compressive forces. It is observed that MAP tau interconnections improve this effect by a factor of two. The enhanced ability of MT bundles to damp buckling waves relative to individual MT filaments, may be interpreted as a self-defense mechanism because it helps axonal MTs to endure harsher environments while maintaining their function. The results indicate that MT filaments in a bundle do not buckle simultaneously implying that the applied stress is not equally shared among the MT filaments, that is a consequence of the nonuniform distribution of MAP tau proteins along the bundle length. Furthermore, from a pathological perspective, it is observed that axonal MT bundles are more vulnerable to failure in

  8. Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-03-07

    Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

  9. Buckling Behavior of Individual and Bundled Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Peter, Stephen J.; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    As the major structural constituent of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs) serve a variety of biological functions that range from facilitating organelle transport to maintaining the mechanical integrity of the cell. Neuronal MTs exhibit a distinct configuration, hexagonally packed bundles of MT filaments, interconnected by MT-associated protein (MAP) tau. Building on our previous work on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension, this study is focused on exploring the compression scenarios. Intracellular MTs carry a large fraction of the compressive loads sensed by the cell and therefore, like any other column-like structure, are prone to substantial bending and buckling. Various biological activities, e.g., actomyosin contractility and many pathological conditions are driven or followed by bending, looping, and buckling of MT filaments. The coarse-grained model previously developed in our lab has been used to study the mechanical behavior of individual and bundled in vivo MT filaments under uniaxial compression. Both configurations show tip-localized, decaying, and short-wavelength buckling. This behavior highlights the role of the surrounding cytoplasm and MAP tau on MT buckling behavior, which allows MT filaments to bear much larger compressive forces. It is observed that MAP tau interconnections improve this effect by a factor of two. The enhanced ability of MT bundles to damp buckling waves relative to individual MT filaments, may be interpreted as a self-defense mechanism because it helps axonal MTs to endure harsher environments while maintaining their function. The results indicate that MT filaments in a bundle do not buckle simultaneously implying that the applied stress is not equally shared among the MT filaments, that is a consequence of the nonuniform distribution of MAP tau proteins along the bundle length. Furthermore, from a pathological perspective, it is observed that axonal MT bundles are more vulnerable to failure in

  10. Staggered-grid split-node method for spontaneous rupture simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalguer, Luis A.; Day, Steven M.

    2007-02-01

    We adapt the traction-at-split-node method for spontaneous rupture simulations to the velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference scheme. The staggered-grid implementation introduces both velocity and stress discontinuities via split nodes. The staggered traction components on the fault plane are interpolated to form the traction vector at split nodes, facilitating alignment of the vectors of sliding friction and slip velocity. To simplify the split-node partitioning of the equations of motion, spatial differencing is reduced from fourth to second order along the fault plane, but in the remainder of the grid the spatial differencing scheme remains identical to conventional spatially fourth-order three-dimensional staggered-grid schemes. The resulting staggered-grid split node (SGSN) method has convergence rates relative to rupture-time, final-slip, and peak-slip-velocity metrics that are very similar to the corresponding rates for both a partly staggered split-node code (DFM) and the boundary integral method. The SGSN method gives very accurate solutions (in the sense that errors are comparable to the uncertainties in the reference solution) when the median resolution of the cohesive zone is 4.4 grid points. Combined with previous results for other grid types and other fault-discontinuity approximations, the SGSN results demonstrate that accuracy in finite difference solutions to the spontaneous rupture problem is controlled principally by the scheme used to represent the fault discontinuity, and is relatively insensitive to the grid geometry used to represent the continuum. The method provides an efficient and accurate means of adding spontaneous rupture capability to velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference codes, while retaining the computational advantages of those codes for problems of wave propagation in complex media.

  11. The histology of retinal nerve fiber layer bundles and bundle defects.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1979-05-01

    The fiber bundle striations recognized clinically in normal monkey eyes appear to be bundles of axons compartmentalized within glial tunnels formed by Müller's-cell processes, when viewed histologically. The dark boundaries that separate individual bundles are the broadened foot endings of these cells near the inner surface of the retina. Within one week after focal retinal photocoagulation, characteristic fundus changes could be seen in experimental eyes. In histologic sections of the involved retina, there was marked cystic degeneration of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Within one month, atrophy of distal axon segments was complete. With the drop-out of damaged axons and thinning of individual fiber bundles, retinal striations became less prominent. The resulting fundus picture in these experimental eyes is similar to fiber bundle defects that can be seen clinically in various neuro-ophthalmic disorders.

  12. Spectral bundles and the DRY-Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Björn; Curio, Gottfried

    2012-04-01

    Supersymmetric heterotic string models, built from a Calabi-Yau threefold X endowed with a stable vector bundle V, usually start from a phenomenologically motivated choice of a bundle Vv in the visible sector, the spectral cover construction on an elliptically fibered X being a prominent example. The ensuing anomaly mismatch between c2(Vv) and c2(X), or rather the corresponding differential forms, is often 'solved', on the cohomological level, by including a fivebrane. This leads to the question whether the difference can be alternatively realized by a further stable bundle. The 'DRY'-conjecture of Douglas, Reinbacher and Yau in math.AG/0604597 gives a sufficient condition on cohomology classes on X to be realized as the Chern classes of a stable sheaf. In 1010.1644 [hep-th], we showed that infinitely many classes on X exist for which the conjecture is true. In this note, we give the sufficient condition for the mentioned fivebrane classes to be realized by a further stable bundle in the hidden sector. Using a result obtained in 1011.6246 [hep-th], we show that corresponding bundles exist, thereby confirming this version of the DRY-Conjecture.

  13. Photothermal imaging through coherent infrared bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Yonat; Tepper, Michal; Harrington, James A.; Ben David, Moshe; Gannot, Israel

    2011-03-01

    This study aims to develop a photothermal imaging system through a coherent infrared bundle. This system will be used to determine the oxygenation level of various tissues, suspected malignant tissues in particular. The oxygenation estimation is preformed using a computerized algorithm. In order to evaluate the system, different bundle configurations were used for the determination of the optimal one. Bundle transmittance and the algorithm's estimation ability were measured, measurements were performed using agar phantoms consisting of varying ratios of Methylene Blue and ICG. A bundle consisting of 19 Teflon waveguides with a of 1.1mm was found to be the optimal configuration with an RMS of the error of 9.38%. At a second stage the system was validated on blood samples with varying oxygenation levels and there oxygenation levels were estimated. This stage had an RMS of the error of 10.16% for the oxygenation level estimation for samples with a 50% oxygenation level and higher. Once the basic system was validated successfully on agar phantoms and blood samples a portable system was designed and built in order to fit the system for portable use. The portable system consists of a white light illuminating source followed by filters transmitting certain wavelengths, a transmitting fiber, a thermal imaging bundle and a portable thermal camera. This portable system will be evaluated in order to have an adequate portable system for implementing the method out of the lab.

  14. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  15. A Kinetic Model of Active Extensile Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Daniel; Chakraborty, Bulbul; Baskaran, Aparna

    Recent experiments in active filament networks reveal interesting rheological properties (Dan Chen: APS March Meeting 2015 D49.00001). This system consumes ATP to produce an extensile motion in bundles of microtubules. This extension then leads to self generated stresses and spontaneous flows. We propose a minimal model where the activity is modeled by self-extending bundles that are part of a cross linked network. This network can reorganize itself through buckling of extending filaments and merging events that alter the topology of the network. We numerically simulate this minimal kinetic model and examine the emergent rheological properties and determine how stresses are generated by the extensile activity. We will present results that focus on the effects of confinement and network connectivity of the bundles on stress fluctuations and response of an active gel.

  16. Hydrodynamic interaction of bacterial flagella - flagellar bundling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sookkyung

    2013-11-01

    Flagellar bundling is an important aspect of locomotion in bacteria such as Escherichia coli. To study the hydrodynamic behavior of helical flagella, we present a computational model that is based on the geometry of the bacterial flagellar filament at the micrometer scale. We consider two model flagella, each of which has a rotary motor at its base with the rotation rate of the motor set at 100 Hz. Bundling occurs when both flagella are left-handed helices turning counterclockwise (when viewed from the nonmotor end of the flagellum looking back toward the motor) or when both flagella are right-handed helices turning clockwise. Helical flagella of the other combinations of handedness and rotation direction do not bundle. In this work we use the generalized immersed boundary method combined with the unconstrained Kirchhoff rod theory, which allows us to study the complicated hydrodynamics of flagellar behavior. This is a joint work with Charlie Peskin at NYU. NSF

  17. Contour based object detection using part bundles

    PubMed Central

    Lu, ChengEn; Adluru, Nagesh; Ling, Haibin; Zhu, Guangxi; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel framework for contour based object detection from cluttered environments. Given a contour model for a class of objects, it is first decomposed into fragments hierarchically. Then, we group these fragments into part bundles, where a part bundle can contain overlapping fragments. Given a new image with set of edge fragments we develop an efficient voting method using local shape similarity between part bundles and edge fragments that generates high quality candidate part configurations. We then use global shape similarity between the part configurations and the model contour to find optimal configuration. Furthermore, we show that appearance information can be used for improving detection for objects with distinctive texture when model contour does not sufficiently capture deformation of the objects.

  18. Perturbative matching of the staggered four-fermion operators for {epsilon}'/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Weonjong

    2001-09-01

    Using staggered fermions, we calculate the perturbative corrections to the bilinear and four-fermion operators that are used in the numerical study of weak matrix elements for {epsilon}'/{epsilon}. We present results for one-loop matching coefficients between continuum operators, calculated in the naive dimensional regularization (NDR) scheme, and gauge invariant staggered fermion operators. In particular, we concentrate on Feynman diagrams of the current-current insertion type. We also present results for the tadpole improved operators. These results, combined with existing results for penguin diagrams, provide a complete one-loop renormalization of the staggered four-fermion operators. Therefore, using our results, it is possible to match a lattice calculation of K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing and K{yields}{pi}{pi} decays to the continuum NDR results with all corrections of O(g{sup 2}) included.

  19. Coal mining with Triple-section extraction process in stagger arrangement roadway layout method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zimo; Liu, Baozhu; Zhao, Jingli; Chanda, Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    This paper introduces the Triple-section extraction process in the three-dimensional roadway layout of stagger arrangement method for longwall top-coal caving mining. This 3-D roadway layout of stagger arrangement method without coal pillars, which arranged the air intake roadway and air return roadway in different horizons, realizing the design theory transformation of roadway layout from 2D system to 3D system. And the paper makes systematic analysis to the geological, technical and economic factors, applies this new mining roadway layout technology for raising coal recovery ratio and solving the problems about full-seam mining in thick coal seam synthetically according to theoretical study and mining practice. Furthermore, the paper presents a physical simulation about inner staggered roadway layout of this particular longwall top-coal caving method.

  20. A Mechanistic Approach for the Prediction of Critical Power in BWR Fuel Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandraker, Dinesh Kumar; Vijayan, Pallipattu Krishnan; Sinha, Ratan Kumar; Aritomi, Masanori

    The critical power corresponding to the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) or dryout condition is an important design parameter for the evaluation of safety margins in a nuclear fuel bundle. The empirical approaches for the prediction of CHF in a rod bundle are highly geometric specific and proprietary in nature. The critical power experiments are very expensive and technically challenging owing to the stringent simulation requirements for the rod bundle tests involving radial and axial power profiles. In view of this, the mechanistic approach has gained momentum in the thermal hydraulic community. The Liquid Film Dryout (LFD) in an annular flow is the mechanism of CHF under BWR conditions and the dryout modeling has been found to predict the CHF quite accurately for a tubular geometry. The successful extension of the mechanistic model of dryout to the rod bundle application is vital for the evaluation of critical power in the rod bundle. The present work proposes the uniform film flow approach around the rod by analyzing individual film of the subchannel bounded by rods with different heat fluxes resulting in different film flow rates around a rod and subsequently distributing the varying film flow rates of a rod to arrive at the uniform film flow rate as it has been found that the liquid film has a strong tendency to be uniform around the rod. The FIDOM-Rod code developed for the dryout prediction in BWR assemblies provides detailed solution of the multiple liquid films in a subchannel. The approach of uniform film flow rate around the rod simplifies the liquid film cross flow modeling and was found to provide dryout prediction with a good accuracy when compared with the experimental data of 16, 19 and 37 rod bundles under BWR conditions. The critical power has been predicted for a newly designed 54 rod bundle of the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). The selected constitutive models for the droplet entrainment and deposition rates validated for the dryout in tube were

  1. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  2. QUANTIZING TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, A.S.; Gray, G.W.

    1958-07-01

    Beam deflection tubes are described for use in switching or pulse amplitude analysis. The salient features of the invention reside in the target arrangement whereby outputs are obtained from a plurality of collector electrodes each correspondlng with a non-overlapping range of amplitudes of the input sigmal. The tube is provded with mcans for deflecting the electron beam a1ong a line in accordance with the amplitude of an input signal. The target structure consists of a first dymode positioned in the path of the beam wlth slots spaced a1ong thc deflection line, and a second dymode posltioned behind the first dainode. When the beam strikes the solid portions along the length of the first dymode the excited electrons are multiplied and collected in separate collector electrodes spaced along the beam line. Similarly, the electrons excited when the beam strikes the second dynode are multiplied and collected in separate electrodes spaced along the length of the second dyode.

  3. Electron tube

    DOEpatents

    Suyama, Motohiro [Hamamatsu, JP; Fukasawa, Atsuhito [Hamamatsu, JP; Arisaka, Katsushi [Los Angeles, CA; Wang, Hanguo [North Hills, CA

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  4. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  5. Chiral transition and deconfinement transition in QCD with the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action

    SciTech Connect

    Petreczky P.; Bazavov, A.

    2011-10-11

    We report preliminary results on the chiral and deconfinement aspects of the QCD transition at finite temperature using the Highly Improved Staggered Quark (HISQ) action on lattices with temporal extent of N{sub {tau}} = 6 and 8. The chiral aspects of the transition are studied in terms of quark condensates and the disconnected chiral susceptibility. We study the deconfinement transition in terms of the strange quark number susceptibility and the renormalized Polyakov loop. We made continuum estimates for some quantities and find reasonably good agreement between our results and the recent continuum extrapolated results obtained with the stout staggered quark action.

  6. Horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongcai; Wu, Lin

    2015-07-10

    We present the design of a horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications. This solar concentrator consists of an array of telecentric primary concentrators, a horizontally staggered lightguide layer, and a vertically tapered lightguide layer. The primary concentrator is realized by two plano-aspheric lenses with lateral movement and maintains a high F-number over an angle range of ±23.5°. The results of the simulations show that the solar concentrator achieves a high concentration ratio of 500× with ±0.5° of acceptance angle by a single-axis tracker and dual lateral translation stages.

  7. Topological index theorem on the lattice through the spectral flow of staggered fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcoiti, V.; Follana, E.; Vaquero, A.; Di Carlo, G.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate numerically the spectral flow introduced by Adams for the staggered Dirac operator on realistic (quenched) gauge configurations. We obtain clear numerical evidence that the definition works as expected: there is a clear separation between crossings near and far away from the origin, and the topological charge defined through the crossings near the origin agrees, for most configurations, with the one defined through the near-zero modes of large taste-singlet chirality of the staggered Dirac operator. The crossings are much closer to the origin if we improve the Dirac operator used in the definition, and they move towards the origin as we decrease the lattice spacing.

  8. Meromorphic Higgs bundles and related geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalakov, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The present note is mostly a survey on the generalised Hitchin integrable system and moduli spaces of meromorphic G-Higgs bundles. We also fill minor gaps in the existing literature, outline a calculation of the infinitesimal period map and review some related geometries.

  9. Social Bundles: Thinking through the Infant Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlie, Julie; Leith, Valerie M. Sheach

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a UK research study on immunization, this article investigates parents' understandings of the relationship between themselves, their infants, other bodies, the state, and cultural practices--material and symbolic. The article argues that infant bodies are best thought of as always social bundles, rather than as biobundles made social…

  10. Laughter-induced left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Chow, Grant V; Desai, Dipan; Spragg, David D; Zakaria, Sammy

    2012-10-01

    We present the case of a patient with ischemic heart disease and intermittent left bundle branch block, reproducibly induced by laughter. Following treatment of ischemia with successful deployment of a drug-eluting stent, no further episodes of inducible LBBB were seen. Transient ischemia, exacerbated by elevated intrathoracic pressure during laughter, may have contributed to onset of this phenomenon.

  11. Nasogastric feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - nasogastric tube; NG tube; Bolus feeding; Continuous pump feeding; Gavage tube ... If your child has an NG tube, try to keep your child from touching or pulling on the tube. After your nurse teaches you how to flush the tube ...

  12. Bundling dynamics regulates the active mechanics and transport in carbon nanotube networks and their nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Wang, Hailong; Jung, Hyun Young; Hong, Sanghyun; Lee, Sung-Goo; Kim, Sung-Ryong; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Jung, Yung Joon

    2012-05-01

    High-density carbon nanotube networks (CNNs) continue to attract interest as active elements in nanoelectronic devices, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and multifunctional nanocomposites. The interplay between the network nanostructure and its properties is crucial, yet current understanding remains limited to the passive response. Here, we employ a novel superstructure consisting of millimeter-long vertically aligned single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) sandwiched between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers to quantify the effect of two classes of mechanical stimuli, film densification and stretching, on the electronic and thermal transport across the network. The network deforms easily with an increase in the electrical and thermal conductivities, suggestive of a floppy yet highly reconfigurable network. Insight from atomistically informed coarse-grained simulations uncover an interplay between the extent of lateral assembly of the bundles, modulated by surface zipping/unzipping, and the elastic energy associated with the bent conformations of the nanotubes/bundles. During densification, the network becomes highly interconnected yet we observe a modest increase in bundling primarily due to the reduced spacing between the SWCNTs. The stretching, on the other hand, is characterized by an initial debundling regime as the strain accommodation occurs via unzipping of the branched interconnects, followed by rapid rebundling as the strain transfers to the increasingly aligned bundles. In both cases, the increase in the electrical and thermal conductivity is primarily due to the increase in bundle size; the changes in network connectivity have a minor effect on the transport. Our results have broad implications for filamentous networks of inorganic nanoassemblies composed of interacting tubes, wires and ribbons/belts.High-density carbon nanotube networks (CNNs) continue to attract interest as active elements in nanoelectronic devices, nanoelectromechanical systems

  13. Interplanetary Overlay Network Bundle Protocol Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) system's BP package, an implementation of the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Bundle Protocol (BP) and supporting services, has been specifically designed to be suitable for use on deep-space robotic vehicles. Although the ION BP implementation is unique in its use of zero-copy objects for high performance, and in its use of resource-sensitive rate control, it is fully interoperable with other implementations of the BP specification (Internet RFC 5050). The ION BP implementation is built using the same software infrastructure that underlies the implementation of the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) built into the flight software of Deep Impact. It is designed to minimize resource consumption, while maximizing operational robustness. For example, no dynamic allocation of system memory is required. Like all the other ION packages, ION's BP implementation is designed to port readily between Linux and Solaris (for easy development and for ground system operations) and VxWorks (for flight systems operations). The exact same source code is exercised in both environments. Initially included in the ION BP implementations are the following: libraries of functions used in constructing bundle forwarders and convergence-layer (CL) input and output adapters; a simple prototype bundle forwarder and associated CL adapters designed to run over an IPbased local area network; administrative tools for managing a simple DTN infrastructure built from these components; a background daemon process that silently destroys bundles whose time-to-live intervals have expired; a library of functions exposed to applications, enabling them to issue and receive data encapsulated in DTN bundles; and some simple applications that can be used for system checkout and benchmarking.

  14. Flow and Temperature Distribution Evaluation on Sodium Heated Large-sized Straight Double-wall-tube Steam Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kisohara, Naoyuki; Moribe, Takeshi; Sakai, Takaaki

    2006-07-01

    The sodium heated steam generator (SG) being designed in the feasibility study on commercialized fast reactor cycle systems is a straight double-wall-tube type. The SG is large sized to reduce its manufacturing cost by economics of scale. This paper addresses the temperature and flow multi-dimensional distributions at steady state to obtain the prospect of the SG. Large-sized heat exchanger components are prone to have non-uniform flow and temperature distributions. These phenomena might lead to tube buckling or tube to tube-sheet junction failure in straight tube type SGs, owing to tubes thermal expansion difference. The flow adjustment devices installed in the SG are optimized to prevent these issues, and the temperature distribution properties are uncovered by analysis methods. The analysis model of the SG consists of two parts, a sodium inlet distribution plenum (the plenum) and a heat transfer tubes bundle region (the bundle). The flow and temperature distributions in the plenum and the bundle are evaluated by the three-dimensional code 'FLUENT' and the two dimensional thermal-hydraulic code 'MSG', respectively. The MSG code is particularly developed for sodium heated SGs in JAEA. These codes have revealed that the sodium flow is distributed uniformly by the flow adjustment devices, and that the lateral tube temperature distributions remain within the allowable temperature range for the structural integrity of the tubes and the tube to tube-sheet junctions. (authors)

  15. Mixed action simulations on a staggered background: Interpretation and result for the 2-flavor QCD chiral condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenfratz, Anna; Hoffmann, Roland

    2006-12-01

    Growing evidence indicates that in the continuum limit the rooted staggered action is in the correct QCD universality class, the nonlocal terms arising from taste breaking can be viewed as lattice artifacts. In this paper we consider the 2-flavor Asqtad staggered action at lattice spacing a{approx_equal}0.13 fm and probe the properties of the staggered configurations by an overlap valence Dirac operator. By comparing the distribution of the overlap eigenmodes to continuum QCD predictions we investigate if/when the lattice artifacts are small as a function of the staggered quark mass. We define a matching overlap quark mass where the lattice corrections are minimal for the topological susceptibility and from the eigenmode distribution we predict the 2-flavor chiral condensate. Our results indicate that the staggered configurations are consistent with 2-flavor continuum QCD up to small lattice artifacts, and predict a consistent value for the infinite volume chiral condensate.

  16. Computational models of hair cell bundle mechanics: III. 3-D utricular bundles.

    PubMed

    Silber, Joe; Cotton, John; Nam, Jong-Hoon; Peterson, Ellengene H; Grant, Wally

    2004-11-01

    Six utricular hair bundles from a red-eared turtle are modeled using 3-D finite element analysis. The mechanical model includes shear deformable stereocilia, realignment of all forces during force load increments, and tip and lateral link inter-stereocilia connections. Results show that there are two distinct bundle types that can be separated by mechanical bundle stiffness. The more compliant group has fewer total stereocilia and short stereocilia relative to kinocilium height; these cells are located in the medial and lateral extrastriola. The stiff group are located in the striola. They have more stereocilia and long stereocilia relative to kinocilia heights. Tip link tensions show parallel behavior in peripheral columns of the bundle and serial behavior in central columns when the tip link modulus is near or above that of collagen (1x10(9) N/m(2)). This analysis shows that lumped parameter models of single stereocilia columns can show some aspects of bundle mechanics; however, a distributed, 3-D model is needed to explore overall bundle behavior.

  17. Masquerading bundle branch block: a variety of right bundle branch block with left anterior fascicular block.

    PubMed

    Elizari, Marcelo V; Baranchuk, Adrian; Chiale, Pablo A

    2013-01-01

    The so-called 'masquerading' type of right bundle branch block is caused by the simultaneous presence of a high-degree left anterior fascicular block often accompanied with severe left ventricular enlargement and/or fibrotic block in the anterolateral wall of the left ventricle. These conditions tend to reorient the terminal electrical forces of the QRS complex towards the left and upwards, in such a way that the characteristic slurred S wave in lead I becomes smaller or even disappears. In many cases of standard masquerading right bundle branch block, a small Q wave in lead I is present due to the initial forces of the left anterior fascicular block, which are oriented rightwards and inferiorly. However, in some cases, the Q wave in lead I also vanishes, and the mimicking of a left bundle branch block becomes perfect in standard leads. This is commonly associated with an inferior myocardial infarction or severe inferior fibrosis in cardiomyopathies. The typical QRS changes of right bundle branch block may eventually be concealed even in the right precordial leads; under such circumstances, the ECG diagnosis may be mistaken and the right bundle branch block totally missed. The masquerading right bundle branch block carries a poor prognosis, since it always implies the presence of a severe underlying heart disease.

  18. Turkish and Native English Academic Writers' Use of Lexical Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öztürk, Yusuf; Köse, Gül Durmusoglu

    2016-01-01

    Lexical bundles such as "on the other hand" and "as a result of" are extremely common and important in academic discourse. The appropriate use of lexical bundles typical of a specific academic discipline is important for writers and the absence of such bundles may not sound fluent and native-like. Recent studies (e.g. Adel…

  19. 76 FR 61365 - Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Initiative.... SUMMARY: This notice extends the deadlines for the submission of the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement.../patient-care-models/bundled-payments-for-care-improvement.html . Application Submission Deadline:...

  20. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  1. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-12-31

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  2. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  3. The use of staggered scheme and an absorbing buffer zone for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.

    1995-01-01

    Various problems from those proposed for the Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) workshop were studied using second and fourth order staggered spatial discretizations in conjunction with fourth order Runge-Kutta time integration. In addition, an absorbing buffer zone was used at the outflow boundaries. Promising results were obtained and provide a basis for application of these techniques to a wider variety of problems.

  4. Strongly Confined Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons Waveguiding Enabled by Planar Staggered Plasmonic Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Longfang; Xiao, Yifan; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Liang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to achieving highly efficient and strongly confined spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides at subwavelength scale enabled by planar staggered plasmonic waveguides (PSPWs). The structure of these new waveguides consists of an ultrathin metallic strip with periodic subwavelength staggered double groove arrays supported by a flexible dielectric substrate, leading to unique staggered EM coupling and waveguiding phenomenon. The spoof SPP propagation properties, including dispersion relations and near field distributions, are numerically investigated. Furthermore, broadband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to planar staggered plasmonic waveguide (PSPW) transitions are designed to achieve smooth momentum matching and highly efficient spoof SPP mode conversion. By applying these transitions, a CPW-PSPW-CPW structure is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the PSPW’s propagation performance at microwave frequencies. The investigation results show the proposed PSPWs have excellent performance of deep subwavelength spoof SPPs confinement, long propagation length and low bend loss, as well as great design flexibility to engineer the propagation properties by adjusting their geometry dimensions and material parameters. Our work opens up a new avenue for development of various advanced planar integrated plasmonic devices and circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes. PMID:27917930

  5. Strongly Confined Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons Waveguiding Enabled by Planar Staggered Plasmonic Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Longfang; Xiao, Yifan; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Liang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to achieving highly efficient and strongly confined spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides at subwavelength scale enabled by planar staggered plasmonic waveguides (PSPWs). The structure of these new waveguides consists of an ultrathin metallic strip with periodic subwavelength staggered double groove arrays supported by a flexible dielectric substrate, leading to unique staggered EM coupling and waveguiding phenomenon. The spoof SPP propagation properties, including dispersion relations and near field distributions, are numerically investigated. Furthermore, broadband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to planar staggered plasmonic waveguide (PSPW) transitions are designed to achieve smooth momentum matching and highly efficient spoof SPP mode conversion. By applying these transitions, a CPW-PSPW-CPW structure is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the PSPW’s propagation performance at microwave frequencies. The investigation results show the proposed PSPWs have excellent performance of deep subwavelength spoof SPPs confinement, long propagation length and low bend loss, as well as great design flexibility to engineer the propagation properties by adjusting their geometry dimensions and material parameters. Our work opens up a new avenue for development of various advanced planar integrated plasmonic devices and circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  6. Odd-even staggering in the neutron-proton interaction and nuclear mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we study odd-even staggering of the empirical neutron-proton interaction between the last neutron and the last proton, denoted as δ V1 n -1 p , and its consequence in the Garvey-Kelson mass relations (GKs) and nuclear mass models. The root-mean-squared deviations of predicted masses respectively for even-A and odd-A nuclei by using two combinatorial GKs suggest a large odd-even staggering of δ V1 n -1 p between even-odd and odd-even nuclei, while the odd-even difference of δ V1 n -1 p between even-even and odd-odd nuclei is much smaller. The contribution of the odd-even staggering of δ V1 n -1 p between even-A and odd-A nuclei in deviations of theoretical δ V1 n -1 p values of the Duflo-Zuker model and the improved Weizs a ̈cker -Skyrme model are well represented by an isospin-dependent term. The consideration of this odd-even staggering improves our description of binding energies and one-neutron separation energies in both the Duflo-Zuker model and the improved Weizs a ̈cker -Skyrme model.

  7. Convex Grooves in Staggered Herringbone Mixer Improve Mixing Efficiency of Laminar Flow in Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Young Gyu; Najera, Maria Alejandra; Lee, Sang Woo; Strickler, J. Rudi; Chang, Woo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The liquid streams in a microchannel are hardly mixed to form laminar flow, and the mixing issue is well described by a low Reynolds number scheme. The staggered herringbone mixer (SHM) using repeated patterns of grooves in the microchannel have been proved to be an efficient passive micro-mixer. However, only a negative pattern of the staggered herringbone mixer has been used so far after it was first suggested, to the best of our knowledge. In this study, the mixing efficiencies from negative and positive staggered herringbone mixer patterns as well as from opposite flow directions were tested to investigate the effect of the micro-structure geometry on the surrounding laminar flow. The positive herringbone pattern showed better mixing efficiency than the conventionally used negative pattern. Also, generally used forward flow gives better mixing efficiency than reverse flow. The mixing was completed after two cycles of staggered herringbone mixer with both forward and reverse flow in a positive pattern. The traditional negative pattern showed complete mixing after four and five cycles in forward and reverse flow direction, respectively. The mixing effect in all geometries was numerically simulated, and the results confirmed more efficient mixing in the positive pattern than the negative. The results can further enable the design of a more efficient microfluidic mixer, as well as in depth understanding of the phenomena of positive and negative patterns existing in nature with regards to the surrounding fluids. PMID:27814386

  8. Convex Grooves in Staggered Herringbone Mixer Improve Mixing Efficiency of Laminar Flow in Microchannel.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Tae Joon; Nam, Young Gyu; Najera, Maria Alejandra; Lee, Sang Woo; Strickler, J Rudi; Chang, Woo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The liquid streams in a microchannel are hardly mixed to form laminar flow, and the mixing issue is well described by a low Reynolds number scheme. The staggered herringbone mixer (SHM) using repeated patterns of grooves in the microchannel have been proved to be an efficient passive micro-mixer. However, only a negative pattern of the staggered herringbone mixer has been used so far after it was first suggested, to the best of our knowledge. In this study, the mixing efficiencies from negative and positive staggered herringbone mixer patterns as well as from opposite flow directions were tested to investigate the effect of the micro-structure geometry on the surrounding laminar flow. The positive herringbone pattern showed better mixing efficiency than the conventionally used negative pattern. Also, generally used forward flow gives better mixing efficiency than reverse flow. The mixing was completed after two cycles of staggered herringbone mixer with both forward and reverse flow in a positive pattern. The traditional negative pattern showed complete mixing after four and five cycles in forward and reverse flow direction, respectively. The mixing effect in all geometries was numerically simulated, and the results confirmed more efficient mixing in the positive pattern than the negative. The results can further enable the design of a more efficient microfluidic mixer, as well as in depth understanding of the phenomena of positive and negative patterns existing in nature with regards to the surrounding fluids.

  9. Staggered Chromosomal Hybrid Zones in the House Mouse: Relevance to Reticulate Evolution and Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Gündüz, İslam; Pollock, Christianne L.; Giménez, Mabel D.; Förster, Daniel W.; White, Thomas A.; Sans-Fuentes, Maria A.; Hauffe, Heidi C.; Ventura, Jacint; López-Fuster, María José; Searle, Jeremy B.

    2010-01-01

    In the house mouse there are numerous chromosomal races distinguished by different combinations of metacentric chromosomes. These may come into contact with each other and with the ancestral all-acrocentric race, and form hybrid zones. The chromosomal clines that make up these hybrid zones may be coincident or separated from each other (staggered). Such staggered hybrid zones are interesting because they may include populations of individuals homozygous for a mix of features of the hybridising races. We review the characteristics of four staggered hybrid zones in the house mouse and discuss whether they are examples of primary or secondary contact and whether they represent reticulate evolution or not. However, the most important aspect of staggered hybrid zones is that the homozygous populations within the zones have the potential to expand their distributions and become new races (a process termed ‘zonal raciation’). In this way they can add to the total ‘stock’ of chromosomal races in the species concerned. Speciation is an infrequent phenomenon that may involve an unusual set of circumstances. Each one of the products of zonal raciation has the potential to become a new species and by having more races increases the chance of a speciation event. PMID:24710041

  10. An evaluation of torque (moment) on implant/prosthesis with staggered buccal and lingual offset.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, L A; Kruger, B

    1996-06-01

    The supposition that staggered buccal and lingual implant offset is biomechanically advantageous was examined mathematically. The method of evaluation utilized a standard hypothetical geometric configuration from which implants could be staggered buccally and/or lingually in both arches. Torque (moment) values were calculated at the gold screw, abutment screw, and 3.5 mm apical to the head of the implant. Comparisons were made in percentages of change from the hypothetical standard to the buccal and/or lingual implant offset. In the maxillary arch, buccal offset decreased the torque (moment) while lingual offset increased it. If more lingually offset implants were present in the maxillary restoration, the total torque would be greater than if they were all in a straight line. Staggered buccolingual implant alignment often requires abutment reangulation. The resultant line of force produced by occlusal anatomy usually results in buccal inclination in the maxillary arch and lingual inclination in the mandibular arch. As a result, mandibular implant/prostheses are greatly favored over similar maxillary configurations because the mandibular resultant line of force usually passes lingually, closer to the components and supporting bone and considerably less torque is produced. Therefore, the concept of staggered offset for multiple implant-supported prostheses can be utilized on the mandible but is not recommended for the maxilla where maximum uniform buccal implant orientation is advised.

  11. Enhancement of Radiative Efficiency with Staggered InGaN Quantum Well Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tansu, Nelson; Dierolf, Volkmar; Huang, Gensheng; Penn, Samson; Zhao, Hongping; Liu, Guangyu; Li, Xiaohang; Poplawsky, Jonathan

    2011-07-14

    The technology on the large overlap InGaN QWs developed in this program is currently implemented in commercial technology in enhancing the internal quantum efficiency in major LED industry in US and Asia. The scientific finding from this work supported by the DOE enabled the implementation of this step-like staggered quantum well in the commercial LEDs.

  12. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  13. Irreducible vector bundles on some elliptic non-Kahler threefolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brînzănescu, Vasile; Vuletescu, Victor

    2015-05-01

    We study rank-2 vector bundles on non-Kähler threefolds π : X → B, which are elliptic principal bundles with at least one non-zero Chern class over a complex surface B with no curves. In this case, we prove that every rank-2 irreducible vector bundle on X is a pull-back from B up to a twist by a line bundle. These 2-vector bundles are, via the Kobayashi-Hitchin correspondence, solutions of the Yang-Mills equations on the threefold X.

  14. Multiwalled carbon nanotube reinforced biomimetic bundled gel fibres.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Haruko; Sasaki, Naruo; Matsunaga, Yukiko T

    2016-08-19

    This work describes the fabrication and characterization of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based biomimetic bundled gel fibres. The bundled gel fibres were reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A phase-separated aqueous solution with MWCNT and HPC was transformed into a bundled fibrous structure after being injected into a co-flow microfluidic device and applying the sheath flow. The resulting MWCNT-bundled gel fibres consist of multiple parallel microfibres. The mechanical and electrical properties of MWCNT-bundled gel fibres were improved and their potential for tissue engineering applications as a cell scaffold was demonstrated.

  15. Assembly of hair bundles, an amazing problem for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Barr-Gillespie, Peter-G

    2015-08-01

    The hair bundle--the sensory organelle of inner-ear hair cells of vertebrates--exemplifies the ability of a cell to assemble complex, elegant structures. Proper construction of the bundle is required for proper mechanotransduction in response to external forces and to transmit information about sound and movement. Bundles contain tightly controlled numbers of actin-filled stereocilia, which are arranged in defined rows of precise heights. Indeed, many deafness mutations that disable hair-cell cytoskeletal proteins also disrupt bundles. Bundle assembly is a tractable problem in molecular and cellular systems biology; the sequence of structural changes in stereocilia is known, and a modest number of proteins may be involved.

  16. A Comparison between Clinical Results of Selective Bundle and Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Song, Si Young; Yang, Cheol Jung; Ha, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anatomical double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with either selective anteromedial (AM) or posterolateral (PL) bundle reconstruction while preserving a relatively healthy ACL bundle. Materials and Methods The authors evaluated 98 patients with a mean follow-up of 30.8±4.0 months who had undergone DB or selective bundle ACL reconstructions. Of these, 34 cases underwent DB ACL reconstruction (group A), 34 underwent selective AM bundle reconstruction (group B), and 30 underwent selective PL bundle reconstructions (group C). These groups were compared with respect to Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, side-to-side differences of anterior laxity measured by KT-2000 arthrometer at 30 lbs, and stress radiography and Lachman and pivot shift test results. Pre- and post-operative data were objectively evaluated using a statistical approach. Results The preoperative anterior instability measured by manual stress radiography at 90° of knee flexion in group A was significantly greater than that in groups B and C (all p<0.001). At last follow-up, mean side-to-side instrumented laxities measured by the KT-2000 and manual stress radiography were significantly improved from preoperative data in all groups (all p<0.001). There were no significant differences between the three groups in anterior instability measured by KT-2000 arthrometer, pivot shift, or functional scores. Conclusion Selective bundle reconstruction in partial ACL tears offers comparable clinical results to DB reconstruction in complete ACL tears. PMID:27401652

  17. Emitters of N-photon bundles.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C Sánchez; Del Valle, E; Tudela, A González; Müller, K; Lichtmannecker, S; Kaniber, M; Tejedor, C; Finley, J J; Laussy, F P

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the ouput of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks of photonics, with landmarks such as the laser and single-photon sources. The development of quantum applications makes it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity QED scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups, or "bundles" of N photons, for integer N. Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state of the art samples. The emission can be tuned with system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as a N-photon gun. The theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters is developed, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  18. Care bundles reduce readmissions for COPD.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Healther; Tooley, Cathy; Nicholls, Carol; Lindsey-Halls, Anna

    In 2011, the respiratory nursing team at the James Paget University Hospital Foundation Trust were considering introducing a discharge care bundle for patients admitted with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. At the same time, the trust was asking for applications for Commissioning for Quality and Innovation schemes (CQUINs). These are locally agreed packages of quality improvement goals and indicators, which, if achieved in total, enable the provider to earn its full CQUIN payment. A CQUIN scheme should address the three domains of quality, safety and effectiveness, patient experience and also show innovation. This article discusses how the care bundle was introduced and how, over a 12-month period, it showed tangible results in improving the care pathway for COPD patients as well as reducing readmissions and saving a significant amount of money.

  19. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production.

  20. Type IIB flux compactifications on twistor bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaanpur, Ali

    2014-02-01

    We construct a U(1) bundle over N(1,1), usually considered as an SO(3) bundle on CP2, and show that type IIB supergravity can be consistently compactified over it. With the five form flux turned on, there is a solution for which the metric becomes Einstein. We further turn on 3-form fluxes and show that there is a one parameter family of solutions. In particular, there is a limiting solution of large 3-form fluxes for which two U(1) fiber directions of the metric shrink to zero size. We also discuss compactifications over N(1,1) to AdS3. All solutions turn out to be non-supersymmetric.

  1. Non-abelian higher gauge theory and categorical bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, David

    2016-12-01

    A gauge theory is associated with a principal bundle endowed with a connection permitting to define horizontal lifts of paths. The horizontal lifts of surfaces cannot be defined into a principal bundle structure. An higher gauge theory is an attempt to generalize the bundle structure in order to describe horizontal lifts of surfaces. A such attempt is particularly difficult for the non-abelian case. Some structures have been proposed to realize this goal (twisted bundle, gerbes with connection, bundle gerbe, 2-bundle). Each of them uses a category in place of the total space manifold of the usual principal bundle structure. Some of them replace also the structure group by a category (more precisely a Lie crossed module viewed as a category). But the base space remains still a simple manifold (possibly viewed as a trivial category with only identity arrows). We propose a new principal categorical bundle structure, with a Lie crossed module as structure groupoid, but with a base space belonging to a bigger class of categories (which includes non-trivial categories), that we called affine 2-spaces. We study the geometric structure of the categorical bundles built on these categories (which are a more complicated structure than the 2-bundles) and the connective structures on these bundles. Finally we treat an example interesting for quantum dynamics which is associated with the Bloch wave operator theory.

  2. Modeling considerations for the analysis of LMFBR steam generator tube clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, D.M.; Piper, R.M.

    1983-10-01

    In the design of the Babcock and Wilcox Helical Coil Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Steam Generator, the tube bundle is connected to the feedwater and steam plenums via ''inlet/outlet tubes.'' Of prime importance in the design of these tubes is the tube-to-tube and tube-to-shell clamps which are provided to prevent detrimental vibration. This paper presents a method of modeling the tubeto-tube clamps to accurately predict tube-to-clamp interaction in the finite element analysis. It is also the objective of this paper to demonstrate the validity of specific modeling assumptions in determining stresses in the clamp assembly. As this paper deals only with the analytical approach taken, no detailed results are presented.

  3. Uncovering ecosystem service bundles through social preferences.

    PubMed

    Martín-López, Berta; Iniesta-Arandia, Irene; García-Llorente, Marina; Palomo, Ignacio; Casado-Arzuaga, Izaskun; Amo, David García Del; Gómez-Baggethun, Erik; Oteros-Rozas, Elisa; Palacios-Agundez, Igone; Willaarts, Bárbara; González, José A; Santos-Martín, Fernando; Onaindia, Miren; López-Santiago, Cesar; Montes, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem service assessments have increasingly been used to support environmental management policies, mainly based on biophysical and economic indicators. However, few studies have coped with the social-cultural dimension of ecosystem services, despite being considered a research priority. We examined how ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs emerge from diverging social preferences toward ecosystem services delivered by various types of ecosystems in Spain. We conducted 3,379 direct face-to-face questionnaires in eight different case study sites from 2007 to 2011. Overall, 90.5% of the sampled population recognized the ecosystem's capacity to deliver services. Formal studies, environmental behavior, and gender variables influenced the probability of people recognizing the ecosystem's capacity to provide services. The ecosystem services most frequently perceived by people were regulating services; of those, air purification held the greatest importance. However, statistical analysis showed that socio-cultural factors and the conservation management strategy of ecosystems (i.e., National Park, Natural Park, or a non-protected area) have an effect on social preferences toward ecosystem services. Ecosystem service trade-offs and bundles were identified by analyzing social preferences through multivariate analysis (redundancy analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis). We found a clear trade-off among provisioning services (and recreational hunting) versus regulating services and almost all cultural services. We identified three ecosystem service bundles associated with the conservation management strategy and the rural-urban gradient. We conclude that socio-cultural preferences toward ecosystem services can serve as a tool to identify relevant services for people, the factors underlying these social preferences, and emerging ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs.

  4. Uncovering Ecosystem Service Bundles through Social Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Martín-López, Berta; Iniesta-Arandia, Irene; García-Llorente, Marina; Palomo, Ignacio; Casado-Arzuaga, Izaskun; Amo, David García Del; Gómez-Baggethun, Erik; Oteros-Rozas, Elisa; Palacios-Agundez, Igone; Willaarts, Bárbara; González, José A.; Santos-Martín, Fernando; Onaindia, Miren; López-Santiago, Cesar; Montes, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem service assessments have increasingly been used to support environmental management policies, mainly based on biophysical and economic indicators. However, few studies have coped with the social-cultural dimension of ecosystem services, despite being considered a research priority. We examined how ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs emerge from diverging social preferences toward ecosystem services delivered by various types of ecosystems in Spain. We conducted 3,379 direct face-to-face questionnaires in eight different case study sites from 2007 to 2011. Overall, 90.5% of the sampled population recognized the ecosystem’s capacity to deliver services. Formal studies, environmental behavior, and gender variables influenced the probability of people recognizing the ecosystem’s capacity to provide services. The ecosystem services most frequently perceived by people were regulating services; of those, air purification held the greatest importance. However, statistical analysis showed that socio-cultural factors and the conservation management strategy of ecosystems (i.e., National Park, Natural Park, or a non-protected area) have an effect on social preferences toward ecosystem services. Ecosystem service trade-offs and bundles were identified by analyzing social preferences through multivariate analysis (redundancy analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis). We found a clear trade-off among provisioning services (and recreational hunting) versus regulating services and almost all cultural services. We identified three ecosystem service bundles associated with the conservation management strategy and the rural-urban gradient. We conclude that socio-cultural preferences toward ecosystem services can serve as a tool to identify relevant services for people, the factors underlying these social preferences, and emerging ecosystem service bundles and trade-offs. PMID:22720006

  5. Mesophase Behavior in Carbon Fiber Bundles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    Mesophase Coal-tar pitch Mesophase bloating Composite fabrication Mesophase wetting Ccmposite micrography Petroleum pitch 20. Atl RACT (Continue on reve...fiber in petroleum pitch were pyrolyzed under three conditions of constraint. The results confirm a recent report that the mesophase transformation...proceeds differently within a fiber bundle than in bulk pitch . In the early stages of transformation, both pitch and mesophase wet the fiber, and the

  6. Alpha1 LASSO data bundles Lamont, OK

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William Jr; Vogelmann, Andrew; Endo, Satoshi; Toto, Tami; Xiao, Heng; Li, Zhijin; Cheng, Xiaoping; Krishna, Bhargavi

    2016-08-03

    A data bundle is a unified package consisting of LASSO LES input and output, observations, evaluation diagnostics, and model skill scores. LES input includes model configuration information and forcing data. LES output includes profile statistics and full domain fields of cloud and environmental variables. Model evaluation data consists of LES output and ARM observations co-registered on the same grid and sampling frequency. Model performance is quantified by skill scores and diagnostics in terms of cloud and environmental variables.

  7. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - bolus; G-tube - bolus; Gastrostomy button - bolus; Bard Button - bolus; MIC-KEY - bolus ... Your child's gastrostomy tube (G-tube) is a special tube in your child's stomach that will help deliver food and medicines until your ...

  8. An analytical fiber bundle model for pullout mechanics of root bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Schwarz, M.; Or, D.

    2011-09-01

    Roots in soil contribute to the mechanical stability of slopes. Estimation of root reinforcement is challenging because roots form complex biological networks whose geometrical and mechanical characteristics are difficult to characterize. Here we describe an analytical model that builds on simple root descriptors to estimate root reinforcement. Root bundles are modeled as bundles of heterogeneous fibers pulled along their long axes neglecting root-soil friction. Analytical expressions for the pullout force as a function of displacement are derived. The maximum pullout force and corresponding critical displacement are either derived analytically or computed numerically. Key model inputs are a root diameter distribution (uniform, Weibull, or lognormal) and three empirical power law relations describing tensile strength, elastic modulus, and length of roots as functions of root diameter. When a root bundle with root tips anchored in the soil matrix is pulled by a rigid plate, a unique parameter, ?, that depends only on the exponents of the power law relations, dictates the order in which roots of different diameters break. If ? < 1, small roots break first; if ? > 1, large roots break first. When ? = 1, all fibers break simultaneously, and the maximum tensile force is simply the roots' mean force times the number of roots in the bundle. Based on measurements of root geometry and mechanical properties, the value of ? is less than 1, usually ranging between 0 and 0.7. Thus, small roots always fail first. The model shows how geometrical and mechanical characteristics of roots and root diameter distribution affect the pullout force, its maximum and corresponding displacement. Comparing bundles of roots that have similar mean diameters, a bundle with a narrow variance in root diameter will result in a larger maximum force and a smaller displacement at maximum force than a bundle with a wide diameter distribution. Increasing the mean root diameter of a bundle without

  9. Modelling packing interactions in parallel helix bundles: pentameric bundles of nicotinic receptor M2 helices.

    PubMed

    Sankararamakrishnan, R; Sansom, M S

    1995-11-01

    The transbilayer pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is formed by a pentameric bundle of M2 helices. Models of pentameric bundles of M2 helices have been generated using simulated annealing via restrained molecular dynamics. The influence of: (a) the initial C alpha template; and (b) screening of sidechain electrostatic interactions on the geometry of the resultant M2 helix bundles is explored. Parallel M2 helices, in the absence of sidechain electrostatic interactions, pack in accordance with simple ridges-in-grooves considerations. This results in a helix crossing angle of ca. +12 degrees, corresponding to a left-handed coiled coil structure for the bundle as a whole. Tilting of M2 helices away from the central pore axis at their C-termini and/or inclusion of sidechain electrostatic interactions may perturb such ridges-in-grooves packing. In the most extreme cases right-handed coiled coils are formed. An interplay between inter-helix H-bonding and helix bundle geometry is revealed. The effects of changes in electrostatic screening on the dimensions of the pore mouth are described and the significance of these changes in the context of models for the nAChR pore domain is discussed.

  10. Bundled payment fails to gain a foothold In California: the experience of the IHA bundled payment demonstration.

    PubMed

    Ridgely, M Susan; de Vries, David; Bozic, Kevin J; Hussey, Peter S

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether bundled payment could be an effective payment model for California, the Integrated Healthcare Association convened a group of stakeholders (health plans, hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, physician organizations, and vendors) to develop, through a consensus process, the methods and means of implementing bundled payment. In spite of a high level of enthusiasm and effort, the pilot did not succeed in its goal to implement bundled payment for orthopedic procedures across multiple payers and hospital-physician partners. An evaluation of the pilot documented a number of barriers, such as administrative burden, state regulatory uncertainty, and disagreements about bundle definition and assumption of risk. Ultimately, few contracts were signed, which resulted in insufficient volume to test hypotheses about the impact of bundled payment on quality and costs. Although bundled payment failed to gain a foothold in California, the evaluation provides lessons for future bundled payment initiatives.

  11. Confocal microlaparoscope for imaging the fallopian tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tzu-Yu; Schafer, Rachel; Rouse, Andrew R.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that epithelial ovarian cancer may originate in the fimbriated end of the fallopian tube1. Unlike many other cancers, poor access to the ovary and fallopian tubes has limited the ability to study the progression of this deadly disease and to diagnosis it during the early stage when it is most amenable to therapy. We have previously reported on a rigid confocal microlaparoscope system that is currently undergoing a clinical trial to image the epithelial surface of the ovary2. In order to gain in vivo access to the fallopian tubes we have developed a new confocal microlaparoscope with an articulating distal tip. The new instrument builds upon the technology developed for the existing confocal microlaparoscope. It has an ergonomic handle fabricated by a rapid prototyping printer. While maintaining compatibility with a 5 mm trocar, the articulating distal tip of the instrument consists of a 2.2 mm diameter bare fiber bundle catheter with automated dye delivery for fluorescence imaging. This small and flexible catheter design should enable the confocal microlaparoscope to image early stage ovarian cancer arising inside the fallopian tube. Early ex vivo mages of human fallopian tube and in vivo imaging results from recent open surgeries using the rigid confocal microlaparoscope system are presented. Ex vivo images from animal models using the new articulating bare fiber system are also presented. These high quality images collected by the new flexible system are similar in quality to those obtained from the epithelial surface of ovaries with the rigid clinical confocal microlaparoscope.

  12. Confocal microlaparoscope for imaging the fallopian tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tzu-Yu; Rouse, Andrew R.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2014-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that ovarian cancer can originate in the fallopian tube. Unlike many other cancers, poor access to the ovary and fallopian tubes has limited the ability to study the progression of this deadly disease and to diagnosis it during the early stage when it is most amenable to therapy. A rigid confocal microlaparoscope system designed to image the epithelial surface of the ovary in vivo was previously reported. A new confocal microlaparoscope with an articulating distal tip has been developed to enable in vivo access to human fallopian tubes. The new microlaparoscope is compatible with 5-mm trocars and includes a 2.2-mm-diameter articulating distal tip consisting of a bare fiber bundle and an automated dye delivery system for fluorescence confocal imaging. This small articulating device should enable the confocal microlaparoscope to image early stage ovarian cancer arising inside the fallopian tube. Ex vivo images of animal tissue and human fallopian tube using the new articulating device are presented along with in vivo imaging results using the rigid confocal microlaparoscope system.

  13. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  14. Feeding tube - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007235.htm Feeding tube - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A feeding tube is a small, soft, plastic tube placed ...

  15. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000464.htm Tracheostomy tube - eating To use the sharing features on this ... you swallow foods or liquids. Eating and Tracheostomy Tubes When you get your tracheostomy tube, or trach, ...

  16. Eustachian tube patency

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001630.htm Eustachian tube patency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Eustachian tube patency refers to how much the eustachian tube ...

  17. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  18. Numerical simulation of dam-break problem using staggered finite volume method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiasih, L. K.; Wiryanto, L. H.

    2016-02-01

    A problem in a dam-break is when a wall separating two sides of water is removed. A shock wave occurs and propagates. The behavior of the wave is interesting to be investigated with respect to the water depth and its wave speed. The aim of this research is to model dam-break problem using the non-linear shallow water equations and solve them numerically using staggered finite volume method. The solution is used to simulate the dam-break on a wet bed. Our numerical solution will be compared to the analytical solution of shallow water equations for dam-break problem. The momentum non-conservative finite volume scheme on a staggered grid will give a good agreement for dam-break problem on a wet bed, for depth ratios greater than 0.25.

  19. Rooting issue for a lattice fermion formulation similar to staggered fermions but without taste mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David H.

    2008-05-15

    To investigate the viability of the 4th root trick for the staggered fermion determinant in a simpler setting, we consider a 2-taste (flavor) lattice fermion formulation with no taste mixing but with exact taste-nonsinglet chiral symmetries analogous to the taste-nonsinglet U(1){sub A} symmetry of staggered fermions. Creutz's objections to the rooting trick apply just as much in this setting. To counter them we show that the formulation has robust would-be zero modes in topologically nontrivial gauge backgrounds, and that these manifest themselves in a viable way in the rooted fermion determinant and also in the disconnected piece of the pseudoscalar meson propagator as required to solve the U(1) problem. Also, our rooted theory is heuristically seen to be in the right universality class for QCD if the same is true for an unrooted mixed fermion action theory.

  20. Experimental Measurement of the Staggered Magnetization Curve for a Haldane Spin Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, A.; Ressouche, E.; Maslov, S.; Yokoo, T.; Raymond, S.; Akimitsu, J.

    1998-04-01

    Long-range magnetic ordering in R2BaNiO5 ( R = magnetic rare earth) quasi-one-dimensional mixed-spin antiferromagnets is described by a simple mean-field model that is based on the intrinsic staggered magnetization function of isolated Haldane spin chains for the Ni subsystem, and single-ion magnetization functions for the rare earth ions. The model is applied to new experimental results obtained in powder diffraction experiments on Nd2BaNiO5 and NdYBaNiO5, and to previously published diffraction data for Er2BaNiO5. From this analysis we extract the bare staggered magnetization curve for Haldane spin chains in these compounds.

  1. Biomimetic staggered composites with highly enhanced energy dissipation: Modeling, 3D printing, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pu; Heyne, Mary A.; To, Albert C.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the damping enhancement in a class of biomimetic staggered composites via a combination of design, modeling, and experiment. In total, three kinds of staggered composites are designed by mimicking the structure of bone and nacre. These composite designs are realized by 3D printing a rigid plastic and a viscous elastomer simultaneously. Greatly-enhanced energy dissipation in the designed composites is observed from both the experimental results and theoretical prediction. The designed polymer composites have loss modulus up to ~500 MPa, higher than most of the existing polymers. In addition, their specific loss modulus (up to 0.43 km2/s2) is among the highest of damping materials. The damping enhancement is attributed to the large shear deformation of the viscous soft matrix and the large strengthening effect from the rigid inclusion phase.

  2. Test of {Delta}I = 2 staggering in the superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kruecken, R.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Lee, I.Y.; Asztalos, S.

    1996-06-05

    The presence of {Delta}I = 2 staggering in the three known superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg has been reexamined in a new experiment with Gammasphere. A relative accuracy of better than 30 eV was achieved for most transition energies. No statistically significant oscillations in the transition energies were found for band 1 while staggering patterns were observed in bands 2 and 3. The statistical significance of the observed effects was analyzed. The patterns display some similarities with expectations based on a band crossing picture, even though such a picture cannot reproduce the observations in a straightforward way. No evidence was found for additional superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Hg which could account for possible band-crossings.

  3. D(S) spectrum and leptonic decays with Fermilab heavy quarks and improved staggered light quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Massimo Di Pierro et al.

    2004-03-12

    We present preliminary results for the D{sub s} meson spectrum and decay constants in unquenched lattice QCD. Simulations are carried out with 2 + 1 dynamical quarks using gauge configurations generated by the MILC collaboration. We use the ''asqtad'' a{sup 2} improved staggered action for the light quarks, and the clover heavy quark action with the Fermilab interpretation. We compare our spectrum results with the newly discovered 0{sup +} and 1{sup +} states in the D{sub s} system.

  4. A conservative staggered-grid Chebyshev multidomain method for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriva, David A.; Kolias, John H.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new multidomain spectral collocation method that uses staggered grids for the solution of compressible flow problems. The solution unknowns are defined at the nodes of a Gauss quadrature rule. The fluxes are evaluated at the nodes of a Gauss-Lobatto rule. The method is conservative, free-stream preserving, and exponentially accurate. A significant advantage of the method is that subdomain corners are not included in the approximation, making solutions in complex geometries easier to compute.

  5. Numerical study of super-resolved optical microscopy with partly staggered beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jinping; Wang, Nan; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-12-01

    The resolving power of optical microscopy involving two or even more beams, such as pump-probe microscopy and nonlinear optical microscopy, can be enhanced both laterally and longitudinally with partly staggered beams. A numerical study of the new super-resolution imaging technology is performed with vector diffraction theory. The influence of polarization is discussed. A resolving power of sub-100 nm and sub-300 nm in the lateral and longitudinal directions, respectively, is achievable.

  6. A METHOD OF TREATING UNSTRUCTURED CONCAVE CELLS IN STAGGERED-GRID LAGRANGIAN HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    C. ROUSCULP; D. BURTON

    2000-12-01

    A method is proposed for the treatment of concave cells in staggered-grid Lagrangian hydrodynamics. The method is general enough to be applied to two- and three-dimensional unstructured cells. Instead of defining a cell-point as the geometric average of its nodes (a cell-center), the cell-point is that which equalizes the triangular/tetrahedral area/volume in two/three dimensions. Examples are given.

  7. Historical dynamics in ecosystem service bundles.

    PubMed

    Renard, Delphine; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M; Bennett, Elena M

    2015-10-27

    Managing multiple ecosystem services (ES), including addressing trade-offs between services and preventing ecological surprises, is among the most pressing areas for sustainability research. These challenges require ES research to go beyond the currently common approach of snapshot studies limited to one or two services at a single point in time. We used a spatiotemporal approach to examine changes in nine ES and their relationships from 1971 to 2006 across 131 municipalities in a mixed-use landscape in Quebec, Canada. We show how an approach that incorporates time and space can improve our understanding of ES dynamics. We found an increase in the provision of most services through time; however, provision of ES was not uniformly enhanced at all locations. Instead, each municipality specialized in providing a bundle (set of positively correlated ES) dominated by just a few services. The trajectory of bundle formation was related to changes in agricultural policy and global trends; local biophysical and socioeconomic characteristics explained the bundles' increasing spatial clustering. Relationships between services varied through time, with some provisioning and cultural services shifting from a trade-off or no relationship in 1971 to an apparent synergistic relationship by 2006. By implementing a spatiotemporal perspective on multiple services, we provide clear evidence of the dynamic nature of ES interactions and contribute to identifying processes and drivers behind these changing relationships. Our study raises questions about using snapshots of ES provision at a single point in time to build our understanding of ES relationships in complex and dynamic social-ecological systems.

  8. Re: Penetration Behavior of Opposed Rows of Staggered Secondary Air Jets Depending on Jet Penetration Coefficient and Momentum Flux Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain why the extension of the previously published C = (S/Ho)sqrt(J) scaling for opposed rows of staggered jets wasn't directly successful in the study by Choi et al. (2016). It is not surprising that staggered jets from opposite sides do not pass each other at the expected C value, because Ho/D and sqrt(J) are much larger than the maximum in previous studies. These, and large x/D's, tend to suggest development of 2-dimensional flow. Although there are distinct optima for opposed rows of in-line jets, single-side injection, and opposed rows of staggered jets based on C, opposed rows of staggered jets provide as good or better mixing performance, at any C value, than opposed rows of in-line jets or jets from single-side injection.

  9. The avalanche process of the fiber bundle model with defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xia, Hui; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Han, Kui

    2017-04-01

    In order to explore the impacts of defect on the tensile fracture process of materials, the fiber bundle model with defect is constructed based on the classical fiber bundle model. In the fiber bundle model with defect, the two key parameters are the mean size and the density of defects. In both uniform and Weibull threshold distributions, the mean size and density all bring impacts on the threshold distribution of fibers. By means of analytical approximation and numerical simulation, we show that the two key parameters of the model have substantial effects on the failure process of the bundle. From macroscopic view, the defect described by the altering of threshold distribution of fibers will has a significant impact on the mechanical properties of the bundle. While in microscopic scale, the statistical properties of the model are still harmonious with the classical fiber bundle model.

  10. Morphology selection via geometric frustration in chiral filament bundles.

    PubMed

    Hall, Douglas M; Bruss, Isaac R; Barone, Justin R; Grason, Gregory M

    2016-07-01

    In assemblies, the geometric frustration of a locally preferred packing motif leads to anomalous behaviours, from self-limiting growth to defects in the ground state. Here, we demonstrate that geometric frustration selects the equilibrium morphology of cohesive bundles of chiral filaments, an assembly motif critical to a broad range of biological and synthetic nanomaterials. Frustration of inter-filament spacing leads to optimal shapes of self-twisting bundles that break the symmetries of packing and of the underlying inter-filament forces, paralleling a morphological instability in spherical two-dimensional crystals. Equilibrium bundle morphology is controlled by a parameter that characterizes the relative costs of filament bending and the straining of cohesive bonds between filaments. This parameter delineates the boundaries between stable, isotropic cylindrical bundles and anisotropic, twisted-tape bundles. We also show how the mechanical and interaction properties of constituent amyloid fibrils may be extracted from the mesoscale dimensions of the anisotropic bundles that they form.

  11. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  12. Expansion and Polarity Sorting in Microtubule-Dynein Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, A.; Mogilner, A.

    Interactions of multiple molecular motors with dynamicpolymers, such as actin and microtubules, form the basis for many processes in the cell cytoskeleton. One example is the active `sorting' of microtubule bundles by dynein molecular motors into aster-like arrays of microtubules; in these bundles dynein motors cross-link and slide neighboring microtubules apart. A number of models have been suggested to quantify the active dynamics of cross-linked bundles of polar filaments. In the case of densely packed bundles, however, a major complication arises from the fact that each microtubule interacts with multiple neighboring filaments. To explicitly take these interactions into account we performed detailed computer simulations in which the equations of motion for all microtubules in the bundle were iteratively solved. Our simulations demonstrate the phenomenon of polarity sorting and reveal the variable-rate of the concurrent bundle expansion and its dependence on the nature of the microtubule-motor interactions.

  13. Monopoles and Modifications of Bundles over Elliptic Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Andrey M.; Olshanetsky, Mikhail A.; Zotov, Andrei V.

    2009-06-01

    Modifications of bundles over complex curves is an operation that allows one to construct a new bundle from a given one. Modifications can change a topological type of bundle. We describe the topological type in terms of the characteristic classes of the bundle. Being applied to the Higgs bundles modifications establish an equivalence between different classical integrable systems. Following Kapustin and Witten we define the modifications in terms of monopole solutions of the Bogomolny equation. We find the Dirac monopole solution in the case R × (elliptic curve). This solution is a three-dimensional generalization of the Kronecker series. We give two representations for this solution and derive a functional equation for it generalizing the Kronecker results. We use it to define Abelian modifications for bundles of arbitrary rank. We also describe non-Abelian modifications in terms of theta-functions with characteristic.

  14. Cooperativity and Frustration in Protein-Mediated Parallel Actin Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Homin; Drew, Kirstin R. Purdy; Bartles, James R.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2009-12-01

    We examine the mechanism of bundling of cytoskeletal actin filaments by two representative bundling proteins, fascin and espin. Small-angle x-ray studies show that increased binding from linkers drives a systematic overtwist of actin filaments from their native state, which occurs in a linker-dependent fashion. Fascin bundles actin into a continuous spectrum of intermediate twist states, while espin only allows for untwisted actin filaments and fully overtwisted bundles. Based on a coarse-grained, statistical model of protein binding, we show that the interplay between binding geometry and the intrinsic flexibility of linkers mediates cooperative binding in the bundle. We attribute the respective continuous (discontinuous) bundling mechanisms of fascin (espin) to difference in the stiffness of linker bonds themselves.

  15. Entropy Stable Staggered Grid Spectral Collocation for the Burgers' and Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Parsani, Matteo; Fisher, Travis C.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Staggered grid, entropy stable discontinuous spectral collocation operators of any order are developed for Burgers' and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured hexahedral elements. This generalization of previous entropy stable spectral collocation work [1, 2], extends the applicable set of points from tensor product, Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto (LGL) to a combination of tensor product Legendre-Gauss (LG) and LGL points. The new semi-discrete operators discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy inequality for both Burgers' and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions. They are valid for smooth as well as discontinuous flows. The staggered LG and conventional LGL point formulations are compared on several challenging test problems. The staggered LG operators are significantly more accurate, although more costly to implement. The LG and LGL operators exhibit similar robustness, as is demonstrated using test problems known to be problematic for operators that lack a nonlinearly stability proof for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations (e.g., discontinuous Galerkin, spectral difference, or flux reconstruction operators).

  16. Effects of staggered fermions and mixed actions on the scalar correlator

    SciTech Connect

    Prelovsek, S.

    2006-01-01

    We provide the analytic predictions for the flavor nonsinglet scalar correlator, which will enable determination of the scalar meson mass from the lattice scalar correlator. We consider simulations with 2+1 staggered sea quarks and staggered or chiral valence quarks. At small u/d masses the correlator is dominated by the bubble contribution, which is the intermediate state with two pseudoscalar mesons. We determine the bubble contribution within staggered and mixed chiral perturbation theory. Its effective mass is smaller than the mass of {pi}{eta}, which is the lightest intermediate state in proper 2+1 QCD. The unphysical effective mass is a consequence of the taste breaking that makes possible the intermediate state with mass 2M{sub {pi}}. We find that the scalar correlator can be negative in the simulations with mixed quark actions if the sea- and valence-quark masses are tuned by matching the pion masses M{sub val,val}=M{sub {pi}{sub 5}}.

  17. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    DOE PAGES

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy alsomore » eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.« less

  18. An aphid's Odyssey--the cortical quest for the vascular bundle.

    PubMed

    Hewer, Angela; Becker, Alexander; van Bel, Aart J E

    2011-11-15

    Sensing pH and sucrose concentration (with a preference for pH values of 7.0-7.5 and sucrose concentrations of approximately 400 mmol l(-1)) enables aphids to recognise sieve tubes inside vascular bundles. However, it is still unclear how aphids find their way to the vascular bundles. Membrane potentials in the cortex of Vicia faba stems were measured along a radial transect from the epidermis to the sieve elements and there was no gradient detected that could be used by aphids to guide their stylets to the sieve elements. Additionally, aphids did not demonstrate a preference between artificial diets with low or high levels of dissolved oxygen, making it unlikely that oxygen gradients in the cortex assist orientation towards the phloem. Tracks of salivary sheaths indicate that aphids search for vascular bundles in a radial direction (perpendicular from the stem surface to the vascular bundle) with regular side punctures in a pre-programmed fashion. Optical examination and electrical penetration graph (EPG) recordings suggest that aphids (Megoura viciae) probe the vacuolar sap of cortex cells. Acidic pH (5.0-5.5) and low sucrose concentrations in vacuoles, therefore, may provoke aphids to retract their stylets and probe the next cell until a favourable cell sap composition is encountered. The importance of sucrose as a cue was demonstrated by the experimental manipulation of Ricinus communis plants that cause them to transport hexoses instead of sucrose. Aphids (Aphis fabae) ingested less phloem sap of plants transporting hexoses compared with plants transporting the normal sucrose. The proposed rejection-acceptance behaviour provides a universal plant-directed mode of how aphids orientate their stylets towards the phloem.

  19. Higher order mechanics on graded bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Andrew James; Grabowska, Katarzyna; Grabowski, Janusz

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we develop a geometric approach to higher order mechanics on graded bundles in both, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism, via the recently discovered weighted algebroids. We present the corresponding Tulczyjew triple for this higher order situation and derive in this framework the phase equations from an arbitrary (also singular) Lagrangian or Hamiltonian, as well as the Euler-Lagrange equations. As important examples, we geometrically derive the classical higher order Euler-Lagrange equations and analogous reduced equations for invariant higher order Lagrangians on Lie groupoids.

  20. Heat Transfer Analysis in Wire Bundles for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, S. L.; Iamello, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Design of wiring for aerospace vehicles relies on an understanding of "ampacity" which refers to the current carrying capacity of wires, either, individually or in wire bundles. Designers rely on standards to derate allowable current flow to prevent exceedance of wire temperature limits due to resistive heat dissipation within the wires or wire bundles. These standards often add considerable margin and are based on empirical data. Commercial providers are taking an aggressive approach to wire sizing which challenges the conventional wisdom of the established standards. Thermal modelling of wire bundles may offer significant mass reduction in a system if the technique can be generalized to produce reliable temperature predictions for arbitrary bundle configurations. Thermal analysis has been applied to the problem of wire bundles wherein any or all of the wires within the bundle may carry current. Wire bundles present analytical challenges because the heat transfer path from conductors internal to the bundle is tortuous, relying on internal radiation and thermal interface conductance to move the heat from within the bundle to the external jacket where it can be carried away by convective and radiative heat transfer. The problem is further complicated by the dependence of wire electrical resistivity on temperature. Reduced heat transfer out of the bundle leads to higher conductor temperatures and, hence, increased resistive heat dissipation. Development of a generalized wire bundle thermal model is presented and compared with test data. The steady state heat balance for a single wire is derived and extended to the bundle configuration. The generalized model includes the effects of temperature varying resistance, internal radiation and thermal interface conductance, external radiation and temperature varying convective relief from the free surface. The sensitivity of the response to uncertainties in key model parameters is explored using Monte Carlo analysis.

  1. Local load-sharing fiber bundle model in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Santanu; Kjellstadli, Jonas T.; Hansen, Alex

    2015-08-01

    We consider the local load-sharing fiber bundle model in one to five dimensions. Depending on the breaking threshold distribution of the fibers, there is a transition where the fracture process becomes localized. In the localized phase, the model behaves as the invasion percolation model. The difference between the local load-sharing fiber bundle model and the equal load-sharing fiber bundle model vanishes with increasing dimensionality with the characteristics of a power law.

  2. A fast Poisson solver for unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on the half-staggered grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, G. H.; Huang, L. C.; Simon, H.; Tang, W. -P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a fast Poisson solver for unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with finite difference methods on the non-uniform, half-staggered grid is presented. To achieve this, new algorithms for diagonalizing a semi-definite pair are developed. Our fast solver can also be extended to the three dimensional case. The motivation and related issues in using this second kind of staggered grid are also discussed. Numerical testing has indicated the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  3. Complete bundle moduli reduction in heterotic string compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curio, Gottfried

    2012-05-01

    A major problem in discussing heterotic string models is the stabilisation of the many vector bundle moduli via the superpotential generated by world-sheet instantons. In arXiv:1110.6315 we have discussed the method to make a discrete twist in a large and much discussed class of vector bundles such that the generation number gets new contributions (which can be tuned suitably) and at the same time the space of bundle moduli of the new, twisted bundle is a proper subspace (where the 'new', non-generic twist class exists) of the original bundle moduli space; one thus gets a model, closely related to the original model one started with, but with enhanced flexibility in the generation number and where on the other hand the number of bundle moduli is somewhat reduced. Whereas in the previous paper the emphasis was on examples for the new flexibility in the generation number we here classify and describe explicitly the twists and give the precise reduction formula (for the number of moduli) for SU(5) bundles leading to an SU(5) GUT group in four dimensions. Finally we give various examples where the bundle moduli space is reduced completely: the superpotential for such rigid bundles becomes a function of the complex structure moduli alone (besides the exponential Kahler moduli contribution).

  4. Robust Mapping of Incoherent Fiber-Optic Bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Harry E.; Deason, Brent E.; DePlachett, Charles P.; Pilgrim, Robert A.; Sanford, Harold S.

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for mapping between the positions of fibers at opposite ends of incoherent fiber-optic bundles have been invented to enable the use of such bundles to transmit images in visible or infrared light. The method is robust in the sense that it provides useful mapping even for a bundle that contains thousands of narrow, irregularly packed fibers, some of which may be defective. In a coherent fiber-optic bundle, the input and output ends of each fiber lie at identical positions in the input and output planes; therefore, the bundle can be used to transmit images without further modification. Unfortunately, the fabrication of coherent fiber-optic bundles is too labor-intensive and expensive for many applications. An incoherent fiber-optic bundle can be fabricated more easily and at lower cost, but it produces a scrambled image because the position of the end of each fiber in the input plane is generally different from the end of the same fiber in the output plane. However, the image transmitted by an incoherent fiber-optic bundle can be unscrambled (or, from a different perspective, decoded) by digital processing of the output image if the mapping between the input and output fiber-end positions is known. Thus, the present invention enables the use of relatively inexpensive fiber-optic bundles to transmit images.

  5. Isothermal microcalorimetry, a tool for probing SWNT bundles.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Renaud; Greco, Carla; Schultz, Patrick; Meunier, Stéphane; Mioskowski, Charles

    2009-11-01

    The bundling state of several dry single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) samples is compared using isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). So as to get different dry samples with various bundling states, the pristine SWNTs were pretreated with a solution of an aromatic amphiphile with or without sonication, washed and dried before being studied by IMC. The bundling state of the different SWNT samples, which was first analyzed by TEM, was then correlated to the obtained IMC data thanks to the interpretation of the observed energy transfer phenomena. From our results, IMC appears to be an interesting technique for the surface probing of dry SWNT samples, and herein for the evaluation of the bundling state.

  6. Studies of the steam generator degraded tubes behavior on BRUTUS test loop

    SciTech Connect

    Chedeau, C.; Rassineux, B.

    1997-04-01

    Studies for the evaluation of steam generator tube bundle cracks in PWR power plants are described. Global tests of crack leak rates and numerical calculations of crack opening area are discussed in some detail. A brief overview of thermohydraulic studies and the development of a mechanical probabilistic design code is also given. The COMPROMIS computer code was used in the studies to quantify the influence of in-service inspections and maintenance work on the risk of a steam generator tube rupture.

  7. Bundled capillary electrophoresis using microstructured fibres.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Benjamin; Gibson, Graham T T; Oleschuk, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    Joule heating, arising from the electric current passing through the capillary, causes many undesired effects in CE that ultimately result in band broadening. The use of narrow-bore capillaries helps to solve this problem as smaller cross-sectional area results in decreased Joule heating and the rate of heat dissipation is increased by the larger surface-to-volume ratio. Issues arising from such small capillaries, such as poor detection sensitivity, low loading capacity and high flow-induced backpressure (complicating capillary loading) can be avoided by using a bundle of small capillaries operating simultaneously that share buffer reservoirs. Microstructured fibres, originally designed as waveguides in the telecommunication industry, are essentially a bundle of parallel ∼5 μm id channels that extend the length of a fibre having otherwise similar dimensions to conventional CE capillaries. This work presents the use of microstructured fibres for CZE, taking advantage of their relatively high surface-to-volume ratio and the small individual size of each channel to effect highly efficient separations, particularly for dye-labelled peptides.

  8. Confinement-Dependent Friction in Peptide Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Erbaş, Aykut; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Friction within globular proteins or between adhering macromolecules crucially determines the kinetics of protein folding, the formation, and the relaxation of self-assembled molecular systems. One fundamental question is how these friction effects depend on the local environment and in particular on the presence of water. In this model study, we use fully atomistic MD simulations with explicit water to obtain friction forces as a single polyglycine peptide chain is pulled out of a bundle of k adhering parallel polyglycine peptide chains. The whole system is periodically replicated along the peptide axes, so a stationary state at prescribed mean sliding velocity V is achieved. The aggregation number is varied between k = 2 (two peptide chains adhering to each other with plenty of water present at the adhesion sites) and k = 7 (one peptide chain pulled out from a close-packed cylindrical array of six neighboring peptide chains with no water inside the bundle). The friction coefficient per hydrogen bond, extrapolated to the viscous limit of vanishing pulling velocity V → 0, exhibits an increase by five orders of magnitude when going from k = 2 to k = 7. This dramatic confinement-induced friction enhancement we argue to be due to a combination of water depletion and increased hydrogen-bond cooperativity. PMID:23528088

  9. Tangent Bundle Elastica and Computer Vision.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shahar, Ohad; Ben-Yosef, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Visual curve completion, an early visual process that completes the occluded parts between observed boundary fragments (a.k.a. inducers), is a major problem in perceptual organization and a critical step toward higher level visual tasks in both biological and machine vision. Most computational contributions to solving this problem suggest desired perceptual properties that the completed contour should satisfy in the image plane, and then seek the mathematical curves that provide them. Alternatively, few studies (including by the authors) have suggested to frame the problem not in the image plane but rather in the unit tangent bundleR (2) × S(1), the space that abstracts the primary visual cortex, where curve completion allegedly occurs. Combining both schools, here we propose and develop a biologically plausible theory of elastica in the tangent bundle that provides not only perceptually superior completion results but also a rigorous computational prediction that inducer curvatures greatly affects the shape of the completed curve, as indeed indicated by human perception.

  10. Constrained ripple optimization of Tokamak bundle divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Rome, J.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Lyon, J.F.; Fowler, R.H.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Dory, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetic field ripple from a tokamak bundle divertor is localized to a small toroidal sector and must be treated differently from the usual (distributed) toroidal field (TF) coil ripple. Generally, in a tokamak with an unoptimized divertor design, all of the banana-trapped fast ions are quickly lost due to banana drift diffusion or to trapping between the 1/R variation in absolute value vector B ..xi.. B and local field maxima due to the divertor. A computer code has been written to optimize automatically on-axis ripple subject to these constraints, while varying up to nine design parameters. Optimum configurations have low on-axis ripple (<0.2%) so that, now, most banana-trapped fast ions are confined. Only those ions with banana tips near the outside region (absolute value theta < or equal to 45/sup 0/) are lost. However, because finite-sized TF coils have not been used in this study, the flux bundle is not expanded.

  11. Bender/Coiler for Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Easy-to-use tool makes coils of tubing. Tubing to be bend clamped with stop post. Die positioned snugly against tubing. Operator turns handle to slide die along tubing, pushing tubing into spiral groove on mandrel.

  12. Quantifying array losses due to spacing and staggering in offshore wind farms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, C. L.; Mirzaeisefat, S.; Lee, S.; Xie, S.

    2013-12-01

    The layout of wind turbines can have an impact on the power production of a wind farm. Design variables that define the layout of wind turbines within a wind farm include: orientation of the rows with respect to the prevailing wind direction, size and shape of the wind farm, spacing between turbines, and alignment of the turbines (i.e., whether in-line or staggered with one another). There are no universal layout recommendations for offshore wind farms, partly because isolating the contribution of each individual design variable is impossible at existing offshore wind farms, where multiple effects overlap non-linearly on one another, and partly because analyzing the sensitivity to design variables requires sophisticated and computer-intensive numerical codes, such as large-eddy simulations (LES), that can simulate the small-scale turbulent features of turbine wakes. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the only publicly available and open-source LES code that is capable of resolving wind turbine blades as rotating actuator lines (not fixed disks), includes both neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions (stable case is currently under development), and does not rely on periodic boundary conditions. This code, named Simulator for Offshore/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA), is based on OpenFOAM and has been used successfully in the past for turbulent wake simulations. Here we address the issue of quantifying two design variables: turbine spacing (both along and across the prevailing wind direction) and alignment (in-line or staggered for consecutive rows). SOWFA is used to simulate an existing offshore wind farm in Lillgrund (Sweden), consisting of 48 Siemens 2.3 MW turbines with spacing of 3.2D across and 4.3D along the prevailing wind direction and without staggering, where D is the turbine diameter (93 m). This spacing is exceptionally tight, to our knowledge the tightest of all modern wind farms. While keeping the area and the shape of

  13. Quantifying array losses due to spacing and staggering in offshore wind farms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, C. L.; Mirzaeisefat, S.; Lee, S.; Xie, S.

    2011-12-01

    The layout of wind turbines can have an impact on the power production of a wind farm. Design variables that define the layout of wind turbines within a wind farm include: orientation of the rows with respect to the prevailing wind direction, size and shape of the wind farm, spacing between turbines, and alignment of the turbines (i.e., whether in-line or staggered with one another). There are no universal layout recommendations for offshore wind farms, partly because isolating the contribution of each individual design variable is impossible at existing offshore wind farms, where multiple effects overlap non-linearly on one another, and partly because analyzing the sensitivity to design variables requires sophisticated and computer-intensive numerical codes, such as large-eddy simulations (LES), that can simulate the small-scale turbulent features of turbine wakes. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the only publicly available and open-source LES code that is capable of resolving wind turbine blades as rotating actuator lines (not fixed disks), includes both neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions (stable case is currently under development), and does not rely on periodic boundary conditions. This code, named Simulator for Offshore/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA), is based on OpenFOAM and has been used successfully in the past for turbulent wake simulations. Here we address the issue of quantifying two design variables: turbine spacing (both along and across the prevailing wind direction) and alignment (in-line or staggered for consecutive rows). SOWFA is used to simulate an existing offshore wind farm in Lillgrund (Sweden), consisting of 48 Siemens 2.3 MW turbines with spacing of 3.2D across and 4.3D along the prevailing wind direction and without staggering, where D is the turbine diameter (93 m). This spacing is exceptionally tight, to our knowledge the tightest of all modern wind farms. While keeping the area and the shape of

  14. Investigation of the relative abundance of heavy versus light nuclei in primary cosmic rays using underground muon bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaralingam, N.

    1993-06-08

    We study multiple muon events (muon bundles) recorded underground at a depth of 2090 mwe. To penetrate to this depth, the muons must have energies above 0.8 TeV at the Earth`s surface; the primary cosmic ray nuclei which give rise to the observed muon bundles have energies at incidence upon the upper atmosphere of 10 to 10{sup 5}TeV. The events are detected using the Soudan 2 experiment`s fine grained tracking calorimeter which is surrounded by a 14 m {times}10 m {times} 31 m proportional tube array (the ``active shield``). Muon bundles which have at least one muon traversing the calorimeter, are reconstructed using tracks in the calorimeter together with hit patterns in the proportional tube shield. All ionization pulses are required to be coincident within 3 microseconds. A goal of this study is to investigate the relative nuclear abundances in the primary cosmic radiation around the ``knee`` region (10{sup 3} {minus} 10{sup 4} TeV) of the incident energy spectrum. Four models for the nuclear composition of cosmic rays are considered: The Linsley model, the Constant Mass Composition model (CMC), the Maryland model and the Proton-poor model. A Monte Carlo which incorporates one model at a time is used to simulate events which are then reconstructed using the same computer algorithms that are used for the data. Identical cuts and selections are applied to the data and to the simulated events.

  15. Bundle brunch reentrant ventricular tachycardia with two distinct conduction patterns in a patient with complete right bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Enjoji, Yoshihisa; Mizobuchi, Masahiro; Shibata, Kensaku; Ono, Tsuyoshi; Funatsu, Atsushi; Kanbayashi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Nakamura, Shigeru

    2006-12-01

    We report a rare case of bundle branch reentrant ventricular tachycardia [BBRVT]. A 67-year-old female was admitted for management of wide QRS tachycardia (right bundle branch block [RBBB] and a southwest axis). The mapping procedure revealed the tachycardia circuit consisted of the left anterior fascicle (LAF) as an antegrade, and the right bundle as a retrograde pathway. She presented RBBB during sinus rhythm. LAF ablation changed the tachycardia configuration to a northwest axis and prolonged the cycle length. Left posterior fascicle ablation terminated the tachycardia, and complete atrioventricular block occurred, which showed the unidirectional conduction over the right bundle.

  16. Coherent hollow-core waveguide bundles for thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Gal, Udi; Harrington, James; Ben-David, Moshe; Bledt, Carlos; Syzonenko, Nicholas; Gannot, Israel

    2010-09-01

    There has been very little work done in the past to extend the wavelength range of fiber image bundles to the IR range. This is due, in part, to the lack of IR transmissive fibers with optical and mechanical properties analogous to the oxide glass fibers currently employed in the visible fiber bundles. Our research is aimed at developing high-resolution hollow-core coherent IR fiber bundles for transendoscopic infrared imaging. We employ the hollow glass waveguide (HGW) technology that was used successfully to make single-HGWs with Ag/AgI thin film coatings to form coherent bundles for IR imaging. We examine the possibility of developing endoscopic systems to capture thermal images using hollow waveguide fiber bundles adjusted to the 8-10?mum spectral range and investigate the applicability of such systems. We carried out a series of measurements in order to characterize the optical properties of the fiber bundles. These included the attenuation, resolution, and temperature response. We developed theoretical models and simulation tools that calculate the light propagation through HGW bundles, and which can be used to calculate the optical properties of the fiber bundles. Finally, the HGW fiber bundles were used to transmit thermal images of various heated objects; the results were compared with simulation results. The experimental results are encouraging, show an improvement in the resolution and thermal response of the HGW fiber bundles, and are consistent with the theoretical results. Nonetheless, additional improvements in the attenuation of the bundles are required in order to be able to use this technology for medical applications.

  17. Lexical Bundles: Facilitating University "Talk" in Group Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heng, Chan Swee; Kashiha, Hadi; Tan, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Group discussion forms an integral language experience for most language learners, providing them with an opportunity to express themselves in a naturalistic setting. Multi-word expressions are commonly used and one of them is lexical bundles. Lexical bundles are types of extended collocations that occur more commonly than we expect; they are…

  18. Amplitude death of coupled hair bundles with stochastic channel noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Joong; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2014-04-01

    Hair cells conduct auditory transduction in vertebrates. In lower vertebrates such as frogs and turtles, due to the active mechanism in hair cells, hair bundles (stereocilia) can be spontaneously oscillating or quiescent. Recently an amplitude death phenomenon has been proposed [K.-H. Ahn, J. R. Soc. Interface, 10, 20130525 (2013)] as a mechanism for auditory transduction in frog hair-cell bundles, where sudden cessation of the oscillations arises due to the coupling between nonidentical hair bundles. The gating of the ion channel is intrinsically stochastic due to the stochastic nature of the configuration change of the channel. The strength of the noise due to the channel gating can be comparable to the thermal Brownian noise of hair bundles. Thus, we perform stochastic simulations of the elastically coupled hair bundles. In spite of stray noisy fluctuations due to its stochastic dynamics, our simulation shows the transition from collective oscillation to amplitude death as interbundle coupling strength increases. In its stochastic dynamics, the formation of the amplitude death state of coupled hair bundles can be seen as a sudden suppression of the displacement fluctuation of the hair bundles as the coupling strength increases. The enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio through the amplitude death phenomenon is clearly seen in the stochastic dynamics. Our numerical results demonstrate that the multiple number of transduction channels per hair bundle is an important factor to the amplitude death phenomenon, because the phenomenon may disappear for a small number of transduction channels due to strong gating noise.

  19. As Can Be Seen: Lexical Bundles and Disciplinary Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Ken

    2008-01-01

    An important component of fluent linguistic production is control of the multi-word expressions referred to as clusters, chunks or bundles. These are extended collocations which appear more frequently than expected by chance, helping to shape meanings in specific contexts and contributing to our sense of coherence in a text. Bundles have begun to…

  20. Lexical Bundles in University Spoken and Written Registers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biber, Douglas; Barbieri, Federica

    2007-01-01

    Lexical bundles--recurrent sequences of words--are important building blocks of discourse in spoken and written registers. Previous research has shown that lexical bundles are especially prevalent in university classroom teaching, where they serve three major discourse functions: stance expressions, discourse organizers, and referential…

  1. Sensory transduction: the 'swarm intelligence' of auditory hair bundles.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jörg

    2011-08-23

    In vertebrate hair cells, the hair bundle is responsible for the conversion of mechanical vibrations into electrical signals. In a combined experimental and computational tour de force, a group of researchers now presents a quantitative model that explains how the bundle's specific microarchitecture gives rise to its exquisite mechanosensory properties.

  2. Presenting Lexical Bundles for Explicit Noticing with Schematic Linguistic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Haidee Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Lexical bundles are essential for fluency, but their incompleteness is a stumbling block for learners. In this study, two presentation methods to increase awareness of lexical bundles through explicit noticing are explored and compared with incidental exposure. The three conditions in this study were as follows: noticing with schematic linguistic…

  3. Extendability of parallel sections in vector bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Tim

    2016-01-01

    I address the following question: Given a differentiable manifold M, what are the open subsets U of M such that, for all vector bundles E over M and all linear connections ∇ on E, any ∇-parallel section in E defined on U extends to a ∇-parallel section in E defined on M? For simply connected manifolds M (among others) I describe the entirety of all such sets U which are, in addition, the complement of a C1 submanifold, boundary allowed, of M. This delivers a partial positive answer to a problem posed by Antonio J. Di Scala and Gianni Manno (2014). Furthermore, in case M is an open submanifold of Rn, n ≥ 2, I prove that the complement of U in M, not required to be a submanifold now, can have arbitrarily large n-dimensional Lebesgue measure.

  4. Cyclic hardening in bundled actin networks.

    PubMed

    Schmoller, K M; Fernández, P; Arevalo, R C; Blair, D L; Bausch, A R

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear deformations can irreversibly alter the mechanical properties of materials. Most soft materials, such as rubber and living tissues, display pronounced softening when cyclically deformed. Here we show that, in contrast, reconstituted networks of crosslinked, bundled actin filaments harden when subject to cyclical shear. As a consequence, they exhibit a mechano-memory where a significant stress barrier is generated at the maximum of the cyclic shear strain. This unique response is crucially determined by the network architecture: at lower crosslinker concentrations networks do not harden, but soften showing the classic Mullins effect known from rubber-like materials. By simultaneously performing macrorheology and confocal microscopy, we show that cyclic shearing results in structural reorganization of the network constituents such that the maximum applied strain is encoded into the network architecture.

  5. Bundled automobile insurance coverage and accidents.

    PubMed

    Li, Chu-Shiu; Liu, Chwen-Chi; Peng, Sheng-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of automobile accidents by taking into account two types of automobile insurance coverage: comprehensive vehicle physical damage insurance and voluntary third-party liability insurance. By using a unique data set in the Taiwanese automobile insurance market, we explore the bundled automobile insurance coverage and the occurrence of claims. It is shown that vehicle physical damage insurance is the major automobile coverage and affects the decision to purchase voluntary liability insurance coverage as a complement. Moreover, policyholders with high vehicle physical damage insurance coverage have a significantly higher probability of filing vehicle damage claims, and if they additionally purchase low voluntary liability insurance coverage, their accident claims probability is higher than those who purchase high voluntary liability insurance coverage. Our empirical results reveal that additional automobile insurance coverage information can capture more driver characteristics and driving behaviors to provide useful information for insurers' underwriting policies and to help analyze the occurrence of automobile accidents.

  6. Vision, healing brush, and fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Todor

    2005-03-01

    The Healing Brush is a tool introduced for the first time in Adobe Photoshop (2002) that removes defects in images by seamless cloning (gradient domain fusion). The Healing Brush algorithms are built on a new mathematical approach that uses Fibre Bundles and Connections to model the representation of images in the visual system. Our mathematical results are derived from first principles of human vision, related to adaptation transforms of von Kries type and Retinex theory. In this paper we present the new result of Healing in arbitrary color space. In addition to supporting image repair and seamless cloning, our approach also produces the exact solution to the problem of high dynamic range compression of17 and can be applied to other image processing algorithms.

  7. Voltage- and calcium-dependent motility of saccular hair bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, Patricia M.; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-12-01

    Active bundle motility, which is hypothesized to supply feedback for mechanical amplification of signals, is thought to enhance sensitivity and sharpen tuning in vestibular and auditory organs. To study active hair bundle motility, we combined high-speed camera recordings of bullfrog sacculi, which were mounted in a two-compartment chamber, and voltage-clamp of the hair cell membrane potential. Using this paradigm, we measured three types of bundle motions: 1) spontaneous oscillations which can be analyzed to measure the physiological operating range of the transduction channel; 2) a sustained quasi-static movement of the bundle that depends on membrane potential; and 3) a fast, transient and asymmetric movement that resets the bundle position and depends on changes in the membrane potential. These data support a role for both calcium and voltage in the transduction-channel function.

  8. Historical dynamics in ecosystem service bundles

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Delphine; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M.; Bennett, Elena M.

    2015-01-01

    Managing multiple ecosystem services (ES), including addressing trade-offs between services and preventing ecological surprises, is among the most pressing areas for sustainability research. These challenges require ES research to go beyond the currently common approach of snapshot studies limited to one or two services at a single point in time. We used a spatiotemporal approach to examine changes in nine ES and their relationships from 1971 to 2006 across 131 municipalities in a mixed-use landscape in Quebec, Canada. We show how an approach that incorporates time and space can improve our understanding of ES dynamics. We found an increase in the provision of most services through time; however, provision of ES was not uniformly enhanced at all locations. Instead, each municipality specialized in providing a bundle (set of positively correlated ES) dominated by just a few services. The trajectory of bundle formation was related to changes in agricultural policy and global trends; local biophysical and socioeconomic characteristics explained the bundles’ increasing spatial clustering. Relationships between services varied through time, with some provisioning and cultural services shifting from a trade-off or no relationship in 1971 to an apparent synergistic relationship by 2006. By implementing a spatiotemporal perspective on multiple services, we provide clear evidence of the dynamic nature of ES interactions and contribute to identifying processes and drivers behind these changing relationships. Our study raises questions about using snapshots of ES provision at a single point in time to build our understanding of ES relationships in complex and dynamic social-ecological systems. PMID:26460005

  9. Young modulus, mechanical and electrical properties of isolated individual and bundled single-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenal, Raul; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Xu, Zhi; Loiseau, Annick; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-07-01

    The Young modulus of individual single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SW-BNNTs) was determined using a high-resolution transmission-electron microscope (HRTEM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) set-up. The Young modulus and maximum stress for these NTs were deduced from the analysis of the stress-strain curves, and discussed as a function of the considered value for the shell thickness of an SW-BNNT. The elastic properties of bundles of SW-BNNTs were also investigated. All these experiments revealed that SW-BNNTs are very flexible. Furthermore, the electrical behavior of these SW-BNNTs was also analyzed employing a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) holder integrated with the same HRTEM. I/V curves were measured on individual tubes as well as on bundles of SW-BNNTs.

  10. Big things come in bundled packages: implications of bundled payment systems in health care reimbursement reform.

    PubMed

    Delisle, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    With passage of the Affordable Care Act, the ever-evolving landscape of health care braces for another shift in the reimbursement paradigm. As health care costs continue to rise, providers are pressed to deliver efficient, high-quality care at flat to minimally increasing rates. Inherent systemwide inefficiencies between payers and providers at various clinical settings pose a daunting task for enhancing collaboration and care coordination. A change from Medicare's fee-for-service reimbursement model to bundled payments offers one avenue for resolution. Pilots using such payment models have realized varying degrees of success, leading to the development and upcoming implementation of a bundled payment initiative led by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation. Delivery integration is critical to ensure high-quality care at affordable costs across the system. Providers and payers able to adapt to the newly proposed models of payment will benefit from achieving cost reductions and improved patient outcomes and realize a competitive advantage.

  11. On the Quality of Velocity Interpolation Schemes for Marker-in-Cell Method and Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2016-11-01

    The marker-in-cell method is generally considered a flexible and robust method to model the advection of heterogenous non-diffusive properties (i.e., rock type or composition) in geodynamic problems. In this method, Lagrangian points carrying compositional information are advected with the ambient velocity field on an Eulerian grid. However, velocity interpolation from grid points to marker locations is often performed without considering the divergence of the velocity field at the interpolated locations (i.e., non-conservative). Such interpolation schemes can induce non-physical clustering of markers when strong velocity gradients are present (Journal of Computational Physics 166:218-252, 2001) and this may, eventually, result in empty grid cells, a serious numerical violation of the marker-in-cell method. To remedy this at low computational costs, Jenny et al. (Journal of Computational Physics 166:218-252, 2001) and Meyer and Jenny (Proceedings in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics 4:466-467, 2004) proposed a simple, conservative velocity interpolation scheme for 2-D staggered grid, while Wang et al. (Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 16(6):2015-2023, 2015) extended the formulation to 3-D finite element methods. Here, we adapt this formulation for 3-D staggered grids (correction interpolation) and we report on the quality of various velocity interpolation methods for 2-D and 3-D staggered grids. We test the interpolation schemes in combination with different advection schemes on incompressible Stokes problems with strong velocity gradients, which are discretized using a finite difference method. Our results suggest that a conservative formulation reduces the dispersion and clustering of markers, minimizing the need of unphysical marker control in geodynamic models.

  12. EM reconstruction of dual isotope PET using staggered injections and prompt gamma positron emitters

    PubMed Central

    Andreyev, Andriy; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of dual isotope positron emission tomography (DIPET) is to create two separate images of two coinjected PET radiotracers. DIPET shortens the duration of the study, reduces patient discomfort, and produces perfectly coregistered images compared to the case when two radiotracers would be imaged independently (sequential PET studies). Reconstruction of data from such simultaneous acquisition of two PET radiotracers is difficult because positron decay of any isotope creates only 511 keV photons; therefore, the isotopes cannot be differentiated based on the detected energy. Methods: Recently, the authors have proposed a DIPET technique that uses a combination of radiotracer A which is a pure positron emitter (such as 18F or 11C) and radiotracer B in which positron decay is accompanied by the emission of a high-energy (HE) prompt gamma (such as 38K or 60Cu). Events that are detected as triple coincidences of HE gammas with the corresponding two 511 keV photons allow the authors to identify the lines-of-response (LORs) of isotope B. These LORs are used to separate the two intertwined distributions, using a dedicated image reconstruction algorithm. In this work the authors propose a new version of the DIPET EM-based reconstruction algorithm that allows the authors to include an additional, independent estimate of radiotracer A distribution which may be obtained if radioisotopes are administered using a staggered injections method. In this work the method is tested on simple simulations of static PET acquisitions. Results: The authors’ experiments performed using Monte-Carlo simulations with static acquisitions demonstrate that the combined method provides better results (crosstalk errors decrease by up to 50%) than the positron-gamma DIPET method or staggered injections alone. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that the authors’ new EM algorithm which combines information from triple coincidences with prompt gammas and staggered injections improves

  13. On the Quality of Velocity Interpolation Schemes for Marker-in-Cell Method and Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2017-03-01

    The marker-in-cell method is generally considered a flexible and robust method to model the advection of heterogenous non-diffusive properties (i.e., rock type or composition) in geodynamic problems. In this method, Lagrangian points carrying compositional information are advected with the ambient velocity field on an Eulerian grid. However, velocity interpolation from grid points to marker locations is often performed without considering the divergence of the velocity field at the interpolated locations (i.e., non-conservative). Such interpolation schemes can induce non-physical clustering of markers when strong velocity gradients are present (Journal of Computational Physics 166:218-252, 2001) and this may, eventually, result in empty grid cells, a serious numerical violation of the marker-in-cell method. To remedy this at low computational costs, Jenny et al. (Journal of Computational Physics 166:218-252, 2001) and Meyer and Jenny (Proceedings in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics 4:466-467, 2004) proposed a simple, conservative velocity interpolation scheme for 2-D staggered grid, while Wang et al. (Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 16(6):2015-2023, 2015) extended the formulation to 3-D finite element methods. Here, we adapt this formulation for 3-D staggered grids (correction interpolation) and we report on the quality of various velocity interpolation methods for 2-D and 3-D staggered grids. We test the interpolation schemes in combination with different advection schemes on incompressible Stokes problems with strong velocity gradients, which are discretized using a finite difference method. Our results suggest that a conservative formulation reduces the dispersion and clustering of markers, minimizing the need of unphysical marker control in geodynamic models.

  14. His bundle recordings in right bundle-branch block coexisting with iatrogenic right ventricular pre-excitation

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Agustin; Castillo, Cesar A.

    1972-01-01

    Iatrogenic right ventricular pre-excitation failed to abolish right bundle-branch block in two patients. When `exclusive' His bundle pacing was performed, the QRS complexes, St-V, and St-LVE intervals were similar to the ventricular deflections, H-V, and V-LVE (intervals) recorded during sinus rhythm. `Exclusive' pacing of the ordinary muscle at the right ventricular inflow tract produced a complete left bundle-branch block pattern without abnormal left axis deviation. Pacing of both His bundle and ordinary muscle yielded combination complexes in which the right bundle-branch block pattern persisted. The ventricular activation process was studied in these beats, as well as during the right and left bundle-branch block induced by coupled atrial stimulation. It appeared as if certain areas of the right septal surface behaved, electrophysiologically, as if they belonged to the left ventricle. Impulses emerging from these sites were not propagated to the right ventricular free wall. The latter was activated by the excitation front emerging through the left bundle system. During right bundle-branch block the endocardium of the right ventricular inflow was activated before the peak of the R in V1. Bipolar leads, 1 mm apart (with the possible exception of the ones over the tricuspid valve), were helpful in mapping the spread of activation in the human heart. Images PMID:18610233

  15. A staggered mesh finite difference scheme for the computation of hypersonic Euler flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A shock capturing finite difference method for systems of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented which avoids the need to solve Riemann problems while being competitive in performance with other current methods. A staggered spatial mesh is employed, so that complicated nonlinear waves generated at cell interfaces are averaged over cell interiors at the next time level. The full method combines to form a conservative version of the modified method of characteristics. The advantages of the method are discussed, and numerical results are presented for the two-dimensional double ellipse problem.

  16. Calculation of the Nucleon Axial Form Factor Using Staggered Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Hill, Richard J.; Kronfeld, Andreas S.; Li, Ruizi; Simone, James N.

    2016-10-14

    The nucleon axial form factor is a dominant contribution to errors in neutrino oscillation studies. Lattice QCD calculations can help control theory errors by providing first-principles information on nucleon form factors. In these proceedings, we present preliminary results on a blinded calculation of $g_A$ and the axial form factor using HISQ staggered baryons with 2+1+1 flavors of sea quarks. Calculations are done using physical light quark masses and are absolutely normalized. We discuss fitting form factor data with the model-independent $z$ expansion parametrization.

  17. A conservative staggered-grid Chebyshev multidomain method for compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kopriva, D.A.; Kolias, J.H.

    1996-04-01

    The authors present a new multidomain spectral collocation method that uses a staggered grid for the solution of compressible flow problems. The solution unknowns are defined at the nodes of a Gauss quadrature rule. The fluxes are evaluated at the nodes of a Gauss-Lobatto rule. The method is conservative, free-stream preserving, and exponentially accurate. A significant advantage of the method is that subdomain corners are not included in the approximation, making solutions in complex geometries easier to compute. 41 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Staggered-grid PSTD on local Fourier basis and its applications to surface tissue modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming; Chen, Kun

    2010-04-26

    We introduce a high performance parallelization to the PSTD solution of Maxwell equations by employing the fast Fourier transform on local Fourier basis. Meanwhile a reformatted derivative operator allows the adoption of a staggered-grid such as the Yee lattice in PSTD, which can overcome the numerical errors in a collocated-grid when spatial discontinuities are present. The accuracy and capability of our method are confirmed by two analytical models. In two applications to surface tissue optics, an ultra wide coherent backscattering cone from the surface layer is found, and the penetration depth of polarization gating identified. Our development prepares a tool for investigating the optical properties of surface tissue structures.

  19. Fuel cell integral bundle assembly including ceramic open end seal and vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R [Murrysville, PA; Gillett, James E [Greensburg, PA

    2012-04-24

    A plurality of integral bundle assemblies contain a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion containing a base support, the base supports a dense, ceramic air exhaust manifold having four supporting legs, the manifold is below and connects to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the open end of the fuel cells rest upon and within a separate combination ceramic seal and bundle support contained in a ceramic support casting, where at least one flexible cushion ceramic band seal located between the recuperator and fuel cells protects and controls horizontal thermal expansion, and where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all of the weight of the generator.

  20. PEG tube insertion -- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... shower or bathe. Keeping the PEG-tube in Place If the feeding tube comes out, the stoma ... eds. Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2011:chap 100. ...

  1. Glass tube splitting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J. A.; Murray, C. D.; Stein, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Tool accurately splits glass tubing so cuts are aligned 180 deg apart and reassembled tube forms low pressure, gastight enclosure. Device should interest industries using cylindrical closed glass containers.

  2. Eustachian tube (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are more common in children because their eustachian tubes are shorter, narrower, and more horizontal than in ... become trapped when the tissue of the eustachian tube becomes swollen from colds or allergies. Bacteria trapped ...

  3. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  4. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  5. Spontaneous Oscillation by Hair Bundles of the Bullfrog's Sacculus

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Pascal; Bozovic, D.; Choe, Y.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    One prominent manifestation of mechanical activity in hair cells is spontaneous otoacoustic emission, the unprovoked emanation of sound by an internal ear. Because active hair-bundle motility probably constitutes the active process of non-mammalian hair cells, we investigated the ability of hair bundles in the bullfrog's sacculus to produce oscillations that might underlie spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. When maintained in the ear's normal ionic milieu, many bundles oscillated spontaneously through distances as great as 80 nm at frequencies of 5-50 Hz. Whole-cell recording disclosed that the positive phase of movement was associated with the opening of transduction channels. Gentamicin, which blocks transduction channels, reversibly arrested oscillation; drugs that affect the cAMP phosphorylation pathway and might influence myosin's activity altered the rate of oscillation. Increasing the Ca2+ concentration rendered oscillations faster and smaller until they were suppressed; lowering the Ca2+ concentration moderately with chelators had the opposite effect. When a bundle was offset with a stimulus fiber, oscillations were transiently suppressed but gradually resumed. Loading a bundle by partial displacement clamping, which simulated the presence of the accessory structures to which a bundle is ordinarily attached, increased the frequency and diminished the magnitude of oscillation. These observations accord with a model in which oscillations arise from the interplay of the hair bundle's negative stiffness with the activity of adaptation motors and with Ca2+-dependent relaxation of gating springs. PMID:12805294

  6. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  7. 1992 tubing tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper is helpful to those designing oil well completions or purchasing tubing with proprietary or premium connections. Tables contain specifications and application data for over 100 different tubing joints, including those used with fiberglass pipe. The tables this year contain dimensional and performance data for coiled tubing.

  8. Two-state approach to stochastic hair bundle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausznitzer, Diana; Lindner, Benjamin; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2008-04-01

    Hair cells perform the mechanoelectrical transduction of sound signals in the auditory and vestibular systems of vertebrates. The part of the hair cell essential for this transduction is the so-called hair bundle. In vitro experiments on hair cells from the sacculus of the American bullfrog have shown that the hair bundle comprises active elements capable of producing periodic deflections like a relaxation oscillator. Recently, a continuous nonlinear stochastic model of the hair bundle motion [Nadrowski , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 12195 (2004)] has been shown to reproduce the experimental data in stochastic simulations faithfully. Here, we demonstrate that a binary filtering of the hair bundle's deflection (experimental data and continuous hair bundle model) does not change significantly the spectral statistics of the spontaneous as well as the periodically driven hair bundle motion. We map the continuous hair bundle model to the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of neural excitability and discuss the bifurcations between different regimes of the system in terms of the latter model. Linearizing the nullclines and assuming perfect time-scale separation between the variables we can map the FitzHugh-Nagumo system to a simple two-state model in which each of the states corresponds to the two possible values of the binary-filtered hair bundle trajectory. For the two-state model, analytical expressions for the power spectrum and the susceptibility can be calculated [Lindner and Schimansky-Geier, Phys. Rev. E 61, 6103 (2000)] and show the same features as seen in the experimental data as well as in simulations of the continuous hair bundle model.

  9. Test of {Delta}I = 2 staggering in the superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kruecken, R.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Hackman, G.

    1996-11-01

    Superdeformed (SD) states in {sup 194}Hg were populated in {sup 150}Nd({sup 48}Ca,4n) using a 201 MeV {sup 48}Ca beam from the 88- inch cyclotron. A high statistics experiment was done to test for the previously reported evidence for a {Delta}I = 2 staggering in the three SD bands in {sup 194}Hg. The transition energies were determined with a precision of at least 60 eV for most transitions. From this improvement, we cannot confirm evidence for an extended regular {Delta}I = 2 staggering in any of the three SD bands of {sup 194}Hg. However, we observe deviations from a smooth reference in the SD bands 2 and 3 which differ from previous results. Oscillation patterns of the {gamma}-ray energies that can be induced by a simple band crossing or level shift are discussed. Even though such level shifts would explain the observed effects, other experimental signatures, such as a crossing band, are needed to fully understand the results of the present work; no such band was found.

  10. Calculations of separated 3-D flows with a pressure-staggered Navier-Stokes equations solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1991-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes equations solver based on a pressure correction method with a pressure-staggered mesh and calculations of separated three-dimensional flows are presented. It is shown that the velocity pressure decoupling, which occurs when various pressure correction algorithms are used for pressure-staggered meshes, is caused by the ill-conditioned discrete pressure correction equation. The use of a partial differential equation for the incremental pressure eliminates the velocity pressure decoupling mechanism by itself and yields accurate numerical results. Example flows considered are a three-dimensional lid driven cavity flow and a laminar flow through a 90 degree bend square duct. For the lid driven cavity flow, the present numerical results compare more favorably with the measured data than those obtained using a formally third order accurate quadratic upwind interpolation scheme. For the curved duct flow, the present numerical method yields a grid independent solution with a very small number of grid points. The calculated velocity profiles are in good agreement with the measured data.

  11. Cas9-catalyzed DNA Cleavage Generates Staggered Ends: Evidence from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhicheng; Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (spCas9) along with a single guide RNA (sgRNA) has emerged as a versatile toolbox for genome editing. Despite recent advances in the mechanism studies on spCas9-sgRNA-mediated double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) recognition and cleavage, it is still unclear how the catalytic Mg2+ ions induce the conformation changes toward the catalytic active state. It also remains controversial whether Cas9 generates blunt-ended or staggered-ended breaks with overhangs in the DNA. To investigate these issues, here we performed the first all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the spCas9-sgRNA-dsDNA system with and without Mg2+ bound. The simulation results showed that binding of two Mg2+ ions at the RuvC domain active site could lead to structurally and energetically favorable coordination ready for the non-target DNA strand cleavage. Importantly, we demonstrated with our simulations that Cas9-catalyzed DNA cleavage produces 1-bp staggered ends rather than generally assumed blunt ends. PMID:27874072

  12. Identification of flow regimes around two staggered square cylinders by a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboueian, J.; Sohankar, A.

    2017-02-01

    The flow over two square cylinders in staggered arrangement is simulated numerically at a fixed Reynolds number (Re =150 ) for different gap spacing between cylinders from 0.1 to 6 times a cylinder side to understand the flow structures. The non-inclined square cylinders are located on a line with a staggered angle of 45° the oncoming velocity vector. All numerical simulations are carried out with a finite-volume code based on a collocated grid arrangement. The effects of vortex shedding on the various features of the flow field are numerically visualized using different flow contours such as λ 2 criterion, vorticity, pressure and magnitudes of velocity to distinguish the distinctive flow patterns. By changing the gap spacing between cylinders, five different flow regimes are identified and classified as single body, periodic gap flow, aperiodic, modulated periodic and synchronized vortex shedding regimes. This study revealed that the observed multiple frequencies in global forces of the downstream cylinder in the modulated periodic regime are more properly associated with differences in vortex shedding frequencies of individual cylinders than individual shear layers reported in some previous works; particularly, both shear layers from the downstream cylinder often shed vortices at the same multiple frequencies. The maximum Strouhal number for the upstream cylinder is also identified at {G}^{*}=1 for aperiodic flow pattern. Furthermore, for most cases studied, the downstream cylinder experiences larger drag force than the upstream cylinder.

  13. Interaction induced staggered spin-orbit order in two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Tanmoy

    2012-06-05

    Decoupling spin and charge transports in solids is among the many prerequisites for realizing spin electronics, spin caloritronics, and spin-Hall effect. Beyond the conventional method of generating and manipulating spin current via magnetic knob, recent advances have expanded the possibility to optical and electrical method which are controllable both internally and externally. Yet, due to the inevitable presence of charge excitations and electrical polarizibility in these methods, the separation between spin and charge degrees of freedom of electrons remains a challenge. Here we propose and formulate an interaction induced staggered spin-orbit order as a new emergent phase of matter. We show that when some form of inherent spin-splitting via Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling renders two helical Fermi surfaces to become significantly nested, a Fermi surface instability arises. To lift this degeneracy, a spontaneous symmetry breaking spin-orbit density wave develops, causing a surprisingly large quasiparticle gapping with chiral electronic states, with no active charge excitations. Since the staggered spin-orbit order is associated with a condensation energy, quantified by the gap value, destroying such spin-orbit interaction costs sufficiently large perturbation field or temperature or de-phasing time. BiAg2 surface state is shown to be a representative system for realizing such novel spin-orbit interaction with tunable and large strength, and the spin-splitting is decoupled from charge excitations.

  14. Staggered grid lagrangian method with local structured adaptive mesh refinement for modeling shock hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliot, N S

    2000-09-26

    A new method for the solution of the unsteady Euler equations has been developed. The method combines staggered grid Lagrangian techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). This method is a precursor to a more general adaptive arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE-AMR) algorithm under development, which will facilitate the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a Lagrange step, which is the focus of the work described here. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. These new algorithmic components are first developed in one dimension and are then generalized to two dimensions. Solutions of several model problems involving shock hydrodynamics are presented and discussed.

  15. A staggered approach for the coupling of Cahn-Hilliard type diffusion and finite strain elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Samaniego, E.; Rabczuk, T.

    2016-02-01

    We develop an algorithm and computational implementation for simulation of problems that combine Cahn-Hilliard type diffusion with finite strain elasticity. We have in mind applications such as the electro-chemo-mechanics of lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. We concentrate on basic computational aspects. A staggered algorithm is proposed for the coupled multi-field model. For the diffusion problem, the fourth order differential equation is replaced by a system of second order equations to deal with the issue of the regularity required for the approximation spaces. Low order finite elements are used for discretization in space of the involved fields (displacement, concentration, nonlocal concentration). Three (both 2D and 3D) extensively worked numerical examples show the capabilities of our approach for the representation of (i) phase separation, (ii) the effect of concentration in deformation and stress, (iii) the effect of strain in concentration, and (iv) lithiation. We analyze convergence with respect to spatial and time discretization and found that very good results are achievable using both a staggered scheme and approximated strain interpolation.

  16. A staggered differential phase-shift keying modulation format for 100Gbit/s applications.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yufeng; Wen, Shuangchun; Chen, Lin; Li, Ying; Xu, Huiwen

    2008-08-18

    We propose and demonstrate by numerical simulation a new phase modulation format, the staggered differential phase-shift keying (SDPSK), for 100 Gbit/s applications. Non-return-to-zero (NRZ) SDPSK signals was generated by using two phase modulators, and return-to-zero (RZ) SDPSK signals with 50% duty cycle was generated by cascading a dual-arm Mach-Zehnder modulator. The demodulation of 2 bit/symbol can be simply achieved on 1 bit rate through only one Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer and a balanced receiver. By comparing the transmission characteristics of the two staggered phase modulation formats with those of NRZ-DPSK, RZ-DPSK, NRZ-DQPSK, and RZ-DQPSK, respectively, we show that, the SDPSK signal has similar chromatic dispersion and polarization-mode-dispersion tolerance to the DPSK signal with same NRZ or RZ shape, while the SDPSK signal has stronger nonlinear tolerance than the DPSK or DQPSK signal. In addition, the SDPSK signal has the best transmission performance when each signal was transmitted over 106km optical SMF+DCF, and then launched into a third-order Gaussian optical bandpass filter placed with beyond 125GHz bandwidth.

  17. Staggered scheduling of sensor estimation and fusion for tracking over long-haul links

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Qiang; Rao, Nageswara S. V.; Wang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Networked sensing can be found in a multitude of real-world applications. Here, we focus on the communication-and computation-constrained long-haul sensor networks, where sensors are remotely deployed over a vast geographical area to perform certain tasks. Of special interest is a class of such networks where sensors take measurements of one or more dynamic targets and send their state estimates to a remote fusion center via long-haul satellite links. The severe loss and delay over such links can easily reduce the amount of sensor data received by the fusion center, thereby limiting the potential information fusion gain and resulting in suboptimalmore » tracking performance. In this paper, starting with the temporal-domain staggered estimation for an individual sensor, we explore the impact of the so-called intra-state prediction and retrodiction on estimation errors. We then investigate the effect of such estimation scheduling across different sensors on the spatial-domain fusion performance, where the sensing time epochs across sensors are scheduled in an asynchronous and staggered manner. In particular, the impact of communication delay and loss as well as sensor bias on such scheduling is explored by means of numerical and simulation studies that demonstrate the validity of our analysis.« less

  18. Coupled versus decoupled multigrid solvers for variable viscosity Stokes problems using a staggered finite difference scheme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton; Püsök, Adina

    2014-05-01

    In order to solve high-resolution 3D problems in computational geodynamics it is crucial to use multigrid solvers in combination with parallel computers. A number of approaches are currently in use in the community, which can broadly be divided into coupled and decoupled approaches. In the decoupled approach, an algebraic or geometric multigrid method is used as a preconditioner for the velocity equations only while an iterative approach such as Schur complement reduction used to solve the outer velocity-pressure equations. In the coupled approach, on the other hand, a multigrid approach is applied to both the velocity and pressure equations. The coupled multigrid approaches are typically employed in combination with staggered finite difference discretizations, whereas the decoupled approach is the method of choice in many of the existing finite element codes. Yet, it is unclear whether there are differences in speed between the two approaches, and if so, how this depends on the initial guess. Here, we implemented both approaches in combination with a staggered finite difference discretization and test the robustness of the two approaches with respect to large jumps in viscosity contrast, as well as their computational efficiency as a function of the initial guess. Acknowledgements. Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC Grant agreement #258830. Numerical computations have been performed on JUQUEEN of the Jülich high-performance computing center.

  19. Computational imaging from non-uniform degradation of staggered TDI thermal infrared imager.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Jian Guo; Shi, Yan; Chen, Wangli; Qin, Qianqing; Zhang, Zijian

    2015-09-21

    For the Time Delay Integration (TDI) staggered line-scanning thermal infrared imager, a Computational Imaging (CI) approach is developed to achieve higher spatial resolution images. After a thorough analysis of the causes of non-uniform image displacement and degradation for multi-channel staggered TDI arrays, the study aims to approach one-dimensional (1D) sub-pixel displacement estimation and superposition of images from time-division multiplexing scanning lines. Under the assumption that a thermal image is 2D piecewise C(2) smooth, a sparse-and-smooth deconvolution algorithm with L1-norm regularization terms combining the first and second order derivative operators is proposed to restore high frequency components and to suppress aliasing simultaneously. It is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated, with simulation and airborne thermal infrared images, that this is a state-of-the-art practical CI method to reconstruct clear images with higher frequency components from raw thermal images that are subject to instantaneous distortion and blurring.

  20. Cas9-catalyzed DNA Cleavage Generates Staggered Ends: Evidence from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zhicheng; Liu, Jin

    2016-11-01

    The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (spCas9) along with a single guide RNA (sgRNA) has emerged as a versatile toolbox for genome editing. Despite recent advances in the mechanism studies on spCas9-sgRNA-mediated double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) recognition and cleavage, it is still unclear how the catalytic Mg2+ ions induce the conformation changes toward the catalytic active state. It also remains controversial whether Cas9 generates blunt-ended or staggered-ended breaks with overhangs in the DNA. To investigate these issues, here we performed the first all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the spCas9-sgRNA-dsDNA system with and without Mg2+ bound. The simulation results showed that binding of two Mg2+ ions at the RuvC domain active site could lead to structurally and energetically favorable coordination ready for the non-target DNA strand cleavage. Importantly, we demonstrated with our simulations that Cas9-catalyzed DNA cleavage produces 1-bp staggered ends rather than generally assumed blunt ends.

  1. Staggered scheduling of sensor estimation and fusion for tracking over long-haul links

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiang; Rao, Nageswara S. V.; Wang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Networked sensing can be found in a multitude of real-world applications. Here, we focus on the communication-and computation-constrained long-haul sensor networks, where sensors are remotely deployed over a vast geographical area to perform certain tasks. Of special interest is a class of such networks where sensors take measurements of one or more dynamic targets and send their state estimates to a remote fusion center via long-haul satellite links. The severe loss and delay over such links can easily reduce the amount of sensor data received by the fusion center, thereby limiting the potential information fusion gain and resulting in suboptimal tracking performance. In this paper, starting with the temporal-domain staggered estimation for an individual sensor, we explore the impact of the so-called intra-state prediction and retrodiction on estimation errors. We then investigate the effect of such estimation scheduling across different sensors on the spatial-domain fusion performance, where the sensing time epochs across sensors are scheduled in an asynchronous and staggered manner. In particular, the impact of communication delay and loss as well as sensor bias on such scheduling is explored by means of numerical and simulation studies that demonstrate the validity of our analysis.

  2. Parametric modeling and stagger angle optimization of an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. X.; Zhang, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Axial flow fans are widely used in every field of social production. Improving their efficiency is a sustained and urgent demand of domestic industry. The optimization of stagger angle is an important method to improve fan performance. Parametric modeling and calculation process automation are realized in this paper to improve optimization efficiency. Geometric modeling and mesh division are parameterized based on GAMBIT. Parameter setting and flow field calculation are completed in the batch mode of FLUENT. A control program is developed in Visual C++ to dominate the data exchange of mentioned software. It also extracts calculation results for optimization algorithm module (provided by Matlab) to generate directive optimization control parameters, which as feedback are transferred upwards to modeling module. The center line of the blade airfoil, based on CLARK y profile, is constructed by non-constant circulation and triangle discharge method. Stagger angles of six airfoil sections are optimized, to reduce the influence of inlet shock loss as well as gas leak in blade tip clearance and hub resistance at blade root. Finally an optimal solution is obtained, which meets the total pressure requirement under given conditions and improves total pressure efficiency by about 6%.

  3. A two-dimensional coding design for staggered islands bit-patterned media recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrayangkool, A.; Warisarn, C.

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a two dimensional (2D) staggered recorded-bit patterning (SRBP) coding scheme for staggered array bit-patterned media recording channel to alleviate the severe 2D interference, which requires no redundant bits at the expense of increased an additional memories. Specifically, a data sequence is first split into three tracks. Then, each data track is circularly shifted to find the best data pattern based on a look-up table before recording such that the shifted data tracks cause the lowest 2D interference in the readback signal. Simulation results indicate that the system with our proposed SRBP scheme outperforms that without any 2D coding, especially when an areal density (AD) is high and/or the position jitter is large. Specifically, for the system without position jitter at bit-error rate of 10-4, the proposed scheme can provide about 1.8 and 2.3 dB gains at the AD of 2.5 and 3.0 Tb/in.2, respectively.

  4. Maximum group velocity in a one-dimensional model with a sinusoidally varying staggered potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Tanay; Sen, Diptiman; Dutta, Amit

    2015-06-01

    We use Floquet theory to study the maximum value of the stroboscopic group velocity in a one-dimensional tight-binding model subjected to an on-site staggered potential varying sinusoidally in time. The results obtained by numerically diagonalizing the Floquet operator are analyzed using a variety of analytical schemes. In the low-frequency limit we use adiabatic theory, while in the high-frequency limit the Magnus expansion of the Floquet Hamiltonian turns out to be appropriate. When the magnitude of the staggered potential is much greater or much less than the hopping, we use degenerate Floquet perturbation theory; we find that dynamical localization occurs in the former case when the maximum group velocity vanishes. Finally, starting from an "engineered" initial state where the particles (taken to be hard-core bosons) are localized in one part of the chain, we demonstrate that the existence of a maximum stroboscopic group velocity manifests in a light-cone-like spreading of the particles in real space.

  5. An experimental investigation of wind flow over tall towers in staggered form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Proma; Islam, Md. Quamrul; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    In this research work an experiment is conducted to see the effect of wind loading on square, pentagonal and Hexagonal shape cylinders in staggered form. The experiment is done in an open circuit wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 4.23×104 based on the face width of the cylinder across the flow direction. The flow velocity has been kept uniform throughout the experiment at 14.3 m/s. The test has been conducted for single cylinders first and then in staggered form. Angle of attack is chosen at a definite interval. The static pressure at different locations of the cylinder is measured by inclined multi-manometer. From the surface static pressure readings pressure coefficients are calculated first, then drag and lift coefficients are calculated using numerical Integration Method. These results will surely help engineers to design buildings with such shapes more efficiently. All the results are expressed in non-dimensional form, so they can be applied for prototype buildings and determine the wind loading at any wind speed on structures of similar external shapes.

  6. Heat exchanger performance calculations for enhanced-tube condenser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1992-07-01

    The lack of a prediction method is sometimes used for the rejection of enhanced tubes for some condenser applications even though there is ample data from single-tube condensing experiments. Three methods are discussed that can be used to rate and/or size these multitube units based on the single-tube experimental results. The Kern vertical-number correction appears to be quite adequate for most operating conditions, the exceptions being large sizes and/or deep vacuum operation. The bundle-factor method is preferred for these applications; however, field test results are required to obtain this factor. If performance data are not available, pointwise or numerical methods are required but special care must be taken to insure that the adverse effects of noncondensable gas pockets and the saturation-temperature depression are properly addressed.

  7. Heat exchanger performance calculations for enhanced-tube condenser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The lack of a prediction method is sometimes used for the rejection of enhanced tubes for some condenser applications even though there is ample data from single-tube condensing experiments. Three methods are discussed that can be used to rate and/or size these multitube units based on the single-tube experimental results. The Kern vertical-number correction appears to be quite adequate for most operating conditions, the exceptions being large sizes and/or deep vacuum operation. The bundle-factor method is preferred for these applications; however, field test results are required to obtain this factor. If performance data are not available, pointwise or numerical methods are required but special care must be taken to insure that the adverse effects of noncondensable gas pockets and the saturation-temperature depression are properly addressed.

  8. Numerical investigation of base-setting of stator's stagger angles for a 15-stage axial-flow compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hao; Zhao, Weiguang; Jin, Donghai; Peng, Zeyan; Gui, Xingmin

    2014-02-01

    A 15-stage axial-flow compressor utilized in steel industry was studied in this paper. All the stator's stagger angles of the compressor are variable to ensure the multistage compressor operate effectively within a wide range of flow rate and meanwhile satisfy the demand for sufficient pressure ratio, adiabatic efficiency and stall margin. Three in all different base-settings of stator's stagger angles were presented and commercial CFD software was applied to obtain the overall performance characteristics. The results showed that both of the optimized base-settings improved the performances both in summer and winter conditions, although the adiabatic efficiency was somewhat decreased. Taking incidence angle and stage loading into consideration, differences among the three cases were analyzed in detail. On the basis of numerical computations, the performance could be effectively improved through adjusting the base-setting of stator's stagger angles.

  9. Bundle duct interaction studies for fuel assemblies. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, H.T.S.; Kaplan, S.

    1981-06-01

    It is known that the wire-wrapped rods and duct in an LMFBR are undergoing a gradual structural distortion from the initially uniform geometry under the combined effects of thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling and creep. These deformations have a significant effect on flow characteristics, thus causing changes in thermal behavior such as cladding temperature and temperature distribution within a bundle. The temperature distribution may further enhance or retard irradiation induced deformation of the bundle. This report summarizes the results of the continuing effort in investigating the bundle-duct interaction, focusing on the need for the large development plant.

  10. Systematic evaluation of bundled SPC water for biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Srinivasa M; Kuhn, Alexander B; Schäfer, Lars V

    2015-04-07

    In bundled SPC water models, the relative motion of groups of four water molecules is restrained by distance-dependent potentials. Bundled SPC models have been used in hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA/CG) multiscale simulations, since they enable to couple atomistic SPC water with supra-molecular CG water models that effectively represent more than a single water molecule. In the present work, we systematically validated and critically tested bundled SPC water models as solvent for biomolecular simulations. To that aim, we investigated both thermodynamic and structural properties of various biomolecular systems through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force of dimerization of pairs of amino acid side chains as well as hydration free energies of single side chains obtained with bundled SPC and standard (unrestrained) SPC water agree closely with each other and with experimental data. Decomposition of the hydration free energies into enthalpic and entropic contributions reveals that in bundled SPC, this favorable agreement of the free energies is due to a larger degree of error compensation between hydration enthalpy and entropy. The Ramachandran maps of Ala3, Ala5, and Ala7 peptides are similar in bundled and unrestrained SPC, whereas for the (GS)2 peptide, bundled water leads to a slight overpopulation of extended conformations. Analysis of the end-to-end distance autocorrelation times of the Ala5 and (GS)2 peptides shows that sampling in more viscous bundled SPC water is about two times slower. Pronounced differences between the water models were found for the structure of a coiled-coil dimer, which is instable in bundled SPC but not in standard SPC. In addition, the hydration of the active site of the serine protease α-chymotrypsin depends on the water model. Bundled SPC leads to an increased hydration of the active site region, more hydrogen bonds between water and catalytic triad residues, and a significantly slower exchange of water

  11. Dark-field illuminated reflectance fiber bundle endoscopic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-04-01

    We propose a reflectance fiber bundle microscope using a dark-field illumination configuration for applications in endoscopic medical imaging and diagnostics. Our experiment results show that dark-field illumination can effectively suppress strong specular reflection from the proximal end of the fiber bundle. We realized a lateral resolution of 4.4 μm using the dark-field illuminated fiber bundle configuration. To demonstrate the feasibility of using the system to study cell morphology, we obtained still and video images of two thyroid cancer cell lines. Our results clearly allow differentiation of different cancer cell types.

  12. Characterization of a space orbited incoherent fiber optic bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewalt, Stephen A.; Taylor, Edward W.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a study performed to determine the effects of adverse space environments on a bundle of over 1800 optical fibers orbited for 69 months are reported. Experimental results are presented on an incoherent fiber optic bundle oriented in low Earth orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite as part of the Space Environment Effects Experiment (M0006). Measurements were performed to determine if space induced radiation effects changed the fiber bundle characteristics. Data demonstrating the success of light transmitting fibers to withstand the adverse space environment are presented.

  13. Structural Transitions of F-Actin:Espin Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin; Bartles, James; Wong, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Espin is an actin bundling protein involved in the formation of the parallel bundles of filamentous actin in hair cell stereocilia. Mutations in espin are implicated in deafness phenotypes in mice and humans. We present measurements of the F-actin structures induced by wild type and by mutated espin obtained via small angle x-ray scattering and fluorescence microscopy. We found that wild type espin induced a paracrystalline hexagonal array of twisted F-actin, whereas the mutated espin only condensed the F-actin into a nematic-like phase. The possibility of coexisting nematic and bundled actin in mixtures containing both mutant and wild type espins was also investigated.

  14. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  17. SiPM-PET with a short optical fiber bundle for simultaneous PET-MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong Jong; Kang, Han Gyoo; Ko, Guen Bae; Song, In Chan; Rhee, June-Tak; Lee, Jae Sung

    2012-06-21

    For positron emission tomography (PET) inserts to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications, optical fibers have been used for some time to transfer scintillation photons to photomultiplier tubes positioned outside the fringe magnetic field. We previously proposed a novel utilization of an optical fiber for good radio frequency (RF) transmission from body coils to an imaging object. Optical fiber bundles between silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and scintillation crystals provide an increased spacing between RF-shielded electronics boxes, facilitating RF passage from the body RF coils to imaging objects. In this paper, we present test results of a SiPM-PET system with a short optical fiber bundle for simultaneous PET-MR imaging. We built the SiPM-PET system which consisted of 12 SiPM-PET modules; each module was assembled with a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicatecrystal block, a 31 mm optical fiber bundle, a Hamamatsu multi-pixel photon counter S11064-050P and a signal processing box shielded with copper. The SiPM-PET system, with a face-to-face distance of 71 mm, was placed inside a 3 T MRI. A small surface coil placed inside the SiPM-PET system was used to receive the signal from phantoms while the body RF coil transmitted the RF pulses. The SiPM-PET system showed little performance degradation during the simultaneous PET-MR imaging and it caused no significant degradation of MR images with turbo spin echo (TSE), gradient echo or 3D spoiled gradient recalled sequences. Echo planar imaging MR images with and without the SiPM-PET inside the MR scanner were significantly worse than the images obtained with the TSE sequence.

  18. Pollen tube development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark A; Kost, Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    Pollen tubes grow rapidly in a strictly polarized manner as they transport male reproductive cells through female flower tissues to bring about fertilization. Vegetative pollen tube cells are an excellent model system to investigate processes underlying directional cell expansion. In this chapter, we describe materials and methods required for (1) the identification of novel factors essential for polarized cell growth through the isolation and analysis of Arabidopsis mutants with defects in pollen tube growth and (2) the detailed functional characterization of pollen tube proteins based on transient transformation and microscopic analysis of cultured tobacco pollen tubes.

  19. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  20. Controlled production of aligned-nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, M.; Grobert, N.; Olivares, J.; Zhang, J. P.; Terrones, H.; Kordatos, K.; Hsu, W. K.; Hare, J. P.; Townsend, P. D.; Prassides, K.; Cheetham, A. K.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    1997-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes might be usefully employed in nanometre-scale engineering and electronics. Electrical conductivity measurements on the bulk material, on individual multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes and on bundles of single-walled nanotubes have revealed that they may behave as metallic, insulating or semiconducting nanowires, depending on the method of production-which controls the degree of graphitization, the helicity and the diameter. Measurements of Young's modulus show that single nanotubes are stiffer than commercial carbon fibres. Methods commonly used to generate nanotubes-carbon-arc discharge techniques, catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons and condensed-phase electrolysis-generally suffer from the drawbacks that polyhedral particles are also formed and that the dimensions of the nanotubes are highly variable. Here we describe a method for generating aligned carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis of 2-amino-4,6-dichloro-s-triazine over thin films of a cobalt catalyst patterned on a silica substrate by laser etching. The use of a patterned catalyst apparently encourages the formation of aligned nanotubes. The method offers control over length (up to about 50μm) and fairly uniform diameters (30-50nm), as well as producing nanotubes in high yield, uncontaminated by polyhedral particles.

  1. Concise Care Bundles In Acute Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kivlin, Jude; Altemimi, Harith

    2015-01-01

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn, Norfolk is a 488 bed hospital providing services to approximately 331,000 people across 750 square miles. In 2012 a need was recognised for documentation (pathways) in a practical format to increase usage of national guidelines and facilitate adherence to best practice (gold standards of care) that could be easily version controlled, auditable and provide support in clinical decision-making by junior doctors. BMJ Action Sets[1] fulfilled the brief with expert knowledge, version control and support, though they were deemed too lengthy and unworkable in fast paced settings like the medical assessment unit; they formed the base creation of concise care bundles (CCB). CCB were introduced for 21 clinical presentations and one procedure. Outcomes were fully audited and showed significant improvement in a range of measures, including an increase in completions of CHADVASC score in atrial fibrillation, antibiotics prescribed per protocol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and Blatchford score recorded for patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleed. PMID:26734437

  2. Nursing Care Management: Influence on Bundled Payments.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Shaynie; Luther, Brenda

    Fragmented and uncoordinated care is the third highest driver of U.S. healthcare costs. Although less than 10% of patients experience uncoordinated care, these patients represent 36% of total healthcare costs; care management interaction makes a significant impact on the utilization of healthcare dollars. A literature search was conducted to construct a model of care coordination for elective surgical procedures by collecting best practices for acute, transitions, and post-acute care periods. A case study was used to demonstrate the model developed. Care management defines care coordination as a model of care to address improving patient and caregiver engagement, communication across settings of care, and ultimately improved patient outcomes of care. Nurse-led care coordination in the presurgical, inpatient, and post-acute care settings requires systems change and administrative support to effectively meet the goals of the Affordable Care Act of reducing redundancy and costs while improving the patient experience. Nursing is the lynchpin of care management processes in all settings of care; thus, this model of care coordination for elective surgical admissions can provide nursing care management leaders a comprehensive view of coordinating care for these patient across settings of care during the predetermined time period of care. As bundled payment structures increasingly affect hospital systems, nursing leaders need to be ready to create or improve their care management processes; care coordination is one such process requiring immediate attention.

  3. A study of bacterial flagellar bundling.

    PubMed

    Flores, Heather; Lobaton, Edgar; Méndez-Diez, Stefan; Tlupova, Svetlana; Cortez, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Certain bacteria, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), use multiple flagella often concentrated at one end of their bodies to induce locomotion. Each flagellum is formed in a left-handed helix and has a motor at the base that rotates the flagellum in a corkscrew motion. We present a computational model of the flagellar motion and their hydrodynamic interaction. The model is based on the equations of Stokes flow to describe the fluid motion. The elasticity of the flagella is modeled with a network of elastic springs while the motor is represented by a torque at the base of each flagellum. The fluid velocity due to the forces is described by regularized Stokeslets and the velocity due to the torques by the associated regularized rotlets. Their expressions are derived. The model is used to analyze the swimming motion of a single flagellum and of a group of three flagella in close proximity to one another. When all flagellar motors rotate counterclockwise, the hydrodynamic interaction can lead to bundling. We present an analysis of the flow surrounding the flagella. When at least one of the motors changes its direction of rotation, the same initial conditions lead to a tumbling behavior characterized by the separation of the flagella, changes in their orientation, and no net swimming motion. The analysis of the flow provides some intuition for these processes.

  4. A Test Condenser to Measure Condensate Inundation Effects in a Tube Bundle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    the predictions of Nusselt (Eq. 3), Eissenberg (Eq. 8), and Chen (Eq. ’) for the norma - lized average value of the heat transfer coefficient of a bank...Ganic, E.N., "Vapor/Liquid Interaction and Entrainment in Falling Film Evaporators", Transactions of ASME , Vol. 102, February, 19So. 22. Withers, J.G

  5. The Effect of Condensate Inundation on Steam Condensation Heat Transfer in a Tube Bundle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    APPENDIX B: UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS------------------------ 80 APPENDIX C: COMPUTER PROGRAMS--------------------------- 88 APPENDIX D: SIEDER -TATE CONSTANT...Correction factor (p c/Pw) Cf,c Calculated correction factor C. Sieder -Tate coefficient C Specific heat of water (kJ/kg.K)PC DF Average flow...coefficient was computed using the Sieder -Tate equation described in Holman [Ref. 31]: Nu = hi Di/k c = C i Re Pr 1 3 (c/w) (4.1) where the coefficient C

  6. A Hybrid Vortex Method for Two-Dimensional Flow Over Tube Bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1998-11-13

    A hybrid vortex method is presented for computing flows about objects that accurately resolves the boundary layer details while keeping the number of free vortices at a reasonable level. The method uses a wall layer model close to the body surface and discrete vortex blobs in the free wake. Details of the wall layer implementation are presented, and results of sample calculations are compared with known analytical solutions and with calculations from other vortex codes. These results show that the computed boundary layer details are accurate to approximately 0.3 percent of analytical solutions while using three orders of magnitude fewer vortices than other vortex simulations.

  7. Correlation of expression of the actin filament-bundling protein espin with stereociliary bundle formation in the developing inner ear.

    PubMed

    Li, Huawei; Liu, Hong; Balt, Steve; Mann, Sabine; Corrales, C Eduardo; Heller, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The vertebrate hair cell is named for its stereociliary bundle or hair bundle that protrudes from the cell's apical surface. Hair bundles mediate mechanosensitivity, and their highly organized structure plays a critical role in mechanoelectrical transduction and amplification. The prototypical hair bundle is composed of individual stereocilia, 50-300 in number, depending on the animal species and on the type of hair cell. The assembly of stereocilia, in particular, the formation during development of individual rows of stereocilia with descending length, has been analyzed in great morphological detail. Electron microscopic studies have demonstrated that stereocilia are filled with actin filaments that are rigidly cross-linked. The growth of individual rows of stereocilia is associated with the addition of actin filaments and with progressively increasing numbers of cross-bridges between actin filaments. Recently, a mutation in the actin filament-bundling protein espin has been shown to underlie hair bundle degeneration in the deaf jerker mouse, subsequently leading to deafness. Our study was undertaken to investigate the appearance and developmental expression of espin in chicken inner ear sensory epithelia. We found that the onset of espin expression correlates with the initiation and growth of stereocilia bundles in vestibular and cochlear hair cells. Intense espin immunolabeling of stereocilia was colocalized with actin filament staining in all types of hair cells at all developmental stages and in adult animals. Our analysis of espin as a molecular marker for actin filament cross-links in stereocilia is in full accordance with previous morphological studies and implicates espin as an important structural component of hair bundles from initiation of bundle assembly to mature chicken hair cells.

  8. Structure and vibrational properties of single-wall carbon nanotube bundles under hyprostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Stephanie; Thomsen, Christian; Ordejon, Pablo

    2001-03-01

    We investigated experimentally and theoretically the mechanical and vibrational properties of carbon nanotube bundles under high hydrostatic pressure. While Raman spectra excited with blue laser light (2.54 eV) show a uniform shift of the high-energy modes under pressure towards higher frequencies (≈3.8 TPa-1), we find a small splitting of 0.56 TPa-1 when exciting in the red (1.92 eV).(S. Reich, H. Jantoljak, and C. Thomsen, Phys. Rev. B 61), R13 389 (2000); and references therein To investigate this splitting we calculated the relaxed structure of bundles of small nanotubes (d=8 Åunder pressures up to 4 GPa using an LDA pseudopotential structural ab initio method.(D. Sanchez-Portal, P. Ordejón, E. Artacho, and J. M. Soler Int. J. Quant. Chem. 65), 453 (1997). We find that armchair nanotubes show a different strain in axial and circumferential directions. In contrast, zig zag tubes behave uniformly in this respect. We discuss these results in light of the theoretical and experimental pressure dependence of the high energy modes.

  9. Modeling of the energy savings of variable recruitment McKibben muscle bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Michael A.; Chipka, Jordan B.; Bryant, Matthew J.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2015-03-01

    McKibben artificial muscles are often utilized in mobile robotic applications that require compliant and light weight actuation capable of producing large forces. In order to increase the endurance of these mobile robotic platforms, actuation efficiency must be addressed. Since pneumatic systems are rarely more than 30% efficient due to the compressibility of the working fluid, the McKibben muscles are hydraulically powered. Additionally, these McKibben artificial muscles utilize an inelastic bladder to reduce the energy losses associated with elastic energy storage in the usual rubber tube bladders. The largest energy losses in traditional valve-controlled hydraulic systems are found in the valving implementation to match the required loads. This is performed by throttling, which results in large pressure drops over the control valves and significant fluid power being wasted as heat. This paper discusses how these throttling losses are reduced by grouping multiple artificial muscles to form a muscle bundle where, like in skeletal muscle, more elements that make up the muscle bundle are recruited to match the load. This greatly lessens the pressure drops by effectively changing the actuator area, leading to much higher efficiencies over a broader operation envelope. Simulations of several different loading scenarios are discussed that reveal the benefits of such an actuation scheme.

  10. The body-centered cubic structure of methyllithium tetramer crystal: staggered methyl conformation by electrostatic stabilization via intratetramer multipolarization.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yusuke; Demura, Akimitsu; Okamoto, Takuya; Hitomi, Haruko; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2006-06-29

    The methyllithium tetramer (CH3Li)4 structure in the bcc crystal has been theoretically optimized with the use of density functional theory calculations under the periodic boundary condition. The X-ray structure shows that the methyl-group conformation in tetramer in crystal takes the staggered form rather than the eclipsed form that is taken in the isolated tetramer, i.e., the crystal packing effect, and this has been reproduced for the first time. It is concluded that the staggered form is advantageous in crystal, as a whole, due to the larger electrostatic stabilization via the induced intratetramer multipolarization, although it should cause, simultaneously, smaller destabilization in intratetramer electronic energy.

  11. Renormalization-group approach to quantum Fisher information in an XY model with staggered Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, X M; Cheng, W W; Liu, J-M

    2016-01-19

    We investigate the quantum Fisher information and quantum phase transitions of an XY spin chain with staggered Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction using the quantum renormalization-group method. The quantum Fisher information, its first-derivatives, and the finite-size scaling behaviors are rigorously calculated respectively. The singularity of the derivatives at the phase transition point as a function of lattice size is carefully discussed and it is revealed that the scaling exponent for quantum Fisher information at the critical point can be used to describe the correlation length of this model, addressing the substantial role of staggered Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in modulating quantum phase transitions.

  12. Heat tube device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention discloses a heat tube device through which a working fluid can be circulated to transfer heat to air in a conventional air conditioning system. The heat tube device is disposable about a conventional cooling coil of the air conditioning system and includes a plurality of substantially U-shaped tubes connected to a support structure. The support structure includes members for allowing the heat tube device to be readily positioned about the cooling coil. An actuatable adjustment device is connected to the U-shaped tubes for allowing, upon actuation thereof, for the heat tubes to be simultaneously rotated relative to the cooling coil for allowing the heat transfer from the heat tube device to air in the air conditioning system to be selectively varied.

  13. Intercostal drainage tube or intracardiac drainage tube?

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, N.; Kamath, S. Ganesh; Khymdeit, Edison; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Although insertion of chest drain tubes is a common medical practice, there are risks associated with this procedure, especially when inexperienced physicians perform it. Wrong insertion of the tube has been known to cause morbidity and occasional mortality. We report a case where the left ventricle was accidentally punctured leading to near-exsanguination. This report is to highlight the need for experienced physicians to supervise the procedure and train the younger physician in the safe performance of the procedure. PMID:27397467

  14. Bundles of Norms About Teen Sex and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Sennott, Christie

    2015-09-01

    Teen pregnancy is a cultural battleground in struggles over morality, education, and family. At its heart are norms about teen sex, contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. Analyzing 57 interviews with college students, we found that "bundles" of related norms shaped the messages teens hear. Teens did not think their communities encouraged teen sex or pregnancy, but normative messages differed greatly, with either moral or practical rationalizations. Teens readily identified multiple norms intended to regulate teen sex, contraception, abortion, childbearing, and the sanctioning of teen parents. Beyond influencing teens' behavior, norms shaped teenagers' public portrayals and post hoc justifications of their behavior. Although norm bundles are complex to measure, participants could summarize them succinctly. These bundles and their conflicting behavioral prescriptions create space for human agency in negotiating normative pressures. The norm bundles concept has implications for teen pregnancy prevention policies and can help revitalize social norms for understanding health behaviors.

  15. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: Consensus Bundle on Obstetric Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and System Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation.

  16. National Partnership for Maternal Safety Consensus Bundle on Obstetric Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into 4 domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation.

  17. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: consensus bundle on obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and System Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation.

  18. 15. VIEW OF SHINGLES BUNDLED, PLACED ON PALLET, AND READIED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF SHINGLES BUNDLED, PLACED ON PALLET, AND READIED FOR FORKLIFT OPERATOR TO MOVE PALLET OF SHINGLES TO LOADING DOCK - Lester Shingle Mill, 1602 North Eighteenth Street, Sweet Home, Linn County, OR

  19. Assembly of mm-scale macrobridges with carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Anyuan; Ajayan, P. M.; Ramanath, G.

    2003-07-01

    We report a chemical vapor deposition method for in situ bridging of mm-scale metal-contact patterns with bundles of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The nanotube bundles synthesized from a hexane-ferrocene-thiophene mixture have a diameter of <50 μm and lengths up to millimeters, typically consisting of tens to hundreds of aligned nanotubes. These bundles are transported to the downstream end of the furnace, where they are captured by relief patterns of metal-contact tips. We can control the orientation and length of the nanotube bridges by preorganizing the metal tips to receive the bundles. This method is amenable to both scaling up, e.g., to create large-area arrays of nanotubes with contact electrodes, as well as scaling down, e.g., to bridge closely spaced contact structures.

  20. Generalized holomorphic bundles and the B-field action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchin, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    On a generalized complex manifold, there is an associated definition of a generalized holomorphic bundle, introduced by Gualtieri. In the case of an ordinary complex structure, this notion yields an object which we call a co-Higgs bundle, and we consider the B-field action of a closed form of type (1,1), both local and global. The effect makes contact with both Nahm's equations and holomorphic gerbes.

  1. Performance-based bundled payments: potential benefits and burdens.

    PubMed

    Satin, David J; Miles, Justin

    2009-10-01

    Performance-based bundled payments have emerged as the most recent iteration of pay for performance. These are programs in which providers are paid a single fee for a set of evidenced-based services related to a diagnosis. The payments are typically linked to outcomes as well as other quality measures. This paper reviews two prominent bundled payment programs--PROMETHEUS and ProvenCare--and discusses the potential pitfalls of these approaches.

  2. A Technological Determinist Viewpoint of the Stanton-Staggers Conflict over "The Selling of the Pentagon": Print Man Versus Electronic Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    Media, specifically documentary films on television, profoundly affect both social structure and man's psychological percepts. The clash of views depicted is between "print man" (using U.S. Representative Harley Staggers as an example) and "electronic man" (portrayed as Frank Stanton of CBS) centering on Stagger's objections to…

  3. Hydraulic testing of accelerator-production-of-tritium rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Spatz, T.L.; Siebe, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Hydraulic tests have been performed on small pitch-to-diameter-ratio rod bundles using light water (1.7 < P/D < 1.17, and d = 3.175 mm). Flows cover the range from greater-than-nominal Reynolds numbers (fully turbulent) to low-speed laminar flows. Differential pressure measurements were made across the support plates holding the rod bundles, across the rod bundles, and across the entire assembly. Flow rates, temperatures, and gauge pressures also were measured. The data from these hydraulic tests have been compared to correlating literature for tightly pitched rod bundles. The prototypic geometry of these tests did not compare directly to any geometry found in the literature because of the variety of subchannels along the outer wall of the rod bundle. Under that constraint, there was excellent comparison of the rod-bundle friction factor with those factors given in the literature. The results show a large range of the Reynolds number over which the flow is in transition from laminar to turbulent (e.g., 580 < Re{sub Tr} < 13,000). Also presented is the comparison of the overall rung pressure drop to a solution based on hydraulic-resistance handbook calculations.

  4. Tapered fiber bundles for combining high-power diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Kosterin, Andrey; Temyanko, Valery; Fallahi, Mahmoud; Mansuripur, Masud

    2004-07-01

    Tapered fiber bundles are often used to combine the output power of several semiconductor lasers into a multimode optical fiber for the purpose of pumping fiber lasers and amplifiers. It is generally recognized that the brightness of such combiners does not exceed the brightness of the individual input fibers. We report that the brightness of the tapered fibers (and fiber bundles) depends on both the taper ratio and the mode-filling properties of the beams launched into the individual fibers. Brightness, therefore, can be increased by selection of sources that fill a small fraction of the input fiber's modal capacity. As proof of concept, we present the results of measurements on tapered fiber-bundle combiners having a low-output étendue. Under low mode-filling conditions per input multimode fiber (i.e., fraction of filled modes < or =0.29), we report brightness enhancements of 8.0 dB for 19 x 1 bundles, 6.7 dB for 7 x 1 bundles, and 4.0 dB for 3 x 1 combiners. Our measured coupling efficiency variations of approximately 1%-2% among the various fibers in a given bundle confirm the uniformity and quality of the fabricated devices.

  5. Optical system design of subminiature endoscope with imaging fiber bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Juan; Xue, Bin; Li, Ting; He, Ying-hong; Ma, Xiao-long; Yan, Xing-tao

    2016-10-01

    A new subminiature endoscope which used for reconnaissance and diagnosis has been designed. This subminiature endoscope is designed based on imaging fiber bundle and consist of the front object lens whose aperture is only 0.5mm, imaging fiber bundle and the post coupling lens. It realized by using subminiature optical systems . The FOV(field of view) and the focal length of the front object lens are 50° and 0.59mm. And the object distance, F number and detected imaging high of the front object lens are 3mm, 6 and 0.5mm. The total number of the imaging fiber bundle are 10000 and it's pixel cell size is 5 μm. The effective aperture of the imaging fiber bundle is 0.46mm. The post coupling lens has a reduction ratio of 1.73. It's object distance and imaging height are 5mm and 0.8mm. The Numerical Aperture (NA) of the front object lens, imaging fiber bundle and the post coupling lens are matching will. The coupling efficiency of the imaging fiber bundle is above 93% and the system's design result can meet the need of the limit resolution of the imaging fiber. This kind of the fiber endoscope has the peculiarity of wide FOV, fine imaging quality, compact configuration, low finished cost and etc. It is meaningful to realize the objective of miniaturization, batch-type production and high imaging quality of the endoscope.

  6. Plantain fibre bundles isolated from Colombian agro-industrial residues.

    PubMed

    Gañán, Piedad; Zuluaga, Robin; Restrepo, Adriana; Labidi, Jalel; Mondragon, Iñaki

    2008-02-01

    Comestible fruit production from Musaceas plants is an important economical activity in developing countries like Colombia. However, it generates a large amount of agro-industrial residues. Some of them are a potential resource of natural fibres, which can be used as reinforcement for composite materials. In this work, a series of commercial plantain (Musa AAB, cv "Dominico Harton") fibre bundles extracted from pseudostem, leaf sheath and rachis agricultural wastes were analyzed. Mechanical decortication and biological retting processes were used during fiber extraction. No significant differences in composition of vascular bundles were observed for both extraction processes. Gross morphological characteristics and mechanical behavior have been evaluated. Conducting tissues with spiral-like arrangement are observed attached to fibre bundles. This fact suggests a big amount of these tissues in commercial plantain plants. Both used extraction methods are not enough to remove them. Pseudostem fibre bundles have higher specific strength and modulus and lower strain at break than leaf sheath and rachis fibre bundles, having values comparable to other lignocellulosic fibres bundles.

  7. Oscillation of carbon molecules inside carbon nanotube bundles.

    PubMed

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Cox, Barry J; Hill, James M

    2009-04-08

    In this paper, we investigate the mechanics of a nanoscaled gigahertz oscillator comprising a carbon molecule oscillating within the centre of a uniform concentric ring or bundle of carbon nanotubes. Two kinds of oscillating molecules are considered, which are a carbon nanotube and a C(60) fullerene. Using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, we obtain a relation between the bundle radius and the radii of the nanotubes forming the bundle, as well as the optimum bundle size which gives rise to the maximum oscillatory frequency for both the nanotube-bundle and the C(60)-bundle oscillators. While previous studies in this area have been undertaken through molecular dynamics simulations, this paper emphasizes the use of applied mathematical modelling techniques, which provides considerable insight into the underlying mechanisms of the nanoscaled oscillators. The paper presents a synopsis of the major results derived in detail by the present authors (Cox et al 2007 Proc. R. Soc. A 464 691-710 and Cox et al 2007 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 40 13197-208).

  8. Oscillation of carbon molecules inside carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the mechanics of a nanoscaled gigahertz oscillator comprising a carbon molecule oscillating within the centre of a uniform concentric ring or bundle of carbon nanotubes. Two kinds of oscillating molecules are considered, which are a carbon nanotube and a C60 fullerene. Using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, we obtain a relation between the bundle radius and the radii of the nanotubes forming the bundle, as well as the optimum bundle size which gives rise to the maximum oscillatory frequency for both the nanotube-bundle and the C60-bundle oscillators. While previous studies in this area have been undertaken through molecular dynamics simulations, this paper emphasizes the use of applied mathematical modelling techniques, which provides considerable insight into the underlying mechanisms of the nanoscaled oscillators. The paper presents a synopsis of the major results derived in detail by the present authors (Cox et al 2007 Proc. R. Soc. A 464 691-710 and Cox et al 2007 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 40 13197-208).

  9. Optimal spacing within a tubed, volumetric, cavity receiver suitable for modular molten salt solar towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A 2-dimensional radiation analysis has been developed to analyse the radiative efficiency of an arrangement of heat transfer tubes distributed in layers but spaced apart to form a tubed, volumetric receiver. Such an arrangement could be suitable for incorporation into a cavity receiver. Much of the benefit of this volumetric approach is gained after using 5 layers although improvements do continue with further layers. The radiation analysis splits each tube into multiple segments in which each segment surface can absorb, reflect and radiate rays depending on its surface temperature. An iterative technique is used to calculate appropriate temperatures depending on the distribution of the net energy absorbed and assuming that the cool heat transfer fluid (molten salt) starts at the front layer and flows back through successive layers to the rear of the cavity. Modelling the finite diameter of each layer of tubes increases the ability of a layer to block radiation scattered at acute angles and this effect is shown to reduce radiation losses by nearly 25% compared to the earlier 1-d analysis. Optimum efficient designs tend to occur when the blockage factor is 0.2 plus the inverse of the number of tube layers. It is beneficial if the distance between successive layers is ≥ 2 times the diameter of individual tubes and in this situation, if the incoming radiation is spread over a range of angles, the performance is insensitive to the degree of any tube positional offset or stagger between layers.

  10. Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoichi

    The pulse tube refrigerator is one of the regenerative cycle refrigerators such as Stirling cycle or Gifford-McMahon cycle which gives the cooling temperature below 150 K down to liquid helium temperature. In 1963, W. E. Gifford invented a simple refrigeration cycle which is composed of compressor, regenerator and simple tube named as pulse tube which gives a similar function of the expander in Stirling or Gifford-McMahon cycle. The thermodynamically performance of this pulse tube refrigerator is inferior to that of other regenerative cycles. In 1984, however, Mikulin and coworkers made a significant advance in pulse tube configuration called as orifice pulse tube. After this, several modifications of the pulse tube hot end configuration have been developed. With those modifications, the thermodynamic performance of the pulse tube refrigerator became the same order to that of Stirling and Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. This article reviews the brief history of the pulse tube refrigerator development in the view point of its thermodynamically efficiency. Simplified theories of the energy flow in the pulse tube have also been described.

  11. A compactification of the moduli space of principal Higgs bundles over singular curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Giudice, Alessio; Pustetto, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    A principal Higgs bundle (P , ϕ) over a singular curve X is a pair consisting of a principal bundle P and a morphism ϕ : X →Ad P ⊗ ΩX1. We construct the moduli space of principal Higgs G-bundles over an irreducible singular curve X using the theory of decorated vector bundles. More precisely, given a faithful representation ρ : G → Sl(V) of G, we consider principal Higgs bundles as triples (E , q , φ) , where E is a vector bundle with rk(E) = dim V over the normalization X ˜ of X, q is a parabolic structure on E and φ :Ea,b → L is a morphism of bundles, L being a line bundle and Ea,b ≑(E⊗a) ⊕ b a vector bundle depending on the Higgs field ϕ and on the principal bundle structure.

  12. Quantum coherence and quantum phase transition in the XY model with staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Ning-Ju; Xu, Yang-Yang; Wang, Jicheng; Zhang, Yixin; Hu, Zheng-Da

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the properties of geometric quantum coherence in the XY spin-1/2 chain with staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction via the quantum renormalization-group approach. It is shown that the geometric quantum coherence and its coherence susceptibility are effective to detect the quantum phase transition. In the thermodynamic limit, the geometric quantum coherence exhibits a sudden jump. The coherence susceptibilities versus the anisotropy parameter and the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction are infinite and vanishing, respectively, illustrating the distinct roles of the anisotropy parameter and the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction in quantum phase transition. Moreover, we also explore the finite-size scaling behaviors of the coherence susceptibilities. For a finite-size chain, the coherence susceptibility versus the phase-transition parameter is always maximal at the critical point, indicating the dramatic quantum fluctuation. Besides, we show that the correlation length can be revealed by the scaling exponent for the coherence susceptibility versus the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction.

  13. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor-fuel-module construction. [LWBR

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, G.K.; DiGuiseppe, C.P.

    1982-10-28

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wherein the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements.

  14. Robust picosecond writing of a layered antiferromagnet by staggered spin-orbit fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P. E.; Otxoa, R. M.; Wunderlich, J.

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast electrical switching by current-induced staggered spin-orbit fields, with minimal risk of overshoot is shown in layered easy-plane antiferromagnets with basal-plane anisotropies. Reliable switching is due to the fieldlike torque, relaxing stringent requirements with respect to precision in the duration of the excitation pulse. Focus is put on a system with weak planar biaxial anisotropy. We investigate the switching as a function of the spin-orbit field strength, pulse duration, rise and fall times, and damping using atomistic spin dynamics simulations and an effective equation for the antiferromagnetic order parameter. The critical spin-orbit field strength required for switching a biaxial system is determined, and we show that writing is possible at feasible current magnitudes. Finally, we discuss switching of systems exhibiting a dominant uniaxial basal-plane anisotropy.

  15. γ-band staggering and E(5)-type structure: Zn64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihai, C.; Zamfir, N. V.; Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, G.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Ivaşcu, M.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.

    2007-04-01

    The staggering factor S4 in the quasi-γ band was used for the first time as a signature of the E(5) symmetry. This observable, together with the R4/2 ratio is used to find E(5) type nuclei in the Z=28 50 and Z=50 82 shells. An E(5) candidate is found to be Zn64. Low-spin states in Zn64 populated in the ɛ/β+ decay of Ga64, produced in the Fe54(C12,pn)Ga64, were studied through off-beam γ-ray spectroscopy. The decay scheme of Zn64 is found to be reasonably close to the predictions of the E(5) critical point symmetry. The structure of the excited 0+ states in Zn64 and their behavior in the Zn isotopic chain is discussed.

  16. A free surface capturing discretization for the staggered grid finite difference scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; May, D. A.; Yamato, P.

    2016-03-01

    The coupling that exists between surface processes and deformation within both the shallow crust and the deeper mantle-lithosphere has stimulated the development of computational geodynamic models that incorporate a free surface boundary condition. We introduce a treatment of this boundary condition that is suitable for staggered grid, finite difference schemes employing a structured Eulerian mesh. Our interface capturing treatment discretizes the free surface boundary condition via an interface that conforms with the edges of control volumes (e.g. a `staircase' representation) and requires only local stencil modifications to be performed. Comparisons with analytic solutions verify that the method is first-order accurate. Additional intermodel comparisons are performed between known reference models to further validate our free surface approximation. Lastly, we demonstrate the applicability of a multigrid solver to our free surface methodology and demonstrate that the local stencil modifications do not strongly influence the convergence of the iterative solver.

  17. Staggered-ladder quasienergy spectra for generic quasimomentum and quantum-dynamical manifestations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Itzhack

    2013-04-01

    A non-Poisson regular quasienergy spectrum is found for the generalized kicked particle under quantum-resonance conditions at generic quasimomentum, a quantity most relevant in atom-optics experimental realizations of kicked-rotor systems. The regular spectrum has the structure of a staggered ladder, i.e., it is the superposition of a finite number of ladder subspectra all having the same spacing, which is independent of the nonintegrability of the system. This spectral structure is shown to have distinct quantum-dynamical manifestations: a suppression of quantum resonances and a dynamical localization characterized by unique features such as traveling-wave components in the time evolution. These phenomena are found to be robust under small variations of the quasimomentum and should therefore be experimentally observable using Bose-Einstein condensates with sufficiently small quasimomentum width.

  18. Spectrum of the Dirac operator and multigrid algorithm with dynamical staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkreuter, T. Fachbereich Physik , Humboldt-Universitaet, Invalidenstrasse 110, D-10099 Berlin )

    1995-02-01

    Complete spectra of the staggered Dirac operator [ital ];sD are determined in quenched four-dimensional SU(2) gauge fields, and also in the presence of dynamical fermions. Periodic as well as antiperiodic boundary conditions are used. An attempt is made to relate the performance of multigrid (MG) and conjugate gradient (CG) algorithms for propagators with the distribution of the eigenvalues of [ital ];sD. The convergence of the CG algorithm is determined only by the condition number [kappa] and by the lattice size. Since [kappa]'s do not vary significantly when quarks become dynamic, CG convergence in unquenched fields can be predicted from quenched simulations. On the other hand, MG convergence is not affected by [kappa] but depends on the spectrum in a more subtle way.

  19. Variational Study on Loop Currents in Bose Hubbard model with Staggered Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toga, Y.; Yokoyama, H.

    In view of strongly interacting bosons in an optical lattice with a large gauge field, we study phase transitions in a two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model with a staggered flux, on the basis of variational Monte Carlo calculations. Inthe trial states,besides typical onsite and intersite correlation factors, we introduce a configuration-dependent phase factor,which was recently found essential for treating current-carrying states. It is found that this phase factor is qualitativelyvitalfordescribing a Mott insulating (MI) state in the present model. Thereby, the Peierls phasesattached in relevant hopping processes are cancelled out. As a result, local currents completely suppressed in MI states, namely, a chiral Mott state does not appear for the square lattice, in contrast tothecorresponding two-leg ladder model. In addition, we discuss other features of the first-order superfluid-MI transition in this model.

  20. A 3D staggered-grid finite difference scheme for poroelastic wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijie; Gao, Jinghuai

    2014-10-01

    Three dimensional numerical modeling has been a viable tool for understanding wave propagation in real media. The poroelastic media can better describe the phenomena of hydrocarbon reservoirs than acoustic and elastic media. However, the numerical modeling in 3D poroelastic media demands significantly more computational capacity, including both computational time and memory. In this paper, we present a 3D poroelastic staggered-grid finite difference (SFD) scheme. During the procedure, parallel computing is implemented to reduce the computational time. Parallelization is based on domain decomposition, and communication between processors is performed using message passing interface (MPI). Parallel analysis shows that the parallelized SFD scheme significantly improves the simulation efficiency and 3D decomposition in domain is the most efficient. We also analyze the numerical dispersion and stability condition of the 3D poroelastic SFD method. Numerical results show that the 3D numerical simulation can provide a real description of wave propagation.

  1. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  2. BK using HYP-smeared staggered fermions in Nf = 2 + 1 unquenched QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.; Bae, T.; Jang, Y-C.; Kim, H-J.; Kim, J.; Kim, K; Lee, W.; Sharpe, S.; Yoon, B.

    2010-12-20

    We present results for the kaon mixing parameter B{sub K} calculated using HYP (hypercubic fat link)-smeared improved staggered fermions on the asqtad lattices generated by the MILC collaboration. We use three lattice spacings (a{approx} 0.12, 0.09 and 0.06 fm), ten different valence-quark masses (m {approx} m{sub s}/10-m{sub s}), and several light sea-quark masses in order to control the continuum and chiral extrapolations. We derive the next-to-leading order staggered chiral perturbation theory (SChPT) results necessary to fit our data, and use these results to do extrapolations based both on SU(2) and SU(3) SChPT. The SU(2) fitting is particularly straightforward because parameters related to taste breaking and matching errors appear only at next-to-next-to-leading order. We match to the continuum renormalization scheme [naive dimensional regularization (NDR)] using one-loop perturbation theory. Our final result is from the SU(2) analysis, with the SU(3) result providing a (less accurate) cross check. We find B{sub K}(NDR, {mu} = 2 GeV) = 0.529 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.032 and B{sub K} = B{sub K}(RGI) = 0.724 {+-} 0.012 {+-} 0.043, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The error is dominated by the truncation error in the matching factor. Our results are consistent with those obtained using valence domain-wall fermions on lattices generated with asqtad or domain-wall sea quarks.

  3. Cellular uptake of magnetite nanoparticles enhanced by NdFeB magnets in staggered arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Ching; Chang, Fan-Yu; Tu, Shu-Ju; Chen, Jyh-Ping; Ma, Yunn-Hwa

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic force may greatly enhance uptake of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by cultured cells; however, the effects of non-uniformity of magnetic field/ magnetic gradient on MNP internalization in culture has not been elucidated. Cellular uptake of polyacrylic acid coated-MNP by LN229 cells was measured with cylindrical NdFeB magnets arranged in a staggered pattern. The magnetic field generated by placing a magnet underneath (H-field) elicited a homogenous distribution of MNPs on the cells in culture; whereas the field without magnet underneath (L-field) resulted in MNP distribution along the edge of the wells. Cell-associated MNP (MNPcell) appeared to be magnetic field- and concentration-dependent. In H-field, MNPcell reached plateau within one hour of exposure to MNP with only one-min application of the magnetic force in the beginning of incubation; continuous presence of the magnet for 2 h did not further increase MNPcell, suggesting that magnetic force-induced uptake may be primarily contributed to enhanced MNP sedimentation. Although MNP distribution was much inhomogeneous in L-field, averaged MNPcell in the L-field may reach as high as 80% of that in H-field during 1-6 h incubation, suggesting high capacity of MNP internalization. In addition, no significant difference was observed in MNPcell analyzed by flow cytometry with the application of H-field of staggered plate vs. filled magnet plate. Therefore, biological variation may dominate MNP internalization even under relatively uniformed magnetic field; whereas non-uniformed magnetic field may serve as a model for tumor targeting with MNPs in vivo.

  4. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. IV. Limb darkening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Chiavassa, A.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We compute the emergent stellar spectra from the UV to far infrared for different viewing angles using realistic 3D model atmospheres for a large range in stellar parameters to predict the stellar limb darkening. Methods: We have computed full 3D LTE synthetic spectra based on 3D radiative hydrodynamic atmosphere models from the Stagger-grid in the ranges: Teff from 4000 to 7000 K, log g from 1.5 to 5.0, and [Fe/H], from -4.0 to +0.5. From the resulting intensities, we derived coefficients for the standard limb darkening laws considering a number of often-used photometric filters. Furthermore, we calculated theoretical transit light curves, in order to quantify the differences between predictions by the widely used 1D model atmosphere and our 3D models. Results: The 3D models are often found to predict steeper darkening towards the limb compared to the 1D models, mainly due to the temperature stratifications and temperature gradients being different in the 3D models compared to those predicted with 1D models based on the mixing length theory description of convective energy transport. The resulting differences in the transit light curves are rather small; however, these can be significant for high-precision observations of extrasolar transits, and are able to lower the residuals from the fits with 1D limb darkening profiles. Conclusions: We advocate the use of the new limb darkening coefficients provided for the standard four-parameter non-linear power law, which can fit the limb darkening more accurately than other choices. Full Table A.1 and the grid of spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/A90, as well as at http://www.stagger-stars.net

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: STAGGER-grid of 3D stellar models. I. (Magic+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.; Trampedach, R.; Hayek, W.; Chiavassa, A.; Stein, R. F.; Nordlund, A.

    2013-07-01

    The 3D model atmospheres presented here were constructed with a custom version of the Stagger-code, a state-of-the-art, multipurpose, radiative-magnetohydrodynamics (R-MHD) code originally developed by Nordlund & Galsgaard (1995, http://www.astro.ku.dk/~kg/Papers/MHD_code.ps.gz), and continuously improved over the years by its user community. (1 data file).

  6. Convergence and superconvergence of staggered discontinuous Galerkin methods for the three-dimensional Maxwell’s equations on Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric T.; Ciarlet, Patrick; Yu, Tang Fei

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a new type of staggered discontinuous Galerkin methods for the three dimensional Maxwell’s equations is developed and analyzed. The spatial discretization is based on staggered Cartesian grids so that many good properties are obtained. First of all, our method has the advantages that the numerical solution preserves the electromagnetic energy and automatically fulfills a discrete version of the Gauss law. Moreover, the mass matrices are diagonal, thus time marching is explicit and is very efficient. Our method is high order accurate and the optimal order of convergence is rigorously proved. It is also very easy to implement due to its Cartesian structure and can be regarded as a generalization of the classical Yee’s scheme as well as the quadrilateral edge finite elements. Furthermore, a superconvergence result, that is the convergence rate is one order higher at interpolation nodes, is proved. Numerical results are shown to confirm our theoretical statements, and applications to problems in unbounded domains with the use of PML are presented. A comparison of our staggered method and non-staggered method is carried out and shows that our method has better accuracy and efficiency.

  7. Gas phase synthesis of non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-armchair chiralities

    SciTech Connect

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Zhu, Z.; Reynaud, O.; Houbenov, N.; Tian, Y.; Jiang, H.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Susi, T.; Nasibulin, A. G.

    2015-07-06

    We present a floating catalyst synthesis route for individual, i.e., non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow chiral angle distribution peaking at high chiralities near the armchair species. An ex situ spark discharge generator was used to form iron particles with geometric number mean diameters of 3–4 nm and fed into a laminar flow chemical vapour deposition reactor for the continuous synthesis of long and high-quality SWCNTs from ambient pressure carbon monoxide. The intensity ratio of G/D peaks in Raman spectra up to 48 and mean tube lengths up to 4 μm were observed. The chiral distributions, as directly determined by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope, clustered around the (n,m) indices (7,6), (8,6), (8,7), and (9,6), with up to 70% of tubes having chiral angles over 20°. The mean diameter of SWCNTs was reduced from 1.10 to 1.04 nm by decreasing the growth temperature from 880 to 750 °C, which simultaneously increased the fraction of semiconducting tubes from 67% to 80%. Limiting the nanotube gas phase number concentration to ∼10{sup 5 }cm{sup −3} prevented nanotube bundle formation that is due to collisions induced by Brownian diffusion. Up to 80% of 500 as-deposited tubes observed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy were individual. Transparent conducting films deposited from these SWCNTs exhibited record low sheet resistances of 63 Ω/□ at 90% transparency for 550 nm light.

  8. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  9. Programming DNA tube circumferences.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; Hariadi, Rizal F; Sahu, Sudheer; Choi, Harry M T; Park, Sung Ha; Labean, Thomas H; Reif, John H

    2008-08-08

    Synthesizing molecular tubes with monodisperse, programmable circumferences is an important goal shared by nanotechnology, materials science, and supermolecular chemistry. We program molecular tube circumferences by specifying the complementarity relationships between modular domains in a 42-base single-stranded DNA motif. Single-step annealing results in the self-assembly of long tubes displaying monodisperse circumferences of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, or 20 DNA helices.

  10. Ruggedized electronographic tube development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their glass components and lack of far ultraviolet sensitivity, currently available Spectracons are not suited for rocket launch. Technology developed for second generation image tubes and for magnetically focused image tubes can be applied to improve the optical and mechanical properties of these magnetically focused electronographic tubes whose 40 kilovolt signal electrons exit a 4-micrometer thick mica window and penetrate a photographic recording emulsion.

  11. Retrograde gastrojejunostomy tube migration.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Adeleke; Rammohan, Guhan; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous enteral feeding tubes are placed about 250,000 times each year in the United States. Although they are relatively safe, their placement may be complicated by perforation, infection, bleeding, vomiting, dislodgment, and obstruction. There have been numerous reports of antegrade migration of gastrojejunostomy (G-J) tubes. We report a case of G-J tube regurgitation following protracted vomiting and discuss the management of this very rare entity.

  12. COAXIAL TUBE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Niemoth, H.R.

    1963-02-26

    BS>This patent shows a device for quickly coupling coaxial tubes in metal-to-metal fashion, so as to be suitable for use in a nuclear reactor. A threaded coliar urges a tapered metal extension on the outer coaxial tube into a tapered seat in the device and simultaneously exerts pressure through a coaxial helical spring so that a similar extension on the inner tube seats in a similar seat near the other end. (AEC)

  13. TUBE SPLITTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Cawley, W.E.

    1961-05-01

    A tool is described for cutting a coolant tube adapted to contain fuel elements to enable the tube to be removed from a graphite moderator mass. The tool splits the tube longitudinally into halves and curls the longitudinal edges of the halves inwardly so that they occupy less space and can be moved radially inwardly away from the walls of the hole in the graphite for easy removal from the graphite.

  14. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Outwater, J.O.

    2000-05-23

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  15. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high

  16. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  17. Fuel nozzle tube retention

    DOEpatents

    Cihlar, David William; Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2017-02-28

    A system for retaining a fuel nozzle premix tube includes a retention plate and a premix tube which extends downstream from an outlet of a premix passage defined along an aft side of a fuel plenum body. The premix tube includes an inlet end and a spring support feature which is disposed proximate to the inlet end. The premix tube extends through the retention plate. The spring retention feature is disposed between an aft side of the fuel plenum and the retention plate. The system further includes a spring which extends between the spring retention feature and the retention plate.

  18. Process for sensing defects on a smooth cylindrical interior surface in tubing

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, G. Wayne

    1987-11-17

    The cylindrical interior surface of small diameter metal tubing is optically inspected to determine surface roughness by passing a slightly divergent light beam to illuminate the entire interior surface of the tubing. Impingement of the input light beam components on any rough spots on the interior surface generates forward and backward scattered radiation components. The forward scattered components can be measured by blocking direct and specular radiation components exiting the tubing while allowing the forward scattered radiation to travel past the blocking location. Collecting optics are employed to converge the forward scattered radiation onto a photodetector generating a signal indicative of surface roughness. In the back scattered mode, back scattered radiation exiting the tubing through the entrance opening is reflected 90.degree. by a beam splitter towards collecting optics and a photodetector. Alternatively, back scattered radiation can be transmitted through a fiber optic bundle towards the collecting optics. The input light beam can be supplied through a white light fiber optic bundle mounted coaxial with the first bundle.

  19. Process for sensing defects on a smooth cylindrical interior surface in tubing

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, G.W.

    1987-11-17

    The cylindrical interior surface of small diameter metal tubing is optically inspected to determine surface roughness by passing a slightly divergent light beam to illuminate the entire interior surface of the tubing. Impingement of the input light beam components on any rough spots on the interior surface generates forward and backward scattered radiation components. The forward scattered components can be measured by blocking direct and specular radiation components exiting the tubing while allowing the forward scattered radiation to travel past the blocking location. Collecting optics are employed to converge the forward scattered radiation onto a photodetector generating a signal indicative of surface roughness. In the back scattered mode, back scattered radiation exiting the tubing through the entrance opening is reflected 90[degree] by a beam splitter towards collecting optics and a photodetector. Alternatively, back scattered radiation can be transmitted through a fiber optic bundle towards the collecting optics. The input light beam can be supplied through a white light fiber optic bundle mounted coaxial with the first bundle. 6 figs.

  20. Process and apparatus for sensing defects on a smooth cylindrical surface in tubing

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, G.W.

    1985-08-05

    The cylindrical interior surface of small diameter metal tubing is optically inspected to determine surface roughness by passing a slightly divergent light beam to illuminate the entire interior surface of the tubing. Impingement of the input light beam components on any rough spots on the interior surface generates forward and backward scattered radiation components. The forward scattered components can be measured by blocking direct and specular radiation components exiting the tubing while allowing the forward scattered radiation to travel past the blocking location. Collecting optics are employed to converge the forward scattered radiation onto a photodetector generating a signal indicative of surface roughness. In the back scattered mode, back scattered radiation exiting the tubing through the entrance opening is reflected 90/sup 0/ by a beam splitter towards collecting optics and a photodetector. Alternatively, back scattered radiation can be transmitted through a fiber optic bundle towards the collecting optics. The input light beam can be supplied through a white light fiber optic bundle mounted coaxial with the first bundle.

  1. Numerical modeling of anisotropic fiber bundle behavior in oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Sonya S; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-11-01

    Prediction of flow patterns through oxygenator fiber bundles can allow shape optimization so that efficient gas exchange occurs with minimal thrombus formation and hemolysis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can be used to predict three-dimensional flow velocities and flow distribution from spatially dependent variables and they allow estimations of erythrocyte residence time within the fiber bundle. This study builds upon previous work to develop an accurate numerical model for oxygenators, which would allow for accelerated iterations in oxygenator shape and diffuser plate design optimization. Hollow fiber flow channels were developed to permit experimental calculation of fluid permeability in two directions: main flow along the hollow fiber and perpendicular to the hollow fibers. Commercial software was used to develop three-dimensional CFD models of the experimental flow channels and an anisotropic porous media model for oxygenators from these experimental results. The oxygenator model was used to predict pressure loss throughout the device, visualize blood distribution within the fiber bundle, and estimate erythrocyte residence time within the bundle. Experimental flow channels measurements produced a streamwise permeability of 1.143e(-8) m(2) and transverse permeability of 2.385e(-9) m(2) . These permeabilities, coupled with previous work with volume porosity, were used to develop the numerical model of anisotropic behavior through porous fiber bundles, which indicated a more uniform flow field throughout the oxygenator. Incorporation of known anisotropic fiber bundle behavior in previous numerical models more accurately represents fluid behavior through an oxygenator fiber bundle. CFD coupled with experimental validation can produce a powerful tool for oxygenator design and development.

  2. Ultrastructure of the three anterior cruciate ligament bundles.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Otsubo, Hidenori; Watanabe, Takafumi; Kamiya, Tomoaki; Nagoya, Satoshi; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Shino, Konsei

    2015-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be morphologically separated into not only two, but three bundles: the anteromedial-medial bundle (AM-MB), the anteromedial-lateral bundle (AM-LB), and the posterolateral bundle (PLB). Our hypothesis was that the three bundles differ in their microstructures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the microstructural differences among the three bundles. The normal ACLs of six fresh frozen cadavers were harvested. After the AM-MB, AM-LB, and PLB were identified, their fibril structures were analyzed using a transmission electron microscope. The fibril orientation, distribution pattern, and the mass average diameter of the fibrils (MAD) were compared among the AM-MBs, AM-LBs, and PLBs. The AM-MB and AM-LB fibrils were arranged mostly in the longitudinal direction, while the PLB fibrils were not aligned in a uniform direction. The fibril diameter distribution pattern of AM-MBs showed a bi-modal pattern due to the existence of small-diameter (30-40 nm) and large-diameter fibrils (70-80 nm), while that of the AM-LBs and PLBs had a unimodal pattern with one prominent high peak at a diameter of 50-60 nm. The mean MAD of the AM-MBs (83.2 - 11.2 nm) was significantly larger than that of the PLBs (66.8 - 7.7 nm), while it showed no significant difference compared to that of the AM-LBs (77.6 - 12.3 nm). The three ACL bundles have different ultrastructures. The AM-MB predominantly includes thick, uni-directionally oriented fibrils like tendons, while the PLB consists of thinner, multi-directionally oriented fibrils. The AM-LB shows an intermediate structure between the AM-MB and the PLB.

  3. Peanut witches' broom (PnWB) phytoplasma-mediated leafy flower symptoms and abnormal vascular bundles development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi-Te; Huang, Hsin-Mei; Hong, Syuan-Fei; Kuo-Huang, Ling-Long; Yang, Chiao-Yin; Lin, Yen-Yu; Lin, Chan-Pin; Lin, Shih-Shun

    2015-01-01

    The peanut witches' broom (PnWB) phytoplasma causes virescence symptoms such as phyllody (leafy flower) in infected peanuts. However, the obligate nature of phytoplasma limits the study of host-pathogen interactions, and the detailed anatomy of PnWB-infected plants has yet to be reported. Here, we demonstrate that 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining can be used to track PnWB infection. The DAPI-stained phytoplasma cells were observed in phloem/internal phloem tissues, and changes in vascular bundle morphology, including increasing pith rays and thinner cell walls in the xylem, were found. We also discerned the cell types comprising PnWB in infected sieve tube members. These results suggest that the presence of PnWB in phloem tissue facilitates the transmission of phytoplasma via sap-feeding insect vectors. In addition, PnWB in sieve tube members and changes in vascular bundle morphology might strongly promote the ability of phytoplasmas to assimilate nutrients. These data will help further an understanding of the obligate life cycle and host-pathogen interactions of phytoplasma.

  4. Verification of the FBR fuel bundle-duct interaction analysis code BAMBOO by the out-of-pile bundle compression test with large diameter pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Nemoto, Junichi; Ichikawa, Shoichi; Katsuyama, Kozo

    2014-09-01

    The BAMBOO computer code was verified by results for the out-of-pile bundle compression test with large diameter pin bundle deformation under the bundle-duct interaction (BDI) condition. The pin diameters of the examined test bundles were 8.5 mm and 10.4 mm, which are targeted as preliminary fuel pin diameters for the upgraded core of the prototype fast breeder reactor (FBR) and for demonstration and commercial FBRs studied in the FaCT project. In the bundle compression test, bundle cross-sectional views were obtained from X-ray computer tomography (CT) images and local parameters of bundle deformation such as pin-to-duct and pin-to-pin clearances were measured by CT image analyses. In the verification, calculation results of bundle deformation obtained by the BAMBOO code analyses were compared with the experimental results from the CT image analyses. The comparison showed that the BAMBOO code reasonably predicts deformation of large diameter pin bundles under the BDI condition by assuming that pin bowing and cladding oval distortion are the major deformation mechanisms, the same as in the case of small diameter pin bundles. In addition, the BAMBOO analysis results confirmed that cladding oval distortion effectively suppresses BDI in large diameter pin bundles as well as in small diameter pin bundles.

  5. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  6. External Verification of the Bundle Adjustment in Photogrammetric Software Using the Damped Bundle Adjustment Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börlin, Niclas; Grussenmeyer, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate whether the Matlab-based Damped Bundle Adjustment Toolbox (DBAT) can be used to provide independent verification of the BA computation of two popular software—PhotoModeler (PM) and PhotoScan (PS). For frame camera data sets with lens distortion, DBAT is able to reprocess and replicate subsets of PM results with high accuracy. For lens-distortion-free data sets, DBAT can furthermore provide comparative results between PM and PS. Data sets for the discussed projects are available from the authors. The use of an external verification tool such as DBAT will enable users to get an independent verification of the computations of their software. In addition, DBAT can provide computation of quality parameters such as estimated standard deviations, correlation between parameters, etc., something that should be part of best practice for any photogrammetric software. Finally, as the code is free and open-source, users can add computations of their own.

  7. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing.

    PubMed

    Newman, W I; Phoenix, S L

    2001-02-01

    Fiber bundle models, where fibers have random lifetimes depending on their load histories, are useful tools in explaining time-dependent failure in heterogeneous materials. Such models shed light on diverse phenomena such as fatigue in structural materials and earthquakes in geophysical settings. Various asymptotic and approximate theories have been developed for bundles with various geometries and fiber load-sharing mechanisms, but numerical verification has been hampered by severe computational demands in larger bundles. To gain insight at large size scales, interest has returned to idealized fiber bundle models in 1D. Such simplified models typically assume either equal load sharing (ELS) among survivors, or local load sharing (LLS) where a failed fiber redistributes its load onto its two nearest flanking survivors. Such models can often be solved exactly or asymptotically in increasing bundle size, N, yet still capture the essence of failure in real materials. The present work focuses on 1D bundles under LLS. As in previous works, a fiber has failure rate following a power law in its load level with breakdown exponent rho. Surviving fibers under fixed loads have remaining lifetimes that are independent and exponentially distributed. We develop both new asymptotic theories and new computational algorithms that greatly increase the bundle sizes that can be treated in large replications (e.g., one million fibers in thousands of realizations). In particular we develop an algorithm that adapts several concepts and methods that are well-known among computer scientists, but relatively unknown among physicists, to dramatically increase the computational speed with no attendant loss of accuracy. We consider various regimes of rho that yield drastically different behavior as N increases. For 1/2< or =rho< or =1, ELS and LLS have remarkably similar behavior (they have identical lifetime distributions at rho=1) with approximate Gaussian bundle lifetime statistics and a

  8. Method for shaping polyethylene tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Method forms polyethylene plastic tubing into configurations previously only possible with metal tubing. By using polyethylene in place of copper or stain less steel tubing inlow pressure systems, fabrication costs are significantly reduced. Polyethylene tubing can be used whenever low pressure tubing is needed in oil operations, aircraft and space applications, powerplants, and testing laboratories.

  9. Intercalation of heavy alkali metals (K, Rb and Cs) in the bundles of single wall nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclaux, L.; Méténier, K.; Lauginie, P.; Salvetat, J. P.; Bonnamy, S.; Beguin, F.

    2000-11-01

    The electric-arc discharge carbon deposits (collaret) containing Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) were heat treated at 1600 °C during 2 days under N2 flow in order to eliminate the Ni catalyst by sublimation, without modifications of the SWNTs ropes. Sorting this deposit by gravity enabled to obtain in the coarsest particles higher amount of SWNTs ropes than in other particle sizes. The coarser particles of the carbon deposits were reacted with the alkali metals vapor giving intercalated samples with a MC8 composition. The intercalation led to an expansion of the 2D lattice of the SWNTs so that the alkali metals were intercalated in between the tubes within the bundles. Disordered lattices were observed after intercalation of Rb and Cs. The simulations of the X-ray diffractograms of SWNTs reacted with K, gave the best fit for three K ions occupying the inter-tubes triangular cavities. The investigations by EPR, and 13C NMR, showed that doped carbon deposits are metallic.

  10. Ecosystem service bundles for analyzing tradeoffs in diverse landscapes.

    PubMed

    Raudsepp-Hearne, C; Peterson, G D; Bennett, E M

    2010-03-16

    A key challenge of ecosystem management is determining how to manage multiple ecosystem services across landscapes. Enhancing important provisioning ecosystem services, such as food and timber, often leads to tradeoffs between regulating and cultural ecosystem services, such as nutrient cycling, flood protection, and tourism. We developed a framework for analyzing the provision of multiple ecosystem services across landscapes and present an empirical demonstration of ecosystem service bundles, sets of services that appear together repeatedly. Ecosystem service bundles were identified by analyzing the spatial patterns of 12 ecosystem services in a mixed-use landscape consisting of 137 municipalities in Quebec, Canada. We identified six types of ecosystem service bundles and were able to link these bundles to areas on the landscape characterized by distinct social-ecological dynamics. Our results show landscape-scale tradeoffs between provisioning and almost all regulating and cultural ecosystem services, and they show that a greater diversity of ecosystem services is positively correlated with the provision of regulating ecosystem services. Ecosystem service-bundle analysis can identify areas on a landscape where ecosystem management has produced exceptionally desirable or undesirable sets of ecosystem services.

  11. Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Susan; Keats, John P; Hoffman, M Camille; Kay, Lisa B; Miller, Emily S; Simas, Tiffany A Moore; Frieder, Ariela; Hackley, Barbara; Indman, Pec; Raines, Christena; Semenuk, Kisha; Wisner, Katherine L; Lemieux, Lauren A

    2017-04-06

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary work group to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

  12. Surgical Management of Neurovascular Bundle in Uterine Fibroid Pseudocapsule

    PubMed Central

    Malvasi, Antonio; Hurst, Brad S.; Tsin, Daniel A.; Davila, Fausto; Dominguez, Guillermo; Dell'edera, Domenico; Cavallotti, Carlo; Negro, Roberto; Gustapane, Sarah; Teigland, Chris M.; Mettler, Liselotte

    2012-01-01

    The uterine fibroid pseudocapsule is a fibro-neurovascular structure surrounding a leiomyoma, separating it from normal peripheral myometrium. The fibroid pseudocapsule is composed of a neurovascular network rich in neurofibers similar to the neurovascular bundle surrounding a prostate. The nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy has several intriguing parallels to myomectomy. It may serve either as a useful model in modern fibroid surgical removal, or it may accelerate our understanding of the role of the fibrovascular bundle and neurotransmitters in the healing and restoration of reproductive potential after intracapsular myomectomy. Surgical innovations, such as laparoscopic or robotic myomectomy applied to the intracapsular technique with magnification of the fibroid pseudocapsule surrounding a leiomyoma, originated from the radical prostatectomy method that highlighted a careful dissection of the neurovascular bundle to preserve sexual functioning after prostatectomy. Gentle uterine leiomyoma detachment from the pseudocapsule neurovascular bundle has allowed a reduction in uterine bleeding and uterine musculature trauma with sparing of the pseudocapsule neuropeptide fibers. This technique has had a favorable impact on functionality in reproduction and has improved fertility outcomes. Further research should determine the role of the myoma pseudocapsule neurovascular bundle in the formation, growth, and pathophysiological consequences of fibroids, including pain, infertility, and reproductive outcomes. PMID:22906340

  13. Hair-bundle friction from transduction channels' gating forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormuth, Volker; Barral, Jérémie; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Hearing starts when sound-evoked mechanical vibrations of the hair-cell bundle activate mechanosensitive ion channels, giving birth to an electrical signal. As for any mechanical system, friction impedes movements of the hair bundle and thus constrains the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of auditory transduction. We have shown recently that the opening and closing of the transduction channels produce internal frictional forces that can dominate viscous drag on the micrometer-sized hair bundle and thus provide a major source of damping [2]. We develop here a physical theory of passive hair-bundle mechanics that explains the origin of channel friction. We show that channel friction can be understood quantitatively by coupling the dynamics of the conformational change associated with channel gating to tip-link tension. As a result, varying channel properties affects friction, with faster channels producing smaller friction. The analysis emphasizes the dual role of transduction channels' gating forces, which affect both hair-bundle stiffness and drag. Friction originating from gating of ion channels is a general concept that is relevant to all mechanosensitive channels.

  14. Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Susan; Keats, John P; Hoffman, M Camille; Kay, Lisa B; Miller, Emily S; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Frieder, Ariela; Hackley, Barbara; Indman, Pec; Raines, Christena; Semenuk, Kisha; Wisner, Katherine L; Lemieux, Lauren A

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary workgroup to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

  15. Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Susan; Keats, John P; Hoffman, M Camille; Kay, Lisa B; Miller, Emily S; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Frieder, Ariela; Hackley, Barbara; Indman, Pec; Raines, Christena; Semenuk, Kisha; Wisner, Katherine L; Lemieux, Lauren A

    2017-03-01

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary workgroup to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

  16. Variable recruitment in bundles of miniature pneumatic artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    DeLaHunt, Sylvie A; Pillsbury, Thomas E; Wereley, Norman M

    2016-09-13

    The natural compliance and force generation properties of pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) allow them to operate like human muscles in anthropomorphic robotic manipulators. Traditionally, manipulators use a single PAM or multiple PAMs actuated in unison in place of a human muscle. However, these standard manipulators can experience significant efficiency losses when operated outside their target performance ranges at low actuation pressures. This study considers the application of a variable recruitment control strategy to a parallel bundle of miniature PAMs as an attempt to mimic the selective recruitment of motor units in a human muscle. Bundles of miniature PAMs are experimentally characterized, their actuation behavior is modeled, and the efficiency gains and losses associated with the application of a variable recruitment control strategy are assessed. This bio-inspired control strategy allows muscle bundles to operate the fewest miniature PAMs necessary to achieve a desired performance objective, improving the muscle bundle's operating efficiency over larger ranges of force generation and displacement. The study also highlights the need for improved PAM fabrication techniques to facilitate the production of identical miniature PAMs for inclusion in muscle bundles.

  17. A statistical model of protein binding in parallel actin bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Homin; Grason, Gregory; Purdy Drew, Kirstin; Wong, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    We propose a coarse-grained lattice model of cross-linking proteins in parallel actin bundles. Based on this model that captures the interplay between geometrical frustration of binding and the intrinsic flexibility of filaments and linkers, we predict a unique regular ground-state structure of fully cross-linked bundles. We also discuss the linker-dependent thermodynamic transition of actin filaments from their native state to the overtwisted state and map out the ``twist-state'' phase diagram in terms of linker flexibility as well as the chemical potential. A flexible linker regime exhibits a continuous spectrum of intermediate twist states, while a stiff linker regime only allows for untwisted actin filaments and fully overtwisted bundles. Our predictions compare well with small-angle scattering studies of bundles formed in the presence of two types of reconstituted cross-linking proteins, fascin and espin. Additionally, this study reveals how subtle differences in crosslinking agents themselves may be used by cells to achieve self-organized bundles with dramatically different properties.

  18. Statistical evaluation of fiber bundle imagery of wavelength multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixin

    1994-09-01

    The effects of the wavelength multiplexing on the quality of an image transferred through a fiber bundle system is discussed by using the information capacity of an imaging system. The image transfer through a conventional fiber bundle can be thought of as a discrete sampling of the illuminance of the image at the entrance and of the bundle by each fiber element. This discrete sampling limits the band width of signals which can be transmitted. Also, the ends of the component fibers form an obtrusive pattern in the received image. Because, in the dispersion fiber bundle system, each fiber integrates the flux falling upon its entrance aperture, the entire picture format dispersion scan is reproduced at the frequency response characteristic of a uniform disk whose diameter is equal to that of the component fibers. Also, the individual fiber ends are thus blurred out and the obtrusive pattern formed by them is destroyed. It is shown, in theory, that the use of a dispersion method makes it possible to reduce the value of the light transmission nonuniformity contrast and to improve the resolution of fiber bundle image system, respectively.

  19. Dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo

    2010-03-01

    There has been a very high demand in developing efficient soft body armors to protect the military and law enforcement personnel from ballistic or explosive attack. As a basic component in the soft body armor, fibers or fiber bundles play a key role in the performance against ballistic impact. In order to study the ballistic-resistant mechanism of the soft body armor, it is desirable to understand the dynamic response of the fiber bundle under transverse impact. Transverse wave speed is one important parameter because a faster transverse wave speed can make the impact energy dissipate more quickly. In this study, we employed split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to generate constant high-speed impact on a Kevlar fiber bundle in the transverse direction. The deformation of the fiber bundle was photographed with high-speed digital cameras. The transverse wave speeds were experimentally measured at various transverse impact velocities. The experimental results can also be used to quantitatively verify the current analytical models or to develop new models to describe the dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

  20. Abnormal cingulum bundle development in autism: a probabilistic tractography study.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Toshikazu; Shafritz, Keith M; Bregman, Joel; Peters, Bart D; Gruner, Patricia; Malhotra, Anil K; Szeszko, Philip R

    2014-01-30

    There is now considerable evidence that white matter abnormalities play a role in the neurobiology of autism. Little research has been directed, however, at understanding (a) typical white matter development in autism and how this relates to neurocognitive impairments observed in the disorder. In this study we used probabilistic tractography to identify the cingulum bundle in 21 adolescents and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. We investigated group differences in the relationships between age and fractional anisotropy, a putative measure of white matter integrity, within the cingulum bundle. Moreover, in a preliminary investigation, we examined the relationship between cingulum fractional anisotropy and executive functioning using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). The ASD participants demonstrated significantly lower fractional anisotropy within the cingulum bundle compared to the typically developing volunteers. There was a significant group-by-age interaction such that the ASD group did not show the typical age-associated increases in fractional anisotropy observed among healthy individuals. Moreover, lower fractional anisotropy within the cingulum bundle was associated with worse BRIEF behavioral regulation index scores in the ASD group. The current findings implicate a dysregulation in cingulum bundle white matter development occurring in late adolescence and early adulthood in ASD, and suggest that greater disturbances in this trajectory are associated with executive dysfunction in ASD.

  1. The effect of flexible tube vibration on pressure drop and heat transfer in heat exchangers considering viscous dissipation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokouhmand, H.; Sangtarash, F.

    2008-04-01

    The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in tube bundle of shell and tube heat exchangers are investigated considering viscous dissipation effects. The governing equations are solved numerically. Because of temperature-dependent viscosity the equations should be solved simultaneously. The flexible tubes vibration is modeled in a quasi-static method by taking the first tube of the row to be in 20 asymmetric positions with respect to the rest of the tubes which are assumed to be fixed and time averaging the steady state solutions corresponding to each one of these positions .The results show that the eccentricity of the first tube increases pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients significantly comparing to the case of rigid tube bundles, symmetrically placed. In addition, these vibrations not only compensate the effect of viscous dissipations on heat transfer coefficient but also increase heat transfer coefficient. The constant viscosity results obtained from our numerical method have a good agreement with the available experimental data of constant viscosity for flexible tube heat exchangers.

  2. Pyrotechnic Tubing Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J.; Yang, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Tool forms mechanical seal at joint without levers or hydraulic apparatus. Proposed tool intended for use in outer space used on Earth by heavily garbed workers to join tubing in difficult environments. Called Pyrotool, used with Lokring (or equivalent) fittings. Piston slides in cylinder when pushed by gas from detonating pyrotechnic charge. Impulse of piston compresses fittings, sealing around butting ends of tubes.

  3. Fallopian Tube Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, Amy Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Fallopian tube catheterization is used for treatment of infertility caused by proximal tubal occlusion, and has replaced surgical treatment for this condition. More recently, fallopian tube catheterization has been used for tubal sterilization. Interventional radiologists tested numerous methods for tubal occlusion using the rabbit as an animal model. As a result, a tubal device has recently been Food and Drug Administration approved for permanent sterilization using hysteroscopic guidance; it can also be placed fluoroscopically by fallopian tube catheterization as an “off-label” procedure. This is a 5-year continuation and update on a procedure that has been done by interventional radiologists for 25 years; history of the development of fallopian tube catheterization in women has been published in detail in this journal. Highlighted in this article will be description of the basic components needed for fallopian tube catheterization. PMID:24436565

  4. High thermodynamic stability of parametrically designed helical bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Po -Ssu; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Xu, Chunfu; Pei, Xue Y.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Rogers, Joseph M.; DiMaio, Frank; Gonen, Tamir; Luisi, Ben; Baker, David

    2014-10-24

    Here we describe a procedure for designing proteins with backbones produced by varying the parameters in the Crick coiled coil–generating equations. Combinatorial design calculations identify low-energy sequences for alternative helix supercoil arrangements, and the helices in the lowest-energy arrangements are connected by loop building. We design an antiparallel monomeric untwisted three-helix bundle with 80-residue helices, an antiparallel monomeric right-handed four-helix bundle, and a pentameric parallel left-handed five-helix bundle. The designed proteins are extremely stable (extrapolated ΔGfold > 60 kilocalories per mole), and their crystal structures are close to those of the design models with nearly identical core packing between the helices. The approach enables the custom design of hyperstable proteins with fine-tuned geometries for a wide range of applications.

  5. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-12-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells.

  6. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials.

  7. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells. PMID:27974743

  8. IKKε inhibits PKC to promote Fascin-dependent actin bundling

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yosuke; Misaki, Kazuyo; Maeda, Takuya; Kimpara, Akiyo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Signaling molecules have pleiotropic functions and are activated by various extracellular stimuli. Protein kinase C (PKC) is activated by diverse receptors, and its dysregulation is associated with diseases including cancer. However, how the undesired activation of PKC is prevented during development remains poorly understood. We have previously shown that a protein kinase, IKKε, is active at the growing bristle tip and regulates actin bundle organization during Drosophila bristle morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IKKε regulates the actin bundle localization of a dynamic actin cross-linker, Fascin. IKKε inhibits PKC, thereby protecting Fascin from inhibitory phosphorylation. Excess PKC activation is responsible for the actin bundle defects in IKKε-deficient bristles, whereas PKC is dispensable for bristle morphogenesis in wild-type bristles, indicating that PKC is repressed by IKKε in wild-type bristle cells. These results suggest that IKKε prevents excess activation of PKC during bristle morphogenesis. PMID:27578797

  9. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  10. High thermodynamic stability of parametrically designed helical bundles

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Po -Ssu; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Xu, Chunfu; ...

    2014-10-24

    Here we describe a procedure for designing proteins with backbones produced by varying the parameters in the Crick coiled coil–generating equations. Combinatorial design calculations identify low-energy sequences for alternative helix supercoil arrangements, and the helices in the lowest-energy arrangements are connected by loop building. We design an antiparallel monomeric untwisted three-helix bundle with 80-residue helices, an antiparallel monomeric right-handed four-helix bundle, and a pentameric parallel left-handed five-helix bundle. The designed proteins are extremely stable (extrapolated ΔGfold > 60 kilocalories per mole), and their crystal structures are close to those of the design models with nearly identical core packing between themore » helices. The approach enables the custom design of hyperstable proteins with fine-tuned geometries for a wide range of applications.« less

  11. Rheology of semiflexible bundle networks with transient linkers.

    PubMed

    Müller, Kei W; Bruinsma, Robijn F; Lieleg, Oliver; Bausch, Andreas R; Wall, Wolfgang A; Levine, Alex J

    2014-06-13

    We present a theoretical and computational analysis of the rheology of networks made up of bundles of semiflexible filaments bound by transient cross-linkers. Such systems are ubiquitous in the cytoskeleton and can be formed in vitro using filamentous actin and various cross-linkers. We find that their high-frequency rheology is characterized by a scaling behavior that is quite distinct from that of networks of the well-studied single semiflexible filaments. This regime can be understood theoretically in terms of a length-scale-dependent bending modulus for bundles. Next, we observe new dissipative dynamics associated with the shear-induced disruption of the network at intermediate frequencies. Finally, at low frequencies, we encounter a region of non-Newtonian rheology characterized by power-law scaling. This regime is dominated by bundle dissolution and large-scale rearrangements of the network driven by equilibrium thermal fluctuations.

  12. Betti numbers of graded modules and cohomology of vector bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbud, David; Schreyer, Frank-Olaf

    2009-07-01

    In the remarkable paper Graded Betti numbers of Cohen-Macaulay modules and the multiplicity conjecture, Mats Boij and Jonas Soederberg conjectured that the Betti table of a Cohen-Macaulay module over a polynomial ring is a positive linear combination of Betti tables of modules with pure resolutions. We prove a strengthened form of their conjectures. Applications include a proof of the Multiplicity Conjecture of Huneke and Srinivasan and a proof of the convexity of a fan naturally associated to the Young lattice. With the same tools we show that the cohomology table of any vector bundle on projective space is a positive rational linear combination of the cohomology tables of what we call supernatural vector bundles. Using this result we give new bounds on the slope of a vector bundle in terms of its cohomology.

  13. Preparation of superhydrophobic poly-p-phenylenebenzobisoxazole (PBO) fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zai X.; Geng, Lin; Huang, Yu D.

    2011-02-01

    According to the reformed Cassie-Baxter equation, the superhydrophobic phenylenebenzobisoxazole (PBO) fiber bundle boats were fabricated from mimicking the lotus leaf venation using chemical surface modifications and roughness introduction. Water contact angles as high as 152.3° were achieved for PBO fiber bundles. Furthermore, the loading capacities of the superhydrophobic PBO fiber bundle boats were also measured. And the highest loading weight, 8.36 g, was obtained by the boats treated with 2.0 wt.% (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2,-tetradecyl)trimethoxysilane (HFTES). The large loading capacities were believed to arise from the air film surrounding the superhydrophobic surfaces of boats. The results of this study presented new applications of artificial hydrophobic surfaces in areas of miniature aquatic devices.

  14. Stable parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotically stable decorated swamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Nikolai

    2016-06-01

    Parabolic Higgs bundles can be described in terms of decorated swamps, which we studied in a recent paper. This description induces a notion of stability of parabolic Higgs bundles depending on a parameter, and we construct their moduli space inside the moduli space of decorated swamps. We then introduce asymptotic stability of decorated swamps in order to study the behaviour of the stability condition as one parameter approaches infinity. The main result is the existence of a constant, such that stability with respect to parameters greater than this constant is equivalent to asymptotic stability. This implies boundedness of all decorated swamps which are semistable with respect to some parameter. Finally, we recover the usual stability condition of parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotic stability.

  15. Collective cargo hauling by a bundle of parallel microtubules: bi-directional motion caused by load-dependent polymerization and depolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanti, Dipanwita; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2015-01-01

    A microtubule (MT) is a hollow tube of approximately 25 nm diameter. The two ends of the tube are dissimilar and are designated as ‘plus’ and ‘minus’ ends. Motivated by the collective push and pull exerted by a bundle of MTs during chromosome segregation in a living cell, we have developed here a much simplified theoretical model of a bundle of parallel dynamic MTs. The plus-end of all the MTs in the bundle is permanently attached to a movable ‘wall’ by a device whose detailed structure is not treated explicitly in our model. The only requirement is that the device allows polymerization and depolymerization of each MT at the plus-end. In spite of the absence of external force and direct lateral interactions between the MTs, the group of polymerizing MTs attached to the wall create a load force against the group of depolymerizing MTs and vice versa; the load against a group is shared equally by the members of that group. Such indirect interactions among the MTs give rise to the rich variety of possible states of collective dynamics that we have identified by computer simulations of the model in different parameter regimes. The bi-directional motion of the cargo, caused by the load-dependence of the polymerization kinetics, is a ‘proof-of-principle’ that the bi-directional motion of chromosomes before cell division does not necessarily need active participation of motor proteins.

  16. Fiber bundle design for an integrated wearable artificial lung.

    PubMed

    Madhani, Shalv P; Frankowski, Brian J; Federspiel, William J

    2017-02-07

    Mechanical ventilation and ECMO are the only viable treatment options for lung failure patients at the end stage, including ARDS and COPD. These treatments however are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to long wait times for lung transplant. Contemporary clinical literature has shown ambulation improves post-transplant outcomes in lung failure patients. Given this, we are developing the PAAL, a truly wearable artificial lung that allows for ambulation. In this study, we targeted 180 ml/min oxygenation and determined the form factor for a hollow fiber membrane (HFM) bundle for the PAAL.Based on a previously published mass transfer correlation we modeled oxygenation efficiency as a function of fiber bundle diameter. Three benchmark fiber bundles were fabricated to validate the model through in-vitro blood gas exchange at blood flow rates from 1 to 4 L/min according to ASTM standards. We used the model to determine a final design, which was characterized in-vitro through a gas exchange as well as a hemolysis study at 3.5 L/minThe percent difference between model predictions and experiment for the benchmark bundles ranged from 3% to 17.5% at the flowrates tested. Using the model, we predicted a 1.75 inch diameter bundle with 0.65 m surface area would produce 180 ml/min at 3.5 L/min blood flow rate. The oxygenation efficiency was 278 ml/min/m and the Normalized Index of Hemolysis (NIH) was less than 0.05g/100L. Future work involves integrating this bundle into the PAAL for which an experimental prototype is under development in our laboratory.

  17. One-sided ejaculation of echidna sperm bundles.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Smith, B; Pyne, M; Stenzel, D; Holt, W V

    2007-12-01

    We report for the first time an unusual ejaculatory mechanism in the short-beaked echidna in which each side of the bilaterally symmetrical, rosettelike glans penis is used alternately, with the other being shut down. This is unparalleled in mammals but is reminiscent of the use of hemipenes in squamate reptiles, providing further reproductive evidence of a sauropsidian lineage in the Monotremata. Further, we describe the occurrence of motile sperm bundles in ejaculated echidna semen and provide scanning electron micrographs of their morphology. Sperm bundling appears to confer increased sperm motility, which may provide the potential for sperm competition between males.

  18. Dunkl Operators as Covariant Derivatives in a Quantum Principal Bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdevich, Micho; Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2013-05-01

    A quantum principal bundle is constructed for every Coxeter group acting on a finite-dimensional Euclidean space E, and then a connection is also defined on this bundle. The covariant derivatives associated to this connection are the Dunkl operators, originally introduced as part of a program to generalize harmonic analysis in Euclidean spaces. This gives us a new, geometric way of viewing the Dunkl operators. In particular, we present a new proof of the commutativity of these operators among themselves as a consequence of a geometric property, namely, that the connection has curvature zero.

  19. Chern-Simons functional under gauge transformations on flat bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Yanghyun; Kim, Joohee

    2017-01-01

    We describe the effect of a gauge transformation on the Chern-Simons functional in a thorough and unifying manner. We use the assumptions that the structure group is compact and connected and, in particular, that the principal bundle is flat. The Chern-Simons functional we consider is the one defined by choosing a flat reference connection. The most critical step in arriving at the main result is to show both the existence and the uniqueness of a cohomology class on the adjoint bundle such that it is the class of the so-called Maurer-Cartan 3-form when restricted to each fiber.

  20. [Enteral tube feeding].

    PubMed

    Haller, Alois

    2014-03-01

    Tube feeding is an integral part of medical therapies, and can be easily managed also in the outpatient setting. Tube feeding by the stomach or small intestine with nasogastral or nasojejunal tubes is common in clinical practice. Long-term nutrition is usually provided through a permanent tube, i. e. a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Modern portable nutrition pumps are used to cover the patient's nutritional needs. Enteral nutrition is always indicated if patients can not or should not eat or if nutritional requirements cannot be covered within 3 days after an intervention, e. g. after abdominal surgery. Industrially produced tube feedings with defined substrate concentrations are being used; different compositions of nutrients, such as glutamine fish oil etc., are used dependent on the the condition of the patient. Enteral nutrition may be associated with complications of the tube, e. g. dislocation, malposition or obstruction, as well as the feeding itself, e. g.hyperglycaemia, electrolyte disturbances, refeeding syndrome diarrhea or aspiration). However, the benefit of tube feeding usually exceeds the potential harm substantially.

  1. Microtubule-dependent balanced cell contraction and luminal-matrix modification accelerate epithelial tube fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kagayaki; Dong, Bo; Wada, Housei; Tanaka-Matakatsu, Miho; Yagi, Yoshimasa; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Connection of tubules into larger networks is the key process for the development of circulatory systems. In Drosophila development, tip cells of the tracheal system lead the migration of each branch and connect tubules by adhering to each other and simultaneously changing into a torus-shape. We show that as adhesion sites form between fusion cells, myosin and microtubules form polarized bundles that connect the new adhesion site to the cells' microtubule-organizing centres, and that E-cadherin and retrograde recycling endosomes are preferentially deposited at the new adhesion site. We demonstrate that microtubules help balancing tip cell contraction, which is driven by myosin, and is required for adhesion and tube fusion. We also show that retrograde recycling and directed secretion of a specific matrix protein into the fusion-cell interface promote fusion. We propose that microtubule bundles connecting these cell–cell interfaces coordinate cell contractility and apical secretion to facilitate tube fusion. PMID:27067650

  2. Competition between pairing correlations and deformation from the odd-even mass staggering of francium and radium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreim, S.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Borgmann, Ch.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Cocolios, T. E.; Gottberg, A.; Herfurth, F.; Kowalska, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Lunney, D.; Manea, V.; Mendonca, T. M.; Naimi, S.; Neidherr, D.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Stora, Th.; Wienholtz, F.; Wolf, R. N.; Zuber, K.

    2014-08-01

    The masses of Fr222,224,226-233 and Ra233,234 have been determined with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the ISOLDE facility at CERN, including the previously unknown mass and half-life of Fr233. We study the evolution of the odd-even staggering of binding energies along the francium and radium isotopic chains and of its lowest-order estimator, Δ3(N). An enhancement of the staggering of Δ3(N) is observed towards neutron number N =146, which points to contributions beyond pairing correlations. These contributions are investigated in the Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approaches, emphasizing the connections to the single-particle level density and nuclear deformation.

  3. Distinct failure modes in bio-inspired 3D-printed staggered composites under non-aligned loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slesarenko, Viacheslav; Kazarinov, Nikita; Rudykh, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    The superior mechanical properties of biological materials originate in their complex hierarchical microstructures, combining stiff and soft constituents at different length scales. In this work, we employ a three-dimensional multi-materials printing to fabricate the bio-inspired staggered composites, and study their mechanical properties and failure mechanisms. We observe that bio-inspired staggered composites with inclined stiff tablets are able to undergo two different failure modes, depending on the inclination angle. We find that such artificial structure demonstrates high toughness only under loading applied at relatively small angle to the tablets stacking direction, while for higher angles the composites fail catastrophically. This aspect of the failure behavior was captured experimentally as well as by means of the finite element analysis. We show that even a relatively simple failure model with a strain energy limiter, can be utilized to qualitatively distinguish these two different modes of failure, occurring in the artificial bio-inspired composites.

  4. Analysis of a regularized, time-staggered discretization method and its link to the semi-implicit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, J.; Reich, S.; Staniforth, A.; White, A.; Wood, N.

    2005-04-01

    A key aspect of the recently proposed Hamiltonian particle-mesh (HPM) method is its time-staggered discretization combined with a regularization of the continuous governing equations. In this article, the time discretization aspect of the HPM method is analysed for the linearized, rotating, shallow-water equations with orography, and the combined effect of time-staggering and regularization is compared analytically with the popular two-time-level semi-implicit time discretization of the unregularized equations. It is found that the two approaches are essentially equivalent, provided the regularization parameter is chosen appropriately in terms of the time step t. The article treats space as a continuum and, hence, its analysis is not limited to the HPM method.

  5. Development of an explicit non-staggered scheme for solving three-dimensional Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Tony W. H.; Chung, Y. W.; Li, J. H.; Wang, Y. C.

    2016-10-01

    An explicit finite-difference scheme for solving the three-dimensional Maxwell's equations in non-staggered grids is presented. We aspire to obtain time-dependent solutions of the Faraday's and Ampère's equations and predict the electric and magnetic fields within the discrete zero-divergence context (or Gauss's law). The local conservation laws in Maxwell's equations are numerically preserved using the explicit second-order accurate symplectic partitioned Runge-Kutta temporal scheme. Following the method of lines, the spatial derivative terms in the semi-discretized Faraday's and Ampère's equations are approximated theoretically to obtain a highly accurate numerical phase velocity. The proposed fourth-order accurate space-centered finite difference scheme minimizes the discrepancy between the exact and numerical phase velocities. This minimization process considerably reduces the dispersion and anisotropy errors normally associated with finite difference time-domain methods. The computational efficiency of getting the same level of accuracy at less computing time and the ability of preserving the symplectic property have been numerically demonstrated through several test problems.

  6. An analytical solution for contact resistance of staggered organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi-Alavijeh, Hamidreza; Katebi-Jahromi, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    We have developed analytical models for bias dependent contact resistance (RC) and output characteristics of staggered organic field-effect transistors (OFETS) based on a bulk resistance-approximated and mobility-modified current-crowding method. Numerical evaluations of RC and its resistive components show that the bias dependency of the bulk resistance is negligible. Consequently, the properties of the active layer interfaces determine RC and its characteristics. Effective parameters include a normally constant charge injection barrier at the organic-metal interface (Eb) and a gate induced surface carrier-concentration (PS0) at the organic-insulator boundary. The energy barrier pertains to the fabrication process, and its related resistance (rc) can be determined as the fitting parameter of the theoretical model. However, PS0 is strongly gate bias dependent and the results of the numerical model indicate that the resulting component (rch) is dominant and has a considerable effect on RC and its characteristics. More importantly, PS0 as the key parameter of the contact resistance is analytically expressible and by using a proposed mobility-modified current-crowding model, the contact resistance can be analytically formulated. Accordingly, the output characteristics of the OFETs in the triode region can be also analytically modeled using the developed relation of RC.

  7. On the relationship between the dynamic behavior and nanoscale staggered structure of the bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2015-05-01

    Bone, a typical load-bearing biological material, composed of ordinary base materials such as organic protein and inorganic mineral arranged in a hierarchical architecture, exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties. Up to now, most of previous studies focused on its mechanical properties under static loading. However, failure of the bone occurs often under dynamic loading. An interesting question is: Are the structural sizes and layouts of the bone related or even adapted to the functionalities demanded by its dynamic performance? In the present work, systematic finite element analysis was performed on the dynamic response of nanoscale bone structures under dynamic loading. It was found that for a fixed mineral volume fraction and unit cell area, there exists a nanoscale staggered structure at some specific feature size and layout which exhibits the fastest attenuation of stress waves. Remarkably, these specific feature sizes and layouts are in excellent agreement with those experimentally observed in the bone at the same scale, indicating that the structural size and layout of the bone at the nanoscale are evolutionarily adapted to its dynamic behavior. The present work points out the importance of dynamic effect on the biological evolution of load-bearing biological materials.

  8. Animal physiology and genetic aspects of ryegrass staggers in grazing sheep.

    PubMed

    Morris, C A; Wheeler, T T; Henderson, H V; Towers, N R; Phua, S H

    2017-03-19

    Ryegrass staggers (RGS) is a metabolic disease of herbivores, caused by the ingestion of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) containing a fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii) which produces a tremorgenic toxin, lolitrem B. RGS has a major economic impact for agriculture in New Zealand as well as internationally. Management of RGS in grazing sheep can be problematic, and there is an incomplete knowledge of the interaction between the toxin and the grazing animal. This review is focused on recent advances in understanding the molecular physiology of RGS in the affected animal as well as the influence of animal genetics on the degree of susceptibility to RGS. Investigations to date suggest that the primary target for toxin is the large conductance, calcium-activated, potassium (BK) channel, resulting in disruption of neuromuscular junction signalling. Genetic investigation has established the existence of genes influencing resistance to RGS, however their identity has not been confirmed and their impact has not been established. Studies to date suggest that a multi-gene selection approach will be necessary in order to develop an effective selection tool for use in the agricultural industries.

  9. Highly improved staggered quarks on the lattice with applications to charm physics

    SciTech Connect

    Follana, E.; Davies, C.; Wong, K.; Mason, Q.; Hornbostel, K.; Lepage, G. P.; Shigemitsu, J.; Trottier, H.

    2007-03-01

    We use perturbative Symanzik improvement to create a new staggered-quark action (HISQ) that has greatly reduced one-loop taste-exchange errors, no tree-level order a{sup 2} errors, and no tree-level order (am){sup 4} errors to leading order in the quark's velocity v/c. We demonstrate with simulations that the resulting action has taste-exchange interactions that are 3-4 times smaller than the widely used ASQTAD action. We show how to bound errors due to taste exchange by comparing ASQTAD and HISQ simulations, and demonstrate with simulations that such errors are likely no more than 1% when HISQ is used for light quarks at lattice spacings of 1/10 fm or less. The suppression of (am){sup 4} errors also makes HISQ the most accurate discretization currently available for simulating c quarks. We demonstrate this in a new analysis of the {psi}-{eta}{sub c} mass splitting using the HISQ action on lattices where am{sub c}=0.43 and 0.66, with full-QCD gluon configurations (from MILC). We obtain a result of 111(5) MeV which compares well with the experiment. We discuss applications of this formalism to D physics and present our first high-precision results for D{sub s} mesons.

  10. Optimized Equivalent Staggered-grid FD Method for Elastic Wave Modeling Based on Plane Wave Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Peng; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Liao, Wenyuan; Qu, Luping; Li, Qingyang; Liu, Peijun

    2016-12-01

    In finite difference (FD) method, numerical dispersion is the dominant factor influencing the accuracy of seismic modeling. Various optimized FD schemes for scalar wave modeling have been proposed to reduce grid dispersion, while the optimized time-space domain FD schemes for elastic wave modeling have not been fully investigated yet. In this paper, an optimized FD scheme with Equivalent Staggered Grid (ESG) for elastic modelling has been developed. We start from the constant P- and S-wave speed elastic wave equations and then deduce analytical plane wave solutions in the wavenumber domain with eigenvalue decomposition method. Based on the elastic plane wave solutions, three new time-space domain dispersion relations of ESG elastic modeling are obtained, which are represented by three equations corresponding to P-, S- and converted wave terms in the elastic equations, respectively. By using these new relations, we can study the dispersion errors of different spatial FD terms independently. The dispersion analysis showed that different spatial FD terms have different errors. It is therefore suggested that different FD coefficients to be used to approximate the three spatial derivative terms. In addition, the relative dispersion error in L2-norm is minimized through optimizing FD coefficients using Newton's method. Synthetic examples have demonstrated that this new optimal FD schemes have superior accuracy for elastic wave modeling compared to Taylor-series expansion and optimized space domain FD schemes.

  11. Mixed Meson Mass for Domain-Wall Valence and Staggered Sea Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos; Andre Walker-Loud

    2007-05-01

    Mixed action lattice calculations allow for an additive lattice spacing dependent mass renormalization of mesons composed of one sea and one valence quark, regardless of the type of fermion discretization methods used in the valence and sea sectors. The value of the mass renormalization depends upon the lattice actions used. This mixed meson mass shift is the most important lattice artifact to determine for mixed action calculations: because it modifies the pion mass, it plays a central role in the low energy dynamics of all hadronic correlation functions. We determine the leading order and next to leading order additive mass renormalization of valence-sea mesons for a mixed lattice action with domain-wall valence fermions and staggered sea fermions. We find that on the asqtad improved coarse MILC lattices, the leading order additive mass renormalization for the mixed mesons is Δ(am)^2 LO = 0.0409(11) which corresponds to a^2 Δ_Mix = (319 MeV)^2± (53 MeV)^2 for a = 0.125 fm. We also find significant next to leading order contributions which reduce the mass renormalization by a significant amount, such that for 0 < am_π ≤ 0.22 the mixed meson mass renormalization is well approximated by Δ(am)^2 = 0.0340 (23) or a^2δ_Mix = (290 MeV)^2 ± (76 MeV)^2. The full next-to-leading order analysis is presented in the text.

  12. Development of eclipsed and staggered forms in some hydrogen bonded complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Habibi, Mostafa; Hesabi, Nahid

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonding in X3CH···NH3 (X = H, F, Cl, and Br) complexes has been studied by B3LYP, B3PW91, MP2, MP3, MP4, and CCSD methods using 6-311++G(d,p) and AUG-cc-PVTZ basis sets. These complexes could exist in both eclipsed (EC) and staggered (ST) forms. The differences between binding energies of EC and ST forms are negligible and all EC and ST shapes correspond to minimum stationary states. The order of stabilities of them is in an agreement with the results of atoms in molecules (AIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses. On the basis of low differences between binding energies, ST forms are more stable than EC forms in all complexes with the exception of Br3CH···NH3, which behaves just opposite. Although the differences between binding energies are negligible, they are consistent with the results of AIM analysis.

  13. Optimized equivalent staggered-grid FD method for elastic wave modelling based on plane wave solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Peng; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Liao, Wenyuan; Qu, Luping; Li, Qingyang; Liu, Peijun

    2017-02-01

    In finite-difference (FD) method, numerical dispersion is the dominant factor influencing the accuracy of seismic modelling. Various optimized FD schemes for scalar wave modelling have been proposed to reduce grid dispersion, while the optimized time-space domain FD schemes for elastic wave modelling have not been fully investigated yet. In this paper, an optimized FD scheme with Equivalent Staggered Grid (ESG) for elastic modelling has been developed. We start from the constant P- and S-wave speed elastic wave equations and then deduce analytical plane wave solutions in the wavenumber domain with eigenvalue decomposition method. Based on the elastic plane wave solutions, three new time-space domain dispersion relations of ESG elastic modelling are obtained, which are represented by three equations corresponding to P-, S- and converted-wave terms in the elastic equations, respectively. By using these new relations, we can study the dispersion errors of different spatial FD terms independently. The dispersion analysis showed that different spatial FD terms have different errors. It is therefore suggested that different FD coefficients to be used to approximate the three spatial derivative terms. In addition, the relative dispersion error in L2-norm is minimized through optimizing FD coefficients using Newton's method. Synthetic examples have demonstrated that this new optimal FD schemes have superior accuracy for elastic wave modelling compared to Taylor-series expansion and optimized space domain FD schemes.

  14. Massive expansions of Dscam splicing diversity via staggered homologous recombination during arthropod evolution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher; Kim, Namshin; Roy, Meenakshi; Graveley, Brenton R

    2010-01-01

    The arthropod Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene can generate tens of thousands of protein isoforms via combinatorial splicing of numerous alternative exons encoding immunoglobulin variable domains organized into three clusters referred to as the exon 4, 6, and 9 clusters. Dscam protein diversity is important for nervous system development and immune functions. We have performed extensive phylogenetic analyses of Dscam from 20 arthropods (each containing between 46 and 96 alternative exons) to reconstruct the detailed history of exon duplication and loss events that built this remarkable system over 450 million years of evolution. Whereas the structure of the exon 4 cluster is ancient, the exon 6 and 9 clusters have undergone massive, independent expansions in each insect lineage. An analysis of nearly 2000 duplicated exons enabled detailed reconstruction of the timing, location, and boundaries of these duplication events. These data clearly show that new Dscam exons have arisen continuously throughout arthropod evolution and that this process is still occurring in the exon 6 and 9 clusters. Recently duplicated regions display boundaries corresponding to a single exon and the adjacent intron. The boundaries, homology, location, clustering, and relative frequencies of these duplication events strongly suggest that staggered homologous recombination is the major mechanism by which new Dscam exons evolve. These data provide a remarkably detailed picture of how complex gene structure evolves and reveal the molecular mechanism behind this process.

  15. Relaxing the closure assumption in single-season occupancy models: staggered arrival and departure times

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, William L.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    Occupancy statistical models that account for imperfect detection have proved very useful in several areas of ecology, including species distribution and spatial dynamics, disease ecology, and ecological responses to climate change. These models are based on the collection of multiple samples at each of a number of sites within a given season, during which it is assumed the species is either absent or present and available for detection while each sample is taken. However, for some species, individuals are only present or available for detection seasonally. We present a statistical model that relaxes the closure assumption within a season by permitting staggered entry and exit times for the species of interest at each site. Based on simulation, our open model eliminates bias in occupancy estimators and in some cases increases precision. The power to detect the violation of closure is high if detection probability is reasonably high. In addition to providing more robust estimation of occupancy, this model permits comparison of phenology across sites, species, or years, by modeling variation in arrival or departure probabilities. In a comparison of four species of amphibians in Maryland we found that two toad species arrived at breeding sites later in the season than a salamander and frog species, and departed from sites earlier.

  16. Isovector effective charge and the staggering of 2{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} transition probabilities in the titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Poves, A.; Nowacki, F.; Caurier, E.

    2005-10-01

    In an effort to understand the magical status of N=32 and N=34 at the very neutron rich edge, experiments have been carried out in the titanium isotopes up to A=56. The measured staggering of the B(E2)'s is not reproduced by the shell model calculations using the best effective interactions. We argue that this may be related to the choice of the isovector effective charge and to the value of the N=34 neutron gap.

  17. Snorkeling and Jones tubes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lewis Y W; Weatherhead, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of tympanic membrane rupture during snorkeling in a 17-year-old young man who had previously undergone bilateral Jones tubes placed for epiphora. To our knowledge, this phenomenon has not been previously reported.

  18. Enteral nutrition by tube.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P J; Hand, M S; Frederick, G S

    1990-01-01

    When oral intake is unsatisfactory or contraindicated, maintenance of nutrition by tube feeding is an alternative to the parenteral route. A large volume of research data supports the decision to use the enteral route whenever possible. Entry of food into the alimentary tract is a stimulus to structural and functional maintenance of that tract. Enteral nutrition can be given via indwelling nasoesophageal, pharyngostomy, esophagostomy, percutaneous or surgical gastrostomy, or enterostomy tube. Use of an appropriate catheter, familiarity with the technique used, and careful patient selection and monitoring are important factors in successful tube feeding. Blenderized pet food diets should be fed whenever possible; commercially available liquid diets provide an alternative when tube caliber or patient factors preclude the use of blenderized foods.

  19. Integrated structure vacuum tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

  20. Tube-Forming Assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  1. Kinking of medical tubes.

    PubMed

    Ingles, David

    2004-05-01

    The phenomenon of kinking in medical tubing remains a problem for some applications, particularly critical ones such as transporting gasses or fluids. Design features are described to prevent its occurrence.

  2. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor Review Date 8/5/2015 Updated by: Sumana Jothi ... Otolaryngology, NCHCS VA, SFVA, San Francisco, CA. Internal review and update on 09/01/2016 by David ...

  3. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Review Date 8/ ...

  4. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    MedlinePlus

    Air passing through vocal cords (larynx) causes them to vibrate, creating sounds and speech. A tracheostomy tube blocks most of the air from passing through your vocal cords. Instead, your breath (air) goes out ...

  5. Gastrostomy tube placement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100125.htm Gastrostomy tube placement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  6. Intra- and inter-tube exciton relaxation dynamics in high purity semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Saito, Shingo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Ando, Hiroaki

    2013-02-01

    We have measured the exciton and carrier dynamics in the high purity semiconducting (S-) and metallic (M-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the isolated and aggregated (bundled) forms. The exciton relaxation decay times are measured by using the pump-probe spectroscopy. For bundled samples, the relaxation time becomes shorter than that for isolated SWNTs sample, because of the existence of inter-tube relaxation. We estimate the relaxation rates from S-SWNT to S-SWNT and S-SWNT to M-SWNT using the decay times for isolated SWNTs, high purity S-SWNTs bundle, and doped S-SWNTs in high purity M-SWNTs bundle. For S-SWNTs, inter-tube relaxation plays an important role in the relaxation dynamics. However, for M-SWNTs, the inter-tube relaxation is not so important, and the transition energy and intensity of exciton in M-SWNTs is strongly affected by the photoexcited carriers which plays like as photo doping.

  7. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    PubMed

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading.

  8. Get ready: Bundled payments are in your future.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS') mandatory bundled payment pilot project makes clear that the agency intends to reform Medicare reimbursement. Hospitals in 75 geographic areas are required to participate in a five-year pilot project that puts them at risk for the cost of hip and knee replacements from the time of surgery until 90 days after discharge. Already, more than 6,500 providers are participating in the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement project, a voluntary program where participants can choose from 48 clinical episodes and four models. Even if they won't be part of a bundled payments arrangement, case managers need to shift their thinking to prepare for the future of reimbursement by developing close working relationships with post-acute providers, knowing the services and quality delivered by post-acute providers, and being aware of the costs for the entire episode of care. Case managers will not be able to handle all the responsibilities necessary in a bundled payment arrangement if they have large caseloads.

  9. Wire bundle formed into grids with minute interstices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, H. H.

    1965-01-01

    Deforming the ends of a bundle of closely packed parallel wires to restrict the interstices to substantially uniform and minute dimensions produces grids or filters for ion engines. Porous metal structures made by this process are also used as fuel cell electrodes, diffusion membranes, and catalysts.

  10. Defect-driven shape instabilities in cohesive filament bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruss, Isaac; Grason, Gregory

    When defects are incorporated into the lattice of a flexible 2D crystalline membrane, it buckles into a new configuration. Specifically, 5- and 7-fold disclinations produce conical- and saddle-like geometries respectively. For bundles composed of a crystalline array of cohesive flexible filaments, we propose a similar phenomena of defect-induced buckling. This revelation is fueled by a recently discovered mapping between the metric properties of a curved surface, and the inter-filament spacing within a deformed bundle. Using a combination of continuum elasticity theory and numerical simulations, we investigate the effects of defects in the cross section on a bundle's global structure. We find that positive disclinations promote the twisting of filaments around a central axis within the bundle, while negative disclinations promote twisting around two parallel axes simultaneously. Both instabilities are interpreted by means of their equivalent Gaussian curvature, and map appropriately to the the corresponding membrane responses. Additionally, for 5-fold disclinations we uncover a new equilibria structure, torsional wrinkling, with the intriguing ability to focus gradients in filament tilt much like curvature-focusing for the analogous membrane. NSF (CAREER) DMR-0955760.

  11. A comprehensive in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Rixin; Zhang, Shucheng; Chen, Dianshan

    1991-02-01

    An in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle has been conducted in HWRR at IAE of China. This paper describes the structure of the test bundle (3 × 3-2), fabrication process and quality control of the fuel rod, irradiation conditions and the main Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) results. The test fuel bundle was irradiated under the PWR operation and water chemistry conditions with an average linear power of 381 W/cm and reached an average burnup of 25010 MWd/tU of the fuel bundle. After the test, destructive and non-destructive examination of the fuel rods was conducted at hot laboratories. The fission gas release was 10.4-23%. The ridge height of cladding was 3 to 8 μm. The hydrogen content of the cladding was 80 to 140 ppm. The fuel stack height was increased by 2.9 to 3.3 mm. The relative irradiation growth was about 0.11 to 0.17% of the fuel rod length. During the irradiation test, no fuel rod failure or other abnormal phenomena had been found by the on-line fuel failure monitoring system of the test loop and water sampling analysis. The structure of the test fuel assembly was left undamaged without twist and detectable deformation.

  12. Fission Yeast Scp3 Potentially Maintains Microtubule Orientation through Bundling

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Kanako; Chikashige, Yuji; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules play important roles in organelle transport, the maintenance of cell polarity and chromosome segregation and generally form bundles during these processes. The fission yeast gene scp3+ was identified as a multicopy suppressor of the cps3-81 mutant, which is hypersensitive to isopropyl N-3-chlorophenylcarbamate (CIPC), a poison that induces abnormal multipolar spindle formation in higher eukaryotes. In this study, we investigated the function of Scp3 along with the effect of CIPC in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Microscopic observation revealed that treatment with CIPC, cps3-81 mutation and scp3+ gene deletion disturbed the orientation of microtubules in interphase cells. Overexpression of scp3+ suppressed the abnormal orientation of microtubules by promoting bundling. Functional analysis suggested that Scp3 functions independently from Ase1, a protein largely required for the bundling of the mitotic spindle. A strain lacking the ase1+ gene was more sensitive to CIPC, with the drug affecting the integrity of the mitotic spindle, indicating that CIPC has a mitotic target that has a role redundant with Ase1. These results suggested that multiple systems are independently involved to ensure microtubule orientation by bundling in fission yeast. PMID:25767875

  13. Formation and Dissociation of Sperm Bundles in Monotremes.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Brett; Ecroyd, Heath; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Dacheux, Francoise; Labas, Valerie; Johnston, Steve D; Jones, Russell C

    2016-10-01

    Because monotremes are the earliest offshoot of the mammalian lineage, the platypus and short-beaked echidna were studied as model animals to assess the origin and biological significance of adaptations considered unique to therian mammals: epididymal sperm maturation and subsequent capacitation. We show that spermatozoa from both species assemble into bundles of approximately 100 cells during passage through the epididymis and that an epididymal protein-secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (osteonectin; SPARC)-is involved in bundle formation. The bundles persisted during incubation in vitro for at least 1 h under conditions that capacitate therian spermatozoa, and then underwent a time-dependent dissociation to release spermatozoa capable of fertilization. Only after this dissociation could the spermatozoa bind to the perivitelline membrane of a hen's egg, display an altered form of motility reminiscent of hyperactivation, and be induced to undergo an acrosome reaction. It is concluded that the development of sperm bundles in the monotreme epididymis mandates that they require a time-dependent process to be capable of fertilizing an ovum. However, because this functional end point was achieved without overt changes in protein tyrosine phosphorylation (a hallmark of capacitation in therians), it is concluded that the process in monotremes is distinctly different from capacitation in therian mammals.

  14. Metabolite Diffusion into Bundle Sheath Cells from C4 Plants

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Hendrik; Burnell, James N.; Woodrow, Ian E.; Heldt, Hans W.; Hatch, Marshall D.

    1988-01-01

    The present studies provide the first measurements of the resistance to diffusive flux of metabolites between mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of C4 plants. Species examined were Panicum miliaceum, Urochloa panicoides, Atriplex spongiosa, and Zea mays. Diffusive flux of metabolites into isolated bundle sheath cells was monitored by following their metabolic transformation. Evidence was obtained that the observed rapid fluxes occurred via functional plasmodesmata. Diffusion constants were determined from the rate of transformation of limiting concentrations of metabolites via cytosolic enzymes with high potential velocities and favorable equilibrium constants. Values on a leaf chlorophyll basis ranged between 1 and 5 micromoles per minute per milligram of chlorophyll per millimolar gradient depending on the molecular weight of the metabolite and the source of bundle sheath cells. Diffusion of metabolites into these cells was unaffected by a wide variety of compounds including respiratory inhibitors, monovalent and divalent cations, and plant hormones, but it was interrupted by treatments inducing cell plasmolysis. The molecular weight exclusion limit for permeation of compounds into bundle sheath cells was in the range of 850 to 900. These cells provide an ideal system for the quantitative study of plasmodesmatal function. PMID:16666390

  15. Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Anthony P.; Stachowski, Russell E.

    1995-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced.

  16. A Method of Assembling Compact Coherent Fiber-Optic Bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan; Liu, Duncan; Levine, Bruce Martin; Shao, Michael; Wallace, James

    2007-01-01

    A method of assembling coherent fiber-optic bundles in which all the fibers are packed together as closely as possible is undergoing development. The method is based, straightforwardly, on the established concept of hexagonal close packing; hence, the development efforts are focused on fixtures and techniques for practical implementation of hexagonal close packing of parallel optical fibers.

  17. Exposure Control Using Adaptive Multi-Stage Item Bundles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.

    This paper presents a multistage adaptive testing test development paradigm that promises to handle content balancing and other test development needs, psychometric reliability concerns, and item exposure. The bundled multistage adaptive testing (BMAT) framework is a modification of the computer-adaptive sequential testing framework introduced by…

  18. Fiber-bundle formalism for quantization in curved spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrozumski, T. )

    1990-08-15

    We set up a geometrical formulation of the canonical quantization of a free Klein-Gordon field on a gravitational background. We introduce the notion of the Bogolubov bundle as the principal fiber bundle over the space of all Cauchy surfaces belonging to some fixed foliation of space-time, with the Bogolubov group as the structure group, as a tool in considering local Bogolubov transformations. Sections of the associated complex structure bundle have the meaning of attaching Hilbert spaces to Cauchy surfaces. We single out, as physical, sections defined by the equation of parallel transport on the Bogolubov bundle. The connection is then subjected to a certain nonlinear differential equation. We find a particular solution, which happens to coincide with a formula given by Parker for Robertson-Walker space-times. Finally, we adopt the adiabatic hypothesis as the physical input to the formalism and fix in this way a free parameter in the connection. Concluding, we comment on a possible geometrical interpretation of the regularization of the stress-energy tensor and on generalizations of the formalism toward quantum gravity.

  19. Hair Cells: Bundles, Tuning, Transduction—A Moderated Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavitaki, K. Domenica; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2011-11-01

    A discussion moderated by the authors on the topic "Hair Cells: Bundles, Tuning, Transduction" was held on 17 July 2011 at the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Williamstown, Massachusetts. The paper provides an edited transcript of the session.

  20. Masquerading Bundle Branch Block: A Poor Prognostic Sign Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dhanse, Suheil; Kareem, Hashir; Devasia, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Masquerading bundle branch block is a rare but important finding on the Electrocardiogram (ECG). It is an indication of severe and diffuse conduction system disease and usually indicates poor prognosis. The precordial leads show a Right Bundle Branch Block (RBBB) pattern while the limb leads resemble a Left Bundle Branch Block (LBBB). This finding on an ECG is almost invariably associated with severe underlying heart disease. It is extremely important to be aware of this finding as it is a marker of poor cardiac outcomes. We report the case of a 68-year-old gentleman, who presented with progressive dyspnoea on exertion over three months. ECG showed a broad QRS complex with a RBBB pattern on the precordial leads and a LBBB pattern on the limb leads (suggestive of masquerading bundle branch block). A coronary angiogram revealed severe Triple Vessel Disease (TVD). The patient was scheduled for an early Coronary Artery By-Pass Grafting Surgery. However, his clinical condition deteriorated and he died while awaiting the surgery. PMID:27790494