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Sample records for staggered vertex model

  1. Vertex Models of Epithelial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Alexander G.; Osterfield, Miriam; Baker, Ruth E.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of epithelial cell sheets plays a central role during numerous developmental processes. Genetic and imaging studies of epithelial morphogenesis in a wide range of organisms have led to increasingly detailed mechanisms of cell sheet dynamics. Computational models offer a useful means by which to investigate and test these mechanisms, and have played a key role in the study of cell-cell interactions. A variety of modeling approaches can be used to simulate the balance of forces within an epithelial sheet. Vertex models are a class of such models that consider cells as individual objects, approximated by two-dimensional polygons representing cellular interfaces, in which each vertex moves in response to forces due to growth, interfacial tension, and pressure within each cell. Vertex models are used to study cellular processes within epithelia, including cell motility, adhesion, mitosis, and delamination. This review summarizes how vertex models have been used to provide insight into developmental processes and highlights current challenges in this area, including progressing these models from two to three dimensions and developing new tools for model validation. PMID:24896108

  2. A staggered-grid convolutional differentiator for elastic wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Zhou, Binzhong; Fu, Li-Yun

    2015-11-01

    The computation of derivatives in governing partial differential equations is one of the most investigated subjects in the numerical simulation of physical wave propagation. An analytical staggered-grid convolutional differentiator (CD) for first-order velocity-stress elastic wave equations is derived in this paper by inverse Fourier transformation of the band-limited spectrum of a first derivative operator. A taper window function is used to truncate the infinite staggered-grid CD stencil. The truncated CD operator is almost as accurate as the analytical solution, and as efficient as the finite-difference (FD) method. The selection of window functions will influence the accuracy of the CD operator in wave simulation. We search for the optimal Gaussian windows for different order CDs by minimizing the spectral error of the derivative and comparing the windows with the normal Hanning window function for tapering the CD operators. It is found that the optimal Gaussian window appears to be similar to the Hanning window function for tapering the same CD operator. We investigate the accuracy of the windowed CD operator and the staggered-grid FD method with different orders. Compared to the conventional staggered-grid FD method, a short staggered-grid CD operator achieves an accuracy equivalent to that of a long FD operator, with lower computational costs. For example, an 8th order staggered-grid CD operator can achieve the same accuracy of a 16th order staggered-grid FD algorithm but with half of the computational resources and time required. Numerical examples from a homogeneous model and a crustal waveguide model are used to illustrate the superiority of the CD operators over the conventional staggered-grid FD operators for the simulation of wave propagations.

  3. Artificial Spin-Ice and Vertex Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugliandolo, Leticia F.

    2017-01-01

    In classical and quantum frustrated magnets the interactions in combination with the lattice structure impede the spins to order in optimal configurations at zero temperature. The theoretical interest in their classical realisations has been boosted by the artificial manufacture of materials with these properties, that are of flexible design. This note summarises work on the use of vertex models to study bidimensional spin-ices samples, done in collaboration with R. A. Borzi, M. V. Ferreyra, L. Foini, G. Gonnella, S. A. Grigera, P. Guruciaga, D. Levis, A. Pelizzola and M. Tarzia, in recent years. It is an invited contribution to a J. Stat. Mech. special issue dedicated to the memory of Leo P. Kadanoff.

  4. Superstring vertex operators in type IIB matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Kitazawa, Yoshihisa; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2008-06-15

    We clarify the relation between the vertex operators in type IIB matrix model and superstring. Green-Schwarz light-cone closed superstring theory is obtained from IIB matrix model on two-dimensional noncommutative backgrounds. Superstring vertex operators should be reproduced from those of IIB matrix model through this connection. Indeed, we confirm that supergravity vertex operators in IIB matrix model on the two-dimensional backgrounds reduce to those in superstring theory. Noncommutativity plays an important role in our identification. Through this correspondence, we can reproduce superstring scattering amplitudes from IIB matrix model.

  5. Quark-gluon vertex model and lattice-QCD data

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, M.S.; Tandy, P.C.

    2004-11-01

    A model for the dressed-quark-gluon vertex, at zero gluon momentum, is formed from a nonperturbative extension of the two Feynman diagrams that contribute at one loop in perturbation theory. The required input is an existing ladder-rainbow model Bethe-Salpeter kernel from an approach based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations; no new parameters are introduced. The model includes an Ansatz for the triple-gluon vertex. Two of the three vertex amplitudes from the model provide a pointwise description of the recent quenched-lattice-QCD data. An estimate of the effects of quenching is made.

  6. Vertex models: from cell mechanics to tissue morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alt, Silvanus; Ganguly, Poulami; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2017-05-19

    Tissue morphogenesis requires the collective, coordinated motion and deformation of a large number of cells. Vertex model simulations for tissue mechanics have been developed to bridge the scales between force generation at the cellular level and tissue deformation and flows. We review here various formulations of vertex models that have been proposed for describing tissues in two and three dimensions. We discuss a generic formulation using a virtual work differential, and we review applications of vertex models to biological morphogenetic processes. We also highlight recent efforts to obtain continuum theories of tissue mechanics, which are effective, coarse-grained descriptions of vertex models.This article is part of the themed issue 'Systems morphodynamics: understanding the development of tissue hardware'.

  7. Vertex models: from cell mechanics to tissue morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Silvanus; Ganguly, Poulami

    2017-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires the collective, coordinated motion and deformation of a large number of cells. Vertex model simulations for tissue mechanics have been developed to bridge the scales between force generation at the cellular level and tissue deformation and flows. We review here various formulations of vertex models that have been proposed for describing tissues in two and three dimensions. We discuss a generic formulation using a virtual work differential, and we review applications of vertex models to biological morphogenetic processes. We also highlight recent efforts to obtain continuum theories of tissue mechanics, which are effective, coarse-grained descriptions of vertex models. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Systems morphodynamics: understanding the development of tissue hardware’. PMID:28348254

  8. Compressibility enhancement in an almost staggered interacting Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Bat-el; Berkovits, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the compressibility in the almost staggered fermionic Harper model with repulsive interactions in the vicinity of half-filling. It has been shown by Kraus et al. [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161106(R) (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161106 that for spinless electrons and nearest neighbors electron-electron interactions the compressibility in the central band is enhanced by repulsive interactions. Here we would like to investigate the sensitivity of this conclusion to the spin degree of freedom and longer range interactions. We use the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation, as well as the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculation to evaluate the compressibility. In the almost staggered Harper model, the central energy band is essentially flat and separated from the other bands by a large gap and therefore, the HF approximation is rather accurate. In both cases the compressibility of the system is enhanced compared to the noninteracting case, although the enhancement is weaker due to the inclusion of Hubbard and longer ranged interactions. We also show that the entanglement entropy is suppressed when the compressibility of the system is enhanced.

  9. Persistent current in an almost staggered Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasserman, A.; Berkovits, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we study the persistent current (PC) of a staggered Harper model, close to the half-filling. The Harper model is different than other one dimensional disordered systems which are always localized, since it is a quasi-periodic system with correlated disorder resulting in the fact that it can be in the metallic regime. Nevertheless, the PC for a wide range of parameters of the Harper model does not show typical metallic behavior, although the system is in the metallic regime. This is a result of the nature of the central band states, which are a hybridization of Gaussian states localized in superlattice points. When the superlattice is not commensurate with the system length, the PC behaves as an insulator. Thus even in the metallic regime a typical finite Harper model may exhibit a PC expected from an insulator.

  10. Three-dimensional vertex model for simulating multicellular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Satoru; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-01-01

    During morphogenesis, various cellular activities are spatiotemporally coordinated on the protein regulatory background to construct the complicated, three-dimensional (3D) structures of organs. Computational simulations using 3D vertex models have been the focus of efforts to approach the mechanisms underlying 3D multicellular constructions, such as dynamics of the 3D monolayer or multilayer cell sheet like epithelia as well as the 3D compacted cell aggregate, including dynamic changes in layer structures. 3D vertex models enable the quantitative simulation of multicellular morphogenesis on the basis of single-cell mechanics, with complete control of various cellular activities such as cell contraction, growth, rearrangement, division, and death. This review describes the general use of the 3D vertex model, along with its applications to several simplified problems of developmental phenomena. PMID:27493850

  11. Staggered Flux State in Two-Dimensional Hubbard Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Hisatoshi; Tamura, Shun; Ogata, Masao

    2016-12-01

    The stability and other properties of a staggered flux (SF) state or a correlated d-density wave state are studied for the Hubbard (t-t'-U) model on extended square lattices, as a low-lying state that competes with the dx2 - y2-wave superconductivity (d-SC) and possibly causes the pseudogap phenomena in underdoped high-Tc cuprates and organic κ-BEDT-TTF salts. In calculations, a variational Monte Carlo method is used. In the trial wave function, a configuration-dependent phase factor, which is vital to treat a current-carrying state for a large U/t, is introduced in addition to ordinary correlation factors. Varying U/t, t'/t, and the doping rate (δ) systematically, we show that the SF state becomes more stable than the normal state (projected Fermi sea) for a strongly correlated (U/t ≳ 5) and underdoped (δ ≲ 0.16) area. The decrease in energy is sizable, particularly in the area where Mott physics prevails and the circular current (order parameter) is strongly suppressed. These features are consistent with those for the t-J model. The effect of the frustration t'/t plays a crucial role in preserving charge homogeneity and appropriately describing the behavior of hole- and electron-doped cuprates and κ-BEDT-TTF salts. We argue that the SF state does not coexist with d-SC and is not a "normal state" from which d-SC arises. We also show that a spin current (flux or nematic) state is never stabilized in the same regime.

  12. An unenumerative DNA computing model for vertex coloring problem.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Qiang, Xiaoli; Yang, Yan; Wang, Baoju; Yang, Dongliang; Luo, Liang; Pan, Linqiang; Wang, Shudong

    2011-06-01

    The solution space exponential explosion caused by the enumeration of the candidate solutions maybe is the biggest obstacle in DNA computing. In the paper, a new unenumerative DNA computing model for graph vertex coloring problem is presented based on two techniques: 1) ordering the vertex sequence for a given graph in such a way that any two consecutive labeled vertices i and i+1 should be adjacent in the graph as much as possible; 2) reducing the number of encodings representing colors according to the construture of the given graph. A graph with 12 vertices without triangles is solved and its initial solution space includes only 283 DNA strands, which is 0.0532 of 3(12) (the worst complexity).

  13. Spectral properties and chiral symmetry violations of (staggered) domain wall fermions in the Schwinger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelbling, Christian; Zielinski, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We follow up on a suggestion by Adams and construct explicit domain wall fermion operators with staggered kernels. We compare different domain wall formulations, namely the standard construction as well as Boriçi's modified and Chiu's optimal construction, utilizing both Wilson and staggered kernels. In the process, we generalize the staggered kernels to arbitrary even dimensions and introduce both truncated and optimal staggered domain wall fermions. Some numerical investigations are carried out in the (1 +1 )-dimensional setting of the Schwinger model, where we explore spectral properties of the bulk, effective and overlap Dirac operators in the free-field case, on quenched thermalized gauge configurations and on smooth topological configurations. We compare different formulations using the effective mass, deviations from normality and violations of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation as measures of chirality.

  14. The eight-vertex model with quasi-periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccoli, G.; Terras, V.

    2016-01-01

    We study the inhomogeneous eight-vertex model (or equivalently the XYZ Heisenberg spin-1/2 chain) with all kinds of integrable quasi-periodic boundary conditions: periodic, {σ }x-twisted, {σ }y-twisted or {σ }z-twisted. We show that in all these cases but the periodic one with an even number of sites {N}, the transfer matrix of the model is related, by the vertex-IRF transformation, to the transfer matrix of the dynamical six-vertex model with antiperiodic boundary conditions, which we have recently solved by means of Sklyanin's separation of variables approach. We show moreover that, in all the twisted cases, the vertex-IRF transformation is bijective. This allows us to completely characterize, from our previous results on the antiperiodic dynamical six-vertex model, the twisted eight-vertex transfer matrix spectrum (proving that it is simple) and eigenstates. We also consider the periodic case for {N} odd. In this case we can define two independent vertex-IRF transformations, both not bijective, and by using them we show that the eight-vertex transfer matrix spectrum is doubly degenerate, and that it can, as well as the corresponding eigenstates, also be completely characterized in terms of the spectrum and eigenstates of the dynamical six-vertex antiperiodic transfer matrix. In all these cases we can adapt to the eight-vertex case the reformulations of the dynamical six-vertex transfer matrix spectrum and eigenstates that had been obtained by T-Q functional equations, where the Q-functions are elliptic polynomials with twist-dependent quasi-periods. Such reformulations enable one to characterize the eight-vertex transfer matrix spectrum by the solutions of some Bethe-type equations, and to rewrite the corresponding eigenstates as the multiple action of some operators on a pseudo-vacuum state, in a similar way as in the algebraic Bethe ansatz framework.

  15. Odd-even staggering in the neutron-proton interaction and nuclear mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we study odd-even staggering of the empirical neutron-proton interaction between the last neutron and the last proton, denoted as δ V1 n -1 p , and its consequence in the Garvey-Kelson mass relations (GKs) and nuclear mass models. The root-mean-squared deviations of predicted masses respectively for even-A and odd-A nuclei by using two combinatorial GKs suggest a large odd-even staggering of δ V1 n -1 p between even-odd and odd-even nuclei, while the odd-even difference of δ V1 n -1 p between even-even and odd-odd nuclei is much smaller. The contribution of the odd-even staggering of δ V1 n -1 p between even-A and odd-A nuclei in deviations of theoretical δ V1 n -1 p values of the Duflo-Zuker model and the improved Weizs a ̈cker -Skyrme model are well represented by an isospin-dependent term. The consideration of this odd-even staggering improves our description of binding energies and one-neutron separation energies in both the Duflo-Zuker model and the improved Weizs a ̈cker -Skyrme model.

  16. A dynamic cellular vertex model of growing epithelial tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shao-Zhen; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2017-03-01

    Intercellular interactions play a significant role in a wide range of biological functions and processes at both the cellular and tissue scales, for example, embryogenesis, organogenesis, and cancer invasion. In this paper, a dynamic cellular vertex model is presented to study the morphomechanics of a growing epithelial monolayer. The regulating role of stresses in soft tissue growth is revealed. It is found that the cells originating from the same parent cell in the monolayer can orchestrate into clustering patterns as the tissue grows. Collective cell migration exhibits a feature of spatial correlation across multiple cells. Dynamic intercellular interactions can engender a variety of distinct tissue behaviors in a social context. Uniform cell proliferation may render high and heterogeneous residual compressive stresses, while stress-regulated proliferation can effectively release the stresses, reducing the stress heterogeneity in the tissue. The results highlight the critical role of mechanical factors in the growth and morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and help understand the development and invasion of epithelial tumors.

  17. Biomimetic staggered composites with highly enhanced energy dissipation: Modeling, 3D printing, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pu; Heyne, Mary A.; To, Albert C.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the damping enhancement in a class of biomimetic staggered composites via a combination of design, modeling, and experiment. In total, three kinds of staggered composites are designed by mimicking the structure of bone and nacre. These composite designs are realized by 3D printing a rigid plastic and a viscous elastomer simultaneously. Greatly-enhanced energy dissipation in the designed composites is observed from both the experimental results and theoretical prediction. The designed polymer composites have loss modulus up to ~500 MPa, higher than most of the existing polymers. In addition, their specific loss modulus (up to 0.43 km2/s2) is among the highest of damping materials. The damping enhancement is attributed to the large shear deformation of the viscous soft matrix and the large strengthening effect from the rigid inclusion phase.

  18. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    DOE PAGES

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy alsomore » eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.« less

  19. Staggered-grid PSTD on local Fourier basis and its applications to surface tissue modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming; Chen, Kun

    2010-04-26

    We introduce a high performance parallelization to the PSTD solution of Maxwell equations by employing the fast Fourier transform on local Fourier basis. Meanwhile a reformatted derivative operator allows the adoption of a staggered-grid such as the Yee lattice in PSTD, which can overcome the numerical errors in a collocated-grid when spatial discontinuities are present. The accuracy and capability of our method are confirmed by two analytical models. In two applications to surface tissue optics, an ultra wide coherent backscattering cone from the surface layer is found, and the penetration depth of polarization gating identified. Our development prepares a tool for investigating the optical properties of surface tissue structures.

  20. Parametric modeling and stagger angle optimization of an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. X.; Zhang, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Axial flow fans are widely used in every field of social production. Improving their efficiency is a sustained and urgent demand of domestic industry. The optimization of stagger angle is an important method to improve fan performance. Parametric modeling and calculation process automation are realized in this paper to improve optimization efficiency. Geometric modeling and mesh division are parameterized based on GAMBIT. Parameter setting and flow field calculation are completed in the batch mode of FLUENT. A control program is developed in Visual C++ to dominate the data exchange of mentioned software. It also extracts calculation results for optimization algorithm module (provided by Matlab) to generate directive optimization control parameters, which as feedback are transferred upwards to modeling module. The center line of the blade airfoil, based on CLARK y profile, is constructed by non-constant circulation and triangle discharge method. Stagger angles of six airfoil sections are optimized, to reduce the influence of inlet shock loss as well as gas leak in blade tip clearance and hub resistance at blade root. Finally an optimal solution is obtained, which meets the total pressure requirement under given conditions and improves total pressure efficiency by about 6%.

  1. Modeling & Informatics at Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated: our philosophy for sustained impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaughey, Georgia; Patrick Walters, W.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular modelers and informaticians have the unique opportunity to integrate cross-functional data using a myriad of tools, methods and visuals to generate information. Using their drug discovery expertise, information is transformed to knowledge that impacts drug discovery. These insights are often times formulated locally and then applied more broadly, which influence the discovery of new medicines. This is particularly true in an organization where the members are exposed to projects throughout an organization, such as in the case of the global Modeling & Informatics group at Vertex Pharmaceuticals. From its inception, Vertex has been a leader in the development and use of computational methods for drug discovery. In this paper, we describe the Modeling & Informatics group at Vertex and the underlying philosophy, which has driven this team to sustain impact on the discovery of first-in-class transformative medicines.

  2. The monodromy matrix in the F-basis for arbitrary six-vertex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, M. J.; Zuparic, M.

    2011-10-01

    We present the expressions for the monodromy matrix elements of the six-vertex model in the F-basis for arbitrary Boltzmann weights. The results rely solely on the property of unitarity and Yang-Baxter relations, avoiding any specific parameterization of the weights. This allows us to write complete algebraic expressions for the inner products and the underlying domain wall partition functions in the case of arbitrary rapidities. We then apply our results for the trigonometric six-vertex model in the presence of inhomogeneous electric fields and obtain a determinant formula for the respective on-shell scalar products.

  3. Staggered grid lagrangian method with local structured adaptive mesh refinement for modeling shock hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliot, N S

    2000-09-26

    A new method for the solution of the unsteady Euler equations has been developed. The method combines staggered grid Lagrangian techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). This method is a precursor to a more general adaptive arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE-AMR) algorithm under development, which will facilitate the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a Lagrange step, which is the focus of the work described here. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. These new algorithmic components are first developed in one dimension and are then generalized to two dimensions. Solutions of several model problems involving shock hydrodynamics are presented and discussed.

  4. Maximum group velocity in a one-dimensional model with a sinusoidally varying staggered potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Tanay; Sen, Diptiman; Dutta, Amit

    2015-06-01

    We use Floquet theory to study the maximum value of the stroboscopic group velocity in a one-dimensional tight-binding model subjected to an on-site staggered potential varying sinusoidally in time. The results obtained by numerically diagonalizing the Floquet operator are analyzed using a variety of analytical schemes. In the low-frequency limit we use adiabatic theory, while in the high-frequency limit the Magnus expansion of the Floquet Hamiltonian turns out to be appropriate. When the magnitude of the staggered potential is much greater or much less than the hopping, we use degenerate Floquet perturbation theory; we find that dynamical localization occurs in the former case when the maximum group velocity vanishes. Finally, starting from an "engineered" initial state where the particles (taken to be hard-core bosons) are localized in one part of the chain, we demonstrate that the existence of a maximum stroboscopic group velocity manifests in a light-cone-like spreading of the particles in real space.

  5. Variational Study on Loop Currents in Bose Hubbard model with Staggered Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toga, Y.; Yokoyama, H.

    In view of strongly interacting bosons in an optical lattice with a large gauge field, we study phase transitions in a two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model with a staggered flux, on the basis of variational Monte Carlo calculations. Inthe trial states,besides typical onsite and intersite correlation factors, we introduce a configuration-dependent phase factor,which was recently found essential for treating current-carrying states. It is found that this phase factor is qualitativelyvitalfordescribing a Mott insulating (MI) state in the present model. Thereby, the Peierls phasesattached in relevant hopping processes are cancelled out. As a result, local currents completely suppressed in MI states, namely, a chiral Mott state does not appear for the square lattice, in contrast tothecorresponding two-leg ladder model. In addition, we discuss other features of the first-order superfluid-MI transition in this model.

  6. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. IV. Limb darkening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Chiavassa, A.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We compute the emergent stellar spectra from the UV to far infrared for different viewing angles using realistic 3D model atmospheres for a large range in stellar parameters to predict the stellar limb darkening. Methods: We have computed full 3D LTE synthetic spectra based on 3D radiative hydrodynamic atmosphere models from the Stagger-grid in the ranges: Teff from 4000 to 7000 K, log g from 1.5 to 5.0, and [Fe/H], from -4.0 to +0.5. From the resulting intensities, we derived coefficients for the standard limb darkening laws considering a number of often-used photometric filters. Furthermore, we calculated theoretical transit light curves, in order to quantify the differences between predictions by the widely used 1D model atmosphere and our 3D models. Results: The 3D models are often found to predict steeper darkening towards the limb compared to the 1D models, mainly due to the temperature stratifications and temperature gradients being different in the 3D models compared to those predicted with 1D models based on the mixing length theory description of convective energy transport. The resulting differences in the transit light curves are rather small; however, these can be significant for high-precision observations of extrasolar transits, and are able to lower the residuals from the fits with 1D limb darkening profiles. Conclusions: We advocate the use of the new limb darkening coefficients provided for the standard four-parameter non-linear power law, which can fit the limb darkening more accurately than other choices. Full Table A.1 and the grid of spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/A90, as well as at http://www.stagger-stars.net

  7. Conserved currents in the six-vertex and trigonometric solid-on-solid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlef, Yacine; Weston, Robert

    2017-04-01

    We construct quasi-local conserved currents in the six-vertex model with anisotropy parameter η by making use of the quantum-group approach of Bernard and Felder. From these currents, we construct parafermionic operators with spin 1+\\text{i}η /π that obey a discrete-integral condition around lattice plaquettes embedded into the complex plane. These operators are identified with primary fields in a c  =  1 compactified free Boson conformal field theory. We then consider a vertex-face correspondence that takes the six-vertex model to a trigonometric SOS model, and construct SOS operators that are the image of the six-vertex currents under this correspondence. We define corresponding SOS parafermionic operators with spins s  =  1 and s=1+2\\text{i}η /π that obey discrete integral conditions around SOS plaquettes embedded into the complex plane. We consider in detail the cyclic-SOS case corresponding to the choice η =\\text{i}π ≤ft( p-{{p}\\prime}\\right)/p , with {{p}\\prime} coprime. We identify our SOS parafermionic operators in terms of the screening operators and primary fields of the associated c=1-6≤ft( p-{{p}\\prime}\\right){{}2}/p{{p}\\prime} conformal field theory.

  8. Renormalization-group approach to quantum Fisher information in an XY model with staggered Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, X M; Cheng, W W; Liu, J-M

    2016-01-19

    We investigate the quantum Fisher information and quantum phase transitions of an XY spin chain with staggered Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction using the quantum renormalization-group method. The quantum Fisher information, its first-derivatives, and the finite-size scaling behaviors are rigorously calculated respectively. The singularity of the derivatives at the phase transition point as a function of lattice size is carefully discussed and it is revealed that the scaling exponent for quantum Fisher information at the critical point can be used to describe the correlation length of this model, addressing the substantial role of staggered Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in modulating quantum phase transitions.

  9. Computational analysis of three-dimensional epithelial morphogenesis using vertex models

    PubMed Central

    Du, XinXin; Osterfield, Miriam; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    The folding of epithelial sheets, accompanied by cell shape changes and rearrangements, gives rise to three-dimensional structures during development. Recently, some aspects of epithelial morphogenesis have been modeled using vertex models, in which each cell is approximated by a polygon; however, these models have been largely confined to two dimensions. Here, we describe an adaptation of these models in which the classical two-dimensional vertex model is embedded in three dimensions. This modification allows for the construction of complex three-dimensional shapes from simple sheets of cells. We describe algorithmic, computational, and biophysical aspects of our model, with the view that it may be useful for formulating and testing hypotheses regarding the mechanical forces underlying a wide range of morphogenetic processes. PMID:25410646

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: STAGGER-grid of 3D stellar models. I. (Magic+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.; Trampedach, R.; Hayek, W.; Chiavassa, A.; Stein, R. F.; Nordlund, A.

    2013-07-01

    The 3D model atmospheres presented here were constructed with a custom version of the Stagger-code, a state-of-the-art, multipurpose, radiative-magnetohydrodynamics (R-MHD) code originally developed by Nordlund & Galsgaard (1995, http://www.astro.ku.dk/~kg/Papers/MHD_code.ps.gz), and continuously improved over the years by its user community. (1 data file).

  11. Optimized Equivalent Staggered-grid FD Method for Elastic Wave Modeling Based on Plane Wave Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Peng; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Liao, Wenyuan; Qu, Luping; Li, Qingyang; Liu, Peijun

    2016-12-01

    In finite difference (FD) method, numerical dispersion is the dominant factor influencing the accuracy of seismic modeling. Various optimized FD schemes for scalar wave modeling have been proposed to reduce grid dispersion, while the optimized time-space domain FD schemes for elastic wave modeling have not been fully investigated yet. In this paper, an optimized FD scheme with Equivalent Staggered Grid (ESG) for elastic modelling has been developed. We start from the constant P- and S-wave speed elastic wave equations and then deduce analytical plane wave solutions in the wavenumber domain with eigenvalue decomposition method. Based on the elastic plane wave solutions, three new time-space domain dispersion relations of ESG elastic modeling are obtained, which are represented by three equations corresponding to P-, S- and converted wave terms in the elastic equations, respectively. By using these new relations, we can study the dispersion errors of different spatial FD terms independently. The dispersion analysis showed that different spatial FD terms have different errors. It is therefore suggested that different FD coefficients to be used to approximate the three spatial derivative terms. In addition, the relative dispersion error in L2-norm is minimized through optimizing FD coefficients using Newton's method. Synthetic examples have demonstrated that this new optimal FD schemes have superior accuracy for elastic wave modeling compared to Taylor-series expansion and optimized space domain FD schemes.

  12. Optimized equivalent staggered-grid FD method for elastic wave modelling based on plane wave solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Peng; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Liao, Wenyuan; Qu, Luping; Li, Qingyang; Liu, Peijun

    2017-02-01

    In finite-difference (FD) method, numerical dispersion is the dominant factor influencing the accuracy of seismic modelling. Various optimized FD schemes for scalar wave modelling have been proposed to reduce grid dispersion, while the optimized time-space domain FD schemes for elastic wave modelling have not been fully investigated yet. In this paper, an optimized FD scheme with Equivalent Staggered Grid (ESG) for elastic modelling has been developed. We start from the constant P- and S-wave speed elastic wave equations and then deduce analytical plane wave solutions in the wavenumber domain with eigenvalue decomposition method. Based on the elastic plane wave solutions, three new time-space domain dispersion relations of ESG elastic modelling are obtained, which are represented by three equations corresponding to P-, S- and converted-wave terms in the elastic equations, respectively. By using these new relations, we can study the dispersion errors of different spatial FD terms independently. The dispersion analysis showed that different spatial FD terms have different errors. It is therefore suggested that different FD coefficients to be used to approximate the three spatial derivative terms. In addition, the relative dispersion error in L2-norm is minimized through optimizing FD coefficients using Newton's method. Synthetic examples have demonstrated that this new optimal FD schemes have superior accuracy for elastic wave modelling compared to Taylor-series expansion and optimized space domain FD schemes.

  13. Relaxing the closure assumption in single-season occupancy models: staggered arrival and departure times

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, William L.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    Occupancy statistical models that account for imperfect detection have proved very useful in several areas of ecology, including species distribution and spatial dynamics, disease ecology, and ecological responses to climate change. These models are based on the collection of multiple samples at each of a number of sites within a given season, during which it is assumed the species is either absent or present and available for detection while each sample is taken. However, for some species, individuals are only present or available for detection seasonally. We present a statistical model that relaxes the closure assumption within a season by permitting staggered entry and exit times for the species of interest at each site. Based on simulation, our open model eliminates bias in occupancy estimators and in some cases increases precision. The power to detect the violation of closure is high if detection probability is reasonably high. In addition to providing more robust estimation of occupancy, this model permits comparison of phenology across sites, species, or years, by modeling variation in arrival or departure probabilities. In a comparison of four species of amphibians in Maryland we found that two toad species arrived at breeding sites later in the season than a salamander and frog species, and departed from sites earlier.

  14. Vertex expansion for the Bianchi type I model

    SciTech Connect

    Campiglia, Miguel; Henderson, Adam; Nelson, William

    2010-09-15

    A perturbative expansion of loop quantum cosmological transitions amplitudes of Bianchi I models is performed. Following the procedure outlined in [1,2] for isotropic models, it is shown that the resulting expansion can be written in the form of a series of amplitudes each with a fixed number of transitions mimicking a spin foam expansion. This analogy is more complete than in the isotropic case, since there are now the additional anisotropic degrees of freedom which play the role of 'coloring' of the spin foams. Furthermore, the isotropic expansion is recovered by integrating out the anisotropies.

  15. A new Q-matrix in the eight-vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, Klaus

    2007-04-01

    We construct a Q-matrix for the eight-vertex model at roots of unity for crossing parameter η = 2mK/L with odd L, a case for which the existing constructions do not work. The new Q-matrix {\\skew3\\hat{Q}} depends on the spectral parameter v and also on a free parameter t. For t=0, {\\skew3\\hat{Q}} has the standard properties. For t ≠ 0, however, it does not commute with the operator S nor with itself for different values of the spectral parameter. We show that the six-vertex limit of {\\skew3\\hat{Q}}(v,t=iK^{\\prime}/2) exists.

  16. The loop-cluster algorithm for the case of the 6 vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evertz, Hans Gerd; Marcu, Mihai

    1993-03-01

    We present the loop algorithm, a new type of cluster algorithm that we recently introduced for the F model. Using the framework of Kandel and Domany, we show how to generalize the algorithm to the arrow flip symmetric 6 vertex model. We propose the principle of least possible freezing as the guide to choosing the values of free parameters in the algorithm. Finally, we briefly discuss the application of our algorithm to simulations of quantum spin systems. In particular, all necessary information is provided for the simulation of spin {1}/{2} Heisenberg and ¢x¢x z models.

  17. Symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices in a nineteen-vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagendorf, Christian; Morin-Duchesne, Alexi

    2016-05-01

    The nineteen-vertex model of Fateev and Zamolodchikov on a periodic lattice with an anti-diagonal twist is investigated. Its inhomogeneous transfer matrix is shown to have a simple eigenvalue, with the corresponding eigenstate displaying intriguing combinatorial features. Similar results were previously found for the same model with a diagonal twist. The eigenstate for the anti-diagonal twist is explicitly constructed using the quantum separation of variables technique. A number of sum rules and special components are computed and expressed in terms of Kuperberg’s determinants for partition functions of the inhomogeneous six-vertex model. The computations of some components of the special eigenstate for the diagonal twist are also presented. In the homogeneous limit, the special eigenstates become eigenvectors of the Hamiltonians of the integrable spin-one XXZ chain with twisted boundary conditions. Their sum rules and special components for both twists are expressed in terms of generating functions arising in the weighted enumeration of various symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices (ASMs). These include half-turn symmetric ASMs, quarter-turn symmetric ASMs, vertically symmetric ASMs, vertically and horizontally perverse ASMs and double U-turn ASMs. As side results, new determinant and pfaffian formulas for the weighted enumeration of various symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices are obtained.

  18. A combined crystal plasticity and graph-based vertex model of dynamic recrystallization at large deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellbin, Y.; Hallberg, H.; Ristinmaa, M.

    2015-06-01

    A mesoscale model of microstructure evolution is formulated in the present work by combining a crystal plasticity model with a graph-based vertex algorithm. This provides a versatile formulation capable of capturing finite-strain deformations, development of texture and microstructure evolution through recrystallization. The crystal plasticity model is employed in a finite element setting and allows tracing of stored energy build-up in the polycrystal microstructure and concurrent reorientation of the crystal lattices in the grains. This influences the progression of recrystallization as nucleation occurs at sites with sufficient stored energy and since the grain boundary mobility and energy is allowed to vary with crystallographic misorientation across the boundaries. The proposed graph-based vertex model describes the topological changes to the grain microstructure and keeps track of the grain inter-connectivity. Through homogenization, the macroscopic material response is also obtained. By the proposed modeling approach, grain structure evolution at large deformations as well as texture development are captured. This is in contrast to most other models of recrystallization which are usually limited by assumptions of one or the other of these factors. In simulation examples, the model is in the present study shown to capture the salient features of dynamic recrystallization, including the effects of varying initial grain size and strain rate on the transitions between single-peak and multiple-peak oscillating flow stress behavior. Also the development of recrystallization texture and the influence of different assumptions on orientation of recrystallization nuclei are investigated. Further, recrystallization kinetics are discussed and compared to classical JMAK theory. To promote computational efficiency, the polycrystal plasticity algorithm is parallelized through a GPU implementation that was recently proposed by the authors.

  19. Staggered quantum walks with Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portugal, R.; de Oliveira, M. C.; Moqadam, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum walks are recognizably useful for the development of new quantum algorithms, as well as for the investigation of several physical phenomena in quantum systems. Actual implementations of quantum walks face technological difficulties similar to the ones for quantum computers, though. Therefore, there is a strong motivation to develop new quantum-walk models which might be easier to implement. In this work we present an extension of the staggered quantum walk model that is fitted for physical implementations in terms of time-independent Hamiltonians. We demonstrate that this class of quantum walk includes the entire class of staggered quantum walk model, Szegedy's model, and an important subset of the coined model.

  20. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  1. tbW vertex in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect

    Penunuri, F.; Larios, F.

    2009-01-01

    A study of the effective tbW vertex is done in the littlest Higgs model with T parity that includes the one-loop induced weak dipole coefficient f{sub 2R}. The top's width and the W-boson helicity in the t{yields}bW{sup +} decay as well as the t-channel and the s-channel modes of single top quark production at the LHC are then obtained for the tbW coupling. Our calculation is done in the Feynman-'t Hooft gauge, and we provide details of the analysis, like exact formulas (to all orders of the expansion variable v/f) of masses and mixing angles of all of the particles involved. Also, a complete and exact diagonalization (and normalization) of the scalar sector of the model is made.

  2. Vertex/propagator model for least-scattered photons traversing a turbid medium.

    PubMed

    Wang, R K; Wilson, M

    2001-01-01

    The least-scattered photons that arrive at a detector through highly scattering tissues have the potential to image internal structures, functions, and status with high imaging resolution. In contrast, optical diffusing tomography is based on the use of the late-arriving photons, which have been diffusely scattered, leading to very low imaging resolution. A good model of the early-arriving photons, i.e., the least-scattered photons, may have a significant effect on the development of imaging algorithms and a further understanding of imaging mechanisms within current high-resolution optical-imaging techniques. We describe a vertex/propagator approach that attempts to find the probabilities for least-scattered photons traversing a scattering medium, based on analytical expressions for photon histories. The basic mathematical derivations for the model are outlined, and the results are discussed and found to be in very good agreement with those from the Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Genome sequencing supports a multi-vertex model for Brassiceae species.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Liang, Jianli; Cai, Chengcheng; Cai, Xu; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu

    2017-02-24

    The economically important Brassica genus is a good system for studying the evolution of polyploids. Brassica genomes have undergone whole genome triplication (WGT). Subgenome dominance phenomena such as biased gene fractionation and dominant gene expression were observed in tripled genomes of Brassica. The genome of radish (Raphanus sativus), another important crop of tribe Brassiceae, was derived from the same WGT event and shows similar subgenome dominance. These findings and molecular dating indicate that radish occupies a similar evolutionary origin as that of Brassica species. Here, we extended the Brassica "triangle of U" to a multi-vertex model. This model describes the relationships or the potential of using more Brassiceae mesohexaploids in the creation of new allotetraploid oil or vegetable crop species.

  4. W W V (V =γ , Z ) vertex in the Georgi-Machacek model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-Ureña, M. A.; Hernández-Tomé, G.; Tavares-Velasco, G.

    2016-11-01

    The C P -even static form factors Δ κV' and Δ QV (V =γ , Z ) associated with the W W V vertex are studied in the context of the Georgi-Machacek model (GMM), which predicts nine new scalar bosons accommodated in a singlet, a triplet, and a fiveplet. General expressions for the one-loop contributions to Δ κV' and Δ QV arising from neutral, singly, and doubly charged scalar bosons are obtained in terms of both parametric integrals and Passarino-Veltman scalar functions, which can be numerically evaluated. It is found that the GMM yields 15 (28) distinct contributions to Δ κγ' and Δ Qγ (Δ κZ' and Δ QZ), though several of them are naturally suppressed. A numerical analysis is done in the region of parameter space still consistent with current experimental data and it is found that the largest contributions to Δ κV' arise from Feynman diagrams with two nondegenerate scalar bosons in the loop, with values of the order of a =g2/(96 π2) reached when there is a large splitting between the masses of these scalar bosons. As for Δ QV, it reaches values as large as 10-2a for the lightest allowed scalar bosons, but it decreases rapidly as one of the masses of the scalar bosons becomes large. Among the new contributions of the GMM to the Δ κV' and Δ QV form factors are those induced by the H5±W∓Z vertex, which arises at the tree level and is a unique prediction of this model.

  5. Modeling one-mode projection of bipartite networks by tagging vertex information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jian; Meng, Ying-Ying; Chen, Hsinchun; Huang, Hong-Qiao; Li, Guo-Ying

    2016-09-01

    Traditional one-mode projection models are less informative than their original bipartite networks. Hence, using such models cannot control the projection's structure freely. We proposed a new method for modeling the one-mode projection of bipartite networks, which thoroughly breaks through the limitations of the available one-mode projecting methods by tagging the vertex information of bipartite networks in their one-mode projections. We designed a one-mode collaboration network model by using the method presented in this paper. The simulation results show that our model matches three real networks very well and outperforms the available collaboration network models significantly, which reflects the idea that our method is ideal for modeling one-mode projection models of bipartite graphs and that our one-mode collaboration network model captures the crucial mechanisms of the three real systems. Our study reveals that size growth, individual aging, random collaboration, preferential collaboration, transitivity collaboration and multi-round collaboration are the crucial mechanisms of collaboration networks, and the lack of some of the crucial mechanisms is the main reason that the other available models do not perform as well as ours.

  6. A family of time-staggered schemes for integrating hybrid DPD models for polymers: Algorithms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Symeonidis, Vasileios; Karniadakis, George Em . E-mail: gk@dam.brown.edu

    2006-10-10

    We propose new schemes for integrating the stochastic differential equations of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) in simulations of dilute polymer solutions. The hybrid DPD models consist of hard potentials that describe the microscopic dynamics of polymers and soft potentials that describe the mesoscopic dynamics of the solvent. In particular, we develop extensions to the velocity-Verlet and Lowe's approaches - two representative DPD time-integrators - following a subcycling procedure whereby the solvent is advanced with a timestep much larger than the one employed in the polymer time-integration. The introduction of relaxation parameters allows optimization studies for accuracy while maintaining the low computational complexity of standard DPD algorithms. We demonstrate through equilibrium simulations that a 10-fold gain in efficiency can be obtained with the time-staggered algorithms without loss of accuracy compared to the non-staggered schemes. We then apply the new approach to investigate the scaling response of polymers in equilibrium as well as the dynamics of {lambda}-phage DNA molecules subjected to shear.

  7. A family of time-staggered schemes for integrating hybrid DPD models for polymers: Algorithms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeonidis, Vasileios; Karniadakis, George Em

    2006-10-01

    We propose new schemes for integrating the stochastic differential equations of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) in simulations of dilute polymer solutions. The hybrid DPD models consist of hard potentials that describe the microscopic dynamics of polymers and soft potentials that describe the mesoscopic dynamics of the solvent. In particular, we develop extensions to the velocity-Verlet and Lowe's approaches - two representative DPD time-integrators - following a subcycling procedure whereby the solvent is advanced with a timestep much larger than the one employed in the polymer time-integration. The introduction of relaxation parameters allows optimization studies for accuracy while maintaining the low computational complexity of standard DPD algorithms. We demonstrate through equilibrium simulations that a 10-fold gain in efficiency can be obtained with the time-staggered algorithms without loss of accuracy compared to the non-staggered schemes. We then apply the new approach to investigate the scaling response of polymers in equilibrium as well as the dynamics of λ-phage DNA molecules subjected to shear.

  8. Implementing vertex dynamics models of cell populations in biology within a consistent computational framework.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Alexander G; Osborne, James M; Maini, Philip K; Gavaghan, David J

    2013-11-01

    The dynamic behaviour of epithelial cell sheets plays a central role during development, growth, disease and wound healing. These processes occur as a result of cell adhesion, migration, division, differentiation and death, and involve multiple processes acting at the cellular and molecular level. Computational models offer a useful means by which to investigate and test hypotheses about these processes, and have played a key role in the study of cell-cell interactions. However, the necessarily complex nature of such models means that it is difficult to make accurate comparison between different models, since it is often impossible to distinguish between differences in behaviour that are due to the underlying model assumptions, and those due to differences in the in silico implementation of the model. In this work, an approach is described for the implementation of vertex dynamics models, a discrete approach that represents each cell by a polygon (or polyhedron) whose vertices may move in response to forces. The implementation is undertaken in a consistent manner within a single open source computational framework, Chaste, which comprises fully tested, industrial-grade software that has been developed using an agile approach. This framework allows one to easily change assumptions regarding force generation and cell rearrangement processes within these models. The versatility and generality of this framework is illustrated using a number of biological examples. In each case we provide full details of all technical aspects of our model implementations, and in some cases provide extensions to make the models more generally applicable.

  9. Quantum coherence and quantum phase transition in the XY model with staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Ning-Ju; Xu, Yang-Yang; Wang, Jicheng; Zhang, Yixin; Hu, Zheng-Da

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the properties of geometric quantum coherence in the XY spin-1/2 chain with staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction via the quantum renormalization-group approach. It is shown that the geometric quantum coherence and its coherence susceptibility are effective to detect the quantum phase transition. In the thermodynamic limit, the geometric quantum coherence exhibits a sudden jump. The coherence susceptibilities versus the anisotropy parameter and the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction are infinite and vanishing, respectively, illustrating the distinct roles of the anisotropy parameter and the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction in quantum phase transition. Moreover, we also explore the finite-size scaling behaviors of the coherence susceptibilities. For a finite-size chain, the coherence susceptibility versus the phase-transition parameter is always maximal at the critical point, indicating the dramatic quantum fluctuation. Besides, we show that the correlation length can be revealed by the scaling exponent for the coherence susceptibility versus the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction.

  10. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L.; Marlin, David H.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  11. Recrystallization and texture evolution during hot rolling of copper, studied by a multiscale model combining crystal plasticity and vertex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellbin, Y.; Hallberg, H.; Ristinmaa, M.

    2016-10-01

    A multiscale modeling framework, combining a graph-based vertex model of microstructure evolution with a GPU-parallelized crystal plasticity model, was recently proposed by the authors. Considering hot rolling of copper, the full capabilities of the model are demonstrated in the present work. The polycrystal plasticity model captures the plastic response and the texture evolution during materials processing while the vertex model provides central features of grain structure evolution through dynamic recrystallization, such as nucleation and growth of individual crystals. The multiscale model makes it possible to obtain information regarding grain size and texture development throughout the workpiece, capturing the effects of recrystallization and heterogeneous microstructure evolution. Recognizing that recrystallization is a highly temperature dependent phenomenon, simulations are performed at different process temperatures. The results show that the proposed modeling framework is capable of simultaneously capturing central aspects of material behavior at both the meso- and macrolevel. Detailed investigation of the evolution of texture, grain size distribution and plastic deformation during the different processing conditions are performed, using the proposed model. The results show a strong texture development, but almost no recrystallization, for the lower of the investigated temperatures, while at higher temperatures an increased recrystallization is shown to weaken the development of a typical rolling texture. The simulations also show the influence of the shear deformation close to the rolling surface on both texture development and recrystallization.

  12. Staggered eigenvalue mimicry

    SciTech Connect

    Duerr, Stephan; Hoelbling, Christian; Wenger, Urs

    2004-11-01

    We study the infrared part of the spectrum for UV-filtered staggered Dirac operators and compare them to the overlap counterpart. With sufficient filtering and at small enough lattice spacing the staggered spectra manage to 'mimic' the overlap version. They show a 4-fold near degeneracy, and a clear separation between would-be zero modes and nonzero modes. This suggests an approximate index theorem for filtered staggered fermions and a correct sensitivity to the topology of QCD. Moreover, it supports square-rooting the staggered determinant to obtain dynamical ensembles with N{sub f}=2.

  13. Properties of Linear Integral Equations Related to the Six-Vertex Model with Disorder Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, Hermann; Göhmann, Frank

    2011-10-01

    One of the key steps in recent work on the correlation functions of the XXZ chain was to regularize the underlying six-vertex model by a disorder parameter α. For the regularized model it was shown that all static correlation functions are polynomials in only two functions. It was further shown that these two functions can be written as contour integrals involving the solutions of a certain type of linear and non-linear integral equations. The linear integral equations depend parametrically on α and generalize linear integral equations known from the study of the bulk thermodynamic properties of the model. In this note we consider the generalized dressed charge and a generalized magnetization density. We express the generalized dressed charge as a linear combination of two quotients of Q-functions, the solutions of Baxter's t-Q-equation. With this result we give a new proof of a lemma on the asymptotics of the generalized magnetization density as a function of the spectral parameter.

  14. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. I. Methods and general properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.; Trampedach, R.; Hayek, W.; Chiavassa, A.; Stein, R. F.; Nordlund, Å.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We present the Stagger-grid, a comprehensive grid of time-dependent, three-dimensional (3D), hydrodynamic model atmospheres for late-type stars with realistic treatment of radiative transfer, covering a wide range in stellar parameters. This grid of 3D models is intended for various applications besides studies of stellar convection and atmospheres per se, including stellar parameter determination, stellar spectroscopy and abundance analysis, asteroseismology, calibration of stellar evolution models, interferometry, and extrasolar planet search. In this introductory paper, we describe the methods we applied for the computation of the grid and discuss the general properties of the 3D models as well as of their temporal and spatial averages (here denoted ⟨3D⟩ models). Methods: All our models were generated with the Stagger-code, using realistic input physics for the equation of state (EOS) and for continuous and line opacities. Our ~ 220 grid models range in effective temperature, Teff, from 4000 to 7000 K in steps of 500 K, in surface gravity, log g, from 1.5 to 5.0 in steps of 0.5 dex, and metallicity, [Fe/H], from - 4.0 to + 0.5 in steps of 0.5 and 1.0 dex. Results: We find a tight scaling relation between the vertical velocity and the surface entropy jump, which itself correlates with the constant entropy value of the adiabatic convection zone. The range in intensity contrast is enhanced at lower metallicity. The granule size correlates closely with the pressure scale height sampled at the depth of maximum velocity. We compare the ⟨3D⟩ models with currently widely applied one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere models, as well as with theoretical 1D hydrostatic models generated with the same EOS and opacity tables as the 3D models, in order to isolate the effects of using self-consistent and hydrodynamic modeling of convection, rather than the classical mixing length theory approach. For the first time, we are able to quantify systematically over a broad

  15. Investigation of deformation mechanisms of staggered nanocomposites using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiazhagan, S.; Anup, S.

    2016-08-01

    Biological materials with nanostructure of regularly or stair-wise staggered arrangements of hard platelets reinforced in a soft protein matrix have superior mechanical properties. Applications of these nanostructures to ceramic matrix composites could enhance their toughness. Using molecular dynamics simulations, mechanical behaviour of the bio-inspired nanocomposites is studied. Regularly staggered model shows better flow behaviour compared to stair-wise staggered model due to the symmetrical crack propagation along the interface. Though higher stiffness and strength are obtained for stair-wise staggered models, rapid crack propagation reduces the toughness. Arresting this crack propagation could lead to superior mechanical properties in stair-wise staggered models.

  16. Optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Han, B.; Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate an optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling. An anti-lumped mass strategy is incorporated to minimize the numerical dispersion. The optimal finite-difference coefficients and the mass weighting coefficients are obtained by minimizing the misfit between the normalized phase velocities and the unity. An iterative damped least-squares method, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, is utilized for the optimization. Dispersion analysis shows that the optimal fourth-order scheme presents less grid dispersion and anisotropy than the conventional fourth-order scheme with respect to different Poisson's ratios. Moreover, only 3.7 grid-points per minimum shear wavelength are required to keep the error of the group velocities below 1%. The memory cost is then greatly reduced due to a coarser sampling. A parallel iterative method named CARP-CG is used to solve the large ill-conditioned linear system for the frequency-domain modeling. Validations are conducted with respect to both the analytic viscoacoustic and viscoelastic solutions. Compared with the conventional fourth-order scheme, the optimal scheme generates wavefields having smaller error under the same discretization setups. Profiles of the wavefields are presented to confirm better agreement between the optimal results and the analytic solutions.

  17. A no-cost improved velocity-stress staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for modelling seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadsaeed, Leila; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Ansari, Anooshiravan; Kristekova, Miriam

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the problem of finite-difference approximations of the velocity-stress formulation of the equation of motion and constitutive law on the staggered grid (SG) and collocated grid (CG). For approximating the first spatial and temporal derivatives, we use three approaches: Taylor expansion (TE), dispersion-relation preserving (DRP), and combined TE-DRP. The TE and DRP approaches represent two fundamental extremes. We derive useful formulae for DRP and TE-DRP approximations. We compare accuracy of the numerical wavenumbers and numerical frequencies of the basic TE, DRP and TE-DRP approximations. Based on the developed approximations, we construct and numerically investigate 14 basic TE, DRP and TE-DRP finite-difference schemes on SG and CG. We find that (1) the TE second-order in time, TE fourth-order in space, 2-point in time, 4-point in space SG scheme (that is the standard (2,4) VS SG scheme, say TE-2-4-2-4-SG) is the best scheme (of the 14 investigated) for large fractions of the maximum possible time step, or, in other words, in a homogeneous medium; (2) the TE second-order in time, combined TE-DRP second-order in space, 2-point in time, 4-point in space SG scheme (say TE-DRP-2-2-2-4-SG) is the best scheme for small fractions of the maximum possible time step, or, in other words, in models with large velocity contrasts if uniform spatial grid spacing and time step are used. The practical conclusion is that in computer codes based on standard TE-2-4-2-4-SG, it is enough to redefine the values of the approximation coefficients by those of TE-DRP-2-2-2-4-SG for increasing accuracy of modelling in models with large velocity contrast between rock and sediments.

  18. Ab initio dynamical vertex approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Anna; Thunström, Patrik; Gunacker, Patrik; Tomczak, Jan M.; Held, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Diagrammatic extensions of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) such as the dynamical vertex approximation (DΓ A) allow us to include nonlocal correlations beyond DMFT on all length scales and proved their worth for model calculations. Here, we develop and implement an Ab initio DΓ A approach (AbinitioDΓ A ) for electronic structure calculations of materials. The starting point is the two-particle irreducible vertex in the two particle-hole channels which is approximated by the bare nonlocal Coulomb interaction and all local vertex corrections. From this, we calculate the full nonlocal vertex and the nonlocal self-energy through the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The AbinitioDΓ A approach naturally generates all local DMFT correlations and all nonlocal G W contributions, but also further nonlocal correlations beyond: mixed terms of the former two and nonlocal spin fluctuations. We apply this new methodology to the prototypical correlated metal SrVO3.

  19. 3D change detection in staggered voxels model for robotic sensing and navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruixu; Hampshire, Brandon; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2016-05-01

    3D scene change detection is a challenging problem in robotic sensing and navigation. There are several unpredictable aspects in performing scene change detection. A change detection method which can support various applications in varying environmental conditions is proposed. Point cloud models are acquired from a RGB-D sensor, which provides the required color and depth information. Change detection is performed on robot view point cloud model. A bilateral filter smooths the surface and fills the holes as well as keeps the edge details on depth image. Registration of the point cloud model is implemented by using Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) algorithm. It uses surface normal as the previous stage for the ground and wall estimate. After preprocessing the data, we create a point voxel model which defines voxel as surface or free space. Then we create a color model which defines each voxel that has a color by the mean of all points' color value in this voxel. The preliminary change detection is detected by XOR subtract on the point voxel model. Next, the eight neighbors for this center voxel are defined. If they are neither all `changed' voxels nor all `no changed' voxels, a histogram of location and hue channel color is estimated. The experimental evaluations performed to evaluate the capability of our algorithm show promising results for novel change detection that indicate all the changing objects with very limited false alarm rate.

  20. Role of vertex corrections in the matrix formulation of the random phase approximation for the multiorbital Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Michaela; Guterding, Daniel; Hirschfeld, P. J.; Maier, Thomas A.; Valentí, Roser; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2016-12-01

    In the framework of a multiorbital Hubbard model description of superconductivity, a matrix formulation of the superconducting pairing interaction that has been widely used is designed to treat spin, charge, and orbital fluctuations within a random phase approximation (RPA). In terms of Feynman diagrams, this takes into account particle-hole ladder and bubble contributions as expected. It turns out, however, that this matrix formulation also generates additional terms which have the diagrammatic structure of vertex corrections. Here we examine these terms and discuss the relationship between the matrix-RPA superconducting pairing interaction and the Feynman diagrams that it sums.

  1. Dynamic inversion method based on the time-staggered stereo-modeling scheme and its acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Hao; Yang, Dinghui; Wu, Hao

    2016-12-01

    A set of second-order differential equations describing the space-time behaviour of derivatives of displacement with respect to model parameters (i.e. waveform sensitivities) is obtained via taking the derivative of the original wave equations. The dynamic inversion method obtains sensitivities of the seismic displacement field with respect to earth properties directly by solving differential equations for them instead of constructing sensitivities from the displacement field itself. In this study, we have taken a new perspective on the dynamic inversion method and used acceleration approaches to reduce the computational time and memory usage to improve its ability of performing high-resolution imaging. The dynamic inversion method, which can simultaneously use different waves and multicomponent observation data, is appropriate for directly inverting elastic parameters, medium density or wave velocities. Full wavefield information is utilized as much as possible at the expense of a larger amount of calculations. To mitigate the computational burden, two ways are proposed to accelerate the method from a computer-implementation point of view. One is source encoding which uses a linear combination of all shots, and the other is to reduce the amount of calculations on forward modeling. We applied a new finite-difference (FD) method to the dynamic inversion to improve the computational accuracy and speed up the performance. Numerical experiments indicated that the new FD method can effectively suppress the numerical dispersion caused by the discretization of wave equations, resulting in enhanced computational efficiency with less memory cost for seismic modeling and inversion based on the full wave equations. We present some inversion results to demonstrate the validity of this method through both checkerboard and Marmousi models. It shows that this method is also convergent even with big deviations for the initial model. Besides, parallel calculations can be easily

  2. Staggered fermions, zero modes, and flavor-singlet mesons

    DOE PAGES

    Donald, Gordon C; Davies, Christine T.H.; Follana, Eduardo; ...

    2011-09-12

    We examine the taste structure of eigenvectors of the staggered-fermion Dirac operator. We derive a set of conditions on the eigenvectors of modes with small eigenvalues (near-zero modes), such that staggered fermions reproduce the 't Hooft vertex in the continuum limit. We also show that, assuming these conditions, the correlators of flavor-singlet mesons are free of contributions singular in 1/m, where m is the quark mass. This conclusion holds also when a single flavor of sea quark is represented by the fourth root of the staggered-fermion determinant. We then test numerically, using the HISQ action, whether these conditions hold onmore » realistic lattice gauge fields. We find that the needed structure does indeed emerge.« less

  3. Staggered fermions, zero modes, and flavor-singlet mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, Gordon C; Davies, Christine T.H.; Follana, Eduardo; Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2011-09-12

    We examine the taste structure of eigenvectors of the staggered-fermion Dirac operator. We derive a set of conditions on the eigenvectors of modes with small eigenvalues (near-zero modes), such that staggered fermions reproduce the 't Hooft vertex in the continuum limit. We also show that, assuming these conditions, the correlators of flavor-singlet mesons are free of contributions singular in 1/m, where m is the quark mass. This conclusion holds also when a single flavor of sea quark is represented by the fourth root of the staggered-fermion determinant. We then test numerically, using the HISQ action, whether these conditions hold on realistic lattice gauge fields. We find that the needed structure does indeed emerge.

  4. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.; Asplund, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. Methods: The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, sbot, and the entropy jump, Δs, determined from the 3D RHD models, were matched with the mixing length parameter, αMLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derived the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[vz,vz], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. Results: The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is α๏MLT (Sbot) = 1.98. . For different stellar parameters, αMLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, αMLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity. We find equivalent results for α๏MLT (ΔS). In addition, we find a tight correlation between the mixing length parameter and the inverse entropy jump. We derive an analytical expression from the hydrodynamic mean-field equations that motivates the relation to the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and find that it qualitatively shows a similar variation with stellar parameter (between 1.6 and 2.4) with the solar value of α๏m = 1.83.. The vertical correlation length scaled with the pressure scale height yields 1.71 for the Sun, but only displays a small systematic variation with stellar parameters, the correlation length slightly increases with Teff. Conclusions: We derive mixing length parameters for various stellar parameters that can be used to replace a constant value. Within any convective envelope, αm and related quantities vary strongly. Our results will help to replace a constant αMLT. Appendices are available in electronic form at http

  5. Staggered Costas signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Avraham; Levanon, Nadav

    1986-11-01

    A radar signal, based on coherent processing of a train of staggered Costas (1984) bursts is based on a minimum number of collocation of their individual ambiguity function sidelobe peaks. The resulting ambiguity function combines qualities of both 'thumbtack' and 'bed of nails' signals. Comparison with linear-FM, V-FM, and complementary phase coded signals is given, as well as comparison with hybrid signals consisting of both phase and frequency coding.

  6. Three-dimensional viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference seismic modelling using the staggered Adams-Bashforth time integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas; Wittkamp, Florian

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the performance of a higher order accurate staggered viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference method, in which the staggered Adams-Bashforth (ABS) third-order and fourth-order accurate time integrators are used for temporal discretization. ABS is a multistep method that uses previously calculated wavefields to increase the order of accuracy in time. The analysis shows that the numerical dispersion is much lower than that of the widely used second-order leapfrog method. Numerical dissipation is introduced by the ABS method which is significantly smaller for fourth-order than third-order accuracy. In 1-D and 3-D simulation experiments, we verify the convincing improvements of simulation accuracy of the fourth-order ABS method. In a realistic elastic 3-D scenario, the computing time reduces by a factor of approximately 2.4, whereas the memory requirements increase by approximately a factor of 2.2. The ABS method thus provides an alternative strategy to increase the simulation accuracy in time by investing computer memory instead of computing time.

  7. Java Vertexing Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Strube, Jan; Graf, Norman; /SLAC

    2006-03-03

    This document describes the implementation of the topological vertex finding algorithm ZVTOP within the org.lcsim reconstruction and analysis framework. At the present date, Java vertexing tools allow users to perform topological vertexing on tracks that have been obtained from a Fast MC simulation. An implementation that will be able to handle fully reconstructed events is being designed from the ground up for longevity and maintainability.

  8. Staggered chiral random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, James C.

    2011-02-01

    We present a random matrix theory for the staggered lattice QCD Dirac operator. The staggered random matrix theory is equivalent to the zero-momentum limit of the staggered chiral Lagrangian and includes all taste breaking terms at their leading order. This is an extension of previous work which only included some of the taste breaking terms. We will also present some results for the taste breaking contributions to the partition function and the Dirac eigenvalues.

  9. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. II. Horizontal and temporal averaging and spectral line formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Collet, R.; Hayek, W.; Asplund, M.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We study the implications of averaging methods with different reference depth scales for 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres computed with the Stagger-code. The temporally and spatially averaged (hereafter denoted as ⟨3D⟩) models are explored in the light of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation by comparing spectrum calculations using full 3D atmosphere structures with those from ⟨3D⟩ averages. Methods: We explored methods for computing mean ⟨3D⟩ stratifications from the Stagger-grid time-dependent 3D radiative hydrodynamical atmosphere models by considering four different reference depth scales (geometrical depth, column-mass density, and two optical depth scales). Furthermore, we investigated the influence of alternative averages (logarithmic, enforced hydrostatic equilibrium, flux-weighted temperatures). For the line formation we computed curves of growth for Fe i and Fe ii lines in LTE. Results: The resulting ⟨3D⟩ stratifications for the four reference depth scales can be very different. We typically find that in the upper atmosphere and in the superadiabatic region just below the optical surface, where the temperature and density fluctuations are highest, the differences become considerable and increase for higher Teff, lower log g, and lower [Fe / H]. The differential comparison of spectral line formation shows distinctive differences depending on which ⟨3D⟩ model is applied. The averages over layers of constant column-mass density yield the best mean ⟨3D⟩ representation of the full 3D models for LTE line formation, while the averages on layers at constant geometrical height are the least appropriate. Unexpectedly, the usually preferred averages over layers of constant optical depth are prone to increasing interference by reversed granulation towards higher effective temperature, in particular at low metallicity. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgMean ⟨3D⟩ models are

  10. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  11. Minimizing costs while meeting safety requirements: Modeling deterministic (imperfect) staggered tests using standard Markov models for SIL calculations.

    PubMed

    Rouvroye, Jan L; Wiegerinck, Jan A M

    2006-10-01

    In industry, potentially hazardous (technical) structures are equipped with safety systems in order to protect people, the environment, and assets from the consequences of accidents by reducing the probability of incidents occurring. Not only companies but also society will want to know what the effect of these safety measures is: society in terms of "likelihood of undesired events" and companies in addition in terms of "value for money," the expected benefits per dollar or euro invested that these systems provide. As a compromise between demands from society (the safer the better) and industry (but against what cost), in many countries government has decided to impose standards to industry with respect to safety requirements. These standards use the average probability of failure on demand as the main performance indicator for these systems, and require, for the societal reason given before, that this probability remain below a certain value depending on a given risk. The main factor commonly used in industry to "fine-tune" the average probability of failure on demand for a given system configuration in order to comply with these standards against financial risk for the company is "optimizing" the test strategy (interval, coverage, and procedure). In industry, meeting the criterion on the average probability of failure on demand is often demonstrated by using well accepted mathematical models such as Markov models from literature and adapting them for the actual situation. This paper shows the implications and potential pitfalls when using this commonly used practical approach for a situation where the test strategy is changed. Adapting an existing Markov model can lead to unexpected results, and this paper will demonstrate that a different model has to be developed. In addition, the authors propose an approach that can be applied in industry without suffering from the problems mentioned above.

  12. Bilepton effects on the WWV* vertex in the 331 model with right-handed neutrinos via a SUL(2)×UY(1) covariant quantization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Zavaleta, F.; Tavares-Velasco, G.; Toscano, J. J.

    2007-04-01

    In a recent paper [J. Montano, F. Ramírez-Zavaleta, G. Tavares-Velasco, and J. J. Toscano, Phys. Rev. D 72, 055023 (2005).PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.72.055023], we investigated the effects of the massive charged gauge bosons (bileptons) predicted by the minimal 331 model on the off-shell vertex WWV* (V=γ, Z) using a SUL(2)×UY(1) covariant gauge-fixing term for the bileptons. We proceed along the same lines and calculate the effects of the gauge bosons predicted by the 331 model with right-handed neutrinos. It is found that the bilepton effects on the WWV* vertex are of the same order of magnitude as those arising from the standard model and several of its extensions, provided that the bilepton mass is of the order of a few hundred of GeVs. For heavier bileptons, their effects on the WWV* vertex are negligible. The behavior of the form factors at high energies is also discussed as it is a reflection of the gauge invariance and gauge independence of the WWV* Green function obtained via our quantization method.

  13. Thermodynamics of spin chains of Haldane-Shastry type and one-dimensional vertex models

    SciTech Connect

    Enciso, Alberto; Finkel, Federico; Gonzalez-Lopez, Artemio

    2012-11-15

    We study the thermodynamic properties of spin chains of Haldane-Shastry type associated with the A{sub N-1} root system in the presence of a uniform external magnetic field. To this end, we exactly compute the partition function of these models for an arbitrary finite number of spins. We then show that these chains are equivalent to a suitable inhomogeneous classical Ising model in a spatially dependent magnetic field, generalizing the results of Basu-Mallick et al. for the zero magnetic field case. Using the standard transfer matrix approach, we are able to compute in closed form the free energy per site in the thermodynamic limit. We perform a detailed analysis of the chains' thermodynamics in a unified way, with special emphasis on the zero field and zero temperature limits. Finally, we provide a novel interpretation of the thermodynamic quantities of spin chains of Haldane-Shastry type as weighted averages of the analogous quantities over an ensemble of classical Ising models. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition function of spin chains of Haldane-Shastry type in magnetic field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Equivalence to classical inhomogeneous Ising models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Free energy per site, other thermodynamic quantities in thermodynamic limit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zero field, zero temperature limits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic equivalence with ensemble of classical Ising models.

  14. Vertex shading of the three-dimensional model based on ray-tracing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoming; Sang, Xinzhu; Xing, Shujun; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Ray Tracing Algorithm is one of the research hotspots in Photorealistic Graphics. It is an important light and shadow technology in many industries with the three-dimensional (3D) structure, such as aerospace, game, video and so on. Unlike the traditional method of pixel shading based on ray tracing, a novel ray tracing algorithm is presented to color and render vertices of the 3D model directly. Rendering results are related to the degree of subdivision of the 3D model. A good light and shade effect is achieved by realizing the quad-tree data structure to get adaptive subdivision of a triangle according to the brightness difference of its vertices. The uniform grid algorithm is adopted to improve the rendering efficiency. Besides, the rendering time is independent of the screen resolution. In theory, as long as the subdivision of a model is adequate, cool effects as the same as the way of pixel shading will be obtained. Our practical application can be compromised between the efficiency and the effectiveness.

  15. Optimal staggered-grid finite-difference schemes by combining Taylor-series expansion and sampling approximation for wave equation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongyong; Yang, Lei; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2016-12-01

    High-order staggered-grid finite-difference (SFD) schemes have been universally used to improve the accuracy of wave equation modeling. However, the high-order SFD coefficients on spatial derivatives are usually determined by the Taylor-series expansion (TE) method, which just leads to great accuracy at small wavenumbers for wave equation modeling. Some conventional optimization methods can achieve high accuracy at large wavenumbers, but they hardly guarantee the small numerical dispersion error at small wavenumbers. In this paper, we develop new optimal explicit SFD (ESFD) and implicit SFD (ISFD) schemes for wave equation modeling. We first derive the optimal ESFD and ISFD coefficients for the first-order spatial derivatives by applying the combination of the TE and the sampling approximation to the dispersion relation, and then analyze their numerical accuracy. Finally, we perform elastic wave modeling with the ESFD and ISFD schemes based on the TE method and the optimal method, respectively. When the appropriate number and interval for the sampling points are chosen, these optimal schemes have extremely high accuracy at small wavenumbers, and can also guarantee small numerical dispersion error at large wavenumbers. Numerical accuracy analyses and modeling results demonstrate the optimal ESFD and ISFD schemes can efficiently suppress the numerical dispersion and significantly improve the modeling accuracy compared to the TE-based ESFD and ISFD schemes.

  16. Regularization of the fermion self-energy and the electromagnetic vertex in the Yukawa model within light-front dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Karmanov, V. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Mathiot, J.-F.

    2007-02-15

    In light-front dynamics, the regularization of amplitudes by traditional cutoffs imposed on the transverse and longitudinal components of particle momenta corresponds to restricting the integration volume by a nonrotationally invariant domain. The result depends not only on the size of this domain (i.e., on the cutoff values), but also on its orientation determined by the position of the light-front plane. Explicitly covariant formulation of light-front dynamics allows us to parametrize the latter dependence in a very transparent form. If we decompose the regularized amplitude in terms of independent invariant amplitudes, extra (nonphysical) terms should appear, with spin structures which explicitly depend on the orientation of the light-front plane. The number of form factors, i.e., the coefficients of this decomposition, therefore also increases. The spin-1/2 fermion self-energy is determined by three scalar functions, instead of the two standard ones, while for the elastic electromagnetic vertex the number of form factors increases from two to five. In the present paper we calculate perturbatively all these form factors in the Yukawa model. Then we compare the results obtained in the two following ways: (i) by using the light-front dynamics graph technique rules directly; (ii) by integrating the corresponding Feynman amplitudes in terms of the light-front variables. For each of these methods, we use two types of regularization: the transverse and longitudinal cutoffs, and the Pauli-Villars regularization. In the latter case, the dependence of amplitudes on the light-front plane orientation vanishes completely provided enough Pauli-Villars subtractions are made.

  17. An optimal implicit staggered-grid finite-difference scheme based on the modified Taylor-series expansion with minimax approximation method for elastic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Yan, Hongyong; Liu, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Implicit staggered-grid finite-difference (ISFD) scheme is competitive for its great accuracy and stability, whereas its coefficients are conventionally determined by the Taylor-series expansion (TE) method, leading to a loss in numerical precision. In this paper, we modify the TE method using the minimax approximation (MA), and propose a new optimal ISFD scheme based on the modified TE (MTE) with MA method. The new ISFD scheme takes the advantage of the TE method that guarantees great accuracy at small wavenumbers, and keeps the property of the MA method that keeps the numerical errors within a limited bound at the same time. Thus, it leads to great accuracy for numerical solution of the wave equations. We derive the optimal ISFD coefficients by applying the new method to the construction of the objective function, and using a Remez algorithm to minimize its maximum. Numerical analysis is made in comparison with the conventional TE-based ISFD scheme, indicating that the MTE-based ISFD scheme with appropriate parameters can widen the wavenumber range with high accuracy, and achieve greater precision than the conventional ISFD scheme. The numerical modeling results also demonstrate that the MTE-based ISFD scheme performs well in elastic wave simulation, and is more efficient than the conventional ISFD scheme for elastic modeling.

  18. Comparison between staggered grid finite-volume and edge-based finite-element modelling of geophysical electromagnetic data on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahandari, Hormoz; Ansari, SeyedMasoud; Farquharson, Colin G.

    2017-03-01

    This study compares two finite-element (FE) and three finite-volume (FV) schemes which use unstructured tetrahedral grids for the modelling of electromagnetic (EM) data. All these schemes belong to a group of differential methods where the electric field is defined along the edges of the elements. The FE and FV schemes are based on both the EM-field and the potential formulations of Maxwell's equations. The EM-field FE scheme uses edge-based (vector) basis functions while the potential FE scheme uses vector and scalar basis functions. All the FV schemes use staggered tetrahedral-Voronoï grids. Three examples are used for comparisons in terms of accuracy and in terms of the computation resources required by generic iterative and direct solvers for solving the problems. Two of these examples represent survey scenarios with electric and magnetic sources and the results are compared with those from the literature while the third example is a comparison against analytical solutions for an electric dipole source. Exactly the same mesh is used for all examples to allow for direct comparison of the various schemes. The results show that while the FE and FV schemes are comparable in terms of accuracy and computation resources, the FE schemes are slightly more accurate but also more expensive than the FV schemes.

  19. Taste changing in staggered quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Quentin Mason et al.

    2004-01-05

    The authors present results from a systematic perturbative investigation of taste-changing in improved staggered quarks. They show one-loop taste-changing interactions can be removed perturbatively by an effective four-quark term and calculate the necessary coefficients.

  20. On staggered indecomposable Virasoro modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytölä, Kalle; Ridout, David

    2009-12-01

    In this article, certain indecomposable Virasoro modules are studied. Specifically, the Virasoro mode L0 is assumed to be nondiagonalizable, possessing Jordan blocks of rank 2. Moreover, the module is further assumed to have a highest weight submodule, the "left module," and that the quotient by this submodule yields another highest weight module, the "right module." Such modules, which have been called staggered, have appeared repeatedly in the logarithmic conformal field theory literature, but their theory has not been explored in full generality. Here, such a theory is developed for the Virasoro algebra using rather elementary techniques. The focus centers on two different but related questions typically encountered in practical studies: How can one identify a given staggered module, and how can one demonstrate the existence of a proposed staggered module. Given just the values of the highest weights of the left and right modules, themselves subject to simple necessary conditions, invariants are defined which together with the knowledge of the left and right modules uniquely identify a staggered module. The possible values of these invariants form a vector space of dimension 0, 1, or 2, and the structures of the left and right modules limit the isomorphism classes of the corresponding staggered modules to an affine subspace (possibly empty). The number of invariants and affine restrictions is purely determined by the structures of the left and right modules. Moreover, in order to facilitate applications, the expressions for the invariants and restrictions are given by formulas as explicit as possible (they generally rely on expressions for Virasoro singular vectors). Finally, the text is liberally peppered throughout with examples illustrating the general concepts. These have been carefully chosen for their physical relevance or for the novel features they exhibit.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: STAGGER-grid of 3D stellar models. III. (Magic+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.; Asplund, M.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, sbot, and the entropy jump, Δs, determined from the 3D RHD models, are matched with the mixing length parameter, αMLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derive the mass mixing length, αm, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[Vz,Vz], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. (1 data file).

  2. Diamagnetic susceptibility obtained from the six-vertex model and its implications for the high-temperature diamagnetic state of cuprate superconductors.

    PubMed

    Sau, Jay D; Tewari, Sumanta

    2011-10-21

    We study the diamagnetism of the six-vertex model with the arrows as directed bond currents. To our knowledge, this is the first study of the diamagnetism of this model. A special version of this model, called the F model, describes the thermal disordering transition of an orbital antiferromagnet, known as d-density wave, a proposed state for the pseudogap phase of the high-T(c) cuprates. We find that the F model is strongly diamagnetic and the susceptibility may diverge in the high-temperature critical phase with power-law arrow correlations. These results may explain the surprising recent observation of a diverging low-field diamagnetic susceptibility seen in some optimally doped cuprates within the d-density wave model of the pseudogap phase.

  3. Vertex Detector Cable Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, William E.; /Fermilab

    2009-02-01

    Vertex detector cable requirements are considered within the context of the SiD concept. Cable material should be limited so that the number of radiation lengths represented is consistent with the material budget. In order to take advantage of the proposed accelerator beam structure and allow cooling by flow of dry gas, 'pulsed power' is assumed. Potential approaches to power distribution, cable paths, and cable design for operation in a 5 T magnetic field are described.

  4. Biricodar. Vertex Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Dey, Saibal

    2002-05-01

    Vertex is developing biricodar as a chemosensitizing agent designed to restore the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents in tumor multidrug resistance. By November 1998, phase II trials had commenced for biricodar, in combination with chemotherapy, for five common cancer indications: breast, ovarian, soft-tissue sarcomas, small cell lung cancer and prostate cancer. Phase II trials were ongoing in January 2002. By March 2000, Vertex was the sole developer of biricodar, as an agreement made in 1996 with BioChem Pharma (now Shire Pharmaceuticals), for the development and marketing of biricodar in Canada was terminated. Biricodar is the free base compound, which also has a citrate salt analog known as VX-710-3. Vertex has published three patents, WO-09615101, WO-09636630 and WO-09736869, disclosing derivatives of biricodar that are claimed for the treatment of multidrug resistant protein and P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistant tumors. In January 2002, a Banc of America analyst report forecast that biricodar had a 30% chance of reaching the market with a launch date in the second half of 2005, with peak sales estimated at $250 million.

  5. Application of the Vertex Exchange Method to estimate a semi-parametric mixture model for the MIC density of Escherichia coli isolates tested for susceptibility against ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Stijn; Verbeke, Geert; Böhning, Dankmar; Aerts, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, considerable attention has been paid to the collection of antimicrobial resistance data, with the aim of monitoring non-wild-type isolates. This monitoring is performed based on minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values, which are collected through dilution experiments. We present a semi-parametric mixture model to estimate the entire MIC density on the continuous scale. The parametric first component is extended with a non-parametric second component and a new back-fitting algorithm, based on the Vertex Exchange Method, is proposed. Our data example shows how to estimate the MIC density for Escherichia coli tested for ampicillin and how to use this estimate for model-based classification. A simulation study was performed, showing the promising behavior of the new method, both in terms of density estimation as well as classification.

  6. An improved failure criterion for biological and engineered staggered composites.

    PubMed

    Barthelat, Francois; Dastjerdi, Ahmad Khayer; Rabiei, Reza

    2013-02-01

    High-performance biological materials such as nacre, spider silk or bone have evolved a staggered microstructure consisting of stiff and strong elongated inclusions aligned with the direction of loading. This structure leads to useful combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness, and it is therefore increasingly mimicked in bio-inspired composites. The performance of staggered composites can be tuned; for example, their mechanical properties increase when the overlap between the inclusions is increased. However, larger overlaps may lead to excessive tensile stress and fracture of the inclusions themselves, a highly detrimental failure mode. Fracture of the inclusions has so far only been predicted using highly simplified models, which hinder our ability to properly design and optimize engineered staggered composites. In this work, we develop a new failure criterion that takes into account the complex stress field within the inclusions as well as initial defects. The model leads to an 'optimum criterion' for cases where the shear tractions on the inclusions is uniform, and a 'conservative' criterion for which the tractions are modelled as point forces at the ends of the overlap regions. The criterion can therefore be applied for a wide array of material behaviour at the interface, even if the details of the shear load transfer is not known. The new criterion is validated with experiments on staggered structures made of millimetre-thick alumina tablets, and by comparison with data on nacre. Formulated in a non-dimensional form, our new criterion can be applied on a wide variety of engineered staggered composites at any length scale. It also reveals new design guidelines, for example high aspect ratio inclusions with weak interfaces are preferable over inclusions with low aspect ratio and stronger interfaces. Together with existing models, this new criterion will lead to optimal designs that harness the full potential of bio-inspired staggered composites.

  7. On Making a Distinguished Vertex Minimum Degree by Vertex Deletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Nadja; Bredereck, Robert; Niedermeier, Rolf; Uhlmann, Johannes

    For directed and undirected graphs, we study the problem to make a distinguished vertex the unique minimum-(in)degree vertex through deletion of a minimum number of vertices. The corresponding NP-hard optimization problems are motivated by applications concerning control in elections and social network analysis. Continuing previous work for the directed case, we show that the problem is W[2]-hard when parameterized by the graph's feedback arc set number, whereas it becomes fixed-parameter tractable when combining the parameters "feedback vertex set number" and "number of vertices to delete". For the so far unstudied undirected case, we show that the problem is NP-hard and W[1]-hard when parameterized by the "number of vertices to delete". On the positive side, we show fixed-parameter tractability for several parameterizations measuring tree-likeness, including a vertex-linear problem kernel with respect to the parameter "feedback edge set number". On the contrary, we show a non-existence result concerning polynomial-size problem kernels for the combined parameter "vertex cover number and number of vertices to delete", implying corresponding nonexistence results when replacing vertex cover number by treewidth or feedback vertex set number.

  8. Effect of initial stagger selection on the handedness of Amyloid beta helical fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Cheng, Xiaolin; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Various structural models for Amyloid $\\beta$ fibrils derived from a variety of experimental techniques are currently available. However, this data cannot differentiate between the relative position of the two arms of the $\\beta$ hairpin called the stagger. Amyloid fibrils of various heirarchical levels form left--handed helices composed of $\\beta$ sheets. However it is unclear if positive, negative and neutral staggers all form the macroscopic left--handed helices. Studying this is important since the success of computational approaches to develop drugs for amyloidic diseases will depend on selecting the physiologically relevant structure of the sheets. To address this issue we have conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations of Amyloid$\\beta$ sheets of various staggers and show that only negative staggers generate the experimentally observed left--handed helices while positive staggers generate the incorrect right--handed helices. The implications of this result extend in to all amyloidic--aggregation type diseases.

  9. Possible Aoki phase for staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Wang Qinghai

    2004-12-01

    The phase diagram for staggered fermions is discussed in the context of the staggered chiral Lagrangian, extending previous work on the subject. When the discretization errors are significant, there may be an Aoki-like phase for staggered fermions, where the remnant SO(4) taste-symmetry is broken down to SO(3). We solve explicitly for the mass spectrum in the 3-flavor degenerate mass case and discuss qualitatively the 2+1-flavor case. From numerical results we find that current simulations are outside the staggered-Aoki phase. As for near-future simulations with more-improved versions of the staggered action, it seems unlikely that these will be in the Aoki phase for any realistic value of the quark mass, although the evidence is not conclusive.

  10. Complex growing networks with intrinsic vertex fitness

    SciTech Connect

    Bedogne, C.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2006-10-15

    One of the major questions in complex network research is to identify the range of mechanisms by which a complex network can self organize into a scale-free state. In this paper we investigate the interplay between a fitness linking mechanism and both random and preferential attachment. In our models, each vertex is assigned a fitness x, drawn from a probability distribution {rho}(x). In Model A, at each time step a vertex is added and joined to an existing vertex, selected at random, with probability p and an edge is introduced between vertices with fitnesses x and y, with a rate f(x,y), with probability 1-p. Model B differs from Model A in that, with probability p, edges are added with preferential attachment rather than randomly. The analysis of Model A shows that, for every fixed fitness x, the network's degree distribution decays exponentially. In Model B we recover instead a power-law degree distribution whose exponent depends only on p, and we show how this result can be generalized. The properties of a number of particular networks are examined.

  11. The formation of a yield-surface vertex in rock

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructural models of deformation of polycrystalline materials suggest that inelastic deformation leads to the formation of a corner or vertex at the current load point. This vertex can cause the response to non-proportional loading to be more compliant than predicted by the smooth yield-surface idealization. Combined compression-torsion experiments on Tennessee marble indicate that a vertex forms during inelastic flow. An important implication is that strain localization by bifurcation occurs earlier than predicted by bifurcation analysis using isotropic hardening.

  12. Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, D.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Bulla, L.; Caria, G.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; De Pietro, G.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C.; Kandra, J.; Kambara, N.; Kang, K. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kumar, R.; Kun, W.; Kvasnička, P.; La Licata, C.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Libby, J.; Lueck, T.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Resmi, P. K.; Rozanska, M.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Watanuki, S.; Watanabe, M.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.; Zani, L.

    2017-02-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB asymmetric energy e+e‑ collider in KEK, Japan will operate at an instantaneous luminosity 40 times larger than that of its predecessor, Belle. It is built with an aim of collecting a huge amount of data (50 ab‑1 by 2025) for precise CP violation measurements and new physics search. Thus, we need an accurate vertex determination and reconstruction of low momentum tracks which will be achieved with the help of vertex detector (VXD). The Belle II VXD consists of two layers of DEPFET pixels (`Pixel Detector') and four layers of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors (`Silicon Vertex Detector'), assembled over carbon fibre ribs. In this paper, we discuss about the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector, especially its design and key features; we also present its module (`ladder') assembly and testing procedures.

  13. The STAR Vertex Position Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llope, W. J.; Zhou, J.; Nussbaum, T.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Asselta, K.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Butterworth, J.; Camarda, T.; Christie, W.; Crawford, H. J.; Dong, X.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Geurts, F.; Hammond, J.; Judd, E.; McDonald, D. L.; Perkins, C.; Ruan, L.; Scheblein, J.; Schambach, J. J.; Soja, R.; Xin, K.; Yang, C.

    2014-09-01

    The 2×3 channel pseudo Vertex Position Detector (pVPD) in the STAR experiment at RHIC has been upgraded to a 2×19 channel detector in the same acceptance, called the Vertex Position Detector (VPD). This detector is fully integrated into the STAR trigger system and provides the primary input to the minimum-bias trigger in Au+Au collisions. The information from the detector is used both in the STAR Level-0 trigger and offline to measure the location of the primary collision vertex along the beam pipe and the event "start time" needed by other fast-timing detectors in STAR. The offline timing resolution of single detector channels in full-energy Au+Au collisions is ~100 ps, resulting in a start time resolution of a few tens of picoseconds and a resolution on the primary vertex location of ~1 cm.

  14. Lorentzian proper vertex amplitude: Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan; Vilensky, Ilya; Zipfel, Antonia

    2016-09-01

    In previous work, the Lorentzian proper vertex amplitude for a spin-foam model of quantum gravity was derived. In the present work, the asymptotics of this amplitude are studied in the semiclassical limit. The starting point of the analysis is an expression for the amplitude as an action integral with action differing from that in the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) case by an extra "projector" term. This extra term scales linearly with spins only in the asymptotic limit, and is discontinuous on a (lower dimensional) submanifold of the integration domain in the sense that its value at each such point depends on the direction of approach. New tools are introduced to generalize stationary phase methods to this case. For the case of boundary data which can be glued to a nondegenerate Lorentzian 4-simplex, the asymptotic limit of the amplitude is shown to equal the single Feynman term, showing that the extra term in the asymptotics of the EPRL amplitude has been eliminated.

  15. Hessian and graviton propagator of the proper vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaharsough Shirazi, Atousa; Engle, Jonathan; Vilensky, Ilya

    2016-10-01

    The proper spin-foam vertex amplitude is obtained from the EPRL vertex by projecting out all but a single gravitational sector, in order to achieve correct semi-classical behavior. In this paper we calculate the gravitational two-point function predicted by the proper spin-foam vertex to lowest order in the vertex expansion. We find the same answer as in the EPRL case in the ‘continuum spectrum’ limit, so that the theory is consistent with the predictions of linearized gravity in the regime of small curvature. The method for calculating the two-point function is similar to that used in prior works: we cast it in terms of an action integral and use stationary phase methods. Thus, the calculation of the Hessian matrix plays a key role. Once the Hessian is calculated, it is used not only to calculate the two-point function, but also to calculate the coefficient appearing in the semi-classical limit of the proper vertex amplitude itself. This coefficient is the effective discrete ‘measure factor’ encoded in the spin-foam model. Through a non-trivial cancellation of different factors, we find that this coefficient is the same as the coefficient in front of the term in the asymptotics of the EPRL vertex corresponding to the selected gravitational sector.

  16. Loop-quantum-gravity vertex amplitude.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-10-19

    Spin foam models are hoped to provide the dynamics of loop-quantum gravity. However, the most popular of these, the Barrett-Crane model, does not have the good boundary state space and there are indications that it fails to yield good low-energy n-point functions. We present an alternative dynamics that can be derived as a quantization of a Regge discretization of Euclidean general relativity, where second class constraints are imposed weakly. Its state space matches the SO(3) loop gravity one and it yields an SO(4)-covariant vertex amplitude for Euclidean loop gravity.

  17. Staggered heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2008-03-01

    Although taste violations significantly affect the results of staggered calculations of pseudoscalar and heavy-light mesonic quantities, those entering staggered calculations of baryonic quantities have not been quantified. Here I develop staggered chiral perturbation theory in the light-quark baryon sector by mapping the Symanzik action into heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. For 2+1 dynamical quark flavors, the masses of flavor-symmetric nucleons are calculated to third order in partially quenched and fully dynamical staggered chiral perturbation theory. To this order the expansion includes the leading chiral logarithms, which come from loops with virtual decuplet-like states, as well as terms of O(m{sub {pi}}{sup 3}), which come from loops with virtual octet-like states. Taste violations enter through the meson propagators in loops and tree-level terms of O(a{sup 2}). The pattern of taste symmetry breaking and the resulting degeneracies and mixings are discussed in detail. The resulting chiral forms are appropriate to lattice results obtained with operators already in use and could be used to study the restoration of taste symmetry in the continuum limit. I assume that the fourth root of the fermion determinant can be incorporated in staggered chiral perturbation theory using the replica method.

  18. Spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg model with the pair XYZ Heisenberg interaction and quartic Ising interactions as the exactly soluble zero-field eight-vertex model.

    PubMed

    Strecka, Jozef; Canová, Lucia; Minami, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-01

    The spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg model with the pair XYZ Heisenberg interaction and quartic Ising interactions is exactly solved by establishing a precise mapping relationship with the corresponding zero-field (symmetric) eight-vertex model. It is shown that the Ising-Heisenberg model with the ferromagnetic Heisenberg interaction exhibits a striking critical behavior, which manifests itself through re-entrant phase transitions as well as continuously varying critical exponents. The changes in critical exponents are in accordance with the weak universality hypothesis in spite of a peculiar singular behavior that emerges at a quantum critical point of the infinite order, which occurs at the isotropic limit of the Heisenberg interaction. On the other hand, the Ising-Heisenberg model with the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg interaction surprisingly exhibits less significant changes in both critical temperatures and critical exponents upon varying the strength of the exchange anisotropy in the Heisenberg interaction.

  19. Examining B(M1) staggering as a fingerprint for chiral doublet bands

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, B.; Yao, J. M.; Zhang, S. Q.; Wang, S. Y.; Meng, J.

    2009-04-15

    The electromagnetic transitions of the doublet bands with different triaxiality parameter {gamma} are discussed in the particle rotor model with {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}h{sub 11/2}{sup -1} configuration. It is found that B(M1) staggering as well as the resulting B(M1)/B(E2) and B(M1){sub in}/B(M1){sub out} staggering are sensitive to the triaxiality parameter {gamma}, and they associate strongly with the characters of nuclear chirality for 15 deg. {<=}{gamma}{<=}30 deg., i.e., the staggering is weak in the chiral vibration region while strong in the static chirality region. For partner bands with near degenerate energy spectra and similar B(M1) and B(E2) transitions, the strong B(M1) staggering can be used as a fingerprint for the static chirality.

  20. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  1. Three-point vertex functions in Yang-Mills Theory and QCD in Landau gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Adrian L.; Alkofer, Reinhard; Huber, Markus Q.; Windisch, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Solutions for the three-gluon and quark-gluon vertices from Dyson-Schwinger equations and the three-particle irreducible formalism are discussed. Dynamical quarks ("unquenching") change the three-gluon vertex via the quark-triangle diagrams which themselves include fully dressed quark-gluon vertex functions. On the other hand, the quark-swordfish diagram is, at least with the model used for the two-quark-two-gluon vertex employed here, of minor importance. For the leading tensor structure of the threegluon vertex the "unquenching" effect can be summarized for the nonperturbative part as a shift of the related dressing function towards the infrared.

  2. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Enami, K.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  3. STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu,Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

    2008-01-28

    We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented.

  4. Refining the shifted topological vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Jehjouh, H.; Saidi, E. H.

    2009-01-15

    We study aspects of the refining and shifting properties of the 3d MacMahon function C{sub 3}(q) used in topological string theory and BKP hierarchy. We derive the explicit expressions of the shifted topological vertex S{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q) and its refined version T{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q,t). These vertices complete results in literature.

  5. Scalar meson spectroscopy with lattice staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; DeTar, Carleton; Fu Ziwen; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2007-11-01

    With sufficiently light up and down quarks the isovector (a{sub 0}) and isosinglet (f{sub 0}) scalar meson propagators are dominated at large distance by two-meson states. In the staggered-fermion formulation of lattice quantum chromodynamics, taste-symmetry breaking causes a proliferation of two-meson states that further complicates the analysis of these channels. Many of them are unphysical artifacts of the lattice approximation. They are expected to disappear in the continuum limit. The staggered-fermion fourth-root procedure has its purported counterpart in rooted staggered chiral perturbation theory (rS{chi}PT). Fortunately, the rooted theory provides a strict framework that permits the analysis of scalar meson correlators in terms of only a small number of low-energy couplings. Thus the analysis of the point-to-point scalar meson correlators in this context gives a useful consistency check of the fourth-root procedure and its proposed chiral realization. Through numerical simulation we have measured correlators for both the a{sub 0} and f{sub 0} channels in the 'Asqtad' improved staggered-fermion formulation in a lattice ensemble with lattice spacing a=0.12 fm. We analyze those correlators in the context of rS{chi}PT and obtain values of the low-energy chiral couplings that are reasonably consistent with previous determinations.

  6. Evaluation of new spin foam vertex amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavkine, Igor

    2009-06-01

    The Christensen-Egan algorithm is extended and generalized to efficiently evaluate new spin foam vertex amplitudes proposed by Engle, Pereira and Rovelli and Freidel and Krasnov, with or without (factored) boundary states. A concrete pragmatic proposal is made for comparing the different models using uniform methodologies, applicable to the behavior of large spin asymptotics and of expectation values of specific semiclassical observables. The asymptotics of the new models exhibit non-oscillatory, power-law decay similar to that of the Barrett-Crane model, though with different exponents. Also, an analysis of the semiclassical wave packet propagation problem indicates that the Magliaro, Rovelli and Perini's conjecture of good semiclassical behavior of the new models does not hold for generic factored states, which neglect spin-spin correlations.

  7. Spinfoam Cosmology with the Proper Vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilensky, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    A modification of the EPRL vertex amplitude in the spin-foam framework of quantum gravity - so-called ``proper vertex amplitude'' - has been developed to enable correct semi-classical behavior to conform to the classical Regge calculus. The proper vertex amplitude is defined by projecting to the single gravitational sector. The amplitude is recast into an exponentiated form and we derive the asymptotic form of the projector part of the action. This enables us to study the asymptotics of the proper vertex by applying extended stationary phase methods. We use the proper vertex amplitude to investigate transition amplitudes between coherent quantum boundary states of cosmological geometries. In particular, Hartle-Hawking no-boundary states are computed in the proper vertex framework. We confirm that in the classical limit the Hartle-Hawking wavefunction satisfies the Hamiltonian constraint. Partly supported by NSF grants PHY-1205968 and PHY-1505490.

  8. CLIC vertex detector R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar

    2016-07-01

    A vertex detector concept is under development for the proposed multi-TeV linear e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). To perform precision physics measurements in a challenging environment, the CLIC vertex detector pushes the technological requirements to the limits. This paper reviews the requirements for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensor, readout, powering and cooling.

  9. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tkaczyk, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.

    1993-09-01

    A silicon strip vertex detector was designed, constructed and commissioned at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The mechanical design of the detector, its cooling and monitoring are presented. The front end electronics employing a custom VLSI chip, the readout electronics and various components of the SVX system are described. The system performance and the experience with the operation of the detector in the radiation environment are discussed. The device has been taking colliding beams data since May of 1992, performing at its best design specifications and enhancing the physics program of CDF.

  10. A practical guide to the staggered herringbone mixer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Manda S.; Longmuir, Kenneth J.; Yager, Paul

    2009-01-01

    An analytical model of mixing in the staggered herringbone mixer (SHM) was derived to estimate mixing parameters and provide practical expressions to guide mixer design and operation for a wide range of possible solutes and flow conditions. Mixing in microfluidic systems has historically been characterized by the mixing of a specific solute system or by the redistribution of flow streams; this approach does not give any insight into the ideal operational parameters of the mixer with an arbitrary real system. For Stokes-flow mixers, mixing can be computed from a relationship between solute diffusivity, flow rate, and mixer length. Confocal microscopy and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling were used to directly determine the extent of mixing for several solutes in the staggered herringbone mixer over a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) and Péclet numbers (Pe); the results were used to develop and evaluate an analytical model of its behavior. Mixing was found to be a function of only Pe and downstream position in the mixer. Required mixer length was proportional to Log(Pe); this analytical model matched well with the confocal data and CFD model for Pe < 5×104, at which point the experiments reached the limit of resolution. For particular solutes, required length and mixing time depend upon Re and diffusivity. This analytical model is applicable to other solute systems, and possibly to other embodiments of the mixer, to enable optimal design, operation, and estimation of performance. PMID:18584088

  11. Fan Stagger Angle for Dirt Rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Rose, Becky E. (Inventor); Brilliant, Lisa I. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, a propulsor coupled to be rotated about an axis by the turbine through the spool, and a gear assembly coupled between the propulsor and the spool such that rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extend from the hub. Each of the propulsor blades has a span between a root at the hub and a tip, and a chord between a leading edge and a trailing edge. The chord forms a stagger angle alpha with the axis, and the stagger angle alpha is less than 15 deg. at a position along the propulsor blade that is within an inboard 20% of the span.

  12. A staggered-grid finite-difference scheme optimized in the time–space domain for modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Sirui; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-11-01

    For modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems using finite-difference schemes, optimizing the coefficients of the finite-difference operators can reduce numerical dispersion. Most optimized finite-difference schemes for modeling seismic-wave propagation suppress only spatial but not temporal dispersion errors. We develop a novel optimized finite-difference scheme for numerical scalar-wave modeling to control dispersion errors not only in space but also in time. Our optimized scheme is based on a new stencil that contains a few more grid points than the standard stencil. We design an objective function for minimizing relative errors of phase velocities of waves propagating in all directions within a given range of wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis and numerical examples demonstrate that our optimized finite-difference scheme is computationally up to 2.5 times faster than the optimized schemes using the standard stencil to achieve the similar modeling accuracy for a given 2D or 3D problem. Compared with the high-order finite-difference scheme using the same new stencil, our optimized scheme reduces 50 percent of the computational cost to achieve the similar modeling accuracy. This new optimized finite-difference scheme is particularly useful for large-scale 3D scalar-wave modeling and inversion.

  13. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  14. Proposed proper Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine vertex amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    As established in a prior work of the author, the linear simplicity constraints used in the construction of the so-called “new” spin-foam models mix three of the five sectors of Plebanski theory as well as two dynamical orientations, and this is the reason for multiple terms in the asymptotics of the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine vertex amplitude as calculated by Barrett et al. Specifically, the term equal to the usual exponential of i times the Regge action corresponds to configurations either in sector (II+) with positive orientation or sector (II-) with negative orientation. The presence of the other terms beyond this cause problems in the semiclassical limit of the spin-foam model when considering multiple 4-simplices due to the fact that the different terms for different 4-simplices mix in the semiclassical limit, leading in general to a non-Regge action and hence non-Regge and nongravitational configurations persisting in the semiclassical limit. To correct this problem, we propose to modify the vertex so its asymptotics include only the one term of the form eiSRegge. To do this, an explicit classical discrete condition is derived that isolates the desired gravitational sector corresponding to this one term. This condition is quantized and used to modify the vertex amplitude, yielding what we call the “proper Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine vertex amplitude.” This vertex still depends only on standard SU(2) spin-network data on the boundary, is SU(2) gauge-invariant, and is linear in the boundary state, as required. In addition, the asymptotics now consist in the single desired term of the form eiSRegge, and all degenerate configurations are exponentially suppressed. A natural generalization to the Lorentzian signature is also presented.

  15. Vertex finding with deformable templates at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Nikita; Khanov, Alexandre

    1997-02-01

    We present a novel vertex finding technique. The task is formulated as a discrete-continuous optimisation problem in a way similar to the deformable templates approach for the track finding. Unlike the track finding problem, "elastic hedgehogs" rather than elastic arms are used as deformable templates. They are initialised by a set of procedures which provide zero level approximation for vertex positions and track parameters at the vertex point. The algorithm was evaluated using the simulated events for the LHC CMS detector and demonstrated good performance.

  16. Edge union of networks on the same vertex set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loe, Chuan Wen; Jeldtoft Jensen, Henrik

    2013-06-01

    Random network generators such as Erdős-Rényi, Watts-Strogatz and Barabási-Albert models are used as models to study real-world networks. Let G1(V, E1) and G2(V, E2) be two such networks on the same vertex set V. This paper studies the degree distribution and clustering coefficient of the resultant networks, G(V, E1∪E2).

  17. Quark-gluon vertex dressing and meson masses beyond ladder-rainbow truncation

    SciTech Connect

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Thomas, Anthony W.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2007-04-15

    We include a generalized infinite class of quark-gluon vertex dressing diagrams in a study of how dynamics beyond the ladder-rainbow truncation influences the Bethe-Salpeter description of light-quark pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The diagrammatic specification of the vertex is mapped into a corresponding specification of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel, which preserves chiral symmetry. This study adopts the algebraic format afforded by the simple interaction kernel used in previous work on this topic. The new feature of the present work is that in every diagram summed for the vertex and the corresponding Bethe-Salpeter kernel, each quark-gluon vertex is required to be the self-consistent vertex solution. We also adopt from previous work the effective accounting for the role of the explicitly non-Abelian three-gluon coupling in a global manner through one parameter determined from recent lattice-QCD data for the vertex. Within the current model, the more consistent dressed vertex limits the ladder-rainbow truncation error for vector mesons to be never more than 10% as the current quark mass is varied from the u/d region to the b region.

  18. Quark-gluon vertex dressing and meson masses beyond ladder-rainbow truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Thomas, Anthony W.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2007-04-01

    We include a generalized infinite class of quark-gluon vertex dressing diagrams in a study of how dynamics beyond the ladder-rainbow truncation influences the Bethe-Salpeter description of light-quark pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The diagrammatic specification of the vertex is mapped into a corresponding specification of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel, which preserves chiral symmetry. This study adopts the algebraic format afforded by the simple interaction kernel used in previous work on this topic. The new feature of the present work is that in every diagram summed for the vertex and the corresponding Bethe-Salpeter kernel, each quark-gluon vertex is required to be the self-consistent vertex solution. We also adopt from previous work the effective accounting for the role of the explicitly non-Abelian three-gluon coupling in a global manner through one parameter determined from recent lattice-QCD data for the vertex. Within the current model, the more consistent dressed vertex limits the ladder-rainbow truncation error for vector mesons to be never more than 10% as the current quark mass is varied from the u/d region to the b region.

  19. A spin glass approach to the directed feedback vertex set problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-07-01

    A directed graph (digraph) is formed by vertices and arcs (directed edges) from one vertex to another. A feedback vertex set (FVS) is a set of vertices that contains at least one vertex of every directed cycle in this digraph. The directed feedback vertex set problem aims at constructing a FVS of minimum cardinality. This is a fundamental cycle-constrained hard combinatorial optimization problem with wide practical applications. In this paper we construct a spin glass model for the directed FVS problem by converting the global cycle constraints into local arc constraints, and study this model through the replica-symmetric (RS) mean field theory of statistical physics. We then implement a belief propagation-guided decimation (BPD) algorithm for single digraph instances. The BPD algorithm slightly outperforms the simulated annealing algorithm on large random graph instances. The RS mean field results and algorithmic results can be further improved by working on a more restrictive (and more difficult) spin glass model.

  20. Vertex amplitudes in spin foam loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David

    2016-03-01

    We discuss properties of the vertex expansion for homogeneous, isotropic loop quantum cosmological models sourced by a massless, minimally coupled scalar field, which in this model plays the role of an internal matter ``clock''. We show that the vertex expansion, first written down by Ashtekar, Campiglia and Henderson, must be thought of as a short-time expansion in the sense that the amplitude for volume transitions is constrained both by the order of the expansion and by the elapsed scalar field. To calculate the amplitude for significant volume changes or between large differences in the value of the scalar field requires the expansion be evaluated to very high order. This contribution describes work in collaboration with P. Singh.

  1. Vertex micromagnetic energy in artificial square ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Yann; Canals, Benjamin; Rougemaille, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Artificial arrays of interacting magnetic elements provide an uncharted arena in which the physics of magnetic frustration and magnetic monopoles can be observed in real space and in real time. These systems offer the formidable opportunity to investigate a wide range of collective magnetic phenomena with a lab-on-chip approach and to explore various theoretical predictions from spin models. Here, we study artificial square ice systems numerically and use micromagnetic simulations to understand how the geometrical parameters of the individual magnetic elements affect the energy levels of an isolated square vertex. More specifically, we address the question of whether the celebrated square ice model could be made relevant for artificial square ice systems. Our work reveals that tuning the geometry alone should not allow the experimental realization of the square ice model when using nanomagnets coupled through the magnetostatic interaction. However, low-aspect ratios combined with small gaps separating neighboring magnetic elements of moderated thickness might permit approaching the ideal case where the degeneracy of the ice rule states is recovered.

  2. Thermal Protection System with Staggered Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Xavier D. (Inventor); Robinson, Michael J. (Inventor); Andrews, Thomas L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The thermal protection system disclosed herein is suitable for use with a spacecraft such as a reentry module or vehicle, where the spacecraft has a convex surface to be protected. An embodiment of the thermal protection system includes a plurality of heat resistant panels, each having an outer surface configured for exposure to atmosphere, an inner surface opposite the outer surface and configured for attachment to the convex surface of the spacecraft, and a joint edge defined between the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint edges of adjacent ones of the heat resistant panels are configured to mate with each other to form staggered joints that run between the peak of the convex surface and the base section of the convex surface.

  3. Power module assemblies with staggered coolant channels

    DOEpatents

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-16

    A manifold is provided for supporting a power module assembly with a plurality of power modules. The manifold includes a first manifold section. The first face of the first manifold section is configured to receive the first power module, and the second face of the first manifold section defines a first cavity with a first baseplate thermally coupled to the first power module. The first face of the second manifold section is configured to receive the second power module, and the second face of the second manifold section defines a second cavity with a second baseplate thermally coupled to the second power module. The second face of the first manifold section and the second face of the second manifold section are coupled together such that the first cavity and the second cavity form a coolant channel. The first cavity is at least partially staggered with respect to second cavity.

  4. Penguin diagrams for improved staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Weonjong

    2005-01-01

    We calculate, at the one-loop level, penguin diagrams for improved staggered fermion operators constructed using various fat links. The main result is that diagonal mixing coefficients with penguin operators are identical between the unimproved operators and the improved operators using such fat links as Fat7, Fat7+Lepage, Fat7, HYP (I) and HYP (II). In addition, it turns out that the off-diagonal mixing vanishes for those constructed using fat links of Fat7, Fat7 and HYP (II). This is a consequence of the fact that the improvement by various fat links changes only the mixing with higher dimension operators and off-diagonal operators. The results of this paper, combined with those for current-current diagrams, provide complete matching at the one-loop level with all corrections of O(g{sup 2}) included.

  5. Proposal of a Bulk HTSC Staggered Array Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kii, Toshiteru; Kinjo, Ryota; Bakr, Mahmoud A.; Sonobe, Taro; Higashimura, Keisuke; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yoshida, Kyohei; Zen, Heisyun

    2010-06-23

    We proposed a new type of undulator based on bulk high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSC) which consists of a single solenoid and a stacked array of bulk HTSC. The main advantage of this configuration is that a mechanical structure is not required to produce and control the undulator field. In order to perform a proof of principle experiment, we have developed a prototype of bulk HTSC staggered array undulator using 11 pairs of DyBaCuO bulk superconductors and a normal conducting solenoid. Experimental results obtained by using the prototype undulator and numerical results obtained by a loop current model based on the Bean mode for a type-II superconductor were compared.

  6. Investigating the influences of two position (non-staggered and staggered) of wind turbine arrays to produce power in a wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Kamal, Samsul; Purnomo, Sarjiya

    2016-06-01

    This investigation was conducted to identify the influences of the two positions (non-staggered and staggered) of wind turbine arrays. Identification on down-scaled size wind turbine arrays was carried out in an open circuit, suction-type wind tunnel. Based on the results of the experiment, empirical relations for the centreline velocity deficit, tipline velocity deficit and wake radius are proposed. The non-staggered position results are larger power generated than that of the staggered position, this influenced by the trend deficit in velocity that makes wind turbine generated power difference between staggered position and non-stagger position. The area used non-staggered position larger than staggered position. Result staggered position has become one of the solutions to harness wind farms confined areas.

  7. Optimal Designs of Staggered Dean Vortex Micromixers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Chen, Chun Huei; Shie, Shian Ruei

    2011-01-01

    A novel parallel laminar micromixer with a two-dimensional staggered Dean Vortex micromixer is optimized and fabricated in our study. Dean vortices induced by centrifugal forces in curved rectangular channels cause fluids to produce secondary flows. The split-and-recombination (SAR) structures of the flow channels and the impinging effects result in the reduction of the diffusion distance of two fluids. Three different designs of a curved channel micromixer are introduced to evaluate the mixing performance of the designed micromixer. Mixing performances are demonstrated by means of a pH indicator using an optical microscope and fluorescent particles via a confocal microscope at different flow rates corresponding to Reynolds numbers (Re) ranging from 0.5 to 50. The comparison between the experimental data and numerical results shows a very reasonable agreement. At a Re of 50, the mixing length at the sixth segment, corresponding to the downstream distance of 21.0 mm, can be achieved in a distance 4 times shorter than when the Re equals 1. An optimization of this micromixer is performed with two geometric parameters. These are the angle between the lines from the center to two intersections of two consecutive curved channels, θ, and the angle between two lines of the centers of three consecutive curved channels, ϕ. It can be found that the maximal mixing index is related to the maximal value of the sum of θ and ϕ, which is equal to 139.82°. PMID:21747691

  8. Efficiency and optimal allocation in the staggered entry design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    The staggered entry design for survival analysis specifies that r left-truncated samples are to be used in estimation of a population survival function. The ith sample is taken at time Bi, from the subpopulation of individuals having survival time exceeding Bi. This paper investigates the performance of the staggered entry design relative to the usual design in which all samples have a common time origin. The staggered entry design is shown to be an attractive alternative, even when not necessitated by logistical constraints. The staggered entry design allows for increased precision in estimation of the right tail of the survival function, especially when some of the data may be censored. A trade-off between the range of values for which the increased precision occurs and the magnitude of the increased precision is demonstrated.

  9. Structural insight for chain selection and stagger control in collagen

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Sergei P.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    Collagen plays a fundamental role in all known metazoans. In collagens three polypeptides form a unique triple-helical structure with a one-residue stagger to fit every third glycine residue in the inner core without disturbing the poly-proline type II helical conformation of each chain. There are homo- and hetero-trimeric types of collagen consisting of one, two or three distinct chains. Thus there must be mechanisms that control composition and stagger during collagen folding. Here, we uncover the structural basis for both chain selection and stagger formation of a collagen molecule. Three distinct chains (α1, α2 and α3) of the non-collagenous domain 2 (NC2) of type IX collagen are assembled to guide triple-helical sequences in the leading, middle and trailing positions. This unique domain opens the door for generating any fragment of collagen in its native composition and stagger. PMID:27897211

  10. Topological susceptibility in staggered fermion chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Billeter, Brian; DeTar, Carleton; Osborn, James

    2004-10-01

    The topological susceptibility of the vacuum in quantum chromodynamics has been simulated numerically using the Asqtad improved staggered fermion formalism. At nonzero lattice spacing, the residual fermion doublers (fermion tastes) in the staggered fermion formalism give contributions to the susceptibility that deviate from conventional continuum chiral perturbation theory. In this brief report, we estimate the taste-breaking artifact and compare it with results of recent simulations, finding that it accounts for roughly half of the scaling violation.

  11. Effective field theories for QCD with rooted staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2008-04-01

    Even highly improved variants of lattice QCD with staggered fermions show significant violations of taste symmetry at currently accessible lattice spacings. In addition, the 'rooting trick' is used in order to simulate with the correct number of light sea quarks, and this makes the lattice theory nonlocal, even though there is good reason to believe that the continuum limit is in the correct universality class. In order to understand scaling violations, it is thus necessary to extend the construction of the Symanzik effective theory to include rooted staggered fermions. We show how this can be done, starting from a generalization of the renormalization-group approach to rooted staggered fermions recently developed by one of us. We then explain how the chiral effective theory follows from the Symanzik action, and show that it leads to 'rooted' staggered chiral perturbation theory as the correct chiral theory for QCD with rooted staggered fermions. We thus establish a direct link between the renormalization-group based arguments for the correctness of the continuum limit and the success of rooted staggered chiral perturbation theory in fitting numerical results obtained with the rooting trick. In order to develop our argument, we need to assume the existence of a standard partially-quenched chiral effective theory for any local partially-quenched theory. Other technical, but standard, assumptions are also required.

  12. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions. (LEW)

  13. ILC Vertex Tracker R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marco; Bussat, Jean-Marie; Contarato, Devis; Denes,Peter; Glesener, Lindsay; Greiner, Leo; Hooberman, Benjamin; Shuman,Derek; Tompkins, Lauren; Vu, Chinh; Bisello, Dario; Giubilato, Piero; Pantano, Devis; Costa, Marco; La Rosa, Alessandro; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; Children, Isaac

    2007-10-01

    This document summarizes past achievements, current activities and future goals of the R&D program aimed at the design, prototyping and characterization of a full detector module, equipped with monolithic pixel sensors, matching the requirements for the Vertex Tracker at the ILC. We provide a plan of activities to obtain a demonstrator multi-layered vertex tracker equipped with sensors matching the ILC requirements and realistic lightweight ladders in FY11, under the assumption that ILC detector proto-collaborations will be choosing technologies and designs for the Vertex Tracker by that time. The R&D program discussed here started at LBNL in 2004, supported by a Laboratory Directed R&D (LDRD) grant and by funding allocated from the core budget of the LBNL Physics Division and from the Department of Physics at UC Berkeley. Subsequently additional funding has been awarded under the NSF-DOE LCRD program and also personnel have become available through collaborative research with other groups. The aim of the R&D program carried out by our collaboration is to provide a well-integrated, inclusive research effort starting from physics requirements for the ILC Vertex Tracker and addressing Si sensor design and characterization, engineered ladder design, module system issues, tracking and vertex performances and beam test validation. The broad scope of this program is made possible by important synergies with existing know-how and concurrent programs both at LBNL and at the other collaborating institutions. In particular, significant overlaps with LHC detector design, SLHC R&D as well as prototyping for the STAR upgrade have been exploited to optimize the cost per deliverable of our program. This activity is carried out as a collaborative effort together with Accelerator and Fusion Research, the Engineering and the Nuclear Science Divisions at LBNL, INFN and the Department of Physics in Padova, Italy, INFN and the Department of Physics in Torino, Italy and the Department

  14. Experimental Measurement of the Staggered Magnetization Curve for a Haldane Spin Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, A.; Ressouche, E.; Maslov, S.; Yokoo, T.; Raymond, S.; Akimitsu, J.

    1998-04-01

    Long-range magnetic ordering in R2BaNiO5 ( R = magnetic rare earth) quasi-one-dimensional mixed-spin antiferromagnets is described by a simple mean-field model that is based on the intrinsic staggered magnetization function of isolated Haldane spin chains for the Ni subsystem, and single-ion magnetization functions for the rare earth ions. The model is applied to new experimental results obtained in powder diffraction experiments on Nd2BaNiO5 and NdYBaNiO5, and to previously published diffraction data for Er2BaNiO5. From this analysis we extract the bare staggered magnetization curve for Haldane spin chains in these compounds.

  15. Staggered chiral perturbation theory and the fourth-root trick

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, C.

    2006-06-01

    Staggered chiral perturbation theory (S{chi}PT) takes into account the 'fourth-root trick' for reducing unwanted (taste) degrees of freedom with staggered quarks by multiplying the contribution of each sea quark loop by a factor of 1/4. In the special case of four staggered fields (four flavors, n{sub F}=4), I show here that certain assumptions about analyticity and phase structure imply the validity of this procedure for representing the rooting trick in the chiral sector. I start from the observation that, when the four flavors are degenerate, the fourth root simply reduces n{sub F}=4 to n{sub F}=1. One can then treat nondegenerate quark masses by expanding around the degenerate limit. With additional assumptions on decoupling, the result can be extended to the more interesting cases of n{sub F}=3, 2, or 1. An apparent paradox associated with the one-flavor case is resolved. Coupled with some expected features of unrooted staggered quarks in the continuum limit, in particular, the restoration of taste symmetry, S{chi}PT then implies that the fourth-root trick induces no problems (for example, a violation of unitarity that persists in the continuum limit) in the lowest energy sector of staggered lattice QCD. It also says that the theory with staggered valence quarks and rooted staggered sea quarks behaves like a simple, partially-quenched theory, not like a mixed theory in which sea and valence quarks have different lattice actions. In most cases, the assumptions made in this paper are not only sufficient but also necessary for the validity of S{chi}PT, so that a variety of possible new routes for testing this validity are opened.

  16. Investigation of the thermodynamic properties and phase transitions in a strongly diluted three-vertex antiferromagnetic Potts model by the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazaev, A. K.; Babaev, A. B.; Ataeva, G. Ya.

    2017-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties and phase transitions in a two-dimensional strongly diluted threevertex antiferromagnetic Potts model on a triangular lattice have been investigated using the Monte Carlo method. The systems with linear dimensions of L × L = N, where L = 18-48, have been considered. It has been shown using the method of fourth-order Binder cumulants that, upon the introduction of nonmagnetic impurities into the spin system described by the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic Potts model, the firstorder phase transition changes to a second-order phase transition.

  17. Numerical simulation of dam-break problem using staggered finite volume method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiasih, L. K.; Wiryanto, L. H.

    2016-02-01

    A problem in a dam-break is when a wall separating two sides of water is removed. A shock wave occurs and propagates. The behavior of the wave is interesting to be investigated with respect to the water depth and its wave speed. The aim of this research is to model dam-break problem using the non-linear shallow water equations and solve them numerically using staggered finite volume method. The solution is used to simulate the dam-break on a wet bed. Our numerical solution will be compared to the analytical solution of shallow water equations for dam-break problem. The momentum non-conservative finite volume scheme on a staggered grid will give a good agreement for dam-break problem on a wet bed, for depth ratios greater than 0.25.

  18. Optimized Vertex Method and Hybrid Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven A.; Krishnamurthy, T.; Mason, B. H.

    2002-01-01

    A method of calculating the fuzzy response of a system is presented. This method, called the Optimized Vertex Method (OVM), is based upon the vertex method but requires considerably fewer function evaluations. The method is demonstrated by calculating the response membership function of strain-energy release rate for a bonded joint with a crack. The possibility of failure of the bonded joint was determined over a range of loads. After completing the possibilistic analysis, the possibilistic (fuzzy) membership functions were transformed to probability density functions and the probability of failure of the bonded joint was calculated. This approach is called a possibility-based hybrid reliability assessment. The possibility and probability of failure are presented and compared to a Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) of the bonded joint.

  19. The HERA-B vertex detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C.; Bräuer, M.; Glebe, T.; Hofmann, W.; Jagla, T.; Klefenz, F.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Pugatch, V.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Trunk, U.; Wanke, R.; Zurheide, F.; Abt, I.; Dressel, M.; Kisel, I.; Masciocchi, S.; Moshous, B.; Perschke, T.; Sang, M.; Schaller, S.; Wagner, W.

    2000-10-01

    The HERA-B experiment is being built to measure CP violation in the B-system using internal targets at the HERA proton storage ring at DESY. This paper presents an overview of its vertex detector which - apart from an additional superlayer - is realized by a system of 20 Roman pots containing seven superlayers of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors that are operated at 10 mm distance from the proton beam in a high-radiation environment.

  20. Staggered chiral perturbation theory in the two-flavor case

    SciTech Connect

    Du Xining

    2010-07-01

    I study two-flavor staggered chiral perturbation theory in the light pseudoscalar sector. The pion mass and decay constant are calculated through next-to-leading order in the partially-quenched case. In the limit where the strange quark mass is large compared to the light quark masses and the taste splittings, I show that the SU(2) staggered chiral theory emerges from the SU(3) staggered chiral theory, as expected. Explicit relations between SU(2) and SU(3) low energy constants and taste-violating parameters are given. The results are useful for SU(2) chiral fits to asqtad data and allow one to incorporate effects from varying strange quark masses.

  1. Effect of Stagger on the Vibroacoustic Loads from Clustered Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojo, Raymundo; Tinney, Charles E.; Ruf, Joseph H.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of stagger startup on the vibro-acoustic loads that form during the end- effects-regime of clustered rockets is studied using both full-scale (hot-gas) and laboratory scale (cold gas) data. Both configurations comprise three nozzles with thrust optimized parabolic contours that undergo free shock separated flow and restricted shock separated flow as well as an end-effects regime prior to flowing full. Acoustic pressure waveforms recorded at the base of the nozzle clusters are analyzed using various statistical metrics as well as time-frequency analysis. The findings reveal a significant reduction in end- effects-regime loads when engine ignition is staggered. However, regardless of stagger, both the skewness and kurtosis of the acoustic pressure time derivative elevate to the same levels during the end-effects-regime event thereby demonstrating the intermittence and impulsiveness of the acoustic waveforms that form during engine startup.

  2. B_K in unquenched QCD using improved staggered fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongjeong

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results for BK calculated using improved staggered fermions with a mixed action (HYP-smeared staggered valence quarks and AsqTad staggered sea quarks). We investigate £¡ ¢ a2¤ effect due to non- the effect of non-degenerate quarks on BK and attempt to estimate the Goldstone pions in loops. We fit the data to continuum partially quenched chiral perturbation theory. We find that the quality of fit for BK improves if we include non-degenerate quark mass combinations. We also observe, however, that the fitting curve deviates from the data points in the light quark mass region. This may indicate the need to include taste-breaking in pion loops.

  3. Upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leflat, A.

    2014-08-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm, with access to all event information. This will enable the detector to run at luminosities of 1-2 × 1033/cm2/s and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy sector with unprecedented precision. The upgraded VELO must be low mass, radiation hard and vacuum compatible. It must be capable of fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction and will be required to drive data to the outside world at speeds of up to 2.5 Tbit/s. This challenge is being met with a new Vertex Locator (VELO) design based on hybrid pixel detectors positioned to within 5 mm of the LHC colliding beams. The sensors have 55 × 55 μm square pixels and the VELOPix ASIC which is being developed for the readout is based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips. The hottest ASIC will have to cope with pixel hit rates of up to 900 MHz. The material budget will be optimised with the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within a thin silicon substrate. Microchannel cooling brings many advantages: very efficient heat transfer with almost no temperature gradients across the module, no CTE mismatch with silicon components, and low material contribution. This is a breakthrough technology being developed for LHCb. LHCb is also focussing effort on the construction of a lightweight foil to separate the primary and secondary LHC vacua, the development of high speed cables and radiation qualification of the module. The 40 MHz readout will also bring significant conceptual changes to the way in which the upgrade trigger is operated. Work is in progress to incorporate momentum and impact parameter information into the trigger at the earliest possible stage, using the fast pattern recognition capabilities of the upgraded detector. The current status of the VELO upgrade will

  4. Developing new fluorescent proteins with stagger extension process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Lu, Jinling; Luo, Haiming; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2009-02-01

    The Stagger Extension Process (StEP), a recombination of DNA technique, has been used as a rapid molecular mutagenesis strategy. In this study, for obtaining the fluorescence proteins with new properties, six fluorescence proteins (EYFP, EGFP, ECFP, mCitrine, mCerulean and Venus) were used as the templates to recombine the mutation library by the Stagger Extension Process (StEP) technique. Through screening this mutation library, we have obtained some useful new FPs which are different fluorescent properties with ancestor. These protein will extend fluorescent proteins application.

  5. Boundary conditions in a meshless staggered particle code

    SciTech Connect

    Libersky, L.D.; Randles, P.W.

    1998-07-01

    A meshless method utilizing two sets of particles and generalized boundary conditions is introduced. Companion sets of particles, one carrying velocity and the other carrying stress, are employed to reduce the undesirable effects of colocation of all field variables and increase accuracy. Boundary conditions implemented within this staggered framework include contact, stress-free, stress, velocity, and symmetry constraints. Several test problems are used to evaluate the method. Of particular importance is the motion of stress particles relative to velocity particles in higher dimensions. Early results show promise, but difficulties remain that must be overcome if the staggered technique is to be successful.

  6. Vertex cover problem studied by cavity method: Analytics and population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haijun

    2003-03-01

    We study the vertex cover problem on finite connectivity random graphs by zero-temperature cavity method. The minimum vertex cover corresponds to the ground state(s) of a proposed Ising spin model. When the connectivity c > e = 2.718282, there is no state for this system as the reweighting parameter y, which takes a similar role as the inverse temperature β in conventional statistical physics, approaches infinity; consequently the ground state energy is obtained at a finite value of y when the free energy function attains its maximum value. The minimum vertex cover size at given c is estimated using population dynamics and compared with known rigorous bounds and numerical results. The backbone size is also calculated.

  7. The Vertex Version of Weighted Wiener Number for Bicyclic Molecular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Weifan

    2015-01-01

    Graphs are used to model chemical compounds and drugs. In the graphs, each vertex represents an atom of molecule and edges between the corresponding vertices are used to represent covalent bounds between atoms. We call such a graph, which is derived from a chemical compound, a molecular graph. Evidence shows that the vertex-weighted Wiener number, which is defined over this molecular graph, is strongly correlated to both the melting point and boiling point of the compounds. In this paper, we report the extremal vertex-weighted Wiener number of bicyclic molecular graph in terms of molecular structural analysis and graph transformations. The promising prospects of the application for the chemical and pharmacy engineering are illustrated by theoretical results achieved in this paper. PMID:26640513

  8. Building a non-perturbative quark-gluon vertex from a perturbative one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Rocio

    2016-10-01

    The quark-gluon vertex describes the electromagnetic and the strong interaction among these particles. The description of this interaction at high precision in both regimes, perturbative and non-perturbative, continues being a matter of interest in the context of QCD and Hadron Physics. There exist very helpful models in the literature that explain perturbative aspects of the theory but they fail describing non-perturbative phenomena, as confinement and dynamic chiral symmetry breaking. In this work we study the structure of the quark-gluon vertex in a non-perturbative regime examining QCD, checking results with QED, and working in the Schwinger-Dyson formalism.

  9. Electronics cooling of Phenix multiplicity and vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Gregory, W.S.

    1996-08-01

    The Multiplicity and Vertex Detector (MVD) uses silicon strip sensors arranged in two concentric barrels around the beam pipe of the PHENIX detector that will be installed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Each silicon sensor is connected by a flexible kapton cable to its own front-end electronics printed circuit board that is a multi-chip module or MCM. The MCMs are the main heat source in the system. To maintain the MVD at optimized operational status, the maximum temperature of the multi-chip modules must be below 40 C. Using COSMOS/M HSTAR for the Heat Transfer analysis, a finite element model of a typical MCM plate was created to simulate a 9m/s airflow and 9m/s mixed flow composed of 50% helium and 50% air respectively, with convective heat transfer on both sides of the plate. The results using a mixed flow of helium and air show that the average maximum temperature reached by the MCMs is 37.5 C. The maximum temperature which is represented by the hot spots on the MCM is 39.43 C for the helium and air mixture which meets the design temperature requirement 40 C. To maintain the Multiplicity and Vertex Detector at optimized operational status, the configuration of the plenum chamber, the power dissipated by the silicon chips, the fluid flow velocity and comparison on the MCM design parameters will be discussed.

  10. Natural constraints on the gluon-quark vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binosi, Daniele; Chang, Lei; Papavassiliou, Joannis; Qin, Si-Xue; Roberts, Craig D.

    2017-02-01

    In principle, the strong-interaction sector of the standard model is characterized by a unique renormalization-group-invariant (RGI) running interaction and a unique form for the dressed-gluon-quark vertex, Γμ; but, whilst much has been learnt about the former, the latter is still obscure. In order to improve this situation, we use a RGI running-interaction that reconciles top-down and bottom-up analyses of the gauge sector in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) to compute dressed-quark gap equation solutions with 1,660,000 distinct Ansätze for Γμ. Each one of the solutions is then tested for compatibility with three physical criteria and, remarkably, we find that merely 0.55% of the solutions survive the test. Evidently, even a small selection of observables places extremely tight bounds on the domain of realistic vertex Ansätze. This analysis and its results should prove useful in constraining insightful contemporary studies of QCD and hadronic phenomena.

  11. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Ackermann, K.; Aihara, H.; Aziz, T.; Bergauer, T.; Bozek, A.; Campbell, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Drasal, Z.; Frankenberger, A.; Gadow, K.; Gfall, I.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Higuchi, T.; Himori, S.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Joo, C.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kodys, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kvasnicka, P.; Marinas, C.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mibe, T.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Negishi, K.; Nakayama, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Niebuhr, C.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Park, H.; Rao, K. K.; Ritter, M.; Rozanska, M.; Saito, T.; Sakai, K.; Sato, N.; Schmid, S.; Schnell, M.; Shimizu, N.; Steininger, H.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G.; Tsuboyama, T.; Ueno, K.; Uozumi, S.; Ushiroda, Y.; Valentan, M.; Yamamoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    The KEKB machine and the Belle experiment in Tsukuba (Japan) are now undergoing an upgrade, leading to an ultimate luminosity of 8×1035 cm-2 s-1 in order to measure rare decays in the B system with high statistics. The previous vertex detector cannot cope with this 40-fold increase of luminosity and thus needs to be replaced. Belle II will be equipped with a two-layer Pixel Detector surrounding the beam pipe, and four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors at higher radii than the old detector. The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) will have a total sensitive area of 1.13 m2 and 223,744 channels-twice as many as its predecessor. All silicon sensors will be made from 150 mm wafers in order to maximize their size and thus to reduce the relative contribution of the support structure. The forward part has slanted sensors of trapezoidal shape to improve the measurement precision and to minimize the amount of material as seen by particles from the vertex. Fast-shaping front-end amplifiers will be used in conjunction with an online hit time reconstruction algorithm in order to reduce the occupancy to the level of a few percent at most. A novel “Origami” chip-on-sensor scheme is used to minimize both the distance between strips and amplifier (thus reducing the electronic noise) as well as the overall material budget. This report gives an overview on the status of the Belle II SVD and its components, including sensors, front-end detector ladders, mechanics, cooling and the readout electronics.

  12. Mechanical design of the CDF SVX II silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    A next generation silicon vertex detector is planned at CDF for the 1998 Tevatron collider run with the Main Injector. The SVX II silicon vertex detector will allow high luminosity data-taking, enable online triggering of secondary vertex production, and greatly increase the acceptance for heavy flavor physics at CDF. The design specifications, geometric layout, and early mechanical prototyping work for this detector are discussed.

  13. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Construction of the CDF silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Snider, F.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S. ); Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Gonzales, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T. ); Carithers, W.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester

    1992-04-01

    Technical details and methods used in constructing the CDF silicon vertex detector are presented. This description includes a discussion of the foam-carbon fiber composite structure used to silicon microstrip detectors and the procedure for achievement of 5 {mu}m detector alignment. The construction of the beryllium barrel structure, which houses the detector assemblies, is also described. In addition, the 10 {mu}m placement accuracy of the detectors in the barrel structure is discussed and the detector cooling and mounting systems are described. 12 refs.

  15. {kappa}K*{sup 0}{gamma}-vertex in light cone QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Gokalp, A.; Yilmaz, O.; Sarac, Y.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the {kappa}K*{sup 0}{gamma}-vertex in the framework of light cone QCD sum rules. We estimate the coupling constant g{sub {kappa}}{sub K*{sup 0}}{sub {gamma}}, and compare our result with that used in the nonlinear chiral Lagrangian approach using the vector-meson dominance model in the SU(3) limit.

  16. Drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC/LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, K.G.

    1987-03-01

    The short but measurable lifetimes of the b and c quarks and the tau lepton have motivated the development of high precision tracking detectors capable of providing information on the decay vertex topology of events containing these particles. This paper reviews the OPAL, L3, and MARK II experiments vertex drift chambers.

  17. Calculation of the Nucleon Axial Form Factor Using Staggered Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Hill, Richard J.; Kronfeld, Andreas S.; Li, Ruizi; Simone, James N.

    2016-10-14

    The nucleon axial form factor is a dominant contribution to errors in neutrino oscillation studies. Lattice QCD calculations can help control theory errors by providing first-principles information on nucleon form factors. In these proceedings, we present preliminary results on a blinded calculation of $g_A$ and the axial form factor using HISQ staggered baryons with 2+1+1 flavors of sea quarks. Calculations are done using physical light quark masses and are absolutely normalized. We discuss fitting form factor data with the model-independent $z$ expansion parametrization.

  18. Displaced vertex searches for sterile neutrinos at future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of future lepton colliders to displaced vertices from the decays of long-lived heavy (almost sterile) neutrinos with electroweak scale masses and detectable time of flight. As future lepton colliders we consider the FCC-ee, the CEPC, and the ILC, searching at the Z-pole and at the center-of-mass energies of 240, 350 and 500 GeV. For a realistic discussion of the detector response to the displaced vertex signal and the Standard Model background we consider the ILC's Silicon Detector (SiD) as benchmark for the future lepton collider detectors. We find that displaced vertices constitute a powerful search channel for sterile neutrinos, sensitive to squared active-sterile mixing angles as small as 10-11.

  19. Small Vertex Cover Makes Petri Net Coverability and Boundedness Easier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, M.

    The coverability and boundedness problems for Petri nets are known to be Expspace-complete. Given a Petri net, we associate a graph with it. With the vertex cover number k of this graph and the maximum arc weight W as parameters, we show that coverability and boundedness are in ParaPspace. This means that these problems can be solved in space O(ef(k,W)poly(n)) where ef(k,W) is some exponential function and poly(n) is some polynomial in the size of the input. We then extend the ParaPspace result to model checking a logic that can express some generalizations of coverability and boundedness.

  20. Vertex Sensitivity in the Schwinger-Dyson Equations of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Wilson, Michael R. Pennington

    2012-01-01

    The nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators in Landau gauge QCD are obtained using the Schwinger-Dyson equation approach. The propagator equations are solved in Euclidean space using Landau gauge with a range of vertex inputs. Initially we solve for the ghost alone, using a model gluon input, which leads us to favour a finite ghost dressing in the nonperturbative region. In order to then solve the gluon and ghost equations simultaneously, we find that non-trivial vertices are required, particularly for the gluon propagator in the small momentum limit. We focus on the properties of a number vertices and how these differences influence the final solutions. The self-consistent solutions we obtain are all qualitatively similar and contain a mass-like term in the gluon propagator dressing in agreement with related studies, supporting the long-held proposal of Cornwall.

  1. Twisted vertex algebras, bicharacter construction and boson-fermion correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguelova, Iana I.

    2013-12-01

    The boson-fermion correspondences are an important phenomena on the intersection of several areas in mathematical physics: representation theory, vertex algebras and conformal field theory, integrable systems, number theory, cohomology. Two such correspondences are well known: the types A and B (and their super extensions). As a main result of this paper we present a new boson-fermion correspondence of type D-A. Further, we define a new concept of twisted vertex algebra of order N, which generalizes super vertex algebra. We develop the bicharacter construction which we use for constructing classes of examples of twisted vertex algebras, as well as for deriving formulas for the operator product expansions, analytic continuations, and normal ordered products. By using the underlying Hopf algebra structure we prove general bicharacter formulas for the vacuum expectation values for two important groups of examples. We show that the correspondences of types B, C, and D-A are isomorphisms of twisted vertex algebras.

  2. On the Quality of Velocity Interpolation Schemes for Marker-in-Cell Method and Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2016-11-01

    The marker-in-cell method is generally considered a flexible and robust method to model the advection of heterogenous non-diffusive properties (i.e., rock type or composition) in geodynamic problems. In this method, Lagrangian points carrying compositional information are advected with the ambient velocity field on an Eulerian grid. However, velocity interpolation from grid points to marker locations is often performed without considering the divergence of the velocity field at the interpolated locations (i.e., non-conservative). Such interpolation schemes can induce non-physical clustering of markers when strong velocity gradients are present (Journal of Computational Physics 166:218-252, 2001) and this may, eventually, result in empty grid cells, a serious numerical violation of the marker-in-cell method. To remedy this at low computational costs, Jenny et al. (Journal of Computational Physics 166:218-252, 2001) and Meyer and Jenny (Proceedings in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics 4:466-467, 2004) proposed a simple, conservative velocity interpolation scheme for 2-D staggered grid, while Wang et al. (Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 16(6):2015-2023, 2015) extended the formulation to 3-D finite element methods. Here, we adapt this formulation for 3-D staggered grids (correction interpolation) and we report on the quality of various velocity interpolation methods for 2-D and 3-D staggered grids. We test the interpolation schemes in combination with different advection schemes on incompressible Stokes problems with strong velocity gradients, which are discretized using a finite difference method. Our results suggest that a conservative formulation reduces the dispersion and clustering of markers, minimizing the need of unphysical marker control in geodynamic models.

  3. On the Quality of Velocity Interpolation Schemes for Marker-in-Cell Method and Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2017-03-01

    The marker-in-cell method is generally considered a flexible and robust method to model the advection of heterogenous non-diffusive properties (i.e., rock type or composition) in geodynamic problems. In this method, Lagrangian points carrying compositional information are advected with the ambient velocity field on an Eulerian grid. However, velocity interpolation from grid points to marker locations is often performed without considering the divergence of the velocity field at the interpolated locations (i.e., non-conservative). Such interpolation schemes can induce non-physical clustering of markers when strong velocity gradients are present (Journal of Computational Physics 166:218-252, 2001) and this may, eventually, result in empty grid cells, a serious numerical violation of the marker-in-cell method. To remedy this at low computational costs, Jenny et al. (Journal of Computational Physics 166:218-252, 2001) and Meyer and Jenny (Proceedings in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics 4:466-467, 2004) proposed a simple, conservative velocity interpolation scheme for 2-D staggered grid, while Wang et al. (Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 16(6):2015-2023, 2015) extended the formulation to 3-D finite element methods. Here, we adapt this formulation for 3-D staggered grids (correction interpolation) and we report on the quality of various velocity interpolation methods for 2-D and 3-D staggered grids. We test the interpolation schemes in combination with different advection schemes on incompressible Stokes problems with strong velocity gradients, which are discretized using a finite difference method. Our results suggest that a conservative formulation reduces the dispersion and clustering of markers, minimizing the need of unphysical marker control in geodynamic models.

  4. The upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, T.

    2014-12-01

    The LHCb experiment is set for a significant upgrade, which will be ready for Run 3 of the LHC in 2020. This upgrade will allow LHCb to run at a significantly higher instantaneous luminosity and collect an integrated luminosity of 50fb-1 by the end of Run 4. In this process the Vertex Locator (VELO) detector will be upgraded to a pixel-based silicon detector. The upgraded VELO will improve upon the current detector by being closer to the beams and having lower material modules with microchannel cooling and a thinner RF-foil. Simulations have shown that it will maintain its excellent performance, even after the radiation damage caused by collecting an integrated luminosity of 50fb-1.

  5. Compton scattering vertex for massive scalar QED

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.; Delbourgo, R.; Tejeda-Yeomans, M. E.

    2009-08-15

    We investigate the Compton scattering vertex of charged scalars and photons in scalar quantum electrodynamics (SQED). We carry out its nonperturbative construction consistent with Ward-Fradkin-Green-Takahashi identity which relates 3-point vertices to the 4-point ones. There is an undetermined part which is transverse to one or both the external photons, and needs to be evaluated through perturbation theory. We present in detail how the transverse part at the 1-loop order can be evaluated for completely general kinematics of momenta involved in covariant gauges and dimensions. This involves the calculation of genuine 4-point functions with three massive propagators, the most nontrivial integrals reported in this paper. We also discuss possible applications of our results.

  6. Future of Lattice Calculations with Staggered Sea Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, Steven

    2011-05-23

    The MILC collaboration for some years has been creating gauge ensembles with 2+1 flavors of asqtad or improved staggered quarks. There are some 40 ensembles covering a wide range of quark mass and lattice spacing, thus allowing control of the chiral and continuum limits. An extensive review of that program has been published in Reviews of Modern Physics. Recently, MILC has begun a new program using HPQCD's highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action. This action has smaller taste symmetry breaking than asqtad and improved scaling properties. We also include a dynamical charm quark in these calculations. We summarize the achievements of the asqtad program, what has been done so far with HISQ quarks, and then consider what future ensembles will be created and their impact.

  7. B{sub K} in staggered chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Water, Ruth S. van de; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the kaon B parameter, B{sub K}, to next-to-leading order in staggered chiral perturbation theory. We find expressions for partially quenched QCD with three sea quarks, quenched QCD, and full QCD with m{sub u}=m{sub d}{ne}m{sub s}. We extend the usual power counting to include the effects of using perturbative (rather than nonperturbative) matching factors. Taste breaking enters through the O(a{sup 2}) terms in the effective action, through O(a{sup 2}) terms from the discretization of operators, and through the truncation of matching factors. These effects cause mixing with several additional operators, complicating the chiral and continuum extrapolations. In addition to the staggered expressions, we present B{sub K} at next-to-leading order in continuum PQ{chi}PT for N{sub f}=3 sea quarks with m{sub u}=m{sub d}{ne}m{sub s}.

  8. Baryons with Ginsparg-Wilson quarks in a staggered sea

    SciTech Connect

    Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2005-11-01

    We determine the masses and magnetic moments of the octet baryons in chiral perturbation theory formulated for a mixed lattice action of Ginsparg-Wilson valence quarks and staggered sea quarks. Taste-symmetry breaking does not occur at next-to-leading order in the combined lattice spacing and chiral expansion. Expressions derived for masses and magnetic moments are required for addressing lattice artifacts in mixed-action simulations of these observables.

  9. Calculating weak matrix elements using HYP staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Bhattacharya; G. T. Fleming; G. Kilcup; R. Gupta; W. Lee; S. Sharpe

    2004-03-01

    We present preliminary results of weak matrix elements relevant to CP violation calculated using the HYP (II) staggered fermions. Since the complete set of matching coefficients at the one-loop level became available recently, we have constructed lattice operators with all the g{sup 2} corrections included. The main results include both {Delta}I = 3/2 and {Delta}I = 1/2 contributions.

  10. Staggered baryon operators with flavor SU(3) quantum numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2007-06-01

    The construction of the first baryon operators for staggered lattice QCD exploited the taste symmetry to emulate physical quark flavor; contemporary 2+1 flavor simulations explicitly include three physical quark flavors and necessitate interpreting a valence sector with 12 quarks. After discussing expected features of the resulting baryon spectrum, I consider the spectra of operators transforming irreducibly under SU(3){sub F}xGTS, the direct product of flavor SU(3){sub F} and the geometrical time-slice group of the 1-flavor staggered theory. I then describe the construction of a set of maximally local baryon operators transforming irreducibly under SU(3){sub F}xGTS and enumerate this set. In principle, the operators listed here could be used to extract the masses of all the lightest spin-(1/2) and spin-(3/2) baryon resonances of staggered QCD. Using appropriate operators from this set in partially quenched simulations should allow for particularly clean 2+1 flavor calculations of the masses of the nucleon, {delta}, {sigma}*, {xi}*, and {omega}{sup -}.

  11. Staggered chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Stephen R.; Van de Water, Ruth S.

    2005-06-01

    We study taste and Euclidean rotational symmetry violation for staggered fermions at nonzero lattice spacing using staggered chiral perturbation theory. We extend the staggered chiral Lagrangian to O(a{sup 2}p{sup 2}), O(a{sup 4}), and O(a{sup 2}m), the orders necessary for a full next-to-leading order calculation of pseudo-Goldstone boson masses and decay constants including analytic terms. We then calculate a number of SO(4) taste-breaking quantities, which involve only a small subset of these next-to-leading order operators. We predict relationships between SO(4) taste-breaking splittings in masses, pseudoscalar decay constants, and dispersion relations. We also find predictions for a few quantities that are not SO(4) breaking. All these results hold also for theories in which the fourth root of the fermionic determinant is taken to reduce the number of quark tastes; testing them will therefore provide evidence for or against the validity of this trick.

  12. Taste symmetry breaking with hypercubic-smeared staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Taegil; Adams, David H.; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Jongjeong; Kim, Kwangwoo; Lee, Weonjong; Jung, Chulwoo; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2008-05-01

    We study the impact of hypercubic (HYP) smearing on the size of taste-breaking for staggered fermions, comparing to unimproved and to asqtad-improved staggered fermions. As in previous studies, we find a substantial reduction in taste-breaking compared to unimproved staggered fermions (by a factor of 4-7 on lattices with spacing a{approx_equal}0.1 fm). In addition, we observe that discretization effects of next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion (O(a{sup 2}p{sup 2})) are markedly reduced by HYP smearing. Compared to asqtad valence fermions, we find that taste-breaking in the pion spectrum is reduced by a factor of 2.5-3, down to a level comparable to the expected size of generic O(a{sup 2}) effects. Our results suggest that, once one reaches a lattice spacing of a{approx_equal}0.09 fm, taste-breaking will be small enough after HYP smearing that one can use a modified power counting in which O(a{sup 2})<

  13. Staggered chiral perturbation theory for heavy-light mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Bernard, C.

    2006-01-01

    We incorporate heavy-light mesons into staggered chiral perturbation theory (S{chi}PT), working to leading order in 1/m{sub Q}, where m{sub Q} is the heavy-quark mass. At first nontrivial order in the chiral expansion, staggered taste violations affect the chiral logarithms for heavy-light quantities only through the light-meson propagators in loops. There are also new analytic contributions coming from additional terms in the Lagrangian involving heavy-light and light mesons. Using this heavy-light S{chi}PT, we perform the one-loop calculation of the B (or D) meson leptonic decay constant in the partially quenched and full QCD cases. In our treatment, we assume the validity both of the 'fourth root trick' to reduce four staggered tastes to one, and of the S{chi}PT prescription to represent this trick by insertions of factors of 1/4 for each sea-quark loop.

  14. Locking mechanisms in degree-4 vertex origami structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Xu, Jian; Wang, K. W.

    2016-04-01

    Origami has emerged as a potential tool for the design of mechanical metamaterials and metastructures whose novel properties originate from their crease patterns. Most of the attention in origami engineering has focused on the wellknown Miura-Ori, a folded tessellation that is flat-foldable for folded sheet and stacked blocks. This study advances the state of the art and expands the research field to investigate generic degree-4 vertex (4-vertex) origami, with a focus on facet-binding. In order to understand how facet-binding attributes to the mechanical properties of 4-vertex origami structures, geometries of the 4-vertex origami cells are analyzed and analytically expressed. Through repeating and stacking 4-vertex cells, origami sheets and stacked origami blocks can be constructed. Geometry analyses discover four mechanisms that will lead to the self-locking of 4-vertex origami cells, sheets, and stacked blocks: in-cell facet-binding, inlayer facet-binding, inter-layer facet binding, and in-layer and inter-layer facet-bindings. These mechanisms and the predicted self-locking phenomena are verified through 3D simulations and prototype experiments. Finally, this paper briefly introduces the unusual mechanical properties caused by the locking of 4-vertex origami structures. The research reported in this paper could foster a new breed of self-locking structures with various engineering applications.

  15. Quark-gluon vertex in arbitrary gauge and dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydychev, A. I.; Osland, P.; Saks, L.

    2001-01-01

    One-loop off-shell contributions to the quark-gluon vertex are calculated, in an arbitrary covariant gauge and in arbitrary space-time dimension, including quark-mass effects. It is shown how one can get results for all on-shell limits of interest directly from the off-shell expressions. In order to demonstrate that the Ward-Slavnov-Taylor identity for the quark-gluon vertex is satisfied, we have also calculated the corresponding one-loop contribution involving the quark-quark-ghost-ghost vertex.

  16. RAVE—a Detector-independent vertex reconstruction toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Mitaroff, Winfried; Moser, Fabian

    2007-10-01

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE ) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO ) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state of the art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available. VERTIGO = "vertex reconstruction toolkit and interface to generic objects".

  17. Isovector effective charge and the staggering of 2{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} transition probabilities in the titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Poves, A.; Nowacki, F.; Caurier, E.

    2005-10-01

    In an effort to understand the magical status of N=32 and N=34 at the very neutron rich edge, experiments have been carried out in the titanium isotopes up to A=56. The measured staggering of the B(E2)'s is not reproduced by the shell model calculations using the best effective interactions. We argue that this may be related to the choice of the isovector effective charge and to the value of the N=34 neutron gap.

  18. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Bergauer, T.; Dolejschi, P.; Frankenberger, A.; Gfall, I.; Irmler, C.; Obermayer, T.; Onuki, Y.; Smiljic, D.; Tsuboyama, T.; Valentan, M.

    The KEKB factory (Tsukuba, Japan) has been shut down in mid-2010 after reaching a total integrated luminosity of 1ab-1. Recently, the work on an upgrade of the collider (SuperKEKB), aiming at an ultimate luminosity of 8×1035 cm-2s-1, has started. This is 40 times the peak value of the previous system and thus also requires a redesign of the Belle detector (leading to Belle II), especially its Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which surrounds the beam pipe. Similar to its predecessor, the future Belle II SVD will again consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors (DSSD), but at higher radii. Moreover, a double-layer PiXel Detector (PXD) will complement the SVD as the innermost sensing device. All DSSDs will be made from 6" silicon wafers and read out by APV25 chips, which were originally developed for the CMS experiment. That system was proven to meet the requirements for Belle II in matters of occupancy and dead time. Since the KEKB factory operates at relatively low energy, material inside the active volume has to be minimized in order to reduce multiple scattering. This can be achieved by the Origami chip-on-sensor concept, including a very light-weight mechanical support structure made from carbon fiber reinforced Airex foam. Moreover, CO2 cooling for the front-end chips will ensure high efficiency at minimum material budget.

  19. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs.

    PubMed

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity.

  20. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity. PMID:27336059

  1. A staggered approach for the coupling of Cahn-Hilliard type diffusion and finite strain elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Samaniego, E.; Rabczuk, T.

    2016-02-01

    We develop an algorithm and computational implementation for simulation of problems that combine Cahn-Hilliard type diffusion with finite strain elasticity. We have in mind applications such as the electro-chemo-mechanics of lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. We concentrate on basic computational aspects. A staggered algorithm is proposed for the coupled multi-field model. For the diffusion problem, the fourth order differential equation is replaced by a system of second order equations to deal with the issue of the regularity required for the approximation spaces. Low order finite elements are used for discretization in space of the involved fields (displacement, concentration, nonlocal concentration). Three (both 2D and 3D) extensively worked numerical examples show the capabilities of our approach for the representation of (i) phase separation, (ii) the effect of concentration in deformation and stress, (iii) the effect of strain in concentration, and (iv) lithiation. We analyze convergence with respect to spatial and time discretization and found that very good results are achievable using both a staggered scheme and approximated strain interpolation.

  2. Efficient variants of the vertex space domain decomposition algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.F.; Shao, J.P. . Dept. of Mathematics); Mathew, T.P. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1994-11-01

    Several variants of the vertex space algorithm of Smith for two-dimensional elliptic problems are described. The vertex space algorithm is a domain decomposition method based on nonoverlapping subregions, in which the reduced Schur complement system on the interface is solved using a generalized block Jacobi-type preconditioner, with the blocks corresponding to the vertex space, edges, and a coarse grid. Two kinds of approximations are considered for the edge and vertex space subblocks, one based on Fourier approximation, and another based on an algebraic probing technique in which sparse approximations to these subblocks are computed. The motivation is to improve the efficiency of the algorithm without sacrificing the optimal convergence rate. Numerical and theoretical results on the performance of these algorithms, including variants of an algorithm of Bramble, Pasciak, and Schatz are presented.

  3. Distinct failure modes in bio-inspired 3D-printed staggered composites under non-aligned loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slesarenko, Viacheslav; Kazarinov, Nikita; Rudykh, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    The superior mechanical properties of biological materials originate in their complex hierarchical microstructures, combining stiff and soft constituents at different length scales. In this work, we employ a three-dimensional multi-materials printing to fabricate the bio-inspired staggered composites, and study their mechanical properties and failure mechanisms. We observe that bio-inspired staggered composites with inclined stiff tablets are able to undergo two different failure modes, depending on the inclination angle. We find that such artificial structure demonstrates high toughness only under loading applied at relatively small angle to the tablets stacking direction, while for higher angles the composites fail catastrophically. This aspect of the failure behavior was captured experimentally as well as by means of the finite element analysis. We show that even a relatively simple failure model with a strain energy limiter, can be utilized to qualitatively distinguish these two different modes of failure, occurring in the artificial bio-inspired composites.

  4. Evidence for a pairing anti-halo effect in the odd-even staggering in reaction cross sections of weakly bound nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, K.; Sagawa, H.

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spatial extension of weakly bound Ne and C isotopes by taking into account the pairing correlation with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method and a three-body model, respectively. We show that the odd-even staggering in the reaction cross sections of {sup 30,31,32}Ne and {sup 14,15,16}C are successfully reproduced, and thus the staggering can be attributed to the pairing anti-halo effect. A correlation between a one-neutron separation energy and the anti-halo effect is demonstrated for s and p waves using the HFB wave functions.

  5. Observations on staggered fermions at nonzero lattice spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2006-06-01

    We show that the use of the fourth-root trick in lattice QCD with staggered fermions corresponds to a nonlocal theory at nonzero lattice spacing, but argue that the nonlocal behavior is likely to go away in the continuum limit. We give examples of this nonlocal behavior in the free theory, and for the case of a fixed topologically nontrivial background gauge field. In both special cases, the nonlocal behavior indeed disappears in the continuum limit. Our results invalidate a recent claim that at nonzero lattice spacing an additive mass renormalization is needed because of taste-symmetry breaking.

  6. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; Hecke, H. van; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two con- centric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity ({nu}) distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  7. Phase Transition of Bosons Driven by a Staggered Gauge Field in AN Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Min-Chul

    2013-06-01

    We have studied the ground state properties of hard-core bosons in a two-leg optical ladder in the presence of uniform and staggered frustrations due to an artificial gauge field. By calculating the ground state via the Lanczos method, we find first-order phase transitions tuned by the staggered gauge field between the Meissner and the vortex states. The momentum distributions show that the Meissner state has edge and staggered currents, while the vortex states have vortex-solid or vortex-glass phases in the presence of a staggered field.

  8. Covariant and self-consistent vertex corrections for pions and isobars in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Korpa, C. L.; Lutz, M. F. M.; Riek, F.

    2009-08-15

    We evaluate the pion and isobar propagators in cold nuclear matter self-consistently applying a covariant form of the isobar-hole model. Migdal's vertex correction effects are considered systematically in the absence of phenomenological soft form factors. Saturated nuclear matter is modeled by scalar and vector mean fields for the nucleon. It is shown that the short-range dressing of the {pi}N{delta} vertex has a significant effect on the pion and isobar properties. Using realistic parameters sets we predict a downward shift of about 50 MeV for the {delta} resonance at nuclear saturation density. The pionic soft modes are much less pronounced than in previous studies.

  9. Magnetic-free non-reciprocity based on staggered commutation

    PubMed Central

    Reiskarimian, Negar; Krishnaswamy, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Lorentz reciprocity is a fundamental characteristic of the vast majority of electronic and photonic structures. However, non-reciprocal components such as isolators, circulators and gyrators enable new applications ranging from radio frequencies to optical frequencies, including full-duplex wireless communication and on-chip all-optical information processing. Such components today dominantly rely on the phenomenon of Faraday rotation in magneto-optic materials. However, they are typically bulky, expensive and not suitable for insertion in a conventional integrated circuit. Here we demonstrate magnetic-free linear passive non-reciprocity based on the concept of staggered commutation. Commutation is a form of parametric modulation with very high modulation ratio. We observe that staggered commutation enables time-reversal symmetry breaking within very small dimensions (λ/1,250 × λ/1,250 in our device), resulting in a miniature radio-frequency circulator that exhibits reduced implementation complexity, very low loss, strong non-reciprocity, significantly enhanced linearity and real-time reconfigurability, and is integrated in a conventional complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor integrated circuit for the first time. PMID:27079524

  10. Magnetic-free non-reciprocity based on staggered commutation.

    PubMed

    Reiskarimian, Negar; Krishnaswamy, Harish

    2016-04-15

    Lorentz reciprocity is a fundamental characteristic of the vast majority of electronic and photonic structures. However, non-reciprocal components such as isolators, circulators and gyrators enable new applications ranging from radio frequencies to optical frequencies, including full-duplex wireless communication and on-chip all-optical information processing. Such components today dominantly rely on the phenomenon of Faraday rotation in magneto-optic materials. However, they are typically bulky, expensive and not suitable for insertion in a conventional integrated circuit. Here we demonstrate magnetic-free linear passive non-reciprocity based on the concept of staggered commutation. Commutation is a form of parametric modulation with very high modulation ratio. We observe that staggered commutation enables time-reversal symmetry breaking within very small dimensions (λ/1,250 × λ/1,250 in our device), resulting in a miniature radio-frequency circulator that exhibits reduced implementation complexity, very low loss, strong non-reciprocity, significantly enhanced linearity and real-time reconfigurability, and is integrated in a conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuit for the first time.

  11. A subzone reconstruction algorithm for efficient staggered compatible remapping

    SciTech Connect

    Starinshak, D.P. Owen, J.M.

    2015-09-01

    Staggered-grid Lagrangian hydrodynamics algorithms frequently make use of subzonal discretization of state variables for the purposes of improved numerical accuracy, generality to unstructured meshes, and exact conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. For Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian (ALE) methods using a geometric overlay, it is difficult to remap subzonal variables in an accurate and efficient manner due to the number of subzone–subzone intersections that must be computed. This becomes prohibitive in the case of 3D, unstructured, polyhedral meshes. A new procedure is outlined in this paper to avoid direct subzonal remapping. The new algorithm reconstructs the spatial profile of a subzonal variable using remapped zonal and nodal representations of the data. The reconstruction procedure is cast as an under-constrained optimization problem. Enforcing conservation at each zone and node on the remapped mesh provides the set of equality constraints; the objective function corresponds to a quadratic variation per subzone between the values to be reconstructed and a set of target reference values. Numerical results for various pure-remapping and hydrodynamics tests are provided. Ideas for extending the algorithm to staggered-grid radiation-hydrodynamics are discussed as well as ideas for generalizing the algorithm to include inequality constraints.

  12. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    PubMed

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading.

  13. Influence of the density of states on the odd-even staggering in the charge distribution of the emitted fragments in nuclear heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleya, N. L.; Souza, S. R.; Carlson, B. V.; Donangelo, R.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    The fragmentation of thermalized sources is studied using a version of the Statistical Multifragmentation Model which employs state densities that take the pairing gap in the nuclear levels into account. Attention is focused on the properties of the charge distributions observed in the breakup of the source. Since the microcanonical version of the model used in this study provides the primary fragment excitation energy distribution, one may correlate the reduction of the odd-even staggering in the charge distribution with the increasing occupation of high-energy states. Thus, in the framework of this model, such staggering tends to disappear as a function of the total excitation energy of the source, although the energy per particle may be small for large systems. We also find that, although the deexcitation of the primary fragments should, in principle, blur these odd-even effects as the fragments follow their decay chains, the consistent treatment of pairing may significantly enhance these staggering effects on the final yields. In the framework of this model, we find that odd-even effects in the charge distributions should be observed in the fragmentation of relatively light systems at very low excitation energies. Our results also suggest that the odd-even staggering may provide useful information on the nuclear state density.

  14. A free surface capturing discretization for the staggered grid finite difference scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; May, D. A.; Yamato, P.

    2016-03-01

    The coupling that exists between surface processes and deformation within both the shallow crust and the deeper mantle-lithosphere has stimulated the development of computational geodynamic models that incorporate a free surface boundary condition. We introduce a treatment of this boundary condition that is suitable for staggered grid, finite difference schemes employing a structured Eulerian mesh. Our interface capturing treatment discretizes the free surface boundary condition via an interface that conforms with the edges of control volumes (e.g. a `staircase' representation) and requires only local stencil modifications to be performed. Comparisons with analytic solutions verify that the method is first-order accurate. Additional intermodel comparisons are performed between known reference models to further validate our free surface approximation. Lastly, we demonstrate the applicability of a multigrid solver to our free surface methodology and demonstrate that the local stencil modifications do not strongly influence the convergence of the iterative solver.

  15. A 3D staggered-grid finite difference scheme for poroelastic wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijie; Gao, Jinghuai

    2014-10-01

    Three dimensional numerical modeling has been a viable tool for understanding wave propagation in real media. The poroelastic media can better describe the phenomena of hydrocarbon reservoirs than acoustic and elastic media. However, the numerical modeling in 3D poroelastic media demands significantly more computational capacity, including both computational time and memory. In this paper, we present a 3D poroelastic staggered-grid finite difference (SFD) scheme. During the procedure, parallel computing is implemented to reduce the computational time. Parallelization is based on domain decomposition, and communication between processors is performed using message passing interface (MPI). Parallel analysis shows that the parallelized SFD scheme significantly improves the simulation efficiency and 3D decomposition in domain is the most efficient. We also analyze the numerical dispersion and stability condition of the 3D poroelastic SFD method. Numerical results show that the 3D numerical simulation can provide a real description of wave propagation.

  16. An image matching method based on closed edges incorporated with vertex angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoming; Chen, Xiaowei; Lu, Jun; Gong, Zhihui; Guo, Haitao

    2015-10-01

    An image matching method based on closed edges incorporated with vertex angles is proposed in this paper. Based on edge detection results by Edison operator, invariant moments of closed edges and angles between the two branches for edge vertexes are used as matching entities to determine conjugate features candidates. The transformation relationship between images is approximated by similarity transformation model, and a set of transformation parameters can be determined by each pair of conjugate features after combining conjugate feature candidates in pair-wise. Furthermore, considering that the difference among transformation parameters which calculated by real conjugate features are minor, K-d tree method and K-means Spatial clustering method are used in succession to eliminate pairs which contain mismatching features. Therefore, conjugate features can be obtained from the similarity transformation parameters. Experimental results turn out that this method shows a stable performance and presents a satisfactory matching result.

  17. Students' Understanding of the Concept of Vertex of Quadratic Functions in Relation to Their Personal Meaning of the Concept of Vertex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Annie Burns; Vidakovic, Draga

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores sixty-six students' personal meaning and interpretation of the vertex of a quadratic function in relation to their understanding of quadratic functions in two different representations, algebraic and word problem. Several categories emerged from students' personal meaning of the vertex including vertex as maximum or minimum…

  18. VERTEX: manganese transport through oxygen minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John H.; Knauer, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Manganese transport through a well-developed oxygen minimum was studied off central Mexico (18°N, 108°W) in October-November 1981 as part of the VERTEX (Vertical Transport and Exchange) research program. Refractory, leachable and dissolved Mn fractions associated with particulates caught in traps set at eight depths (120-1950 m) were analyzed. Particles entering the oxygen minimum had relatively large Mn loads; however, as the particulates sank further into the minimum, total Mn fluxes steadily decreased from 190 nmol m -2 day -1 at 120 m to 36 nmol m -2 day -1 at 400 m. Manganese fluxes then steadily increased in the remaining 800-1950 m, reaching rates of up to 230 nmol m -2 day -1 at 1950 m. Manganese concentrations were also measured in the water column. Dissolved Mn levels < 3.0 nmol kg -1 were consistently observed within the 150-600 m depth interval. In contrast, suspended particulate leachable Mn amounts were especially low at those depths, and never exceeded 0.04 nmol kg -1. The combined water column and particle trap data clearly indicate that Mn is released from particles as they sink through the oxygen minimum. Rate-of-change estimates based on trap flux data yield regeneration rates of up to 0.44 nmol kg -1 yr -1 in the upper oxygen minimum (120-200 m). However, only 30% of the dissolved Mn in the oxygen minimum appears to be from sinking particulate regeneration; the other 70% probably results from continental-slope-release-horizontal-transport processes. Dissolved Mn scavenges back onto particles as oxygen levels begin to increase with depth. Scavenging rates ranging from -0.03 to -0.09 nmol kg -1 yr -1 were observed at depths from 700 to 1950 m. These scavenging rates result in Mn residence times of 16-19 years, and scavenging rate constants on the order of 0.057 yr -1. Manganese removal via scavenging on sinking particles below the oxygen minimum is balanced by Mn released along continental boundaries and transported horizontally via advective

  19. 't Hooft vertices, partial quenching, and rooted staggered QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the properties of 't Hooft vertices in partially quenched and rooted versions of QCD in the continuum. These theories have a physical subspace, equivalent to ordinary QCD, that is contained within a larger space that includes many unphysical correlation functions. We find that the 't Hooft vertices in the physical subspace have the expected form, despite the presence of unphysical 't Hooft vertices appearing in correlation functions that have an excess of valence quarks (or ghost quarks). We also show that, due to the singular behavior of unphysical correlation functions as the massless limit is approached, order parameters for nonanomalous symmetries can be nonvanishing in finite volume if these symmetries act outside of the physical subspace. Using these results, we demonstrate that arguments recently given by Creutz - claiming to disprove the validity of rooted staggered QCD - are incorrect. In particular, the unphysical 't Hooft vertices do not present an obstacle to the recovery of taste symmetry in the continuum limit.

  20. Plethystic vertex operators and boson-fermion correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauser, Bertfried; Jarvis, Peter D.; King, Ronald C.

    2016-10-01

    We study the algebraic properties of plethystic vertex operators, introduced in (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 405202), underlying the structure of symmetric functions associated with certain generalized universal character rings of subgroups of the general linear group, defined to stabilize tensors of Young symmetry type characterized by a partition of arbitrary shape π. Here we establish an extension of the well-known boson-fermion correspondence involving Schur functions and their associated (Bernstein) vertex operators: for each π, the modes generated by the plethystic vertex operators and their suitably constructed duals, satisfy the anticommutation relations of a complex Clifford algebra. The combinatorial manipulations underlying the results involve exchange identities exploiting the Hopf-algebraic structure of certain symmetric function series and their plethysms.

  1. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W.; Liko, D.; Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T.; Braithwaite, W.

    1991-12-31

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  2. A GPU algorithm for minimum vertex cover problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toume, Kouta; Kinjo, Daiki; Nakamura, Morikazu

    2014-10-01

    The minimum vertex cover problem is one of the fundamental problems in graph theory and is known to be NP-hard. For data mining in large-scale structured systems, we proposes a GPU algorithm for the minimum vertex cover problem. The algorithm is designed to derive sufficient parallelism of the problem for the GPU architecture and also to arrange data on the device memory for efficient coalesced accessing. Through the experimental evaluation, we demonstrate that our GPU algorithm is quite faster than CPU programs and the speedup becomes much evident when the graph size is enlarged.

  3. The RAVE/VERTIGO vertex reconstruction toolkit and framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltenberger, W.; Mitaroff, W.; Moser, F.; Pflugfelder, B.; Riedel, H. V.

    2008-07-01

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE1) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO2) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state-of-the-art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available.

  4. Cellular uptake of magnetite nanoparticles enhanced by NdFeB magnets in staggered arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Ching; Chang, Fan-Yu; Tu, Shu-Ju; Chen, Jyh-Ping; Ma, Yunn-Hwa

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic force may greatly enhance uptake of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by cultured cells; however, the effects of non-uniformity of magnetic field/ magnetic gradient on MNP internalization in culture has not been elucidated. Cellular uptake of polyacrylic acid coated-MNP by LN229 cells was measured with cylindrical NdFeB magnets arranged in a staggered pattern. The magnetic field generated by placing a magnet underneath (H-field) elicited a homogenous distribution of MNPs on the cells in culture; whereas the field without magnet underneath (L-field) resulted in MNP distribution along the edge of the wells. Cell-associated MNP (MNPcell) appeared to be magnetic field- and concentration-dependent. In H-field, MNPcell reached plateau within one hour of exposure to MNP with only one-min application of the magnetic force in the beginning of incubation; continuous presence of the magnet for 2 h did not further increase MNPcell, suggesting that magnetic force-induced uptake may be primarily contributed to enhanced MNP sedimentation. Although MNP distribution was much inhomogeneous in L-field, averaged MNPcell in the L-field may reach as high as 80% of that in H-field during 1-6 h incubation, suggesting high capacity of MNP internalization. In addition, no significant difference was observed in MNPcell analyzed by flow cytometry with the application of H-field of staggered plate vs. filled magnet plate. Therefore, biological variation may dominate MNP internalization even under relatively uniformed magnetic field; whereas non-uniformed magnetic field may serve as a model for tumor targeting with MNPs in vivo.

  5. LOGISTIC NETWORK REGRESSION FOR SCALABLE ANALYSIS OF NETWORKS WITH JOINT EDGE/VERTEX DYNAMICS.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Zack W; Butts, Carter T

    2014-08-01

    Change in group size and composition has long been an important area of research in the social sciences. Similarly, interest in interaction dynamics has a long history in sociology and social psychology. However, the effects of endogenous group change on interaction dynamics are a surprisingly understudied area. One way to explore these relationships is through social network models. Network dynamics may be viewed as a process of change in the edge structure of a network, in the vertex set on which edges are defined, or in both simultaneously. Although early studies of such processes were primarily descriptive, recent work on this topic has increasingly turned to formal statistical models. Although showing great promise, many of these modern dynamic models are computationally intensive and scale very poorly in the size of the network under study and/or the number of time points considered. Likewise, currently used models focus on edge dynamics, with little support for endogenously changing vertex sets. Here, the authors show how an existing approach based on logistic network regression can be extended to serve as a highly scalable framework for modeling large networks with dynamic vertex sets. The authors place this approach within a general dynamic exponential family (exponential-family random graph modeling) context, clarifying the assumptions underlying the framework (and providing a clear path for extensions), and they show how model assessment methods for cross-sectional networks can be extended to the dynamic case. Finally, the authors illustrate this approach on a classic data set involving interactions among windsurfers on a California beach.

  6. LOGISTIC NETWORK REGRESSION FOR SCALABLE ANALYSIS OF NETWORKS WITH JOINT EDGE/VERTEX DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Almquist, Zack W.; Butts, Carter T.

    2015-01-01

    Change in group size and composition has long been an important area of research in the social sciences. Similarly, interest in interaction dynamics has a long history in sociology and social psychology. However, the effects of endogenous group change on interaction dynamics are a surprisingly understudied area. One way to explore these relationships is through social network models. Network dynamics may be viewed as a process of change in the edge structure of a network, in the vertex set on which edges are defined, or in both simultaneously. Although early studies of such processes were primarily descriptive, recent work on this topic has increasingly turned to formal statistical models. Although showing great promise, many of these modern dynamic models are computationally intensive and scale very poorly in the size of the network under study and/or the number of time points considered. Likewise, currently used models focus on edge dynamics, with little support for endogenously changing vertex sets. Here, the authors show how an existing approach based on logistic network regression can be extended to serve as a highly scalable framework for modeling large networks with dynamic vertex sets. The authors place this approach within a general dynamic exponential family (exponential-family random graph modeling) context, clarifying the assumptions underlying the framework (and providing a clear path for extensions), and they show how model assessment methods for cross-sectional networks can be extended to the dynamic case. Finally, the authors illustrate this approach on a classic data set involving interactions among windsurfers on a California beach. PMID:26120218

  7. A Cohomology Theory of Grading-Restricted Vertex Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Zhi

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a cohomology theory of grading-restricted vertex algebras. To construct the correct cohomologies, we consider linear maps from tensor powers of a grading-restricted vertex algebra to "rational functions valued in the algebraic completion of a module for the algebra," instead of linear maps from tensor powers of the algebra to a module for the algebra. One subtle complication arising from such functions is that we have to carefully address the issue of convergence when we compose these linear maps with vertex operators. In particular, for each , we have an inverse system of nth cohomologies and an additional nth cohomology of a grading-restricted vertex algebra V with coefficients in a V-module W such that is isomorphic to the inverse limit of the inverse system . In the case of n = 2, there is an additional second cohomology denoted by which will be shown in a sequel to the present paper to correspond to what we call square-zero extensions of V and to first order deformations of V when W = V.

  8. Recent developments in high precision vertex chambers at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, D.R.

    1984-04-01

    Three detectors MARK II, MAC, AND HRS are using or planning small drift chambers placed as close as possible to the interaction print at PEP. There is also a program of development for a gaseous vertex detector for MARK II at SLC. All these programs are reviewed. 13 references.

  9. Tests of track segment and vertex finding with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B.; Lessner, E. ); Lindsey, C.S. )

    1990-04-01

    Feed forward neural networks have been trained, using back-propagation, to find the slopes of simulated track segments in a straw chamber and to find the vertex of tracks from both simulated and real events in a more conventional drift chamber geometry. Network architectures, training, and performance are presented. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  10. A neural network z-vertex trigger for Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus, S.; Skambraks, S.; Abudinen, F.; Chen, Y.; Feindt, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Heck, M.; Kiesling, C.; Knoll, A.; Paul, S.; Schieck, J.

    2015-05-01

    We present the concept of a track trigger for the Belle II experiment, based on a neural network approach, that is able to reconstruct the z (longitudinal) position of the event vertex within the latency of the first level trigger. The trigger will thus be able to suppress a large fraction of the dominating background from events outside of the interaction region. The trigger uses the drift time information of the hits from the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) of Belle II within narrow cones in polar and azimuthal angle as well as in transverse momentum (sectors), and estimates the z-vertex without explicit track reconstruction. The preprocessing for the track trigger is based on the track information provided by the standard CDC trigger. It takes input from the 2D (r — φ) track finder, adds information from the stereo wires of the CDC, and finds the appropriate sectors in the CDC for each track in a given event. Within each sector, the z-vertex of the associated track is estimated by a specialized neural network, with a continuous output corresponding to the scaled z-vertex. The input values for the neural network are calculated from the wire hits of the CDC.

  11. SVT: an online silicon vertex tracker for the CDF upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bardi, A.; Belforte, S.; Berryhill, J.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-07-01

    The SVT is an online tracker for the CDF upgrade which will reconstruct 2D tracks using information from the Silicon VerteX detector (SVXII) and Central Outer Tracker (COT). The precision measurement of the track impact parameter will then be used to select and record large samples of B hadrons. We discuss the overall architecture, algorithms, and hardware implementation of the system.

  12. SVX{prime}, the new CDF silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cihangir, S.; Gillespie, G.; Gonzalez, H.

    1994-08-26

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) radiation hardened silicon vertex detector (SVX{prime}) is described. The new detector has several improvements over its predecessor such as better signal to noise and higher efficiency. It`s expected to have a radiation tolerance in excess of 1 Mrad. It has been taking data for several months and some preliminary results are shown.

  13. Self-locking degree-4 vertex origami structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2016-11-01

    A generic degree-4 vertex (4-vertex) origami possesses one continuous degree-of-freedom for rigid folding, and this folding process can be stopped when two of its facets bind together. Such facet-binding will induce self-locking so that the overall structure stays at a pre-specified configuration without additional locking elements or actuators. Self-locking offers many promising properties, such as programmable deformation ranges and piecewise stiffness jumps, that could significantly advance many adaptive structural systems. However, despite its excellent potential, the origami self-locking features have not been well studied, understood, and used. To advance the state of the art, this research conducts a comprehensive investigation on the principles of achieving and harnessing self-locking in 4-vertex origami structures. Especially, for the first time, this study expands the 4-vertex structure construction from single-component to dual-component designs and investigates their self-locking behaviours. By exploiting various tessellation designs, this research discovers that the dual-component designs offer the origami structures with extraordinary attributes that the single-component structures do not have, which include the existence of flat-folded locking planes, programmable locking points and deformability. Finally, proof-of-concept experiments investigate how self-locking can effectively induce piecewise stiffness jumps. The results of this research provide new scientific knowledge and a systematic framework for the design, analysis and utilization of self-locking origami structures for many potential engineering applications.

  14. The role of geometry in 4-vertex origami mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott; Dieleman, Peter; van Hecke, Martin

    Origami offers an interesting design platform metamaterials because it strongly couples mechanics with geometry. Even so, most research carried out so far has been limited to one or two particular patterns. I will discuss the full geometrical space of the most common origami building block, the 4-vertex, and show how exotic geometries can have dramatic effects on the mechanics.

  15. Self-locking degree-4 vertex origami structures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Wang, K W

    2016-11-01

    A generic degree-4 vertex (4-vertex) origami possesses one continuous degree-of-freedom for rigid folding, and this folding process can be stopped when two of its facets bind together. Such facet-binding will induce self-locking so that the overall structure stays at a pre-specified configuration without additional locking elements or actuators. Self-locking offers many promising properties, such as programmable deformation ranges and piecewise stiffness jumps, that could significantly advance many adaptive structural systems. However, despite its excellent potential, the origami self-locking features have not been well studied, understood, and used. To advance the state of the art, this research conducts a comprehensive investigation on the principles of achieving and harnessing self-locking in 4-vertex origami structures. Especially, for the first time, this study expands the 4-vertex structure construction from single-component to dual-component designs and investigates their self-locking behaviours. By exploiting various tessellation designs, this research discovers that the dual-component designs offer the origami structures with extraordinary attributes that the single-component structures do not have, which include the existence of flat-folded locking planes, programmable locking points and deformability. Finally, proof-of-concept experiments investigate how self-locking can effectively induce piecewise stiffness jumps. The results of this research provide new scientific knowledge and a systematic framework for the design, analysis and utilization of self-locking origami structures for many potential engineering applications.

  16. Status and upgrade plans of the Belle silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, H.; Arakawa, T.; Asano, Y.; Aso, T.; Bakich, A.; Barbero, M.; Browder, T.; Chang, M. C.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chidzik, S.; Chouvikov, A.; Choi, Y. K.; Das, A.; Dalseno, J.; Fratina, S.; Friedl, M.; Fujiyama, Y.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Harrop, B.; Hayashi, K.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Higuchi, T.; Hirakawa, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishino, H.; Joshi, N. K.; Kajiwara, S.; Kakuno, H.; Kameshima, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Kim, Y. J.; Koike, S.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kurashiro, H.; Kusaka, A.; Marlow, D.; Miyake, H.; Moloney, G. R.; Nakahama, Y.; Natkaniec, Z.; Okuno, S.; Ono, S.; Ostrowicz, W.; Ozaki, H.; Peak, L.; Pernicka, M.; Rosen, M.; Rozanska, M.; Sato, N.; Schmid, S.; Schümann, J.; Stanič, S.; Steininger, H.; Sumisawa, K.; Tajima, O.; Takahashi, T.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, M.; Tani, N.; Taylor, G. N.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, K.; Ueno, K.; Ushiroda, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K.; Velikzhanin, Y. S.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M. Z.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Ziegler, T.

    2007-12-01

    The second generation of Belle Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) has been efficiently operated for more than three years. With increasing beam-induced background, a degradation of the detector performance is expected. To avoid such a difficulty, we are planing a next upgrade, the third generation of the SVD. Currently, its design is almost finalized.

  17. Gap and stagger effects on the aerodynamic performance and the wake behind a biplane with endplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hantae

    Modern flow diagnostics applied to a very old aerodynamic problem has produced a number of intriguing new results and new insight into previous results. The aerodynamic performance and associated flow physics of the biplane with endplates as a function of variation in gap and stagger were analytically and experimentally investigated. A combination of vortex lattice method, integrated force measurement, streamwise PIV, and Trefftz plane Stereo PIV were used to better understand the flowfield around the biplane with endplates. This study was performed to determine the configuration with the optimal aerodynamic performance and to understand the fluid mechanics behind optimal and suboptimal performance of the configuration. The Vortex Lattice code (AVL) shows that the gap and stagger have the most dramatic effects out of the six parameters studied: gap, stagger, dihedral, decalage, sweep and overhang. The force balance measurements with fourteen biplane configurations of different gaps and staggers show that as gap and stagger increase, the lift efficiency also increases at all angles of attack tested at both Re 60,000 and 120,000. Using the force balance data, a generalized empirical method for the prediction of lift coefficient as a function of gap, stagger and angle of attack has been determined and validated when combined with existing relations for CL--α adjustments for AR and taper effects. The resulting empirical approach allows for a rapid determination of CL for a biplane having different gap, stagger, AR and taper without the need for a complete flowfield analysis. Two Dimensional PIV results show a distinctive pattern in the downwash angle for the different gap and stagger configurations tested. The downwash angle increases with increasing gap and stagger. It is also evident that the change in downwash angle is directly proportional to the change in lift coefficient as would be expected. Increasing gap spacing increases the downwash angle as well. Based on

  18. Analysis of social optimum for staggered shifts in a single-entry traffic corridor with no late arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Yao; Huang, Hai-Jun; Tang, Tie-Qiao

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the traffic flow dynamics under the social optimum (SO) principle in a single-entry traffic corridor with staggered shifts from the analytical and numerical perspectives. The LWR (Lighthill-Whitham and Richards) model and the Greenshield's velocity-density function are utilized to describe the dynamic properties of traffic flow. The closed-form SO solution is analytically derived and some numerical examples are used to further testify the analytical solution. The optimum proportion of the numbers of commuters with different desired arrival times is further discussed, where the analytical and numerical results both indicate that the cumulative outflow curve under the SO principle is piecewise smooth.

  19. Empty versus filled polyhedra: 11 vertex bare germanium clusters.

    PubMed

    Uţă, Matei-Maria; King, Robert Bruce

    2014-04-01

    The structures and energetics of centered 10-vertex Ge@Ge₁₀(z) (z = -4, -2, 0, +2, +4) clusters have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT) for comparison with the previously studied isomeric empty 11-vertex Ge₁₁(z) clusters. For the cationic species (z = +2, +4) such centered Ge@Ge₁₀(z) structures are shown to be energetically competitive (within ∼1 kcal mol⁻¹) to the lowest energy isomeric empty Ge₁₁(z) structures. These Ge@Ge₁₀(z) structures can be derived from the lowest energy empty 10-vertex Ge₁₀(z-4) structures by inserting a Ge⁴⁺ ion in the center. The outer 10-vertex polyhedron in the lowest energy Ge@Ge₁₀²⁺ dication structure is the most spherical D(4d) bicapped square antiprism, which is also the lowest energy structure of the empty Ge₁₀²⁻ dianion, as expected from the Wade-Mingos skeletal electron counting rules. For the tetracationic Ge₁₁⁴⁺ /Ge@Ge₁₀⁴⁺ system the lowest energy centered Ge@Ge₁₀⁴⁺ structure can be obtained by inserting a Ge⁴⁺ ion in the center of a C(3v) deltahedral empty Ge10 cluster. Centered 10-vertex polyhedral Ge@Ge₁₀(z) structures were also found for the neutral (z = 0) and dianionic (z = -2) systems but at significantly higher energies than the lowest energy isomeric empty Ge₁₁(z) structures.

  20. A quantum hybrid with a thin antenna at the vertex of a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Raffaele; Posilicano, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    We study the spectrum, resonances and scattering matrix of a quantum Hamiltonian on a "hybrid surface" consisting of a half-line attached by its endpoint to the vertex of a concave planar wedge. At the boundary of the wedge, outside the vertex, homogeneous Dirichlet conditions are imposed. The system is tunable by varying the measure of the angle at the vertex.

  1. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor fuel module construction

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, Gary K.; DiGuiseppe, Carl P.

    1985-01-01

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wher the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements. The arrangements of the fissile and fertile regions in an alternating axial manner minimizes the radial power peaking factors and provides a more optional thermal-hydraulic design than is afforded by radial arrangements.

  2. Heat transfer coefficients for staggered arrays of short pin fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Short pin fins are often used to increase that heat transfer to the coolant in the trailing edge of a turbine blade. Due primarily to limits of casting technology, it is not possible to manufacture pins of optimum length for heat transfer purposes in the trailing edge region. In many cases the pins are so short that they actually decrease the total heat transfer surface area compared to a plain wall. A heat transfer data base for these short pins is not available in the literature. Heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for several staggered arrays of short pin fins. The measured Nusselt numbers when plotted versus Reynolds numbers were found to fall on a single curve for all surfaces tested. The heat transfer coefficients for the short pin fins (length to diameter ratios of 1/2 and 2) were found to be about a factor of two lower than data from the literature for longer pin arrays (length to diameter ratios of about 8).

  3. Rashba coupling amplification by a staggered crystal field

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Cottin, David; Casula, Michele; Lantz, Gabriel; Klein, Yannick; Petaccia, Luca; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Marsi, Marino; Gauzzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in materials where relativistic effects induce non-trivial electronic states with promise for spintronics applications. One example is the splitting of bands with opposite spin chirality produced by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling in asymmetric potentials. Sizable splittings have been hitherto obtained using either heavy elements, where this coupling is intrinsically strong, or large surface electric fields. Here by means of angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we give evidence of a large Rashba coupling of 0.25 eV Å, leading to a remarkable band splitting up to 0.15 eV with hidden spin-chiral polarization in centrosymmetric BaNiS2. This is explained by a huge staggered crystal field of 1.4 V Å−1, produced by a gliding plane symmetry, that breaks inversion symmetry at the Ni site. This unexpected result in the absence of heavy elements demonstrates an effective mechanism of Rashba coupling amplification that may foster spin-orbit band engineering. PMID:27089869

  4. An Adaptive Staggered Dose Design for a Normal Endpoint.

    PubMed

    Wu, Joseph; Menon, Sandeep; Chang, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In a clinical trial where several doses are compared to a control, a multi-stage design that combines both the selection of the best dose and the confirmation of this selected dose is desirable. An example is the two-stage drop-the-losers or pick-the-winner design, where inferior doses are dropped after interim analysis. Selection of target dose(s) can be based on ranking of observed effects, hypothesis testing with adjustment for multiplicity, or other criteria at interim stages. A number of methods have been proposed and have made significant gains in trial efficiency. However, many of these designs started off with all doses with equal allocation and did not consider prioritizing the doses using existing dose-response information. We propose an adaptive staggered dose procedure that allows explicit prioritization of doses and applies error spending scheme that favors doses with assumed better responses. This design starts off with only a subset of the doses and adaptively adds new doses depending on interim results. Using simulation, we have shown that this design performs better in terms of increased statistical power than the drop-the-losers design given strong prior information of dose response.

  5. Superconductor magnets used for stagger-tuning traveling-wave maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Superconducting materials reduce size and weight of magnets used for stagger-tuning individual traveling-wave maser crystals. The invention is useful in microwave communication systems requiring a high information rate.

  6. An analytical solution for contact resistance of staggered organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi-Alavijeh, Hamidreza; Katebi-Jahromi, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    We have developed analytical models for bias dependent contact resistance (RC) and output characteristics of staggered organic field-effect transistors (OFETS) based on a bulk resistance-approximated and mobility-modified current-crowding method. Numerical evaluations of RC and its resistive components show that the bias dependency of the bulk resistance is negligible. Consequently, the properties of the active layer interfaces determine RC and its characteristics. Effective parameters include a normally constant charge injection barrier at the organic-metal interface (Eb) and a gate induced surface carrier-concentration (PS0) at the organic-insulator boundary. The energy barrier pertains to the fabrication process, and its related resistance (rc) can be determined as the fitting parameter of the theoretical model. However, PS0 is strongly gate bias dependent and the results of the numerical model indicate that the resulting component (rch) is dominant and has a considerable effect on RC and its characteristics. More importantly, PS0 as the key parameter of the contact resistance is analytically expressible and by using a proposed mobility-modified current-crowding model, the contact resistance can be analytically formulated. Accordingly, the output characteristics of the OFETs in the triode region can be also analytically modeled using the developed relation of RC.

  7. {Delta}I = 2 energy staggering in normal deformed dysprosium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.A.; Brown, T.B.; Archer, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Very high spin states (I{ge}50{Dirac_h}) have been observed in {sup 155,156,157}Dy. The long regular band sequences, free from sharp backbending effects, observed in these dysprosium nuclei offer the possibility of investigating the occurence of any {Delta}I = 2 staggering in normal deformed nuclei. Employing the same analysis techniques as used in superdeformed nuclei, certain bands do indeed demonstrate an apparent staggering and this is discussed.

  8. Theoretical and practical considerations for staggered production of crops in a BLSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutte, G. W.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Yorio, N. C.; Wheeler, A.

    1997-01-01

    A functional Bioregenerative Life Support System (BLSS) will generate oxygen, remove excess carbon dioxide, purify water, and produce food on a continuous basis for long periods of operation. In order to minimize fluctuations in gas exchange, water purification, and yield that are inherent in batch systems, staggered planting and harvesting of the crop is desirable. A 418-d test of staggered production of potato cv. Norland (26-d harvest cycles) using nutrients recovered from inedible biomass was recently completed at Kennedy Space Center. The results indicate that staggered production can be sustained without detrimental effects on life support functions in a CELSS. System yields of H_2O, O_2 and food were higher in staggered than batch plantings. Plants growing in staggered production or batch production on ``aged'' solution initiated tubers earlier, and were shorter than plants grown on ``fresh'' solution. This morphological response required an increase in planting density to maintain full canopy coverage. Plants grown in staggered production used available light more efficiently than the batch planting due to increased sidelighting.

  9. Design and construction of a Vertex Chamber and measurement of the average B-Hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-10-01

    Four parameters describe the mixing of the three quark generations in the Standard Model of the weak charged current interaction. These four parameters are experimental inputs to the model. A measurement of the mean lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks, or B-Hadrons, constrains the magnitudes of two of these parameters. Measurement of the B-Hadron lifetime requires a device that can measure the locations of the stable particles that result from B-Hadron decay. This device must function reliably in an inaccessible location, and survive high radiation levels. We describe the design and construction of such a device, a gaseous drift chamber. Tubes of 6.9 mm diameter, having aluminized mylar walls of 100 ..mu..m thickness are utilized in this Vertex Chamber. It achieves a spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m, and a resolution in extrapolation to the B-Hadron decay location of 87 ..mu..m. Its inner layer is 4.6 cm from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams. The Vertex Chamber is situated within the MAC detector at PEP. We have analyzed botht he 94 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity accumulated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the Vertex Chamber in place as well as the 210 pb/sup -1/ accumulated previously. We require a lepton with large momentum transverse to the event thrust axis to obtain a sample of events enriched in B-Hadron decays. The distribution of signed impact parameters of all tracks in these events is used to measure the B-Hadron flight distance, and hence lifetime. 106 refs., 79 figs., 20 tabs.

  10. Vertex detectors: The state of the art and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Damerell, C.J.S.

    1997-01-01

    We review the current status of vertex detectors (tracking microscopes for the recognition of charm and bottom particle decays). The reasons why silicon has become the dominant detector medium are explained. Energy loss mechanisms are reviewed, as well as the physics and technology of semiconductor devices, emphasizing the areas of most relevance for detectors. The main design options (microstrips and pixel devices, both CCD`s and APS`s) are discussed, as well as the issue of radiation damage, which probably implies the need to change to detector media beyond silicon for some vertexing applications. Finally, the evolution of key performance parameters over the past 15 years is reviewed, and an attempt is made to extrapolate to the likely performance of detectors working at the energy frontier ten years from now.

  11. On the zero crossing of the three-gluon vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athenodorou, A.; Binosi, D.; Boucaud, Ph.; De Soto, F.; Papavassiliou, J.; Rodríguez-Quintero, J.; Zafeiropoulos, S.

    2016-10-01

    We report on new results on the infrared behavior of the three-gluon vertex in quenched Quantum Chromodynamics, obtained from large-volume lattice simulations. The main focus of our study is the appearance of the characteristic infrared feature known as 'zero crossing', the origin of which is intimately connected with the nonperturbative masslessness of the Faddeev-Popov ghost. The appearance of this effect is clearly visible in one of the two kinematic configurations analyzed, and its theoretical origin is discussed in the framework of Schwinger-Dyson equations. The effective coupling in the momentum subtraction scheme that corresponds to the three-gluon vertex is constructed, revealing the vanishing of the effective interaction at the exact location of the zero crossing.

  12. Vertex topological indices and tree expressions, generalizations of continued fractions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We expand on the work of Hosoya to describe a generalization of continued fractions called “tree expressions.” Each rooted tree will be shown to correspond to a unique tree expression which can be evaluated as a rational number (not necessarily in lowest terms) whose numerator is equal to the Hosoya index of the entire tree and whose denominator is equal to the tree with the root deleted. In the development, we use Z(G) to define a natural candidate ζ(G, v) for a “vertex topological index” which is a value applied to each vertex of a graph, rather than a value assigned to the graph overall. Finally, we generalize the notion of tree expression to “labeled tree expressions” that correspond to labeled trees and show that such expressions can be evaluated as quotients of determinants of matrices that resemble adjacency matrices. PMID:20490285

  13. Performance of the CDF Online Silicon Vertex Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    R. Carosi et al.

    2002-03-27

    The Online Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is the new trigger processor dedicated to the 2-D reconstruction of charged particle trajectories at the Level 2 of the CDF trigger. The SVT links the digitized pulse heights found within the Silicon Vertex detector to the tracks reconstructed in the Central Outer Tracker by the Level 1 fast track finder. Preliminary tests of the system took place during the October 2000 commissioning run of the Tevatron Collider. During the April-October 2001 data taking it was possible to evaluate the performance of the system. In this paper we review the tracking algorithms implemented in the SVT and we report on the performance achieved during the early phase of run II.

  14. Worldline calculation of the three-gluon vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadiniaz, N.; Schubert, C.

    2012-10-23

    The three-gluon vertex is a basic object of interest in nonabelian gauge theory. At the one-loop level, it has been calculated and analyzed by a number of authors. Here we use the worldline formalism to unify the calculations of the scalar, spinor and gluon loop contributions to the one-loop vertex, leading to an extremely compact representation in terms of field strength tensors. We verify its equivalence with previously obtained representations, and explain the relation of its structure to the low-energy effective action. The sum rule found by Binger and Brodsky for the scalar, spinor and gluon loop contributions in the present approach relates to worldline supersymmetry.

  15. The SVX II Silicon Vertex Detector at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, Juan A.

    1999-08-01

    The Silicon VerteX detector (SVX II) for the CDF experiment at the Tevatron p overlinep collider is a 3-barrel 5-layer device with double-sided, AC-coupled silicon strip detectors. The readout is based on a custom IC, the SVX3 chip, capable of simultaneous acquisition, digitization and readout operation (dead-timeless). In this paper we report on the SVX II design and project status including mechanical design, frontend electronics, and data acquisition.

  16. Automatically Generated Algorithms for the Vertex Coloring Problem

    PubMed Central

    Contreras Bolton, Carlos; Gatica, Gustavo; Parada, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    The vertex coloring problem is a classical problem in combinatorial optimization that consists of assigning a color to each vertex of a graph such that no adjacent vertices share the same color, minimizing the number of colors used. Despite the various practical applications that exist for this problem, its NP-hardness still represents a computational challenge. Some of the best computational results obtained for this problem are consequences of hybridizing the various known heuristics. Automatically revising the space constituted by combining these techniques to find the most adequate combination has received less attention. In this paper, we propose exploring the heuristics space for the vertex coloring problem using evolutionary algorithms. We automatically generate three new algorithms by combining elementary heuristics. To evaluate the new algorithms, a computational experiment was performed that allowed comparing them numerically with existing heuristics. The obtained algorithms present an average 29.97% relative error, while four other heuristics selected from the literature present a 59.73% error, considering 29 of the more difficult instances in the DIMACS benchmark. PMID:23516506

  17. Staggered-grid split-node method for spontaneous rupture simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalguer, Luis A.; Day, Steven M.

    2007-02-01

    We adapt the traction-at-split-node method for spontaneous rupture simulations to the velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference scheme. The staggered-grid implementation introduces both velocity and stress discontinuities via split nodes. The staggered traction components on the fault plane are interpolated to form the traction vector at split nodes, facilitating alignment of the vectors of sliding friction and slip velocity. To simplify the split-node partitioning of the equations of motion, spatial differencing is reduced from fourth to second order along the fault plane, but in the remainder of the grid the spatial differencing scheme remains identical to conventional spatially fourth-order three-dimensional staggered-grid schemes. The resulting staggered-grid split node (SGSN) method has convergence rates relative to rupture-time, final-slip, and peak-slip-velocity metrics that are very similar to the corresponding rates for both a partly staggered split-node code (DFM) and the boundary integral method. The SGSN method gives very accurate solutions (in the sense that errors are comparable to the uncertainties in the reference solution) when the median resolution of the cohesive zone is 4.4 grid points. Combined with previous results for other grid types and other fault-discontinuity approximations, the SGSN results demonstrate that accuracy in finite difference solutions to the spontaneous rupture problem is controlled principally by the scheme used to represent the fault discontinuity, and is relatively insensitive to the grid geometry used to represent the continuum. The method provides an efficient and accurate means of adding spontaneous rupture capability to velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference codes, while retaining the computational advantages of those codes for problems of wave propagation in complex media.

  18. Multifractal cross-correlation effects in two-variable time series of complex network vertex observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OświÈ©cimka, Paweł; Livi, Lorenzo; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the scaling of the cross-correlations calculated for two-variable time series containing vertex properties in the context of complex networks. Time series of such observables are obtained by means of stationary, unbiased random walks. We consider three vertex properties that provide, respectively, short-, medium-, and long-range information regarding the topological role of vertices in a given network. In order to reveal the relation between these quantities, we applied the multifractal cross-correlation analysis technique, which provides information about the nonlinear effects in coupling of time series. We show that the considered network models are characterized by unique multifractal properties of the cross-correlation. In particular, it is possible to distinguish between Erdös-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, and Watts-Strogatz networks on the basis of fractal cross-correlation. Moreover, the analysis of protein contact networks reveals characteristics shared with both scale-free and small-world models.

  19. Perturbative matching of the staggered four-fermion operators for {epsilon}'/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Weonjong

    2001-09-01

    Using staggered fermions, we calculate the perturbative corrections to the bilinear and four-fermion operators that are used in the numerical study of weak matrix elements for {epsilon}'/{epsilon}. We present results for one-loop matching coefficients between continuum operators, calculated in the naive dimensional regularization (NDR) scheme, and gauge invariant staggered fermion operators. In particular, we concentrate on Feynman diagrams of the current-current insertion type. We also present results for the tadpole improved operators. These results, combined with existing results for penguin diagrams, provide a complete one-loop renormalization of the staggered four-fermion operators. Therefore, using our results, it is possible to match a lattice calculation of K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing and K{yields}{pi}{pi} decays to the continuum NDR results with all corrections of O(g{sup 2}) included.

  20. Coal mining with Triple-section extraction process in stagger arrangement roadway layout method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zimo; Liu, Baozhu; Zhao, Jingli; Chanda, Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    This paper introduces the Triple-section extraction process in the three-dimensional roadway layout of stagger arrangement method for longwall top-coal caving mining. This 3-D roadway layout of stagger arrangement method without coal pillars, which arranged the air intake roadway and air return roadway in different horizons, realizing the design theory transformation of roadway layout from 2D system to 3D system. And the paper makes systematic analysis to the geological, technical and economic factors, applies this new mining roadway layout technology for raising coal recovery ratio and solving the problems about full-seam mining in thick coal seam synthetically according to theoretical study and mining practice. Furthermore, the paper presents a physical simulation about inner staggered roadway layout of this particular longwall top-coal caving method.

  1. Modified Omega-k Algorithm for High-Speed Platform Highly-Squint Staggered SAR Based on Azimuth Non-Uniform Interpolation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Yang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the staggered SAR technique is employed for high-speed platform highly-squint SAR by varying the pulse repetition interval (PRI) as a linear function of range-walk. To focus the staggered SAR data more efficiently, a low-complexity modified Omega-k algorithm is proposed based on a novel method for optimal azimuth non-uniform interpolation, avoiding zero padding in range direction for recovering range cell migration (RCM) and saving in both data storage and computational load. An approximate model on continuous PRI variation with respect to sliding receive-window is employed in the proposed algorithm, leaving a residual phase error only due to the effect of a time-varying Doppler phase caused by staggered SAR. Then, azimuth non-uniform interpolation (ANI) at baseband is carried out to compensate the azimuth non-uniform sampling (ANS) effect resulting from continuous PRI variation, which is further followed by the modified Omega-k algorithm. The proposed algorithm has a significantly lower computational complexity, but with an equally effective imaging performance, as shown in our simulation results. PMID:25664433

  2. Anomalous ω-Z-γ vertex from hidden local symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Masayasu; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    We formulate the general form of the ω-Z-γ vertex in the framework based on the hidden local symmetry, which arises from the gauge-invariant terms for intrinsic parity-odd part of the effective action. Those terms are given as the homogeneous part of the general solution (having free parameters) to the Wess-Zumino anomaly equation and hence are not determined by the anomaly, in sharp contrast to the Harvey-Hill-Hill (HHH) action where the relevant vertex is claimed to be uniquely determined by the anomaly. We show that, even in the framework that HHH was based on, the ω-Z-γ vertex is actually not determined by the anomaly but by the homogeneous (anomaly-free) part of the general solution to the Wess-Zumino anomaly equation having free parameters in the same way as in the hidden local symmetry formulation: The HHH action is just a particular choice of the free parameters in the general solution. We further show that the ω-Z-γ vertex related to the neutrino (ν)-nucleon (N) scattering cross section σ(νN→νN(N')γ) is determined not by the anomaly but by the anomaly-free part of the general solution having free parameters. Nevertheless, we find that the cross section σ(νN→νN(N')γ) is related through the Ward-Takahashi identity to Γ(ω→π0γ) which has the same parameter dependence as that of σ(νN→νN(N')γ) and hence the ratio σ(νN→νN(N')γ)/Γ(ω→π0γ) is fixed independently of these free parameters. Other set of the free parameters of the general solution can be fixed to make the best fit of the ω→π0l+l- process, which substantially differs from the HHH action. This gives a prediction of the cross section σ(νN→νN(N')γ*(l+l-)) to be tested at ν-N collision experiments in the future.

  3. Low-mass materials and vertex detector systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Physics requirements set the material budget and the precision and stability necessary in low-mass vertex detector systems. Operational considerations, along with physics requirements, set the operating environment to be provided and determine the heat to be removed. Representative materials for fulfilling those requirements are described and properties of the materials are tabulated. A figure of merit is proposed to aid in material selection. Multi-layer structures are examined as a method to allow material to be used effectively, thereby reducing material contributions. Lastly, comments are made on future directions to be considered in using present materials effectively and in developing new materials.

  4. Low-mass materials and vertex detector systems

    DOE PAGES

    Cooper, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Physics requirements set the material budget and the precision and stability necessary in low-mass vertex detector systems. Operational considerations, along with physics requirements, set the operating environment to be provided and determine the heat to be removed. Representative materials for fulfilling those requirements are described and properties of the materials are tabulated. A figure of merit is proposed to aid in material selection. Multi-layer structures are examined as a method to allow material to be used effectively, thereby reducing material contributions. Lastly, comments are made on future directions to be considered in using present materials effectively and in developing newmore » materials.« less

  5. Vertex Operators Arising from Jacobi-Trudi Identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Rozhkovskaya, Natasha

    2016-09-01

    We give an interpretation of the boson-fermion correspondence as a direct consequence of the Jacobi-Trudi identity. This viewpoint enables us to construct from a generalized version of the Jacobi-Trudi identity the action of a Clifford algebra on the polynomial algebras that arrive as analogues of the algebra of symmetric functions. A generalized Giambelli identity is also proved to follow from that identity. As applications, we obtain explicit formulas for vertex operators corresponding to characters of the classical Lie algebras, shifted Schur functions, and generalized Schur symmetric functions associated to linear recurrence relations.

  6. Chiral transition and deconfinement transition in QCD with the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action

    SciTech Connect

    Petreczky P.; Bazavov, A.

    2011-10-11

    We report preliminary results on the chiral and deconfinement aspects of the QCD transition at finite temperature using the Highly Improved Staggered Quark (HISQ) action on lattices with temporal extent of N{sub {tau}} = 6 and 8. The chiral aspects of the transition are studied in terms of quark condensates and the disconnected chiral susceptibility. We study the deconfinement transition in terms of the strange quark number susceptibility and the renormalized Polyakov loop. We made continuum estimates for some quantities and find reasonably good agreement between our results and the recent continuum extrapolated results obtained with the stout staggered quark action.

  7. Horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongcai; Wu, Lin

    2015-07-10

    We present the design of a horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications. This solar concentrator consists of an array of telecentric primary concentrators, a horizontally staggered lightguide layer, and a vertically tapered lightguide layer. The primary concentrator is realized by two plano-aspheric lenses with lateral movement and maintains a high F-number over an angle range of ±23.5°. The results of the simulations show that the solar concentrator achieves a high concentration ratio of 500× with ±0.5° of acceptance angle by a single-axis tracker and dual lateral translation stages.

  8. Topological index theorem on the lattice through the spectral flow of staggered fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcoiti, V.; Follana, E.; Vaquero, A.; Di Carlo, G.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate numerically the spectral flow introduced by Adams for the staggered Dirac operator on realistic (quenched) gauge configurations. We obtain clear numerical evidence that the definition works as expected: there is a clear separation between crossings near and far away from the origin, and the topological charge defined through the crossings near the origin agrees, for most configurations, with the one defined through the near-zero modes of large taste-singlet chirality of the staggered Dirac operator. The crossings are much closer to the origin if we improve the Dirac operator used in the definition, and they move towards the origin as we decrease the lattice spacing.

  9. Kaon BSM B -parameters using improved staggered fermions from Nf=2+1 unquenched QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-28

    In this paper, we present results for the matrix elements of the additional ΔS = 2 operators that appear in models of physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM), expressed in terms of four BSM B -parameters. Combined with experimental results for ΔMK and εK, these constrain the parameters of BSM models. We use improved staggered fermions, with valence hypercubic blocking transfromation (HYP)-smeared quarks and Nf = 2 + 1 flavors of “asqtad” sea quarks. The configurations have been generated by the MILC Collaboration. The matching between lattice and continuum four-fermion operators and bilinears is done perturbatively at one-loop order. We use three lattice spacings for the continuum extrapolation: a ≈ 0.09 , 0.06 and 0.045 fm. Valence light-quark masses range down to ≈ mmore » $$phys\\atop{s}$$ /13 while the light sea-quark masses range down to ≈ m$$phys\\atop{s}$$ / 20 . Compared to our previous published work, we have added four additional lattice ensembles, leading to better controlled extrapolations in the lattice spacing and sea-quark masses. We report final results for two renormalization scales, μ = 2 and 3 GeV, and compare them to those obtained by other collaborations. Agreement is found for two of the four BSM B-parameters (B2 and B$$SUSY\\atop{3}$$ ). The other two (B4 and B5) differ significantly from those obtained using regularization independent momentum subtraction (RI-MOM) renormalization as an intermediate scheme, but are in agreement with recent preliminary results obtained by the RBC-UKQCD Collaboration using regularization independent symmetric momentum subtraction (RI-SMOM) intermediate schemes.« less

  10. Kaon BSM B -parameters using improved staggered fermions from Nf=2 +1 unquenched QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Benjamin J.; Jang, Yong-Chull; Jung, Chulwoo; Jeong, Hwancheol; Kim, Jangho; Kim, Jongjeong; Kim, Sunghee; Lee, Weonjong; Leem, Jaehoon; Pak, Jeonghwan; Park, Sungwoo; Sharpe, Stephen R.; Yoon, Boram; SWME Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present results for the matrix elements of the additional Δ S =2 operators that appear in models of physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM), expressed in terms of four BSM B -parameters. Combined with experimental results for Δ MK and ɛK, these constrain the parameters of BSM models. We use improved staggered fermions, with valence hypercubic blocking transfromation (HYP)-smeared quarks and Nf=2 +1 flavors of "asqtad" sea quarks. The configurations have been generated by the MILC Collaboration. The matching between lattice and continuum four-fermion operators and bilinears is done perturbatively at one-loop order. We use three lattice spacings for the continuum extrapolation: a ≈0.09 , 0.06 and 0.045 fm. Valence light-quark masses range down to ≈msphys/13 while the light sea-quark masses range down to ≈msphys/20 . Compared to our previous published work, we have added four additional lattice ensembles, leading to better controlled extrapolations in the lattice spacing and sea-quark masses. We report final results for two renormalization scales, μ =2 and 3 GeV, and compare them to those obtained by other collaborations. Agreement is found for two of the four BSM B -parameters (B2 and B3SUSY). The other two (B4 and B5) differ significantly from those obtained using regularization independent momentum subtraction (RI-MOM) renormalization as an intermediate scheme, but are in agreement with recent preliminary results obtained by the RBC-UKQCD Collaboration using regularization independent symmetric momentum subtraction (RI-SMOM) intermediate schemes.

  11. The Belle II silicon vertex detector assembly and mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Bulla, L.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Lueck, T.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2017-02-01

    The Belle II experiment at the asymmetric SuperKEKB collider in Japan will operate at an instantaneous luminosity approximately 50 times greater than its predecessor (Belle). The central feature of the experiment is a vertex detector comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detectors (PXD) and four layers of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors (SVD). One of the key measurements for Belle II is CP violation asymmetry in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons, which hinges on a precise charged-track vertex determination and low-momentum track measurement. Towards this goal, a proper assembly of the SVD components with precise alignment ought to be performed and the geometrical tolerances should be checked to fall within the design limits. We present an overview of the assembly procedure that is being followed, which includes the precision gluing of the SVD module components, wire-bonding of the various electrical components, and precision 3D coordinate measurements of the final SVD modules. Finally, some results from the latest test-beam are reported.

  12. Quark-gluon vertex: A perturbation theory primer and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, R.; Albino, L.; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Tejeda-Yeomans, M. E.; Bashir, A.

    2017-02-01

    There has been growing evidence that the infrared enhancement of the form factors defining the full quark-gluon vertex plays an important role in realizing a dynamical breakdown of chiral symmetry in quantum chromodynamics, leading to the observed spectrum and properties of hadrons. Both the lattice and the Schwinger-Dyson communities have begun to calculate these form factors in various kinematical regimes of momenta involved. A natural consistency check for these studies is that they should match onto the perturbative predictions in the ultraviolet, where nonperturbative effects mellow down. In this article, we carry out a numerical analysis of the one-loop result for all the form factors of the quark-gluon vertex. Interestingly, even the one-loop results qualitatively encode most of the infrared enhancement features expected of their nonperturbative counter parts. We analyze various kinematical configurations of momenta: symmetric, on shell, and asymptotic. The on-shell limit enables us to compute anomalous chromomagnetic moment of quarks. The asymptotic results have implications for the multiplicative renormalizability of the quark propagator and its connection with the Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformations, allowing us to analyze and compare various Ansätze proposed so far.

  13. Heavy flavour physics at colliders with silicon strip vertex detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Andreas S.

    1994-03-01

    The physics of heavy flavours has played a dominant role in high energy physics research ever since the discovery of charm in 1974, followed by the τ lepton in 1975 and bottom in 1977. With the startup of the large experiments at the e+e- colliders LEP and the SLC a new type of detector system has now come into operation which has a major impact on the studies of heavy flavours: the silicon strip vertex detector. The basic design priciples of these novel detector systems are outlined and three representative experimental realizations are discussed. The impact of these detectors on the studies of the properties of heavy flavours is just emerging and focuses on the measurement of lifetimes and the tagging of the presence of heavy flavour hadrons in hadronic events. The tools that are being developed for these studies are described as well as details of representative analyses. The potential of these devices and the associated technological developments that were necessary for their application in the colding beam environment is reflected in a plethora of new proposals to build sophisticated silicon detector systems for a large variety of future high energy physics applications. Two examples will be briefly sketched, a vertex detector for an asymmetric e+e- bottom factory and a large scale tracking system for a multipurpose detector at one of the new large hadron colliders.

  14. A cell-vertex multigrid method for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radespiel, R.

    1989-01-01

    A cell-vertex scheme for the Navier-Stokes equations, which is based on central difference approximations and Runge-Kutta time stepping, is described. Using local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, a multigrid method, and carefully controlled artificial dissipative terms, very good convergence rates are obtained for a wide range of two- and three-dimensional flows over airfoils and wings. The accuracy of the code is examined by grid refinement studies and comparison with experimental data. For an accurate prediction of turbulent flows with strong separations, a modified version of the nonequilibrium turbulence model of Johnson and King is introduced, which is well suited for an implementation into three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes. It is shown that the solutions for three-dimensional flows with strong separations can be dramatically improved, when a nonequilibrium model of turbulence is used.

  15. Mixed action simulations on a staggered background: Interpretation and result for the 2-flavor QCD chiral condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenfratz, Anna; Hoffmann, Roland

    2006-12-01

    Growing evidence indicates that in the continuum limit the rooted staggered action is in the correct QCD universality class, the nonlocal terms arising from taste breaking can be viewed as lattice artifacts. In this paper we consider the 2-flavor Asqtad staggered action at lattice spacing a{approx_equal}0.13 fm and probe the properties of the staggered configurations by an overlap valence Dirac operator. By comparing the distribution of the overlap eigenmodes to continuum QCD predictions we investigate if/when the lattice artifacts are small as a function of the staggered quark mass. We define a matching overlap quark mass where the lattice corrections are minimal for the topological susceptibility and from the eigenmode distribution we predict the 2-flavor chiral condensate. Our results indicate that the staggered configurations are consistent with 2-flavor continuum QCD up to small lattice artifacts, and predict a consistent value for the infinite volume chiral condensate.

  16. Magnetic property of a staggered-array undulator using a bulk high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinjo, Ryota; Mishima, Kenta; Choi, Yong-Woon; Omer, Mohamed; Yoshida, Kyohei; Negm, Hani; Torgasin, Konstantin; Shibata, Marie; Shimahashi, Kyohei; Imon, Hidekazu; Okumura, Kensuke; Inukai, Motoharu; Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Nagasaki, Kazunobu; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2014-02-01

    The magnetic field of a staggered-array undulator using a bulk high-temperature superconductor is calculated by analytical and numerical methods. Analytical formulas for the undulator field and the solenoid field required to generate the undulator field are derived from a simple two-dimensional model. The analytical calculation shows the degree of dependence of these fields on the undulator parameters, the generation of a high undulator field proportional to the critical current density of the bulk superconductor, and the good tunability of the undulator field over a wide range of values. The numerical calculation is performed in a three-dimensional geometry by two methods: the center field and energy minimization methods. The latter treats the current distribution inside the bulk, whereas the former neglects it as a natural extension of the analytical model. The calculation also reveals the dependence of the fields on the undulator parameters arising from the current distribution. From the comparison with experimental results, we find that the latter method reproduces the experimental results well, which indicates the importance of the current distribution inside the bulk. Therefore, we derive a semiempirical formula for the required solenoid field by modifying the analytical formula using the numerical results so as to include the effect of the current distribution. The semiempirical formula reproduces the numerical result with an error of 3%. Finally, we estimate the magnetic performance of the undulator as an example of using the formulas and values presented in this paper. The estimation shows that an undulator field twice as large as that of the present in-vacuum undulator but with an equal period and gap can be obtained at a temperature of approximately 20-40 K, and that deflection parameters (K values) of 1 and 2 can be achieved with periods of 5 and 10 mm at approximately 4-20 K.

  17. Multiple jet impingement heat transfer characteristic: Experimental investigation of in-line and staggered arrays with crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Takeuchi, D. I.; Berry, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Heat transfer characteristics were obtained for configurations designed to model the impingement cooled midchord region of air cooled gas turbine airfoils. The configurations tested were inline and staggered two-dimensional arrays of circular jets with ten spanwise rows of holes. The cooling air was constrained to exit in the chordwise direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and the heat transfer surface. Tests were run for chordwise jet hole spacings of five, ten, and fifteen hole diameters; spanwise spacings of four, six, and eight diameters; and channel heights of one, two, three, and six diameters. Mean jet Reynolds numbers ranged from 5000 to 50,000. The thermal boundary condition at the heat transfer test surface was isothermal. Tests were run for sets of geometrically similar configurations of different sizes. Mean and chordwise resolved Nusselt numbers were determined utilizing a specially constructed test surface which was segmented in the chordwise direction.

  18. Influence of the mineral staggering on the elastic properties of the mineralized collagen fibril in lamellar bone.

    PubMed

    Vercher-Martínez, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Fuenmayor, F Javier

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a three-dimensional finite element model of the staggered distribution of the mineral within the mineralized collagen fibril has been developed to characterize the lamellar bone elastic behavior at the sub-micro length scale. Minerals have been assumed to be embedded in a collagen matrix, and different degrees of mineralization have been considered allowing the growth of platelet-shaped minerals both in the axial and the transverse directions of the fibril, through the variation of the lateral space between platelets. We provide numerical values and trends for all the elastic constants of the mineralized collagen fibril as a function of the volume fraction of mineral. In our results, we verify the high influence of the mineral overlapping on the mechanical response of the fibril and we highlight that the lateral distance between crystals is relevant to the mechanical behavior of the fibril and not only the mineral overlapping in the axial direction.

  19. The use of staggered scheme and an absorbing buffer zone for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.

    1995-01-01

    Various problems from those proposed for the Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) workshop were studied using second and fourth order staggered spatial discretizations in conjunction with fourth order Runge-Kutta time integration. In addition, an absorbing buffer zone was used at the outflow boundaries. Promising results were obtained and provide a basis for application of these techniques to a wider variety of problems.

  20. Strongly Confined Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons Waveguiding Enabled by Planar Staggered Plasmonic Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Longfang; Xiao, Yifan; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Liang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to achieving highly efficient and strongly confined spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides at subwavelength scale enabled by planar staggered plasmonic waveguides (PSPWs). The structure of these new waveguides consists of an ultrathin metallic strip with periodic subwavelength staggered double groove arrays supported by a flexible dielectric substrate, leading to unique staggered EM coupling and waveguiding phenomenon. The spoof SPP propagation properties, including dispersion relations and near field distributions, are numerically investigated. Furthermore, broadband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to planar staggered plasmonic waveguide (PSPW) transitions are designed to achieve smooth momentum matching and highly efficient spoof SPP mode conversion. By applying these transitions, a CPW-PSPW-CPW structure is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the PSPW’s propagation performance at microwave frequencies. The investigation results show the proposed PSPWs have excellent performance of deep subwavelength spoof SPPs confinement, long propagation length and low bend loss, as well as great design flexibility to engineer the propagation properties by adjusting their geometry dimensions and material parameters. Our work opens up a new avenue for development of various advanced planar integrated plasmonic devices and circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes. PMID:27917930

  1. Strongly Confined Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons Waveguiding Enabled by Planar Staggered Plasmonic Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Longfang; Xiao, Yifan; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Liang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to achieving highly efficient and strongly confined spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides at subwavelength scale enabled by planar staggered plasmonic waveguides (PSPWs). The structure of these new waveguides consists of an ultrathin metallic strip with periodic subwavelength staggered double groove arrays supported by a flexible dielectric substrate, leading to unique staggered EM coupling and waveguiding phenomenon. The spoof SPP propagation properties, including dispersion relations and near field distributions, are numerically investigated. Furthermore, broadband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to planar staggered plasmonic waveguide (PSPW) transitions are designed to achieve smooth momentum matching and highly efficient spoof SPP mode conversion. By applying these transitions, a CPW-PSPW-CPW structure is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the PSPW’s propagation performance at microwave frequencies. The investigation results show the proposed PSPWs have excellent performance of deep subwavelength spoof SPPs confinement, long propagation length and low bend loss, as well as great design flexibility to engineer the propagation properties by adjusting their geometry dimensions and material parameters. Our work opens up a new avenue for development of various advanced planar integrated plasmonic devices and circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  2. Convex Grooves in Staggered Herringbone Mixer Improve Mixing Efficiency of Laminar Flow in Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Young Gyu; Najera, Maria Alejandra; Lee, Sang Woo; Strickler, J. Rudi; Chang, Woo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The liquid streams in a microchannel are hardly mixed to form laminar flow, and the mixing issue is well described by a low Reynolds number scheme. The staggered herringbone mixer (SHM) using repeated patterns of grooves in the microchannel have been proved to be an efficient passive micro-mixer. However, only a negative pattern of the staggered herringbone mixer has been used so far after it was first suggested, to the best of our knowledge. In this study, the mixing efficiencies from negative and positive staggered herringbone mixer patterns as well as from opposite flow directions were tested to investigate the effect of the micro-structure geometry on the surrounding laminar flow. The positive herringbone pattern showed better mixing efficiency than the conventionally used negative pattern. Also, generally used forward flow gives better mixing efficiency than reverse flow. The mixing was completed after two cycles of staggered herringbone mixer with both forward and reverse flow in a positive pattern. The traditional negative pattern showed complete mixing after four and five cycles in forward and reverse flow direction, respectively. The mixing effect in all geometries was numerically simulated, and the results confirmed more efficient mixing in the positive pattern than the negative. The results can further enable the design of a more efficient microfluidic mixer, as well as in depth understanding of the phenomena of positive and negative patterns existing in nature with regards to the surrounding fluids. PMID:27814386

  3. Convex Grooves in Staggered Herringbone Mixer Improve Mixing Efficiency of Laminar Flow in Microchannel.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Tae Joon; Nam, Young Gyu; Najera, Maria Alejandra; Lee, Sang Woo; Strickler, J Rudi; Chang, Woo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The liquid streams in a microchannel are hardly mixed to form laminar flow, and the mixing issue is well described by a low Reynolds number scheme. The staggered herringbone mixer (SHM) using repeated patterns of grooves in the microchannel have been proved to be an efficient passive micro-mixer. However, only a negative pattern of the staggered herringbone mixer has been used so far after it was first suggested, to the best of our knowledge. In this study, the mixing efficiencies from negative and positive staggered herringbone mixer patterns as well as from opposite flow directions were tested to investigate the effect of the micro-structure geometry on the surrounding laminar flow. The positive herringbone pattern showed better mixing efficiency than the conventionally used negative pattern. Also, generally used forward flow gives better mixing efficiency than reverse flow. The mixing was completed after two cycles of staggered herringbone mixer with both forward and reverse flow in a positive pattern. The traditional negative pattern showed complete mixing after four and five cycles in forward and reverse flow direction, respectively. The mixing effect in all geometries was numerically simulated, and the results confirmed more efficient mixing in the positive pattern than the negative. The results can further enable the design of a more efficient microfluidic mixer, as well as in depth understanding of the phenomena of positive and negative patterns existing in nature with regards to the surrounding fluids.

  4. Staggered Chromosomal Hybrid Zones in the House Mouse: Relevance to Reticulate Evolution and Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Gündüz, İslam; Pollock, Christianne L.; Giménez, Mabel D.; Förster, Daniel W.; White, Thomas A.; Sans-Fuentes, Maria A.; Hauffe, Heidi C.; Ventura, Jacint; López-Fuster, María José; Searle, Jeremy B.

    2010-01-01

    In the house mouse there are numerous chromosomal races distinguished by different combinations of metacentric chromosomes. These may come into contact with each other and with the ancestral all-acrocentric race, and form hybrid zones. The chromosomal clines that make up these hybrid zones may be coincident or separated from each other (staggered). Such staggered hybrid zones are interesting because they may include populations of individuals homozygous for a mix of features of the hybridising races. We review the characteristics of four staggered hybrid zones in the house mouse and discuss whether they are examples of primary or secondary contact and whether they represent reticulate evolution or not. However, the most important aspect of staggered hybrid zones is that the homozygous populations within the zones have the potential to expand their distributions and become new races (a process termed ‘zonal raciation’). In this way they can add to the total ‘stock’ of chromosomal races in the species concerned. Speciation is an infrequent phenomenon that may involve an unusual set of circumstances. Each one of the products of zonal raciation has the potential to become a new species and by having more races increases the chance of a speciation event. PMID:24710041

  5. An evaluation of torque (moment) on implant/prosthesis with staggered buccal and lingual offset.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, L A; Kruger, B

    1996-06-01

    The supposition that staggered buccal and lingual implant offset is biomechanically advantageous was examined mathematically. The method of evaluation utilized a standard hypothetical geometric configuration from which implants could be staggered buccally and/or lingually in both arches. Torque (moment) values were calculated at the gold screw, abutment screw, and 3.5 mm apical to the head of the implant. Comparisons were made in percentages of change from the hypothetical standard to the buccal and/or lingual implant offset. In the maxillary arch, buccal offset decreased the torque (moment) while lingual offset increased it. If more lingually offset implants were present in the maxillary restoration, the total torque would be greater than if they were all in a straight line. Staggered buccolingual implant alignment often requires abutment reangulation. The resultant line of force produced by occlusal anatomy usually results in buccal inclination in the maxillary arch and lingual inclination in the mandibular arch. As a result, mandibular implant/prostheses are greatly favored over similar maxillary configurations because the mandibular resultant line of force usually passes lingually, closer to the components and supporting bone and considerably less torque is produced. Therefore, the concept of staggered offset for multiple implant-supported prostheses can be utilized on the mandible but is not recommended for the maxilla where maximum uniform buccal implant orientation is advised.

  6. Enhancement of Radiative Efficiency with Staggered InGaN Quantum Well Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tansu, Nelson; Dierolf, Volkmar; Huang, Gensheng; Penn, Samson; Zhao, Hongping; Liu, Guangyu; Li, Xiaohang; Poplawsky, Jonathan

    2011-07-14

    The technology on the large overlap InGaN QWs developed in this program is currently implemented in commercial technology in enhancing the internal quantum efficiency in major LED industry in US and Asia. The scientific finding from this work supported by the DOE enabled the implementation of this step-like staggered quantum well in the commercial LEDs.

  7. On the Quality of Velocity Interpolation Schemes for Marker-In-Cell Methods on 3-D Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Pusok, A. E.; Popov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The marker-in-cell method is generally considered to be a flexible and robust method to model advection of heterogenous non-diffusive properties (i.e. rock type or composition) in geodynamic problems or incompressible Stokes problems. In this method, Lagrangian points carrying compositional information are advected with the ambient velocity field on an immobile, Eulerian grid. However, velocity interpolation from grid points to marker locations is often performed without preserving the zero divergence of the velocity field at the interpolated locations (i.e. non-conservative). Such interpolation schemes can induce non-physical clustering of markers when strong velocity gradients are present (Jenny et al., 2001) and this may, eventually, result in empty grid cells, a serious numerical violation of the marker-in-cell method. Solutions to this problem include: using larger mesh resolutions and/or marker densities, or repeatedly controlling the marker distribution (i.e. inject/delete), but which does not have an established physical background. To remedy this at low computational costs, Jenny et al. (2001) and Meyer and Jenny (2004) proposed a simple, conservative velocity interpolation (CVI) scheme for 2-D staggered grid, while Wang et al. (2015) extended the formulation to 3-D finite element methods. Here, we follow up with these studies and report on the quality of velocity interpolation methods for 2-D and 3-D staggered grids. We adapt the formulations from both Jenny et al. (2001) and Wang et al. (2015) for use on 3-D staggered grids, where the velocity components have different node locations as compared to finite element, where they share the same node location. We test the different interpolation schemes (CVI and non-CVI) in combination with different advection schemes (Euler, RK2 and RK4) and with/out marker control on Stokes problems with strong velocity gradients, which are discretized using a finite difference method. We show that a conservative formulation

  8. Odd-even staggering in yields of neutron-deficient nuclei produced by projectile fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, B.; Xu, H. S.; Zhang, Y. H.; Wang, M.; Tu, X. L.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Sun, Z. Y.; Zhou, X. H.; Yuan, Y. J.; Blaum, K.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Mao, R. S.; Hu, Z. G.; Shuai, P.; Zang, Y. D.; Ma, X. W.; Zhang, X. Y.; Xia, J. W.; Xiao, G. Q.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, J. C.; Zhang, X. H.; Xu, X.; Yan, X. L.; Zhang, W.; Zhan, W. L.

    2016-10-01

    Background: Fragment yields exhibit a strong odd-even staggering (OES). This OES has been experimentally observed in different fragmentation reactions with different projectile-target combinations. However, the experimental data are still scarce for fragments close to drip lines and the origin of this OES is not well understood. Purpose: More experimental data are needed to explore the origin of this OES in fragment yields and to validate fragmentation reaction models, especially for nuclei close to the drip lines. To study the pronounced OES near the proton drip line, we measured the yields of Tz=-1 and Tz=-3 /2 nuclei over a wide range of mass number. Methods: The combination of a fragment separator and a storage ring at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou has been used to measure the yields of Tz=-1 and Tz=-3 /2 fragments, produced by 58Ni projectiles impinging on a beryllium target at an energy of about 463 MeV/nucleon. Results: A very strong OES is observed in the measured yields of both Tz=-1 and Tz=-3 /2 fragments. Our experimental data demonstrate that the shell structure has a significant impact on the magnitude of this OES. A comparison of different fragmentation reaction data indicates that this OES is almost independent of the projectile-target combinations and the fragmentation energy between 140 and 650 MeV/nucleon. Conclusions: Our study reveals that the OES of fragment yields originates mainly from the OES of particle-emission threshold energies, which is very close to the OES of fragment yields when the Coulomb barrier is considered in particle-emission threshold energies.

  9. Quantum transport in strongly disordered crystals: Electrical conductivity with large negative vertex corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiš, Václav; Pokorný, Vladislav

    2012-12-01

    We propose a renormalization scheme of the Kubo formula for the electrical conductivity with multiple backscatterings contributing to the electron-hole irreducible vertex derived from the asymptotic limit to high spatial dimensions. We use this vertex to represent the two-particle Green function via a symmetrized Bethe-Salpeter equation in momentum space. We further utilize the dominance of a pole in the irreducible vertex to an approximate diagonalization of the Bethe-Salpeter equation and a non-perturbative representation of the electron-hole correlation function. The latter function is then used to derive a compact representation for the electrical conductivity at zero temperature without the necessity to evaluate separately the Drude term and vertex corrections. The electrical conductivity calculated in this way remains nonnegative also in the strongly disordered regime where the localization effects become significant and the negative vertex corrections in the standard Kubo formula overweight the Drude term.

  10. The scalar-photon 3-point vertex in massless quenched scalar QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Sánchez, Y.; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Fernández-Rangel, L. A.

    2016-10-01

    Non perturbative studies of Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDEs) require their infinite, coupled tower to be truncated in order to reduce them to a practically solvable set. In this connection, a physically acceptable ansatz for the three point vertex is the most favorite choice. Scalar quantum electrodynamics (sQED) provides a simple and neat platform to address this problem. The most general form of the scalar-photon three point vertex can be expressed in terms of only two independent form factors, longitudinal and transverse. Ball and Chiu have demonstrated that the longitudinal vertex is fixed by requiring the Ward-Fradkin-Green- Takahashi identity (WFGTI), while the transverse vertex remains undetermined. In massless quenched sQED, we propose the transverse part of the non perturbative scalar-photon vertex.

  11. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-07-01

    The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment, structured in a lantern shape, consists of four layers of ladders, fabricated from two to five silicon sensors. The APV25 readout ASIC chips are mounted on one side of the ladder to minimize the signal path for reducing the capacitive noise; signals from the sensor backside are transmitted to the chip by bent flexible fan-out circuits. The ladder is assembled using several dedicated jigs. Sensor motion on the jig is minimized by vacuum chucking. The gluing procedure provides such a rigid foundation that later leads to the desired wire bonding performance. The full ladder with electrically functional sensors is consistently completed with a fully developed assembly procedure, and its sensor offsets from the design values are found to be less than 200 μm. The potential functionality of the ladder is also demonstrated by the radioactive source test.

  12. The silicon vertex detector of HERA-B

    SciTech Connect

    Moshous, Basil

    1998-02-01

    HERA-B is an experiment to study CP violation in the B system using an internal target at the DESY HERA proton ring(820 GeV). The main goal is to measure the asymmetry in the 'gold plated' decays of B{sup 0}, B-bar{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} yielding a measurement of the angle {beta} of the unitarity triangle. From the semileptonic decay channels of the b, b-bar-hadron produced in association with the B{sup 0},B-bar{sup 0} can be used to tag the flavor of the B{sup 0}. The purpose of the Vertex Detector System is to provide the track coordinates for reconstructing the J/{psi}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} secondary decay vertices and the impact parameters of all tagging particles.

  13. A vertex similarity index for better personalized recommendation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling-Jiao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Liu, Jin-Hu; Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Recommender systems benefit us in tackling the problem of information overload by predicting our potential choices among diverse niche objects. So far, a variety of personalized recommendation algorithms have been proposed and most of them are based on similarities, such as collaborative filtering and mass diffusion. Here, we propose a novel vertex similarity index named CosRA, which combines advantages of both the cosine index and the resource-allocation (RA) index. By applying the CosRA index to real recommender systems including MovieLens, Netflix and RYM, we show that the CosRA-based method has better performance in accuracy, diversity and novelty than some benchmark methods. Moreover, the CosRA index is free of parameters, which is a significant advantage in real applications. Further experiments show that the introduction of two turnable parameters cannot remarkably improve the overall performance of the CosRA index.

  14. Performance of the CLAS12 Silicon Vertex Tracker modules

    SciTech Connect

    Antonioli, Mary Ann; Boiarinov, Serguie; Bonneau, Peter R.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eng, Brian J.; Gotra, Yuri N.; Kurbatov, Evgeny O.; Leffel, Mindy A.; Mandal, Saptarshi; McMullen, Marc E.; Merkin, Mikhail M.; Raydo, Benjamin J.; Teachey, Robert W,; Tucker, Ross J.; Ungaro, Maurizio; Yegneswaran, Amrit S.; Ziegler, Veronique

    2013-12-01

    For the 12 GeV upgrade, the CLAS12 experiment has designed a Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) using single sided microstrip sensors fabricated by Hamamatsu. The sensors have graded angle design to minimize dead areas and a readout pitch of 156{micro}m, with intermediate strip. Double sided SVT module hosts three daisy-chained sensors on each side with a full strip length of 33 cm. There are 512 channels per module read out by four Fermilab Silicon Strip Readout (FSSR2) chips featuring data driven architecture, mounted on a rigid-flex hybrid. Modules are assembled on the barrel using unique cantilevered geometry to minimize the amount of material in the tracking volume. Design and performance of the SVT modules are presented, focusing on results of electrical measurements.

  15. Performance of the CLAS12 Silicon Vertex Tracker modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonioli, M. A.; Boiarinov, S.; Bonneau, P.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eng, B.; Gotra, Y.; Kurbatov, E.; Leffel, M.; Mandal, S.; McMullen, M.; Merkin, M.; Raydo, B.; Teachey, W.; Tucker, R.; Ungaro, M.; Yegneswaran, A.; Ziegler, V.

    2013-12-01

    For the 12 GeV upgrade, the CLAS12 experiment has designed a Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) using single sided microstrip sensors fabricated by Hamamatsu. The sensors have graded angle design to minimize dead areas and a readout pitch of 156 μm, with intermediate strip. Double sided SVT module hosts three daisy-chained sensors on each side with a full strip length of 33 cm. There are 512 channels per module read out by four Fermilab Silicon Strip Readout (FSSR2) chips featuring data driven architecture, mounted on a rigid-flex hybrid. Modules are assembled on the barrel using unique cantilevered geometry to minimize the amount of material in the tracking volume. Design and performance of the SVT modules are presented, focusing on results of electrical measurements.

  16. Cutaneous paraganglioma of the vertex in a child.

    PubMed

    Kim; Lee, Il Jae; Park, Myong Chul; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Lim, Hyoseob

    2012-07-01

    Paraganglioma is a neuroendocrine neoplasm that may develop at various body sites, including the head, neck, thorax, and abdomen. Approximately 85% of paragangliomas develop on the abdomen, 12% develop on the chest, and only 3% develop on the head and neck. These tumors are found in locations that parallel the sympathetic chain ganglion in the thoracolumbar regions and parasympathetic nervous system in craniosacral regions, and all head and neck paragangliomas arise from the parasympathetic nervous system. Although the skin has a rich neural network, it is devoid of ganglia. There has been only 1 report of a paraganglioma on the scalp of a child. We describe a 3-year-old child with a primary cutaneous paraganglioma of the vertex scalp and review the literature on paragangliomas.

  17. Limits on anomalous contributions to the Wtb vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Christopher; Fiolhais, Miguel; Onofre, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Recent LHC results on the measurements of the W-boson helicity fractions and single top quark production cross section at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are combined in order to establish new limits on anomalous contributions to the Wtb vertex. The allowed regions for these limits are presented in three-dimensional graphics, for both real and imaginary components of the different anomalous couplings, allowing all the other anomalous couplings to vary at the same time. These results are combined with the prospected future measurement of the single top quark production cross section and W-boson helicity fractions at the LHC. When compared with the previous most precise limits, these results show a significant improvement, larger than 10%.

  18. The FIRST experiment: interaction region and MAPS vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiriti, E.; de Napoli, M.; Romano, F.; FIRST Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    The improvement of the precision of the measurement of the nuclear cross-section, in order to fulfill the requirements of the actual Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy and space radioprotection, is the main goal of the FIRST experiment. After a brief introduction on the treatment planning in hadrontherapy, this paper describes main characteristics and components of the experiment. The features of the interaction region detectors and their main needs (low material budget, high angular coverage, two tracks resolution and large trigger rate) are discussed. Special emphasis is devoted in discussing the new silicon pixel vertex detector, in particular its new developed data acquisition and its characterization with the first test results obtained with a prototype of the detector.

  19. The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) Pixel Detector Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, E.

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. There is a planned upgrade during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2), expected in 2019, which will allow the detector to run at higher luminosities by transforming the entire readout to a trigger-less system. This will include a substantial upgrade of the Vertex Locator (VELO), the silicon tracker that surrounds the LHCb interaction region. The VELO is moving from silicon strip technology to hybrid pixel sensors, where silicon sensors are bonded to VeloPix ASICs. Sensor prototypes have undergone rigorous testing using the Timepix3 Telescope at the SPS, CERN. The main components of the upgrade are summarised and testbeam results presented.

  20. Photoabsorption off nuclei with self-consistent vertex corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Riek, F.; Lutz, M. F. M.; Korpa, C. L.

    2009-08-15

    We study photoproduction off nuclei based on a self-consistent and covariant many-body approach for the pion and isobar propagation in infinite nuclear matter. For the first time the t-channel exchange of an in-medium pion is evaluated in the presence of vertex correction effects consistently. In particular the interference pattern with the s-channel in-medium nucleon and isobar exchange contribution is considered. Electromagnetic gauge invariance is kept as a consequence of various Ward identities obeyed by the computation. Adjusting the set of Migdal parameters to the data set we predict an attractive mass shift for the isobar of about 50 MeV at nuclear saturation density.

  1. Universal scaling of Néel temperature, staggered magnetization density, and spin-wave velocity of three-dimensional disordered and clean quantum antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D.-R.; Jiang, F.-J.

    2017-02-01

    The Néel temperature, staggered magnetization density, as well as the spin-wave velocity of a three-dimensional (3D) quantum Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic disorder (randomness) are calculated using first-principles nonperturbative quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, we examine the validity of universal scaling relations that are related to these three studied physical quantities. These relations are relevant to experimental data and are firmly established for clean (regular) 3D dimerized spin-1/2 Heisenberg models. Remarkably, our numerical results show that the considered scaling relations remain true for the investigated model with the introduced disorder. In addition, while the presence of disorder may change the physical properties of regular dimerized models, hence leading to different critical theories, both the obtained data of Néel temperature and staggered magnetization density in our study are fully compatible with the expected critical behavior for clean dimerized systems. As a result, it is persuasive to conclude that the related quantum phase transitions of the considered disordered model and its clean analogues are governed by the same critical theory, which is not always the case in general. Finally, we also find smooth scaling curves even emerging when both the data of the investigated disordered model as well as its associated clean system are taken into account concurrently. This in turn implies that, while in a restricted sense, the considered scaling relations for 3D spin-1/2 antiferromagnets are indeed universal.

  2. Impact of nonlocal correlations over different energy scales: A dynamical vertex approximation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohringer, G.; Toschi, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate how nonlocal correlations affect, selectively, the physics of correlated electrons over different energy scales, from the Fermi level to the band edges. This goal is achieved by applying a diagrammatic extension of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT), the dynamical vertex approximation (D Γ A ), to study several spectral and thermodynamic properties of the unfrustrated Hubbard model in two and three dimensions. Specifically, we focus first on the low-energy regime by computing the electronic scattering rate and the quasiparticle mass renormalization for decreasing temperatures at a fixed interaction strength. This way, we obtain a precise characterization of the several steps through which the Fermi-liquid physics is progressively destroyed by nonlocal correlations. Our study is then extended to a broader energy range, by analyzing the temperature behavior of the kinetic and potential energy, as well as of the corresponding energy distribution functions. Our findings allow us to identify a smooth but definite evolution of the nature of nonlocal correlations by increasing interaction: They either increase or decrease the kinetic energy w.r.t. DMFT depending on the interaction strength being weak or strong, respectively. This reflects the corresponding evolution of the ground state from a nesting-driven (Slater) to a superexchange-driven (Heisenberg) antiferromagnet (AF), whose fingerprints are, thus, recognizable in the spatial correlations of the paramagnetic phase. Finally, a critical analysis of our numerical results of the potential energy at the largest interaction allows us to identify possible procedures to improve the ladder-based algorithms adopted in the dynamical vertex approximation.

  3. Cross flow induced vibrations in staggered arrays of cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Marn, J.

    1991-12-31

    Flow induced vibrations cause by instability is the subject of this investigation. The bulk of the work performed is theoretical in nature, the comparison with some of existing experimental data is given for each of four models described. First model encompasses the effects of prescribed motion on the cylinder. Such circumstances occur in the case of vortex shedding initiated instability. The reduced velocity within the cylinder array is low and there is no coupling between the adjacent cylinders. Second model assumes certain form of vibration and corresponding behavior of the perturbed velocity field in temporal and one of spatial coordinates thus transforming partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations and takes into account the motion of the neighboring cylinder. This corresponds to fluid elastic controlled instabilities. The resulting equations are solved analytically. The model is used for better understanding of the equations of cylinder motion as well as for quick estimates of threshold of instability. Third model relaxes an assumption about the form of vibration in spatial direction and uses the vorticity formulation of equation of fluid motion to account for fluid-solid interaction. This model analysis is of two phase (air-water mixture) flow. The void fraction distribution is found to be the single most decisive factor to determine the onset of instability for such a domain. In conclusion, two distinct mechanism were found to be responsible for flow induced vibration caused instabilities, (1) outside source controlled periodic excitation (such as vortex shedding) -- described by the first model and (2) fluid elastic forces -- described by second, third and fourth models. For the values of reduced velocity below 0.7 first model is proposed, for the values above 0.7, the rest.

  4. Automatic 4D Reconstruction of Patient-Specific Cardiac Mesh with 1-to-1 Vertex Correspondence from Segmented Contours Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chi Wan; Su, Yi; Yeo, Si Yong; Ng, Gillian Maria; Nguyen, Vinh Tan; Zhong, Liang; Tan, Ru San; Poh, Kian Keong; Chai, Ping

    2014-01-01

    We propose an automatic algorithm for the reconstruction of patient-specific cardiac mesh models with 1-to-1 vertex correspondence. In this framework, a series of 3D meshes depicting the endocardial surface of the heart at each time step is constructed, based on a set of border delineated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of the whole cardiac cycle. The key contribution in this work involves a novel reconstruction technique to generate a 4D (i.e., spatial–temporal) model of the heart with 1-to-1 vertex mapping throughout the time frames. The reconstructed 3D model from the first time step is used as a base template model and then deformed to fit the segmented contours from the subsequent time steps. A method to determine a tree-based connectivity relationship is proposed to ensure robust mapping during mesh deformation. The novel feature is the ability to handle intra- and inter-frame 2D topology changes of the contours, which manifests as a series of merging and splitting of contours when the images are viewed either in a spatial or temporal sequence. Our algorithm has been tested on five acquisitions of cardiac MRI and can successfully reconstruct the full 4D heart model in around 30 minutes per subject. The generated 4D heart model conforms very well with the input segmented contours and the mesh element shape is of reasonably good quality. The work is important in the support of downstream computational simulation activities. PMID:24743555

  5. Quark-gluon vertex dressing and meson masses beyond ladder-rainbow truncation

    SciTech Connect

    Hrayr Matevosyan; Anthony Thomas; Peter Tandy

    2007-04-01

    We include a generalized infinite class of quark-gluon vertex dressing diagrams in a study of how dynamics beyond the ladder-rainbow truncation influences the Bethe-Salpeter description of light quark pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The diagrammatic specification of the vertex is mapped into a corresponding specification of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel, which preserves chiral symmetry. This study adopts the algebraic format afforded by the simple interaction kernel used in previous work on this topic. The new feature of the present work is that in every diagram summed for the vertex and the corresponding Bethe-Salpeter kernel, each quark-gluon vertex is required to be the self-consistent vertex solution. We also adopt from previous work the effective accounting for the role of the explicitly non-Abelian three gluon coupling in a global manner through one parameter determined from recent lattice-QCD data for the vertex. With the more consistent vertex used here, the error in ladder-rainbow truncation for vector mesons is never more than 10% as the current quark mass is varied from the u/d region to the b region.

  6. Characterizing general scale-free networks by vertex-degree sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenjun; Lai, Zhengwen; Chen, Guanrong

    2015-11-01

    Many complex networks possess a scale-free vertex-degree distribution in a power-law form of c k-γ , where k is the vertex-degree variable and c and γ are constants. To better understand the mechanism of the power-law formation in scale-free networks, it is important to understand and analyze their vertex-degree sequences. We had shown before that, for a scale-free network of size N , if its vertex-degree sequence is k1 vertex degrees in the network, and if its power exponent satisfies γ>1 , then the length l of the vertex-degree sequence is of order log N . In the present paper, we further study complex networks with a more general vertex-degree distribution, not restricted to the power-law, and prove that the same conclusion holds as well. In addition, we verify the new result by real data from a large number of real-world examples. We finally discuss some potential applications of the new finding in various fields of science, technology, and society.

  7. Rooting issue for a lattice fermion formulation similar to staggered fermions but without taste mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David H.

    2008-05-15

    To investigate the viability of the 4th root trick for the staggered fermion determinant in a simpler setting, we consider a 2-taste (flavor) lattice fermion formulation with no taste mixing but with exact taste-nonsinglet chiral symmetries analogous to the taste-nonsinglet U(1){sub A} symmetry of staggered fermions. Creutz's objections to the rooting trick apply just as much in this setting. To counter them we show that the formulation has robust would-be zero modes in topologically nontrivial gauge backgrounds, and that these manifest themselves in a viable way in the rooted fermion determinant and also in the disconnected piece of the pseudoscalar meson propagator as required to solve the U(1) problem. Also, our rooted theory is heuristically seen to be in the right universality class for QCD if the same is true for an unrooted mixed fermion action theory.

  8. Test of {Delta}I = 2 staggering in the superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kruecken, R.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Lee, I.Y.; Asztalos, S.

    1996-06-05

    The presence of {Delta}I = 2 staggering in the three known superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg has been reexamined in a new experiment with Gammasphere. A relative accuracy of better than 30 eV was achieved for most transition energies. No statistically significant oscillations in the transition energies were found for band 1 while staggering patterns were observed in bands 2 and 3. The statistical significance of the observed effects was analyzed. The patterns display some similarities with expectations based on a band crossing picture, even though such a picture cannot reproduce the observations in a straightforward way. No evidence was found for additional superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Hg which could account for possible band-crossings.

  9. D(S) spectrum and leptonic decays with Fermilab heavy quarks and improved staggered light quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Massimo Di Pierro et al.

    2004-03-12

    We present preliminary results for the D{sub s} meson spectrum and decay constants in unquenched lattice QCD. Simulations are carried out with 2 + 1 dynamical quarks using gauge configurations generated by the MILC collaboration. We use the ''asqtad'' a{sup 2} improved staggered action for the light quarks, and the clover heavy quark action with the Fermilab interpretation. We compare our spectrum results with the newly discovered 0{sup +} and 1{sup +} states in the D{sub s} system.

  10. A conservative staggered-grid Chebyshev multidomain method for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriva, David A.; Kolias, John H.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new multidomain spectral collocation method that uses staggered grids for the solution of compressible flow problems. The solution unknowns are defined at the nodes of a Gauss quadrature rule. The fluxes are evaluated at the nodes of a Gauss-Lobatto rule. The method is conservative, free-stream preserving, and exponentially accurate. A significant advantage of the method is that subdomain corners are not included in the approximation, making solutions in complex geometries easier to compute.

  11. Numerical study of super-resolved optical microscopy with partly staggered beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jinping; Wang, Nan; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-12-01

    The resolving power of optical microscopy involving two or even more beams, such as pump-probe microscopy and nonlinear optical microscopy, can be enhanced both laterally and longitudinally with partly staggered beams. A numerical study of the new super-resolution imaging technology is performed with vector diffraction theory. The influence of polarization is discussed. A resolving power of sub-100 nm and sub-300 nm in the lateral and longitudinal directions, respectively, is achievable.

  12. A METHOD OF TREATING UNSTRUCTURED CONCAVE CELLS IN STAGGERED-GRID LAGRANGIAN HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    C. ROUSCULP; D. BURTON

    2000-12-01

    A method is proposed for the treatment of concave cells in staggered-grid Lagrangian hydrodynamics. The method is general enough to be applied to two- and three-dimensional unstructured cells. Instead of defining a cell-point as the geometric average of its nodes (a cell-center), the cell-point is that which equalizes the triangular/tetrahedral area/volume in two/three dimensions. Examples are given.

  13. Re: Penetration Behavior of Opposed Rows of Staggered Secondary Air Jets Depending on Jet Penetration Coefficient and Momentum Flux Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain why the extension of the previously published C = (S/Ho)sqrt(J) scaling for opposed rows of staggered jets wasn't directly successful in the study by Choi et al. (2016). It is not surprising that staggered jets from opposite sides do not pass each other at the expected C value, because Ho/D and sqrt(J) are much larger than the maximum in previous studies. These, and large x/D's, tend to suggest development of 2-dimensional flow. Although there are distinct optima for opposed rows of in-line jets, single-side injection, and opposed rows of staggered jets based on C, opposed rows of staggered jets provide as good or better mixing performance, at any C value, than opposed rows of in-line jets or jets from single-side injection.

  14. Entropy Stable Staggered Grid Spectral Collocation for the Burgers' and Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Parsani, Matteo; Fisher, Travis C.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Staggered grid, entropy stable discontinuous spectral collocation operators of any order are developed for Burgers' and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured hexahedral elements. This generalization of previous entropy stable spectral collocation work [1, 2], extends the applicable set of points from tensor product, Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto (LGL) to a combination of tensor product Legendre-Gauss (LG) and LGL points. The new semi-discrete operators discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy inequality for both Burgers' and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions. They are valid for smooth as well as discontinuous flows. The staggered LG and conventional LGL point formulations are compared on several challenging test problems. The staggered LG operators are significantly more accurate, although more costly to implement. The LG and LGL operators exhibit similar robustness, as is demonstrated using test problems known to be problematic for operators that lack a nonlinearly stability proof for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations (e.g., discontinuous Galerkin, spectral difference, or flux reconstruction operators).

  15. Effects of staggered fermions and mixed actions on the scalar correlator

    SciTech Connect

    Prelovsek, S.

    2006-01-01

    We provide the analytic predictions for the flavor nonsinglet scalar correlator, which will enable determination of the scalar meson mass from the lattice scalar correlator. We consider simulations with 2+1 staggered sea quarks and staggered or chiral valence quarks. At small u/d masses the correlator is dominated by the bubble contribution, which is the intermediate state with two pseudoscalar mesons. We determine the bubble contribution within staggered and mixed chiral perturbation theory. Its effective mass is smaller than the mass of {pi}{eta}, which is the lightest intermediate state in proper 2+1 QCD. The unphysical effective mass is a consequence of the taste breaking that makes possible the intermediate state with mass 2M{sub {pi}}. We find that the scalar correlator can be negative in the simulations with mixed quark actions if the sea- and valence-quark masses are tuned by matching the pion masses M{sub val,val}=M{sub {pi}{sub 5}}.

  16. A fast Poisson solver for unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on the half-staggered grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, G. H.; Huang, L. C.; Simon, H.; Tang, W. -P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a fast Poisson solver for unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with finite difference methods on the non-uniform, half-staggered grid is presented. To achieve this, new algorithms for diagonalizing a semi-definite pair are developed. Our fast solver can also be extended to the three dimensional case. The motivation and related issues in using this second kind of staggered grid are also discussed. Numerical testing has indicated the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  17. Odd-even staggering of heavy cluster spontaneous emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Greiner, W.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Plonski, I. H.

    1986-12-01

    Experimentally observed enhanced14C and24Ne emission rates from even-even parents in comparison with that from even-odd or odd-even nuclei are explained in the framework of the analytical superasymmetric fission model, by taking various prescriptions for the zero point vibration energy of even-even, even-odd, odd-even and odd-odd emitters. Longer half-lives than previously computed are obtained by extrapolating the present prescriptions to emitted clusters heavier than24Ne.

  18. Novel integrated CMOS pixel structures for vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Matis, Howard S.; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans Georg; Wieman, Howard H.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2003-10-29

    Novel CMOS active pixel structures for vertex detector applications have been designed and tested. The overriding goal of this work is to increase the signal to noise ratio of the sensors and readout circuits. A large-area native epitaxial silicon photogate was designed with the aim of increasing the charge collected per struck pixel and to reduce charge diffusion to neighboring pixels. The photogate then transfers the charge to a low capacitance readout node to maintain a high charge to voltage conversion gain. Two techniques for noise reduction are also presented. The first is a per-pixel kT/C noise reduction circuit that produces results similar to traditional correlated double sampling (CDS). It has the advantage of requiring only one read, as compared to two for CDS, and no external storage or subtraction is needed. The technique reduced input-referred temporal noise by a factor of 2.5, to 12.8 e{sup -}. Finally, a column-level active reset technique is explored that suppresses kT/C noise during pixel reset. In tests, noise was reduced by a factor of 7.6 times, to an estimated 5.1 e{sup -} input-referred noise. The technique also dramatically reduces fixed pattern (pedestal) noise, by up to a factor of 21 in our tests. The latter feature may possibly reduce pixel-by-pixel pedestal differences to levels low enough to permit sparse data scan without per-pixel offset corrections.

  19. CDF Run IIb Silicon Vertex Detector DAQ Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    S. Behari et al.

    2003-12-18

    The CDF particle detector operates in the beamline of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, Batavia, IL. The Tevatron is expected to undergo luminosity upgrades (Run IIb) in the future, resulting in a higher number of interactions per beam crossing. To operate in this dense radiation environment, an upgrade of CDF's silicon vertex detector (SVX) subsystem and a corresponding upgrade of its VME-based DAQ system has been explored. Prototypes of all the Run IIb SVX DAQ components have been constructed, assembled into a test stand and operated successfully using an adapted version of CDF's network-capable DAQ software. In addition, a PCI-based DAQ system has been developed as a fast and inexpensive tool for silicon detector and DAQ component testing in the production phase. In this paper they present an overview of the Run IIb silicon DAQ upgrade, emphasizing the new features and improvements incorporated into the constituent VME boards, and discuss a PCI-based DAQ system developed to facilitate production tests.

  20. From vertex detectors to inner trackers with CMOS pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, A.; Pérez, A. Pérez; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Claus, G.; Goffe, M.; Winter, M.

    2017-02-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) for high resolution and low material vertex detectors has been validated with the 2014 and 2015 physics runs of the STAR-PXL detector at RHIC/BNL. This opens the door to the use of CPS for inner tracking devices, with 10-100 times larger sensitive area, which require therefore a sensor design privileging power saving, response uniformity and robustness. The 350 nm CMOS technology used for the STAR-PXL sensors was considered as too poorly suited to upcoming applications like the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS), which requires sensors with one order of magnitude improvement on readout speed and improved radiation tolerance. This triggered the exploration of a deeper sub-micron CMOS technology, Tower-Jazz 180 nm, for the design of a CPS well adapted for the new ALICE-ITS running conditions. This paper reports the R & D results for the conception of a CPS well adapted for the ALICE-ITS.

  1. Fast unmixing of multispectral optoacoustic data with vertex component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luís Deán-Ben, X.; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Multispectral optoacoustic tomography enhances the performance of single-wavelength imaging in terms of sensitivity and selectivity in the measurement of the biodistribution of specific chromophores, thus enabling functional and molecular imaging applications. Spectral unmixing algorithms are used to decompose multi-spectral optoacoustic data into a set of images representing distribution of each individual chromophoric component while the particular algorithm employed determines the sensitivity and speed of data visualization. Here we suggest using vertex component analysis (VCA), a method with demonstrated good performance in hyperspectral imaging, as a fast blind unmixing algorithm for multispectral optoacoustic tomography. The performance of the method is subsequently compared with a previously reported blind unmixing procedure in optoacoustic tomography based on a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). As in most practical cases the absorption spectrum of the imaged chromophores and contrast agents are known or can be determined using e.g. a spectrophotometer, we further investigate the so-called semi-blind approach, in which the a priori known spectral profiles are included in a modified version of the algorithm termed constrained VCA. The performance of this approach is also analysed in numerical simulations and experimental measurements. It has been determined that, while the standard version of the VCA algorithm can attain similar sensitivity to the PCA-ICA approach and have a robust and faster performance, using the a priori measured spectral information within the constrained VCA does not generally render improvements in detection sensitivity in experimental optoacoustic measurements.

  2. Quantifying array losses due to spacing and staggering in offshore wind farms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, C. L.; Mirzaeisefat, S.; Lee, S.; Xie, S.

    2013-12-01

    The layout of wind turbines can have an impact on the power production of a wind farm. Design variables that define the layout of wind turbines within a wind farm include: orientation of the rows with respect to the prevailing wind direction, size and shape of the wind farm, spacing between turbines, and alignment of the turbines (i.e., whether in-line or staggered with one another). There are no universal layout recommendations for offshore wind farms, partly because isolating the contribution of each individual design variable is impossible at existing offshore wind farms, where multiple effects overlap non-linearly on one another, and partly because analyzing the sensitivity to design variables requires sophisticated and computer-intensive numerical codes, such as large-eddy simulations (LES), that can simulate the small-scale turbulent features of turbine wakes. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the only publicly available and open-source LES code that is capable of resolving wind turbine blades as rotating actuator lines (not fixed disks), includes both neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions (stable case is currently under development), and does not rely on periodic boundary conditions. This code, named Simulator for Offshore/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA), is based on OpenFOAM and has been used successfully in the past for turbulent wake simulations. Here we address the issue of quantifying two design variables: turbine spacing (both along and across the prevailing wind direction) and alignment (in-line or staggered for consecutive rows). SOWFA is used to simulate an existing offshore wind farm in Lillgrund (Sweden), consisting of 48 Siemens 2.3 MW turbines with spacing of 3.2D across and 4.3D along the prevailing wind direction and without staggering, where D is the turbine diameter (93 m). This spacing is exceptionally tight, to our knowledge the tightest of all modern wind farms. While keeping the area and the shape of

  3. Quantifying array losses due to spacing and staggering in offshore wind farms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, C. L.; Mirzaeisefat, S.; Lee, S.; Xie, S.

    2011-12-01

    The layout of wind turbines can have an impact on the power production of a wind farm. Design variables that define the layout of wind turbines within a wind farm include: orientation of the rows with respect to the prevailing wind direction, size and shape of the wind farm, spacing between turbines, and alignment of the turbines (i.e., whether in-line or staggered with one another). There are no universal layout recommendations for offshore wind farms, partly because isolating the contribution of each individual design variable is impossible at existing offshore wind farms, where multiple effects overlap non-linearly on one another, and partly because analyzing the sensitivity to design variables requires sophisticated and computer-intensive numerical codes, such as large-eddy simulations (LES), that can simulate the small-scale turbulent features of turbine wakes. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the only publicly available and open-source LES code that is capable of resolving wind turbine blades as rotating actuator lines (not fixed disks), includes both neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions (stable case is currently under development), and does not rely on periodic boundary conditions. This code, named Simulator for Offshore/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA), is based on OpenFOAM and has been used successfully in the past for turbulent wake simulations. Here we address the issue of quantifying two design variables: turbine spacing (both along and across the prevailing wind direction) and alignment (in-line or staggered for consecutive rows). SOWFA is used to simulate an existing offshore wind farm in Lillgrund (Sweden), consisting of 48 Siemens 2.3 MW turbines with spacing of 3.2D across and 4.3D along the prevailing wind direction and without staggering, where D is the turbine diameter (93 m). This spacing is exceptionally tight, to our knowledge the tightest of all modern wind farms. While keeping the area and the shape of

  4. Locating the neutrino interaction vertex with the help of electronic detectors in the OPERA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornushkin, Yu. A.; Dmitrievsky, S. G.; Chukanov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The OPERA experiment is designed for the direct observation of the appearance of ντ from νμ → ντ oscillation in a νμ beam. A description of the procedure of neutrino interaction vertex localization (Brick Finding) by electronic detectors of a hybrid OPERA setup is presented. The procedure includes muon track and hadronic shower axis reconstruction and a determination of the target bricks with the highest probability to contain the vertex.

  5. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Decay vertex reconstruction and 3-dimensional lifetime determination at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; He, Kang-Lin; Zhang, Zi-Ping; Wang, Yi-Fang; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; Han, Lei; Han, Shao-Qing; He, Miao; Hu, Ji-Feng; Hu, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Jia, Lu-Kui; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Hai-Bo; Li, Wei-Dong; Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yong; Luo, Tao; Lü, Qi-Wen; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Mao, Ze-Pu; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Ning, Fei-Peng; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Song, Wen-Bo; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Tian, Hao-Lai; Wang, Ji-Ke; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Wu, Zhi; Xie, Yu-Guang; Yan, Jie; Yan, Liang; Yao, Jian; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-06-01

    This paper focuses mainly on the vertex reconstruction of resonance particles with a relatively long lifetime such as K0S, Λ, as well as on lifetime measurements using a 3-dimensional fit. The kinematic constraints between the production and decay vertices and the decay vertex fitting algorithm based on the least squares method are both presented. Reconstruction efficiencies including experimental resolutions are discussed. The results and systematic errors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo simulation.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope secondary mirror vertex radius/conic constant test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope backup secondary mirror was tested to determine the vertex radius and conic constant. Three completely independent tests (to the same procedure) were performed. Similar measurements in the three tests were highly consistent. The values obtained for the vertex radius and conic constant were the nominal design values within the error bars associated with the tests. Visual examination of the interferometric data did not show any measurable zonal figure error in the secondary mirror.

  7. TECHNICAL DESIGN REPORT OF THE FORWARD SILICON VERTEX (FVTX)

    SciTech Connect

    PHENIX EXPERIMENT; OBRIEN,E.; PAK, R.; DREES, K.A.

    2007-08-01

    The main goal of the RHIC heavy ion program is the discovery of the novel ultra-hot high-density state of matter predicted by the fundamental theory of strong interactions and created in collisions of heavy nuclei, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). From measurements of the large elliptic flow of light mesons and baryons and their large suppression at high transverse momentum pT that have been made at RHIC, there is evidence that new degrees of freedom, characteristic of a deconfined QCD medium, drive the dynamics of nucleus-nucleus collisions. It has been recognized, however, that the potential of light quarks and gluons to characterize the properties of the QGP medium is limited and the next phase of the RHIC program calls for the precise determination of its density, temperature, opacity and viscosity using qualitatively new probes, such as heavy quarks. We propose the construction of two Forward Silicon Vertex Trackers (FVTX) for the PHENIX experiment that will directly identify and distinguish charm and beauty decays within the acceptance of the muon spectrometers. The FVTX will provide this essential coverage over a range of forward and backward rapidities (1.2 < |y| < 2.4)--a rapidity range coverage which not only brings significantly larger acceptance to PHENIX but which is critical for separating cold nuclear matter effects from QGP effects and is critical for measuring the proton spin contributions over a significant fraction of the kinematic range of interest. In addition, the FVTX will provide greatly reduced background and improved mass resolution for dimuon events, culminating in the first measurements of the {upsilon}{prime} and Drell-Yan at RHIC. These same heavy flavor and dimuon measurements in p+p collisions will allow us to place significant constraints on the gluon and sea quark contributions to the proton's spin and to make fundamentally new tests of the Sivers function universality.

  8. VERTEX: Manganese transport with CaCO 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John H.; Knauer, George A.

    1983-04-01

    Manganese transport was studied off central California in August and September 1981 as part of the VERTEX (Vertica l Transport and Exchange) research program. Refractory, leachable, and dissolved Mn fractions associated with particles caught in traps set at 11 depths (50 to 2000 m) were analyzed. Through intentional and unintentional CaCO 3 dissolution 'experiments', it was learned that the weakly leachable Mn was originally in association with the carbonate phase. Adsorption on surfaces rather than absorption in CaCO 3 matrices was indicated by the finding that Mn was not released in proportion to the CaCo 3 dissolved, instead it appeared to keep readsorbing to the dissolving surface. Ultimately, Mn went into solution when the particulate CaCO 3 was essentially depleted, suggesting that sufficient sites for adsorption were no longer available. Manganese fluxes with CaCO 3 were low near the surface (0.1 mg cm -2 ky -1), but increased rapidly in the 50 to 200-m depth interval, and then became more or less constant (1.3 mg cm -2 ky -1 for the remainder of the water column (300 to 2000 m). Rate-of-change estimates indicate that Mn is rapidly scavenged in near-surface waters (-130 ng 1 -1 y -1) and slowly regenerated at depth (2.7 ng 1 -1 y -1) in our near-shore study area. Residence times for dissolved Mn were estimated at 1.2 y for surface waters and 17 y at depth. The implications of Mn transport with CaCO 3 in relation to open-ocean sediment excess Mn are discussed.

  9. Statin prescribing for people with severe mental illnesses: a staggered cohort study of ‘real-world’ impacts

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, R; Osborn, D; Falcaro, M; Nazareth, I; Petersen, I

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the ‘real-world effectiveness of statins for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and for lipid modification in people with severe mental illnesses (SMI), including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Design Series of staggered cohorts. We estimated the effect of statin prescribing on CVD outcomes using a multivariable Poisson regression model or linear regression for cholesterol outcomes. Setting 587 general practice (GP) surgeries across the UK reporting data to The Health Improvement Network. Participants All permanently registered GP patients aged 40–84 years between 2002 and 2012 who had a diagnosis of SMI. Exclusion criteria were pre-existing CVD, statin-contraindicating conditions or a statin prescription within the 24 months prior to the study start. Exposure One or more statin prescriptions during a 24-month ‘baseline’ period (vs no statin prescription during the same period). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was combined first myocardial infarction and stroke. All-cause mortality and total cholesterol concentration were secondary outcomes. Results We identified 2944 statin users and 42 886 statin non-users across the staggered cohorts. Statin prescribing was not associated with significant reduction in CVD events (incident rate ratio 0.89; 95% CI 0.68 to 1.15) or all-cause mortality (0.89; 95% CI 0.78 to 1.02). Statin prescribing was, however, associated with statistically significant reductions in total cholesterol of 1.2 mmol/L (95% CI 1.1 to 1.3) for up to 2 years after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics. On average, total cholesterol decreased from 6.3 to 4.6 in statin users and 5.4 to 5.3 mmol/L in non-users. Conclusions We found that statin prescribing to people with SMI in UK primary care was effective for lipid modification but not CVD events. The latter finding may reflect insufficient power to detect a smaller effect size than that observed in randomised

  10. EM reconstruction of dual isotope PET using staggered injections and prompt gamma positron emitters

    PubMed Central

    Andreyev, Andriy; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of dual isotope positron emission tomography (DIPET) is to create two separate images of two coinjected PET radiotracers. DIPET shortens the duration of the study, reduces patient discomfort, and produces perfectly coregistered images compared to the case when two radiotracers would be imaged independently (sequential PET studies). Reconstruction of data from such simultaneous acquisition of two PET radiotracers is difficult because positron decay of any isotope creates only 511 keV photons; therefore, the isotopes cannot be differentiated based on the detected energy. Methods: Recently, the authors have proposed a DIPET technique that uses a combination of radiotracer A which is a pure positron emitter (such as 18F or 11C) and radiotracer B in which positron decay is accompanied by the emission of a high-energy (HE) prompt gamma (such as 38K or 60Cu). Events that are detected as triple coincidences of HE gammas with the corresponding two 511 keV photons allow the authors to identify the lines-of-response (LORs) of isotope B. These LORs are used to separate the two intertwined distributions, using a dedicated image reconstruction algorithm. In this work the authors propose a new version of the DIPET EM-based reconstruction algorithm that allows the authors to include an additional, independent estimate of radiotracer A distribution which may be obtained if radioisotopes are administered using a staggered injections method. In this work the method is tested on simple simulations of static PET acquisitions. Results: The authors’ experiments performed using Monte-Carlo simulations with static acquisitions demonstrate that the combined method provides better results (crosstalk errors decrease by up to 50%) than the positron-gamma DIPET method or staggered injections alone. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that the authors’ new EM algorithm which combines information from triple coincidences with prompt gammas and staggered injections improves

  11. A staggered mesh finite difference scheme for the computation of hypersonic Euler flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A shock capturing finite difference method for systems of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented which avoids the need to solve Riemann problems while being competitive in performance with other current methods. A staggered spatial mesh is employed, so that complicated nonlinear waves generated at cell interfaces are averaged over cell interiors at the next time level. The full method combines to form a conservative version of the modified method of characteristics. The advantages of the method are discussed, and numerical results are presented for the two-dimensional double ellipse problem.

  12. A conservative staggered-grid Chebyshev multidomain method for compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kopriva, D.A.; Kolias, J.H.

    1996-04-01

    The authors present a new multidomain spectral collocation method that uses a staggered grid for the solution of compressible flow problems. The solution unknowns are defined at the nodes of a Gauss quadrature rule. The fluxes are evaluated at the nodes of a Gauss-Lobatto rule. The method is conservative, free-stream preserving, and exponentially accurate. A significant advantage of the method is that subdomain corners are not included in the approximation, making solutions in complex geometries easier to compute. 41 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  13. PROPOSAL FOR A SILICON VERTEX TRACKER (VTX) FOR THE PHENIX EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    AKIBA,Y.

    2004-03-30

    We propose the construction of a Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX) for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The VTX will substantially enhance the physics capabilities of the PHENIX central arm spectrometers. Our prime motivation is to provide precision measurements of heavy-quark production (charm and beauty) in A+A, p(d)+A, and polarized p+p collisions. These are key measurements for the future RHIC program, both for the heavy ion program as it moves from the discovery phase towards detailed investigation of the properties of the dense nuclear medium created in heavy ion collisions, and for the exploration of the nucleon spin-structure functions. In addition, the VTX will also considerably improve other measurements with PHENIX. The main physics topics addressed by the VTX are: (1) Hot and dense strongly interacting matter--Potential enhancement of charm production; Open beauty production; Flavor dependence of jet quenching and QCD energy loss; Accurate charm reference for quarkonium; Thermal dilepton radiation; High p{sub T} phenomena with light flavors above 10-15 GeV/c in p{sub T}; and Upsilon spectroscopy in the e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel. (2) Gluon spin structure of the nucleon--{Delta}G/G with charm; {Delta}G/G with beauty; and x dependence of {Delta}G/G with {gamma}-jet correlations. (3) Nucleon structure in nuclei--Gluon shadowing over broad x-range. With the present PHENIX detector, heavy-quark production has been measured indirectly through the observation of single electrons. These measurements are inherently limited in accuracy by systematic uncertainties resulting from the large electron background from Dalitz decays and photon conversions. In particular, the statistical nature of the analysis does not allow for a model-independent separation of the charm and beauty contributions. The VTX detector will provide vertex tracking with a resolution of <50 {micro}m over a large coverage both in rapidity (|{eta}| < 1.2) and in azimuthal angle ({Delta}{phi} {approx

  14. Effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in vector heavy-light mesons and theory average of the Bc* meson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Rocha, M.; Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A.

    2016-04-01

    We extend earlier investigations of heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons to the vector case, using a simple model in the context of the Dyson-Schwinger-Bethe-Salpeter approach. We investigate the effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in a systematic fashion and illustrate and attempt to quantify corrections beyond the phenomenologically very useful and successful rainbow-ladder truncation. In particular we investigate the dressed quark-photon vertex in such a setup and make a prediction for the experimentally as yet unknown mass of the Bc* , which we obtain at 6.334 GeV well in line with predictions from other approaches. Furthermore, we combine a comprehensive set of results from the theoretical literature. The theoretical average for the mass of the Bc* meson is 6.336 ±0.002 GeV .

  15. Graphical method for deriving an effective interaction with a new vertex function

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Okamoto, R.; Kumagai, H.; Fujii, S.

    2011-02-15

    Introducing a new vertex function, Z(E), of an energy variable E, we derive a new equation for the effective interaction. The equation is obtained by replacing the Q box in the Krenciglowa-Kuo (KK) method with Z(E). This new approach can be viewed as an extension of the KK method. We show that this equation can be solved both in iterative and noniterative ways. We observe that the iteration procedure with Z(E) brings about fast convergence compared to the usual KK method. It is shown that, as in the KK approach, the procedure of calculating the effective interaction can be reduced to determining the true eigenvalues of the original Hamiltonian H and they can be obtained as the positions of intersections of graphs generated from Z(E). We find that this graphical method yields always precise results and reproduces any of the true eigenvalues of H. The calculation in the present approach can be made regardless of overlaps with the model space and energy differences between unperturbed energies and the eigenvalues of H. We find also that Z(E) is a well-behaved function of E and has no singularity. These characteristics of the present approach ensure stability in actual calculations and would be helpful to resolve some difficulties due to the presence of poles in the Q box. Performing test calculations, we verify numerically theoretical predictions made in the present approach.

  16. The beam test measurements of the Belle II vertex detector modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilka, T.

    2017-03-01

    The Belle II experiment designed to study CP Violation and Beyond Standard model physics at the decays of B-mesons is quickly approaching its first physics run with the SuperKEKB accelerator (Tsukuba, Japan) already under commissioning. To operate in the unique conditions of the Belle II experiment, its vertex detector (VXD) is a six layers silicon detector with two innermost layers of DEPFET active pixel modules and four layers of double-sided strip modules. A section of it will become a commissioning detector for the first collisions of the next-generation high luminosity B-factory. The same setup, from cooling services, mechanical support or sensors and front-end electronics to DAQ, including the software and alignment framework, is tested under an electron beam provided by DESY facilities. We present the basic characteristics of the pixel and strip modules and the setup under test, including software and alignment framework—as close to the final system as possible.

  17. Controllability and observability analysis for vertex domination centrality in directed networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong; Deng, Yue; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Topological centrality is a significant measure for characterising the relative importance of a node in a complex network. For directed networks that model dynamic processes, however, it is of more practical importance to quantify a vertex's ability to dominate (control or observe) the state of other vertices. In this paper, based on the determination of controllable and observable subspaces under the global minimum-cost condition, we introduce a novel direction-specific index, domination centrality, to assess the intervention capabilities of vertices in a directed network. Statistical studies demonstrate that the domination centrality is, to a great extent, encoded by the underlying network's degree distribution and that most network positions through which one can intervene in a system are vertices with high domination centrality rather than network hubs. To analyse the interaction and functional dependence between vertices when they are used to dominate a network, we define the domination similarity and detect significant functional modules in glossary and metabolic networks through clustering analysis. The experimental results provide strong evidence that our indices are effective and practical in accurately depicting the structure of directed networks. PMID:24954137

  18. Design and performance of the SLD Vertex Detector, a 120 Mpixel tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, G.D.; Cotton, R.; Damerell, C.J.S.

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and initial operation of the SLD Vertex Detector, the first device to employ charge coupled devices (CCDs) on a large scale in a high energy physics experiment. The Vertex Detector comprises 480 CCDs, with a total of 120 Mpixels. Each pixel functions as an independent particle detecting element, providing space point measurements of charged particle tracks with a typical precision of 5 {mu}m in each co-ordinate. The CCDs are arranged in four concentric cylinders just outside the beam pipe which surrounds the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collision point of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The Vertex Detector is a powerful tool for distinguishing secondary vertex tracks, produced by decay in flight of heavy flavour hadrons or tau leptons, from tracks produced at the primary event vertex. Because the colliding beam environment imposes severe constraints on the design of such a detector, a six year R&D programme was needed to develop solutions to a number of problems. The requirements include a low-mass structure (to minimise multiple scattering) both for mechanical support and to provide signal paths for the CCDS; operation at low temperature with a high degree of mechanical stability; and relatively high speed CCD readout, signal processing, and data sparsification. The lessons learned through the long R&D period should be useful for the construction of large arrays of CCDs or smart pixel devices in the future, in a number of areas of science and technology.

  19. Test of {Delta}I = 2 staggering in the superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kruecken, R.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Hackman, G.

    1996-11-01

    Superdeformed (SD) states in {sup 194}Hg were populated in {sup 150}Nd({sup 48}Ca,4n) using a 201 MeV {sup 48}Ca beam from the 88- inch cyclotron. A high statistics experiment was done to test for the previously reported evidence for a {Delta}I = 2 staggering in the three SD bands in {sup 194}Hg. The transition energies were determined with a precision of at least 60 eV for most transitions. From this improvement, we cannot confirm evidence for an extended regular {Delta}I = 2 staggering in any of the three SD bands of {sup 194}Hg. However, we observe deviations from a smooth reference in the SD bands 2 and 3 which differ from previous results. Oscillation patterns of the {gamma}-ray energies that can be induced by a simple band crossing or level shift are discussed. Even though such level shifts would explain the observed effects, other experimental signatures, such as a crossing band, are needed to fully understand the results of the present work; no such band was found.

  20. Calculations of separated 3-D flows with a pressure-staggered Navier-Stokes equations solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1991-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes equations solver based on a pressure correction method with a pressure-staggered mesh and calculations of separated three-dimensional flows are presented. It is shown that the velocity pressure decoupling, which occurs when various pressure correction algorithms are used for pressure-staggered meshes, is caused by the ill-conditioned discrete pressure correction equation. The use of a partial differential equation for the incremental pressure eliminates the velocity pressure decoupling mechanism by itself and yields accurate numerical results. Example flows considered are a three-dimensional lid driven cavity flow and a laminar flow through a 90 degree bend square duct. For the lid driven cavity flow, the present numerical results compare more favorably with the measured data than those obtained using a formally third order accurate quadratic upwind interpolation scheme. For the curved duct flow, the present numerical method yields a grid independent solution with a very small number of grid points. The calculated velocity profiles are in good agreement with the measured data.

  1. Cas9-catalyzed DNA Cleavage Generates Staggered Ends: Evidence from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhicheng; Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (spCas9) along with a single guide RNA (sgRNA) has emerged as a versatile toolbox for genome editing. Despite recent advances in the mechanism studies on spCas9-sgRNA-mediated double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) recognition and cleavage, it is still unclear how the catalytic Mg2+ ions induce the conformation changes toward the catalytic active state. It also remains controversial whether Cas9 generates blunt-ended or staggered-ended breaks with overhangs in the DNA. To investigate these issues, here we performed the first all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the spCas9-sgRNA-dsDNA system with and without Mg2+ bound. The simulation results showed that binding of two Mg2+ ions at the RuvC domain active site could lead to structurally and energetically favorable coordination ready for the non-target DNA strand cleavage. Importantly, we demonstrated with our simulations that Cas9-catalyzed DNA cleavage produces 1-bp staggered ends rather than generally assumed blunt ends. PMID:27874072

  2. Identification of flow regimes around two staggered square cylinders by a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboueian, J.; Sohankar, A.

    2017-02-01

    The flow over two square cylinders in staggered arrangement is simulated numerically at a fixed Reynolds number (Re =150 ) for different gap spacing between cylinders from 0.1 to 6 times a cylinder side to understand the flow structures. The non-inclined square cylinders are located on a line with a staggered angle of 45° the oncoming velocity vector. All numerical simulations are carried out with a finite-volume code based on a collocated grid arrangement. The effects of vortex shedding on the various features of the flow field are numerically visualized using different flow contours such as λ 2 criterion, vorticity, pressure and magnitudes of velocity to distinguish the distinctive flow patterns. By changing the gap spacing between cylinders, five different flow regimes are identified and classified as single body, periodic gap flow, aperiodic, modulated periodic and synchronized vortex shedding regimes. This study revealed that the observed multiple frequencies in global forces of the downstream cylinder in the modulated periodic regime are more properly associated with differences in vortex shedding frequencies of individual cylinders than individual shear layers reported in some previous works; particularly, both shear layers from the downstream cylinder often shed vortices at the same multiple frequencies. The maximum Strouhal number for the upstream cylinder is also identified at {G}^{*}=1 for aperiodic flow pattern. Furthermore, for most cases studied, the downstream cylinder experiences larger drag force than the upstream cylinder.

  3. Heat transfer characteristics of staggered wing-shaped tubes bundle at different angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Ibrahiem, Emad Z.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2014-08-01

    An experimental and numerical study has been conducted to clarify heat transfer characteristics and effectiveness of a cross-flow heat exchanger employing staggered wing-shaped tubes at different angels of attack. The water-side Rew and the air-side Rea were at 5 × 102 and at from 1.8 × 103 to 9.7 × 103, respectively. The tubes arrangements were employed with various angles of attack θ1,2,3 from 0° to 330° at the considered Rea range. Correlation of Nu, St, as well as the heat transfer per unit pumping power (ɛ) in terms of Rea and design parameters for the studied bundle were presented. The temperature fields around the staggered wing-shaped tubes bundle were predicted by using commercial CFD FLUENT 6.3.26 software package. Results indicated that the heat transfer increased with the angle of attack in the range from 0° to 45°, while the opposite was true for angles of attack from 135° to 180°. The best thermal performance and hence the efficiency η of studied bundle occurred at the lowest Rea and/or zero angle of attack. Comparisons between the experimental and numerical results of the present study and those, previously, obtained for similar available studies showed good agreements.

  4. Interaction induced staggered spin-orbit order in two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Tanmoy

    2012-06-05

    Decoupling spin and charge transports in solids is among the many prerequisites for realizing spin electronics, spin caloritronics, and spin-Hall effect. Beyond the conventional method of generating and manipulating spin current via magnetic knob, recent advances have expanded the possibility to optical and electrical method which are controllable both internally and externally. Yet, due to the inevitable presence of charge excitations and electrical polarizibility in these methods, the separation between spin and charge degrees of freedom of electrons remains a challenge. Here we propose and formulate an interaction induced staggered spin-orbit order as a new emergent phase of matter. We show that when some form of inherent spin-splitting via Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling renders two helical Fermi surfaces to become significantly nested, a Fermi surface instability arises. To lift this degeneracy, a spontaneous symmetry breaking spin-orbit density wave develops, causing a surprisingly large quasiparticle gapping with chiral electronic states, with no active charge excitations. Since the staggered spin-orbit order is associated with a condensation energy, quantified by the gap value, destroying such spin-orbit interaction costs sufficiently large perturbation field or temperature or de-phasing time. BiAg2 surface state is shown to be a representative system for realizing such novel spin-orbit interaction with tunable and large strength, and the spin-splitting is decoupled from charge excitations.

  5. A staggered differential phase-shift keying modulation format for 100Gbit/s applications.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yufeng; Wen, Shuangchun; Chen, Lin; Li, Ying; Xu, Huiwen

    2008-08-18

    We propose and demonstrate by numerical simulation a new phase modulation format, the staggered differential phase-shift keying (SDPSK), for 100 Gbit/s applications. Non-return-to-zero (NRZ) SDPSK signals was generated by using two phase modulators, and return-to-zero (RZ) SDPSK signals with 50% duty cycle was generated by cascading a dual-arm Mach-Zehnder modulator. The demodulation of 2 bit/symbol can be simply achieved on 1 bit rate through only one Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer and a balanced receiver. By comparing the transmission characteristics of the two staggered phase modulation formats with those of NRZ-DPSK, RZ-DPSK, NRZ-DQPSK, and RZ-DQPSK, respectively, we show that, the SDPSK signal has similar chromatic dispersion and polarization-mode-dispersion tolerance to the DPSK signal with same NRZ or RZ shape, while the SDPSK signal has stronger nonlinear tolerance than the DPSK or DQPSK signal. In addition, the SDPSK signal has the best transmission performance when each signal was transmitted over 106km optical SMF+DCF, and then launched into a third-order Gaussian optical bandpass filter placed with beyond 125GHz bandwidth.

  6. Staggered scheduling of sensor estimation and fusion for tracking over long-haul links

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Qiang; Rao, Nageswara S. V.; Wang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Networked sensing can be found in a multitude of real-world applications. Here, we focus on the communication-and computation-constrained long-haul sensor networks, where sensors are remotely deployed over a vast geographical area to perform certain tasks. Of special interest is a class of such networks where sensors take measurements of one or more dynamic targets and send their state estimates to a remote fusion center via long-haul satellite links. The severe loss and delay over such links can easily reduce the amount of sensor data received by the fusion center, thereby limiting the potential information fusion gain and resulting in suboptimalmore » tracking performance. In this paper, starting with the temporal-domain staggered estimation for an individual sensor, we explore the impact of the so-called intra-state prediction and retrodiction on estimation errors. We then investigate the effect of such estimation scheduling across different sensors on the spatial-domain fusion performance, where the sensing time epochs across sensors are scheduled in an asynchronous and staggered manner. In particular, the impact of communication delay and loss as well as sensor bias on such scheduling is explored by means of numerical and simulation studies that demonstrate the validity of our analysis.« less

  7. Coupled versus decoupled multigrid solvers for variable viscosity Stokes problems using a staggered finite difference scheme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton; Püsök, Adina

    2014-05-01

    In order to solve high-resolution 3D problems in computational geodynamics it is crucial to use multigrid solvers in combination with parallel computers. A number of approaches are currently in use in the community, which can broadly be divided into coupled and decoupled approaches. In the decoupled approach, an algebraic or geometric multigrid method is used as a preconditioner for the velocity equations only while an iterative approach such as Schur complement reduction used to solve the outer velocity-pressure equations. In the coupled approach, on the other hand, a multigrid approach is applied to both the velocity and pressure equations. The coupled multigrid approaches are typically employed in combination with staggered finite difference discretizations, whereas the decoupled approach is the method of choice in many of the existing finite element codes. Yet, it is unclear whether there are differences in speed between the two approaches, and if so, how this depends on the initial guess. Here, we implemented both approaches in combination with a staggered finite difference discretization and test the robustness of the two approaches with respect to large jumps in viscosity contrast, as well as their computational efficiency as a function of the initial guess. Acknowledgements. Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC Grant agreement #258830. Numerical computations have been performed on JUQUEEN of the Jülich high-performance computing center.

  8. Computational imaging from non-uniform degradation of staggered TDI thermal infrared imager.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Jian Guo; Shi, Yan; Chen, Wangli; Qin, Qianqing; Zhang, Zijian

    2015-09-21

    For the Time Delay Integration (TDI) staggered line-scanning thermal infrared imager, a Computational Imaging (CI) approach is developed to achieve higher spatial resolution images. After a thorough analysis of the causes of non-uniform image displacement and degradation for multi-channel staggered TDI arrays, the study aims to approach one-dimensional (1D) sub-pixel displacement estimation and superposition of images from time-division multiplexing scanning lines. Under the assumption that a thermal image is 2D piecewise C(2) smooth, a sparse-and-smooth deconvolution algorithm with L1-norm regularization terms combining the first and second order derivative operators is proposed to restore high frequency components and to suppress aliasing simultaneously. It is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated, with simulation and airborne thermal infrared images, that this is a state-of-the-art practical CI method to reconstruct clear images with higher frequency components from raw thermal images that are subject to instantaneous distortion and blurring.

  9. Cas9-catalyzed DNA Cleavage Generates Staggered Ends: Evidence from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zhicheng; Liu, Jin

    2016-11-01

    The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (spCas9) along with a single guide RNA (sgRNA) has emerged as a versatile toolbox for genome editing. Despite recent advances in the mechanism studies on spCas9-sgRNA-mediated double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) recognition and cleavage, it is still unclear how the catalytic Mg2+ ions induce the conformation changes toward the catalytic active state. It also remains controversial whether Cas9 generates blunt-ended or staggered-ended breaks with overhangs in the DNA. To investigate these issues, here we performed the first all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the spCas9-sgRNA-dsDNA system with and without Mg2+ bound. The simulation results showed that binding of two Mg2+ ions at the RuvC domain active site could lead to structurally and energetically favorable coordination ready for the non-target DNA strand cleavage. Importantly, we demonstrated with our simulations that Cas9-catalyzed DNA cleavage produces 1-bp staggered ends rather than generally assumed blunt ends.

  10. Staggered scheduling of sensor estimation and fusion for tracking over long-haul links

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiang; Rao, Nageswara S. V.; Wang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Networked sensing can be found in a multitude of real-world applications. Here, we focus on the communication-and computation-constrained long-haul sensor networks, where sensors are remotely deployed over a vast geographical area to perform certain tasks. Of special interest is a class of such networks where sensors take measurements of one or more dynamic targets and send their state estimates to a remote fusion center via long-haul satellite links. The severe loss and delay over such links can easily reduce the amount of sensor data received by the fusion center, thereby limiting the potential information fusion gain and resulting in suboptimal tracking performance. In this paper, starting with the temporal-domain staggered estimation for an individual sensor, we explore the impact of the so-called intra-state prediction and retrodiction on estimation errors. We then investigate the effect of such estimation scheduling across different sensors on the spatial-domain fusion performance, where the sensing time epochs across sensors are scheduled in an asynchronous and staggered manner. In particular, the impact of communication delay and loss as well as sensor bias on such scheduling is explored by means of numerical and simulation studies that demonstrate the validity of our analysis.

  11. A two-dimensional coding design for staggered islands bit-patterned media recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrayangkool, A.; Warisarn, C.

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a two dimensional (2D) staggered recorded-bit patterning (SRBP) coding scheme for staggered array bit-patterned media recording channel to alleviate the severe 2D interference, which requires no redundant bits at the expense of increased an additional memories. Specifically, a data sequence is first split into three tracks. Then, each data track is circularly shifted to find the best data pattern based on a look-up table before recording such that the shifted data tracks cause the lowest 2D interference in the readback signal. Simulation results indicate that the system with our proposed SRBP scheme outperforms that without any 2D coding, especially when an areal density (AD) is high and/or the position jitter is large. Specifically, for the system without position jitter at bit-error rate of 10-4, the proposed scheme can provide about 1.8 and 2.3 dB gains at the AD of 2.5 and 3.0 Tb/in.2, respectively.

  12. An experimental investigation of wind flow over tall towers in staggered form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Proma; Islam, Md. Quamrul; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    In this research work an experiment is conducted to see the effect of wind loading on square, pentagonal and Hexagonal shape cylinders in staggered form. The experiment is done in an open circuit wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 4.23×104 based on the face width of the cylinder across the flow direction. The flow velocity has been kept uniform throughout the experiment at 14.3 m/s. The test has been conducted for single cylinders first and then in staggered form. Angle of attack is chosen at a definite interval. The static pressure at different locations of the cylinder is measured by inclined multi-manometer. From the surface static pressure readings pressure coefficients are calculated first, then drag and lift coefficients are calculated using numerical Integration Method. These results will surely help engineers to design buildings with such shapes more efficiently. All the results are expressed in non-dimensional form, so they can be applied for prototype buildings and determine the wind loading at any wind speed on structures of similar external shapes.

  13. Numerical investigation of base-setting of stator's stagger angles for a 15-stage axial-flow compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hao; Zhao, Weiguang; Jin, Donghai; Peng, Zeyan; Gui, Xingmin

    2014-02-01

    A 15-stage axial-flow compressor utilized in steel industry was studied in this paper. All the stator's stagger angles of the compressor are variable to ensure the multistage compressor operate effectively within a wide range of flow rate and meanwhile satisfy the demand for sufficient pressure ratio, adiabatic efficiency and stall margin. Three in all different base-settings of stator's stagger angles were presented and commercial CFD software was applied to obtain the overall performance characteristics. The results showed that both of the optimized base-settings improved the performances both in summer and winter conditions, although the adiabatic efficiency was somewhat decreased. Taking incidence angle and stage loading into consideration, differences among the three cases were analyzed in detail. On the basis of numerical computations, the performance could be effectively improved through adjusting the base-setting of stator's stagger angles.

  14. Vertex evoked potentials in a rating-scale detection task: Relation to signal probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Vertex evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing in an auditory detection task with rating scale responses. Three values of a priori probability of signal presentation were tested. The amplitudes of the N1 and P3 components of the vertex potential associated with correct detections of the signal were found to be systematically related to the strictness of the response criterion and independent of variations in a priori signal probability. No similar evoked potential components were found associated with signal absent judgements (misses and correct rejections) regardless of the confidence level of the judgement or signal probability. These results strongly support the contention that the form of the vertex evoked response is closely correlated with the subject's psychophysical decision regarding the presence or absence of a threshold level signal.

  15. Application of laser differential confocal technique in back vertex power measurement for phoropters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Li, Lin; Ding, Xiang; Liu, Wenli

    2012-10-01

    A phoropter is one of the most popular ophthalmic instruments used in optometry and the back vertex power (BVP) is one of the most important parameters to evaluate the refraction characteristics of a phoropter. In this paper, a new laser differential confocal vertex-power measurement method which takes advantage of outstanding focusing ability of laser differential confocal (LDC) system is proposed for measuring the BVP of phoropters. A vertex power measurement system is built up. Experimental results are presented and some influence factor is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the method based on LDC technique has higher measurement precision and stronger environmental anti-interference capability compared to existing methods. Theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the measurement error of the method is about 0.02m-1.

  16. The body-centered cubic structure of methyllithium tetramer crystal: staggered methyl conformation by electrostatic stabilization via intratetramer multipolarization.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yusuke; Demura, Akimitsu; Okamoto, Takuya; Hitomi, Haruko; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2006-06-29

    The methyllithium tetramer (CH3Li)4 structure in the bcc crystal has been theoretically optimized with the use of density functional theory calculations under the periodic boundary condition. The X-ray structure shows that the methyl-group conformation in tetramer in crystal takes the staggered form rather than the eclipsed form that is taken in the isolated tetramer, i.e., the crystal packing effect, and this has been reproduced for the first time. It is concluded that the staggered form is advantageous in crystal, as a whole, due to the larger electrostatic stabilization via the induced intratetramer multipolarization, although it should cause, simultaneously, smaller destabilization in intratetramer electronic energy.

  17. NLO vertex for a forward jet plus a rapidity gap at high energies

    DOE PAGES

    Hentschinski, Martin; Madrigal Martínez, José Daniel; Murdaca, Beatrice; ...

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the calculation of the forward jet vertex associated to a rapidity gap (coupling of a hard pomeron to the jet) in the BFKL formalism at next-to-leading order (NLO). Real emission contributions are computed via Lipatov’s effective action. The NLO jet vertex turns out to be finite within collinear factorization and allows, together with the NLO non-forward gluon Green’s function, to perform NLO studies of jet production in diffractive events (e.g. Mueller-Tang dijets).

  18. Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihl, M.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam-gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam-beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam-gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam-gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 at point 4.

  19. First experience and results from the HERA-/B vertex detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C.; Baumann, I.; Bräuer, M.; Eberle, M.; Fallot-Burghardt, W.; Grigoriev, E.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Klefenz, F.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Leffers, G.; Perschke, T.; Rieling, J.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sexauer, E.; Seybold, L.; Spengler, J.; StDenis, R.; Trunk, U.; Wanke, R.; Abt, I.; Fox, H.; Moshous, B.; Riechmann, K.; Rietz, M.; Ruebsam, R.; Wagner, W.

    1998-11-01

    The HERA- B collaboration is building a detector to realize the ambitious goal of observing CP violation in decays of neutral B-mesons. A central element of the apparatus is the silicon vertex detector used to selectively trigger on these decays in a high charged particle multiplicity background environment and to reconstruct secondary vertices from such decays with high precision. The vertex detector, the supporting infrastructure and first results using prototype detectors are described. Results include imaging of the proton interaction region on the HERA- B target, hit distributions in the detector planes, and alignment of the detectors with each other and the target.

  20. NLO vertex for a forward jet plus a rapidity gap at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hentschinski, Martin; Madrigal Martínez, José Daniel; Murdaca, Beatrice; Vera, Agustín Sabio

    2015-04-10

    We present the calculation of the forward jet vertex associated to a rapidity gap (coupling of a hard pomeron to the jet) in the BFKL formalism at next-to-leading order (NLO). Real emission contributions are computed via Lipatov’s effective action. The NLO jet vertex turns out to be finite within collinear factorization and allows, together with the NLO non-forward gluon Green’s function, to perform NLO studies of jet production in diffractive events (e.g. Mueller-Tang dijets)

  1. A Technological Determinist Viewpoint of the Stanton-Staggers Conflict over "The Selling of the Pentagon": Print Man Versus Electronic Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    Media, specifically documentary films on television, profoundly affect both social structure and man's psychological percepts. The clash of views depicted is between "print man" (using U.S. Representative Harley Staggers as an example) and "electronic man" (portrayed as Frank Stanton of CBS) centering on Stagger's objections to…

  2. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor-fuel-module construction. [LWBR

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, G.K.; DiGuiseppe, C.P.

    1982-10-28

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wherein the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements.

  3. Robust picosecond writing of a layered antiferromagnet by staggered spin-orbit fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P. E.; Otxoa, R. M.; Wunderlich, J.

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast electrical switching by current-induced staggered spin-orbit fields, with minimal risk of overshoot is shown in layered easy-plane antiferromagnets with basal-plane anisotropies. Reliable switching is due to the fieldlike torque, relaxing stringent requirements with respect to precision in the duration of the excitation pulse. Focus is put on a system with weak planar biaxial anisotropy. We investigate the switching as a function of the spin-orbit field strength, pulse duration, rise and fall times, and damping using atomistic spin dynamics simulations and an effective equation for the antiferromagnetic order parameter. The critical spin-orbit field strength required for switching a biaxial system is determined, and we show that writing is possible at feasible current magnitudes. Finally, we discuss switching of systems exhibiting a dominant uniaxial basal-plane anisotropy.

  4. γ-band staggering and E(5)-type structure: Zn64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihai, C.; Zamfir, N. V.; Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, G.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Ivaşcu, M.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.

    2007-04-01

    The staggering factor S4 in the quasi-γ band was used for the first time as a signature of the E(5) symmetry. This observable, together with the R4/2 ratio is used to find E(5) type nuclei in the Z=28 50 and Z=50 82 shells. An E(5) candidate is found to be Zn64. Low-spin states in Zn64 populated in the ɛ/β+ decay of Ga64, produced in the Fe54(C12,pn)Ga64, were studied through off-beam γ-ray spectroscopy. The decay scheme of Zn64 is found to be reasonably close to the predictions of the E(5) critical point symmetry. The structure of the excited 0+ states in Zn64 and their behavior in the Zn isotopic chain is discussed.

  5. Staggered-ladder quasienergy spectra for generic quasimomentum and quantum-dynamical manifestations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Itzhack

    2013-04-01

    A non-Poisson regular quasienergy spectrum is found for the generalized kicked particle under quantum-resonance conditions at generic quasimomentum, a quantity most relevant in atom-optics experimental realizations of kicked-rotor systems. The regular spectrum has the structure of a staggered ladder, i.e., it is the superposition of a finite number of ladder subspectra all having the same spacing, which is independent of the nonintegrability of the system. This spectral structure is shown to have distinct quantum-dynamical manifestations: a suppression of quantum resonances and a dynamical localization characterized by unique features such as traveling-wave components in the time evolution. These phenomena are found to be robust under small variations of the quasimomentum and should therefore be experimentally observable using Bose-Einstein condensates with sufficiently small quasimomentum width.

  6. Spectrum of the Dirac operator and multigrid algorithm with dynamical staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkreuter, T. Fachbereich Physik , Humboldt-Universitaet, Invalidenstrasse 110, D-10099 Berlin )

    1995-02-01

    Complete spectra of the staggered Dirac operator [ital ];sD are determined in quenched four-dimensional SU(2) gauge fields, and also in the presence of dynamical fermions. Periodic as well as antiperiodic boundary conditions are used. An attempt is made to relate the performance of multigrid (MG) and conjugate gradient (CG) algorithms for propagators with the distribution of the eigenvalues of [ital ];sD. The convergence of the CG algorithm is determined only by the condition number [kappa] and by the lattice size. Since [kappa]'s do not vary significantly when quarks become dynamic, CG convergence in unquenched fields can be predicted from quenched simulations. On the other hand, MG convergence is not affected by [kappa] but depends on the spectrum in a more subtle way.

  7. Delta I = 1 staggering effect for negative parity rotational bands with K = 1/2 in W/Os/Pt odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    The anomalous negative-parity bands of odd-mass nuclei W/Os/Pt for N = 103 isotones are studied within the framework of particle rotor model (PRM). The phenomenon of Δ I = 1 staggering or signature splitting in energies occurs as one plots the gamma transitional energy over spin (EGOS) versus spin for the 1/2-[521] band originating from N = 5 single particle orbital. The rotational band with K = 1/2 separates into two signature partners. The levels with I = 1/2, 5/2, 9/2,… are displaced relatively to the levels with I = 3/2,7/2,11/2,…. The deviations of the level energies from the rigid rotor values is described by Coriolis coupling.

  8. a Numerical Study of Unsteady Fluid Flow in In-Line and Staggered Tube Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, S. B.; Spalding, D. B.

    1999-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the results of numerical calculations for transient flow in in-line-square and rotated-square tube banks with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 2:1, in the Reynolds number range of 30-3000. Transient-periodic behaviour is induced by the consideration of two or more modules, with a sinusoidal span-wise perturbation being applied in the upstream module. There is a triode-like effect, whereby the downstream response to the stimulus is amplified, and there is a net gain in the crosswise flow component. When an appropriate feedback mechanism is provided, a stable transient behaviour is obtained, with alternate vortices being shed from each cylinder. Flow visualization studies of the results of the calculations are presented together with quantitative details of pressure drop, lift, drag and heat transfer. For the staggered bank, a wake-switching or Coanda effect was observed as the serpentine-shaped wake attached to alternate sides of the downstream cylinder. The induced response is independent of the amplitude and frequency of the applied disturbance, including the case of spontaneous behaviour with no excitation mechanism. For the in-line case where each cylinder is in the shadow of the previous one, the motion is less pronounced; however, a shear-layer instability associated with the alternating spin of shed vortices was observed. In this case, the response was found to be somewhat dependent on the frequency of the applied disturbance, and a transient motion could not be induced spontaneously in the absence of an explicit feedback mechanism. Calculated Strouhal numbers were in fair agreement with experimental data: for the staggered geometry, they had values of between 0.26 and 0.35, or from -21 to +6% higher than measured values, while for the in-line geometry, the Strouhal numbers ranged between 0.09 and 0.12, or about 20-40% lower than experimental values.

  9. BK using HYP-smeared staggered fermions in Nf = 2 + 1 unquenched QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.; Bae, T.; Jang, Y-C.; Kim, H-J.; Kim, J.; Kim, K; Lee, W.; Sharpe, S.; Yoon, B.

    2010-12-20

    We present results for the kaon mixing parameter B{sub K} calculated using HYP (hypercubic fat link)-smeared improved staggered fermions on the asqtad lattices generated by the MILC collaboration. We use three lattice spacings (a{approx} 0.12, 0.09 and 0.06 fm), ten different valence-quark masses (m {approx} m{sub s}/10-m{sub s}), and several light sea-quark masses in order to control the continuum and chiral extrapolations. We derive the next-to-leading order staggered chiral perturbation theory (SChPT) results necessary to fit our data, and use these results to do extrapolations based both on SU(2) and SU(3) SChPT. The SU(2) fitting is particularly straightforward because parameters related to taste breaking and matching errors appear only at next-to-next-to-leading order. We match to the continuum renormalization scheme [naive dimensional regularization (NDR)] using one-loop perturbation theory. Our final result is from the SU(2) analysis, with the SU(3) result providing a (less accurate) cross check. We find B{sub K}(NDR, {mu} = 2 GeV) = 0.529 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.032 and B{sub K} = B{sub K}(RGI) = 0.724 {+-} 0.012 {+-} 0.043, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The error is dominated by the truncation error in the matching factor. Our results are consistent with those obtained using valence domain-wall fermions on lattices generated with asqtad or domain-wall sea quarks.

  10. Convergence and superconvergence of staggered discontinuous Galerkin methods for the three-dimensional Maxwell’s equations on Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric T.; Ciarlet, Patrick; Yu, Tang Fei

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a new type of staggered discontinuous Galerkin methods for the three dimensional Maxwell’s equations is developed and analyzed. The spatial discretization is based on staggered Cartesian grids so that many good properties are obtained. First of all, our method has the advantages that the numerical solution preserves the electromagnetic energy and automatically fulfills a discrete version of the Gauss law. Moreover, the mass matrices are diagonal, thus time marching is explicit and is very efficient. Our method is high order accurate and the optimal order of convergence is rigorously proved. It is also very easy to implement due to its Cartesian structure and can be regarded as a generalization of the classical Yee’s scheme as well as the quadrilateral edge finite elements. Furthermore, a superconvergence result, that is the convergence rate is one order higher at interpolation nodes, is proved. Numerical results are shown to confirm our theoretical statements, and applications to problems in unbounded domains with the use of PML are presented. A comparison of our staggered method and non-staggered method is carried out and shows that our method has better accuracy and efficiency.

  11. Spreadsheet Calculations for Jets in Crossflow: Opposed Rows of Inline and Staggered Holes and Single and Opposed Rows with Alternating Hole Sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Clisset, James R.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this jet-in-crossflow study was to calculate expected results for two configurations for which limited or no experimental results have been published: (1) cases of opposed rows of closely-spaced jets from inline and staggered round holes and (2) rows of jets from alternating large and small round holes. Simulations of these configurations were performed using an Excel (Microsoft Corporation) spreadsheet implementation of a NASA-developed empirical model which had been shown in previous publications to give excellent representations of mean experimental scalar results suggesting that the NASA empirical model for the scalar field could confidently be used to investigate these configurations. The supplemental Excel spreadsheet is posted with the current report on the NASA Glenn Technical Reports Server (http://gltrs.grc.nasa.gov) and can be accessed from the Supplementary Notes section as TM-2010-216100-SUPPL1.xls. Calculations for cases of opposed rows of jets with the orifices on one side shifted show that staggering can improve the mixing, particularly for cases where jets would overpenetrate slightly if the orifices were in an aligned configuration. The jets from the larger holes dominate the mixture fraction for configurations with a row of large holes opposite a row of smaller ones although the jet penetration was about the same. For single and opposed rows with mixed hole sizes, jets from the larger holes penetrated farther. For all cases investigated, the dimensionless variance of the mixture fraction decreased significantly with increasing downstream distance. However, at a given downstream distance, the variation between cases was small.

  12. Silicon drift devices for track and vertex detection at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Kraner, H.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Rescia, S. ); Clark, J.; Henderson, S.; Hsu, L.; Oliver, J.; Wilson, R. ); Clemen, M.; Humanic, T.; Kraus, D.; Vilkelis, G.; Yu, B. ); McDonald, K.; Lu, C.; Wall, M. ); Vacchi, A. ); Bert

    1990-01-01

    We report on the recent progress in the study of Semiconductor Drift (Memory) Detectors intended for an inner tracking and vertexing system for the SSC. The systematic studies and the calibration of the existing detectors and the simulated performance in the actual SSC environment are highlighted. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 1: Effects of stimulus delivery rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Enhancement of the auditory vertex potentials with selective attention to dichotically presented tone pips was found to be critically sensitive to the range of inter-stimulus intervals in use. Only at the shortest intervals was a clear-cut enhancement of the latency component to stimuli observed for the attended ear.

  14. Human Performance on Hard Non-Euclidean Graph Problems: Vertex Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Sarah; Masson, Michael E. J.; Stege, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on a computationally hard visual optimization problem, the Traveling Salesperson Problem (TSP), indicate that humans are capable of finding close to optimal solutions in near-linear time. The current study is a preliminary step in investigating human performance on another hard problem, the Minimum Vertex Cover Problem, in which…

  15. Operation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector with colliding beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Grieco, G.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Ristori, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F. ); Bailey, M.W.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kruse, M.C.; Shaw, N.M. ); Carithers, W.C.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneide

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the main features of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) and discuss its performance during actual colliding beam operation at the Fermilab Tevatron. Details on S/N ratio, alignment, resolution and efficiency are given.

  16. Competition between pairing correlations and deformation from the odd-even mass staggering of francium and radium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreim, S.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Borgmann, Ch.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Cocolios, T. E.; Gottberg, A.; Herfurth, F.; Kowalska, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Lunney, D.; Manea, V.; Mendonca, T. M.; Naimi, S.; Neidherr, D.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Stora, Th.; Wienholtz, F.; Wolf, R. N.; Zuber, K.

    2014-08-01

    The masses of Fr222,224,226-233 and Ra233,234 have been determined with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the ISOLDE facility at CERN, including the previously unknown mass and half-life of Fr233. We study the evolution of the odd-even staggering of binding energies along the francium and radium isotopic chains and of its lowest-order estimator, Δ3(N). An enhancement of the staggering of Δ3(N) is observed towards neutron number N =146, which points to contributions beyond pairing correlations. These contributions are investigated in the Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approaches, emphasizing the connections to the single-particle level density and nuclear deformation.

  17. Analysis of a regularized, time-staggered discretization method and its link to the semi-implicit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, J.; Reich, S.; Staniforth, A.; White, A.; Wood, N.

    2005-04-01

    A key aspect of the recently proposed Hamiltonian particle-mesh (HPM) method is its time-staggered discretization combined with a regularization of the continuous governing equations. In this article, the time discretization aspect of the HPM method is analysed for the linearized, rotating, shallow-water equations with orography, and the combined effect of time-staggering and regularization is compared analytically with the popular two-time-level semi-implicit time discretization of the unregularized equations. It is found that the two approaches are essentially equivalent, provided the regularization parameter is chosen appropriately in terms of the time step t. The article treats space as a continuum and, hence, its analysis is not limited to the HPM method.

  18. Development of an explicit non-staggered scheme for solving three-dimensional Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Tony W. H.; Chung, Y. W.; Li, J. H.; Wang, Y. C.

    2016-10-01

    An explicit finite-difference scheme for solving the three-dimensional Maxwell's equations in non-staggered grids is presented. We aspire to obtain time-dependent solutions of the Faraday's and Ampère's equations and predict the electric and magnetic fields within the discrete zero-divergence context (or Gauss's law). The local conservation laws in Maxwell's equations are numerically preserved using the explicit second-order accurate symplectic partitioned Runge-Kutta temporal scheme. Following the method of lines, the spatial derivative terms in the semi-discretized Faraday's and Ampère's equations are approximated theoretically to obtain a highly accurate numerical phase velocity. The proposed fourth-order accurate space-centered finite difference scheme minimizes the discrepancy between the exact and numerical phase velocities. This minimization process considerably reduces the dispersion and anisotropy errors normally associated with finite difference time-domain methods. The computational efficiency of getting the same level of accuracy at less computing time and the ability of preserving the symplectic property have been numerically demonstrated through several test problems.

  19. On the relationship between the dynamic behavior and nanoscale staggered structure of the bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2015-05-01

    Bone, a typical load-bearing biological material, composed of ordinary base materials such as organic protein and inorganic mineral arranged in a hierarchical architecture, exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties. Up to now, most of previous studies focused on its mechanical properties under static loading. However, failure of the bone occurs often under dynamic loading. An interesting question is: Are the structural sizes and layouts of the bone related or even adapted to the functionalities demanded by its dynamic performance? In the present work, systematic finite element analysis was performed on the dynamic response of nanoscale bone structures under dynamic loading. It was found that for a fixed mineral volume fraction and unit cell area, there exists a nanoscale staggered structure at some specific feature size and layout which exhibits the fastest attenuation of stress waves. Remarkably, these specific feature sizes and layouts are in excellent agreement with those experimentally observed in the bone at the same scale, indicating that the structural size and layout of the bone at the nanoscale are evolutionarily adapted to its dynamic behavior. The present work points out the importance of dynamic effect on the biological evolution of load-bearing biological materials.

  20. Animal physiology and genetic aspects of ryegrass staggers in grazing sheep.

    PubMed

    Morris, C A; Wheeler, T T; Henderson, H V; Towers, N R; Phua, S H

    2017-03-19

    Ryegrass staggers (RGS) is a metabolic disease of herbivores, caused by the ingestion of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) containing a fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii) which produces a tremorgenic toxin, lolitrem B. RGS has a major economic impact for agriculture in New Zealand as well as internationally. Management of RGS in grazing sheep can be problematic, and there is an incomplete knowledge of the interaction between the toxin and the grazing animal. This review is focused on recent advances in understanding the molecular physiology of RGS in the affected animal as well as the influence of animal genetics on the degree of susceptibility to RGS. Investigations to date suggest that the primary target for toxin is the large conductance, calcium-activated, potassium (BK) channel, resulting in disruption of neuromuscular junction signalling. Genetic investigation has established the existence of genes influencing resistance to RGS, however their identity has not been confirmed and their impact has not been established. Studies to date suggest that a multi-gene selection approach will be necessary in order to develop an effective selection tool for use in the agricultural industries.

  1. Highly improved staggered quarks on the lattice with applications to charm physics

    SciTech Connect

    Follana, E.; Davies, C.; Wong, K.; Mason, Q.; Hornbostel, K.; Lepage, G. P.; Shigemitsu, J.; Trottier, H.

    2007-03-01

    We use perturbative Symanzik improvement to create a new staggered-quark action (HISQ) that has greatly reduced one-loop taste-exchange errors, no tree-level order a{sup 2} errors, and no tree-level order (am){sup 4} errors to leading order in the quark's velocity v/c. We demonstrate with simulations that the resulting action has taste-exchange interactions that are 3-4 times smaller than the widely used ASQTAD action. We show how to bound errors due to taste exchange by comparing ASQTAD and HISQ simulations, and demonstrate with simulations that such errors are likely no more than 1% when HISQ is used for light quarks at lattice spacings of 1/10 fm or less. The suppression of (am){sup 4} errors also makes HISQ the most accurate discretization currently available for simulating c quarks. We demonstrate this in a new analysis of the {psi}-{eta}{sub c} mass splitting using the HISQ action on lattices where am{sub c}=0.43 and 0.66, with full-QCD gluon configurations (from MILC). We obtain a result of 111(5) MeV which compares well with the experiment. We discuss applications of this formalism to D physics and present our first high-precision results for D{sub s} mesons.

  2. Mixed Meson Mass for Domain-Wall Valence and Staggered Sea Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos; Andre Walker-Loud

    2007-05-01

    Mixed action lattice calculations allow for an additive lattice spacing dependent mass renormalization of mesons composed of one sea and one valence quark, regardless of the type of fermion discretization methods used in the valence and sea sectors. The value of the mass renormalization depends upon the lattice actions used. This mixed meson mass shift is the most important lattice artifact to determine for mixed action calculations: because it modifies the pion mass, it plays a central role in the low energy dynamics of all hadronic correlation functions. We determine the leading order and next to leading order additive mass renormalization of valence-sea mesons for a mixed lattice action with domain-wall valence fermions and staggered sea fermions. We find that on the asqtad improved coarse MILC lattices, the leading order additive mass renormalization for the mixed mesons is Δ(am)^2 LO = 0.0409(11) which corresponds to a^2 Δ_Mix = (319 MeV)^2± (53 MeV)^2 for a = 0.125 fm. We also find significant next to leading order contributions which reduce the mass renormalization by a significant amount, such that for 0 < am_π ≤ 0.22 the mixed meson mass renormalization is well approximated by Δ(am)^2 = 0.0340 (23) or a^2δ_Mix = (290 MeV)^2 ± (76 MeV)^2. The full next-to-leading order analysis is presented in the text.

  3. Development of eclipsed and staggered forms in some hydrogen bonded complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Habibi, Mostafa; Hesabi, Nahid

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonding in X3CH···NH3 (X = H, F, Cl, and Br) complexes has been studied by B3LYP, B3PW91, MP2, MP3, MP4, and CCSD methods using 6-311++G(d,p) and AUG-cc-PVTZ basis sets. These complexes could exist in both eclipsed (EC) and staggered (ST) forms. The differences between binding energies of EC and ST forms are negligible and all EC and ST shapes correspond to minimum stationary states. The order of stabilities of them is in an agreement with the results of atoms in molecules (AIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses. On the basis of low differences between binding energies, ST forms are more stable than EC forms in all complexes with the exception of Br3CH···NH3, which behaves just opposite. Although the differences between binding energies are negligible, they are consistent with the results of AIM analysis.

  4. Massive expansions of Dscam splicing diversity via staggered homologous recombination during arthropod evolution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher; Kim, Namshin; Roy, Meenakshi; Graveley, Brenton R

    2010-01-01

    The arthropod Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene can generate tens of thousands of protein isoforms via combinatorial splicing of numerous alternative exons encoding immunoglobulin variable domains organized into three clusters referred to as the exon 4, 6, and 9 clusters. Dscam protein diversity is important for nervous system development and immune functions. We have performed extensive phylogenetic analyses of Dscam from 20 arthropods (each containing between 46 and 96 alternative exons) to reconstruct the detailed history of exon duplication and loss events that built this remarkable system over 450 million years of evolution. Whereas the structure of the exon 4 cluster is ancient, the exon 6 and 9 clusters have undergone massive, independent expansions in each insect lineage. An analysis of nearly 2000 duplicated exons enabled detailed reconstruction of the timing, location, and boundaries of these duplication events. These data clearly show that new Dscam exons have arisen continuously throughout arthropod evolution and that this process is still occurring in the exon 6 and 9 clusters. Recently duplicated regions display boundaries corresponding to a single exon and the adjacent intron. The boundaries, homology, location, clustering, and relative frequencies of these duplication events strongly suggest that staggered homologous recombination is the major mechanism by which new Dscam exons evolve. These data provide a remarkably detailed picture of how complex gene structure evolves and reveal the molecular mechanism behind this process.

  5. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  6. A FASTBUS flash ADC system for the Mark II vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.

    1988-10-01

    This is a description of a flash ADC system built for the Mark II experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This system was designed for use in the experiment's vertex chamber where signals could occur over a relatively long time, approximately 10 microseconds. This long time, coupled with fast cable amplifiers, necessitated an alternate design approach than was used with a dE/dX FASTBUS flash ADC design. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  7. Chemical Applications of Topology and Group Theory. 20. Eight-Vertex Polyhedra and Their Rearrangements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-14

    Geometriae Dedicata 1975, 3, 469. *(6) Lipscomb, W. N. Science 1966, 153, 373. (7) King, R. B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1969, 91, 7211. * (8) Hoard, J. L...polyhedra given in Table 1 of Federico, P.J. Geometriae Dedicata 1975, 3, 469. The vertex index v7 v6v5 v4 v3 and the symmetry point group are given in

  8. Error estimates for cell-vertex solutions of the compressible Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    The cell-vertex schemes due to Ni and Jameson, et al. have been subjected to a theoretical analysis of their truncation error. The analysis confirms the authors' claims for second-order accuracy on smooth grids, but shows that the same accuracy cannot be obtained on arbitrary grids. It is shown that the schemes have a unique generalization to axisymmetric flow that preserves the second-order accuracy.

  9. Influence of the nonperturbative quark-gluon vertex on the meson and baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios

    2016-01-22

    We present a calculation of the Hadron spectrum in the Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter approach to continuum QCD. A sophisticated truncation featuring all covariant structures of the quark-gluon vertex, with its inherent flavour dependence, is employed in a framework that preserves the dynamics of chiral symmetry breaking. The study is suggestive as to the relevance of additional resonant and non-resonant two- and three-body contributions.

  10. Scalar vertex operator for bound-state QED in the Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, Johan

    2011-12-15

    Adkins's result [Phys. Rev. D 34, 2489 (1986)] for the time component of the renormalized vertex operator in Coulomb-gauge QED is separated according to its tensor structure and some of the Feynman parameter integrals are carried out analytically, yielding a form suited for numerical bound-state QED calculations. This modified form is applied to the evaluation of the self-energy shift to the binding energy in hydrogenic ions of high nuclear charge.

  11. Aoki phases in the lattice Gross-Neveu model with flavored mass terms

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, Michael; Kimura, Taro; Misumi, Tatsuhiro

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the parity-broken phase structure for staggered and naive fermions in the Gross-Neveu model as a toy model of QCD. We consider a generalized staggered Gross-Neveu model including two types of four-point interactions. We use generalized mass terms to split the doublers for both staggered and naive fermions. The phase boundaries derived from the gap equations show that the mass splitting of tastes results in an Aoki phase both in the staggered and naive cases. We also discuss the continuum limit of these models and explore taking the chirally symmetric limit by fine-tuning a mass parameter and two-coupling constants. This supports the idea that in lattice QCD we can derive one- or two-flavor staggered fermions by tuning the mass parameter, which are likely to be less expensive than Wilson fermions in QCD simulation.

  12. The Neuro-Z-Vertex Trigger of the Belle II Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skambraks, Sebastian; Neuhaus, Sara; Kiesling, Christian

    2016-11-01

    A neural network z vertex trigger is planned for the upcoming Belle II detector at the SuperKEKB collider. This neural algorithm is based on a single track 3D parameter estimation using only hit and drift time information from the central drift chamber. Due to the high luminosity (L = 8 × 1035 cm-2 s-1) Belle II will have to face high levels of beam induced background, making a z vertex reconstruction at the first level trigger mandatory. Using the neural z vertex algorithm, the requirements of the standard track trigger can be strongly relaxed. By this, the trigger efficiencies, especially for low multiplicity events, e.g. τ pair production, can be significantly increased. This contribution presents the foreseen neural network trigger setup and the preceding 2D track finder. Special focus is put on the proposal and evaluation of a possible 3D upgrade of the 2D track finder. Additionally, details are given on a dedicated setup for the upcoming cosmic ray test.

  13. A vertex specific dorsal selector Dve represses the ventral appendage identity in Drosophila head.

    PubMed

    Kiritooshi, Naruto; Yorimitsu, Takeshi; Shirai, Tetsuya; Puli, Oorvashi Roy; Singh, Amit; Nakagoshi, Hideki

    2014-08-01

    Developmental fields are subdivided into lineage-restricted cell populations, known as compartments. In the eye imaginal disc of Drosophila, dorso-ventral (DV) lineage restriction is the primary event, whereas antero-posterior compartment boundary is the first lineage restriction in other imaginal discs. The Iroquois complex (Iro-C) genes function as dorsal selectors and repress the default, ventral, identity in the eye-head primordium. In Iro-C mutant clones, change of the dorsal identity to default ventral fate leads to generation of ectopic DV boundary, which results in dorsal eye enlargement, and duplication of ventral appendages like antenna and maxillary palp. Similar phenotypes were observed in heads with defective proventriculus (dve) mutant clones. Here, we show that the homeobox gene dve is a downstream effector of Iro-C in the dorsal head capsule (vertex) specification and represses the ventral (antennal) identity. Two homeodomain proteins Distal-less (Dll) and Homothorax (Hth) are known to be determinants of the antennal identity. Ectopic antenna formation in heads with dve mutant clones was associated with ectopic Dll expression and endogenous Hth expression in the vertex region. Interestingly, dve Dll double mutant clones could also induce ectopic antennae lacking the distal structures, suggesting that the Dve activity is crucial for repressing inappropriate antenna-forming potential in the vertex region. Our results clearly indicate that not only the activation of effector genes to execute developmental program but also the repression of inappropriate program is crucial for establishment of the organ identity.

  14. Vertex Algebras W(p)Am and W(p)Dm and Constant Term Identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamović, Dražen; Lin, Xianzu; Milas, Antun

    2015-03-01

    We consider AD-type orbifolds of the triplet vertex algebras W(p) extending the well-known c=1 orbifolds of lattice vertex algebras. We study the structure of Zhu's algebras A(W(p)^{A_m}) and A(W(p)^{D_m}), where A_m and D_m are cyclic and dihedral groups, respectively. A combinatorial algorithm for classification of irreducible W(p)^Γ-modules is developed, which relies on a family of constant term identities and properties of certain polynomials based on constant terms. All these properties can be checked for small values of m and p with a computer software. As a result, we argue that if certain constant term properties hold, the irreducible modules constructed in [Commun. Contemp. Math. 15 (2013), 1350028, 30 pages; Internat. J. Math. 25 (2014), 1450001, 34 pages] provide a complete list of irreducible W(p)^{A_m} and W(p)^{D_m}-modules. This paper is a continuation of our previous work on the ADE subalgebras of the triplet vertex algebra W(p).

  15. Higher Order Thinking in Collaborative Video Annotations: Investigating Discourse Modeling and the Staggering of Learner Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Craig Dennis

    2012-01-01

    "Collaborative video annotation" (CVA) allows multiple users to annotate video and create a discussion asynchronously. This dissertation investigates 14 small-group CVA discussions held on YouTube in a pre-service teacher education course. Fourteen groups of 6-12 pre-service teachers (141 total) participated. Five of these groups (48…

  16. 49 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart B of... - Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 2 Figure 2 to Subpart B of Part 238... Window Location and Staggering Requirements—§§ 238.113 and 238.114 ER01FE08.005...

  17. 49 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart B of... - Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 2 Figure 2 to Subpart B of Part 238... Window Location and Staggering Requirements—§§ 238.113 and 238.114 ER01FE08.005...

  18. 49 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart B of... - Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 2 Figure 2 to Subpart B of Part 238... Window Location and Staggering Requirements—§§ 238.113 and 238.114 ER01FE08.005...

  19. 49 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart B of... - Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 2 Figure 2 to Subpart B of Part 238... Window Location and Staggering Requirements—§§ 238.113 and 238.114 ER01FE08.005...

  20. 49 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113 1 Figure 1 to Subpart B of Part 238 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... of Part 238—Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits—§ 238.113 ER01FE08.001...

  1. 49 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113 1 Figure 1 to Subpart B of Part 238 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... of Part 238—Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits—§ 238.113 ER01FE08.001...

  2. 49 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart B of... - Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Example of a Multi-Level Car Complying with Window Location and Staggering Requirements-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 2 Figure 2 to Subpart B of Part 238... Window Location and Staggering Requirements—§§ 238.113 and 238.114 ER01FE08.005 [73 FR 6403, Feb. 1, 2008]...

  3. 49 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113 1 Figure 1 to Subpart B of Part 238 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... of Part 238—Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits—§ 238.113 ER01FE08.001...

  4. 49 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113 1 Figure 1 to Subpart B of Part 238 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... of Part 238—Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits—§ 238.113 ER01FE08.001...

  5. 49 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits-§ 238.113 1 Figure 1 to Subpart B of Part 238 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... of Part 238—Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits—§ 238.113 ER01FE08.001...

  6. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiwei; Presley, Gerald N.; Ryu, Jae-San; Menke, Jon R.; Figueroa, Melania; Orr, Galya; Schilling, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Wood-degrading brown rot fungi are essential recyclers of plant biomass in forest ecosystems. Their efficient cellulolytic systems, which have potential biotechnological applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: lignocellulose oxidation (LOX) by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and polysaccharide hydrolysis by a limited set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Given that ROS are strongly oxidizing and nonselective, these two steps are likely segregated. A common hypothesis has been that brown rot fungi use a concentration gradient of chelated metal ions to confine ROS generation inside wood cell walls before enzymes can infiltrate. We examined an alternative: that LOX components involved in ROS production are differentially expressed by brown rot fungi ahead of GH components. We used spatial mapping to resolve a temporal sequence in Postia placenta, sectioning thin wood wafers colonized directionally. Among sections, we measured gene expression by whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) and assayed relevant enzyme activities. We found a marked pattern of LOX up-regulation in a narrow (5-mm, 48-h) zone at the hyphal front, which included many genes likely involved in ROS generation. Up-regulation of GH5 endoglucanases and many other GHs clearly occurred later, behind the hyphal front, with the notable exceptions of two likely expansins and a GH28 pectinase. Our results support a staggered mechanism for brown rot that is controlled by differential expression rather than microenvironmental gradients. This mechanism likely results in an oxidative pretreatment of lignocellulose, possibly facilitated by expansin- and pectinase-assisted cell wall swelling, before cellulases and hemicellulases are deployed for polysaccharide depolymerization. PMID:27621450

  7. A staggered overset grid method for resolved simulation of incompressible flow around moving spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreman, A. W.

    2017-03-01

    An overset grid method for resolved simulation of incompressible (turbulent) flows around moving spherical particles is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations in spherical coordinates are solved on body-fitted spherical polar grids attached to the moving spheres. These grids are overset on a fixed Cartesian background grid, where the Navier-Stokes equations in Cartesian coordinates are solved. The standard second-order staggered finite difference scheme is used on each grid. The velocities and pressures on different grids are coupled by third-order Lagrange interpolations. The method, implemented in the form of a Message Passing Interface parallel program, has been validated for a range of flows around spheres. In a first validation section, the results of simulations of four Stokes flows around a single moving sphere are compared with classical analytical results. The first three cases are the flows due to a translating, an oscillating sphere and a rotating sphere. The numerically produced velocity and pressure fields appear to converge to the corresponding (transient) analytical solutions in the maximum norm. The fourth Stokes case is the flow due to an instantaneously accelerated sphere. For this case, the results are compared with the corresponding numerical solution of the Basset-Boussinesq-Oseen equation. In a second validation section, results of three Navier-Stokes flows around one or more moving spheres are presented. These test configurations are a moving face-centered cubic array of spheres, laminar channel flow with a falling a sphere, and freely moving small spheres in a Taylor-Green flow. Results for the flow with the falling sphere are compared with the results from the literature on immersed boundary methods.

  8. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwei; Presley, Gerald N; Hammel, Kenneth E; Ryu, Jae-San; Menke, Jon R; Figueroa, Melania; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Schilling, Jonathan S

    2016-09-27

    Wood-degrading brown rot fungi are essential recyclers of plant biomass in forest ecosystems. Their efficient cellulolytic systems, which have potential biotechnological applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: lignocellulose oxidation (LOX) by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and polysaccharide hydrolysis by a limited set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Given that ROS are strongly oxidizing and nonselective, these two steps are likely segregated. A common hypothesis has been that brown rot fungi use a concentration gradient of chelated metal ions to confine ROS generation inside wood cell walls before enzymes can infiltrate. We examined an alternative: that LOX components involved in ROS production are differentially expressed by brown rot fungi ahead of GH components. We used spatial mapping to resolve a temporal sequence in Postia placenta, sectioning thin wood wafers colonized directionally. Among sections, we measured gene expression by whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) and assayed relevant enzyme activities. We found a marked pattern of LOX up-regulation in a narrow (5-mm, 48-h) zone at the hyphal front, which included many genes likely involved in ROS generation. Up-regulation of GH5 endoglucanases and many other GHs clearly occurred later, behind the hyphal front, with the notable exceptions of two likely expansins and a GH28 pectinase. Our results support a staggered mechanism for brown rot that is controlled by differential expression rather than microenvironmental gradients. This mechanism likely results in an oxidative pretreatment of lignocellulose, possibly facilitated by expansin- and pectinase-assisted cell wall swelling, before cellulases and hemicellulases are deployed for polysaccharide depolymerization.

  9. Development of vertexing and lifetime triggers and a study of Bs mixing using hadronic decays at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Christopher P.

    2005-03-01

    The D0 detector underwent a major upgrade to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron, the world's highest energy collider. The upgrade included a completely new central tracking system with an outer scintillating fiber tracker and an inner silicon vertex detector all within a 2T superconducting solenoid. This thesis describes the development of high level trigger algorithms including vertexing, impact parameter significance and invariant mass, that utilize tracks from these detectors. One of the main physics goals of Run II is the observation of Bs oscillations. This measurement, which cannot be performed at the B factories, will significantly constrain the ''unitarity triangle'' associated with Cp violation and so probe the Standard Model of particle physics. Furthermore this is an interesting measurement as the study of mixing in meson systems has a long history for revealing new physics. The second part of this thesis presents a study of the hadronic decay Bs → Dsπ. This important mode provides the best proper time resolution for Bs mixing and is reconstructed for the first time at D0. Projections on the sensitivity to Bs oscillations are then presented.

  10. Correlation effects of π electrons on the band structures of conjugated polymers using the self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2012-01-14

    Many-body perturbation theory is used to investigate the effect of π-electron correlations on the quasi-particle band structures of conjugated polymers at the level of the Pariser-Parr-Pople model. The self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections to both the self-energy and the polarization in Hedin's equations is employed in order to eliminate self-interaction errors and include the effects of electron-hole attraction in screening processes. The dynamic inverse dielectric function is constructed from the generalized plasmon-pole approximation with the static dressed polarization given by the coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock equation. The bandgaps of trans-polyacetylene, trans-polyphenylenevinylene and poly(para)phenylene are calculated by both the Hartree-Fock and GW approximation, and a lowering of bandgaps due to electron correlations is found. We conclude that both dielectric screening and vertex corrections are important for calculating the quasi-particle bandgaps of conjugated polymers.

  11. A comparison of natural convection heat transfer for a staggered versus an aligned array of horizontal spent nuclear fuel rods within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.; Canaan, R.E.; Klein, D.E.

    2000-04-01

    Natural convection heat transfer was experimentally investigated in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular isothermal enclosure. The test conditions were characteristic of a spent-fuel assembly during transport or horizontal dry storage. The assembly was configured with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.33 and backfilled with pressurized helium or nitrogen. The backfill pressure was varied between 1 and 5 atm, while the assembly power was varied between 1 and 5 W per heater rod. The resulting data are presented in the form of Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations, where the Nusselt number has been corrected for thermal radiation using a numerical technique. The staggered-array data are compared to previous data for a similar-pitch aligned rod array (a simulated boiling water reactor fuel assembly) to determine if convective heat transfer is enhanced or hindered in a staggered configuration. For the overall array, both the staggered and aligned configurations yield Nusselt-Rayleigh curves with a three-regime trend, which suggests distinct conduction and convection regimes separated by a transition regime. For lower Rayleigh numbers (10{sup 6}), representative of the conduction regime, the aligned-array Nusselt number is 10 to 12% higher than the corresponding staggered-array value. However, in the convection regime at higher Rayleigh numbers, the staggered-array Nusselt number slightly exceeds the aligned-array Nusselt number. This is attributed to the fact that the staggered array begins to transition into the convection regime at lower Rayleigh number than the aligned array. For both configurations, the slope of the Nusselt-Rayleigh curve in the convection regime suggests turbulent flow conditions.

  12. Clustering analysis of the ground-state structure of the vertex-cover problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Alexander K.

    2004-12-01

    Vertex cover is one of the classical NP-complete problems in theoretical computer science. A vertex cover of a graph is a subset of vertices such that for each edge at least one of the two endpoints is contained in the subset. When studied on Erdös-Rényi random graphs (with connectivity c ) one observes a threshold behavior: In the thermodynamic limit the size of the minimal vertex cover is independent of the specific graph. Recent analytical studies show that on the phase boundary, for small connectivities c

  13. Pre-stimulus alpha power affects vertex N2-P2 potentials evoked by noxious stimuli.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Capotosto, Paolo; Le Pera, Domenica; Marzano, Nicola; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Romani, Gian Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2008-03-28

    It is well known that scalp potentials evoked by nonpainful visual and auditory stimuli are enhanced in amplitude when preceded by pre-stimulus low-amplitude alpha rhythms. This study tested the hypothesis that the same holds for the amplitude of vertex N2-P2 potentials evoked by brief noxious laser stimuli, an issue of interest for clinical perspective. EEG data were recorded in 10 subjects from 30 electrodes during laser noxious stimulation. The artifact-free vertex N2-P2 complex was spatially enhanced by surface Laplacian transformation. Pre-stimulus alpha power was computed at three alpha sub-bands according to subject's individual alpha frequency peak (i.e. about 6-8Hz for alpha 1, 8-10Hz for alpha 2 and 10-12Hz for alpha 3 sub-band). Individual EEG single trials were divided in two sub-groups. The strong-alpha sub-group (high band power) included halfway of all EEG single trials, namely those having the highest pre-stimulus alpha power. Weak-alpha sub-group (low band power) included the remaining trials. Averaging procedure provided laser evoked potentials for both trial sub-groups. No significant effect was found for alpha 1 and alpha 2 sub-bands. Conversely, compared to strong-alpha 3 sub-group, weak-alpha 3 sub-group showed vertex N2-P2 potentials having significantly higher amplitude (p<0.05). These results extend to the later phases of pain processing systems the notion that generation mechanisms of pre-stimulus alpha rhythms and (laser) evoked potentials are intrinsically related and subjected to fluctuating "noise". That "noise" could explain the trial-by-trial variability of laser evoked potentials and perception.

  14. {kappa}K{sup +{pi}-} vertex in light cone QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Baytemir, G.; Sarac, Y.; Yilmaz, O.

    2010-05-01

    In this work we study the {kappa}K{sup +{pi}-} vertex in the framework of light cone QCD sum rules. We predict the coupling constant g{sub {kappa}K}{sup +}{sub {pi}}{sup -} to be g{sub {kappa}K}{sup +}{sub {pi}}{sup -}=(6.0{+-}1.0) GeV and estimate the scalar f{sub 0}-{sigma} mixing angle from the experimental ratio g{sup 2}({kappa}{yields}K{pi})/g{sup 2}({sigma}{yields}{pi}{pi}).

  15. TGV32: A 32-channel preamplifier chip for the multiplicity vertex detector at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.; Frank, S.S.

    1997-12-31

    The TGV32, a 32-channel preamplifier-multiplicity discriminator chip for the Multiplicity Vertex Detector (MVD) at PHENIX, is a unique silicon preamplifier in that it provides both an analog output for storage in an analog memory and a weighted summed-current output for conversion to a channel multiplicity count. The architecture and test results of the chip are presented. Details about the design of the preamplifier, discriminator, and programmable digital-analog converters (DACs) performance as well as the process variations are presented. The chip is fabricated in a 1.2-{micro}m, n-well, CMOS process.

  16. 45 deg staggered rib heat transfer coefficient measurements in a square channel

    SciTech Connect

    Taslim, M.E.; Lengkong, A.

    1998-07-01

    For high-blockage ribs with large heat transfer areas, commonly used in small gas turbine blades, the rib heat transfer is a significant portion of the overall heat transfer in the cooling passages. Three staggered 45 deg rib geometries corresponding to blockage ratios of 0.133, 0.167, and 0.25 were tested in a square channel for pitch-to-height ratios of 5, 8.5, and 10, and for two distinct thermal boundary conditions of heated and unheated channel walls. Comparisons were made between the surface-averaged heat transfer coefficients and friction factors for 45 deg ribs, and 90 deg ribs reported previously. Heat transfer coefficients of the furthest upstream rib and that of a typical rib located in the middle of the rib-roughened region were also compared. It was concluded that: (a) For the geometries tested, the rib average heat transfer coefficient was much higher than that for the area between the ribs. (b) Except for two cases corresponding to the highest blockage ribs mounted at pitch-to-height ratios of 8.5 and 10 for which the heat transfer results of 45 deg ribs were very close to those of 90 deg ribs, 45 deg ribs produced higher heat transfer coefficients than 90 deg ribs. (c) At pitch-to-height ratios of 8.5 and 10, all 45 deg ribs produced lower friction factors than 90 deg ribs. However, when they were brought closer to each other (S/e = 5), they produced higher friction factors than 90 deg ribs. (d) Heat transfer coefficients for the two smaller rib geometries (e/D{sub h} = 0.133 and 0.167) did to vary significantly with the pitch-to-height ratio in the range tested. However, the heat transfer coefficient for the high blockage rib geometry increased significantly as the ribs were brought closer to each other. (e) Under otherwise identical conditions, ribs in the furthest upstream position produced lower heat transfer coefficients than those in the midstream position. (f) Rib thermal performance decreased with the rib blockage ratio.

  17. Energy preservation and entropy in Lagrangian space- and time-staggered hydrodynamic schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llor, Antoine; Claisse, Alexandra; Fochesato, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Usual space- and time-staggered (STS) ;leap-frog; Lagrangian hydrodynamic schemes-such as von Neumann-Richtmyer's (1950), Wilkins' (1964), and their variants-are widely used for their simplicity and robustness despite their known lack of exact energy conservation. Since the seminal work of Trulio and Trigger (1950) and despite the later corrections of Burton (1991), it is generally accepted that these schemes cannot be modified to exactly conserve energy while retaining all of the following properties: STS stencil with velocities half-time centered with respect to positions, explicit second-order algorithm (locally implicit for internal energy), and definite positive kinetic energy. It is shown here that it is actually possible to modify the usual STS hydrodynamic schemes in order to be exactly energy-preserving, regardless of the evenness of their time centering assumptions and retaining their simple algorithmic structure. Burton's conservative scheme (1991) is found as a special case of time centering which cancels the term here designated as ;incompatible displacements residue.; In contrast, von Neumann-Richtmyer's original centering can be preserved provided this residue is properly corrected. These two schemes are the only special cases able to capture isentropic flow with a third order entropy error, instead of second order in general. The momentum equation is presently obtained by application of a variational principle to an action integral discretized in both space and time. The internal energy equation follows from the discrete conservation of total energy. Entropy production by artificial dissipation is obtained to second order by a prediction-correction step on the momentum equation. The overall structure of the equations (explicit for momentum, locally implicit for internal energy) remains identical to that of usual STS ;leap-frog; schemes, though complementary terms are required to correct the effects of time-step changes and artificial viscosity

  18. G W -BSE, self-consistency, and vertex corrections applied to group IB/IIB atoms and oxide molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Linda; Ogut, Serdar

    2015-03-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), the GW approximation, and the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) are often used for the first-principles calculation of excited-state properties of materials that contain transition metals. Accuracy is improved compared to mean-field theories such as Kohn-Sham DFT or Hartree-Fock; however, predicted quasiparticle levels and optical spectra can still differ from experiment. We model Cu, Zn, Ag, and Cd atoms and their oxide molecules to assess various approximations in many-body perturbation theory methods that contribute to these differences. In particular, we examine how self-consistent iterations and/or a two-point vertex function affect the predicted excitation energies, compared to ``one-shot'' G0W0 calculations. Experimental measurements of optical spectra and ionization energies for charged and neutral atoms are widely available, and allow us to evaluate excitations from both s and d states. Differences between TDDFT and BSE spectra are also discussed. Calculations are performed with RGWBS, a software suite which uses a basis of transition space and quasiparticle wavefunctions. Supported by DOE Grant No. DE-SC0001853.

  19. A new algorithm to find fuzzy Hamilton cycle in a fuzzy network using adjacency matrix and minimum vertex degree.

    PubMed

    Nagoor Gani, A; Latha, S R

    2016-01-01

    A Hamiltonian cycle in a graph is a cycle that visits each node/vertex exactly once. A graph containing a Hamiltonian cycle is called a Hamiltonian graph. There have been several researches to find the number of Hamiltonian cycles of a Hamilton graph. As the number of vertices and edges grow, it becomes very difficult to keep track of all the different ways through which the vertices are connected. Hence, analysis of large graphs can be efficiently done with the assistance of a computer system that interprets graphs as matrices. And, of course, a good and well written algorithm will expedite the analysis even faster. The most convenient way to quickly test whether there is an edge between two vertices is to represent graphs using adjacent matrices. In this paper, a new algorithm is proposed to find fuzzy Hamiltonian cycle using adjacency matrix and the degree of the vertices of a fuzzy graph. A fuzzy graph structure is also modeled to illustrate the proposed algorithms with the selected air network of Indigo airlines.

  20. Maximum-Path Leaves Relative to Vertices and the Vertex One Center of a Spanning Tree: An Enumeration and Analysis of Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, L.J.

    1998-10-01

    This paper enumerates the configurations of a pair of vertices (one of which is a leaf) relative to the unique vertex one center and the leaf of greatest path length from this center in a spanning tree of a graph. From this enumeration, it demonstrates that the vertex one center is between the vertex and the leaf of greatest path length from the vertex for every such pair of vertices. Using this result this paper develops an algorithm for the optimal reconfiguration of a tree infrastructure required to recover from the failure of a network element.

  1. Renormalization-group analysis of the validity of staggered-fermion QCD with the fourth-root recipe

    SciTech Connect

    Shamir, Yigal

    2007-03-01

    I develop a renormalization-group blocking framework for lattice QCD with staggered fermions. Under plausible, and testable assumptions, I then argue that the fourth-root recipe used in numerical simulations is valid in the continuum limit. The taste-symmetry violating terms, which give rise to nonlocal effects in the fourth-root theory when the lattice spacing is nonzero, vanish in the continuum limit. A key role is played by reweighted theories that are local and renormalizable on the one hand, and that approximate the fourth-root theory better and better as the continuum limit is approached on the other hand.

  2. A Non-Dissipative Staggered Fourth-Order Accurate Explicit Finite Difference Scheme for the Time-Domain Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yefet, Amir; Petropoulos, Peter G.

    1999-01-01

    We consider a divergence-free non-dissipative fourth-order explicit staggered finite difference scheme for the hyperbolic Maxwell's equations. Special one-sided difference operators are derived in order to implement the scheme near metal boundaries and dielectric interfaces. Numerical results show the scheme is long-time stable, and is fourth-order convergent over complex domains that include dielectric interfaces and perfectly conducting surfaces. We also examine the scheme's behavior near metal surfaces that are not aligned with the grid axes, and compare its accuracy to that obtained by the Yee scheme.

  3. Thermodynamics of lattice QCD with 2 light dynamical (staggered) quark flavours on a 16 sup 3 times 8 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S.; Krasnitz, A. . Dept. of Physics); Heller, U.M.; Kennedy, A.D. . Supercomputer Computations Research Inst.); Kogut, J.B. . Dept. of Physics); Liu, W. ); Renken, R.L. (University of Central F

    1991-01-01

    Lattice QCD with 2 light staggered quark flavours is being simulated on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice to study the transition from hadronic matter to a quark gluon plasma. We have completed runs at m{sub q} = 0.0125 and are extending this to m{sub q} = 0.00625. We also examine the addition of a non-dynamical strange'' quark. Thermodynamic order parameters are being measured across the transition and further into the plasma phase, as are various screening lengths. No evidence for a first order transition is seen, and we estimate the transition temperature to be {Tc} = 143(7)MeV.

  4. Thermodynamics of lattice QCD with 2 light dynamical (staggered) quark flavours on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S.; Krasnitz, A.; Heller, U.M.; Kennedy, A.D.; Kogut, J.B.; Liu, W.; Renken, R.L.; Sinclair, D.K.; Sugar, R.L.; Toussaint, D.; Wang, K.C.

    1991-12-31

    Lattice QCD with 2 light staggered quark flavours is being simulated on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice to study the transition from hadronic matter to a quark gluon plasma. We have completed runs at m{sub q} = 0.0125 and are extending this to m{sub q} = 0.00625. We also examine the addition of a non-dynamical ``strange`` quark. Thermodynamic order parameters are being measured across the transition and further into the plasma phase, as are various screening lengths. No evidence for a first order transition is seen, and we estimate the transition temperature to be {Tc} = 143(7)MeV.

  5. Design of the cooling systems for the multiplicity and vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Cunningham, R.

    1997-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being constructed to investigate a phase of matter termed the quark-gluon plasma. The plasma will be produced through the collision of two heavy ions. The multiplicity and vertex detector (MVD) located in the center of PHENIX will characterize the events, determine the collision point, and act as a central trigger. This report presents the final mechanical designs of the cooling systems for the Multiplicity and Vertex Detector (MVD). In particular, the design procedure and layouts are discussed for two different air cooling systems for the multichip modules and MVD enclosure, and a liquid cooling system for the low dropout voltage regulators. First of all, experimental prototype cooling system test results used to drive the final mechanical designs are summarized and discussed. Next, the cooling system requirements and design calculation for the various subsystem components are presented along with detailed lists of supply vendors, components, and costs. Finally, safety measures incorporated in the final mechanical design and operation procedures for each of the subsystems are detailed.

  6. Vertex-wise examination of depressive symptom dimensions and brain volumes in older adults.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Molly E; Szymkowicz, Sarah M; O'Shea, Andrew; Woods, Adam J; Anton, Stephen D; Dotson, Vonetta M

    2017-02-28

    Differences in brain volumes have commonly been reported in older adults with both subthreshold and major depression. Few studies have examined the association between specific symptom dimensions of depression and brain volumes. This study used vertex-wise analyses to examine the association between specific symptom dimensions of depression and brain volumes in older adults with subthreshold levels of depressive symptoms. Forty-three community-dwelling adults between the ages of 55 and 81 years underwent a structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan and completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Vertex-wise analyses were conducted using Freesurfer Imaging Suite to examine the relationship between CES-D subscale scores and gray matter volumes while controlling for sex, age, and education. We found distinct associations between depressed mood, somatic symptoms, and lack of positive affect subscales with regional volumes, including primarily positive relationships in temporal regions and a negative association with the lingual gyrus. The relationship between higher depressed mood subscale scores and larger volumes in the left inferior temporal lobe withstood Monte-Carlo correction for multiple comparisons. Results from this preliminary study highlight the importance of examining depression on a symptom dimension level and identify brain regions that may be important in larger studies of depression.

  7. A vertically integrated pixel readout device for the Vertex Detector at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Christian, David; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2008-12-01

    3D-Integrated Circuit technology enables higher densities of electronic circuitry per unit area without the use of nanoscale processes. It is advantageous for mixed mode design with precise analog circuitry because processes with conservative feature sizes typically present lower process dispersions and tolerate higher power supply voltages, resulting in larger separation of a signal from the noise floor. Heterogeneous wafers (different foundries or different process families) may be combined with some 3D integration methods, leading to the optimization of each tier in the 3D stack. Tracking and vertexing in future High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiments involves construction of detectors composed of up to a few billions of channels. Readout electronics must record the position and time of each measurement with the highest achievable precision. This paper reviews a prototype of the first 3D readout chip for HEP, designed for a vertex detector at the International Linear Collider. The prototype features 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 64 x 64 elements and was fabricated in a 3-tier 0.18 {micro}m Fully Depleted SOI CMOS process at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory. The tests showed correct functional operation of the structure. The chip performs a zero-suppressed readout. Successive submissions are planned in a commercial 3D bulk 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process to overcome some of the disadvantages of an FDSOI process.

  8. The micro-vertex-detector of the PANDA experiment at Darmstadt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmanns, Tobias

    2006-11-01

    The "AntiProton ANnihilations at DArmstadt"—experiment, short PANDA, is one of the main experiments of the "Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research" (FAIR) which replaces and extends the existing GSI-facility at Darmstadt. The main physics goals at the beginning of the experiment in 2012 will be precision spectroscopy of charmonium states, an establishment of gluonic excitations, the search for modifications of meson properties in the nuclear medium and precision γ-ray spectroscopy of single and double hypernuclei. For many of these physics goals an identification of D-mesons via the detection of a secondary vertex with a decay length in the order of 100 μm is essential. Therefore, a special micro-vertex-detector (MVD) is foreseen which allows a precise tracking of all charged particles. Several different technology options from monolithic active pixels to hybrid pixel detectors are on the market. Unfortunately, none of these techniques fully meets the requirements of the PANDA experiment. Different technologies are compared with respect to the requirements of PANDA. In addition, a possible design of the MVD will be shown, which features a combination of hybrid pixel modules, whose layout might be adopted from ATLAS or other LHC experiments, for the inner layers and silicon strip detectors for the outer layers.

  9. An upwind vertex centred Finite Volume solver for Lagrangian solid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Miquel; Gil, Antonio J.; Bonet, Javier; Lee, Chun Hean

    2015-11-01

    A vertex centred Jameson-Schmidt-Turkel (JST) finite volume algorithm was recently introduced by the authors (Aguirre et al., 2014 [1]) in the context of fast solid isothermal dynamics. The spatial discretisation scheme was constructed upon a Lagrangian two-field mixed (linear momentum and the deformation gradient) formulation presented as a system of conservation laws [2-4]. In this paper, the formulation is further enhanced by introducing a novel upwind vertex centred finite volume algorithm with three key novelties. First, a conservation law for the volume map is incorporated into the existing two-field system to extend the range of applications towards the incompressibility limit (Gil et al., 2014 [5]). Second, the use of a linearised Riemann solver and reconstruction limiters is derived for the stabilisation of the scheme together with an efficient edge-based implementation. Third, the treatment of thermo-mechanical processes through a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state is incorporated in the proposed formulation. For completeness, the study of the eigenvalue structure of the resulting system of conservation laws is carried out to demonstrate hyperbolicity and obtain the correct time step bounds for non-isothermal processes. A series of numerical examples are presented in order to assess the robustness of the proposed methodology. The overall scheme shows excellent behaviour in shock and bending dominated nearly incompressible scenarios without spurious pressure oscillations, yielding second order of convergence for both velocities and stresses.

  10. Overview of the Micro Vertex Detector for the P bar ANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    The P bar ANDA experiment is devoted to study interactions between cooled antiproton beams and a fixed target (the interaction rate is of about 107 events/s), hydrogen or heavier nuclei. The innermost tracker of P bar ANDA is the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD), specially designed to ensure the secondary vertex resolution for the discrimination of short-lived charmonium states. Hybrid epitaxial silicon pixels and double-sided silicon microstrips will equip four barrels, arranged around the interaction point, and six forward disks. The experiment features a triggerless architecture with a master clock of 160 MHz, therefore the MVD has to run with a continuous data transmission where the hits need precise timestamps. The energy loss of the particles in the sensor will be measured as well. The challenging request of a triggerless readout suggested to develop custom readout chips for both pixel (ToPix) and microstrip (PASTA) devices. To validate components and the triggerless readout architecture, prototypes have been built and tested. After an overview of the MVD, the technological aspects and performances of some prototypes will be reported.

  11. A two-level fanout system for the CDF silicon vertex tracker

    SciTech Connect

    A. Bardi et al.

    2001-11-02

    The Fanout system is part of the Silicon Vertex Tracker, a new trigger processor designed to reconstruct charged particle trajectories at Level 2 of the CDF trigger, with a latency of 10 {micro}s and an event rate up to 100 kHz. The core of SVT is organized as 12 identical slices, which process in parallel the data from the 12 independent azimuthal wedges of the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVXII). Each SVT slice links the digitized pulse heights found within one SVXII wedge to the tracks reconstructed by the Level 1 fast track finder (XFT) in the corresponding 30{sup o} angular region of the Central Outer Tracker. Since the XFT tracks are transmitted to SVT as a single data stream, their distribution to the proper SVT slices requires dedicated fanout logic. The Fanout system has been implemented as a multi-board project running on a common 20 MHz clock. Track fanout is performed in two steps by one ''Fanout A'' and two ''Fanout B'' boards. The architecture, design, and implementation of this system are described.

  12. Plethysms, replicated Schur functions and series, with applications to vertex operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauser, Bertfried; Jarvis, Peter D.; King, Ronald C.

    2010-10-01

    Specializations of Schur functions are exploited to define and evaluate the Schur functions sλ[αX] and plethysms sλ[αsν(X))] for any α—integer, real or complex. Plethysms are then used to define pairs of mutually inverse infinite series of Schur functions, Mπ and Lπ, specified by arbitrary partitions π. These are used in turn to define and provide generating functions for formal characters, s(π)λ, of certain groups Hπ, thereby extending known results for orthogonal and symplectic group characters. Each of these formal characters is then given a vertex operator realization, first in terms of the series M = M(0) and various L⊥σ dual to Lσ, and then more explicitly in the exponential form. Finally the replicated form of such vertex operators are written down. The characters of the orthogonal and symplectic groups have been found by Schur [34] and Weyl [35] respectively. The method used is transcendental, and depends on integration over the group manifold. These characters, however, may be obtained by purely algebraic methods,.... This algebraic method would seem to offer a better prospect of successful application to other restricted groups than the method of group integration. Littlewood D E 1944 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 239 (809) 392

  13. Comparison of Hydrodynamic and Thermal Performance of Micro Heat Sinks with Inline and Staggered Arrangements of Cylindrical Micro Pin Fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Kosar, Ali; Faculty Of Engineering; Natural Sciences (Fens) Collaboration; Nanotechnology Research; Application Center (Sunum) Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    This computational study compares the hydrodynamic and thermal characteristics of flow inside a rectangular microchannel with different in-line and staggered arrangements of cylindrical micro pin fins (MPF). The channel dimensions are 5000 x 1500 x 100 µm3 (l x w x h) while the height and diameter of MPFs are both 100 µm which results in the H/D ratio of 1. Two different values of 1.5 and 3 are considered for the horizontal and vertical pitch ratios (SL/D and ST/D) among MPFs in each of the in-line and staggered arrangements which results in eight configurations. A constant heat flux of 30 W/cm2 is applied through the bottom section of microchannel as well as the liquid interacting surfaces of MPFs. The flow field is simulated at five different Reynolds numbers of 20, 40, 80, 120 and 160 using ANSYS FLUENT v.14.5. Four parameters of pressure drop, friction factor, Nusselt number and Thermal Performance Index (TPI) are used to analyze the hydrodynamic and thermal performance of micro heat sinks. Results show a great dependency of evaluating parameters on the vertical pitch ratios while minor dependencies are seen on the horizontal pitch ratio.

  14. Risk-based decision making for staggered bioterrorist attacks : resource allocation and risk reduction in "reload" scenarios.

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaster, Michelle Nicole; Gay, David M.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Boggs, Paul T.; Ray, Jaideep

    2009-10-01

    Staggered bioterrorist attacks with aerosolized pathogens on population centers present a formidable challenge to resource allocation and response planning. The response and planning will commence immediately after the detection of the first attack and with no or little information of the second attack. In this report, we outline a method by which resource allocation may be performed. It involves probabilistic reconstruction of the bioterrorist attack from partial observations of the outbreak, followed by an optimization-under-uncertainty approach to perform resource allocations. We consider both single-site and time-staggered multi-site attacks (i.e., a reload scenario) under conditions when resources (personnel and equipment which are difficult to gather and transport) are insufficient. Both communicable (plague) and non-communicable diseases (anthrax) are addressed, and we also consider cases when the data, the time-series of people reporting with symptoms, are confounded with a reporting delay. We demonstrate how our approach develops allocations profiles that have the potential to reduce the probability of an extremely adverse outcome in exchange for a more certain, but less adverse outcome. We explore the effect of placing limits on daily allocations. Further, since our method is data-driven, the resource allocation progressively improves as more data becomes available.

  15. Phase-staggering control of a series-resonant DC-DC converter with paralleled power modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassens, J. Ben; Moize de Chateleux, Willem L. F. H. A.; van Wesenbeeck, M. P. N.

    1988-04-01

    A method of decreasing the ripple on the output voltage of high-power AC-DC or DC-DC series-resonant converters without increasing the internal converter frequency or the capacity of the energy storage elements is discussed. This improvement is accomplished by subdividing the converter into two or more series-resonant power modules operated with a constant relative phase shift (phase-staggering control). The method of eliminating the harmonic components in the input and output currents of the conversion system, without increasing the internal pulse frequency, is justified by Fourier analysis of the current waveforms. The frequency spectra of the source and output waveforms for the continuous and discontinuous resonant current mode are shifted to higher frequency ranges, as computations show for both one single module and multiple paralleled modules. Inadequacies in the phase-staggering control method applied to series-resonant converters are indicated in relation to the dominant harmonic component, in particular for two modules and supported by experimentally acquired waveforms. High-frequency current components to the source and to the load are reduced, resulting in smaller input and output filters. This improves the resolution of the control of the flow of energy from the source to the load, resulting in a faster system response.

  16. Quantum algorithms and mathematical formulations of biomolecular solutions of the vertex cover problem in the finite-dimensional hilbert space.

    PubMed

    Chang, Weng-Long; Ren, Ting-Ting; Feng, Mang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, it is shown that the proposed quantum algorithm for implementing Boolean circuits generated from the DNA-based algorithm solving the vertex-cover problem of any graph G with m edges and n vertices is the optimal quantum algorithm. Next, it is also demonstrated that mathematical solutions of the same biomolecular solutions are represented in terms of a unit vector in the finite-dimensional Hilbert space. Furthermore, for testing our theory, a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment of three quantum bits to solve the simplest vertex-cover problem is completed.

  17. Metastability for the Ising Model on the Hypercube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovski, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    We consider Glauber dynamics for the low-temperature, ferromagnetic Ising Model on the n-dimensional hypercube. We derive precise asymptotic results for the crossover time (the time it takes for the dynamics to go from the configuration with a "-1" at every vertex, to the configuration with a "+1" at each vertex) in the limit as the inverse temperature β → ∞.

  18. New limits on anomalous contributions to the W t b vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birman, J. L.; Déliot, F.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Onofre, A.; Pease, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    The latest and most precise top quark measurements at the LHC and Tevatron are used to establish new limits on the W t b vertex. Recent results on the measurements of the W -boson helicity fractions and single top quark production cross section are combined in order to establish new limits at 95% CL (confidence level). The allowed regions for these limits are presented, for the first time, in three-dimensional graphics, for both real and imaginary components of the different anomalous couplings, providing a new perspective on the impact of the combination of different physics observables. These results are also combined with the prospected future measurement of the single top quark production cross section and W -boson helicity fractions at the LHC.

  19. Software Development for the Commissioning of the Jefferson Lab Hall B Silicon Vertex Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruger, Justin; Ziegler, Veronique; Gotra, Yuri; Gavalian, Gagik

    2015-04-01

    One of the new additions to Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is a Silicon Vertex Tracker system that includes 4 regions with 10, 14, 18, 24 sectors of double-sided modules. Recently, the SVT hardware group has completed construction and installation of regions one and two on a cosmic ray test stand. This test setup will be used to preform the first cosmic ray efficiency analysis of the SVT with the availability of 8 measurement layers. In order to study efficiency and module performance, a set of software packages had to be written to decode, analyze and provide feedback on the output from data acquisition. This talk will provide an overview of the software validation suite designed and developed for Hall B and a report on its current utilization for SVT cosmic data analysis.

  20. Collision-free spatial hash functions for structural analysis of billion-vertex chemical bond networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Bansal, Bhupesh; Branicio, Paulo S.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Sharma, Ashish; Vashishta, Priya

    2006-09-01

    State-of-the-art molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generate massive datasets involving billion-vertex chemical bond networks, which makes data mining based on graph algorithms such as K-ring analysis a challenge. This paper proposes an algorithm to improve the efficiency of ring analysis of large graphs, exploiting properties of K-rings and spatial correlations of vertices in the graph. The algorithm uses dual-tree expansion (DTE) and spatial hash-function tagging (SHAFT) to optimize computation and memory access. Numerical tests show nearly perfect linear scaling of the algorithm. Also a parallel implementation of the DTE + SHAFT algorithm achieves high scalability. The algorithm has been successfully employed to analyze large MD simulations involving up to 500 million atoms.

  1. The prototype of the Micro Vertex Detector of the CBM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziel, Michal; Amar-Youcef, Samir; Bialas, Norbert; Deveaux, Michael; Fröhlich, Ingo; Li, Qiyan; Michel, Jan; Milanović, Borislav; Müntz, Christian; Neumann, Bertram; Schrader, Christoph; Stroth, Joachim; Tischler, Tobias; Weirich, Roland; Wiebusch, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) Experiment is one of the core experiments of the future FAIR facility at Darmstadt, Germany. This fixed-target experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the regime of highest net baryon densities with numerous probes, among them open charm. Reconstructing those short lived particles requires a vacuum compatible Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) with unprecedented properties. Its sensor technology has to feature a spatial resolution of <5 μm, a non-ionizing radiation tolerance of >1013 neq/cm2, an ionizing radiation tolerance of >3 Mrad and a time resolution of a few 10 μs. The MVD-prototype project aimed to study the integration the CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors foreseen for the MVD into an ultra light (0.3% X0) and a vacuum compatible detector system based on a cooling support made of CVD-diamond.

  2. Nuclear vertex constants and asymptotic normalization coefficients for the tritium nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2009-12-15

    The properties of the nuclear vertex constant for virtual triton decay to a deuteron and a neutron (T {sup {yields}} d + n) are investigated along with the properties of the asymptotic normalization coefficient defined for the triton wave function and related to this constant. These quantities are calculated numerically on the basis of an equation that relates the asymptotic normalization coefficient to the triton effective radius {rho}{sub T}, which was introduced in the present study. The values of G{sub T}{sup 2} = 1.244(68) fm and C{sub T}{sup 2} = 2.958(162) found from our calculations are in good agreement with experimental and theoretical estimates obtained for these quantities in other studies. Physical properties of the triton virtual state are also discussed.

  3. The silicon Micro Vertex Detector of the P bar ANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, D.; Panda Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The P bar ANDA experiment will make use of cooled antiproton beams of unprecedented quality that will become available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Darmstadt, featuring a 1.5-15 GeV/c momentum range. The physics program includes measurements of hyperons produced at low energies, spectroscopy of charmonium and open-charm mesons. To handle the forward peaked particle distribution due to the Lorentz boost, the apparatus is arranged in an asymmetric layout around the interaction point. In particular the Micro Vertex Detector based on silicon devices will have a rather unusual geometry. The MVD features fast data readout, since the experiment is triggerless, particle identification over the full range of energies, limited material budget and good spatial and time resolution. The status of the MVD design is shown and the present prototypes are described.

  4. A high rate, low radiation length Micro-Vertex-Detector for the P¯ANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmanns, Tobias

    2011-09-01

    The Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) of the P¯ANDA experiment is the innermost tracking detector. Its most challenging task is the identification of D-meson pairs by their delayed decay point which is about 100- 500 μm from the production point. In addition to the necessary high spatial resolution, it needs a time resolution on the order of 10 ns, a moderate radiation hardness, an untriggered readout of hit data up to 500 MBit/s and a low radiation length. To meet these challenging requirements an intense R&D program is ongoing on all parts of the MVD. This article gives an overview of the ongoing technical developments with a focus on the pixel part of the project.

  5. Front-end module readout and control electronics for the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, M.N.; Allen, M.D.; Boissevain, J.

    1997-11-01

    Front-end module (FEM) readout and control are implemented as modular, high-density, reprogrammable functions in the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector. FEM control is performed by the heap manager, an FPGA-based circuit in the FEM unit. Each FEM has 256 channels of front-end electronics, readout, and control, all located on an MCM. Data readout, formatting, and control are performed by the heap manager along with 4 interface units that reside outside the MVD detector cylinder. This paper discusses the application of a generic heap manager and the addition of 4 interface module types to meet the specific control and data readout needs of the MVD. Unit functioning, interfaces, timing, data format, and communication rates will be discussed in detail. In addition, subsystem issues regarding mode control, serial architecture and functions, error handling, and FPGA implementation and programming will be presented.

  6. Exploitation of secondary vertex information at the CDF detector. Final report, 1991--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Amidei, D.

    1995-11-01

    In the proposal for this work, submitted in November 1990, the author described the application of silicon micro-vertex tracking to hadron collider physics, and outlined a plan of involvement in the first such application, at the CDF Detector, studying p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The proposal included discussion on the use of silicon tracking in B physics measurements, and also some speculation on the ability of silicon tracking to aid in identification of the top quark. In the five years since this proposal, the author has played a significant role in the installation and commissioning of the first such silicon tracking device at a hadron collider, and the utilization of this device in the discovery of the top quark and the study of B production mechanisms. This paper is a summary of this work.

  7. A bottom collider vertex detector design, Monte-Carlo simulation and analysis package

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, P.

    1990-10-01

    A detailed simulation of the BCD vertex detector is underway. Specifications and global design issues are briefly reviewed. The BCD design based on double sided strip detector is described in more detail. The GEANT3-based Monte-Carlo program and the analysis package used to estimate detector performance are discussed in detail. The current status of the expected resolution and signal to noise ratio for the golden'' CP violating mode B{sub d} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} is presented. These calculations have been done at FNAL energy ({radical}s = 2.0 TeV). Emphasis is placed on design issues, analysis techniques and related software rather than physics potentials. 20 refs., 46 figs.

  8. An experimental investigation of airflow-induced vibrations within the multiplicity and vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Bosze, E.; Boissevain, J.; Simon-Gillo, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report summarizes an experimental investigation of vibrations within the multiplicity and vertex detector (MVD). In particular, the maximum displacements of several MVD components were determined from accelerometer measurements of vibrations induced by an electronics air-cooling system. For an MVD inlet air volumetric flow rate of 0.022 m{sup 3}/s, maximum displacements of several MVD components including a multi-chip module, the Rohacell inlet air plenum, and an aluminum structural cross support, were found to be on the order of 1.5 {mu}m. Consequently, it was concluded that air induced vibrations will not significantly interfere with the MVD`s long-term structural integrity or operating performance. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, K. H.; Jeon, H. B.; Park, H.; Uozumi, S.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaia, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor "Origami" method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force.

  10. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  11. Evaporative CO2 cooling using microchannels etched in silicon for the future LHCb vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomerotski, A.; Buytart, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R.; Greening, E.; John, M.; Mapelli, A.; Leflat, A.; Li, Y.; Romagnoli, G.; Verlaat, B.

    2013-04-01

    The extreme radiation dose received by vertex detectors at the Large Hadron Collider dictates stringent requirements on their cooling systems. To be robust against radiation damage, sensors should be maintained below -20°C and at the same time, the considerable heat load generated in the readout chips and the sensors must be removed. Evaporative CO2 cooling using microchannels etched in a silicon plane in thermal contact with the readout chips is an attractive option. In this paper, we present the first results of microchannel prototypes with circulating, two-phase CO2 and compare them to simulations. We also discuss a practical design of upgraded VELO detector for the LHCb experiment employing this approach.

  12. Design and performance of beam test electronics for the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Bryan, W.L.; Emery, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The system architecture and test results of the custom circuits and beam test system for the Multiplicity-Vertex Detector (MVD) for the PHENIX detector collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented in this paper. The final detector per-channel signal processing chain will consist of a preamplifier-gain stage, a current-mode summed multiplicity discriminator, a 64-deep analog memory (simultaneous read-write), a post-memory analog correlator, and a 10-bit 5 {mu}s ADC. The Heap Manager provides all timing control, data buffering, and data formatting for a single 256-channel multi-chip module (MCM). Each chip set is partitioned into 32-channel sets. Beam test (16-cell deep memory) performance for the various blocks will be presented as well as the ionizing radiation damage performance of the 1.2 {mu} n-well CMOS process used for preamplifier fabrication.

  13. A genuinely multi-dimensional upwind cell-vertex scheme for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.; Van Leer, Bram

    1989-01-01

    A scheme of solving the two-dimensional Euler equations is developed. The scheme is genuinely two-dimensional. At each iteration, the data are locally decomposed into four variables, allowing convection in appropriate directions. This is done via a cell-vertex scheme with a downwind-weighted distribution step. The scheme is conservative and third-order accurate in space. The derivation and stability analysis of the scheme for the convection equation, and the derivation of the extension to the Euler equations are given. Preconditioning techniques based on local values of the convection speeds are discussed. The scheme for the Euler equations is applied to two channel-flow problems. It is shown to converge rapidly to a solution that agrees well with that of a third-order upwind solver.

  14. Recent results with HV-CMOS and planar sensors for the CLIC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar

    2017-02-01

    The physics aims for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) impose high precision requirements on the vertex detector which has to match the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of 3 μm , 10 ns time stamping capabilities, low mass (∼0.2% X0 per layer), low power dissipation and pulsed power operation. Recent results of test beam measurements and GEANT4 simulations for assemblies with Timepix3 ASICs and thin active-edge sensors are presented. The 65 nm CLICpix readout ASIC with 25 μm pitch was bump bonded to planar silicon sensors and also capacitively coupled through a thin layer of glue to active HV-CMOS sensors. Test beam results for these two hybridisation concepts are presented.

  15. A Dummy Scan Flip-Flop Insertion Algorithm based on Driving Vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. L.; Li, L.; Zhang, Z. X.; Zhou, W. T.

    2017-03-01

    Commonly termed as Hardware Trojans, is an emerging issue for global hardware security. The research on Hardware Trojan detection is urgent and significant. Dummy Scan Flip-Flop(DSFF) structure could be used to improve the probability of hardware Trojan activation, which is significant to hardware Trojan detection, especially during the design phase. In this express, an algorithm for inserting the DSFF structure based on driving vertex is proposed. According to the experimental results, under the same transition probability threshold(Pth), compared to the state-of-art, the proposed algorithm can reduce both the inserting complexity and the induced area overhead of the DSFF insertion. The maximum area optimization rate can reach 44.8%. The simulation results on S386 and S38584 benchmark circuits indicate that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce Trojan authentication time by increasing activation probability of hardware Trojan circuits.

  16. A MAPS Based Micro-Vertex Detector for the STAR Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Schambach, Joachim; Anderssen, Eric; Contin, Giacomo; ...

    2015-06-18

    For the 2014 heavy ion run of RHIC a new micro-vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed in the STAR experiment. The HFT consists of three detector subsystems with various silicon technologies arranged in 4 approximately concentric cylinders close to the STAR interaction point designed to improve the STAR detector’s vertex resolution and extend its measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain. The two innermost HFT layers are placed at radii of 2.8 cm and 8 cm from the beam line. These layers are constructed with 400 high resolution sensors based on CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensormore » (MAPS) technology arranged in 10-sensor ladders mounted on 10 thin carbon fiber sectors to cover a total silicon area of 0.16 m2. Each sensor of this PiXeL (“PXL”) sub-detector combines a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μm pixel pitch together with front-end electronics and zero-suppression circuitry in one silicon die providing a sensitive area of ~3.8 cm2. This sensor architecture features 185.6 μs readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. This low power dissipation allows the PXL detector to be air-cooled, and with the sensors thinned down to 50 μm results in a global material budget of only 0.4% radiation length per layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows us to effectively install and integrate the PXL sub-detector within a 12 hour period during an on-going multi-month data taking period. The detector requirements, architecture and design, as well as the performance after installation, are presented in this paper.« less

  17. A MAPS Based Micro-Vertex Detector for the STAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schambach, Joachim; Anderssen, Eric; Contin, Giacomo; Greiner, Leo; Silber, Joe; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Szelezniak, Michal; Videbaek, Flemming; Vu, Chinh; Wieman, Howard; Woodmansee, Sam

    2015-06-18

    For the 2014 heavy ion run of RHIC a new micro-vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed in the STAR experiment. The HFT consists of three detector subsystems with various silicon technologies arranged in 4 approximately concentric cylinders close to the STAR interaction point designed to improve the STAR detector’s vertex resolution and extend its measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain. The two innermost HFT layers are placed at radii of 2.8 cm and 8 cm from the beam line. These layers are constructed with 400 high resolution sensors based on CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) technology arranged in 10-sensor ladders mounted on 10 thin carbon fiber sectors to cover a total silicon area of 0.16 m2. Each sensor of this PiXeL (“PXL”) sub-detector combines a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μm pixel pitch together with front-end electronics and zero-suppression circuitry in one silicon die providing a sensitive area of ~3.8 cm2. This sensor architecture features 185.6 μs readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. This low power dissipation allows the PXL detector to be air-cooled, and with the sensors thinned down to 50 μm results in a global material budget of only 0.4% radiation length per layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows us to effectively install and integrate the PXL sub-detector within a 12 hour period during an on-going multi-month data taking period. The detector requirements, architecture and design, as well as the performance after installation, are presented in this paper.

  18. Track reconstruction in the inhomogeneous magnetic field for Vertex Detector of NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzlaya, Anastasia; NA61/SHINE collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The heavy-ion programme of the NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN SPS is expanding to allow precise measurements of exotic particles with lifetime few hundred microns. A Vertex Detector for open charm measurements at the SPS is being constructed by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration to meet the challenges of high spatial resolution of secondary vertices and efficiency of track registration. This task is solved by the application of the coordinate sensitive CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors with extremely low material budget in the new Vertex Detector. A small-acceptance version of the Vertex Detector is being tested this year, later it will be expanded to a large-acceptance version. Simulation studies will be presented. A method of track reconstruction in the inhomogeneous magnetic field for the Vertex Detector was developed and implemented. Numerical calculations show the possibility of high precision measurements in heavy ion collisions of strange and multi strange particles, as well as heavy flavours, like charmed particles.

  19. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    DOE PAGES

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; ...

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linearmore » reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.« less

  20. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linear reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.

  1. Constructive and comprehensive studies on the advantages of using staggered InxGa1-xN/InyGa1-yN QWs in LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Dipankar; Mistry, Apu; Gorai, Anup

    2017-04-01

    A hurdle encountered in the InGaN/GaN LED, is, that the overlap of electrons and holes decreases significantly under certain conditions which deteriorates the performance of the LED. Several methods are being studied for increasing the overlap of electrons and holes of which introduction of a staggered InGaN/GaN QW, in place of the rectangular QW seems promising. In this paper we have studied comprehensively, different forms of the staggered QW; single sided and symmetric, with different Indium compositions in the well. Computations have been carried out through the self-consistent solutions of Schrödinger and Poison equations. We have studied the band structures, fields, the carrier distributions, the transition energies and the overlap of the electron and hole wave functions with current densities. It has been found that the overlap of electrons and holes increases significantly for the staggered QWs at the same current. The best results are obtained for the symmetrically staggered QWs, where the overlap increases even up to three times that of the rectangular QW and using this structure the operating current may be decreased by more than two orders of magnitude to obtain the same transition energy. The theoretical and computational results will be presented with suitable discussions.

  2. Evaluation following staggered implementation of the ‘Rethinking Critical Care’ ICU care bundle in a multi-center community setting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Vincent; Herbert, David; Foss-Durant, Anne; Marelich, Gregory P.; Patel, Anandray; Whippy, Alan; Turk, Benjamin J; Ragins, Arona I; Kipnis, Patricia; Escobar, Gabriel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate process metrics and outcomes following implementation of the ‘Rethinking Critical Care’ (RCC) ICU care bundle in a community setting. Design, Setting, and Patients Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at three hospitals in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California integrated healthcare delivery system between January 1, 2009 and August 30, 2013. Interventions and Measurements The RCC ICU care bundle is designed to reduce potentially preventable complications by focusing on the management of delirium, sedation, mechanical ventilation, mobility, ambulation, and coordinated care. RCC implementation occurred in a staggered fashion between October 2011 and November 2012. We measured implementation metrics based on electronic medical record data and evaluated the impact of implementation on mortality with multivariable regression models. Main Results We evaluated 24,886 first ICU episodes in 19,872 patients. After implementation, some process metrics (e.g., ventilation start and stop times) were achieved at high rates while others (e.g., ambulation distance), available late in the study period, showed steep increases in compliance. Unadjusted mortality decreased from 12.3% to 10.9% (p-value<0.01) before and after implementation, respectively. The adjusted odds ratio for hospital mortality after implementation was 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.73–0.99) and for thirty-day mortality was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.80–0.97) compared with before implementation. However, the mortality rate trends were not significantly different before and after RCC implementation. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay also did not demonstrate incrementally greater declines after implementation. Conclusions RCC implementation was associated with changes in practice and a 12% to 15% reduction in the odds of short-term mortality. However, these findings may represent an evaluation of changes in practices and outcomes still in the mid

  3. Crystal structure of a poly(rA) staggered zipper at acidic pH: evidence that adenine N1 protonation mediates parallel double helix formation

    PubMed Central

    Gleghorn, Michael L.; Zhao, Jianbo; Turner, Douglas H.; Maquat, Lynne E.

    2016-01-01

    We have solved at 1.07 Å resolution the X-ray crystal structure of a polyriboadenylic acid (poly(rA)) parallel and continuous double helix. Fifty-nine years ago, double helices of poly(rA) were first proposed to form at acidic pH. Here, we show that 7-mer oligo(rA), i.e. rA7, hybridizes and overlaps in all registers at pH 3.5 to form stacked double helices that span the crystal. Under these conditions, rA7 forms well-ordered crystals, whereas rA6 forms fragile crystalline-like structures, and rA5, rA8 and rA11 fail to crystallize. Our findings support studies from ∼50 years ago: one showed using spectroscopic methods that duplex formation at pH 4.5 largely starts with rA7 and begins to plateau with rA8; another proposed a so-called ‘staggered zipper’ model in which oligo(rA) strands overlap in multiple registers to extend the helical duplex. While never shown, protonation of adenines at position N1 has been hypothesized to be critical for helix formation. Bond angles in our structure suggest that N1 is protonated on the adenines of every other rAMP−rAMP helix base pair. Our data offer new insights into poly(rA) duplex formation that may be useful in developing a pH sensor. PMID:27288442

  4. An asymptotic finite plane deformation analysis of the elastostatic fields at a notch vertex of an incompressible hyperelastic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, Makrem; Mansouri, Khalil; Rezgui, Ali

    2008-09-01

    This Note is devoted to the theoretical study of the elastostatic fields at a vertex notch under general far-field loading conditions. The analysis is based on the finite plane deformation hyperelasticity theory for an incompressible Mooney-Rivlin material. We approach the solution, near the singularity, by a mixed asymptotic development. We show that the shape of the solution depends on the opening angle of the notch and that there is singularity if the notch is concave. Furthermore, we show that a pure loading mode II gives rise to the opening of the notch vertex in contrast to the linear elasticity. To cite this article: M. Arfaoui et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  5. Description and performance of track and primary-vertex reconstruction with the CMS tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The CMS Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    A description is provided of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices. Despite the very hostile environment at the LHC, the performance obtained with these algorithms is found to be excellent. For tbar t events under typical 2011 pileup conditions, the average track-reconstruction efficiency for promptly-produced charged particles with transverse momenta of pT > 0.9GeV is 94% for pseudorapidities of |η| < 0.9 and 85% for 0.9 < |η| < 2.5. The inefficiency is caused mainly by hadrons that undergo nuclear interactions in the tracker material. For isolated muons, the corresponding efficiencies are essentially 100%. For isolated muons of pT = 100GeV emitted at |η| < 1.4, the resolutions are approximately 2.8% in pT, and respectively, 10μm and 30μm in the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters. The position resolution achieved for reconstructed primary vertices that correspond to interesting pp collisions is 10-12μm in each of the three spatial dimensions. The tracking and vertexing software is fast and flexible, and easily adaptable to other functions, such as fast tracking for the trigger, or dedicated tracking for electrons that takes into account bremsstrahlung.

  6. Different vertex parameterizations and propagators for the Δ contribution in π-photoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós, J. J.; Barbero, C.; Jaramillo, D. E.; Mariano, A.

    2017-04-01

    We evaluate the total cross section for the π-photoproduction process and analyze the behavior of the {{Δ }}(1232) resonance contribution when the photon energy is increased from threshold up to 0.7 GeV. Within this energy range we compare two different parameterizations for the γ N{{Δ }} vertex: the normal parity and the covariant multipole decomposition ones. For completeness, we also compare different versions for the Δ propagator: the first is the dressed propagator obtained including one-loop self-energy contributions (EXACT), the second is the complex mass scheme which consists in replacing {{m}}{{Δ }}\\to {{m}}{{Δ }}-{{i}}{{{Γ }}}{{Δ }}/2 in the bare propagator, and the third is an intermediate approximation between the two previous ones (EXCMS). We conclude that, in order to extend the present calculation to include more energetic resonances in the future and to obtain non-divergent results for the total cross section we will need to use the MD parametrization and the EXCMS propagator.

  7. PROPOSAL FOR A SILICON VERTEX TRACKER (VTX) FOR THE PHENIX EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    AKIBA,Y.

    2004-10-01

    We propose the construction of a Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX) for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The VTX will substantially enhance the physics capabilities of the PHENIX central arm spectrometers. Our prime motivation is to provide precision measurements of heavy-quark production (charm and beauty) in A+A, p(d)+A, and polarized p+p collisions. These are key measurements for the future RHIC program, both for the heavy ion program as it moves from the discovery phase towards detailed investigation of the properties of the dense nuclear medium created in heavy ion collisions, and for the exploration of the nucleon spin-structure functions. In addition, the VTX will also considerably improve other measurements with PHENIX. The main physics topics addressed by the VTX are: (1) Hot and dense strongly interacting matter--(a) Potential enhancement of charm production, (b) Open beauty production, (c) Flavor dependence of jet quenching and QCD energy loss, (d) Accurate charm reference for quarkonium, (e) Thermal dilepton radiation, (f) High p{sub T} phenomena with light flavors above 10-15 GeV/c in p{sub T}, and (g) Upsilon spectroscopy in the e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel. (2) Gluon spin structure of the nucleon--(a) {Delta}G/G with charm, (b) {Delta}G/G with beauty, and (c) x dependence of {Delta}G/G with {gamma}-jet correlations. (3) Nucleon structure in nuclei--Gluon shadowing over broad x-range.

  8. Vertex Movement for Mission Status Graphics: A Polar-Star Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Humans are traditionally bad monitors, especially over long periods of time on reliable systems, and they are being called upon to do this more and more as systems become further automated. Because of this, there is a need to find a way to display the monitoring information to the human operator in such a way that he can notice pertinent deviations in a timely manner. One possible solution is to use polar-star displays that will show deviations from normal in a more salient manner. A polar-star display uses a polygon's vertices to report values. An important question arises, though, of how the vertices should move. This experiment investigated two particular issues of how the vertices should move: (1) whether the movement of the vertices should be continuous or discrete and (2) whether the parameters that made up each vertex should always move in one direction regardless of parameter sign or move in both directions indicating parameter sign. The results indicate that relative movement direction is best. Subjects performed better with this movement type and they subjectively preferred it to the absolute movement direction. As for movement type, no strong preferences were shown.

  9. Connection between effective-range expansion and nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmukhamedov, R.; Baye, D.

    2011-08-15

    Explicit relations between the effective-range expansion and the nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay B{yields}A+a are derived for an arbitrary orbital momentum together with the corresponding location condition for the (A+a) bound-state energy. They are valid both for the charged case and for the neutral case. Combining these relations with the standard effective-range function up to order six makes it possible to reduce to two the number of free effective-range parameters if an ANC value is known from experiment. Values for the scattering length, effective range, and form parameter are determined in this way for the {sup 16}O+p, {alpha}+t, and {alpha}+{sup 3}He collisions in partial waves where a bound state exists by using available ANCs deduced from experiments. The resulting effective-range expansions for these collisions are valid up to energies larger than 5 MeV.

  10. Description and performance of track and primary-vertex reconstruction with the CMS tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-10-16

    A description is provided of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices. Despite the very hostile environment at the LHC, the performance obtained with these algorithms is found to be excellent. For tbar t events under typical 2011 pileup conditions, the average track-reconstruction efficiency for promptly-produced charged particles with transverse momenta of pT > 0.9GeV is 94% for pseudorapidities of |η| < 0.9 and 85% for 0.9 < |η| < 2.5. The inefficiency is caused mainly by hadrons that undergo nuclear interactions in the tracker material. For isolated muons, the corresponding efficiencies are essentially 100%. For isolated muons of pT = 100GeV emitted at |η| < 1.4, the resolutions are approximately 2.8% in pT, and respectively, 10μm and 30μm in the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters. The position resolution achieved for reconstructed primary vertices that correspond to interesting pp collisions is 10–12μm in each of the three spatial dimensions. The tracking and vertexing software is fast and flexible, and easily adaptable to other functions, such as fast tracking for the trigger, or dedicated tracking for electrons that takes into account bremsstrahlung.

  11. Description and performance of track and primary-vertex reconstruction with the CMS tracker

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-10-16

    A description is provided of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices. Despite the very hostile environment at the LHC, the performance obtained with these algorithms is found to be excellent. For tbar t events under typical 2011 pileup conditions, the average track-reconstruction efficiency for promptly-produced charged particles with transverse momenta of pT > 0.9GeV is 94% for pseudorapidities of |η| < 0.9 and 85% for 0.9 < |η| < 2.5. Themore » inefficiency is caused mainly by hadrons that undergo nuclear interactions in the tracker material. For isolated muons, the corresponding efficiencies are essentially 100%. For isolated muons of pT = 100GeV emitted at |η| < 1.4, the resolutions are approximately 2.8% in pT, and respectively, 10μm and 30μm in the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters. The position resolution achieved for reconstructed primary vertices that correspond to interesting pp collisions is 10–12μm in each of the three spatial dimensions. The tracking and vertexing software is fast and flexible, and easily adaptable to other functions, such as fast tracking for the trigger, or dedicated tracking for electrons that takes into account bremsstrahlung.« less

  12. Readout, first- and second-level triggers of the new Belle silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Abe, R.; Abe, T.; Aihara, H.; Asano, Y.; Aso, T.; Bakich, A.; Browder, T.; Chang, M. C.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chidzik, S.; Dalseno, J.; Dowd, R.; Dragic, J.; Everton, C. W.; Fernholz, R.; Fujii, H.; Gao, Z. W.; Gordon, A.; Guo, Y. N.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Harada, Y.; Haruyama, T.; Hasuko, K.; Hayashi, K.; Hazumi, M.; Heenan, E. M.; Higuchi, T.; Hirai, H.; Hitomi, N.; Igarashi, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Ishino, H.; Itoh, K.; Iwaida, S.; Kaneko, J.; Kapusta, P.; Karawatzki, R.; Kasami, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Koike, S.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kurashiro, H.; Kusaka, A.; Lesiak, T.; Limosani, A.; Lin, W. C.; Marlow, D.; Matsumoto, H.; Mikami, Y.; Miyake, H.; Moloney, G. R.; Mori, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakano, Y.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nozaki, S.; Ohkubo, R.; Ohno, F.; Okuno, S.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Ozaki, H.; Peak, L.; Pernicka, M.; Rosen, M.; Rozanska, M.; Sato, N.; Schmid, S.; Shibata, T.; Stamen, R.; Stanič, S.; Steininger, H.; Sumisawa, K.; Suzuki, J.; Tajima, H.; Tajima, O.; Takahashi, K.; Takasaki, F.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Terazaki, H.; Tomura, T.; Trabelsi, K.; Trischuk, W.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, K.; Ueno, K.; Ueno, K.; Uozaki, N.; Ushiroda, Y.; Vahsen, S.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K.; Velikzhanin, Y. S.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M. Z.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yanai, H.; Yang, R.; Yasu, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Ziegler, T.; Žontar, D.

    2004-12-01

    A major upgrade of the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD 2.0) of the Belle experiment at the KEKB factory was installed along with new front-end and back-end electronics systems during the summer shutdown period in 2003 to cope with higher particle rates, improve the track resolution and meet the increasing requirements of radiation tolerance. The SVD 2.0 detector modules are read out by VA1TA chips which provide "fast or" (hit) signals that are combined by the back-end FADCTF modules to coarse, but immediate level 0 track trigger signals at rates of several tens of a kHz. Moreover, the digitized detector signals are compared to threshold lookup tables in the FADCTFs to pass on hit information on a single strip basis to the subsequent level 1.5 trigger system, which reduces the rate below the kHz range. Both FADCTF and level 1.5 electronics make use of parallel real-time processing in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), while further data acquisition and event building is done by PC farms running Linux. The new readout system hardware is described and the first results obtained with cosmics are shown.

  13. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, R.; Finck, Ch.; Juliani, D.; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Tropea, S.; Vanstalle, M.; Younis, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different methods are implemented. The algorithm performances and the accuracy on reconstructed observables are evaluated on the basis of simulated and experimental data.

  14. Magnetoresistance in High-Tc Superconductors: The Role of Vertex Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontani, Hiroshi

    2001-07-01

    In high-Tc cuprates, the orbital magnetoresistance in plane (Δρ/ρ) is anomalously enhanced at lower tempemeratures compared with conventional Fermi liquids, and thus Kohler's rule is strongly violated. Moreover, it should be noted that an intimate relation between Δρ/ρ and the Hall coefficient (RH), Δρ/ρ∝(RH/ρ)2, holds well experimentally, and is called the “modified Kohler's rule”. In this letter, we study this long-standing problem in terms of the nearly antiferromagnetic (AF) Fermi liquid. We analyze the exact expression for Δρ/ρ by including the vertex corrections (VC's) to keep the conservation laws, and find the approximate relation Δρ/ρ∝ξAF4 ρ-2 ·H2 (ξAF being the AF correlation length) in the presence of AF fluctuations. The factor ξAF4, which comes from the VC's for the current, gives the additional temperature dependence. By taking account of the relation RH ∝ξAF2 [Kontani et al.: Phys. Rev. B 59 (1999) 14723], we can naturally explain the modified Kohler's rule. In conclusion, based on the Fermi liquid theory, the famous seemingly non-Fermi liquid behaviors of RH and Δρ/ρ in high-Tc cuprates are naturally understood on an equal footing.

  15. A chiral 60-metal sodalite cage featuring 24 vertex-sharing [Er4(mu3-OH)4] cubanes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Jian; Wu, Yinglan; Long, La-Sheng; Zheng, Lan-Sun; Zheng, Zhiping

    2009-05-27

    A chiral, cagelike, high-nuclearity lanthanide hydroxide cluster containing 60 Er(III) ions is reported. The cluster core possesses a fascinating sodalite-like structure with 24 vertex-sharing cubane-like [Er(4)(mu(3)-OH)(4)](8+) units. The hexagonal face of the sodalite cage features a templating mu(6)-CO(3)(2-) ion. Magnetic studies revealed weak antiferromagnetic interactions.

  16. Defect assistant band alignment transition from staggered to broken gap in mixed As/Sb tunnel field effect transistor heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Jain, N.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Hudait, M. K.; Mohata, D. K.; Datta, S.; Lubyshev, D.; Fastenau, J. M.; Liu, Amy K.; Monsegue, N.

    2012-11-01

    The compositional dependence of effective tunneling barrier height (E{sub beff}) and defect assisted band alignment transition from staggered gap to broken gap in GaAsSb/InGaAs n-channel tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) structures were demonstrated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). High-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the active layers are internally lattice matched. The evolution of defect properties was evaluated using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The defect density at the source/channel heterointerface was controlled by changing the interface properties during growth. By increasing indium (In) and antimony (Sb) alloy compositions from 65% to 70% in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As and 60% to 65% in GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} layers, the E{sub beff} was reduced from 0.30 eV to 0.21 eV, respectively, with the low defect density at the source/channel heterointerface. The transfer characteristics of the fabricated TFET device with an E{sub beff} of 0.21 eV show 2 Multiplication-Sign improvement in ON-state current compared to the device with E{sub beff} of 0.30 eV. On contrary, the value of E{sub beff} was decreased from 0.21 eV to -0.03 eV due to the presence of high defect density at the GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65}/In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As heterointerface. As a result, the band alignment was converted from staggered gap to broken gap, which leads to 4 orders of magnitude increase in OFF-state leakage current. Therefore, a high quality source/channel interface with a properly selected E{sub beff} and well maintained low defect density is necessary to obtain both high ON-state current and low OFF-state leakage in a mixed As/Sb TFET structure for high-performance and lower-power logic applications.

  17. Measurement of the B± lifetime and top quark identification using secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, Ariel G.

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation presents a preliminary measurement of the B± lifetime through the full reconstruction of its decay chain, and the identification of top quark production in the electron plus jets channel using the displaced vertex b-tagging method. Its main contribution is the development, implementation and optimization of the Kalman filter algorithm for vertex reconstruction, and of the displaced vertex technique for tagging jets arising from b quark fragmentation, both of which have now become part of the standard D0 reconstruction package. These two algorithms fully exploit the new state-of-the-art tracking detectors, recently installed as part of the Run 2 D0 upgrade project. The analysis is based on data collected during Run 2a at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ Hadron Collider up to April 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb-1. The measured B meson lifetime of τ = 1.57 ± 0.18 ps is in agreement with the current world average, with a competitive level of precision expected when the full data sample becomes available.

  18. Direct Observation of b_2 Vibrational Levels in the ^1B_2 tilde{C} State of SO_2: Precise Measurement of ν_3 Level Staggerings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Womack, Carrie; Richter, Peter; Field, Robert W.; Whitehill, Andrew Richard; Ono, Shuhei

    2014-06-01

    The ^1B_2 tilde{C} STATE OF SO_2 has been the subject of extensive investigation because it is important in the atmospheric photodissociation of SO_2. The state has a double-minimum potential in the dissociation coordinate, ν_3, arising from vibronic interactions, leading to a staggering of vibrational levels with v_3 odd vs. even. We report the first direct observations of the v_3 fundamental and of other levels with b_2 vibrational symmetry (odd v_3). Our work has made use of LIF, IR-UV double resonance, and coherent MODR techniques. Implications of the precision measurement of v_3 staggerings to the determination of double-minimum potential barrier and to vibronic coupling will be discussed.

  19. Acoustic Reverse-time Migration using Optimal Staggered-grid Finite-difference Operator Based on Least Squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongyong; Yang, Lei; Liu, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Reverse-time migration (RTM) directly solves the two-way wave equation for wavefield propagation; therefore, how to solve the wave equation accurately and quickly is very important for RTM. The conventional staggered-grid finite-difference (SFD) operators are usually based on the Taylor-series expansion theory. If they are used to solve wave equation on a larger frequency content, a strong dispersion will occur, which directly affects the seismic image quality. In this paper, we propose an optimal SFD operator based on least squares to solve acoustic wave equation for prestack RTM, and obtain a new antidispersion RTM algorithm that can use short spatial difference operators. The synthetic and real data tests demonstrate that the least squares SFD (LSSFD) operator can mitigate the numerical dispersion, and the acoustic RTM using the LSSFD operator can effectively improve image quality comparing with that using the Taylor-series expansion SFD (TESFD) operator. Moreover, the LSSFD method can adopt a shorter spatial difference operator to reduce the computing cost.

  20. Cellular localization of cerebellar muscarinic receptors: an autoradiographic analysis of weaver, reeler, Purkinje cell degeneration and staggerer mice

    SciTech Connect

    Neustadt, A.; Frostholm, A.; Rotter, A.

    1988-02-01

    Light microscopic autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites was used to study the distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse mutants which have abnormalities affecting specific cerebellar cell types. In the normal C57BL/6J mouse, binding sites were distributed throughout the cerebellar cortex, with the highest levels in the granule cell layer and deep cerebellar nuclei. Normal binding site density was observed in the cerebellum of the weaver mutant in which the majority of granule cells had degenerated. The density of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites was elevated in the cortex of the reeler, despite a reduction in the number of granule cells. The concentration of binding sites was also high over the Purkinje cell masses where granule cells were largely absent. No significant reduction in cortical (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding site density was detected in the Purkinje cell degeneration mutant, in which essentially all Purkinje cells had degenerated. In contrast, receptor binding in the deep cerebellar nuclei of this mutant was significantly increased. A substantial increase in labeling was observed in the cortex and deep nuclei of the staggerer cerebellum in which a large fraction of Golgi II cells, Purkinje cells, granule cells and mossy fibers have degenerated. We discuss the possibility that the persistence of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in all four mutants may imply a non-neuronal localization for a large proportion of muscarinic receptors in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

  1. Simulations of the solar near-surface layers with the CO5BOLD, MURaM, and Stagger codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeck, B.; Collet, R.; Steffen, M.; Asplund, M.; Cameron, R. H.; Freytag, B.; Hayek, W.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Schüssler, M.

    2012-03-01

    Context. Radiative hydrodynamic simulations of solar and stellar surface convection have become an important tool for exploring the structure and gas dynamics in the envelopes and atmospheres of late-type stars and for improving our understanding of the formation of stellar spectra. Aims: We quantitatively compare results from three-dimensional, radiative hydrodynamic simulations of convection near the solar surface generated with three numerical codes (CO5BOLD, MURaM, and Stagger) and different simulation setups in order to investigate the level of similarity and to cross-validate the simulations. Methods: For all three simulations, we considered the average stratifications of various quantities (temperature, pressure, flow velocity, etc.) on surfaces of constant geometrical or optical depth, as well as their temporal and spatial fluctuations. We also compared observables, such as the spatially resolved patterns of the emerging intensity and of the vertical velocity at the solar optical surface as well as the center-to-limb variation of the continuum intensity at various wavelengths. Results: The depth profiles of the thermodynamical quantities and of the convective velocities as well as their spatial fluctuations agree quite well. Slight deviations can be understood in terms of differences in box size, spatial resolution and in the treatment of non-gray radiative transfer between the simulations. Conclusions: The results give confidence in the reliability of the results from comprehensive radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  2. Experiments on condensation over in-line and staggered condenser tubes in the presence of non-condensable gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Abdulghani; Yamali, Cemil

    2013-12-01

    The problem of the forced film condensation heat transfer of pure steam and steam-air mixture flowing downward a tier of horizontal cylinders is investigated experimentally. An experimental setup was manufactured and mounted at Middle East Technical University workshop. A set of experiments were conducted to observe the condensation heat transfer phenomenon and to verify the theoretical results. The results of the experimental investigation are presented to show the effect of different parameters on the film condensation heat transfer phenomenon over bundle of tubes. These parameters include; free stream velocity, free stream non-condensable gas (air) mass fractions, free stream temperature to wall temperature difference, the angle of inclination. heat transfer coefficients are evaluated at different working conditions for both inline and staggered arrangements. Results show that; a remarked reduction in the vapor side heat transfer coefficient is noticed when very small amounts of air mass fractions present in the vapor. In addition, it decreases by increasing the temperature difference. On the other hand, it increases by increasing the free stream velocity (Reynolds number). Average heat transfer coefficient at the middle and the bottom cylinders increases by increasing the angle of inclination, whereas, no significant change is observed for that of the upper cylinder. Although some discrepancies are noticed, the present study results are inline and in a reasonable agreement with the theory and experiment in the literature.

  3. Staggered magnetization and low-energy magnon dispersion in the multiferroic skyrmion host Cu2OSeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Guy G.; Trump, Benjamin A.; Kindervater, Jonas; Jones, Lacy L.; Stone, Matthew B.; McQueen, Tyrel M.; Broholm, Collin L.

    We present neutron diffraction and inelastic scattering of the insulating helimagnet, Cu2OSeO3 which provide evidence for staggered magnetization and elucidate the associated low-energy magnon spectrum. The modulation wavelength of approximately λ ~ 50 nm detected at antiferromagnetic Bragg points is of the same length scale as previously reported for the skyrmion lattice. This superstructure evidences the composite nature of the spin-1 tetrahedra that form the topological magnetic structure of the material. To understand the interplay of ferrimagnetism and long wavelength modulated magnetism, we have performed inelastic neutron scattering on a co-aligned sample of chemical vapor transport grown single crystals. We shall present the low-energy magnon dispersion and infer an effective spin Hamiltonian to account for the long-wavelength, low-energy magnetism of Cu2OSeO3. The work at IQM was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Material Sciences and Engineering, under Grant No. DEFG02-08ER46544. GGM also acknowledges support from the NSF-GRFP Grant No. DGE-1232825.

  4. A Fully Conservative and Entropy Preserving Cut-Cell Method for Incompressible Viscous Flows on Staggered Cartesian Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Chenadec, Vincent; Bay, Yong Yi

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of complex geometries in Computational Fluid Dynamics applications is a challenging endeavor, which immersed boundary and cut-cell techniques can significantly simplify by alleviating the meshing process required by body-fitted meshes. These methods also introduce new challenges, in that the formulation of accurate and well-posed discrete operators is not trivial. A cut-cell method for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is proposed for staggered Cartesian grids. In both scalar and vector cases, the emphasis is set on the structure of the discrete operators, designed to mimic the properties of the continuous ones while retaining a nearest-neighbor stencil. For convective transport, different forms are proposed (divergence, advective and skew-symmetric), and shown to be equivalent when the discrete continuity equation is satisfied. This ensures mass, momentum and kinetic energy conservation. For diffusive transport, conservative and symmetric operators are proposed for both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Symmetry ensures the existence of a sink term (viscous dissipation) in the discrete kinetic energy budget, which is beneficial for stability. The accuracy of method is finally assessed in standard test cases.

  5. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiwei; Presley, Gerald N.; Hammel, Kenneth E.; Ryu, Jae-San; Menke, Jon R.; Figueroa, Melania; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Schilling, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-12

    The fungi that cause brown rot of wood are essential contributors to biomass recycling in forest ecosystems. Their highly efficient cellulolytic systems, which may have practical applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: nonselective oxidation of the lignocellulose by reactive oxygen species (ROS) coupled with hydrolysis of the polysaccharide components by a limited set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Since the production of strongly oxidizing ROS appears incompatible with the operation of GHs, it has been proposed that the fungi regulate ROS production by maintaining concentration gradients of the chelated metal ions they use to generate extracellular oxidants. However, calculations have indicated that this protective mechanism is physically infeasible. We examined a different hypothesis, that expression of ROS and GH components is temporally staggered by brown rot fungi in wood. We sectioned thin wafers of spruce and aspen that had been colonized directionally by Postia placenta and measured expression of relevant genes and some of the encoded enzymes, thus using the spatial distribution of fungal hyphae to resolve a fine-scale temporal sequence. Hierarchical clustering of gene expression for eight oxidoreductases thought to have a role in ROS production and of eight GHs revealed a zone of oxidoreductase upregulation at the hyphal front that persisted about 48 h before upregulation of the GHs. Additional evidence for differential expression was provided by localization of endoglucanase, xylanase, mannanase, and laccase activities in the colonized wood. Our results support a two-step mechanism for brown rot, in which substrate oxidation precedes enzymatic hydrolysis.

  6. Interim analysis based on the weighted log-rank test for delayed treatment effects under staggered patient entry.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mizuki; Matsuyama, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Fleming and Harrington's G(ρ,γ) class of weighted log-rank tests is appropriate for detecting delayed treatment effects such as those seen in cancer vaccines. A conditional power (CP) and an alpha spending function (ASF) approach are useful for interim analyses that are conducted with the aim of early termination due to futility and efficacy, respectively. However, calculation of the CP and the total Type I error probability are often not considered for delayed effects under the staggered patient entry. In this article, we first propose methods for calculating the CP analytically based on the weighted log-rank test. We compared the performances of the proposed methods with two other methods (i.e., usual log-rank test and optimal one) under the delayed alternatives. Our simulations demonstrated that the CP based on the weighted log-rank test was more powerful than that of the usual log-rank test and was comparable to the CP based on the optimal log-rank test. Second, we quantitatively evaluated the degree to which the Type I error probability was inflated when an ASF approach with forced independent increments assumption was applied to the weighted log-rank test. The proposed method will provide valuable tools in the decision-making stage of the interim analysis.

  7. 49 CFR Figure 1b to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 1B Figure 1B to Subpart B of... of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows—§§ 238.113 and 238.114 ER01FE08.003...

  8. 49 CFR Figure 1b to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 1B Figure 1B to Subpart B of... of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows—§§ 238.113 and 238.114...

  9. 49 CFR Figure 1b to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 1B Figure 1B to Subpart B of... of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows—§§ 238.113 and 238.114 ER01FE08.003...

  10. 49 CFR Figure 1b to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 1B Figure 1B to Subpart B of... of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows—§§ 238.113 and 238.114 ER01FE08.003...

  11. 49 CFR Figure 1b to Subpart B of... - Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Example of Location and Staggering of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 1B Figure 1B to Subpart B of... of Emergency Window Exits and Location of Rescue Access Windows—§§ 238.113 and 238.114 ER01FE08.003...

  12. Critical Comparison of the Collocated and Staggered Grid Arrangements for Incompressible Turbulent Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    1994), (Ye et al., 1998), ( Armenio and Piomelli, 2000), who were interested in performing LES in complex geometries using body-fitted grids. Morinishi et...scheme may be a better overall choice for LES in complex geometries. References Armenio , V. and Piomelli, U. (2000) A Lagrangian mixed subgrid-scale model

  13. A Comparison of Staggered-Mesh Lagrange Plus Remap and Cell-Centered Direct Eulerian Godunov Schemes for Rulerian Shock Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pember, R.B.; Anderson, R.W.

    2000-11-22

    We present a comparison of two algorithms for solving the equations of unsteady inviscid compressible flow in a Eulerian frame. The first algorithm is a staggered grid Lagrange plus remap scheme. The Lagrange step in this method is a time-centered version of the scheme due to Tipton, while the remap step employs a variant of the corner transport upwind scheme due to Colella. The second algorithm is a spatially operator-split version of the higher-order Godunov scheme for gas dynamics due to Colella. They use the two methods to compute solutions to a number of one- and two-dimensional problems. The results show the accuracy and performance of the two schemes to be generally equivalent. In a 1984 survey paper by Woodward and Colella, staggered grid, Lagrange plus remap, artificial viscosity schemes did not compare favorably with cell-centered direct Eulerian higher-order Godunov methods. They examine, therefore, how certain features of the staggered grid scheme discussed here contribute to its improved accuracy. They show in particular that the improved accuracy of the present scheme is due in part to the use of a monotonic artificial viscosity in the Lagrange step and the use of an improved upwind method in the remap step.

  14. Structural properties and band offset determination of p-channel mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap tunnel field-effect transistor structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Jain, N.; Hudait, M. K.; Mohata, D. K.; Datta, S.; Lubyshev, D.; Fastenau, J. M.; Liu, A. K.

    2012-09-10

    The structural properties and band offset determination of p-channel staggered gap In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65} heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were investigated. High resolution x-ray diffraction revealed that the active layers are strained with respect to 'virtual substrate.' Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry confirmed an abrupt junction profile at the In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65} heterointerface and minimal level of intermixing between As and Sb atoms. The valence band offset of 0.37 {+-} 0.05 eV was extracted from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A staggered band lineup was confirmed at the heterointerface with an effective tunneling barrier height of 0.13 eV. Thus, MBE-grown staggered gap In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65} TFET structures are a promising p-channel option to provide critical guidance for the future design of mixed As/Sb type-II based complementary logic and low power devices.

  15. The MAPS-based vertex detector for the STAR experiment: Lessons learned and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contin, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    The PiXeL detector (PXL) of the STAR experiment at RHIC is the first application of the state-of-the-art thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) technology in a collider environment. The PXL, together with the Intermediate Silicon Tracker (IST) and the Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), form the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT), which has been designed to improve the vertex resolution and extend the STAR measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, providing a clean probe for studying the Quark-Gluon Plasma. The two PXL layers are placed at a radius of 2.8 and 8 cm from the beam line, respectively, and is based on ultra-thin high resolution MAPS sensors. The sensor features 20.7 μm pixel pitch, 185.6 μs readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. The detector is air-cooled, allowing a global material budget of 0.4% radiation length on the innermost layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows for fast installation and integration of the pixel sub detector. The HFT took data in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV during the 2014 RHIC run. Modified during the RHIC shutdown to improve its reliability, material budget, and tracking capabilities, the HFT took data in p+p and p+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV in the 2015 RHIC run. In this paper we present detector specifications, experience from the construction and operations, and lessons learned. We also show preliminary results from 2014 Au+Au data analyses, demonstrating the capabilities of charm reconstruction with the HFT.

  16. Recent progress in sensor- and mechanics-R&D for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergauer, T.; Doljeschi, P.; Frankenberger, A.; Friedl, M.; Gfall, I.; Irmler, C.; Onuki, Y.; Smiljic, D.; Tsuboyama, T.; Valentan, M.

    2013-08-01

    The Belle experiment at the KEKB electron/positron collider in Tsukuba (Japan) was successfully running for more than ten years. A major update of the machine to SuperKEKB is now foreseen until 2015, aiming a peak luminosity which is 40 times the peak value of the previous system. This also requires a redesign of the Belle detector (leading to Belle II) and especially its Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which surrounds the beam pipe. The future Belle II SVD will consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors based on 6 in. silicon wafers. Three of the four layers will be equipped with trapezoidal sensors in the slanted forward region. Moreover, two inner layers with pixel detectors based on DEPFET technology will complement the SVD as innermost detector. Since the KEKB-factory operates at relatively low energy, material inside the active volume has to be minimized in order to reduce multiple scattering. This can be achieved by arranging the sensors in the so-called "Origami chip-on-sensor concept", and a very light-weight mechanical support structure made from carbon fiber reinforced Airex foam. Moreover, CO2 cooling for the front-end chips will ensure high efficiency at minimum material budget. In this paper, an overview of the future Belle II SVD design will be given, covering the silicon sensors, the readout electronics and the mechanics. A strong emphasis will be given to our R&D work on double-sided sensors where different p-stop layouts for the n-side of the detectors were compared. Moreover, this paper gives updated numbers for the mechanical dimensions of the ladders and their radii.

  17. The TORCH time-of-flight detector for particle identification and photon vertex association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2017-02-01

    TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) is a novel time-of-flight detector, designed to provide π /K/p particle identification up to 0~ 1 GeV/c momentum and beyond. To achieve this, a time resolution of ~ 15 ps combining information from 0~ 3 detected photons is required over a 10 m flight path. Large areas can be covered with TORCH, nominally up to 30 m2. One such application is for the LHCb experiment, to complement the particle identification capabilities of its RICH detectors. TORCH has a DIRC-like construction with 10 mm-thick synthetic amorphous fused-silica plates as a radiator. Cherenkov photons propagate by total internal reflection to the plate edges and there are focussed onto an array of position-sensitive photodetectors. Custom-built micro-channel plate photo-multipliers (MCP-PMTs) are being developed in collaboration with industry to provide the lifetime, granularity and time resolution to meet the TORCH specifications. In the present paper, laboratory tests of the MCP-PMTs developed for TORCH and its readout electronics are presented. Test beam measurements of a prototype TORCH detector in a low-momentum mixed beam of pions and protons are highlighted. Time resolutions for individual photons approaching 100 ps is achieved, after correction for dispersion effects in the quartz medium. In addition to the particle identification capabilities, the high-precision timing information that TORCH provides could be used at the high-luminosity LHC to associate high-energy photons with the correct primary interaction vertex amongst the many expected.

  18. A review of the Neotyphodium lolii / Lolium perenne symbiosis and its associated effects on animal and plant health, with particular emphasis on ryegrass staggers.

    PubMed

    di Menna, M E; Finch, S C; Popay, A J; Smith, B L

    2012-11-01

    Ryegrass staggers is a seasonal mycotoxicosis of grazing livestock characterised by tremors, in coordination and a staggering gait almost unaccompanied by physical lesions. Deaths occur only as a consequence of accident or starvation. Outbreaks, in summer and autumn, occur only on pasture in which endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii)-infected perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) predominates and usually on which animals are grazed intensively. Animals recover when moved to a different type of grazing or after rain has promoted pasture growth. The disease was recognised for 80 years before its cause was discovered as a consequence of a grazing trial of sheep on three ryegrass cultivars which happened to have three different levels of endophyte infection. The endophyte was first formally described as Acremonium loliae, later corrected to Acremonium lolii, and was finally placed in the genus Neotyphodium. It produces a number of secondary metabolites of which lolitrem B is the principal one causing ryegrass staggers symptoms. Ergopeptides are also produced which cause heat stress and lack of productivity. N. lolii is symptomless in the plant, seed borne and grows intercellularly in the aerial parts, mainly in reproductive tillers and leaf sheaths but sparsely in leaf blades. It dies in stored seed and infection rates of different ryegrass cultivars have depended on seed storage times during their production. In addition, N. Lolii produces insect feeding deterrents, among them peramine, which protects infected plants from pest predation. Because of this, control of ryegrass staggers by elimination of endophyte-infected ryegrass is not feasible in areas in which insect predation is a serious pasture problem. However, N. lolii strains vary in the secondary metabolites they produce allowing the selection of strains that produce desirable metabolites. By inoculating such strains into uninfected ryegrass plants it is possible to produce cultivars which do not cause ryegrass

  19. A staggered space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured tetrahedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavelli, Maurizio; Dumbser, Michael

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose a novel arbitrary high order accurate semi-implicit space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on staggered unstructured curved tetrahedral meshes. As is typical for space-time DG schemes, the discrete solution is represented in terms of space-time basis functions. This allows to achieve very high order of accuracy also in time, which is not easy to obtain for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Similarly to staggered finite difference schemes, in our approach the discrete pressure is defined on the primary tetrahedral grid, while the discrete velocity is defined on a face-based staggered dual grid. While staggered meshes are state of the art in classical finite difference schemes for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, their use in high order DG schemes is still quite rare. A very simple and efficient Picard iteration is used in order to derive a space-time pressure correction algorithm that achieves also high order of accuracy in time and that avoids the direct solution of global nonlinear systems. Formal substitution of the discrete momentum equation on the dual grid into the discrete continuity equation on the primary grid yields a very sparse five-point block system for the scalar pressure, which is conveniently solved with a matrix-free GMRES algorithm. From numerical experiments we find that the linear system seems to be reasonably well conditioned, since all simulations shown in this paper could be run without the use of any preconditioner, even up to very high polynomial degrees. For a piecewise constant polynomial approximation in time and if pressure boundary conditions are specified at least in one point, the resulting system is, in addition, symmetric and positive definite. This allows us to use even faster iterative solvers, like the conjugate gradient method. The flexibility and accuracy of high order space-time DG methods on curved

  20. The Newmark scheme as velocity-stress time-staggering: an efficient PML implementation for spectral element simulations of elastodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, Gaetano; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre

    2005-06-01

    Perfectly matched layers (PMLs) provide an exponential decay, independent of the frequency, of any propagating field along an assigned direction without producing spurious reflections at the interface with the elastic volume. For this reason PMLs have been applied as absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs) and their efficiency in attenuating outgoing wave fields on the outskirts of numerical grids is more and more recognized. However, PMLs are designed for first-order differential equations and a natural extension to second-order Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) involves either additional variables in the time evolution scheme or convolutional operations. Both techniques are computationally expensive when implemented in a spectral element (SE) code and other ABCs (e.g. paraxial or standard sponge methods) still remain more attractive than PMLs. Here, an efficient second-order implementation of PMLs for SE is developed from interpreting the Newmark scheme as a time-staggered velocity-stress algorithm. The discrete equivalence with the standard scheme is based on an L2 approximation of the stress field, with the same polynomial order as the velocity. In this case, PMLs can be introduced as for first-order equations preserving the natural second-order time stepping. Subsequently, a non-classical frequency-dependent perfectly matched layer is introduced by moving the pole of the stretching along the imaginary axis. In this case, the absorption depends on the frequency and the layer switches from a transparent behaviour at low frequencies to a uniform absorption as the frequency goes to infinity. It turns out to be more efficient than classical PMLs in the absorption of the incident waves, as the grazing incidence approaches, at the cost of a memory variable for any split component. Finally, an extension of PMLs to general curvilinear coordinates is proposed.

  1. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-04-01

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √{s}=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured to be 0 .37 ± 0 .07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0 .014 π ± 0 .036 π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0 .15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[ g R /V L] ∈ [-0 .36 , 0 .10] and Im[ g R /V L] ∈ [-0 .17 , 0 .23] with a correlation of 0 .11. The results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-04-05

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured tomore » be 0.37 ± 0.07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0.014π ± 0.036π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0.15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.36, 0.10] and Im[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.17, 0.23] with a correlation of 0.11. We find the results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.« less

  3. The ``Roman pot'' spectrometer and the vertex detector of experiment UA4 at the CERN SPS collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, R.; Bechini, A.; Bosi, F.; Bozzo, M.; Braccini, P. L.; Buskens, J.; Carbonara, F.; Carrara, R.; Castaldi, R.; Cazzola, U.; Cervelli, F.; Chiefari, G.; Drago, E.; Gorini, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Koene, B.; Maleyran, R.; Manna, F.; Matthiae, G.; Merola, L.; Morelli, A.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Rewiersma, P.; Robert, M.; Roiron, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Schuijlenburg, H.; Sciacca, G.; Sette, G.; Van Swol, R.; Timmermans, J.; Traspedini, L.; Vannini, C.; Velasco, J.; Visco, F.

    1985-07-01

    We describe the apparatus used in experiment UA4 to study proton-antiproton elastic and inelastic interactions at the CERN SPS Collider. Elastically scattered particles, travelling at very small angles, are observed by detectors placed inside movable sections ("Roman pots") of the SPS vacuum chamber. The deflection in the field of the machine quadrupoles allow the measurement of the particle momentum. Inelastic interactions are observed by a left-right symmetric system of trigger counter hodoscopes and drift-chamber telescopes. The apparatus reconstructs the interaction vertex and measures the pseudorapidity η of charged particles in the range 2.5 < ‖ η‖ < 5.6.

  4. An experimental investigation of an air cooling scheme for the multichip modules of the multiplicity and vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Bosze, E.; Boissevain, J.; Simon-Gillo, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report presents a summary of an experimental investigation of an electronics air cooling system for the multiplicity and vertex detector (MVD), a device used to determine and characterize the collision location of two accelerated heavy ions. Measurements of the flow rates of the cooling air and the temperatures of the air and electronic components were used to assess and optimize the performance of the proposed air cooling system, identify potential assembly problems and system limitations, and provide the necessary information for designing and sizing the final MVD cooling system components.

  5. Effect of vertex corrections on the possibility of chiral symmetry breaking induced by long-range Coulomb repulsion in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the possibility of chiral (charge or spin density wave) symmetry breaking in graphene due to long-range Coulomb interaction by comparing the results of the Bethe-Salpeter and functional renormalization-group approaches. The former approach performs a summation of ladder diagrams in the particle-hole channel and reproduces the results of the Schwinger-Dyson approach for the critical interaction strength of the quantum phase transition. The renormalization-group approach combines the effect of different channels and allows to study the role of vertex corrections. The critical interaction strength, which is necessary to induce the symmetry breaking in the latter approach, is found in the static approximation to be αc=e2/(ɛ vF) ≈1.05 without considering the Fermi velocity renormalization, and αc=3.7 with accounting the renormailzation of the Fermi velocity. The latter value is expected to be, however, reduced, when the dynamic screening effects are taken into account, yielding the critical interaction, which may be comparable to the one in freely suspended graphene. We show that the vertex corrections are crucially important to obtain the mentioned values of critical interactions.

  6. Vacuum-compatible, ultra-low material budget Micro-Vertex Detector of the compressed baryonic matter experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziel, Michal; Amar-Youcef, Samir; Bialas, Norbert; Deveaux, Michael; Fröhlich, Ingo; Klaus, Philipp; Michel, Jan; Milanović, Borislav; Müntz, Christian; Stroth, Joachim; Tischler, Tobias; Weirich, Roland; Wiebusch, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) Experiment is one of the core experiments of the future FAIR facility near Darmstadt (Germany). The fixed-target experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the regime of high net baryon densities with numerous probes, among them open charm mesons. The Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) will provide the secondary vertex resolution of ∼ 50 μm along the beam axis, contribute to the background rejection in dielectron spectroscopy, and to the reconstruction of weak decays. The detector comprises four stations placed at 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm downstream the target and inside the target vacuum. The stations will be populated with highly granular CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors, which will feature a spatial resolution of < 5 μm, a non-ionizing radiation tolerance of >1013neq /cm2, an ionizing radiation tolerance of ∼ 3 Mrad, and a readout speed of a few 10 μs/frame. This work introduces the MVD-PRESTO project, which aims at integrating a precursor of the second station of the CBM-MVD meeting the following requirements: material budget of x /X0 < 0.5 %, vacuum compatibility, double-sided sensor integration on a Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite (TPG) carrier, and heat evacuation of about 350 mW/cm2/sensor with a temperature gradient of a few K/cm.

  7. Calculation of three-dimensional (3-D) internal flow by means of the velocity-vorticity formulation on a staggered grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stremel, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to accurately compute the viscous flow in three-dimensional (3-D) enclosures. This method is the 3-D extension of a two-dimensional (2-D) method developed for the calculation of flow over airfoils. The 2-D method has been tested extensively and has been shown to accurately reproduce experimental results. As in the 2-D method, the 3-D method provides for the non-iterative solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations by means of a fully coupled implicit technique. The solution is calculated on a body fitted computational mesh incorporating a staggered grid methodology. In the staggered grid method, the three components of vorticity are defined at the centers of the computational cell sides, while the velocity components are defined as normal vectors at the centers of the computational cell faces. The staggered grid orientation provides for the accurate definition of the vorticity components at the vorticity locations, the divergence of vorticity at the mesh cell nodes and the conservation of mass at the mesh cell centers. The solution is obtained by utilizing a fractional step solution technique in the three coordinate directions. The boundary conditions for the vorticity and velocity are calculated implicitly as part of the solution. The method provides for the non-iterative solution of the flow field and satisfies the conservation of mass and divergence of vorticity to machine zero at each time step. To test the method, the calculation of simple driven cavity flows have been computed. The driven cavity flow is defined as the flow in an enclosure driven by a moving upper plate at the top of the enclosure. To demonstrate the ability of the method to predict the flow in arbitrary cavities, results will he shown for both cubic and curved cavities.

  8. Heat Transfer, Adiabatic Effectiveness and Injectant Distributions Downstream of Single Rows and Two Staggered Rows of Film-Cooling Holes with Simple and Compound Angles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    ROWS AND TWO STAGGERED ROWS OF FILM-COOLING HOLES WITH SIMPLE AND COMPOUND ANGLES 92-01241 by DIII l, p111111~ 11I Stephen Mark Jackson DECEMBER 1991...HOLES WITH SIMPLE AND COMPOUND ANGLES 12. PERSONAL AUTHORS STEPHEN MARK JACKSON 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year. A4int, Day...Rows of Film-Cooling Holes with Simple and Compound Angles by Stephen Mark Jackson lieutenant, United States Navy B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1983

  9. Ultrahigh Performance Staggered Lineup (“Type-II”) InP/GaAsSb/InP NpN Double Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, Colombo R.; Dvorak, Martin W.; Matine, Noureddine; Pitts, Oliver J.; Watkins, Simon P.

    2002-02-01

    We study the performance of staggered lineup NpN InP/GaAsSb/InP abrupt double heterojunction bipolar transistors (DHBTs) intended for ultrahigh speed applications. With a peak fT of 305 GHz (and fMAX=300 GHz), InP/GaAsSb/InP DHBTs are currently the fastest bipolar transistors ever implemented, and as such may challenge sub-100 nm gate InP HEMTs for > 40 Gb/s applications: previously published criteria suggest current device performance should be suitable for 80-100 Gb/s OEICs. InP/GaAsSb/InP DHBTs feature high breakdown voltages and low offset and knee voltages, and extremely high current drive levels enabled by the lack of collector current blocking at the staggered base/collector junction. InP/GaAsSb/InP DHBTs also feature important manufacturability advantages because the structure is entirely made up of uniform composition binary and ternary alloy layers.

  10. Band offset determination of mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap heterostructure for n-channel tunnel field effect transistor application

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Jain, N.; Hudait, M. K.; Mohata, D. K.; Datta, S.; Lubyshev, D.; Fastenau, J. M.; Liu, A. K.

    2013-01-14

    The experimental study of the valence band offset ({Delta}E{sub v}) of a mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65}/In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As heterostructure used as source/channel junction of n-channel tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) grown by molecular beam epitaxy was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cross-sectional transmission electron micrograph shows high crystalline quality at the source/channel heterointerface. XPS results demonstrate a {Delta}E{sub v} of 0.39 {+-} 0.05 eV at the GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65}/In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As heterointerface. The conduction band offset was calculated to be {approx}0.49 eV using the band gap values of source and channel materials and the measured valence band offset. An effective tunneling barrier height of 0.21 eV was extracted, suggesting a great promise for designing a metamorphic mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap TFET device structure for low-power logic applications.

  11. High-performance staggered top-gate thin-film transistors with hybrid-phase microstructural ITO-stabilized ZnO channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Sunbin; Chen, Rongsheng; Li, Guijun; Xia, Zhihe; Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Wei; Wong, Man; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the ITO-stabilized ZnO thin films with a hybrid-phase microstructure were introduced, where a number of nanocrystals were embedded in an amorphous matrix. The microstructural and optical properties of thin films were investigated. It was found that the grain boundary and native defect issues in the pristine polycrystalline ZnO could be well suppressed. Meanwhile, such thin films also possessed relatively smooth surface and high transmittance in the visible range. Afterwards, the corresponding staggered top-gate thin-film transistors (TFTs) were fabricated at a temperature of 300 °C and exhibited fairly high electrical characteristics, especially with a field-effect mobility of nearly 20 cm2 V-1 s-1 and a subthreshold swing as low as 0.115 V/decade. In addition, the electrical uniformity and the stability of devices were also examined to be excellent. It is expected that the staggered top-gate TFTs with hybrid-phase microstructural ITO-stabilized ZnO channels are promising in the next-generation active-matrix flat panel displays.

  12. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using missing E(T) + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-03-01

    The authors present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV which uses events with an inclusive signature of significant missing transverse energy and jets. This is the first measurement which makes no explicit lepton identification requirements, so that sensitivity to W {yields} {tau}{nu} decays is maintained. Heavy flavor jets from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 311 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab they measure a production cross section of 5.8 {+-} 1.2(stat.){sub -0.7}{sup +0.9}(syst.) pb for a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with previous determinations and standard model predictions.

  13. Measurement of the tt production cross section in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV using missing E(T) + jets events with secondary vertex b tagging.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; 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Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-05-26

    We present a measurement of the tt production cross section in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV which uses events with an inclusive signature of significant missing transverse energy and jets. This is the first measurement which makes no explicit lepton identification requirements, so that sensitivity to W --> tau nu decays is maintained. Heavy flavor jets from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 311 pb(-1) of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, we measure a production cross section of 5.8 +/- 1.2(stat)(-0.7)(+0.9)(syst) pb for a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous determinations and standard model predictions.

  14. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using secondary vertex b tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys.

    2006-11-01

    We report a new measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using events with one charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and jets. Using 425 pb{sup -1} of data collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and enhancing the t{bar t} content of the sample by tagging b jets with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm, the t{bar t} production cross section is measured to be: {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t}+X} = 6.6 {+-} 0.9(stat + syst) {+-} 0.4(lum) pb. This cross section is the most precise D0 measurement to date for t{bar t} production and is in good agreement with standard model expectations.

  15. Long-term outcome of extensive skull reconstruction using demineralized perforated bone in Siamese twins joined at the skull vertex.

    PubMed

    Salyer, K E; Gendler, E; Squier, C A

    1997-05-01

    The successful use of cortical demineralized perforated bone in the treatment of extensive skeletal defects in children is exemplified by this case involving Siamese twins joined at the skull vertex. Four years following extensive skull reconstruction using demineralized perforated bone, an examination revealed successful calvarial reconstruction in one twin. The other twin required additional implants of demineralized perforated bone to fill in defects. However, a histologic examination taken following this additional procedure revealed that these implants neither caused tissue reaction over a 4-year period, nor showed signs of resorption. Bony remodeling and new bone formation were in progress. Compared with other bone substitutes, demineralized perforated bone has proven to be effective in the treatment of large skull defects in children.

  16. Development of a pixel sensor with fine space-time resolution based on SOI technology for the ILC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shun; Togawa, Manabu; Tsuji, Ryoji; Mori, Teppei; Yamada, Miho; Arai, Yasuo; Tsuboyama, Toru; Hanagaki, Kazunori

    2017-02-01

    We have been developing a new monolithic pixel sensor with silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector system. The SOI monolithic pixel detector is realized using standard CMOS circuits fabricated on a fully depleted sensor layer. The new SOI sensor SOFIST can store both the position and timing information of charged particles in each 20×20 μm2 pixel. The position resolution is further improved by the position weighted with the charges spread to multiple pixels. The pixel also records the hit timing with an embedded time-stamp circuit. The sensor chip has column-parallel analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) circuits and zero-suppression logic for high-speed data readout. We are designing and evaluating some prototype sensor chips for optimizing and minimizing the pixel circuit.

  17. Increasing Stability and Activity of Core-Shell Catalysts by Preferential Segregation of Oxide on Edges and Vertexes: Oxygen Reduction on Ti-Au@Pt/C

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, J.; Wu, L.; Kuttiyiel, K.; ...

    2016-06-30

    We describe a new class of core-shell nanoparticle catalysts having edges and vertexes covered by refractory metal oxide that preferentially segregates onto these catalyst sites. The monolayer shell is deposited on the oxidefree core atoms. The oxide on edges and vertexes induces high catalyst’s stability and activity. The catalyst and synthesis are exemplified by fabrication of Au nanoparticles doped by Ti atoms that segregate as oxide onto low–coordination sites of edges and vertexes. Pt monolayer shell deposited on Au sites has the mass and specific activities for the oxygen reduction reaction about 13 and 5 times higher than those ofmore » commercial Pt/C catalysts. The durability tests show no activity loss after 10000 potential cycles from 0.6 to 1.0V. The superior activity and durability of the Ti-Au@Pt catalyst originate from protective Ti oxide located at the most dissolution-prone edge and vertex sites, and Au-supported active and stable Pt shell.« less

  18. Increasing Stability and Activity of Core-Shell Catalysts by Preferential Segregation of Oxide on Edges and Vertexes: Oxygen Reduction on Ti-Au@Pt/C

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.; Wu, L.; Kuttiyiel, K.; Goodman, K. R.; Zhang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Vukmirovic, M. B.; White, M. G.; Sasaki, K.; Adzic, R. R.

    2016-06-30

    We describe a new class of core-shell nanoparticle catalysts having edges and vertexes covered by refractory metal oxide that preferentially segregates onto these catalyst sites. The monolayer shell is deposited on the oxidefree core atoms. The oxide on edges and vertexes induces high catalyst’s stability and activity. The catalyst and synthesis are exemplified by fabrication of Au nanoparticles doped by Ti atoms that segregate as oxide onto low–coordination sites of edges and vertexes. Pt monolayer shell deposited on Au sites has the mass and specific activities for the oxygen reduction reaction about 13 and 5 times higher than those of commercial Pt/C catalysts. The durability tests show no activity loss after 10000 potential cycles from 0.6 to 1.0V. The superior activity and durability of the Ti-Au@Pt catalyst originate from protective Ti oxide located at the most dissolution-prone edge and vertex sites, and Au-supported active and stable Pt shell.

  19. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. 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L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. 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    2016-04-05

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured to be 0.37 ± 0.07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0.014π ± 0.036π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0.15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.36, 0.10] and Im[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.17, 0.23] with a correlation of 0.11. We find the results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.

  20. Elliptic pfaffians and solvable lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, Hjalmar

    2016-08-01

    We introduce and study twelve multivariable theta functions defined by pfaffians with elliptic function entries. We show that, when the crossing parameter is a cubic root of unity, the domain wall partition function for the eight-vertex-solid-on-solid model can be written as a sum of two of these pfaffians. As a limit case, we express the domain wall partition function for the three-colour model as a sum of two Hankel determinants. We also show that certain solutions of the TQ-equation for the supersymmetric eight-vertex model can be expressed in terms of elliptic pfaffians.