Sample records for stainless steel corrosion

  1. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires.

  2. Performance of ferritic stainless steels for automobile muffler corrosion

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tarutani, Y.; Hashizume, T.

    1995-11-01

    Corrosion behavior of ferritic stainless steels was studied in artificial exhaust gas condensates containing corrosive ions such as Cl{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. Continuous immersion tests in flasks and Dip and Dry tests by using the alternate corrosion tester with a heating system clarified the effects of chromium and molybdenum additions on the corrosion resistance of a ferritic stainless steel in the artificial exhaust gas condensates. Effects of surface oxidation on the corrosion behavior were investigated in a temperature range of 573K to 673K. Oxidation of 673K reduced the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels in the artificialmore » environment of the automobile muffler. Particulate matter deposited on the muffler inner shell from the automobile exhaust gas was also examined. Deposited particulate matter increased the corrosion rate of the ferritic stainless steel. Finally, the authors also investigated the corrosion of the automobile mufflers made of Type 436L ferritic stainless steel with 18% chromium-1.2% molybdenum after 24 months, in Japan. The sets of results clarified that Type 436L ferritic stainless steel as the material for the automobile muffler exhibited acceptable corrosion resistance.« less

  3. Corrosion behavior of sensitized duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Torres, F J; Panyayong, W; Rogers, W; Velasquez-Plata, D; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    The present work investigates the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.9% NaCl solution after various heat-treatments, and compares it to that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. Both stainless steels were heat-treated at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C in air for 1 h, followed by furnace cooling. Each heat-treated sample was examined for their microstructures and Vickers micro-hardness, and subjected to the X-ray diffraction for the phase identification. Using potentiostatic polarization method, each heat-treated sample was corrosion-tested in 37 degrees C 0.9% NaCl solution to estimate its corrosion rate. It was found that simulated sensitization showed an adverse influence on both steels, indicating that corrosion rates increased by increasing the sensitization temperatures.

  4. Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steels in Biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román, Alejandra S.; Méndez, Claudia M.; Ares, Alicia E.

    The aim of this work was to study the corrosion behavior of stainless steels in biodiesel of vegetal origin, at room temperature, evaluating its properties according to the differences in the structures (austenitic, ferritic and austenitic — ferritic) and compositions of the materials. The biodiesel employed was obtained by industrially manufactured based on soybean oil as main raw material. The stainless steels used as samples for the tests were: AISI 304L, Sea Cure and Duplex 2205. For obtaining the desired data potentiodynamic polarization and weight loss trials were carried out. These studies were complemented by observations using an optical microscope. The weight loss study allowed the identification of low corrosion rates to the three stainless steels studied.

  5. Pitting and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saithala, Janardhan R.

    An investigation has been performed to determine the pitting resistance of stainless steels and stress corrosion cracking of super duplex stainless steels in water containing chloride ions from 25 - 170°C. The steels studied are 12% Cr, FV520B, FV566, 304L, Uranus65, 2205, Ferallium Alloy 255, and Zeron 100. All these commercial materials used in very significant industrial applications and suffer from pitting and stress corrosion failures. The design of a new experimental setup using an autoclave enabled potentiodynamic polarisation experiments and slow strain rate tests in dilute environments to be conducted at elevated temperatures. The corrosion potentials were controlled using a three electrode cell with computer controlled potentiostat.The experimental programme to determine pitting potentials was designed to simulate the service conditions experienced in most industrial plants and develop mathematical model equations to help a design engineer in material selection decision. Stress corrosion resistance of recently developed Zeron100 was evaluated in dilute environments to propose a mechanism in chloride solutions at high' temperatures useful for the nuclear and power generation industry. Results have shown the significance of the composition of alloying elements across a wide range of stainless steels and its influence on pitting. Nitrogen and molybdenum added to modern duplex stainless steels was found to be unstable at higher temperatures. The fractographic results obtained using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has given insight in the initiation of pitting in modem duplex and super duplex stainless steels. A mathematical model has been proposed to predict pitting in stainless steels based on the effect of environmental factors (temperature, chloride concentration, and chemical composition). An attempt has been made to identify the mechanism of SCC in Zeron100 super duplex stainless steel.The proposed empirical models have shown good correlation

  6. Hot Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steel with Al-Si/Al-Si-Cr Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangyan; Wu, Yongzhao; Liu, Qun; Li, Rongguang; Su, Yong

    2017-03-01

    The 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel with Al-Si/Al-Si-Cr coatings is prepared by slurry process and vacuum diffusion, and the hot corrosion behavior of the stainless steel with/without the coatings is studied under the condition of Na2SO4 film at 950 °C in air. Results show that the corrosion kinetics of stainless steel, the stainless steel with Al-Si coating and the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating follow parabolic laws in several segments. After 24 h corrosion, the sequence of the mass gain for the three alloys is the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating < the stainless steel with Al-Si coating < the stainless steel without any coating. The corrosion products of the three alloys are layered. Thereinto, the corrosion products of stainless steel without coating are divided into two layers, where the outside layer contains a composite of Fe2O3 and FeO, and the inner layer is Cr2O3. The corrosion products of the stainless steel with Al-Si coating are also divided into two layers, of which the outside layer mainly consists of Cr2O3, and the inner layer is mainly SiO2. The corrosion film of the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating is thin and dense, which combines well with substrate. Thereinto, the outside layer is mainly Cr2O3, and the inside layer is Al2O3. In the matrix of all of the three alloys, there exist small amount of sulfides. Continuous and protective films of Cr2O3, SiO2 and Al2O3 form on the surface of the stainless steel with Al-Si and Al-Si-Cr coatings, which prevent further oxidation or sulfide corrosion of matrix metals, and this is the main reason for the much smaller mass gain of the two alloys than that of the stainless steel without any coatings in the 24 h hot corrosion process.

  7. Ultrasonic Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of High Strength Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebara, R.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kanei, D.; Yamamoto, Y.

    Ultrasonic corrosion fatigue tests were conducted for high strength austenitic stainless steels such as YUS270 and SUS304N2 in 3%NaCl aqueous solution. The reduction of giga-cycle corrosion fatigue strength of YUS270 and SUS304N2 was not observed at all, while the reduction of corrosion fatigue life was observed at higher stress amplitude. Corrosion pit was observed on corrosion fatigue crack initiation area. Striation was predominantly observed on crack propagation area in air and in 3% NaCl aqueous solution. The reduction of corrosion fatigue strength of high strength austenitic stainless steels such as YUS270 and SUS304N2 is due to the corrosion pit formation at corrosion fatigue crack initiation area. It can be concluded that the higher the ultimate tensile strength of austenitic stainless steels the higher the giga-cycle corrosion fatigue strength in 3%NaCl aqueous solution is.

  8. Mechanical Behavior of Stainless Steel Fiber-Reinforced Composites Exposed to Accelerated Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Caitlin; McBride, Amanda; E. Zaghi, Arash; Burke, Kelly A.; Hill, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in metal fibers have introduced a promising new type of stainless steel fiber with high stiffness, high failure strain, and a thickness < 100 μm (<0.00394 in.) that can be utilized in a steel fiber-reinforced polymer. However, stainless steel is known to be susceptible to pitting corrosion. The main goal of this study is to compare the impact of corrosion on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced composites with those of conventional types of stainless steel. By providing experimental evidences, this study may promote the application of steel fiber-reinforced composite as a viable alternative to conventional metals. Samples of steel fiber-reinforced polymer and four different types of stainless steel were subjected to 144 and 288 h of corrosion in ferric chloride solution to simulate accelerated corrosion conditions. The weight losses due to corrosion were recorded. The corroded and control samples were tested under monotonic tensile loading to measure the ultimate stresses and strains. The effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of the different materials was evaluated. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to investigate the failure mechanism of the corrosion-damaged specimens. Overall, steel fiber-reinforced composites had the greatest corrosion resistance. PMID:28773132

  9. Influence of hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of stainless steels in lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, A. V.

    2008-02-01

    Corrosion behavior of several stainless steels in lithium and lithium with 0.05%H has been examined. Corrosion tests were performed under static conditions at 600 and 700 °C in the austenitic stainless steel of the type AISI 304 containers. Intensive formation of σ-phase of the composition Fe 50Cr 43Mo 3Ni 4 on the surface of austenitic stainless steels of the type AISI 316 at 700 °C for 1000 h was established as a result of isothermal mass transfer. Addition of 0.05%H in the form of LiH to lithium resulted in an increase in the quantity of the σ-phase. After corrosion tests of ferritic/martensitic steel in lithium at 700 °C for 1000 h the formation of the γ-phase was observed. In Li + 0.05%H besides the γ-phase was also formed the σ-phase. The features of decarburization of investigated stainless steels were examined using the direct method of activation autoradiography on carbon. Addition of 0.05%H in lithium significantly decreased the carbon content in the decarburization zone of austenitic stainless steel Fe-18Cr-15Ni-0.15C-0.23B without a noticeable change in the thickness of the decarburization zone. Decarburization of ferritic/martensitic stainless steel was less than of austenitic stainless steel using the same corrosion tests.

  10. Effects of chitosan inhibitor on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Se-fei; Wen, Ying; Yi, Pan; Xiao, Kui; Dong, Chao-fang

    2017-11-01

    The effects of chitosan inhibitor on the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel were studied by electrochemical measurements, immersion tests, and stereology microscopy. The influences of immersion time, temperature, and chitosan concentration on the corrosion inhibition performance of chitosan were investigated. The optimum parameters of water-soluble chitosan on the corrosion inhibition performance of 2205 duplex stainless steel were also determined. The water-soluble chitosan showed excellent corrosion inhibition performance on the 2205 duplex stainless steel. Polarization curves demonstrated that chitosan acted as a mixed-type inhibitor. When the stainless steel specimen was immersed in the 0.2 g/L chitosan solution for 4 h, a dense and uniform adsorption film covered the sample surface and the inhibition efficiency (IE) reached its maximum value. Moreover, temperature was found to strongly influence the corrosion inhibition of chitosan; the inhibition efficiency gradually decreased with increasing temperature. The 2205 duplex stainless steel specimen immersed in 0.4 g/L water-soluble chitosan at 30°C displayed the best corrosion inhibition among the investigated specimens. Moreover, chitosan decreased the corrosion rate of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in an FeCl3 solution.

  11. Characterization of corrosion scale formed on stainless steel delivery pipe for reclaimed water treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Yu, Kanghua; Hu, Hongying; Jiang, Wei; Li, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    To reveal corrosion behavior of stainless steel delivery pipe used in reclaimed water treatment, this research focused on the morphological, mineralogical and chemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scale and corroded passive film. Corrosion scale and coupon samples were taken from a type 304 pipe delivering reclaimed water to a clear well in service for more than 12 years. Stainless steel corrosion scales and four representative pipe coupons were investigated using mineralogy and material science research methods. The results showed corrosion scale was predominantly composed of goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, magnetite, ferrous oxide, siderite, chrome green and chromite, the same as that of corroded pipe coupons. Hence, corrosion scale can be identified as podiform chromite deposit. The loss of chromium in passive film is a critical phenomenon when stainless steel passive film is damaged by localized corrosion. This may provide key insights toward improving a better comprehension of the formation of stainless steel corrosion scale and the process of localized corrosion. The localized corrosion behavior of stainless steel is directly connected with reclaimed water quality parameters such as residual chlorine, DO, Cl(-) and SO4(2-). In particular, when a certain amount of residual chlorine in reclaimed water is present as an oxidant, ferric iron is the main chemical state of iron minerals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro corrosion resistance of Lotus-type porous Ni-free stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Kelly; Hyun, Soong-Keun; Fujimoto, Shinji; Nakajima, Hideo

    2008-11-01

    The corrosion behavior of three kinds of austenitic high nitrogen Lotus-type porous Ni-free stainless steels was examined in acellular simulated body fluid solutions and compared with type AISI 316L stainless steel. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical techniques, the analysis of released metal ions was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and the cytotoxicity was investigated in a culture of murine osteoblasts cells. Total immunity to localized corrosion in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions was exhibited by Lotus-type porous Ni-free stainless steels, while Lotus-type porous AISI 316L showed very low pitting corrosion resistance evidenced by pitting corrosion at a very low breakdown potential. Additionally, Lotus-type porous Ni-free stainless steels showed a quite low metal ion release in SBF solutions. Furthermore, cell culture studies showed that the fabricated materials were non-cytotoxic to mouse osteoblasts cell line. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that the investigated alloys are biocompatible and corrosion resistant and a promising material for biomedical applications.

  13. Stainless steel corrosion scale formed in reclaimed water: Characteristics, model for scale growth and metal element release.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Hu, Hongying; Tang, Fusheng; Li, Yuhong; Yu, Kanghua

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steels generally have extremely good corrosion resistance, but are still susceptible to pitting corrosion. As a result, corrosion scales can form on the surface of stainless steel after extended exposure to aggressive aqueous environments. Corrosion scales play an important role in affecting water quality. These research results showed that interior regions of stainless steel corrosion scales have a high percentage of chromium phases. We reveal the morphology, micro-structure and physicochemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scales. Stainless steel corrosion scale is identified as a podiform chromite deposit according to these characteristics, which is unlike deposit formed during iron corrosion. A conceptual model to explain the formation and growth of stainless steel corrosion scale is proposed based on its composition and structure. The scale growth process involves pitting corrosion on the stainless steel surface and the consecutive generation and homogeneous deposition of corrosion products, which is governed by a series of chemical and electrochemical reactions. This model shows the role of corrosion scales in the mechanism of iron and chromium release from pitting corroded stainless steel materials. The formation of corrosion scale is strongly related to water quality parameters. The presence of HClO results in higher ferric content inside the scales. Cl - and SO 4 2- ions in reclaimed water play an important role in corrosion pitting of stainless steel and promote the formation of scales. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The Effects of Alloy Chemistry on Localized Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiro, David O.

    This study investigated localized corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels under stressed and unstressed conditions, as well as corrosion of metallic thin films. While austenitic stainless steels are widely used in corrosive environments, they are vulnerable to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC), particularly in chloride-containing environments. The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels is closely tied to the alloying elements chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Polarization curves were measured for five commercially available austenitic stainless steels of varying chromium, nickel, and molybdenum content in 3.5 wt.% and 25 wt.% NaCl solutions. The alloys were also tested in tension at slow strain rates in air and in a chloride environment under different polarization conditions to explore the relationship between the extent of pitting corrosion and SCC over a range of alloy content and environment. The influence of alloy composition on corrosion resistance was found to be consistent with the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) under some conditions, but there were also conditions under which the model did not hold for certain commercial alloy compositions. Monotonic loading was used to generate SCC in in 300 series stainless steels, and it was possible to control the failure mode through adjusting environmental and polarization conditions. Metallic thin film systems of thickness 10-200 nm are being investigated for use as corrosion sensors and protective coatings, however the corrosion properties of ferrous thin films have not been widely studied. The effects of film thickness and substrate conductivity were examined using potentiodynamic polarization and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) on iron thin films. Thicker films undergo more corrosion than thinner films in the same environment, though the corrosion mechanism is the same. Conductive substrates encourage general corrosion, similar to that of bulk iron

  15. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  16. Application Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Methods to Evaluation Corrosion Behavior of Stainless steels 304 in Nanofluids Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi Prajitno, Djoko; Umar, Efrizon; Gustaman Syarif, Dani

    2017-01-01

    Corrosion is a common problem in many engineering metals and alloys. Electrochemical methods are commonly instrument to use as tool to study the corrosion behavior of the metals and alloy. This method was examined interaction between a surface of the metals and alloys in corrosive media. The present paper, the effects of nano particle ZrO2 as an additive to aqua de mineralized on the corrosion behavior of stainless steel were investigated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) testing was performed in both de mineralized water and demineralized water contain nano particle 0,01% ZrO2 as Nano fluid. Surface morphology examination of the specimens showed that microstructure of stainless steel 304 alloys relatively unchanged after corrosion and EIS testing. According to the corrosion potential examination of the stainless steel 304 in nanofluid media, it showed that stainless steel 304 actively corroded in nanofluida media. The value of anodic Tafel slope stainless steel 304 in nanofluid higher compare with in demineralized water. Tafel polarization examination show that corrosion rate of stainless steel 304 in nanofluid higher compare with corrosin rate in demineralized media.EIS technique show that impedance of stainless steel 304 in nanofluid lower compare with in demineralized media, resulting in an increase in the corrosion rates of these stainless steel 304 specimens in nano fluids

  17. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  18. A SURVEY OF THE CORROSION OF MARTENSITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS IN PRESSURIZED WATER

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.

    1963-07-16

    >The corrosion resistance of mantensitic and ferritic austenitic stainless steels and carbon steels in pressurized water at 500 to 600 deg F is compared. Included are specific out-of-pile data for austenitic stainless steels, AISI types types 410, 420, 431, and 440C; the ferritic AISI types 430, 442, and 446; the precipitation-hardening type 17-4PH; and carbon steels, ASTM 212 A and B. Available corrosion results obtained under irradiation at exposures in the range of 7 x 10/sup 16/ to 3 x 10/sup 19/ nvt are also included for types 304, types of martensitic and ferritic stainless steels which were evaluated domore » not contain nickel. For application where it is desirable to minimize Co/sup 58/ activity produced from nickel, selection of a martensitic or ferritic stainless steel may be more appropriate than choosing the more popular nickel-bearing austenitic stainless steel or a fuel-element cladding material. Interpretation of the data indicates that, on the average, martensitic and ferritic stainless steels corrode more rapidly than austenitic alloys but more slowly than carbon and low-alloy steels. Under selected controlled water conditions or under irradiation, the corrosion of the nickel-free stainless steels appears to differ little from the austenitics. The corrosion of martensitic and ferritic stainless steels in pressurized-water systems therefore does not appear of such magnitude as to rule out development of these materials as the cladding fuel elements for specific applications. (auth)« less

  19. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  1. Effects of simulated inflammation on the corrosion of 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Emily K; Brooks, Richard P; Ehrensberger, Mark T

    2017-02-01

    Stainless steel alloys, including 316L, find use in orthopaedics, commonly as fracture fixation devices. Invasive procedures involved in the placement of these devices will provoke a local inflammatory response that produces hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and an acidic environment surrounding the implant. This study assessed the influence of a simulated inflammatory response on the corrosion of 316L stainless steel. Samples were immersed in an electrolyte representing either normal or inflammatory physiological conditions. After 24h of exposure, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICPMS) were used to evaluate differences in corrosion behavior and ion release induced by the inflammatory conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate surface morphology and corrosion products formed on the sample surface. Inflammatory conditions, involving the presence of H 2 O 2 and an acidic pH, significantly alter the corrosion processes of 316L stainless steel, promoting aggressive and localized corrosion. It is demonstrated that particular consideration should be given to 316L stainless steel implants with crevice susceptible areas (ex. screw-head/plate interface), as those areas may have an increased probability of rapid and aggressive corrosion when exposed to inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Erosion-corrosion resistance properties of 316L austenitic stainless steels after low-temperature liquid nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Pan, Dong

    2018-05-01

    The low-temperature liquid nitriding of stainless steels can result in the formation of a surface zone of so-called expanded austenite (S-phase) by the dissolution of large amounts of nitrogen in the solid solution and formation of a precipitate-free layer supersaturated with high hardness. Erosion-corrosion measurements were performed on low-temperature nitrided and non-nitrided 316L stainless steels. The total erosion-corrosion, erosion-only, and corrosion-only wastages were measured directly. As expected, it was shown that low-temperature nitriding dramatically reduces the degree of erosion-corrosion in stainless steels, caused by the impingement of particles in a corrosive medium. The nitrided 316L stainless steels exhibited an improvement of almost 84% in the erosion-corrosion resistance compared to their non-nitrided counterparts. The erosion-only rates and synergistic levels showed a general decline after low-temperature nitriding. Low-temperature liquid nitriding can not only reduce the weight loss due to erosion but also significantly reduce the weight loss rate of interactions, so that the total loss of material decreased evidently. Therefore, 316L stainless steels displayed excellent erosion-corrosion behaviors as a consequence of their highly favorable corrosion resistances and superior wear properties.

  3. Corrosion behavior of a superduplex stainless steel in chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabalà, Manuele; Calliari, Irene; Variola, Alessandra

    2004-04-01

    Super duplex stainless steels (SDSS) have been widely used as structural materials for chemical plants (especially in those engaged in phosphoric acid production), in the hydrometallurgy industries, and as materials for offshore applications due to their excellent corrosion resistance in chloride environments, compared with other commercial types of ferritic stainless steels. These alloys also possess superior weldability and better mechanical properties than austenitic stainless steels. However, due to their two-phase structure, the nature of which is very dependent on their composition and thermal history, the behavior of SDSS regarding localized corrosion appears difficult to predict, especially in chloride environments. To improve their final properties, the effect of the partition of the alloying elements between the two phases, and the composition and microstructure of each phase are the key to understanding the localized corrosion phenomena of SDSS. This paper concerns the effects of the SDSS microstructure and heat treatment on the SDSS corrosion resistance in aqueous solutions, containing different amounts of NaCl at room temperature.

  4. The effect of tempering temperature on pitting corrosion resistance of 420 stainless steels

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Anwar, Moch Syaiful, E-mail: moch026@lipi.go.id; Prifiharni, Siska, E-mail: sisk002@lipi.go.id; Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: effe004@lipi.go.id

    2016-04-19

    The AISI Type 420 stainless steels are commonly used to steam generators, mixer blades, etc. These stainless steels are most prone to pitting in dissolved Cl{sup −} containing environments. In this paper, the effect of tempering temperature on pitting corrosion resistance of AISI Type 420 stainless steels was studied. The AISI Type 420 stainless steels specimens were heat treated at the temperature of 1050°C for 1 hour to reach austenite stabilization and then quench in the oil. After that, the specimens were tempered at the temperature of 150, 250, 350 and 450°C for 30 minutes and then air cooled tomore » the room temperature. The electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization test was conducted at 3.5% sodium chloride solution to evaluate corrosion rate and pitting corrosion behaviour. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to evaluate the pitting corrosion product. The result have shown that highest pitting potential was found in the sample tempered at 250°C and corrosion pits were found to initiate preferentially around chromium carbides.« less

  5. Effect of alpha/gamma phase ratio on corrosion behavior of dual-phase stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y J; Reyes, M; Thongthammachat, S; Sukchit, K; Panich, M; Oshida, Y

    1999-01-01

    Dual-phase stainless steels have been developed in order to reduce the nickel content, which is potentially responsible to an allergic reaction when these steels are used as medical or dental applications. In this study, two different dual-phase stainless steels (2205 and Z100) were electrochemically tested to evaluate their corrosion resistance in three corrosive solutions (i.e., synthetic saliva, 0.9% NaCl solution, and Ringer solution). Particularly, an attempt was made to correlate the corrosion resistance to a metallographic parameter, which is, in this study, the alpha/gamma phase ratio. It was concluded that (1) type 2205 stainless steel exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in all three corrosion media; however 2205 stainless steel decreases its corrosion resistance by increasing chloride concentration in tested electrolytes from synthetic saliva through 0.9% NaCl solution to Ringer solution. (2) X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the alpha/gamma phase ratio of 2205 (1.735) was higher than that of Z100 (0.905). As a result, it is suggested that by increasing the alpha/gamma phase ratio the material shows more corrosion-prone behavior when being subjected to a hostile environment containing higher chloride ion concentration.

  6. Peptide-based biocoatings for corrosion protection of stainless steel biomaterial in a chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Muruve, Noah G G; Cheng, Y Frank; Feng, Yuanchao; Liu, Tao; Muruve, Daniel A; Hassett, Daniel J; Irvin, Randall T

    2016-11-01

    In this work, PEGylated D-amino acid K122-4 peptide (D-K122-4-PEG), derived from the type IV pilin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coated on 304 stainless steel was investigated for its corrosion resistant properties in a sodium chloride solution by various electrochemical measurements, surface characterization and molecular dynamics simulation. As a comparison, stainless steel electrodes coated with non-PEGylated D-amino acid retroinverso peptide (RI-K122-4) and D-amino acid K122-4 peptide (D-K122-4) were used as control variables during electrochemical tests. It was found that the D-K122-4-PEG coating is able to protect the stainless steel from corrosion in the solution. The RI-K122-4 coating shows corrosion resistant property and should be investigated further, while the D-K122-4 peptide coating, in contrast, shows little to no effect on corrosion. The morphological characterizations support the corrosion resistance of D-K122-4-PEG on stainless steel. The adsorption of D-K122-4 molecules occurs preferentially on Fe2O3, rather than Cr2O3, present on the stainless steel surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, whichmore » is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk

  8. Thermal effects of laser marking on microstructure and corrosion properties of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Švantner, M; Kučera, M; Smazalová, E; Houdková, Š; Čerstvý, R

    2016-12-01

    Laser marking is an advanced technique used for modification of surface optical properties. This paper presents research on the influence of laser marking on the corrosion properties of stainless steel. Processes during the laser beam-surface interaction cause structure and color changes and can also be responsible for reduction of corrosion resistance of the surface. Corrosion tests, roughness, microscopic, energy dispersive x-ray, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and ferrite content analyses were carried out. It was found that increasing heat input is the most crucial parameter regarding the degradation of corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Other relevant parameters include the pulse length and pulse frequency. The authors found a correlation between laser processing parameters, grazing incidence x-ray measurement, ferrite content, and corrosion resistance of the affected surface. Possibilities and limitations of laser marking of stainless steel in the context of the reduction of its corrosion resistance are discussed.

  9. Corrosion of stainless steels in lead-bismuth eutectic up to 600 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, L.; Martín, F. J.; Hernández, F.; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2004-11-01

    An experimental program has been carried out to understand the differences in the corrosion behaviour between different stainless steels: the austenitic steels 304L and 316L, the martensitic steels F82Hmod, T91 and EM10, and the low alloy steel P22. The influence of oxygen level in Pb-Bi, temperature and exposure time is studied. At 600 °C, the martensitic steels and the P22 steel exhibit thick oxide scales that grow with time, following a linear law for the wet environment and a parabolic law for the dry one. The austenitic stainless steels show a better corrosion behaviour, especially AISI 304L. Under reducing conditions, the steels exhibit dissolution, more severe for the austenitic stainless steels. At 450 °C, all the materials show an acceptable behaviour provided a sufficient oxygen level in the Pb-Bi. At reducing conditions, the martensitic steels and the P22 steel have a good corrosion resistance, while the austenitic steels exhibit already dissolution at the longer exposures.

  10. Sliding Wear Characteristics and Corrosion Behaviour of Selective Laser Melted 316L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Moroz, A.; Alrbaey, K.

    2014-02-01

    Stainless steel is one of the most popular materials used for selective laser melting (SLM) processing to produce nearly fully dense components from 3D CAD models. The tribological and corrosion properties of stainless steel components are important in many engineering applications. In this work, the wear behaviour of SLM 316L stainless steel was investigated under dry sliding conditions, and the corrosion properties were measured electrochemically in a chloride containing solution. The results show that as compared to the standard bulk 316L steel, the SLM 316L steel exhibits deteriorated dry sliding wear resistance. The wear rate of SLM steel is dependent on the vol.% porosity in the steel and by obtaining full density it is possible achieve wear resistance similar to that of the standard bulk 316L steel. In the tested chloride containing solution, the general corrosion behaviour of the SLM steel is similar to that of the standard bulk 316L steel, but the SLM steel suffers from a reduced breakdown potential and is more susceptible to pitting corrosion. Efforts have been made to correlate the obtained results with porosity in the SLM steel.

  11. Galvanic corrosion of ferritic stainless steels used for dental magnetic attachments in contact with an iron-platinum magnet.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Takada, Yukyo; Yoda, Masanobu; Kimura, Kohei; Okuno, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    This study was an examination of the galvanic corrosion of ferritic stainless steels, namely SUS 444, SUS XM27, and SUS 447J1, in contact with a Fe-Pt magnet. The surface area ratio of each stainless steel to the Fe-Pt magnet was set at 1/1 or 1/10. Galvanic corrosion between the stainless steels and the magnet was evaluated by the amount of released ions and the electrochemical properties in 0.9% NaCl solution. Although each stainless steel showed sufficient corrosion resistance for clinical use, the amount of ions released from each tended to increase when the stainless steel was in contact with the magnet. When the surface area ratio was reduced to 1/10, the amount of Fe ions released from the stainless steels increased significantly more than when there was no contact. Since contact with the magnet which possessed an extremely noble potential created a very corrosive environment for the stainless steels, 447J1 was thus the recommended choice against a corrosion exposure as such.

  12. Corrosion of 316 stainless steel in high temperature molten Li2BeF4 (FLiBe) salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guiqiu; Kelleher, Brian; Cao, Guoping; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-06-01

    In support of structural material development for the fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR), corrosion tests of 316 stainless steel were performed in the potential primary coolant, molten Li2BeF4 (FLiBe) at 700 °C for an exposure duration up to 3000 h. Tests were performed in both 316 stainless steel and graphite capsules. Corrosion in both capsule materials occurred by the dissolution of chromium from the stainless steel into the salt which led to the depletion of chromium predominantly along the grain boundaries of the test samples. The samples tested in graphite capsules showed a factor of two greater depth of corrosion attack as measured in terms of chromium depletion, compared to those tested in 316 stainless steel capsules. The samples tested in graphite capsules showed the formation of Cr7C3 particulate phases throughout the depth of the corrosion layer. Samples tested in both types of capsule materials showed the formation of MoSi2 phase due to increased activity of Mo and Si as a result of Cr depletion, and furthermore corrosion promoted the formation of a α-ferrite phase in the near-surface regions of the 316 stainless steel. Based on the corrosion tests, the corrosion attack depth in FLiBe salt was predicted as 17.1 μm/year and 31.2 μm/year for 316 stainless steel tested in 316 stainless steel and in graphite capsules respectively. It is in an acceptable range compared to the Hastelloy-N corrosion in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel salt.

  13. Long-term corrosion evaluation of stainless steels in Space Shuttle iodinated resin and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krohn, Douglas D.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of stainless steel exposure to iodinated water is a concern in developing the Integrated Water System (IWS) for Space Station Freedom. The IWS has a life requirement of 30 years, but the effects of general and localized corrosion over such a long period have not been determined for the candidate materials. In 1978, Umpqua Research Center immersed stainless steel 316L, 321, and 347 specimens in a solution of deionized water and the Space Shuttle microbial check valve resin. In April 1990, the solution was chemically analyzed to determine the level of corrosion formed, and the surface of each specimen was examined with scanning electron microscopy and metallography to determine the extent of general and pitting corrosion. This examination showed that the attack on the stainless steels was negligible and never penetrated past the first grain boundary layer. Of the three alloys, 316L performed the best; however, all three materials proved to be compatible with an aqueous iodine environment. In addition to the specimens exposed to aqueous iodine, a stainless steel specimen (unspecified alloy) was exposed to moist microbial check valve resin and air for a comparable period. This environment allowed contact of the metal to the resin as well as to the iodine vapor. Since the particular stainless steel alloy was not known, energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine that this alloy was stainless steel 301. The intergranular corrosion found on the specimen was limited to the first grain boundary layer.

  14. Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael

    2011-09-01

    A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C.more » Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much

  15. Stainless Steel Corrosion Studies Final Report: FY17 End of-Year

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kelly, Daniel; Milenski, Helen Marie; Martinez, Destiny

    Two materials are being considered in applications requiring their contact against stainless steel surfaces. These materials include the solvent methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and the polymer neoprene (polychloroprene). There is concern that contact of these materials with stainless steel substrates may lead to corrosion. To address these concerns we have undertaken corrosion studies under conditions expected to be more aggressive than in intended applications. These conditions include elevated temperature and humidity, and submersion and suspension in solvent vapors, in an attempt to accelerate any potential deleterious interactions. Corrosion rates below 0.1 mpy have historically been deemed INSIGNIFICANT from a WRmore » Production standpoint; corresponding guidelines for non-production applications are lacking.« less

  16. Electrochemical Corrosion of Stainless Steel in Thiosulfate Solutions Relevant to Gold Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Wang, Wei; Alfantazi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the electrochemical corrosion behavior of stainless steel in the ammoniacal thiosulfate gold leaching solutions. Electrochemical corrosion response was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, while the semi-conductive properties and the chemical composition of the surface film were characterized using Mott-Schottky analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The morphology of the corroded specimens was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The stainless steel 316L showed no signs of pitting in the ammoniacal thiosulfate solutions.

  17. Improving by postoxidation of corrosion resistance of plasma nitrocarburized AISI 316 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenilmez, A.; Karakan, M.; Çelik, İ.

    2017-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in several industries such as chemistry, food, health and space due to their perfect corrosion resistance. However, in addition to corrosion resistance, the mechanic and tribological features such as wear resistance and friction are required to be good in the production and engineering of this type of machines, equipment and mechanic parts. In this study, ferritic (FNC) and austenitic (ANC) nitrocarburizing were applied on AISI 316 stainless steel specimens with perfect corrosion resistance in the plasma environment at the definite time (4 h) and constant gas mixture atmosphere. In order to recover corrosion resistance which was deteriorated after nitrocarburizing again, plasma postoxidation process (45 min) was applied. After the duplex treatment, the specimens' structural analyses with XRD and SEM methods, corrosion analysis with polarization method and surface hardness with microhardness method were examined. At the end of the studies, AISI 316 surface hardness of stainless steel increased with nitrocarburizing process, but the corrosion resistance was deteriorated with FNC (570 °C) and ANC (670 °C) nitrocarburizing. With the following of the postoxidation treatment, it was detected that the corrosion resistance became better and it approached its value before the process.

  18. Mechanical and Microstructural Characterization of a New Corrosion Resistant Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiculescu, I.; Geantă, V.; Stefănoiu, R.; Cotruţ, C.; Ciocoiu, R.; Ionescu, M.

    2018-06-01

    The paper investigates the manner in which the chemical composition and delivery status of a new type of stainless steel, highly alloyed with Ni and Cr, affect mechanical properties, microstructure and corrosion resistance. The results obtained during the mechanical test (tensile, compression, Charpy test and micro-hardness) have revealed promising values. During the corrosion test, the preferential attack of the reagent (Aqua regia) located on the grain boundaries, inclusions or polyhedral precipitates have been observed. On the corroded surfaces, some localized pitting effects on grain boundaries have been revealed. The analyses of the parameter values recorded during the corrosion test revealed that the corrosion current density had a low value, comparable to that of other specific types of stainless steels. The actual Icorr (1.089 µA/cm2) value measured for the experimental alloy proves good resistance to corrosion in 3% NaCl saline solution. The estimated rate of corrosion presented acceptable values (0.011 mm/year).

  19. Demonstration and Validation of Stainless Steel Materials for Critical Above Grade Piping in Highly Corrosive Locations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-01

    Protecting And Bonding Reinforcing Steel In Cement -Based Composites, Corrosion 2009, Atlanta, GA, 22-26 March 2009. 7. Hock, V., O. Marshall, S...ER D C/ CE RL T R- 17 -1 3 DoD Corrosion Prevention and Control Program Demonstration and Validation of Stainless Steel Materials for...ERDC/CERL TR-17-13 May 2017 Demonstration and Validation of Stainless Steel Materials for Critical Above-Grade Piping in Highly Corrosive

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  1. Corrosion study of bare and coated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A program was conducted at Kennedy Space Center from February 1968 to February 1971 to evaluate the performance of austenitic stainless steel alloys used in fluid systems lines. For several years, there had been numerous failures of stainless steel hardware caused by pitting and stress corrosion cracking. Several alloys were evaluated for effectiveness of certain sacrificial-type protective coverings in preventing corrosion failures. Samples were tested in specially designed racks placed 91 meters (100 yards) above high-tide line at Cape Kennedy. It is concluded that: (1) unprotected tubing samples showed evidence of pitting initiation after 2 weeks; (2) although some alloys develop larger pits than others, it is probable that the actual pitting rate is independent of alloy type; (3) the deepest pitting occurred in the sheltered part of the samples; and (4) zinc-rich coatings and an aluminum-filled coating have afforded sacrificial protection against pitting for at least 28 months. It is believed that a much longer effective coating life can be expected.

  2. Studies on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Super 304H Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabha, B.; Sundaramoorthy, P.; Suresh, S.; Manimozhi, S.; Ravishankar, B.

    2009-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a common mode of failure encountered in boiler components especially in austenitic stainless steel tubes at high temperature and in chloride-rich water environment. Recently, a new type of austenitic stainless steels called Super304H stainless steel, containing 3% copper is being adopted for super critical boiler applications. The SCC behavior of this Super 304H stainless steel has not been widely reported in the literature. Many researchers have studied the SCC behavior of steels as per various standards. Among them, the ASTM standard G36 has been widely used for evaluation of SCC behavior of stainless steels. In this present work, the SCC behavior of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn-Cu-N stainless steel, subjected to chloride environments at varying strain conditions as per ASTM standard G36 has been studied. The environments employed boiling solution of 45 wt.% of MgCl2 at 155 °C, for various strain conditions. The study reveals that the crack width increases with increase in strain level in Super 304H stainless steels.

  3. Effect of nanograin-boundary networks generation on corrosion of carburized martensitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Boonruang, Chatdanai; Thong-On, Atcharawadi; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2018-02-02

    Martensitic stainless steel parts used in carbonaceous atmosphere at high temperature are subject to corrosion which results in a large amount of lost energy and high repair and maintenance costs. This work therefore proposes a model for surface development and corrosion mechanism as a solution to reduce corrosion costs. The morphology, phase, and corrosion behavior of steel are investigated using GIXRD, XANES, and EIS. The results show formation of nanograin-boundary networks in the protective layer of martensitic stainless steel. This Cr 2 O 3 -Cr 7 C 3 nanograin mixture on the FeCr 2 O 4 layer causes ion transport which is the main reason for the corrosion reaction during carburizing of the steel. The results reveal the rate determining steps in the corrosion mechanism during carburizing of steel. These steps are the diffusion of uncharged active gases in the stagnant-gas layer over the steel surface followed by the conversion of C into C 4- and O into O 2- at the gas-oxide interface simultaneously with the migration of Cr 3+ from the metal-oxide interface to the gas-oxide interface. It is proposed that previous research on Al 2 O 3 coatings may be the solution to producing effective coatings that overcome the corrosion challenges discussed in this work.

  4. A study on corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between Monel 400 and 316L austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Cherish; Karthikeyan, R.; Vincent, S.

    2018-04-01

    An attempt has been made to study the corrosion resistance of bi-metal weld joints of Monel 400 tube to stainless steel 316 tube by GTAW process. The present research paper contributes to the ongoing research work on the use of Monel400 and 316L austenitic stainless steel in industrial environments. Potentiodynamic method is used to investigate the corrosion behavior of Monel 400 and 316L austenitic stainless steel welded joints. The analysis has been performed on the base metal, heat affected zone and weld zone after post weld heat treatment. Optical microscopy was also performed to correlate the results. The heat affected zone of Monel 400 alloy seems to have the lowest corrosion resistance whereas 316L stainless steel base metal has the highest corrosion resistance.

  5. No corrosion of 304 stainless steel implant after 40 years of service.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, D J; Pereira, B P

    2004-07-01

    When exposed to 0.9% NaCl type 304 stainless steel undergoes severe pitting corrosion within a matter of days. However, a Sherman plate fabricated from type 304 stainless steel remained inside a patient's arm for almost 40 years without any visible indications of corrosion. Given the previous understanding of the pathological environments this was considered quite remarkable. It is proposed that the low dissolved oxygen levels found in human-body fluids makes the long-term in vivo environment much more benign than would be anticipated from in vitro experiments. Furthermore, it is proposed that previous cases of localized pitting corrosion on stainless steel implants most likely arose due to the development of short-term aggressive conditions due to pathological changes in the surrounding tissue as a result of the trauma of the implant procedure. In the present case the Sherman plate was sufficiently small that the surrounding tissue was not aggravated sufficiently to lead to the development of such an environment aggressive. The conclusion that surgical implants are at most risk during the first few weeks of service implies that short-term corrosion protection methods, such as coatings, may be more effective than previously thought.

  6. The Influence of Porosity on Corrosion Attack of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Z.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.

    2017-10-01

    Porous metals also known as metal foams is a metallic body having spaces orpores through which liquid or air may pass. Porous metals get an attention from researchers nowadays due to their unique combination of properties includes excellent mechanical and electrical, high energy absorption, good thermal and sound insulation and water and gas permeability. Porous metals have been applied in numerous applications such as in automotive, aerospace and also in biomedical applications. This research reveals the influence of corrosion attack in porous austenitic stainless steel 316L. The cyclic polarization potential analysis was performed on the porous austenitic stainless steel 316L in 3.5% NaCl solution. The morphology and the element presence on the samples before and after corrosion attack was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) respectively to determine the corrosion mechanism structure. The cyclic polarization potential analysis showed the result of (E corr ) for porous austenitic stainless steel type 316L in the range of -0.40v to -0.60v and breakdown potential (E b ) is -0.3v to -0.4v in NaCl solution.

  7. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and pitting corrosion behaviour of similar and dissimilar stainless steel gas tungsten arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar alloys of 5mm thick plates i.e., austenitic stainless steel (316L) and duplex stainless steel (2205) and compared with that of similar welds. Welds are made with conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with two different filler wires namely i.e., 309L and 2209. Welds were characterized using optical microscopy to observe the microstructural changes and correlate with mechanical properties using hardness, tensile and impact testing. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour in different regions of the welds. Results of the present study established that change in filler wire composition resulted in microstructural variation in all the welds with different morphology of ferrite and austenite. Welds made with 2209 filler showed plate like widmanstatten austenite (WA) nucleated at grain boundaries. Compared to similar stainless steel welds inferior mechanical properties was observed in dissimilar stainless steel welds. Pitting corrosion resistance is observed to be low for dissimilar stainless steel welds when compared to similar stainless steel welds. Overall study showed that similar duplex stainless steel welds having favorable microstructure and resulted in better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Relatively dissimilar stainless steel welds made with 309L filler obtained optimum combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance when compared to 2209 filler and is recommended for industrial practice.

  8. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Kunz, Martin

    2015-05-15

    The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide–hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from themore » surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel. - Highlights: • Synchrotron micro-diffraction used to map the distribution of crystalline phases. • Goethite and akaganeite are the main corrosion products during chloride induced corrosion in mortar. • Layers of goethite and akaganeite are negatively correlated. • EDS showed Cr present in corrosion products identified by SEM.« less

  9. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  10. An Evaluation of the Corrosion and Mechanical Performance of Interstitially Surface Hardened Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-10

    Performance of Interstitially Surface Hardened Stainless Steel 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jones, Jennifer Lynn...interstitial carbon atoms into stainless steel surfaces without the formation of carbides. Surface hardening of machine elements such as impellors or...the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is retained, rather than degraded, is of particular interest for marine applications. This project

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Singh Raman, R. K.; Siew, Wai Hoong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution. PMID:28788276

  12. A comparative study of the in vitro corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity of a superferritic stainless steel, a Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy, and an austenitic stainless steel in Hank's solution.

    PubMed

    Assis, S L; Rogero, S O; Antunes, R A; Padilha, A F; Costa, I

    2005-04-01

    In this study, the in vitro corrosion resistance of a superferritic stainless steel in naturally aerated Hank's solution at 37 degrees C has been determined to evaluate the steel for use as a biomaterial. The potentiodynamic polarization method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to determine the corrosion resistance. The polarization results showed very low current densities at the corrosion potential and electrochemical behavior typical of passive metals. At potentials above 0.75 V (SCE), and up to that of the oxygen evolution reaction, the superferritic steel exhibited transpassive behavior followed by secondary passivation. The superferritic stainless steel exhibited high pitting resistance in Hank's solution. This steel did not reveal pits even after polarization to 3000 mV (SCE). The EIS results indicated high impedance values at low frequencies, supporting the results obtained from the polarization measurements. The results obtained for the superferritic steel have been compared with those of the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy and an austenitic stainless steel, as Ti alloys are well known for their high corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and the austenitic stainless steel is widely used as an implant material. The cytotoxicity tests indicated that the superferritic steel, the austenitic steel, and the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy were not toxic. Based on corrosion resistance and cytotoxicity results, the superferritic stainless steel can be considered as a potential biomaterial. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Spray-Formed Boron-Modified Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Nogueira, Ricardo P.; Kiminami, Claudio S.; Botta, Walter J.; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2017-04-01

    Spray-formed boron-modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) grades are alloys developed to withstand severe wear conditions. The addition of boron to the conventional chemical composition of SMSS, combined with the solidification features promoted by the spray forming process, leads to a microstructure composed of low carbon martensitic matrix reinforced by an eutectic network of M2B-type borides, which considerably increases the wear resistance of the stainless steel. Although the presence of borides in the microstructure has a very beneficial effect on the wear properties of the alloy, their effect on the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel was not comprehensively evaluated. The present work presents a study of the effect of boron addition on the corrosion resistance of the spray-formed boron-modified SMSS grades by means of electrochemical techniques. The borides fraction seems to have some influence on the repassivation kinetics of the spray-formed boron-modified SMSS. It was shown that the Cr content of the martensitic matrix is the microstructural feature deciding the corrosion resistance of this sort of alloys. Therefore, if the Cr content in the alloy is increased to around 14 wt pct to compensate for the boron consumed by the borides formation, the corrosion resistance of the alloy is kept at the same level of the alloy without boron addition.

  14. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  15. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    PubMed

    Salahinejad, E; Ghaffari, M; Vashaee, D; Tayebi, L

    2016-05-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn-Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn-Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of scan rate on the corrosion behavior SS 304 stainless steel in the nanofluid measured by Tafel polarization methods

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi

    The Effects of scan rate on the Tafel polarization curve that is obtained to determine corrosion rate are conducted. The tafel polarization curves are obtained at different scan rates for Stainless Steel 304 in nanofluids contain 0.01 gpl nano particle ZrO{sub 2}. The corrosion stainless steel in nanofluid contains adm+0.01 gpl ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles at different scan rate was performed by Tafel polarization. The results show that according corrosion potential examination of the stainless steel in nanofluid media 0.01gpl ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticle was actively corroded. The value of cathodic Tafel slope stainless steel in nanofluid at different scan rate relativelymore » unchanged after polarization testing. Mean while the value of anodic Tafel slope stainless steel in nanofluid increase at different scan rate. The results of Tafel polarization technique show that corrosion rate of stainless steel in nanofluid increase with increasing scan rate. X ray diffraction examination of stainless steel after Tafel polarization depict that γ Fe phase is major phase in the surface of alloy.« less

  17. Corrosion of carbon steels, stainless steels, and titanium in aqueous lithium bromide solution

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Guinon, J.L.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Perez-Herranz, V.

    1994-03-01

    Effects of lithium bromide (LiBr) concentration, pH, temperature, exposure time, and the action of some inhibitors on corrosion of several carbon (C) steels, stainless steels (SS), and a titanium (Ti) alloy were studied. Corrosion rates were determined by the polarization resistance method and compared to rates determined by weight-loss measurements. Pitting potentials (E[sub p]) were evaluated in neutral LiBr solution and with different inhibitors. Pit density and average pit depth depended on the metal tested, with lowest values for Ti, the next lowest values for type 316 SS (UNS S31600), and the highest values for UNS G41350 tempered steel.

  18. Molecular carbon nitride ion beams for enhanced corrosion resistance of stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, A.; Kennedy, J.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach is presented for molecular carbon nitride beams to coat stainless surfaces steel using conventional safe feeder gases and electrically conductive sputter targets for surface engineering with ion implantation technology. GNS Science's Penning type ion sources take advantage of the breaking up of ion species in the plasma to assemble novel combinations of ion species. To test this phenomenon for carbon nitride, mixtures of gases and sputter targets were used to probe for CN+ ions for simultaneous implantation into stainless steel. Results from mass analysed ion beams show that CN+ and a variety of other ion species such as CNH+ can be produced successfully. Preliminary measurements show that the corrosion resistance of stainless steel surfaces increased sharply when implanting CN+ at 30 keV compared to reference samples, which is interesting from an application point of view in which improved corrosion resistance, surface engineering and short processing time of stainless steel is required. The results are also interesting for novel research in carbon-based mesoporous materials for energy storage applications and as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of High Nitrogen Nickel-Free Fe-16Cr-Mn-Mo-N Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K. L.; Liao, H. Y.; Shyue, J. J.; Lian, S. S.

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the current study is to develop austenitic nickel-free stainless steels with lower chromium content and higher manganese and nitrogen contents. In order to prevent nickel-induced skin allergy, cobalt, manganese, and nitrogen were used to substitute nickel in the designed steel. Our results demonstrated that manganese content greater than 14 wt pct results in a structure that is in full austenite phase. The manganese content appears to increase the solubility of nitrogen; however, a lower corrosion potential was found in steel with high manganese content. Molybdenum appears to be able to increase the pitting potential. The effects of Cr, Mn, Mo, and N on corrosion behavior of Fe-16Cr-2Co-Mn-Mo-N high nitrogen stainless steels were evaluated with potentiodynamic tests and XPS surface analysis. The results reveal that anodic current and pits formation of the Fe-16Cr-2Co-Mn-Mo-N high nitrogen stainless steels were smaller than those of lower manganese and nitrogen content stainless steel.

  20. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Laser Additively Manufactured 316L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trelewicz, Jason R.; Halada, Gary P.; Donaldson, Olivia K.; Manogharan, Guha

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metal alloys to produce complex part designs via powder bed fusion methods such as laser melting promises to be a transformative technology for advanced materials processing. However, effective implementation of AM processes requires a clear understanding of the processing-structure-properties-performance relationships in fabricated components. In this study, we report on the formation of micro and nanoscale structures in 316L stainless steel samples printed by laser AM and their implications for general corrosion resistance. A variety of techniques including x-ray diffraction, optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were employed to characterize the microstructure and chemistry of the laser additively manufactured 316L stainless steel, which are compared with wrought 316L coupons via electrochemical polarization. Apparent segregation of Mo has been found to contribute to a loss of passivity and an increased anodic current density. While porosity will also likely impact the environmental performance (e.g., facilitating crevice corrosion) of AM alloys, this work demonstrates the critical influence of microstructure and heterogeneous solute distributions on the corrosion resistance of laser additively manufactured 316L stainless steel.

  1. Corrosion inhibition of stainless steel by a sulfate-reducing bacteria biofilm in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fu-shao; An, Mao-zhong; Duan, Dong-xia

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion inhibition of stainless steel due to a sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilm in seawater was studied. By atomic force microscopy, a layer of fish-scale-like biofilm was found to form as stainless steel coupons were exposed to the culture media with SRB, and this biofilm grew more and more compact. As a result, coupons' surface under the biofilm turned irregular less slowly than that exposed to the sterilized culture media. Then, physicoelectric characteristics of the electrode/biofilm/solution interface were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and the coverage of the biofilm as well as the relative irregularity of coupons' surface was also recorded by EIS spectra. Finally, anodic cyclic polarization results further demonstrated the protective property of the biofilm. Therefore, in estimation of SRB-implicated corrosion of stainless steel, not only the detrimental SRB metabolites but also the protective SRB biofilm as well should be taken into account.

  2. Enhancing the corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel bipolar plates in PEMFCs environment by surface enriched molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Zhuqing, Wang; Tongxiang, Liang; Ken, Suzuki; Hideo, Miura

    Surface molybdenum enrichment on 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by the ball milling technique. The electrochemical results showed molybdenum enrichment on the surface of 2205 duplex stainless steel improved its corrosion resistance in a typical proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment. This was mainly attributed to higher molybdenum content in the passive film formed on 2205 duplex stainless steel after ball milling. The decreased donor and acceptor concentrations improved significantly the corrosion resistance of surface molybdenum-enriched 2205 duplex stainless steel bipolar plates in the simulated cathodic proton exchange membrane fuel cells environment. In addition, the interfacial contact resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel bipolar plates slightly decreased due to surface molybdenum enrichment.

  3. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidation and corrosion behavior of modified-composition, low-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of substituting less strategic elements than Cr on the oxidation and corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated. Cyclic oxidation resistance was evaluated at 870 C. Corrosion resistance was determined by exposure of specimens to a boiling copper-rich solution of copper sulfate and sulfuric acid. Alloy substitutes for Cr included Al, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, V, Y, and misch metal. A level of about 12% Cr was the minimum amount of Cr required for adequate oxidation and corrosion resistance in the modified composition 304 stainless steels. This represents a Cr saving of at least 33%. Two alloys containing 12% Cr and 2% Al plus 2% Mo and 12% Cr plus 2.65% Si were identified as most promising for more detailed evaluation.

  5. A New Maraging Stainless Steel with Excellent Strength–Toughness–Corrosion Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jialong; Wang, Wei; Babar Shahzad, M.; Yan, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Jiang, Zhouhua; Yang, Ke

    2017-01-01

    A new maraging stainless steel with superior strength–toughness–corrosion synergy has been developed based on an innovative concept of alloy design. The high strength–toughness combination is achieved by forming dispersive nano-sized intermetallic compounds in the soft lath martensitic matrix with a slight amount of residual austenite. The good corrosion resistance is guaranteed by exactly controlling the Co content based on understanding the synergistic effect between Co and Cr. The fine structure characteristics of two dominant strengthening precipitations including Ni3Ti and Mo-rich phases were finely characterized associated with transmission electron microscope (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) analyses. The relationship among microstructure, strength and toughness is discussed. The precipitation mechanism of different precipitates in the new maraging stainless steel is revealed based on the APT analysis. PMID:29125550

  6. A New Maraging Stainless Steel with Excellent Strength-Toughness-Corrosion Synergy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jialong; Wang, Wei; Babar Shahzad, M; Yan, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Jiang, Zhouhua; Yang, Ke

    2017-11-10

    A new maraging stainless steel with superior strength-toughness-corrosion synergy has been developed based on an innovative concept of alloy design. The high strength-toughness combination is achieved by forming dispersive nano-sized intermetallic compounds in the soft lath martensitic matrix with a slight amount of residual austenite. The good corrosion resistance is guaranteed by exactly controlling the Co content based on understanding the synergistic effect between Co and Cr. The fine structure characteristics of two dominant strengthening precipitations including Ni₃Ti and Mo-rich phases were finely characterized associated with transmission electron microscope (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) analyses. The relationship among microstructure, strength and toughness is discussed. The precipitation mechanism of different precipitates in the new maraging stainless steel is revealed based on the APT analysis.

  7. Effects of Ce on Inclusions, Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Corrosion Behavior of AISI 202 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guojun; Li, Changsheng

    2015-10-01

    The sizes and morphologies of nonmetallic inclusions, microhardness, tensile strength, and Charpy impact toughness in AISI 202 stainless steel with different Ce contents were synthetically analyzed by means of SEM, TEM, microhardness tester, and tensile and Charpy impact tests. Effects of Ce addition on the corrosion behavior were investigated in 5 wt.% H2SO4 solution for different periods of time through measuring AC impedance. The EIS measurements indicate that the steels with Ce addition exhibit higher R p values than those without Ce, which illustrates the relative resistance to uniform corrosion is accompanied by an increasing Ce addition. Ce addition to AISI 202 stainless steel improves its uniform corrosion resistance owing to metamorphic inclusions and the improvement of electrode potential in matrix. Upon increasing Ce addition, the indentation morphology of samples transfers from sink-in types to pile-up types, explaining good machinability of steels containing Ce. It is witnessed from the fracture mode that Ce refines the grain size of steels, significantly increasing the strength; in the meantime, its plasticity is improved, thereby solving the contradiction between the strength and the plasticity of steels. It is concluded that AISI 202 stainless steel with 0.016 wt.% Ce addition in the mass fraction has the best mechanical properties and the uniform corrosion resistance.

  8. Investigation of corrosion of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of corrosion resistance of materials is one of the most important tests that allow determining their functional properties. Among these tests the special group consist electrochemical investigations, which let to accelerate the course of the process. These investigations allow rapidly estimating corrosion processes occurring in metal elements under the influence of the analysed environment. In the paper are presented results of investigations of the resistance to pitting corrosion of the steel of next grades: austenitic 316L and duplex 2205. It was also analysed the corrosion resistance of welded joints of these grades of steel. The investigations were conducted in two different corrosion environments: in the neutral one (3.5 % sodium chloride) and in the aggressive one (0.1 M sulphuric acid VI). The obtained results indicate different resistance of analysed grades of steel and their welded joints in relation to the corrosion environment. The austenitic 316L steel characterizes by the higher resistance to the pitting corrosion in the aggressive environment then the duplex 2205 steel. In the paper are presented results of potentiodynamic tests. They showed that all the specimens are less resistant to pitting corrosion in the environment of sulphuric acid (VI) than in the sodium chloride one. The 2205 steel has higher corrosion resistance than the 316L stainless steel in 3.5% NaCl. On the other hand, in 0.1 M H2SO4, the 316L steel has a higher corrosion resistance than the 2205 one. The weld has a similar, very good resistance to pitting corrosion like both steels.

  9. Analysis of in vivo corrosion of 316L stainless steel posterior thoracolumbar plate systems: a retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Majid, Kamran; Crowder, Terence; Baker, Erin; Baker, Kevin; Koueiter, Denise; Shields, Edward; Herkowitz, Harry N

    2011-12-01

    One hundred eighteen patients retrieved 316L stainless steel thoracolumbar plates, of 3 different designs, used for fusion in 60 patients were examined for evidence of corrosion. A medical record review and statistical analysis were also carried out. This study aims to identify types of corrosion and examine preferential metal ion release and the possibility of statistical correlation to clinical effects. Earlier studies have found that stainless steel spine devices showed evidence of mild-to-severe corrosion; fretting and crevice corrosion were the most commonly reported types. Studies have also shown the toxicity of metal ions released from stainless steel corrosion and how the ions may adversely affect bone formation and/or induce granulomatous foreign body responses. The retrieved plates were visually inspected and graded based on the degree of corrosion. The plates were then analyzed with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. A retrospective medical record review was performed and statistical analysis was carried out to determine any correlations between experimental findings and patient data. More than 70% of the plates exhibited some degree of corrosion. Both fretting and crevice corrosion mechanisms were observed, primarily at the screw plate interface. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis indicated reductions in nickel content in corroded areas, suggestive of nickel ion release to the surrounding biological environment. The incidence and severity of corrosion was significantly correlated with the design of the implant. Stainless steel thoracolumbar plates show a high incidence of corrosion, with statistical dependence on device design.

  10. Effect of Surface Modification on Corrosion Resistance of Uncoated and DLC Coated Stainless Steel Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scendo, Mieczyslaw; Staszewska-Samson, Katarzyna

    2017-08-01

    Corrosion resistance of 4H13 stainless steel (EN-X46Cr13) surface uncoated and coated with an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) film [diamond-like carbon (DLC)] in acidic chloride solution was investigated. The DLC films were deposited on steel surface by a plasma deposition, direct current discharge (PDCD) method. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) was used to determine the chemical groups existing on DLC films. The surface of the specimens was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The tribological properties of the both materials were examined using a ball-on disk tribometer. The microhardness (HV) of diamond-like carbon film increased over five times in relation to the 4H13 stainless steel without of DLC coating. Oxidation kinetic parameters were determined by gravimetric and electrochemical methods. The high value of polarization resistance indicates that the DLC film on substrate was characterized by low electrical conductivity. The corrosion rate of 4H13 stainless steel with of DLC film decreased about eight times in relation to uncoated surface of 4H13 stainless steel.

  11. [Study of a new medical stainless steel].

    PubMed

    Ren, Yibin; Yang, Ke; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Huibin

    2006-10-01

    Medical implantable stainless steels are widely used in medical field due to their excellent properties, besides its allergic response to human body, the nickel ion released from the steels due to corrosion has the harm of malformation and carcingenesis. The mechanical property, corrosion resistance and blood compatibility of a new nickel-free stainless steel (BIOSSN4) is researched in this paper. Compared with the traditional 316L medical stainless steel, BIOSSN4 shows wide future applications because of its better combination of strength and toughness, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

  12. Effect of Aging Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of Sintered 17-4 PH Stainless Steel in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczyk-Nykiel, Aneta; Kazior, Jan

    2017-07-01

    The general corrosion behavior of sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel processed under different processing conditions in dilute sulfuric acid solution at 25 °C was studied by open-circuit potential measurement and potentiodynamic polarization technique. The corrosion resistance was evaluated based on electrochemical parameters, such as polarization resistance, corrosion potential, corrosion current density as well as corrosion rate. The results showed that the precipitation-hardening treatment could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel in studied environment. As far as the influence of aging temperature on corrosion behavior of the sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel is concerned, polarization resistance and corrosion rate are reduced with increasing aging temperature from 480 up to 500 °C regardless of the temperature of solution treatment. It can be concluded that the highest corrosion resistance in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution exhibits 17-4 PH after solution treatment at 1040 °C followed by aging at 480 °C.

  13. Effect of polishing process on corrosion behavior of 308L stainless steel in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cheng; Han, En-Hou; Peng, Qunjia; Ke, Wei

    2018-06-01

    Effect of change in surface composition and roughness by different polishing processes on corrosion of 308L stainless steel in high temperature water was investigated. The investigation was conducted by comparing the corrosion behavior of electropolished specimens with that of the 40 nm-colloidal silica slurry polished specimens. The result revealed that the electropolished specimens had a higher corrosion rate than the colloidal silica slurry polished specimens, which was attributed to formation of an amount of chromium hydroxide and higher roughness of the electropolished surface. Moreover, the ferrite in 308L stainless steel was found to have a higher resistance to corrosion than the austenite matrix.

  14. In vitro corrosion resistance of plasma source ion nitrided austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Le, M K; Zhu, X M

    2001-04-01

    Plasma source ion nitriding has emerged as a low-temperature, low-pressure nitriding approach for low-energy implanting nitrogen ions and then diffusing them into steel and alloy. In this work, a single high nitrogen face-centered-cubic (f.c.c.) phase (gammaN) formed on the 1Cr18Ni9Ti and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels with a high nitrogen concentration of about 32 at % was characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance of the gammaN-phase layer was studied by the electrochemical cyclic polarization measurement in Ringer's solutions buffered to pH from 3.5 to 7.2 at a temperature of 37 degrees C. No pitting corrosion in the Ringer's solutions with pH = 7.2 and 5.5 was detected for the gammaN-phase layers on the two stainless steels. The high pitting potential for the gammaN-phase layers is higher, about 500 and 600 mV, above that of the two original stainless steels, respectively, in the Ringer's solution with pH = 3.5. The corroded surface morphologies of the gammaN-phase layers observed by scanning electron microscopy are consistent with the results of the electrochemical polarization measurement.

  15. Microbially Influenced Corrosion of 304 Stainless Steel and Titanium by P. variotii and A. niger in Humid Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dawei; Zhou, Feichi; Xiao, Kui; Cui, Tianyu; Qian, Hongchong; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-07-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) poses significant threats to reliability and safety of engineering materials and structures. While most MIC studies focus on prokaryotic bacteria such as sulfate-reducing bacteria, the influence of fungi on corrosion behaviors of metals has not been adequately reported. In this study, 304 stainless steel and titanium were exposed to two very common fungi, Paecilomyces variotii, Aspergillus niger and their mixtures under highly humid atmosphere. The initial corrosion behaviors within 28 days were studied via scanning Kelvin probe, which showed marked surface ennoblement and increasingly heterogeneous potential distribution upon prolonged fungus exposure. Using stereomicroscopy, fungus growth as well as corrosion morphology of 304 stainless steel and titanium were also evaluated after a long-term exposure for 60 days. The presence of fungi decreased the corrosion resistance for both 304 stainless steel and titanium. Titanium showed higher resistance to fungus growth and the induced corrosion. Exposure to the mixed strains resulted in the highest fungus growth rate but the mildest corrosion, possibly due to the decreased oxygen level by increased fungal activities.

  16. Study made of corrosion resistance of stainless steel and nickel alloys in nuclear reactor superheaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Hart, R. K.; Lee, R. H.; Ruther, W. E.; Schlueter, R. R.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments performed under conditions found in nuclear reactor superheaters determine the corrosion rate of stainless steel and nickel alloys used in them. Electropolishing was the primary surface treatment before the corrosion test. Corrosion is determined by weight loss of specimens after defilming.

  17. Anaerobic Corrosion of 304 Stainless Steel Caused by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ru; Yang, Dongqing; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous bacterium capable of forming problematic biofilms in many environments. They cause biocorrosion of medical implants and industrial equipment and infrastructure. Aerobic corrosion of P. aeruginosa against stainless steels has been reported by some researchers while there is a lack of reports on anaerobic P. aeruginosa corrosion in the literature. In this work, the corrosion by a wild-type P. aeruginosa (strain PAO1) biofilm against 304 stainless steel (304 SS) was investigated under strictly anaerobic condition for up to 14 days. The anaerobic corrosion of 304 SS by P. aeruginosa was reported for the first time. Results showed that the average sessile cell counts on 304 SS coupons after 7- and 14-day incubations were 4.8 × 107 and 6.2 × 107 cells/cm2, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy corroborated the sessile cell counts. The X-ray diffraction analysis identified the corrosion product as iron nitride, confirming that the corrosion was caused by the nitrate reducing biofilm. The largest pit depths on 304 SS surfaces after the 7- and 14-day incubations with P. aeruginosa were 3.9 and 7.4 μm, respectively. Electrochemical tests corroborated the pitting data. PMID:29230206

  18. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel weldments in physiological solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, A.; Azam, M.; Deen, K. M.

    2018-01-01

    In this study corrosion behavior of TIG welded 316L stainless steel plates in simulated biological solutions is investigated. The mechanical testing results showed slight decrease in ductility after welding and the fracture surface represented mixed cleavage and inclusions containing dimple structure. The heat affected and weld zone (WZ) demonstrated higher corrosion potential and relatively large pitting tendency than base metal (BM) in both Hank’s and Ringer’s solution. The formation of delta (δ) ferrite in the heat affected and WZ decreased the corrosion resistance as confirmed from potentiodynamic Tafel scans. The decrease in pitting resistance and lower protection tendency of the WZ compared to BM and heat affected zone was also quantified from the cyclic polarization trends.

  19. Anodized titanium and stainless steel in contact with CFRP: an electrochemical approach considering galvanic corrosion.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Yves; Tognini, Roger; Mayer, Joerg; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2007-09-15

    The combination of different materials in an implant gives the opportunity to better fulfill the requirements that are needed to improve the healing process. However, using different materials increases the risk of galvanic coupling corrosion. In this study, coupling effects of gold-anodized titanium, stainless steel for biomedical applications, carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRP), and CFRP containing tantalum fibers are investigated electrochemically and by long-term immersion experiments in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization experiments (i/E curves) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of the separated materials showed a passive behavior of the metallic samples. Anodized titanium showed no corrosion attacks, whereas stainless steel is highly susceptibility for localized corrosion. On the other side, an active dissolution behavior of both of the CFRPs in the given environment could be determined, leading to delaminating of the carbon fibers from the matrix. Long-term immersion experiments were carried out using a set-up especially developed to simulate coupling conditions of a point contact fixator system (PC-Fix) in a biological environment. Electrochemical data were acquired in situ during the whole immersion time. The results of the immersion experiments correlate with the findings of the electrochemical investigation. Localized corrosion attacks were found on stainless steel, whereas anodized titanium showed no corrosion attacks. No significant differences between the two CFRP types could be found. Galvanic coupling corrosion in combination with crevice conditions and possible corrosion mechanisms are discussed. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Indium oxide thin film as potential photoanodes for corrosion protection of stainless steel under visible light

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Jianqiang, E-mail: jianqyu@qdu.edu.cn; Sun, Kai

    Graphical abstract: If the conduction band potential of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is more negative than the corrosion potential of stainless steel, photo-induced electrons will be transferred from In{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the steel, thus shifting the potential of the steel into a corrosion immunity region and preventing the steel from the corrosion. - Highlights: • Indium oxide performed novel application under visible light. • Indium oxide by sol–gel method behaved better photoelectrochemical properties. • Electrons were transferred to stainless steel from indium oxide once light on. - Abstract: This paper reports the photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of 304 stainless steel bymore » In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin-film under visible-light. The films were fabricated with In{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders, synthesized by both sol–gel (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg) and solid-state (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss) processes. The photo-induced open circuit potential and the photo-to-current efficiency measurements suggested that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} could be a promising candidate material for photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of metallic alloys under visible light. Moreover, the polarization curve experimental results indicated that In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film can mitigate the corrosion potential of 304 stainless steel to much more negative values with a higher photocurrent density than the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss film under visible-light illumination. All the results demonstrated that the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film provides a better photoelectrochemical cathodic protection for 304 stainless steel than In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss thin-film under visible-light illumination. The higher photoelectrochemical efficiency is possibly due to the uniform thin films produced with the smaller particle size of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg, which facilitates the transfer of the photo-induced electrons from bulk to the surface and suppresses the charge recombination of the electrons and holes.« less

  1. Corrosion of stainless steel sternal wire after long-term implantation.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Yasuko; Hanawa, Takao; Kuroda, Daisuke; Nishida, Hiroshi; Endo, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    A variety of metallic components have been used in medical devices where lifelong durability and physical strength are demanded. To investigate the in vivo changes of implanted metallic medical devices in humans, stainless steel sternal wires removed from patients were evaluated. Stainless steel (316L) sternal wires removed from four patients after 10, 13, 22, and 30 years of implantation were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Macroscopically, the removed specimens maintained their metallic luster and color. Under SEM, small holes were observed sporadically at 10 years and they tended to connect in the drawing direction. The longer the implanted duration, the more numerous and deeper were the crevices observed. By EDS, sulfur, phosphorus, and calcium were identified in all areas at 10 years, in addition to the component elements of stainless steel, comprising iron, chromium, nickel, and manganese. Corrosion products observed at 30 years were identified as calcium phosphate. In conclusion, stainless steel sternal wires develop corroded pores that grow larger and deeper with time after implantation; however, the pores remain shallow even after decades of implantation and they may not be a cause of mechanical failure. An amount of metal ions equivalent to the corroded volume must have been released into the human body, but the effect of these metal ions on the body is not apparent.

  2. Nanohardness, corrosion and protein adsorption properties of CuAlO2 films deposited on 316L stainless steel for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shih-Hang; Chen, Jian-Zhang; Hsiao, Sou-Hui; Lin, Guan-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study preliminarily assesses the biomedical applications of CuAlO2 coatings according to nanoindentation, electrochemical, and protein adsorption tests. Nanoindentation results revealed that the surface hardness of 316L stainless steel increased markedly after coating with CuAlO2 films. Electrochemical tests of corrosion potential, breakdown potential, and corrosion current density showed that the corrosion resistance properties of 316L stainless steel are considerably improved by CuAlO2 coatings. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay results revealed that the protein adsorption behavior of 316L stainless steel did not exhibit notable differences with or without CuAlO2 coatings. A CuAlO2 coating of 100 nm thickness improved the surface nanohardness and corrosion resistance ability of 316L stainless steel. CuAlO2 is a potential candidate for biomaterial coating applications, particularly for surface modification of fine, delicate implants.

  3. Corrosion of Stainless-Steel Tubing in a Spacecraft Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; MacDowell, Louis G.; Curran, Joe; Calle, Luz Maria; Hodge, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    This is a report of exposure of various metal tubing to oceanfront launch environments. The objective is to examine various types of corrosion-resistant tubing for Space Shuttle launch sites. The metals were stainless steels (austenitic, low-carbon, Mo-alloy, superaustenitic, duplex, and superferritic), Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, Ni-Mo-Cr-Fe-W alloy, and austenitic Ni-base superalloy.

  4. Study on stainless steel electrode based on dynamic aluminum liquid corrosion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hua; Yang, Ruifeng

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrion microscope (SEM) was performed for investigations on the corrosion mechanism of stainless steel electrode in dynamic melting aluminum liquid. Microstructures and composition analysis was made by electron probe analysis (EPA) combined with metallic phase analysis. It can be concluded that the corrosion process is mainly composed of physical corrosion (flowing and scouring corrosion) and chemical corrosion (forming FeAl and Fe2Al5) and the two mechanisms usually exist simultaneously. The corrosion interface thickness is about 10 μm, which is different to usual interface width of hundreds μm in the static melting Al with iron matrix.

  5. Localized corrosion of 316L stainless steel with SiO2-CaO films obtained by means of sol-gel treatment.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, M; Izquierdo-Barba, I; Gil, F J

    2003-11-01

    Sol-gel films on austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L) polished wafer were prepared from sono-sols obtained from tetraethylorthosilane and hydrated calcium nitrate. However, pitting was observed in different places on the stainless steel surfaces. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by the polarization resistance in simulated body fluid environment at 37 degrees C. The critical current density, the passive current density, the corrosion potential, and the critical pitting potential were studied. The austenitic stainless steel 316L treated presents important electrochemical corrosion and consequently its application as endosseous implants is not possible. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Investigation of Stainless Steel Corrosion in Ultrahigh-Purity Water and Steam Systems by Surface Analytical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xia; Iacocca, Ronald G.; Bustard, Bethany L.; Kemp, Craig A. J.

    2010-02-01

    Stainless steel pipes with different degrees of rouging and a Teflon®-coated rupture disc with severe corrosion were thoroughly investigated by combining multiple surface analytical techniques. The surface roughness and iron oxide layer thickness increase with increasing rouge severity, and the chromium oxide layer coexists with the iron oxide layer in samples with various degrees of rouging. Unlike the rouging observed for stainless steel pipes, the fast degradation of the rupture disc was caused by a crevice corrosion environment created by perforations in the protective Teflon coating. This failure analysis clearly shows the highly corrosive nature of ultrapure water used in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products, and demonstrates some of the unexpected corrosion mechanisms that can be encountered in these environments.

  7. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  8. Mechanical properties and oxidation and corrosion resistance of reduced-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify effective substitutes for part of the Cr in 304 stainless steel as a method of conserving the strategic element Cr. Although special emphasis was placed on tensile properties, oxidation and corrosion resistance were also examined. Results indicate that over the temperature range of -196 C to 540 C the yield stress of experimental austenitic alloys with only 12 percent Cr compare favorably with the 18 percent Cr in 304 stainless steel. Oxidation resistance and in most cases corrosion resistance for the experimental alloys were comparable to the commercial alloy. Effective substitutes for Cr included Al, Mo, Si, Ti, and V, while Ni and Mn contents were increased to maintain an austenitic structure.

  9. High temperature chlorosilane corrosion of iron and AISI 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Joshua Loren

    Chlorosilane gas streams are used at high temperatures (>500°C) throughout the semiconductor, polycrystalline silicon, and fumed silica industries, primarily as a way to refine, deposit, and produce silicon and silicon containing materials. The presence of both chlorine and silicon in chlorosilane species creates unique corrosion environments due to the ability of many metals to form both metal-chlorides and metal-silicides, and it is further complicated by the fact that many metal-chlorides are volatile at high-temperatures while metal-silicides are generally stable. To withstand the uniquely corrosive environments, expensive alloys are often utilized, which increases the cost of final products. This work focuses on the corrosion behavior of iron, the primary component of low-cost alloys, and AISI 316L, a common low-cost stainless steel, in environments representative of industrial processes. The experiments were conducted using a customized high temperature chlorosilane corrosion system that exposed samples to an atmospheric pressure, high temperature, chlorosilane environment with variable input amounts of hydrogen, silicon tetrachloride, and hydrogen chloride plus the option of embedding samples in silicon during the exposure. Pre and post exposure sample analysis including scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and gravimetric analysis showed the surface corrosion products varied depending on the time, temperature, and environment that the samples were exposed to. Most commonly, a volatile chloride product formed first, followed by a stratified metal silicide layer. The chlorine and silicon activities in the corrosion environment were changed independently and were found to significantly alter the corrosion behavior; a phenomenon supported by computational thermodynamic equilibrium simulations. It was found that in comparable environments, the stainless steel corroded significantly less than the pure iron. This

  10. Effect of Nb addition on microstructure and corrosion resistance of novel stainless steels fabricated by direct laser metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. Q.; Zhang, C. H.; Zhang, S.; Wang, Q.; Liu, Y.; Abdullah, Adil O.

    2018-03-01

    The study demonstrated the successful fabrication of novel stainless steels by direct laser metal deposition with the aim of investigating the impact of niobium content (Nb = 0, 0.25, 0.75, 1.25 wt%) on their microstructure and electrochemical properties. The microstructure and phase evolution of the as-built stainless steels were studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD). Corrosion behavior of the samples was evaluated using electrochemical workstation in 3.5 wt% NaCl. Experimental results have shown that the crystal structure of as-built stainless steels was BCC with a small trace of dispersive carbides and FCC phase. Grain refinement was observed with increasing niobium content. Large-angle boundaries were obtained in different Nb-containing samples with distribution from 50° to 60°. An increase in niobium content extremely improved the corrosion resistance of as-built stainless steels and the as-built samples with 1.25 wt% exhibited the best corrosion resistance among the tested samples as indicated by its lowest corrosion rate, which was an order of magnitude lower than that of Nb-free samples.

  11. Electrochemical study on the corrosion resistance of plasma nanocoated 316L stainless steel in albumin- and lysozyme-containing electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, John Eric; Chen, Meng; Chou, Ju; Yu, Qingsong

    2017-01-01

    The physiological corrosion resistance of plasma nanocoated 316L stainless steel was studied in protein-containing electrolytes using electrochemical methods. Plasma nanocoatings with thicknesses of 20–30 nm were deposited onto 316L stainless steel coupons in a glow discharge of trimethylsilane (TMS) or its mixture with oxygen gas under various gas ratios. The surface chemistries of the plasma nanocoatings were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Corrosion properties of the plasma nanocoated 316L stainless steel coupons were assessed using potentiodynamic polarization, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) electrolytes that contain bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme. It was found that BSA adsorption on the plasma nanocoated 316L coupons was heavily favored. BSA adsorption on the plasma nanocoating surfaces could block charge-transfer reactions between the electrolyte and 316L substrate, and thus stabilize the 316L substrates from further corrosion. In contrast, lysozyme adsorption on the plasma nanocoated specimens was not as pronounced and mildly influenced the corrosion properties of the plasma nanocoated 316L stainless steel. PMID:29422723

  12. Effect of heat history on the corrosion of ferritic stainless steels used for dental magnetic attachments.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of heat history on the corrosion of keepers used for dental magnetic attachments. Ferritic stainless steels of SUS 444 and 447J1 were prepared with heat treatments in the temperature range of 550-850 degrees C for 1-5 hours. The stainless steels were electrochemically and metallurgically examined by anodic polarization curves in a 0.9% NaCl solution and by microstructural observation using an electron probe microanalyzer with WDS. Heating both kinds of stainless steel at 650-750 degrees C for two hours or more led to the deterioration of their corrosion resistance. For example, there was evidence of a reduction in the breakdown potentials and an increase in the current densities of the anodic polarization curves. These phenomena were attributed mainly to the precipitation of the sigma (FeCr) or chi (Fe18Cr6Mo5) phase, which sometimes resulted in intergranular corrosion. When dental alloys are cast in investment molds embedding the keepers, the heat time required for thermal expansion of the molds should be kept under one hour.

  13. Influences of passivating elements on the corrosion and biocompatibility of super stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Young-Ran; Jang, Soon-Geun; Oh, Keun-Taek; Kim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Young-Sik

    2008-08-01

    Biometals need high corrosion resistance since metallic implants in the body should be biocompatible and metal ion release should be minimized. In this work, we designed three kinds of super stainless steel and adjusted the alloying elements to obtain different microstructures. Super stainless steels contain larger amounts of Cr, Mo, W, and N than commercial alloys. These elements play a very important role in localized corrosion and, thus, their effects can be represented by the "pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN)." This work focused on the behavior which can arise when the bare surface of an implant in the body is exposed during walking, heavy exercise, and so on. Among the experimental alloys examined herein, Alloy Al and 316L stainless steels were mildly cytotoxic, whereas the other super austenitic, duplex, and ferritic stainless steels were noncytotoxic. This behavior is primarily related to the passive current and pitting resistance of the alloys. When the PREN value was increased, the passivation behavior in simulated body solution was totally different from that in acidic chloride solution and, thus, the Cr(2)O(3)/Cr(OH)(3) and [Metal oxide]/[Metal + Metal oxide] ratios of the passive film in the simulated body solution were larger than those in acidic chloride solution. Also, the critical current density in simulated body solution increased and, thus, active dissolution may induce metal ion release into the body when the PREN value and Ni content are increased. This behavior was closely related to the presence of EDTA in the simulated body solution. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Study of the Corrosion Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steels during Conversion of Waste to Biofuel

    PubMed Central

    Cabrini, Marina; Lorenzi, Sergio; Pastore, Tommaso; Pellegrini, Simone; Burattini, Mauro; Miglio, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with the corrosion behavior of stainless steels as candidate materials for biofuel production plants by liquefaction process of the sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Corrosion tests were carried out on AISI 316L and AISI 304L stainless steels at 250 °C in a batch reactor during conversion of raw material to bio-oil (biofuel precursor), by exposing specimens either to water/oil phase or humid gas phase. General corrosion rate was measured by weight loss tests. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was evaluated by means of U-bend specimens and slow stress rate tests at 10−6 or 10−5 s−1 strain rate. After tests, scanning electron microscope analysis was carried out to detect cracks and localized attacks. The results are discussed in relation with exposure conditions. They show very low corrosion rates strictly dependent upon time and temperature. No stress corrosion cracking was observed on U-bend specimens, under constant loading. Small cracks confined in the necking cone of specimens prove that stress corrosion cracking only occurred during slow strain rate tests at stresses exceeding the yield strength. PMID:28772682

  15. Evaluation of pitting corrosion resistance of high-alloyed stainless steels welds for FGD plants in Korea

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Baek, K.K.; Sung, H.J.; Im, C.S.

    1998-12-31

    For successful application of high-alloyed stainless steels for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants, pitting corrosion resistance of arc welds of N-added 6%Mo austenitic stainless steels (UNS N 08367) and super duplex stainless steels (UNS S 32550) made with various filler metals were evaluated using the Green Death solution. For Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) and Gas Metal Arc (GMA) welds of N 08367, Critical Pitting Temperature (CPT) of base metal was 65--70 C, whereas weld made by ERNiCrMo-3 filler metal yielded CPT of 50 C. Welds made by ERNiCrMo-10 or ERNiCrMo-4 filler metals showed CPT of 60--65 C and 65--70C, respectively.more » For GTA and GMA welds of S 32550, CPT of welds made by ERNiCrMo-3 was 45--50 C, indicating that the filler metal can provide pitting corrosion resistance matching the S 32550 alloy. Thus, a proper pitting corrosion resistance of weldments of high-alloy stainless steels can be achieved by selecting filler metals having at least +10 higher Pitting Resistance Equivalent Number (PRE{sub N}) value than the base metal regardless of the type of arc welding process. The over-alloyed filler metals would compensate preferential segregation of Cr, MO along the dendrite boundary, which made the dendrite core more susceptible to pitting. Nitrogen addition to the GTA welds of N 08367 made with ERNiCrMo-3 failed to improve pitting corrosion resistance, which was attributed to the precipitation of nitrogen in the weld metal in the form of Nb-nitride.« less

  16. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Hardening-Treated 13Cr Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Li-Bin; Ishitake, Hisamitsu; Izumi, Sakae; Shiokawa, Kunio; Yamashita, Mitsuo; Sakai, Yoshihiro

    2018-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the hardening-treated materials of 13Cr stainless steel was examined with SSRT tests and constant load tests. In the simulated geothermal water and even in the test water without addition of impurities, the hardening-treated materials showed a brittle intergranular fracture due to the sensitization, which was caused by the present hardening-treatments.

  17. Sintered Intermetallic Reinforced 434L Ferritic Stainless Steel Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, A.; Balaji, S.

    2009-03-01

    The present study examines the effect of aluminide (Ni3Al, Fe3Al) additions on the sintering behavior of ferritic 434L stainless steels during solid-state sintering (SSS) and supersolidus liquid-phase sintering (SLPS). 434L stainless steel matrix composites containing 5 and 10 wt pct of each aluminide were consolidated at 1200 °C (SSS) and 1400 °C (SLPS). The effects of sintering and aluminide additions on the densification, microstructural evolution, mechanical, tribological, and corrosion behavior of sintered ferritic (434L) stainless steels were investigated. The performances of the 434L-aluminide composites were compared with the straight 434L stainless steels processed at similar conditions. Supersolidus sintering resulted in significant improvement in densification, mechanical, wear, and corrosion resistance in both straight 434L and 434L-aluminide composites. Fe3Al additions to 434L stainless steels result in improved wear resistance without significant degradation of corrosion resistance in 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution.

  18. Evaluation of stainless steel reinforcement construction project

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-02-01

    Stainless steel reinforcement has greater corrosion resistance than that of the conventional reinforcement. In this project, bridge A6059, the first in Missouri utilizing stainless steel reinforcement in the deck, was constructed, along with bridge A...

  19. Correlation between evolution of inclusions and pitting corrosion in 304 stainless steel with yttrium addition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weining; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe

    2018-03-19

    Effects of the evolution of inclusions on the pitting corrosion resistance of 304 stainless steel with different contents of the rare-earth element yttrium (Y) were studied using thermodynamic calculations, accelerated immersion tests, and electrochemical measurements. The experimental results showed that regular Y 2 O 3 inclusions demonstrated the best pitting resistance, followed in sequence by (Al,Mn)O inclusions, the composite inclusions, and irregular Y 2 O 3 inclusions. The pitting resistance first decreased, then increased, and then decreased again with increasing Y content, because sulfide inclusions were easily generated when the Y content was low and YN inclusions were easily generated at higher Y contents. The best pitting corrosion resistance was obtained for 304 stainless steel with addition of 0.019% Y.

  20. Microstructure, Properties and Weldability of Duplex Stainless Steel 2101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    The continuous development of duplex stainless steels (DSSs) is due to their excellent corrosion resistance in aggressive environments and their mechanical strength, which is usually twice of conventional austenitic stainless steels (ASSs). In this paper, a designed lean duplex stainless steel 2101, with the alloy design of reduced nickel content and increased additions of manganese and nitrogen, is studied by being partly compared with typical ASS 304L steels. The microstructure, mechanical properties, impact toughness, corrosion resistance and weldability of the designed DSS 2101 were conducted. The results demonstrated that both 2101 steel and its weldment show excellent mechanical properties, impact toughness and corrosion resistance, so DSS 2101 exhibits good comprehensive properties and can be used to replace 304L in numerous applications.

  1. Influence of the post-weld surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel 1.4062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosemann, P.; Müller, C.; Baumann, O.; Modersohn, W.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    The duplex stainless steel 1.4062 (X2CrNiN22-2) is used as alternative material to austenitic stainless steels in the construction industry. The corrosion resistance of welded seams is influenced by the base material, the weld filler material, the welding process and also by the final surface treatment. The scale layer next to the weld seam can be removed by grinding, pickling, electro-polished or blasting depending on the application and the requested corrosion resistance. Blasted surfaces are often used in industrial practice due to the easier and cheaper manufacturing process compared to pickled or electro-polished surfaces. Furthermore blasting with corundum-grain is more effective than blasting with glass-beads which also lower the process costs. In recent years, stainless steel surfaces showed an unusually high susceptibility to pitting corrosion after grinding with corundum. For this reason, it is now also questioned critically whether the corrosion resistance is influenced by the applied blasting agent. This question was specifically investigated by comparing grinded, pickled, corundum-grain- and glass-bead-blasted welding seams. Results of the SEM analyses of the blasting agents and the blasted surfaces will be presented and correlated with the different performed corrosion tests (potential measurement, KorroPad-test and pitting potential) on welding seams with different surface treatments.

  2. Biocompatibly Coated 304 Stainless Steel as Superior Corrosion-Resistant Implant Material to 316L Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Subir; Mandal, Chandranath

    2013-10-01

    Surface treatments of 304 stainless steel by electro-coating and passivating in few inorganic electrolytes were found to be very effective in drastically reducing the corrosion rate of the material in stimulated body fluid (SBF) by several orders in comparison to that of 316L steel, presently being used for orthopedic implants. Polarization studies of electrodeposited hydroxyl apatite coating on 304 steel showed remarkably improved corrosion current. Cyclic polarization of the material in SBF reflected the broadened passivity region, much lower passive current, and narrower hysteresis loops. Similar effects were also found through the formation of inorganic coatings by passivation in NaF, CaNO3, and calcium phosphate buffer solutions. Surface characterization by XRD showed the peaks of the respective coating crystals. The morphology of the coatings studied by SEM showed a flake-type structure for hydroxyapatite coating and fine spherical-subspherical particles for other coatings.

  3. Investigation on localized corrosion of 304 stainless steel joints brazed using Sn-plated Ag alloy filler in NaCl aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingxing; Li, Shuai; Peng, Jin

    2018-03-01

    Novel AgCuZnSn filler metal with high Sn contents was prepared from BAg50CuZn filler metal by a process of electroplating and thermal diffusion, and the prepared filler metal was applied to induction brazing of 304 stainless steel. The corrosion behavior of the brazed joints was evaluated based on localized corrosion analysis, the morphology of the joints were analyzed by SEM after immersion in a 3.5 vol% NaCl aqueous solution. The results indicated that corrosion groove occurred near the interface between the stainless steel base metal and the brazing seam. A wide range of defects such as holes and cracks appeared on the surface of the base metal, while the brazing seam zone almost no corrosion defects occur. With the increase of corrosion time, the corrosion rates of both the brazing seam and the base metal first exhibited an increasing trend, followed by a decreasing trend, and the corrosion rate of the base metal was slightly greater than that of the brazing seam. The corrosion potential of the brazing seam and 304 stainless steel were -0.7758 V and -0.7863 V, respectively.

  4. Corrosion-induced microstructural developments in 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li 2BeF 4(FLiBe) salt

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Guiqiu; He, Lingfeng; Carpenter, David; ...

    2016-10-12

    The microstructural evaluation and characterization of 316 stainless steel samples that were tested in molten Li 2BeF 4 (FLiBe) salt were investigated in this study for evaluating its performance in high-temperature molten fluoride salts. Recently, 316 stainless steel and FLiBe salt are being actively considered as the main structural alloy and primary coolant of fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR), a leading nuclear reactor concept for the next generation nuclear plants (NGNP). In support of the materials development for the FHR, high-temperature corrosion tests of 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe salt at 700°C have been conducted in both bare graphitemore » crucibles and 316 stainless steel-lined crucibles in an inert atmosphere for up to 3000 hours. The microstructure of the tested samples was comprehensively characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with EDS. In addition to the noticeable intergranular corrosion attack on surface, the corrosion in terms of the Cr depletion along high angle grain boundaries (15-180º) extended to 22µm in depth after 3000-hour exposure to molten FLiBe salt in graphite crucible. The coherent Σ3 grain boundary appeared high resistance to the Cr depletion. The substantial Cr depletion from the near-to-surface layer induced phase transformation from γ-martensite to α-ferrite phase (FeNi x) during corrosion at 700ºC. Furthermore, the presence of graphite in the molten salt doubled the corrosion attack depth and led to the formation of round Mo2C, hexagonal Cr 7C 3 and needle-like Al 4C 3 phase within the alloy as deep as 50 µm after 3000-hour corrosion testing. Based on the microstructural analysis, the corrosion mechanisms of 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe salt in different corrosion crucibles were illuminated through schematic

  5. Corrosion-induced microstructural developments in 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li 2BeF 4(FLiBe) salt

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zheng, Guiqiu; He, Lingfeng; Carpenter, David

    The microstructural evaluation and characterization of 316 stainless steel samples that were tested in molten Li 2BeF 4 (FLiBe) salt were investigated in this study for evaluating its performance in high-temperature molten fluoride salts. Recently, 316 stainless steel and FLiBe salt are being actively considered as the main structural alloy and primary coolant of fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR), a leading nuclear reactor concept for the next generation nuclear plants (NGNP). In support of the materials development for the FHR, high-temperature corrosion tests of 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe salt at 700°C have been conducted in both bare graphitemore » crucibles and 316 stainless steel-lined crucibles in an inert atmosphere for up to 3000 hours. The microstructure of the tested samples was comprehensively characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with EDS. In addition to the noticeable intergranular corrosion attack on surface, the corrosion in terms of the Cr depletion along high angle grain boundaries (15-180º) extended to 22µm in depth after 3000-hour exposure to molten FLiBe salt in graphite crucible. The coherent Σ3 grain boundary appeared high resistance to the Cr depletion. The substantial Cr depletion from the near-to-surface layer induced phase transformation from γ-martensite to α-ferrite phase (FeNi x) during corrosion at 700ºC. Furthermore, the presence of graphite in the molten salt doubled the corrosion attack depth and led to the formation of round Mo2C, hexagonal Cr 7C 3 and needle-like Al 4C 3 phase within the alloy as deep as 50 µm after 3000-hour corrosion testing. Based on the microstructural analysis, the corrosion mechanisms of 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe salt in different corrosion crucibles were illuminated through schematic

  6. Properties of super stainless steels for orthodontic applications.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Kim, Young-Sik; Park, Yong-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2004-05-15

    Orthodontic stainless-steel appliances are considered to be corrosion resistant, but localized corrosion can occur in the oral cavity. This study was undertaken to evaluate the properties of super stainless steels in orthodontic applications. Accordingly, the metallurgical properties, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, amount of the released nickel, cytotoxicity, and characteristics of the passive film were investigated. Corrosion resistances of the specimens were high and in the following order: super austenitic stainless steel (SR-50A) > super ferritic stainless steel (SFSS) = super duplex stainless steel (SR-6DX) > 316L SS > super martensitic stainless steel (SR-3Mo) in artificial saliva, 37 degrees C. At 500 mV (SCE), current densities of SR-50A, SFSS, SR-6DX, 316L SS, and SR-3Mo were 5.96 microA/cm(2), 20.3 microA/cm(2), 31.9 microA/cm(2), 805 microA/cm(2), and 5.36 mA/cm(2), respectively. Open circuit potentials of SR-50A, 316L SS, SR-6DX, SR-3Mo, and SFSS were - 0.2, - 0.22, - 0.24, - 0.43, and - 0.46 V (SCE), respectively. SR-50A, SFSS, and SR-6DX released below 3 ng/ml nickel for 8 weeks, and increased a little with immersion time, and 316L SS released about 3.5 ng/ml nickel, but SR-3Mo released a large amount of nickel, which increased with immersion time. The study demonstrated that SR-50A, SR-6DX, and SFSS have high corrosion resistance and mild or no cytotoxicity, due to the passive film enhanced by synergistic effect of Mo + N or by high addition effect of Cr + W. All super stainless steels showed very low cytotoxicity regardless of their nickel contents, although SR-3Mo was found to be relatively cytotoxic. From these studies, these steels are considered suitable for orthodontic applications. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Stainless steel reinforcement as a replacement for epoxy coated steel in bridge decks : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-08-01

    The corrosion resistance of 2304 stainless steel reinforcement and stainless steel clad reinforcement was compared to conventional and epoxy-coated reinforcement (ECR). 2304 stainless steel was tested in both the as-received condition (dark mottled f...

  8. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TYPE 410 EXPERIMENTAL MOTOR TUBES TEMPERED AT 1150 F. Includes WAPD CTA(MEE)-510, Attachment (A): 1150 F TEMPERED TYPE 410 STAINLESS STEEL CORROSION PROGRAM. Attachment (B): 1150 F TEMPERED TYPE 410 STAINLESS STEEL METALLURGICAL EVALUATION PROGRAM

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Faduska, A.; Rau, E.; Alger, J.V.

    Data are given on the corrosion properties of type 410 stainless steel tempered at 1150 d F. Control mechanismn-drive motor tubes and some outer housings are constructed of 650 d F tempered type 410 stainless steel. Since the stress corrosion resistance of type 410 in the 1150 d F tempered condition is superior, the utilization of the 1150 d F tempered material is more desirable for this application. The properties of 410 stainless steel hardened and tempered at 1150 d F are given. (W.L.H.)

  9. Nanocomposite coatings on biomedical grade stainless steel for improved corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Srinivasan; Mohana, Marimuthu; Sudhagar, Pitchaimuthu; Raman, Vedarajan; Nishimura, Toshiyasu; Kim, Sanghyo; Kang, Yong Soo; Rajendran, Nallaiyan

    2012-10-24

    The 316 L stainless steel is one of the most commonly available commercial implant materials with a few limitations in its ease of biocompatibility and long-standing performance. Hence, porous TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coated over 316 L stainless steels was studied for their enhanced performance in terms of its biocompatibility and corrosion resistance, following a sol-gel process via dip-coating technique. The surface composition and porosity texture was studied to be uniform on the substrate. Biocompatibility studies on the TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coatings were investigated by placing the coated substrate in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The immersion procedure resulted in the complete coverage of the TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite (coated on the surface of 316 L stainless steel) with the growth of a one-dimensional (1D) rod-like carbonate-containing apatite. The TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coated specimens showed a higher corrosion resistance in the SBF solution with an enhanced biocompatibility, surpassing the performance of the pure oxide coatings. The cell viability of TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coated implant surface was examined under human dermal fibroblasts culture, and it was observed that the composite coating enhances the proliferation through effective cellular attachment compared to pristine 316 L SS surface.

  10. Features of residual stresses in duplex stainless steel butt welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Chin-Hyung; Chang, Kyong-Ho; Nguyen Van Do, Vuong

    2018-04-01

    Duplex stainless steel finds increasing use as an alternative to austenitic stainless steel, particularly where chloride or sulphide stress corrosion cracking is of primary concern, due to the excellent combination of strength and corrosion resistance. During welding, duplex stainless steel does not create the same magnitude or distribution of weld-induced residual stresses as those in welded austenitic stainless steel due to the different physical and mechanical properties between them. In this work, an experimental study on the residual stresses in butt-welded duplex stainless steel is performed utilizing the layering technique to investigate the characteristics of residual stresses in the weldment. Three-dimensional thermos-mechanical-metallurgical finite element analysis is also performed to confirm the residual stress measurements.

  11. Creation of superhydrophobic stainless steel surfaces by acid treatments and hydrophobic film deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Lester; Breedveld, Victor; Hess, Dennis W

    2012-09-26

    In this work, we present a method to render stainless steel surfaces superhydrophobic while maintaining their corrosion resistance. Creation of surface roughness on 304 and 316 grade stainless steels was performed using a hydrofluoric acid bath. New insight into the etch process is developed through a detailed analysis of the chemical and physical changes that occur on the stainless steel surfaces. As a result of intergranular corrosion, along with metallic oxide and fluoride redeposition, surface roughness was generated on the nano- and microscales. Differences in alloy composition between 304 and 316 grades of stainless steel led to variations in etch rate and different levels of surface roughness for similar etch times. After fluorocarbon film deposition to lower the surface energy, etched samples of 304 and 316 stainless steel displayed maximum static water contact angles of 159.9 and 146.6°, respectively. However, etching in HF also caused both grades of stainless steel to be susceptible to corrosion. By passivating the HF-etched samples in a nitric acid bath, the corrosion resistant properties of stainless steels were recovered. When a three step process was used, consisting of etching, passivation and fluorocarbon deposition, 304 and 316 stainless steel samples exhibited maximum contact angles of 157.3 and 134.9°, respectively, while maintaining corrosion resistance.

  12. Effect of Mo contents on corrosion behaviors of welded duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Seong Han; Lee, Hae Woo

    2013-05-01

    The corrosion behaviour and change of the phase fraction in welded 24Cr Duplex stainless steel was investigated for different chemical composition ranges of Mo contents. Filler metal was produced by fixing the contents of Cr, Ni, N, and Mn while adjusting the Mo content to 0.5, 1.4, 2.5, 3.5 wt%. The δ-ferrite fraction was observed to increase as the content of Mo increased. A polarisation test conducted in a salt solution, indicated the pitting corrosion potential increased continuously to 3.5 wt% Mo, while the corrosion potential changed most between 0.5 and 1.41 wt% Mo. The location of the pitting corrosion in 0.5 wt% Mo steel was randomly distributed, but it occurred selectively at the grain boundary between the γ- and δ-ferrite phases in 1.4, 2.5 and 3.5 wt% Mo steel. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping analysis showed that areas deficient in Cr, Mo, and Ni occurred around the grain boundary of the γ- and δ-ferrite phases. Non-metallic inclusions are thought to act as initiation points for the pitting corrosion that occurs in the salt solution initially as a result of the potential difference between the matrix structure and the incoherent inclusions.

  13. Corrosion behavior of surface films on boron-implanted high purity iron and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Carter, W. B.; Hochman, R. F.; Meletis, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Boron (dose, 2 x 10 to the 17th ions/sq cm) was implanted into high purity iron, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel, and AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel, at 40 keV. The film structure of implanted samples was examined and characterized by contrast and diffraction analyses utilizing transmission electron microscopy. The effect of B(+) ion implantation on the corrosion behavior was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Tests were performed in deaerated 1 N H2SO4 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the corroded surfaces after testing.

  14. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Ren, Yibin

    2010-02-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels.

  15. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Ren, Yibin

    2010-01-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels. PMID:27877320

  16. The corrosion performance of high chromium stainless steels and titanium alloys at a reverse osmosis plant in Arabian Gulf seawater

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Al-Odwani, A.; Al-Tabatabaei, M.; Carew, J.

    1997-08-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate the corrosion performance of four high chromium stainless steels and Grade 2 titanium in flowing Arabian Gulf natural seawater. The EIS provided information concerning the changes to the interfacial impedance as a function of exposure time for these alloys. The impedance spectra for all the alloys showed slight changes at the low frequency region over the exposure period. The open-circuit potentials (OCP) of these alloys were also monitored as a function of exposure time. The stainless steel alloys exhibited slight fluctuation in potential around the initial exposure potential. However, Grade 2 titaniummore » initial potential was more active and then gradually shifted towards the noble direction. The linear polarization resistance (LPR) method indicated that Grade 2 titanium exhibited the lowest corrosion rate with respect to the stainless steel alloys. The results of the EIS analysis and OCP indicated that Grade 2 titanium performed better than the four high chromium stainless steel alloys.« less

  17. Intergranular Corrosion Behavior of Low-Nickel and 304 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansod, Ankur V.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Moon, Abhijeet P.; Khobragade, Nilay N.

    2016-09-01

    Intergranular corrosion (IGC) susceptibility for Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel and 304 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was estimated using electrochemical techniques. Optical and SEM microscopy studies were carried out to investigate the nature of IGC at 700 °C with increasing time (15, 30, 60, 180, 360, 720, 1440 min) according to ASTM standard 262 A. Quantitative analysis was performed to estimate the degree of sensitization (DOS) using double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR) and EIS technique. DLEPR results indicated that with the increase in thermal aging duration, DOS becomes more severe for both types of stainless steel. The DOS for Cr-Mn ASS was found to be higher (65.12% for 1440 min) than that of the AISI 304 ASS (23% for 1440 min). The higher degree of sensitization resulted in lowering of electrical charge capacitance resistance. Chronoamperometry studies were carried out at a passive potential of 0.4 V versus SCE and was observed to have a higher anodic dissolution of the passive film of Cr-Mn ASS. EDS studies show the formation of chromium carbide precipitates in the vicinity of the grain boundary. The higher Mn content was also observed for Cr-Mn ASS at the grain boundary.

  18. Microstructure, Hardness, and Corrosion Behavior of TiC-Duplex Stainless Steel Composites Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Shicheng; Chen, Hua; Ran, Xu

    2017-08-01

    Duplex stainless steel composites with various weight fractions of TiC particles are prepared by spark plasma sintering. Ferritic 434L and austenitic 316L stainless steel powders are premixed in a 50:50 weight ratio and added with 3-9 wt.% TiC. The compacts are sintered in the solid state under vacuum conditions at 1223 K for 5 min. The effects of TiC content on the microstructure, hardness, and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel composites fabricated by powder metallurgy are evaluated. The results indicate that the TiC particulates as reinforcements can be distributed homogeneously in the steel matrix. Densification of sintered composites decreases with increasing TiC content. M23C6 carbide precipitates along grain boundary, and its neighboring Cr-Mo-depleted region is formed in the sintered microstructure, which can be eliminated subsequently with appropriate heat treatment. With the addition of TiC, the hardness of duplex stainless steel fabricated by powder metallurgy can be markedly enhanced despite increased porosity in the composites. However, TiC particles increase the corrosion rate and degrade the passivation capability, particularly for the composite with TiC content higher than 6 wt.%. Weakened metallurgical bonding in the composite with high TiC content provides the preferred sites for pitting nucleation and/or dissolution.

  19. Enhanced corrosion resistance of stainless steel type 316 in sulphuric acid solution using eco-friendly waste product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanni, O.; Popoola, A. P. I.; Fayomi, O. S. I.

    2018-06-01

    Literature has shown that different organic compounds are effective corrosion inhibitors for metal in acidic environments. Such compounds usually contain oxygen, nitrogen or sulphur and function through adsorption on the metal surface, thereby creating a barrier for corrosion attack. Unfortunately, these organic compounds are toxic, scarce and expensive. Therefore, plants, natural product and natural oils have been posed as cheap, environmentally acceptable, abundant, readily available and effective molecules having low environmental impact. The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel Type 316 in the presence of eco-friendly waste product was studied using weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization techniques in 0.5 M H2SO4. The corrosion rate and corrosion potential of the steel was significantly altered by the studied inhibitor. Results show that increase in concentration of the inhibitor hinders the formation of the passive film. Experimental observation shows that its pitting potential depends on the concentration of the inhibitor in the acid solution due to adsorption of anions at the metal film interface. The presence of egg shell powder had a strong influence on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel Type 316 with highest inhibition efficiency of 94.74% from weight loss analysis, this is as a result of electrochemical action and inhibition of the steel by the ionized molecules of the inhibiting compound which influenced the mechanism of the redox reactions responsible for corrosion and surface deterioration. Inhibitor adsorption fits the Langmuir isotherm model. The two methods employed for the corrosion assessment were in good agreement.

  20. Stoichiometric titanium dioxide ion implantation in AISI 304 stainless steel for corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, A.; Decker, M.; Klein, O.; Karl, H.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of highly chemically inert titanium dioxide synthesized by ion beam implantation for corrosion protection of AISI 304 stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. More specifically, the prevention of galvanic corrosion between carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and AISI 304 was investigated. Corrosion performance of TiO2 implanted AISI 304 - examined for different implantation and annealing parameters - is strongly influenced by implantation fluence. Experimental results show that a fluence of 5 × 1016 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1017 cm-2 (O+) is sufficient to prevent pitting corrosion significantly, while galvanic corrosion with CFRP can already be noticeably reduced by an implantation fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1016 cm-2 (O+). Surface roughness, implantation energy and annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C show only little influence on the corrosion behavior. TEM analysis indicates the existence of stoichiometric TiO2 inside the steel matrix for medium fluences and the formation of a separated metal oxide layer for high fluences.

  1. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Abudaia, F. B., E-mail: fabudaia@yahoo.com; Khalil, E. O., E-mail: ekhalil9@yahoo.com; Esehiri, A. F., E-mail: Hope-eseheri@hotmail.co.uk

    2015-03-30

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtainedmore » for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe{sub 2}C{sub 5}. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.« less

  2. Corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in a mercury thermal convection loop

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1999-04-01

    Two thermal convection loops fabricated from 316L stainless steel containing mercury (Hg) and Hg with 1000 wppm gallium (Ga), respectively, were operated continuously for about 5000 h. In each case, the maximum loop temperature was constant at about 305 degrees C and the minimum temperature was constant at about 242 degrees C. Coupons in the hot leg of the Hg-loop developed a posous surface layer substantially depleted of nickel and chromium, which resulted in a transformation to ferrite. The coupon exposed at the top of the hot leg in the Hg-loop experienced the maximum degradation, exhibiting a surface layer extendingmore » an average of 9-10 mu m after almost 5000 h. Analysis of the corrosion rate data as a function of temperature (position) in the Hg-loop suggests wetting by the mer cury occurred only above about 255 degrees C and that the rate limiting step in the corrosion process above 255 degrees C is solute diffusion through the saturated liquid boundary layer adjacent to the corroding surface. The latter factor suggests that the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in a mercury loop may be velocity dependent. No wetting and no corrosion were observed on the coupons and wall specimens removed from the Hg/Ga loop after 5000 h of operation.« less

  3. Microstructure, corrosion and tribological and antibacterial properties of Ti-Cu coated stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaomin; Gao, Lizhen; Liu, Erqiang; Yu, Feifei; Shu, Xuefeng; Wang, Hefeng

    2015-10-01

    A Ti-Cu coated layer on 316L stainless steel (SS) was obtained by using the Closed Field Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (CFUBMS) system to improve antibacterial activity, corrosion and tribological properties. The microstructure and phase constituents of Ti-Cu coated layer were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES). The corrosion and tribological properties of a stainless steel substrate, SS316L, when coated with Ti-Cu were investigated in a simulated body fluid (SBF) environment. The viability of bacteria attached to the antibacterial surface was tested using the spread plate method. The results indicate that the Ti-Cu coated SS316L could achieve a higher corrosion polarization resistance and a more stable corrosion potential in an SBF environment than the uncoated SS316L substrate. The desirable corrosion protection performance of Ti-Cu may be attributable to the formation of a Ti-O passive layer on the coating surface, protecting the coating from further corrosion. The Ti-Cu coated SS316L also exhibited excellent wear resistance and chemical stability during the sliding tests against Si3N4 balls in SBF environment. Moreover, the Ti-Cu coatings exhibited excellent antibacterial abilities, where an effective reduction of 99.9% of Escherichia coli (E.coli) within 12h was achieved by contact with the modified surface, which was attributed to the release of copper ions when the Ti-Cu coatings are in contact with bacterial solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Corrosion resistance of premodeled wires made of stainless steel used for heart electrotherapy leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przondziono, J.; Walke, W.; Młynarski, R.; Szatka, W.

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate resistance to electrochemical corrosion of wire made of X10CrNi18-8 stainless steel designed for use in cardiology treatment. The influence of strain formed in the premodeling process and methods of wire surface preparation to corrosive resistance in artificial plasma solution were analysed. Wire corrosion tests were carried out in the solution of artificial plasma. Resistance to electrochemical corrosion was evaluated on the ground of recorded curves of anodic polarization by means of potentiodynamic method. Potentiodynamic tests carried out enabled to determine how the resistance to pitting corrosion of wire changes, depending on strain formed in the premodeling process as well as on the method of wire surface preparation. For evaluation of phenomena occurring on the surface of tested steel, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was applied. Deterioration of corrosive properties of wire along with the increase in the formed strain hardening was observed.

  5. AC-Induced Bias Potential Effect on Corrosion of Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-05

    induction, variable conduction Experimental Setup Super- martensitic stainless steel composition Analysis: C Mn Si Cr Ni Mo Cu N Typical 13 Cr ɘ.01 0.6... stainless steel used in pipelines. •Low carbon (ɘ.01): allows the formation of a “soft” martensite that is more resistant than standard martensitic ...Proposed AC Corrosion Models  AC Simulated Corrosion testing  Stainless steel pipe and coating  Cathodic protection  Experimental Setup  Preliminary

  6. Structural Characterization and Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steel Coated With Sol-Gel Titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, Daniela C. L.; Nunes, Eduardo H. M.; Sabioni, Antônio Claret S.; da Costa, João C. Diniz; Vasconcelos, Wander L.

    2012-03-01

    Sol-gel titania films were prepared from hydrolysis and condensation of titanium (IV) isopropoxide. Diethanolamine was used as chelant agent in titania synthesis. 316L stainless steel substrates were dip-coated at three different withdrawal speeds (6, 30, and 60 mm/min) and heated up to 400 °C. Thermogravimetry and differential thermal analyses of the titania gel solution evinced a continuous mass loss for temperatures up to 800 °C. The transition of anatase to the rutile phase begins at 610-650 °C, being the rutile transformation completed at 900 °C. The thicknesses of the films were determined as a function of the heat treatment and withdrawal speed. It was observed that their thicknesses varied from 130 to 770 nm. Scanning electron microscopy images of the composites revealed the glass-like microstructure of the films. The obtained sol-gel films were also characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The chemical evolution of the films as a function of the heating temperature was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (specular reflectance method). After performing the adhesion tests, the adherence of the titania films to the stainless steel substrate was excellent, rated 5B according to ASTM 3359. The hardness of the ceramic films obtained was measured by the Knoop microindentation hardness test with a 10 g load. We observed that the titania film became harder than the steel substrate when it was heated above 400 °C. The corrosion rates of the titania/steel composites, determined from potentiodynamic curves, were two orders of magnitude lower than that of the bare stainless steel. The presence of the sol-gel titania film contributed to the increase of the corrosion potential in ca. 650 mV and the passivation potential in ca. 720 mV.

  7. Microelectrode Array Microscopy: Investigation of Dynamic Behavior of Localized Corrosion at Type 304 Stainless Steel Surfaces

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tedd E. Lister; Patrick J. Pinhero

    2005-03-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and a recently developed microelectrode array microscope have been used to study localized corrosion and electron-transfer characteristics of native oxide layers of type 304 stainless steels. The I-/I3- redox couple was employed as a mediator and allowed sensitive detection of oxide breakdown events. In solutions containing I-, a signal at the microelectrode was observed on type 304 stainless steel surfaces at active pitting corrosion sites. Under conditions where pitting corrosion occurs, SECM was used to track the temporal characteristics of the reaction in a spatial manner. However, because of the time required to create an image,more » much of the temporal information was not obtained. To improve the temporal resolution of the measurement, microelectrode array microscopy (MEAM) was developed as a parallel method of performing SECM. The demonstration shown reveals the potential of MEAM for analysis of surface chemistry on temporal and spatial domains.« less

  8. Microstructure, Corrosion and Magnetic Behavior of an Aged Dual-Phase Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziouche, A.; Haddad, A.; Badji, R.; Zergoug, M.; Zoubiri, N.; Bedjaoui, W.; Abaidia, S.

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, the effect of the precipitation phenomena on corrosion and magnetic behavior of an aged dual-phase stainless steel was investigated. Aging treatment caused the precipitation of the σ phase, chromium carbides and secondary austenite, which was accompanied by the shifting of the δ/γ interfaces inside the δ ferrite grains. Aging between 700 and 850 °C strongly deteriorated the pitting corrosion resistance of the studied material. Magnetic investigation of the aged material using the vibration sample magnetic technique revealed the sensitivity of the intrinsic magnetic properties to the smallest microstructural change. This was confirmed by the Eddy current technique that led also to the evaluation of the aging-induced localized corrosion.

  9. The influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qiang; Zou, Yan; Kong, Xiangfeng; Gao, Yang; Dong, Sheng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The high strength low-alloy steels are welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes. The micro-structural and electrochemical corrosion study of base metal (BM), weld zone (WZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) are carried out to understand the influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes, methods used including, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the WZ acts as a cathode and there is no corrosion product on it throughout the immersion period in seawater. The HAZ and BM acts as anodes. The corrosion rates of the HAZ and BM change with the immersion time increasing. In the initial immersion period, the HAZ has the highest corrosion rate because it has a coarse tempered martensite structure and the BM exhibites a microstructure with very fine grains of ferrite and pearlite. After a period of immersion, the BM has the highest corrosion rate. The reason is that the corrosion product layer on the HAZ is dense and has a better protective property while that on the BM is loose and can not inhibit the diffusion of oxygen.

  10. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  11. Improving Corrosion Resistance of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Using ZrO2 Sol-Gel Coating in Nitric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazazi, Mahdi; Haghighi, Milad; Yarali, Davood; Zaynolabedini, Masoomeh H.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, thin-film coating of zirconium oxide (ZrO2) was prepared by sol-gel method and subsequent heat treatment process. The sol was prepared by controlled hydrolysis of zirconium tetrapropoxide using acetic acid and ethanol/acetylacetone mixture as catalyst and chelating agent, respectively, and finally deposited onto the 316L austenitic stainless steel (316L SS) using dip coating method in order to improve its corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. The composition, structure, and morphology of the coated surface were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The obtained results from XRD and FTIR state the formation of tetragonal and monoclinic ZrO2 phase. Also, the obtained results from surface morphology investigation by SEM and AFM indicate the formation of smooth, homogeneous and uniform coatings on the steel substrate. Then, the corrosion behavior of stainless steel was investigated in a 1 and 10 M nitric acid solutions using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and linear polarization test. The obtained results from these tests for ZrO2-coated specimens indicated a considerable improvement in the corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel by an increase in corrosion potential and transpassive potential, and a decrease in passive current density and corrosion current density. The decrease in passive current density in both the concentration of solutions was two orders of magnitude from bare to coated specimens.

  12. Interstitial Hardening of Stainless Steel for Enhanced Corrosion Resistance for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Fortunately, it is straightforward to nitride at lower nitrogen activities by mixing NH3 with hydrogen (H2) gas and a systematic study of nitridation...prior work had been concerned with carburization, mostly using carbon monoxide (CO) as the carbon somce. Inasmuch as many commercial hardening processes...using nitrogen in isolation, or in combination with carbon , could likewise enhance corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels, and if so, to

  13. Temperature Effects on Stainless Steel 316L Corrosion in the Environment of Sulphuric Acid (H2SO4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayu Arwati, I. G.; Herianto Majlan, Edy; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Shyuan, Loh Kee; Arifin, Khuzaimah Binti; Husaini, Teuku; Alfa, Sagir; Ashidiq, Fakhruddien

    2018-03-01

    In its application, metal is always in contact with its environment whether air, vapor, water, and other chemicals. During contact, chemical interactions emerge between metals and their respective environments such that the metal surface corrodes. This study aims to determine the corrosion rate of 316L stainless steel sulphuric acid environment (H2SO4) with weight loss and electrochemical methods. The corrosion rate (CR) is value of 316L stainless steel by weight loss method with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) with concentration of 0.5 M. The result obtained in conjunction with the increase of temperature the rate of erosion obtained appears to be larger, with a consecutive 3 hour the temperature of 50°C is 0.27 mg/cm2h, temperature 70°C 0.38 mg/cm2h, and temperature 90 °C 0.52 mg/cm2h. With the electrochemical method, the current value increases by using a C350 potentiostal tool. The higher the current, the longer the time the corrosion rate increases, where the current is at 90 °C with a 10-minute treatment time of 0.0014736 A. The 316L stainless steel in surface metal morphology is shown by using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  14. Image analysis of corrosion pit initiation on ASTM type A240 stainless steel and ASTM type A 1008 carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nine, H. M. Zulker

    The adversity of metallic corrosion is of growing concern to industrial engineers and scientists. Corrosion attacks metal surface and causes structural as well as direct and indirect economic losses. Multiple corrosion monitoring tools are available although those are time-consuming and costly. Due to the availability of image capturing devices in today's world, image based corrosion control technique is a unique innovation. By setting up stainless steel SS 304 and low carbon steel QD 1008 panels in distilled water, half-saturated sodium chloride and saturated sodium chloride solutions and subsequent RGB image analysis in Matlab, in this research, a simple and cost-effective corrosion measurement tool has identified and investigated. Additionally, the open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results have been compared with RGB analysis to gratify the corrosion. Additionally, to understand the importance of ambiguity in crisis communication, the communication process between Union Carbide and Indian Government regarding the Bhopal incident in 1984 was analyzed.

  15. Localized corrosion of 316L stainless steel in tritiated water containing aggressive radiolytic and decomposition products at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellanger, G.

    2008-02-01

    Tritium is one of the more important radionuclides used in nuclear industry as plutonium and uranium. The tritium in tritiated water always causes difficulties in nuclear installations, including equipment corrosion. Moreover, with tritiated water there are, in addition, the radiolytic and decomposition products such as hydrogen peroxide formed during decay, chloride ions produced by degradation of organic seals and oils used for tightness and pumping, and acid pH produced by excitation of nitrogen in air by the β - particle. Highly concentrated tritiated water releases energy and its temperature is about 80 °C, moreover heating is necessary in the tritium processes. These conditions highly facilitate the corrosion of stainless steels by pitting and crevice attack. Corrosion tests were performed by electrochemical analysis methods and by visual inspection of the surface of stainless steel.

  16. Analytical and Electrochemical Study of Passive Films in Stainless Steels Subjected to Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangiribabavi, Negin

    The objective of this research is to study the corrosion behavior of the stainless steel centrifugal contactor used in the spent nuclear fuel treatment process called UREX+ process. AISI type 304L stainless steel was suggested as the material of construction for this contactor. Corrosion of 304L stainless steel in three acidic aqueous solutions of 5.0M HNO3, 5.0M HNO 3 + 0.1M HF, and 5.0M HNO3 + 0.1M HF + 0.1M Zr4+ was studied. Immersion, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) corrosion tests were conducted at test temperatures of 25, 40, and 80°C and three different rotational speeds (0, 1000, 2000 rpm) in order to mimic the operating conditions of the centrifugal contactor. The results showed that the 5.0M HNO3 + 0.1M HF solution was the most corrosive environment as the fluoride ions dissolved the passive film present on the surface of the stainless steel. The addition of 0.1M Zr 4+ ions to this acidic mixture reduced the corrosion caused by HF to levels similar to those found in HNO3 solutions and allowed the stainless steel to preserve its passive film. Further addition of zirconium ion did not result in better corrosion resistance of the stainless steel. Besides, higher corrosion rates were obtained as the solutions temperatures increased while the hydrodynamic conditions had less significant effect on corrosion rates.

  17. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  18. Resistance to Corrosion of Zirconia Coatings Deposited by Spray Pyrolysis in Nitrided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, G. I.; Olaya, J. J.; Bethencourt, M.; Cifredo, G.; Blanco, G.

    2013-10-01

    Coatings of zirconium oxide were deposited onto three types of stainless steel, AISI 316L, 2205, and tool steel AISI D2, using the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method. The effect of the flux ratio on the process and its influence on the structure and morphology of the coatings were investigated. The coatings obtained, 600 nm thick, were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The resistance to corrosion of the coatings deposited over steel (not nitrided) and stainless steel nitrided (for 2 h at 823 K) in an ammonia atmosphere was evaluated. The zirconia coating enhances the stainless steel's resistance to corrosion, with the greatest increase in corrosion resistance being observed for tool steel. When the deposition is performed on previously nitrided stainless steel, the morphology of the surface improves and the coating is more homogeneous, which leads to an improved corrosion resistance.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of Aqua-Blasted and Laser-Engraved Type 316L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, B.; Cook, P.; Hobbs, J.; Engelberg, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of aqua blasting and laser engraving on surface microstructure development, residual stress and corrosion resistance of type 316L stainless steel has been investigated. Aqua blasting resulted in a deformed near-surface microstructure containing compressive residual stresses. Subsequent laser engraving produced a surface layer with tensile residual stresses reaching to a depth of 200 microns. Changes of surface roughness topography were accompanied by the development of a thick oxide/hydroxide film after laser engraving. The atmospheric corrosion behavior of all surfaces with MgCl2-laden droplets was compared to their electrochemical response in 1M NaCl and 0.7 M HCl aqueous solutions. The measured total volume loss after atmospheric corrosion testing was similar for all investigated surface conditions. Laser-engraved surface exhibited the smallest number of corrosion sites, but the largest mean corrosion depth.

  20. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  1. Effect of Secondary Phase Precipitation on the Corrosion Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steels.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kai Wang; Tjong, Sie Chin

    2014-07-22

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with austenitic and ferritic phases have been increasingly used for many industrial applications due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in acidic, caustic and marine environments. However, DSSs are susceptible to intergranular, pitting and stress corrosion in corrosive environments due to the formation of secondary phases. Such phases are induced in DSSs during the fabrication, improper heat treatment, welding process and prolonged exposure to high temperatures during their service lives. These include the precipitation of sigma and chi phases at 700-900 °C and spinodal decomposition of ferritic grains into Cr-rich and Cr-poor phases at 350-550 °C, respectively. This article gives the state-of the-art review on the microstructural evolution of secondary phase formation and their effects on the corrosion behavior of DSSs.

  2. General corrosion properties of modified PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water as a fuel cladding candidate material for supercritical water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazono, Y.; Iwai, T.; Abe, H.

    2010-03-01

    The Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) has been designed and investigated because of its high thermal efficiency and plant simplification. There are some advantages including the use of a single phase coolant with high enthalpy but there are numerous potential problems, particularly with materials. As the operating temperature of supercritical water reactor will be between 280°C and 620°C with a pressure of 25MPa, the selection of materials is difficult and important. Austenitic stainless steels were selected for possible use in supercritical water systems because of their corrosion resistance and radiation resistance. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a nuclear fuel cladding material for a Na-cooled fast breeder reactor. The corrosion data of PNC1520 in supercritical water (SCW) is required but does not exist. The purpose of the present study is to research the corrosion properties for PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water. The supercritical water corrosion test was performed for the standard PNC1520 (1520S) and the Ti-additional type of PNC1520 (1520Ti) by using a supercritical water autoclave. Corrosion tests on the austenitic 1520S and 1520Ti steels in supercritical water were performed at 400, 500 and 600°C with exposures up to 1000h. The amount of weight gain, weight loss and weight of scale were evaluated after the corrosion test in supercritical water for both austenitic steels. After 1000h corrosion test performed, the weight gains of both austenitic stainless steels were less than 2 g/m2 at 400°C and 500°C . But both weight gain and weight loss of 1520Ti were larger than those of 1520S at 600°C . By increasing the temperature to 600°C, the surface of 1520Ti was covered with magnetite formed in supercritical water and dissolution of the steel alloying elements has been observed. In view of corrosion, 1520S may have larger possibility than 1520Ti to adopt a

  3. Corrosion of austenitic and martensitic stainless steels in flowing 17Li83Pb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broc, M.; Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-07-01

    With regard to the behaviour of 316 L stainless steel at 400°C in flowing anisothermal 17Li83Pb the mass transfer suffered by this steel appears to be quite important without noticeable influence of constant or cyclic stress. Evaluation made from solution-annealed specimens leads to a corrosion rate of approximately 30 μm yr -1 at steady state to which a depth of 25 μm has to be added to take into account the initial period phenomena. On the other hand, with semi-stagnant 17Li83Pb at 400° C, the mass transfer of 316 L steel appears to be lower and more acceptable after a 3000-h exposure; but long-time kinetics data have to be achieved in order to see if that better behaviour is persistent and does not correspond to a longer incubation period. As for the martensitic steels their corrosion rate at 450°C in the thermal convection loop TULIP is constant up to 3000 h and five times lower than that observed for 316 L steel in the same conditions.

  4. Effect of boron addition on injection molded 316L stainless steel: mechanical, corrosion properties and in vitro bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Bayraktaroglu, Esra; Gulsoy, H Ozkan; Gulsoy, Nagihan; Er, Ozay; Kilic, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    The research was investigated the effect of boron additions on sintering characteristics, mechanical, corrosion properties and biocompatibility of injection molded austenitic grade 316L stainless steel. Addition of boron is promoted to get high density of sintered 316L stainless steels. The amount of boron plays a role in determining the sintered microstructure and all properties. In this study, 316L stainless steel powders have been used with the elemental NiB powders. A feedstock containing 62.5 wt% powders loading was molded at different injection molded temperature. The binders were completely removed from molded components by solvent and thermal debinding at different temperature. The debinded samples were sintered at different temperature for 60 min. Mechanical property, microstructural characterization and electrochemical property of the sintered samples were performed using tensile testing, hardness, optical, scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical corrosion experiments. Sintered samples were immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) with elemental concentrations that were comparable to those of human blood plasma for a total period of 15 days. Both materials were implanted in fibroblast culture for biocompatibility evaluations were carried out. Results of study showed that sintered 316L and 316L with NiB addition samples exhibited high mechanical and corrosion properties in a physiological environment. Especially, 316L with NiB addition can be used in some bioapplications.

  5. Investigation on the influence of nitrogen in process atmospheres on the corrosion behavior of brazed stainless steel joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.; Uhlig, T.; Wagner, G.; Langohr, A.; Holländer, U.

    2018-06-01

    Brazing of stainless steels is commonly carried out using nickel-based brazing fillers, which provide a high corrosion and oxidation resistance of the resulting joints. These brazed stainless steel joints are mostly used for manufacturing of heat exchangers for energy and air conditioning technologies. The joints of the study were produced at temperatures of 1000 °C, 1125 °C and 1150 °C in vacuum furnaces or continuous furnaces. In both cases, the parts interact with process gases like nitrogen within the brazing process, especially during cooling. The amount of nitrogen in the braze metal as well as in the base material was determined by the carrier gas hot extraction technique. The occurring diffusion of nitrogen into the braze metal and the base material causes a shift in the corrosion potentials. In this work, the influence of the nitrogen enrichment on the corrosion behavior was investigated using a capillary microcell. The corrosion measurements were carried out on the braze metal and the base material. The results of samples, brazed with and without the influence of nitrogen, were compared.

  6. Anti-Corrosion Performance of 1,3-BENZOTHIAZOLE on 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel in H2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loto, Roland Tolulope

    The corrosion inhibition effect of synthesized 1,3-benzothiazole at very low concentrations on 410 martensitic stainless steel in 3MH2SO4 solution was studied through potentiodynamic polarization and weight loss measurements. The observation showed that the organic compound performed effectively with average inhibition efficiencies of 94% and 98% at the concentrations studied from both electrochemical methods due to the inhibition action of protonated inhibitor molecules in the acid solution. The amine and aromatics functional groups of the molecules active in the corrosion inhibition reaction were exposed from Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. Thermodynamic calculations showed cationic adsorption to be chemisorption adsorption, obeying the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Images from optical microscopy showed an improved morphology in comparison to images from corroded stainless steel. Severe surface deterioration and macro-pits were observed in the uninhibited samples.

  7. Corrosion resistance improvement for 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents by trimethylsilane plasma nanocoatings.

    PubMed

    Eric Jones, John; Chen, Meng; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-10-01

    To improve their corrosion resistance and thus long-term biocompatibility, 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents were coated with trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coatings of 20-25 nm in thickness. Both direct current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) glow discharges were utilized for TMS plasma coatings and additional NH₃/O₂ plasma treatment to tailor the surface properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the coating surface chemistry. It was found that both DC and RF TMS plasma coatings had Si- and C-rich composition, and the O- and N-contents on the surfaces were substantially increased after NH₃/O₂ plasma treatment. Surface contact angle measurements showed that DC TMS plasma nanocoating with NH₃/O₂ plasma treatment generated very hydrophilic surface. The corrosion resistance of TMS plasma coated stents was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The potentiodynamic polarization demonstrated that the TMS plasma coated stents imparted higher corrosion potential and pitting potential, as well as lower corrosion current densities as compared with uncoated controls. The surface morphology of stents before and after potentiodynamic polarization testing was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, which indicated less corrosion on coated stents than uncoated controls. It was also noted that, from EIS data, the hydrophobic TMS plasma nanocoatings showed stable impedance modulus at 0.1 Hz after 21 day immersion in an electrolyte solution. These results suggest improved corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel stents by TMS plasma nanocoatings and great promise in reducing and blocking metallic ions releasing into the bloodstream. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mechanical characteristics of welded joints between different stainless steels grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of mechanical characteristics of welded joints is one of the most important tasks that allow determining their functional properties. Due to the very high, still rising, cost of some stainless steels it is justified, on economic grounds, welding austenitic stainless steel with steels that are corrosion-resistant like duplex ones. According to forecasts the price of corrosion resistant steels stil can increase by 26 ÷ 30%. For technical reasons welded joints require appropriate mechanical properties such as: tensile strength, bending, ductility, toughness, and resistance to aggressive media. Such joints are applied in the construction of chemical tankers, apparatus and chemical plants and power steam stations. Using the proper binder makes possible the welds directly between the elements of austenitic stainless steels and duplex ones. It causes that such joits behave satisfactorily in service in such areas like maritime constructions and steam and chemical plants. These steels have high mechanical properties such as: the yield strength, the tensile strength and the ductility as well as the resistance to general corrosion media. They are resistant to both pitting and stress corrosions. The relatively low cost of production of duplex steels, in comparison with standard austenitic steels, is inter alia, the result of a reduced amount of scarce and expensive Nickel, which is seen as a further advantage of these steels.

  9. Microstructure Evolution and Selective Corrosion Resistance in Underwater Multi-pass 2101 Duplex Stainless Steel Welding Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu; Shi, Yonghua; Shen, Xiaoqin; Wang, Zhongmin

    2018-05-01

    A recently developed promising material, 2101 lean duplex stainless steel, represents an alternative to 304 austenite stainless steel. In this work, multi-pass 2101 weld joints were fabricated using the flux-cored arc welding method in a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure varied from 0 to 0.75 MPa. The evolution of the welding process and microstructure was investigated. γ 2 formation in the reheated zones of the WM and HAZ was not uniform. The closer the reheated zone is to the subsequent heat source, the greater the γ 2 formation in the reheated zone. Sufficient primary austenite transformation inhibited Cr2N precipitation and the subsequent intragranular γ 2 formation in the reheated weld passes of the 0.45 MPa weld metal. The localized corrosion resistance of each zone of the 0.45 MPa DSS joint was measured using non-destructive double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation tests. The localized corrosion was induced by γ 2 and Cr2N. The root region of the 0.45 MPa weld metal underwent two subsequent welding thermal cycles, which induced increased γ 2 formation and lower resistance to corrosion because of the decreased pitting resistance value of γ 2. The correlation between microstructure evolution and the distribution of selective corrosion was determined.

  10. Transuranic contamination of stainless steel in nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, Timothy; Banford, Anthony W.; Thompson, Olivia R.; Carey, Thomas; Schild, Dieter; Geist, Andreas; Sharrad, Clint A.

    2017-09-01

    Stainless steels coupons have been exposed to transuranic species in conditions representative of those found in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Stainless steel was prepared to different surface finishes and exposed to nitric acid of varying concentrations containing 237Np, 239Pu or 243Am for one month at 50 °C. Contamination by these transuranics has been observed on all surfaces exposed to the solution through the use of autoradiography. This technique showed that samples held in 4 M HNO3 bind 2-3 times as much radionuclide as those held in 10.5 M HNO3. It was also found that the polished steel surfaces generally took up more transuranic contamination than the etched and "as received" steel finishes. The extent of corrosion on the steel surfaces was found, by scanning electron microscopy, to be greater in solutions containing Np and Pu in comparison to that observed from contact with Am containing solutions, indicating that redox activity of transuranics can influence the mechanism of stainless steel corrosion.

  11. Influence of Co content on the biocompatibility and bio-corrosion of super ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Y. R.; Jang, S. G.; Nam, H. S.; Shim, G. T.; Cho, H. H.; Kim, J. G.; Kim, Y. S.

    2008-12-01

    Bio-metals require high corrosion resistance, because their biocompatibility is closely related to this parameter. Bio-metals release metal ions into the human body, leading to deleterious effects. Allergies, dermatitis, and asthma are the predominant systemic effects resulting in the human body. In particular, Ni is one of the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. In the present work, we designed new ferritic stainless steels wherein Ni is replaced with Co under consideration of allergic respondes and microstructural stability. This work focuses on the effect of Co content on the biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of high PRE super ferritic stainless steels in bio-solution and acidic chloride solution. In the case of the acidic chloride solution, with increasing Co content in the ferritic stainless steels, passive current density increased and critical pitting temperature (CPT) decreased. Also, in the passive state, AC impedance and repassivation rate were reduced. These results are attributed to the thermodynamic stability of cobalt ions, as indicated in the EpH diagram for a Co-H2O system. However, in the case of bio-solutions, with increasing Co content of the alloys, the passive current density decreased. AC impedance and repassivation rate meanwhile increased in the passive state. This is due to the increased ratios of Cr2O3/Cr(OH)3 and [Metal Oxide]/Metal + Metal Oxide] of the passive film formed in bio-solution.

  12. Characterization and corrosion behavior of F6NM stainless steel treated in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng-yang; Cai, Zhen-bing; Yang, Wen-jin; Shen, Xiao-yao; Xue, Guo-hong; Zhu, Min-hao

    2018-03-01

    F6NM martensitic stainless steel was exposed to 350 °C water condition for 500, 1500, and 2500 h to simulate pressurized water reactor (PWR) condition. The characterization and corrosion behavior of the oxide film were investigated. Results indicate that the exposed steel surface formed a double-layer oxide film. The outer oxide film is Fe-rich and contains two type oxide particles. However, the inner oxide film is Cr-rich, and two oxide films, whose thicknesses increase with increasing exposure time. The oxide film reduces the corrosion behavior because the outer oxide film has many crack and pores. Finally, the mechanism and factors affecting the formation of the oxide film were investigated.

  13. Effect of Niobium on Phase Transformations, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Mariana Perez; Calderón-Hernández, José Wilmar; Magnabosco, Rodrigo; Hincapie-Ladino, Duberney; Alonso-Falleiros, Neusa

    2017-04-01

    The influence of niobium addition in a supermartensitic stainless steel with 13Cr-5Ni-2Mo has been studied. The steel with Nb tempered at 600 °C for 2 h showed improved mechanical resistance properties and lower degree of sensitization, without compromising elongation and pitting corrosion resistance, when compared to the reference steel. In order to understand the Nb effect in such steel, mainly regarding phase transformation, different tempering time intervals have been studied. The better performance of the SM2MoNb is attributed to the hindering effect that Nb has in the kinetics of the phase transformations during tempering, delaying the precipitation start and coarsening stages of the present phases.

  14. Sulfide stress corrosion study of a super martensitic stainless steel in H2S sour environments: Metallic sulfides formation and hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnot, Martin; Nogueira, Ricardo P.; Roche, Virginie; Berthomé, Grégory; Chauveau, Eric; Estevez, Rafael; Mantel, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their high corrosion resistance, super martensitic stainless steels are commonly used in the oil and gas industry, particularly in sour environments. Some grades are however susceptible to undergo hydrogen and mechanically-assisted corrosion processes in the presence of H2S, depending on the pH. The martensitic stainless steel EN 1.4418 grade exhibits a clear protective passive behavior with no sulfide stress corrosion cracking when exposed to sour environments of pH ≥ 4, but undergoes a steep decrease in its corrosion resistance at lower pH conditions. The present paper investigated this abrupt loss of corrosion resistance with electrochemical measurements as well as different physicochemical characterization techniques. Results indicated that below pH 4.0 the metal surface is covered by a thick (ca 40 μm) porous and defect-full sulfide-rich corrosion products layer shown to be straightforwardly related to the onset of hydrogen and sulfide mechanically-assisted corrosion phenomena.

  15. High temperature corrosion of austenitic stainless steel coils in a direct reduction plant in Mexico

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Juarez-Islas, J.A.; Campillo, B.; Chaudhary, N.

    1996-08-01

    The subject of this study is related to the performance of austenitic steels coils and tubes, in a range of temperatures between 425 to 870 C for the transport of reducing gases, in an installation involving the direct reduction of iron-ore by reforming natural gas. Evidence is presented that metal dusting is not the only unique high temperature corrosion mechanism that caused catastrophic failures of austenitic 304 (UNS S30400) coils and HK-40 (UNS J94204) tubes. Sensitization as well as stress corrosion cracking occurred in 304 stainless steel coils, and metal dusting occurred in tubes of HK-40, a high resistance alloy.more » The role of a continuous injection of H{sub 2}S to the process is suggested to avoid the high temperature metal dusting corrosion mechanism found in these kind of installations.« less

  16. Ennoblement, corrosion, and biofouling in brackish seawater: Comparison between six stainless steel grades.

    PubMed

    Huttunen-Saarivirta, E; Rajala, P; Marja-Aho, M; Maukonen, J; Sohlberg, E; Carpén, L

    2018-04-01

    In this work, six common stainless steel grades were compared with respect to ennoblement characteristics, corrosion performance and tendency to biofouling in brackish sea water in a pilot-scale cooling water circuit. Two tests were performed, each employing three test materials, until differences between the materials were detected. Open circuit potential (OCP) was measured continuously in situ. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were conducted before and after the tests. Exposed specimens were further subjected to examinations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and the biofouling was studied using epifluorescence microscopy, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and high-throughput sequencing (HTP sequencing). The results revealed dissimilarities between the stainless steel grades in corrosion behaviour and biofouling tendency. The test material that differed from the most of the other studied alloys was grade EN 1.4162. It experienced fastest and most efficient ennoblement of OCP, its passive area shrank to the greatest extent and the cathodic reaction was accelerated to a significant degree by the development of biofilm. Furthermore, microbiological analyses revealed that bacterial community on EN 1.4162 was dominated by Actinobacteria, whereas on the other five test materials Proteobacteria was the main bacterial phylum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stainless steel surface biofunctionalization with PMMA-bioglass coatings: compositional, electrochemical corrosion studies and microbiological assay.

    PubMed

    Floroian, L; Samoila, C; Badea, M; Munteanu, D; Ristoscu, C; Sima, F; Negut, I; Chifiriuc, M C; Mihailescu, I N

    2015-06-01

    A solution is proposed to surpass the inconvenience caused by the corrosion of stainless steel implants in human body fluids by protection with thin films of bioactive glasses or with composite polymer-bioactive glass nanostructures. Our option was to apply thin film deposition by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) which, to the difference to other laser or plasma techniques insures the protection of a more delicate material (a polymer in our case) against degradation or irreversible damage. The coatings composition, modification and corrosion resistance were investigated by FTIR and electrochemical techniques, under conditions which simulate their biological interaction with the human body. Mechanical testing demonstrates the adhesion, durability and resistance to fracture of the coatings. The coatings biocompatibility was assessed by in vitro studies and by flow cytometry. Our results support the unrestricted usage of coated stainless steel as a cheap alternative for human implants manufacture. They will be more accessible for lower prices in comparison with the majority present day fabrication of implants using Ti or Ti alloys.

  18. Effect of Secondary Phase Precipitation on the Corrosion Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steels

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kai Wang; Tjong, Sie Chin

    2014-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with austenitic and ferritic phases have been increasingly used for many industrial applications due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in acidic, caustic and marine environments. However, DSSs are susceptible to intergranular, pitting and stress corrosion in corrosive environments due to the formation of secondary phases. Such phases are induced in DSSs during the fabrication, improper heat treatment, welding process and prolonged exposure to high temperatures during their service lives. These include the precipitation of sigma and chi phases at 700–900 °C and spinodal decomposition of ferritic grains into Cr-rich and Cr-poor phases at 350–550 °C, respectively. This article gives the state-of the-art review on the microstructural evolution of secondary phase formation and their effects on the corrosion behavior of DSSs. PMID:28788129

  19. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  20. The structural and bio-corrosion barrier performance of Mg-substituted fluorapatite coating on 316L stainless steel human body implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifnabi, A.; Fathi, M. H.; Eftekhari Yekta, B.; Hossainalipour, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings were deposited on medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel via sol-gel dip coating method. Phase composition, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained coatings were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was also used to evaluate functional groups of the obtained coatings. The surface morphology and cross-section of the final coatings were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy was used to determine elemental chemical composition of the obtained coatings. In order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of uncoated and Mg-substituted fluorapatite coated 316L stainless steel, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed in physiological solutions at 37 ± 1 °C. Moreover, the released metallic ions from uncoated and coated substrates were measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) within 2 months of immersing in Ringer's solution at 36.5 ± 1 °C as an indication of biocompatibility. The results showed that fluoride and magnesium were successfully incorporated into apatite lattice structure and the prepared coatings were nanostructured with crystallinity of about 70%. Obtained coatings were totally crack-free and uniform and led to decrease in corrosion current densities of 316L stainless steel in physiological solutions. In addition, coated sample released much less ions such as Fe, Cr and Ni in physiological media. Therefore, it was concluded that Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings could improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of 316L stainless steel human body implants.

  1. Laser surface alloying of FeCoCrAlNi high-entropy alloy on 304 stainless steel to enhance corrosion and cavitation erosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Wu, C. L.; Zhang, C. H.; Guan, M.; Tan, J. Z.

    2016-10-01

    FeCoCrAlNi high-entropy alloy coating was synthesized with premixed high-purity Co, Cr, Al and Ni powders on 304 stainless steel by laser surface alloying, aiming at improving corrosion and cavitation erosion resistance. Phase constituents, microstructure and microhardness were investigated using XRD, SEM, and microhardness tester, respectively. The cavitation erosion and electrochemical corrosion behavior of FeCoCrAlNi coating in 3.5% NaCl solution were also evaluated using an ultrasonic vibrator and potentiodynamic polarization measurement. Experimental results showed that with appropriate laser processing parameters, FeCoCrAlNi coating with good metallurgical bonding to the substrate could be achieved. FeCoCrAlNi coating was composed of a single BCC solid solution. The formation of simple solid solutions in HEAs was the combined effect of mixing entropy (ΔSmix), mixing enthalpy (ΔHmix), atom-size difference (δ) and valence electron concentration (VEC), and the effect of ΔSmix was much larger than that of the other factors. The microhardness of the FeCoCrAlNi coating was ~3 times that of the 304 stainless steel. Both the corrosion and cavitation erosion resistance of the coating were improved. The cavitation erosion resistance for FeCoCrAlNi HEA coating was ~7.6 times that of 304 stainless steel. The corrosion resistance was also improved as reflected by a reduction in the current density of one order of magnitude as compared with 304 stainless steel.

  2. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  3. Accelerated corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel caused by marine aerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dake; Xia, Jin; Zhou, Enze; Zhang, Dawei; Li, Huabing; Yang, Chunguang; Li, Qi; Lin, Hai; Li, Xiaogang; Yang, Ke

    2017-02-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated through electrochemical and surface analyses. The electrochemical results showed that P. aeruginosa significantly reduced the corrosion resistance of 2205 DSS. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images showed that the depths of the largest pits on 2205 DSS with and without P. aeruginosa were 14.0 and 4.9μm, respectively, indicating that the pitting corrosion was accelerated by P. aeruginosa. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that CrO 3 and CrN formed on the 2205 DSS surface in the presence of P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Withdrawal Strength and Bending Yield Strength of Stainless Steel Nails

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that stainless steel nails have superior corrosion performance compared to carbon steel or galvanized nails in treated wood; however, their mechanical fastening behavior is unknown. In this paper, the performance of stainless steel nails is examined with respect to two important properties used in wood connection design: withdrawal strength...

  5. Comparative study on corrosion resistance and in vitro biocompatibility of bulk nanocrystalline and microcrystalline biomedical 304 stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Nie, F L; Wang, S G; Wang, Y B; Wei, S C; Zheng, Y F

    2011-07-01

    SUS 304 stainless steels have been widely used in orthodontics and implants such as archwires, brackets, and screws. The purpose of present study was to investigate the biocompatibility of both the commercial microcrystalline biomedical 304 stainless steel (microcrystalline 304ss) and novel-fabricated nanocrystalline 304 stainless steel (nanocrystalline 304ss). Bulk nanocrystalline 304ss sheets had been successfully prepared by microcrystalline 304ss plates using severe rolling technique. The electrochemical corrosion and ion release behavior immersion in artificial saliva were measured to evaluate the property of biocorrosion in oral environment. The cell lines of murine and human cell lines from oral and endothelial environment were co-cultured with extracts to evaluate the cytotoxicity and provide referential evidence in vivo. The polarization resistance trials indicated that nanocrystalline 304ss is more corrosion resistant than the microcrystalline 304ss in oral-like environment with higher corrosion potential, and the amount of toxic ions released into solution after immersion is lower than that of the microcrystalline 304ss and the daily dietary intake level. The cytotoxicity results also elucidated that nanocrystalline 304ss is biologically compatible in vitro, even better than that of microcrystalline 304ss. Based on the much higher mechanical and physical performances, nanocrystalline 304ss with enhanced biocorrosion property, well-behaved in vitro cytocompatibility can be a promising alternative in orthodontics and fixation fields in oral cavity. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dissolution corrosion of 316L austenitic stainless steels in contact with static liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrinou, Konstantina; Charalampopoulou, Evangelia; Van der Donck, Tom; Delville, Rémi; Schryvers, Dominique

    2017-07-01

    This work addresses the dissolution corrosion behaviour of 316L austenitic stainless steels. For this purpose, solution-annealed and cold-deformed 316L steels were simultaneously exposed to oxygen-poor (<10-8 mass%) static liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) for 253-3282 h at 500 °C. Corrosion was consistently more severe for the cold-drawn steels than the solution-annealed steel, indicating the importance of the steel thermomechanical state. The thickness of the dissolution-affected zone was non-uniform, and sites of locally-enhanced dissolution were occasionally observed. The progress of LBE dissolution attack was promoted by the interplay of certain steel microstructural features (grain boundaries, deformation twin laths, precipitates) with the dissolution corrosion process. The identified dissolution mechanisms were selective leaching leading to steel ferritization, and non-selective leaching; the latter was mainly observed in the solution-annealed steel. The maximum corrosion rate decreased with exposure time and was found to be inversely proportional to the depth of dissolution attack.

  7. Corrosion resistance improvement for 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents by trimethylsilane plasma nanocoatings

    PubMed Central

    Jones, John Eric; Chen, Meng; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    To improve their corrosion resistance and thus long-term biocompatibility, 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents were coated with trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coatings of 20–25 nm in thickness. Both direct current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) glow discharges were utilized for TMS plasma coatings and additional NH3/O2 plasma treatment to tailor the surface properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the coating surface chemistry. It was found that both DC and RF TMS plasma coatings had Si- and C-rich composition, and the O-and N-contents on the surfaces were substantially increased after NH3/O2 plasma treatment. Surface contact angle measurements showed that DC TMS plasma nanocoating with NH3/O2 plasma treatment generated very hydrophilic surface. The corrosion resistance of TMS plasma coated stents was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization and electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The potentiodynamic polarization demonstrated that the TMS plasma coated stents imparted higher corrosion potential and pitting potential, as well as lower corrosion current densities as compared with uncoated controls. The surface morphology of stents before and after potentiodynamic polarization testing was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, which indicated less corrosion on coated stents than uncoated controls. It was also noted that, from EIS data, the hydrophobic TMS plasma nanocoatings showed stable impedance modulus at 0.1 Hz after 21 day immersion in an electrolyte solution. These results suggest improved corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel stents by TMS plasma nanocoatings and great promise in reducing and blocking metallic ions releasing into the bloodstream. PMID:24500866

  8. Preparation and characterization of 304 stainless steel/Q235 carbon steel composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenning; Feng, Lajun; Feng, Hui; Cao, Ying; Liu, Lei; Cao, Mo; Ge, Yanfeng

    The composite material of 304 stainless steel reinforced Q235 carbon steel has been prepared by modified hot-rolling process. The resulted material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, three-electrode method, fault current impact method, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that metallurgical bond between the stainless steel layer and carbon steel substrate has been formed. The composite material exhibited good electrical conductivity and thermal stability. The average grounding resistance of the composite material was about 13/20 of dip galvanized steel. There has no surface crack and bubbling formed after fault current impact. The composite material led to a significant decrease in the corrosion current density in soil solution, compared with that of hot dip galvanized steel and bare carbon steel. On the basis polarization curve and EIS analyses, it can be concluded that the composite material showed improved anti-corrosion property than hot-dip galvanized steel.

  9. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  10. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Stainless Steel Components

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Peter, William H.; Lou, Xiaoyuan; List, III, Frederick Alyious

    This collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric Company aimed to evaluate the mechanical properties, microstructure, and porosity of the additively manufactured 316L stainless steel by ORNL’s Renishaw AM250 machine for nuclear application. The program also evaluated the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of the same material in high temperature water environments. Results show the properties of this material to be similar to the properties of 316L stainless steel fabricated additively with equipment from other manufacturers with slightly higher porosity. The stress corrosion crack growth rate is similar to that for wrought 316L stainlessmore » steel for an oxygenated high temperature water environment and slightly higher for a hydrogenated high temperature water environment. Optimized heat treatment of this material is expected to improve performance in high temperature water environments.« less

  11. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Novosibirsk during the 1980s [14]. In this process, particles of the coating material are accelerated by entrainment in a supersonic jet of gas ...THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COATINGS by John A Luhn June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Sarath...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CORROSION AND THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC

  12. Effect of electromagnetic interaction during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rentería, M. A.; López-Morelos, V. H.; González-Sánchez, J.; García-Hernández, R.; Dzib-Pérez, L.; Curiel-López, F. F.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) applied during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the resistance to localised corrosion in natural seawater was investigated. The heat affected zone (HAZ) of samples welded under EMILI showed a higher temperature for pitting initiation and lower dissolution under anodic polarisation in chloride containing solutions than samples welded without EMILI. The EMILI assisted welding process developed in the present work enhanced the resistance to localised corrosion due to a modification on the microstructural evolution in the HAZ and the fusion zone during the thermal cycle involved in fusion welding. The application of EMILI reduced the size of the HAZ, limited coarsening of the ferrite grains and promoted regeneration of austenite in this zone, inducing a homogeneous passive condition of the surface. EMILI can be applied during fusion welding of structural or functional components of diverse size manufactured with duplex stainless steel designed to withstand aggressive environments such as natural seawater or marine atmospheres.

  13. [Stainless steels for medical instruments].

    PubMed

    Feofilov, R N

    1981-01-01

    Both in the USSR and abroad similar types of martensitic and austenitic stainless steel are used for the manufacture of medical instruments. Martensitic steel, the cheapest and most economically alloyed, has the best combination of properties necessary for medical instruments. The analysis of the Soviet and foreign experience in using different grades of steel for the production of medical instruments demonstrates the expediency and possibility of improving the quality of martensitic steel and rolled stock, as well as that of medical instruments manufactured from these materials, by improving, the operations of the metallurgical and technological processes and by specifying more precisely the requirements for medical instruments. The possibility and expediency of using, in some technically justified cases, lower grades of alloyed steel instead of grade 12X18H9T for clamps and other instruments made of stainless steel, as well as highly corrosive grades of steel for microinstruments, have been established.

  14. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  15. Chemical coloring on stainless steel by ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zuohui; Xue, Yongqiang; Ju, Hongbin

    2018-01-01

    To solve the problems of high temperature and non-uniformity of coloring on stainless steel, a new chemical coloring process, applying ultrasonic irradiation to the traditional chemical coloring process, was developed in this paper. The effects of ultrasonic frequency and power density (sound intensity) on chemical coloring on stainless steel were studied. The uniformity of morphology and colors was observed with the help of polarizing microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS), meanwhile, the wear resistance and the corrosion resistance were investigated, and the effect mechanism of ultrasonic irradiation on chemical coloring was discussed. These results show that in the process of chemical coloring on stainless steel by ultrasonic irradiation, the film composition is the same as the traditional chemical coloring, and this method can significantly enhance the uniformity, the wear and corrosion resistances of the color film and accelerate the coloring rate which makes the coloring temperature reduced to 40°C. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation on the chemical coloring can be attributed to the coloring rate accelerated and the coloring temperature reduced by thermal-effect, the uniformity of coloring film improved by dispersion-effect, and the wear and corrosion resistances of coloring film enhanced by cavitation-effect. Ultrasonic irradiation not only has an extensive application prospect for chemical coloring on stainless steel but also provides an valuable reference for other chemical coloring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrochemical techniques implementation for corrosion rate measurement in function of humidity level in grounding systems (copper and stainless steel) in soil samples from Tunja (Colombia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Blanco, J.; Jimenez, C.; Vera-Monroy, S. P.; Mejía-Camacho, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, DC electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion rate of copper and stainless-steel electrodes used in grounding, varying the level of humidity, in sandy loam and clay loam soils. The maximum corrosion potentials were: for copper -211 and -236mV and for stainless steel of -252 and -281mV, in sandy loam and clay loam respectively, showing that in sandy loam the values are higher, about 30mV. The mechanism by which steel controls corrosion is by diffusion, whereas in copper it is carried out by transfer of mass and charge, which affects the rate of corrosion, which in copper reached a maximum value of 5mm/yr and in Steel 0.8mm/yr, determined by Tafel approximations. The behaviour of the corrosion rate was mathematically adjusted to an asymptotic model that faithfully explains the C.R. as a function of humidity, however, it is necessary to define the relation between the factor □ established in the model and the precise characteristics of the soil, such as the permeability or quantity of ions present.

  17. Development of Ferrium S53 High-Strength, Corrosion-Resistant Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    strength steel used in landing gear, and equivalent in corrosion resistance to the lower strength 15-5PH stainless steel used in actuators. It also...5PH stainless steel used in modern aerospace actuators. These objectives were met, with two minor exceptions: (1) the tensile yield of S53 is... stainless steel used in modern aerospace actuators. The work was initially funded as a 1-year SERDP proof-of-principle project. In this first

  18. Effect of Welding Process on Microstructure, Mechanical and Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made to weld 2205 Duplex stainless steel of 6mm thick plate using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A- GTAW) process using silica powder as activated flux. Present work is aimed at studying the effect of welding process on depth of penetration, width of weld zone of 2205 duplex stainless steel. It also aims to observe the microstructural changes and its effect on mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel welds. Metallography is done to observe the microstructural changes of the welds using image analyzer attached to the optical microscopy. Hardness studies, tensile and ductility bend tests were evaluated for mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out using a basic GillAC electro-chemical system in 3.5% NaCl solution to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour. Results of the present investigation established that increased depth of penetration and reduction of weld width in a single pass by activated GTAW with the application of SiO2 flux was observed when compared with conventional GTAW process. It may be attributed to the arc constriction effect. Microstructure of the weld zones for both the welds is observed to be having combination of austenite and delta ferrite. Grain boundary austenite (GBA) with Widmanstatten-type austenite (WA) of plate-like feature was nucleated from the grain boundaries in the weld zone of A-GTAW process. Mechanical properties are relatively low in activated GTAW process and are attributed to changes in microstructural morphology of austenite. Improved pitting corrosion resistance was observed for the welds made with A-GTAW process.

  19. The effect of inhibitor sodium nitrate on pitting corrosion of dissimilar material weldment joint of stainless steel AISI 304 and mild steel SS 400

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hilca, B. R., E-mail: bangkithilca@yahoo.com; Triyono, E-mail: triyonomesin@uns.ac.id

    This study experimentally evaluated the effect of Sodium Nitrate inhibitor (NaNO{sub 3}) of 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% on NaCl 3.5% toward pitting corrosion of dissimilar metal welding joint between stainless steel AISI 304 and mild steel SS 400. Electrochemical corrosion was tested using potentiodynamic polarization. Further the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) conducted to analyze the specimen. Chemical composition analysis used Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS). The highest efficiency of sodium nitrate for ER 308 attained 63.8% and 64.89%for ER 309L. The specimen surface which observed through SEM showed decrease of pitting corrosion respectively with the addition of sodium nitrate contentmore » as inhibitor.« less

  20. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  1. Effects of the Treating Time on Microstructure and Erosion Corrosion Behavior of Salt-Bath-Nitrided 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Mingxing; Fan, Hongyuan; Zeng, Dezhi; Xiong, Ji

    2013-08-01

    The effects of salt-bath nitriding time on the microstructure, microhardness, and erosion-corrosion behavior of nitrided 17-4PH stainless steel at 703 K (430 °C) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and erosion-corrosion testing. The experimental results revealed that the microstructure and phase constituents of the nitrided surface alloy are highly process condition dependent. When 17-4PH stainless steel was subjected to complex salt-bathing nitriding, the main phase of the nitrided layer was expanded martensite ( α`), expanded austenite (S), CrN, Fe4N, and Fe2N. The thickness of nitrided layers increased with the treating time. The salt-bath nitriding improves effectively the surface hardness. The maximum values measured from the treated surface are observed to be 1100 HV0.1 for 40 hours approximately, which is about 3.5 times as hard as the untreated material (309 HV0.1). Low-temperature nitriding can improve the erosion-corrosion resistance against two-phase flow. The sample nitrided for 4 hours has the best corrosion resistance.

  2. Mechanical properties of low-nickel stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Demand for improved corrosion-resistant steels, coupled with increased emphasis on conserving strategic metals, has led to development of family of stainless steels in which manganese and nitrogen are substituted for portion of usual nickel content. Advantages are approximately-doubled yield strength in annealed condition, better resistance to stress-corrosion cracking, retention of low magnetic permeability even after severe cold working, excellent strength and ductility at cryogenic temperatures, superior resistance to wear and galling, and excellent high-temperature properties.

  3. Crevice Corrosion Behavior of 45 Molybdenum-Containing Stainless Steels in Seawater.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Armco, Avesta Jernverks, Cabot, Carpenter Technology, Crucible, Eastern, Firth-Brown, Huntington, Jessup, Langley Alloys, and Uddeholm. 16...Department of Energy, Report ANL/OTEC-BCM-022. 7. Wallen, B., and M. Liljas, " Avesta 254 SMO - A New, High Molybdenum Stainless Steel," presented at NKM8...1977).; 11. Wallen, B., " Avesta 254 SMO - A Stainless Steel for Seawater Service," presented at the Advanced Stainless Steels for Turbine Condensors

  4. Analysis of the Enameled AISI 316LVM Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukovec, Mitja; Xhanari, Klodian; Lešer, Tadej; Petovar, Barbara; Finšgar, Matjaž

    2018-03-01

    In this work, four different enamels were coated on AISI 316LVM stainless steel and the corrosion resistance of these samples was tested in 5 wt.% NaCl solution at room temperature. The preparation procedure of the enamels was optimized in terms of firing temperature, time and composition. First the thermal expansion was measured using dilatometry followed by electrochemical analysis using chronopotentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic polarization. The topography of the most resistant sample was obtained by 3D-profilometry. All samples coated with enamel showed significantly higher corrosion and dilatation resistance compared with the uncoated stainless steel material.

  5. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Elastomer-induced crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel heat exchanger plates in sour amine service

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hay, M.G.; Baron, J.J.; Moffat, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    Types S31600 and S31254 stainless steel heat exchanger plates have suffered crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking under gaskets in rich amine service in a sour gas plant. The gasket material, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), has been used successfully for many years at other sour gas plants. Laboratory testing has duplicated the corrosion observed and shown that the mechanism is synergistic sulfide-halide attack. The use of a bromine plus chlorine-activated curing system for the EPDM rubber gaskets provided the necessary halides. Laboratory testing identified some nickel-based superalloys which were resistant to this corrosion and also demonstrated that essentially halogen-free, peroxide-cured EPDMmore » gaskets do not cause attack of S31600 or S31254. The heat exchanger packs were replaced with S31600 plates and peroxide-cured EPDM gaskets having a specified total halogen concentration of 200 ppm maximum. Field operating experience has been excellent.« less

  7. Biomaterial Studies on AISI 316L Stainless Steel after Magnetoelectropolishing

    PubMed Central

    Hryniewicz, Tadeusz; Rokosz, Krzysztof; Filippi, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    The polarisation characteristics of the electropolishing process in a magnetic field (MEP – magnetoelectropolishing), in comparison with those obtained under standard/conventional process (EP) conditions, have been obtained. The occurrence of an EP plateau has been observed in view of the optimization of MEP process. Up-to-date stainless steel surface studies always indicated some amount of free-metal atoms apart from the detected oxides and hydroxides. Such a morphology of the surface film usually affects the thermodynamic stability and corrosion resistance of surface oxide layer and is one of the most important features of stainless steels. With this new MEP process we can improve metal surface properties by making the stainless steel more resistant to halides encountered in a variety of environments. Furthermore, in this paper the stainless steel surface film study results have been presented. The results of the corrosion research carried out by the authors on the behaviour of the most commonly used material − medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel both in Ringer’s body fluid and in aqueous 3% NaCl solution have been investigated and presented earlier elsewhere, though some of these results, concerning the EIS Nyquist plots and polarization curves are also revealed herein. In this paper an attempt to explain this peculiar performance of 316L stainless steel has been undertaken. The SEM studies, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on 316L samples after three treatments: MP – abrasive polishing (800 grit size), EP – conventional electrolytic polishing, and MEP – magnetoelectropolishing. It has been found that the proposed magnetoelectropolishing (MEP) process considerably modifies the morphology and the composition of the surface film, thus leading to improved corrosion resistance of the studied 316L SS.

  8. Measuring secondary phases in duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calliari, I.; Brunelli, K.; Dabalà, M.; Ramous, E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of duplex stainless steels is limited by their susceptibility to the formation of dangerous intermetallic phases resulting in detrimental effects on impact toughness and corrosion resistance. This precipitation and the quantitative determinations of the phases have received considerable attention and different precipitation sequences (σ phase, χ phase, and carbides) have been suggested. This study investigates the phase transformation during continuous cooling and isothermal treatments in commercial duplex stainless steel grades and the effects on alloy properties, and compares the most common techniques of analysis.

  9. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of 431 stainless steel alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanical properties of type 431 stainless steel in two conditions: annealed bar and hardened and tempered bar are presented. Test specimens, manufactured from approximately 1.0 inch (2.54 cm) diameter bar stock, were tested at temperatures of 80 F (+26.7 C), 0 F (-17.8 C), -100 F (-73 C), and -200 F (-129 C). The test data indicated excellent tensile strength, notched/unnotched tensile ratio, ductility, shear, and impact properties at all testing temperatures. Results of the alternate immersion stress corrosion tests on stressed and unstressed longitudinal tensile specimens 0.1250 inch (0.3175 cm) diameter and transverse C-ring specimens, machined from 1.0 inch (2.54 cm) diameter bar stock, indicated that the material is not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking when tested in a 3.5 percent NaCl solution for 180 days.

  10. Hydrogen-facilitated corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel of type 310

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Qiao Lijie; Chu Wuyang; Miao Huijun

    1993-04-01

    The effects of hydrogen precharge and stress on anodic dissolution for Type 310 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) have been investigated. An experiment determining the effect of hydrogen on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was carried out in a boiling 42% MgCl[sub 2] solution and in a 2.5 mol/l H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] + 1 mol/l HCl solution. The results showed that both hydrogen and stress would increase the dissolution rate, and the effects of hydrogen and stress on the dissolution rate were synergistic rather than simply additive. Hydrogen lowered the threshold stress and the shortened fracture time of SCC in a boilingmore » MgCl[sub 2] solution by a factor of 1/5 and 10, respectively.« less

  11. Electrochemical analysis of the corrosion inhibition effect of trypsin complex on the pitting corrosion of 420 martensitic stainless steel in 2M H2SO4 solution.

    PubMed

    Loto, Roland Tolulope

    2018-01-01

    Inhibition effect of trypsin complex (TC) on the pitting corrosion of martensitic stainless steel (type 420) in 1M H2SO4 solution was studied with potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential measurement and optical microscopy. TC reduced the corrosion rate of the steel with maximum inhibition efficiency of 80.75%. Corrosion potential shifted anodically due to the electrochemical action of TC. The pitting potential increased from 1.088VAg/AgCl (3M) at 0% TC to 1.365VAg/AgCl(3M) at 4% TC. TC shifts the open circuit corrosion potential from -0.270s at 0% TC concentration to -0.255V at 5% TC. The compound completely adsorbed onto the steel according to Langmuir, Frumkin and Temkin isotherms. ATF-FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the inhibition mode to be through surface coverage. Thermodynamic calculations showed physisorption molecular interaction. Corrosion pits are present on the uninhibited 420 morphology in comparison to TC inhibited surface which slightly deteriorated.

  12. Electrochemical analysis of the corrosion inhibition effect of trypsin complex on the pitting corrosion of 420 martensitic stainless steel in 2M H2SO4 solution

    PubMed Central

    Loto, Roland Tolulope

    2018-01-01

    Inhibition effect of trypsin complex (TC) on the pitting corrosion of martensitic stainless steel (type 420) in 1M H2SO4 solution was studied with potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential measurement and optical microscopy. TC reduced the corrosion rate of the steel with maximum inhibition efficiency of 80.75%. Corrosion potential shifted anodically due to the electrochemical action of TC. The pitting potential increased from 1.088VAg/AgCl (3M) at 0% TC to 1.365VAg/AgCl(3M) at 4% TC. TC shifts the open circuit corrosion potential from -0.270s at 0% TC concentration to -0.255V at 5% TC. The compound completely adsorbed onto the steel according to Langmuir, Frumkin and Temkin isotherms. ATF-FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the inhibition mode to be through surface coverage. Thermodynamic calculations showed physisorption molecular interaction. Corrosion pits are present on the uninhibited 420 morphology in comparison to TC inhibited surface which slightly deteriorated. PMID:29672541

  13. Reduction of liquid metal embrittlement in copper-brazed stainless steel joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, T.; Fedorov, V.; Elßner, M.; Wagner, G.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Due to its very good formability and the low raw material cost, pure copper in form of foils is commonly used to braze plate heat exchangers made of stainless steel. The difference in the electrochemical potentials of brazing filler and base material leads to corrosion effects in contact with electrolytes. This may lead to leakages, which decrease the reliability of the heat exchanger during service in potable water. The dissolution of the emerging corrosion products of brazing filler and base material induces the migration of heavy metal ions, such as Cu2+ and Ni2+, into the potable water. The so-called liquid metal embrittlement, which takes place during the brazing process, may intensify the corrosion. The brazing filler infiltrates the stainless steel along the grain boundaries and causes an embrittlement. This paper deals with the determination of the grain boundary erosion dependent on the degree of deformation and heat treatment of the stainless steel AISI 316L.

  14. Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoh, S. Y.; Senin, H. B.; Nik, W. N. Wan; Amin, M. M.

    2007-05-01

    The inhibition of sodium benzoate for stainless steel controlling corrosion was studied in seawater at room temperature. Three sets of sample have been immersed in seawater containing sodium benzoate with the concentrations of 0.3M, 0.6M and 1.0M respectively. One set of sample has been immersed in seawater without adding any sodium benzoate. It was found that the highest corrosion rate was observed for the stainless steel with no inhibitor was added to the seawater. As the concentration of sodium benzoate being increased, the corrosion rate is decreases. Results show that by the addition of 1.0M of sodium benzoate in seawater samples, it giving ≥ 90% efficiencies.

  15. Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Seoh, S. Y.; Senin, H. B.; Nik, W. N. Wan

    2007-05-09

    The inhibition of sodium benzoate for stainless steel controlling corrosion was studied in seawater at room temperature. Three sets of sample have been immersed in seawater containing sodium benzoate with the concentrations of 0.3M, 0.6M and 1.0M respectively. One set of sample has been immersed in seawater without adding any sodium benzoate. It was found that the highest corrosion rate was observed for the stainless steel with no inhibitor was added to the seawater. As the concentration of sodium benzoate being increased, the corrosion rate is decreases. Results show that by the addition of 1.0M of sodium benzoate in seawatermore » samples, it giving {>=} 90% efficiencies.« less

  16. Investigation of effect of fluoride on corrosion of 2S-0 aluminum and 347 stainless steel in fuming nitric acid at 170 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, Charles E; Morrell, Gerald

    1954-01-01

    The effect of small additions of fluoride on the corrosion of 2S-0 aluminum and 347 stainless steel by fuming nitric acid at 170 degrees F has been evaluated quantitatively by the determination of the weight loss of metal specimens immersed in the acid. The ratio of metal surface area to volume of acid was approximately 7.5 inch (superscript)-1 in all cases. It was found that for acids containing no fluorides the weight loss of aluminum was approximately 1/5 that of stainless steel. Addition of 1 percent fluoride ion to the acid reduced the weight loss of both metals to practically zero even after 26 days of exposure to the acid at 170 degrees F. The minimum quantity of fluoride ion required to inhibit corrosion was found to be approximately 0.25 and 0.5 percent for aluminum and stainless steel, respectively, in white fuming nitric acid and 0.5 and 1 percent in red fuming nitric acid (18 percent nitrogen dioxide). These fluoride percentages were based on the total weight of acid. Provided the concentration of fluoride ion was sufficient to inhibit corrosion, the source of these ions was immaterial. Additional information concerning the effect of fluorides on corrosion was obtained by measuring the electrode potentials of the metals against a platinum reference electrode.

  17. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hug, E.; Prasath Babu, R.; Monnet, I.; Etienne, A.; Moisy, F.; Pralong, V.; Enikeev, N.; Abramova, M.; Sauvage, X.; Radiguet, B.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV 56Fe5+ ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  18. Evaluation of the electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance for layers deposited via sputtering on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, J.; Salas, Y.; Jiménez, C.; Pineda, Y.; Bustamante, A.

    2017-12-01

    In some Engineering fields, we need that conductive materials have a mechanic performance and specific electrical for that they maintain conditions or corrosive attack if they are in the environment or if they are closed structure. The stainless steels have an inert film on their surface and it has the function to act in contrast to external agents who generates the corrosion, especially for stings, spoiling the film until to fail. We found a solution taking into account the electrical performance and the anticorrosive; into the process we put recovering of specific oxides on, stainless steel using the method of sputtering with Unbalanced Magnetron, (UBM) varying the oxygen in the reactive environment. The coating obtained had a thickness one micron approximately and we saw on serious structural uniformity [1]. The corrosion resistance was evaluated through the potentiodynamics polarization and electrochemical spectroscopy impedance in NACL according to the standard. The cathode protection is the most important method employed for the corrosion prevention of metallic structures in the soil or immersed on the water. The electrical resistivity was evaluated with the four points methods and it showed a behaviour of diode type in some substrates with a threshold potential in several volts. We noticed a simple resistance solution when it was analysed in the Nyquist graphics whit the Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy technique. With on equivalent circuit, for this reason we determinate a variation in the corrosion speed in almost two orders of magnitude when we analysed the potentiodynamics curve by Tafel approximation. The data obtained and analysed show that this type of surface modification maintains the conductivity condition at the interface, improving the resistance in relation whit the corrosion of these elements where the recovering allowed the ionic flow wished for overcoming threshold voltage, acting as an insulator in different cases.

  19. Enhanced corrosion resistance of strontium hydroxyapatite coating on electron beam treated surgical grade stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopi, D.; Rajeswari, D.; Ramya, S.; Sekar, M.; R, Pramod; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kavitha, L.; Ramaseshan, R.

    2013-12-01

    The surface of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) is irradiated by high energy low current DC electron beam (HELCDEB) with energy of 500 keV and beam current of 1.5 mA followed by the electrodeposition of strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HAp) to enhance its corrosion resistance in physiological fluid. The coatings were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). The Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS exhibits micro-flower structure. Electrochemical results show that the Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS possesses maximum corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution.

  20. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of 2707 Hyper-Duplex Stainless Steel by Marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huabing; Zhou, Enze; Zhang, Dawei; Xu, Dake; Xia, Jin; Yang, Chunguang; Feng, Hao; Jiang, Zhouhua; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a serious problem in many industries because it causes huge economic losses. Due to its excellent resistance to chemical corrosion, 2707 hyper duplex stainless steel (2707 HDSS) has been used in the marine environment. However, its resistance to MIC was not experimentally proven. In this study, the MIC behavior of 2707 HDSS caused by the marine aerobe Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Electrochemical analyses demonstrated a positive shift in the corrosion potential and an increase in the corrosion current density in the presence of the P. aeruginosa biofilm in the 2216E medium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis results showed a decrease in Cr content on the coupon surface beneath the biofilm. The pit imaging analysis showed that the P. aeruginosa biofilm caused a largest pit depth of 0.69 μm in 14 days of incubation. Although this was quite small, it indicated that 2707 HDSS was not completely immune to MIC by the P. aeruginosa biofilm. PMID:26846970

  1. Electrochemical study of Type 304 and 316L stainless steels in simulated body fluids and cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yee-Chin; Katsuma, Shoji; Fujimoto, Shinji; Hiromoto, Sachiko

    2006-11-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of Type 304 and 316L stainless steels was studied in Hanks' solution, Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM), serum containing medium (MEM with 10% of fetal bovine serum) without cells, and serum containing medium with cells over a 1-week period. Polarization resistance measurements indicated that the stainless steels were resistant to Hanks' and MEM solutions. Type 304 was more susceptible to pitting corrosion than Type 316L in Hanks' and MEM solutions. The uniform corrosion resistance of stainless steels, determined by R(p), was lower in culturing medium than in Hanks' and MEM. The low corrosion resistance was due to surface passive film with less protective to reveal high anodic dissolution rate. When cells were present, the initial corrosion resistance was low, but gradually increased after 3 days, consistent with the trend of cell coverage. The presence of cells was found to suppress the cathodic reaction, that is, oxygen reduction, and increase the uniform corrosion resistance as a consequence. On the other hand, both Type 304 and 316L stainless steels became more susceptible to pitting corrosion when they were covered with cells.

  2. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzner, Nathan

    Friction welding, a solid-state joining method, is presented as a novel alternative process step for lining mild steel pipe and forged components internally with a corrosion resistant (CR) metal alloy for petrochemical applications. Currently, fusion welding is commonly used for stainless steel overlay cladding, but this method is costly, time-consuming, and can lead to disbonding in service due to a hard martensite layer that forms at the interface due to partial mixing at the interface between the stainless steel CR metal and the mild steel base. Firstly, the process parameter space was explored for inertia friction butt welding using AISI type 304L stainless steel and AISI 1018 steel to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties effects. A conceptual model for heat flux density versus radial location at the faying surface was developed with consideration for non-uniform pressure distribution due to frictional forces. An existing 1 D analytical model for longitudinal transient temperature distribution was modified for the dissimilar metals case and to account for material lost to the flash. Microstructural results from the experimental dissimilar friction welds of 304L stainless steel to 1018 steel were used to discuss model validity. Secondly, the microstructure and mechanical property implications were considered for replacing the current fusion weld cladding processes with friction welding. The nominal friction weld exhibited a smaller heat softened zone in the 1018 steel than the fusion cladding. As determined by longitudinal tensile tests across the bond line, the nominal friction weld had higher strength, but lower apparent ductility, than the fusion welds due to the geometric requirements for neck formation adjacent to a rigid interface. Martensite was identified at the dissimilar friction weld interface, but the thickness was smaller than that of the fusion welds, and the morphology was discontinuous due to formation by a mechanism of solid

  3. Structure and properties of corrosion and wear resistant Cr-Mn-N steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenel, U. R.; Knott, B. R.

    1987-06-01

    Steels containing about 12 pct Cr, 10 pct Mn, and 0.2 pct N have been shown to have an unstable austenitic microstructure and have good ductility, extreme work hardening, high fracture strength, excellent toughness, good wear resistance, and moderate corrosion resistance. A series of alloys containing 9.5 to 12.8 pct Cr, 5.0 to 10.4 pct Mn, 0.16 to 0.32 pct N, 0.05 pct C, and residual elements typical of stainless steels was investigated by microstructural examination and mechanical, abrasion, and corrosion testing. Microstructures ranged from martensite to unstable austenite. The unstable austenitic steels transformed to α martensite on deformation and displayed very high work hardening, exceeding that of Hadfield’s manganese steels. Fracture strengths similar to high carbon martensitic stainless steels were obtained while ductility and toughness values were high, similar to austenitic stainless steels. Resistance to abrasive wear exceeded that of commercial abrasion resistant steels and other stainless steels. Corrosion resistance was similar to that of other 12 pct Cr steels. Properties were not much affected by minor compositional variations or rolled-in nitrogen porosity. In 12 pct Cr-10 pct Mn alloys, ingot porosity was avoided when nitrogen levels were below 0.19 pet, and austenitic microstructures were obtained when nitrogen levels exceeded 0.14 pct.

  4. The Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steel 316L in Novel Quaternary Eutectic Molten Salt System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Mantha, Divakar; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2017-03-01

    In this article, the corrosion behavior of stainless steel 316L in a low melting point novel LiNO3-NaNO3-KNO3-NaNO2 eutectic salt mixture was investigated at 695 K which is considered as thermally stable temperature using electrochemical and isothermal dipping methods. The passive region in the anodic polarization curve indicates the formation of protective oxides layer on the sample surface. After isothermal dipping corrosion experiments, samples were analyzed using SEM and XRD to determine the topography, corrosion products, and scale growth mechanisms. It was found that after long-term immersion in the LiNO3-NaNO3-KNO3-NaNO2 molten salt, LiFeO2, LiFe5O8, Fe3O4, (Fe, Cr)3O4 and (Fe, Ni)3O4 oxides were formed. Among these corrosion products, LiFeO2 formed a dense and protective layer which prevents the SS 316L from severe corrosion.

  5. Study of the corrosion behaviors of 304 austenite stainless steel specimens exposed to static liquid lithium at 600 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiancai; Zuo, Guizhong; Ren, Jun; Xu, Wei; Sun, Zhen; Huang, Ming; Hu, Wangyu; Hu, Jiansheng; Deng, Huiqiu

    2016-11-01

    Investigation of corrosion behavior of stainless steel served as one kind of structure materials exposed to liquid lithium (Li) is one of the keys to apply liquid Li as potential plasma facing materials (PFM) or blanket coolant in the fusion device. Corrosion experiments of 304 austenite stainless steel (304 SS) were carried out in static liquid Li at 600 K and up to1584 h at high vacuum with pressure less than 4 × 10-4 Pa. After exposure to liquid Li, it was found that the weight of 304 SS slightly decreased with weight loss rate of 5.7 × 10-4 g/m2/h and surface hardness increased by about 50 HV. Lots of spinel-like grains and holes were observed on the surface of specimens measured by SEM. By further EDS, XRD and metallographic analyzing, it was confirmed that the main compositions of spinel-like grains were M23C6 carbides, and 304 SS produced a non-uniform corrosion behavior by preferential grain boundary attack, possibly due to the easy formation of M23C6 carbides and/or formation of Li compound at grain boundaries.

  6. Effect of thermal treatment on the corrosion resistance of Type 316L stainless steel exposed in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D. A.; Cook, W. G.; Kish, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    There are still unknown aspects about the growth mechanism of oxide scales formed on candidate stainless steel fuel cladding materials during exposure in supercritical water (SCW) under the conditions relevant to the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). The tendency for intermetallic precipitates to form within the grains and on grain boundaries during prolonged exposure at high temperatures represents an unknown factor to corrosion resistance, since they tend to bind alloyed Cr. The objective of this study was to better understand the extent to which intermetallic precipitates affects the mode and extent of corrosion in SCW. Type 316L stainless steel, used as a model Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloy, was exposed to 25 MPa SCW at 550 °C for 500 h in a static autoclave for this purpose. Mechanically-abraded samples were tested in the mill-annealed (MA) and a thermally-treated (TT) condition. The thermal treatment was conducted at 815 °C for 1000 h to precipitate the carbide (M23C6), chi (χ), laves (η) and sigma (σ) phases. It was found that although relatively large intermetallic precipitates formed at the scale/alloy interface locally affected the oxide scale formation, their discontinuous formation did not affect the short-term overall apparent corrosion resistance.

  7. Analysis of features of stainless steels in dissimilar welded joints in chloride inducted corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Stainless steels of femtic-austenitic microstructure that means the duplex Cr-Ni-Mo steels, in comparison with austenitic steel includes less expensive nickel and has much better mechanical properties with good formability and corrosion resistance, even in environments containing chloride ions. Similar share of high chromium ferrite and austenite, which is characterized by high ductility, determines that the duplex steels have good crack resistance at temperatures up to approximately -40°C. The steels containing approximately 22% Cr, 5% Ni, 3% Mo and 0.2% N crystallizes as a solid solution δ, partially transforming from the temperature of about 1200°C to 850°C into the phase α. The stable structure of considered steels, at temperatures above 850°C, is ferrite, and at lower temperatures the mixture of phase γ+α +σ. The two-phase structure α+γ the duplex steel obtains after hyperquenching at the temperature of stability of the mixture of α+γ phases, and the share of the phases depends on the hyper quenching attributes. Hyperquenching in water, with a temperature close to 1200°C, ensures the instance in the microstructure of the steel a large share of ferrite and a small share of the high chromium austenite. This causes the increase of strength properties and reducing the plasticity of the steel and its resistance ability to cracking and corrosion. Slower cooling from the mentioned temperature, for example in the air, enables the partial transformation of the a phase into the γ one (α → γ) and increasing the share of austenite in the steel structure. It leads to improvement of plasticity properties. In the paper are presented the results of investigations of heteronymous welded joints of duplex steel and austenitic one. The results include the relation between the chemical composition of steels and their weldability.

  8. Corrosion-induced microstructural developments in 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li2BeF4(FLiBe) salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guiqiu; He, Lingfeng; Carpenter, David; Sridharan, Kumar

    2016-12-01

    The microstructural developments in the near-surface regions of AISI 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li2BeF4 (FLiBe) salt have been investigated with the goal of using this material for the construction of the fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR), a leading nuclear reactor concept for the next generation nuclear plants (NGNP). Tests were conducted in molten FLiBe salt (melting point: 459 °C) at 700 °C in graphite crucibles and 316 stainless steel crucibles for exposure duration of up to 3000 h. Corrosion-induced microstructural changes in the near-surface regions of the samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with EDS capabilities. Intergranular corrosion attack in the near-surface regions was observed with associated Cr depletion along the grain boundaries. High-angle grain boundaries (15-180°) were particularly prone to intergranular attack and Cr depletion. The depth of attack extended to the depths of 22 μm after 3000-h exposure for the samples tested in graphite crucible, while similar exposure in 316 stainless steel crucible led to the attack depths of only about 11 μm. Testing in graphite crucibles led to the formation of nanometer-scale Mo2C, Cr7C3 and Al4C3 particle phases in the near-surface regions of the material. The copious depletion of Cr in the near-surface regions induced a γ-martensite to α-ferrite phase (FeNix) transformation. Based on the microstructural analysis, a thermal diffusion controlled corrosion model was developed and experimentally validated for predicting long-term corrosion attack depth.

  9. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of nitrogen-rich surface layers on AISI 304 stainless steel by rapid nitriding in a hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; He, Yongyong; Zhang, Shangzhou; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yijie

    2018-01-01

    Nitriding treatments have been successfully applied to austenitic stainless steels to improve their hardness and tribological properties. However, at temperatures above 450 °C, conventional plasma nitriding processes decrease the corrosion resistance due to the formation of CrN phases within the modified layer. In this work, AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were efficiently treated by rapid plasma nitriding at a high temperature of 530 °C in a hollow cathode discharge. The enhanced ionization obtained in the hollow cathode configuration provided a high current density and, consequently, a high temperature could be attained in a short time. The nitrided layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the dual-layer structure of the nitrided layer consists of a high-N face-centered cubic structure with a free CrN precipitate outer (top) layer and a nitrogen-expanded austenite S-phase bottom layer. The rapid nitriding-assisted hollow cathode discharge technique permits the use of high temperatures, as high as 530 °C, without promoting degradation in the corrosion resistance of stainless steel.

  10. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification on the Residual Stress, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chang; Telang, Abhishek; Gill, Amrinder; Wen, Xingshuo; Mannava, Seetha R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) of 304 stainless steel welds was carried out. UNSM effectively eliminates the tensile stress generated during welding and imparts beneficial compressive residual stresses. In addition, UNSM can effectively refine the grains and increase hardness in the near-surface region. Corrosion tests in boiling MgCl2 solution demonstrate that UNSM can significantly improve the corrosion resistance due to the compressive residual stresses and changes in the near-surface microstructure.

  11. Corrosion and wear behaviors of boronized AISI 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayali, Yusuf; Büyüksaǧiş, Aysel; Yalçin, Yılmaz

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the effects of a boronizing treatment on the corrosion and wear behaviors of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L) were examined. The corrosion behavior of the boronized samples was studied via electrochemical methods in a simulation body fluid (SBF) and the wear behavior was examined using the ball-on-disk wear method. It was observed that the boride layer that formed on the AISI 316L surface had a flat and smooth morphology. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction analyses show that the boride layer contained FeB, Fe2B, CrB, Cr2B, NiB, and Ni2B phases. Boride layer thickness increased with an increasing boronizing temperature and time. The boronizing treatment also increased the surface hardness of the AISI 316L. Although there was no positive effect of the coating on the corrosion resistance in the SBF medium. Furthermore, a decrease in the friction coefficient was recorded for the boronized AISI 316L. As the boronizing temperature increased, the wear rate decreased in both dry and wet mediums. As a result, the boronizing treatment contributed positively to the wear resistance by increasing the surface hardness and by decreasing the friction coefficient of the AISI 316L.

  12. Effect of Ultrasonic Nano-Crystal Surface Modification (UNSM) on the Passivation Behavior of Aged 316L Stainless Steel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Young-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Stainless steels have good corrosion resistance in many environments but welding or aging can decrease their resistance. This work focused on the effect of aging time and ultrasonic nano-crystal surface modification on the passivation behavior of 316L stainless steel. In the case of slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel, increasing the aging time drastically decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film, even though aging did not form chromium carbide and a chromium depletion zone. This behavior is due to the micro-galvanic corrosion between the matrix and carbon segregated area, and this shows the importance of carbon segregation in grain boundaries to the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steel, in addition to the formation of the chromium depletion zone. UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano Crystal Surface Modification)-treatment to the slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel increased the pitting potential, decreased the passive current density, and increased the resistance of the passive film. However, in the case of heavily sensitized 316L stainless steel, UNSM-treatment decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film. This behavior is due to the dual effects of the UNSM-treatment. That is, the UNSM-treatment reduced the carbon segregation, regardless of whether the stainless steel 316L was slightly or heavily sensitized. However, since this treatment made mechanical flaws in the outer surface in the case of the heavily sensitized stainless steel, UNSM-treatment may eliminate chromium carbide, and this flaw can be a pitting initiation site, and therefore decrease the pitting corrosion resistance. PMID:28773067

  13. Effect of Ultrasonic Nano-Crystal Surface Modification (UNSM) on the Passivation Behavior of Aged 316L Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Young-Sik

    2017-06-27

    Stainless steels have good corrosion resistance in many environments but welding or aging can decrease their resistance. This work focused on the effect of aging time and ultrasonic nano-crystal surface modification on the passivation behavior of 316L stainless steel. In the case of slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel, increasing the aging time drastically decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film, even though aging did not form chromium carbide and a chromium depletion zone. This behavior is due to the micro-galvanic corrosion between the matrix and carbon segregated area, and this shows the importance of carbon segregation in grain boundaries to the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steel, in addition to the formation of the chromium depletion zone. UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano Crystal Surface Modification)-treatment to the slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel increased the pitting potential, decreased the passive current density, and increased the resistance of the passive film. However, in the case of heavily sensitized 316L stainless steel, UNSM-treatment decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film. This behavior is due to the dual effects of the UNSM-treatment. That is, the UNSM-treatment reduced the carbon segregation, regardless of whether the stainless steel 316L was slightly or heavily sensitized. However, since this treatment made mechanical flaws in the outer surface in the case of the heavily sensitized stainless steel, UNSM-treatment may eliminate chromium carbide, and this flaw can be a pitting initiation site, and therefore decrease the pitting corrosion resistance.

  14. Corrosion behavior of ferritic stainless steel with 15wt% chromium for the automobile exhaust system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-bing; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Feng, Hao; Zhu, Hong-chun; Sun, Bin-han; Li, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    The effect of chloride ion concentration, pH value, and grain size on the pitting corrosion resistance of a new ferritic stainless steel with 15wt% Cr was investigated using the anodic polarization method. The semiconducting properties of passive films with different chloride ion concentrations were performed using capacitance measurement and Mott-Schottky analysis methods. The aging precipitation and intergranular corrosion behavior were evaluated at 400-900°C. It is found that the pitting potential decreases when the grain size increases. With the increase in chloride ion concentration, the doping density and the flat-bland potential increase but the thickness of the space charge layer decreases. The pitting corrosion resistance increases rapidly with the decrease in pH value. Precipitants is identified as Nb(C,N) and NbC, rather than Cr-carbide. The intergranular corrosion is attributed to the synergistic effects of Nb(C,N) and NbC precipitates and Cr segregation adjacent to the precipitates.

  15. Micro-Abrasion Wear Resistance of Borided 316L Stainless Steel and AISI 1018 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reséndiz-Calderon, C. D.; Rodríguez-Castro, G. A.; Meneses-Amador, A.; Campos-Silva, I. E.; Andraca-Adame, J.; Palomar-Pardavé, M. E.; Gallardo-Hernández, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    The 316L stainless steel has high corrosion resistance but low tribological performance. In different industrial sectors (biomedical, chemical, petrochemical, and nuclear engineering), improvement upon wear resistance of 316L stainless steel components using accessible and inexpensive methods is critical. The AISI 1018 steel is widely used in industry, but its tribological performance is not the best among steels. Therefore, in this study the behavior of the borided 316L stainless steel and 1018 steel is evaluated under micro-abrasion wear. The boriding was carried out at 1223 K over 6 h of exposure time, resulting in a biphase layer composed of FeB/Fe2B phases. In order to evaluate Fe2B phase with no influence from FeB phase, AISI 1018 steel samples were borided at 1273 K for over 20 min and then diffusion annealed at 1273 K over 2 h to obtain a Fe2B mono-phase layer. Micro-abrasion wear resistance was evaluated by a commercial micro-abrasion testing rig using a mix of F-1200 SiC particles with deionized water as abrasive slurry. The obtained wear rates for FeB and Fe2B phases and for the 316L stainless steel were compared. Wear resistance of 316L stainless steel increases after boriding. The wear mechanisms for both phases and for the stainless steel were identified. Also, transient conditions for rolling and grooving abrasion were determined for the FeB and Fe2B phases.

  16. Electrochemical investigation of stainless steel corrosion in a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cell

    DOE PAGES

    Mo, Jingke; Steen, Stuart M.; Zhang, Feng-Yuan; ...

    2015-08-05

    The lack of a fundamental understanding of the corrosion mechanisms in the electrochemical environments of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer and/or fuel cells (ECs/FCs) has seriously hindered the improvement of performance and efficiency of PEM ECs/FCs. In this study, a stainless steel mesh was purposely used as an anode gas diffusion layer that was intentionally operated with high positive potentials under harsh oxidative environments in a PEMEC to study the corrosion mechanism of metal migration. A significant amount of iron and nickel cations were determined to transport through the anode catalyst layer, the PEM and the cathode catalyst layer duringmore » the PEMEC operation. The formation/deposition of iron oxide and nickel oxide on the carbon paper gas diffusion layer at the cathode side is first revealed by both scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate the corrosion elements of iron and nickel are transported from anode to cathode through the catalyst-coated membrane, and deposited on carbon fibers as oxides. This phenomenon could also open a new corrosion-based processing approach to potentially fabricate multifunctional oxide structures on carbon fiber devices. This study has demonstrated a new accelerated test method for investigating the corrosion and durability of metallic materials as well.« less

  17. Electrochemical investigation of stainless steel corrosion in a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cell

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mo, Jingke; Steen, Stuart M.; Zhang, Feng-Yuan

    The lack of a fundamental understanding of the corrosion mechanisms in the electrochemical environments of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer and/or fuel cells (ECs/FCs) has seriously hindered the improvement of performance and efficiency of PEM ECs/FCs. In this study, a stainless steel mesh was purposely used as an anode gas diffusion layer that was intentionally operated with high positive potentials under harsh oxidative environments in a PEMEC to study the corrosion mechanism of metal migration. A significant amount of iron and nickel cations were determined to transport through the anode catalyst layer, the PEM and the cathode catalyst layer duringmore » the PEMEC operation. The formation/deposition of iron oxide and nickel oxide on the carbon paper gas diffusion layer at the cathode side is first revealed by both scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate the corrosion elements of iron and nickel are transported from anode to cathode through the catalyst-coated membrane, and deposited on carbon fibers as oxides. This phenomenon could also open a new corrosion-based processing approach to potentially fabricate multifunctional oxide structures on carbon fiber devices. This study has demonstrated a new accelerated test method for investigating the corrosion and durability of metallic materials as well.« less

  18. Rapid Tempering of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI420: Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi-Khazaei, Bijan; Mollaahmadi, Akbar

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the effect of rapid tempering on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel has been investigated. At first, all test specimens were austenitized at 1050 °C for 1 h and tempered at 200 °C for 1 h. Then, the samples were rapidly reheated by a salt bath furnace in a temperature range from 300 to 1050 °C for 2 min and cooled in air. The tensile tests, impact, hardness and electrochemical corrosion were carried out on the reheated samples. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure and fracture surface. To investigate carbides, transmission electron microscopy and also scanning electron microscopy were used. X-ray diffraction was used for determination of the retained austenite. The results showed that the minimum properties such as the tensile strength, impact energy, hardness and corrosion resistance were obtained at reheating temperature of 700 °C. Semi-continuous carbides in the grain boundaries were seen in this temperature. Secondary hardening phenomenon was occurred at reheating temperature of 500 °C.

  19. Corrosive Metabolic Activity of Desulfovibrio sp. on 316L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkan, Simge; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Cansever, Nurhan

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the effects of chemical parameters (SO4 2-, PO4 3-, Cl-, pH) and the contents of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) regarding the growth of Desulfovibrio sp. on the microbiologically induced corrosion of 316L stainless steel (SS). The experiments were carried out in laboratory-scaled test and control systems. 316L SS coupons were exposed to Desulfovibrio sp. culture over 720 h. The test coupons were removed at specific sampling times for enumeration of Desulfovibrio sp., determination of the corrosion rate by the weight loss measurement method and also for analysis of carbohydrate and protein in the EPS. The chemical parameters of the culture were also established. Biofilm/film formation and corrosion products on the 316L SS surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry analyses in the laboratory-scaled systems. It was found that Desulfovibrio sp. led to the corrosion of 316L SS. Both the amount of extracellular protein and chemical parameters (SO4 2- and PO4 3-) of the culture caused an increase in the corrosion of metal. There was a significantly positive relationship between the sessile and planktonic Desulfovibrio sp. counts ( p < 0.01). It was detected that the growth phases of the sessile and planktonic Desulfovibrio sp. were different from each other and the growth phases of the sessile Desulfovibrio sp. vary depending on the subspecies of Desulfovibrio sp. and the type of metal when compared with the other published studies.

  20. Corrosion of Type 316L stainless steel in Pb-17Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. G.; Lees, J. A.; Sample, T.; Hubberstey, P.

    1991-03-01

    Corrosion tests carried out in Pb-17Li in both capsules and a convection loop (hot leg temperature 768 K, cold leg temperature 748 K, flow rate 10 mm/s) have shown that Type 316 stainless steel undergoes almost complete loss of Ni and Mn, and extensive loss of Cr to form a porous ferritic zone. Ferritic zone depths measured on the loop samples exposed between 1000 and 4000 h were in good agreement with previous data. Some evidence was found for the interaction of chromium with oxygen dissolved in Pb-17Li. Examination of the cold leg samples revealed deposition products of iron and chromium but no deposits containing nickels were observed. These observations were rationalised in terms of recent measurements of the solubilities of metals in Pb-17Li.

  1. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  2. Effect of solution treatment on microstructure and properties of duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Luo, J. M.; Huang, L. Q.; Wang, H. B.; Ma, C. W.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of solution treatment on microstructure and properties of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was studied. The microstructure, precipitates and corrosion resisting property were observed and analyzed by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods. The results showed that a large number of brittle σ-phase precipitates, which deteriorate the plasticity and corrosion resistance of the material, were easy to produce in the duplex stainless steel under the low temperature. The precipitation of σ-phase can be decreased and the plasticity and corrosion resistance can be improved by increasing solution temperature. In addition, the ferrite content increases with the increase of solution temperature, while less affected by cooling rate.

  3. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel type 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel type 301 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  4. Conductive and corrosion behaviors of silver-doped carbon-coated stainless steel as PEMFC bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Hong-feng; Fu, Jie; Tian, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Ni-Cr enrichment on stainless steel SS316L resulting from chemical activation enabled the deposition of carbon by spraying a stable suspension of carbon nanoparticles; trace Ag was deposited in situ to prepare a thin continuous Ag-doped carbon film on a porous carbon-coated SS316L substrate. The corrosion resistance of this film in 0.5 mol·L-1 H2SO4 solution containing 5 ppm F- at 80°C was investigated using polarization tests. The results showed that the surface treatment of the SS316L strongly affected the adhesion of the carbon coating to the stainless steel. Compared to the bare SS316L, the Ag-doped carbon-coated SS316L bipolar plate was remarkably more stable in both the anode and cathode environments of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and the interface contact resistance between the specimen and Toray 060 carbon paper was reduced from 333.0 mΩ·cm2 to 21.6 mΩ·cm2 at a compaction pressure of 1.2 MPa.

  5. In vitro corrosion study by EIS of a nickel-free stainless steel for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, G; Torricelli, P; Fini, M; Giardino, R

    2005-03-01

    The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique was used for the study of the electrochemical behaviour of Ni-free austenitic stainless steel for orthopaedic applications. Experiments were carried out using four different test solutions: (i) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), (ii) minimum essential medium (MEM), (iii) MEM + 10% fetal calf serum (FCS), (iv) MEM + 10% fetal calf serum + L929 fibroblast cell line (Cell). Bode-phase spectra showed the presence of two maxima and were fitted with an equivalent circuit characterized by two parallel combinations (Resistance, Constant Phase Element). The (R(1), CPE(1)) branch was assigned to the inner compact passive film and the (R(2), CPE(2)) branch to the external porous film. The resistance of the inner film R(1), here directly related to the material's uniform corrosion resistance, raised with the immersion time and increased in the following order: PBSstainless steel is, as expected, lower than that of titanium.

  6. The effects of insulation defects on the corrosion of sub-sea super duplex stainless steel process pipes

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Francis, R.; Irwin, J.; Byrne, G.

    1995-10-01

    There is an increasing use of CRAs (corrosion resistant alloys) for subsea flowlines. These pipes carry corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures, and insulation is usually, applied to prevent excessive cooling of the process fluids. The present tests were undertaken to investigate the effect of insulation defects on the susceptibility to localized corrosion of a super duplex stainless steel at different internal temperatures. Four different commercial coating systems were tested, Neoprene, EPDM, Polyurethane and Polyurethane foam. The results show that pitting occurred at an average temperature of 55 C for neoprene and EPDM, and at lower temperatures for themore » other two coatings. The reasons for this are discussed, and the implications for service applications.« less

  7. Lifespan estimation of seal welded super stainless steels for water condenser of nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Sik; Park, Sujin; Chang, Hyun Young

    2014-01-01

    When sea water was used as cooling water for water condenser of nuclear power plants, commercial stainless steels can not be applied because chloride concentration exceeds 20,000 ppm. There are many opinions for the materials selection of tube and tube sheets of a condenser. This work reviewed the application guide line of stainless steels for sea-water facilities and the estimation equations of lifespan were proposed from the analyses of both field data for sea water condenser and experimental results of corrosion. Empirical equations for lifespan estimation were derived from the pit initiation time and re-tubing time of stainless steel tubing in sea water condenser of nuclear power plants. The lifespan of seal-welded super austenitic stainless steel tube/tube sheet was calculated from these equations. Critical pitting temperature of seal-welded PRE 50 grade super stainless steel was evaluated as 60 °C. Using the proposed equation in engineering aspect, tube pitting corrosion time of seal-welded tube/tube sheet was calculated as 69.8 years and re-tubing time was estimated as 82.0 years.

  8. Experimental investigation of microbiologically influenced corrosion of selected steels in sugarcane juice environment.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Sunil Bala; Maurya, Devendra Prasad; Goyal, Hari Sharan; Negi, Sangeeta

    2013-12-01

    In the current study, ferritic stainless grades AISI 439 and AISI 444 were investigated as possible construction materials for machinery and equipment in the cane-sugar industry. Their performance in corrosive cane-sugar juice environment was compared with the presently used low carbon steel AISI 1010 and austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. The Tafel plot electrochemical technique was used to evaluate general corrosion performance. Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) behaviour in sugarcane juice environment was studied. Four microbial colonies were isolated from the biofilms on the metal coupon surfaces on the basis of their different morphology. These were characterized as Brevibacillus parabrevis, Bacillus azotoformans, Paenibacillus lautus and Micrococcus sp. The results of SEM micrographs showed that AISI 439 and AISI 304 grades had suffered maximum localized corrosion. MIC investigations revealed that AISI 444 steel had the best corrosion resistance among the tested materials. However from the Tafel plots it was evident that AISI 1010 had the least corrosion resistance and AISI 439 the best corrosion resistance.

  9. Effect of Ni content on stainless steel fabricated by laser melting deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhang, C. H.; Wang, Q.; Wu, C. L.; Zhang, S.; Chen, J.; Abdullah, Adil O.

    2018-05-01

    The novel stainless steel + x wt.% Ni (x = 0, 3.05, 6.10, 9.15) specimens were successfully fabricated by laser melting deposition, aiming at investigating the influence of Ni content on stainless steel structure and property. The effects of Ni content on phase compositions, microstructure, microhardness, wear and electrochemical corrosion resistance of as-deposited stainless steel were studied systematically using XRD, OM, SEM, microhardness tester, friction-wear tester and potentiodynamic polarization measurement, respectively. Experimental results showed that with the increase of Ni content, the constituent phase of the as-deposited specimen changed from ferrite phase (specimen for x = 0) to austenite phase (specimen for x = 9.15). The microstructure growth followed the principle of dendrite growth. However, the dominant microstructure varied from equiaxed dendrite to columnar dendrite with increasing Ni content. Phase transition from ferrite phase to austenite phase with the addition of Ni content resulted in the decrease of microhardness value from 643HV to 289HV. Meanwhile, the wear resistance of as-deposited specimens decreased gradually with the increasing of Ni content, which might be attributed to the fact that the wear resistance is proportional to microhardness according to Archard's law. It was noted that corrosion resistance of as-deposited stainless steel was extremely improved with the increase of Ni content. The higher Ni content specimen (specimen for x = 9.15) exhibited the best corrosion resistance among the tested specimens based on corrosion rate, which was one order of magnitude lower than that of the lower Ni content specimens (specimens for x = 0, 3.05).

  10. Microstructural-Scale Model for Surfaces Spreading of Intergranular Corrosion in Sensitized Stainless Steels and Aluminum-Magnesium (AA5XXX) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Swati

    Components from AA5XXX (Al-Mg alloys with more than 3 wt% Mg) alloys are X attractive due to availability of low cost, high strength to weight ratio and good weldability. Therefore, these alloys have potential applications in Naval ships. However, these alloys become susceptible to IGC (intergranular corrosion) due to beta-phase precipitation due to improper heat treatment or inadvertent thermal exposure. Stainless steels may also become susceptible due to carbide precipitation and chromium depletion on grain boundaries. IGC susceptibility depends on the interplay between the metallurgical conditions, electrochemical conditions, and chemical conditions. Specific combinations cause IGC while others do not. The objective of this study is to investigate the conditions which bring about surface spreading of IGC in these alloy classes. To accomplish this goal, a microstructure scale model was developed with experimental inputs to understand the 2-D IGC spreading in stainless steels and AA5XXX alloys. The conditions strongly affecting IGC spreading were elucidated. Upon natural and artificial aging, the stainless steels become susceptible to intergranular corrosion because of chromium depletion in the grain boundaries. After aging Al-Mg (AA5XXX) alloys show susceptibility due to the precipitation of the beta-phase (Al3Mg7) in the grain boundaries. Chromium depleted grain boundaries in stainless steels are anodically more active as compared to the interior of the grains. (3-phase rich grain boundaries have lower OCP (open circuit potential) and pitting potentials as compared to the Al-Mg solid solutions. A new approach to modeling the IGC surface spreading in polycrystalline materials that is presented. This model is the first to couple several factors into one granular scale model that illustrates the way in which they interact and IGC occurs. It sheds new information on conditions which cause IGC spreading in two alloy classes and describes a new theory for the critical

  11. Investigation of high temperature corrosion behavior on 304L austenite stainless steel in corrosive environments

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sahri, M. I.; Othman, N. K.; Samsu, Z.

    2014-09-03

    In this work, 304L stainless steel samples were exposed at 700 °C for 10hrs in different corrosive environments; dry oxygen, molten salt, and molten salt + dry oxygen. The corrosion behavior of samples was analyzed using weight change measurement technique, optical microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). The existence phases of corroded sample were determined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The lowest corrosion rate was recorded in dry oxygen while the highest was in molten salt + dry oxygen environments with the value of 0.0062 mg/cm{sup 2} and −13.5225 mg/cm{sup 2} respectively. The surfacemore » morphology of sample in presence of salt mixture showed scale spallation. Oxide scales of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were the main phases developed and detected by XRD technique. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not developed in every sample as protective layers but chromate-rich oxide was developed. The cross-section analysis found the oxide scales were in porous, thick and non-adherent that would not an effective barrier to prevent from further degradation of alloy. EDX analysis also showed the Cr-element was low compared to Fe-element at the oxide scale region.« less

  12. Effects of heat input on pitting corrosion in super duplex stainless steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yong taek; Shin, Hak soo; Lee, Hae woo

    2012-12-01

    Due to the difference in reheating effects depending on the heat input of subsequent weld passes, the microstructure of the weld metal varies between acicular type austenite and a mixture of polygonal type and grain boundary mixed austenite. These microstructural changes may affect the corrosion properties of duplex stainless steel welds. This result indicates that the pitting resistance of the weld can be strongly influenced by the morphology of the secondary austenite phase. In particular, the ferrite phase adjacent to the acicular type austenite phase shows a lower Pitting Resistance Equivalent (PRE) value of 25.3, due to its lower chromium and molybdenum contents, whereas the secondary austenite phase maintains a higher PRE value of more than 38. Therefore, it can be inferred that the pitting corrosion is mainly due to the formation of ferrite phase with a much lower PRE value.

  13. Effect of heat treatment on corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in orthodontic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabea Hammood, Ali; Faraj Noor, Ahmed; Talib Alkhafagy, Mohammed

    2017-12-01

    Heat treatment is necessary for duplex stainless steel (DSS) to remove or dissolve intermetallic phases, to remove segregation and to relieve any residual thermal stress in DSS, which may be formed during production processes. In the present study, the corrosion resistance of a DSS in artificial saliva was studied by potentiodynamic measurements. The microstructure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Vickers hardness (HV). The properties were tested in as-received and in thermally treated conditions (800-900 °C, 2-8 min). The research aims to evaluate the capability of DSS for orthodontic applications, in order to substitute the austenitic grades. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance is mainly affected by the ferrite/austenite ratio. The best result was obtained with a treatment at 900 °C for 2 min.

  14. The Effect of Multiple Shot Peening on the Corrosion Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qiang; She, Jia; Wu, Xueyan; Wang, Chengxi; Jiang, Chuanhai

    2018-03-01

    Various types of shot peening treatments were applied to duplex stainless steel. The effects of shot peening intensity and working procedures on the microstructure were investigated. The domain size and microstrain evolution in the surface layer were characterized utilizing the Rietveld method. As the shot peening intensity increased, the surface roughness increased in the surface layer; however, it decreased after multiple (dual and triple) shot peening. The mole fraction of strain-induced martensite as a function of the intensity of shot peening was evaluated by XRD measurements. Both potentiodynamic polarization curves and salt spray tests of shot-peened samples in NaCl solution were investigated. The results indicate that traditional shot peening has negative effects on corrosion resistance with increasing shot peening intensity; however, the corrosion rate can be reduced by means of multiple shot peening.

  15. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, R. B.; Kamat, H. S.; Ghosal, S. K.; de, P. K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 °C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance to pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constitutent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  16. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bhatt, R.B.; Kamat, H.S.; Ghosal, S.K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improvedmore » pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance of pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constituent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.« less

  17. Electroless nickel plating on stainless steels and aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Procedures for applying an adherent electroless nickel plating on 303 SE, 304, and 17-7 PH stainless steels, and 7075 aluminum alloy was developed. When heat treated, the electroless nickel plating provides a hard surface coating on a high strength, corrosion resistant substrate.

  18. Structural modifications and corrosion behavior of martensitic stainless steel nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, C. A.; Alvarez, F.; Zhang, Z.; Collins, G. A.; Short, K. T.

    2005-07-01

    In this work we report a study of the structural modifications and corrosion behavior of martensitic stainless steels (MSS) nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3). The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, photoemission electron spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic electrochemical measurements. Depending on the PI3 treatment temperature, three different material property trends are observed. At lower implantation temperatures (e.g., 360 °C), the material corrosion resistance is improved and a compact phase of ɛ-(Fe,Cr)3N, without changes in the crystal morphology, is obtained. At intermediate temperatures (e.g., 430 °C), CrN precipitates form principally at grain boundaries, leading to a degradation in the corrosion resistance compared to the original MSS material. At higher temperatures (e.g., 500 °C), the relatively great mobility of the nitrogen and chromium in the matrix induced random precipitates of CrN, transforming the original martensitic phase into α-Fe (ferrite), and causing a further degradation in the corrosion resistance.

  19. Electrodeposition of Ni(OH)2 reinforced polyaniline coating for corrosion protection of 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Syed, Junaid Ali; Gao, Yangzhi; Lu, Hongbin; Meng, Xiangkang

    2018-05-01

    In the present paper, polyaniline (PANI) coating was electropolymerized in the presence of phosphoric acid with subsequent deposition of Ni(OH)2 particles. The Ni(OH)2 reinforced PANI coating significantly enhances the corrosion resistance of 304 stainless steel (304SS) in comparison with the pristine PANI coating. The galvanostatically deposited Ni(OH)2 particles fill the pores of the pristine PANI coating and improves the coatings hydrophobicity which decreases the diffusion of aggressive media. Importantly, the Rp values of Ni(OH)2 reinforced PANI coating is much higher than that of pristine PANI coating and the Ni(OH)2 reinforced PANI coating presents a long-term anti-corrosive ability (360 h) in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. The prolonged corrosion protection of Ni(OH)2 reinforced PANI coating is attributed to the improved physical barrier as well as the facile formation of passive oxide film that sustain the anodic protection of the coating.

  20. Optimization of the A-TIG welding for stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurica, M.; Kožuh, Z.; Garašić, I.; Bušić, M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the influence of the activation flux and shielding gas on tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of the stainless steel. In introduction part, duplex stainless steel was analysed. The A-TIG process was explained and the possibility of welding stainless steels using the A-TIG process to maximize productivity and the cost-effectiveness of welded structures was presented. In the experimental part duplex, 7 mm thick stainless steel has been welded in butt joint. The influence of activation flux chemical composition upon the weld penetration has been investigated prior the welding. The welding process was performed by a robot with TIG equipment. With selected A-TIG welding technology preparation of plates and consumption of filler material (containing Cr, Ni and Mn) have been avoided. Specimens sectioned from the produced welds have been subjected to tensile strength test, macrostructure analysis and corrosion resistance analysis. The results have confirmed that this type of stainless steel can be welded without edge preparation and addition of filler material containing critical raw materials as Cr, Ni and Mn when the following welding parameters are set: current 200 A, welding speed 9,1 cm/min, heat input 1,2 kJ/mm and specific activation flux is used.

  1. Effect of Aging on Precipitation Behavior and Pitting Corrosion Resistance of SAF2906 Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianchun; Li, Guoping; Liang, Wei; Han, Peide; Wang, Hongxia

    2017-09-01

    The effect of aging temperature and holding time on the precipitation of secondary phases and pitting corrosion resistance of SAF2906 super duplex stainless steel was examined. Chromium nitride and σ phase were observed to preferentially precipitate at the ferrite/austenite interface. An amount of nitrides was also observed within the ferrite grain. The precipitation of chromium nitride occurred before the σ phase. The increase in aging temperature and holding time did not affect the concentration of the nitrides but increased the area fraction of the σ phase at a faster rate. The Cr2N precipitation in SAF2906 is more evident than that of the other duplex stainless steels. The variation tendency of the precipitation concentrations is primarily consistent with the prediction results of Thermo-Calc software. The electrochemical results showed that Cr2N and σ phase significantly reduced the pitting potential. Scanning electron microscope observations revealed that pits appear mainly in regions adjacent to sigma phase and Cr2N.

  2. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  3. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  4. COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE INVESTIGATION OF CREVICE CORROSION OF 316 STAINLESS STEEL

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    F. Bocher, J. R. Scully

    2006-01-30

    ). Using new impedance-capable MMA, it is also possible to monitor the film breakdown and the early stages of crevice corrosion as a function of the wires position. In this talk, the use of multi-electrode array to study crevice corrosion of 316 stainless steel and a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy is reviewed.« less

  5. COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE INVESTIGATION OF CREVICE CORROSION OF 316 STAINLESS STEEL

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    F. Bocher and J. R. Scully

    2006-01-30

    ). Using new impedance-capable MMA, it is also possible to monitor the film breakdown and the early stages of crevice corrosion as a function of the wires position. In this talk, the use of multi-electrode array to study crevice corrosion of 316 stainless steel and a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy is reviewed.« less

  6. The Synergistic Effect of Proteins and Reactive Oxygen Species on Electrochemical Behaviour of 316L Stainless Steel for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simionescu, N.; Benea, L.; Dumitrascu, V. M.

    2018-06-01

    The stainless steels, especially 316L type is the most used metallic biomaterials for biomedical applications due to their good biocompatibility, low price, excellent corrosion resistance, availability, easy processing and high strength. Due to these favorable properties 316L stainless steel has become the most attractive biomaterial for dental implants, stents and orthopedic implants. However an implant material in the human body is exposed to an action effect of other molecules, including proteins (such as albumin) and reactive oxygen species (such as hydrogen peroxide - H2O2 ) produced by bacteria and immune cells. In the literature there are few studies to follow the effect of proteins and reactive oxygen species on 316L stainless steel used as implant material and are still unclear. The degree of corrosion resistance is the first criterion in the use of a metallic biomaterial in the oral or body environment. The aim of this research work is to investigate the influence of proteins (albumin) and reactive oxygen species (H2O2 ) in combination, taking into account the synergistic effect of these two factors on 316L stainless steel. Albumin is present in the body near implants and reactive oxygen species could appear in inflammatory processes as well. The study shows that the presence of albumin and reactive species influences the corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in biological solutions. In this research work the corrosion behavior of 316L stainless steel is analyzed by electrochemical methods such as: open circuit potential (OCP), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). It was found that, the electrochemical results are in a good agreement with micro photographs taken before and after corrosion assays. The albumin and reactive oxygen species have influence on 316L stainless steel behavior.

  7. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel alloy A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel alloy A-286 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  8. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Rakowski, James M.

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the articlemore » of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.« less

  9. Development of Cast Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, G.; Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Walker, L. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Leonard, D. N.

    2016-11-01

    Cast Fe-Ni-Cr chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels with Ni levels up to 45 wt.% are used at high temperatures in a wide range of industrial applications that demand microstructural stability, corrosion resistance, and creep strength. Although alumina scales offer better corrosion protection at these temperatures, designing cast austenitic alloys that form a stable alumina scale and achieve creep strength comparable to existing cast chromia-forming alloys is challenging. This work outlines the development of cast Fe-Ni-Cr-Al austenitic stainless steels containing about 25 wt.% Ni with good creep strength and the ability to form a protective alumina scale for use at temperatures up to 800-850°C in H2O-, S-, and C-containing environments. Creep properties of the best alloy were comparable to that of HK-type cast chromia-forming alloys along with improved oxidation resistance typical of alumina-forming alloys. Challenges in the design of cast alloys and a potential path to increasing the temperature capability are discussed.

  10. Bio-corrosion of stainless steel by osteoclasts--in vitro evidence.

    PubMed

    Cadosch, Dieter; Chan, Erwin; Gautschi, Oliver P; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-07-01

    Most metals in contact with biological systems undergo corrosion by an electrochemical process. This study investigated whether human osteoclasts (OC) are able to grow on stainless steel (SS) and directly corrode the metal alloy leading to the formation of corresponding metal ions, which may cause inflammatory reactions and activate the immune system. Scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated long-term viable OC cultures and evident resorption features on the surface of SS discs on which OC were cultured for 21 days. The findings were confirmed by atomic emission spectrometry investigations showing significantly increased levels of chromium, nickel, and manganese in the supernatant of OC cultures. Furthermore, significant levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, which are considered to be major mediators of osteolysis, were revealed in the same cultures by cytometric bead array analysis. Within the present study, it was shown that human osteoclast precursors are able to grow and differentiate towards mature OC on SS. The mature cells are able to directly corrode the metal surface and release corresponding metal ions, which induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines that are known to enhance osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. Enhanced corrosion and the subsequently released metal ions may therefore result in enhanced osteolytic lesions in the peri-prosthetic bone, contributing to the aseptic loosening of the implant.

  11. Oxidation of stainless steel 316 and Nitronic 50 in supercritical and ultrasupercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David; Chidambaram, Dev

    2015-08-01

    Corrosion of stainless steel 316 and Nitronic 50 exposed to supercritical and ultrasupercritical water was studied as a function of temperature and exposure time. Post-exposure surface analysis was performed using Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies to determine the chemistry of the oxides formed as a result of the exposure. When exposed to supercritical water, Nitronic 50 and stainless steel 316 were observed to have similar weight gains; however, stainless steel 316 was found to gain less weight than Nitronic 50 in exposure tests performed in ultrasupercritical water. Stainless steel 316 developed surface films primarily composed of iron oxides, while the surface of Nitronic 50 contained a mixture of iron, chromium and manganese oxides. Based on these analyses, the differences in weight gain and oxidation characteristics of the two materials are attributed to the higher concentration of Cr and Mn in Nitronic 50 compared to stainless steel 316.

  12. Stainless and Galvanized Steel, Hydrophobic Admixture and Flexible Polymer-Cement Coating Compared in Increasing Durability of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Giosuè, Chiara; Mobili, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    The use of stainless or galvanized steel reinforcements, a hydrophobic admixture or a flexible polymer-cement coating were compared as methods to improve the corrosion resistance of sound or cracked reinforced concrete specimens exposed to chloride rich solutions. The results show that in full immersion condition, negligible corrosion rates were detected in all cracked specimens, except those treated with the flexible polymer-cement mortar as preventive method against corrosion and the hydrophobic concrete specimens. High corrosion rates were measured in all cracked specimens exposed to wet-dry cycles, except for those reinforced with stainless steel, those treated with the flexible polymer-cement coating as restorative method against reinforcement corrosion and for hydrophobic concrete specimens reinforced with galvanized steel reinforcements.

  13. Austenitic-ferritic stainless steels: A state-of-the-art review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronenko, B. I.

    1997-10-01

    Austenitic-ferritic stainless steels, more commonly known as duplex stainless steels, or DSS for short, consist of two basic phases. One is austenite, A, and the other is ferrite, F, present in about equal amounts (but not less than 30% each). The two phases owe their corrosion resistance to the high chromium content. Compared to austenitic stainless steels, ASS, they are stronger (without sacrificing ductility), resist corrosion better, and cost less due to their relatively low nickel content. DSS can be used in an environment where standard ASS are not durable enough, such as chloride solutions (ships, petrochemical plant, etc.). Due to their low nickel content and the presence of nickel, DSS have good weldability. However, they have a limited service temperature range (from -40 to 300°) because heating may cause them to give up objectionable excess phases and lower the threshold of cold brittleness in the heat-affected zone of welded joints. State-of-the art DSS are alloyed with nitrogen to stabilize their austenite, and in this respect the nitrogen does the job of nickel. Also, nitrogen enhances the strength and resistance to pitting and improves the structure of welds.

  14. Enhancement of biocompatibility of 316LVM stainless steel by cyclic potentiodynamic passivation.

    PubMed

    Shahryari, Arash; Omanovic, Sasha; Szpunar, Jerzy A

    2009-06-15

    Passivation of stainless steel implants is a common procedure used to increase their biocompatibility. The results presented in this work demonstrate that the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) of a biomedical grade 316LVM stainless steel surface is a very efficient passivation method that can be used to significantly improve the material's general corrosion resistance and thus its biocompatibility. The influence of a range of experimental parameters on the passivation/corrosion protection efficiency is discussed. The passive film formed on a 316LVM surface by using the CPP method offers a significantly higher general corrosion resistance than the naturally grown passive film. The corresponding relative corrosion protection efficiency measured in saline during a 2-month period was 97% +/- 1%, which demonstrates a very high stability of the CPP-formed passive film. Its high corrosion protection efficiency was confirmed also at temperatures and chloride concentrations well above normal physiological levels. It was also shown that the CPP is a significantly more effective passivation method than some other surface-treatment methods commonly used to passivate biomedical grade stainless steels. In addition, the CPP-passivated 316LVM surface showed an enhanced biocompatibility in terms of preosteoblast (MC3T3) cells attachment. An increased thickness of the CPP-formed passive film and its enrichment with Cr(VI) and oxygen was determined to be the origin of the material's increased general corrosion resistance, whereas the increased surface roughness and surface (Volta) potential were suggested to be the origin of the enhanced preosteoblast cells attachment. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. In Vitro Electrochemical Corrosion and Cell Viability Studies on Nickel-Free Stainless Steel Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Salahinejad, Erfan; Hadianfard, Mohammad Jafar; Macdonald, Digby Donald; Sharifi-Asl, Samin; Mozafari, Masoud; Walker, Kenneth J.; Rad, Armin Tahmasbi; Madihally, Sundararajan V.; Tayebi, Lobat

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion and cell viability behaviors of nanostructured, nickel-free stainless steel implants were studied and compared with AISI 316L. The electrochemical studies were conducted by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements in a simulated body fluid. Cytocompatibility was also evaluated by the adhesion behavior of adult human stem cells on the surface of the samples. According to the results, the electrochemical behavior is affected by a compromise among the specimen's structural characteristics, comprising composition, density, and grain size. The cell viability is interpreted by considering the results of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments. PMID:23630603

  16. In vitro electrochemical corrosion and cell viability studies on nickel-free stainless steel orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Salahinejad, Erfan; Hadianfard, Mohammad Jafar; Macdonald, Digby Donald; Sharifi-Asl, Samin; Mozafari, Masoud; Walker, Kenneth J; Rad, Armin Tahmasbi; Madihally, Sundararajan V; Tayebi, Lobat

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion and cell viability behaviors of nanostructured, nickel-free stainless steel implants were studied and compared with AISI 316L. The electrochemical studies were conducted by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements in a simulated body fluid. Cytocompatibility was also evaluated by the adhesion behavior of adult human stem cells on the surface of the samples. According to the results, the electrochemical behavior is affected by a compromise among the specimen's structural characteristics, comprising composition, density, and grain size. The cell viability is interpreted by considering the results of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments.

  17. Sensitization Behavior of Type 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel: Confronting DL-EPR Test and Practice W of ASTM A763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Taís Campos; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes; Sayeg, Isaac Jamil; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2014-06-01

    Stainless steels employed for manufacturing automotive exhaust systems must withstand severe thermal cycles, corrosive environment due to urea decomposition, and welding operations. AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel can be considered a low-cost alternative for this application. However, depending on the manufacturing conditions during welding cycles, this material can be sensitized due to the precipitation of chromium carbides at grain boundaries. In this work, the intergranular corrosion resistances of the AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel were evaluated after annealing at 300, 500, and 700 °C for 2, 4, and 6 h. Solution-annealed samples were also tested for comparison purposes. Two methodologies were used to assess the sensitization behavior of the 409 stainless steel samples: the first one was based on the ASTM A763 (practice W), while the second one was based on the double-loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation test. It was possible to identify that the annealing treatment performed at 500 °C was more critical to the occurrence of intergranular corrosion.

  18. Initation of pitting corrosion in martensitic stainless steels. [17-4PH; 13-8Mo; Custom 450

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cieslak, W.R.; Semarge, R.E.; Bovard, F.S.

    1986-01-01

    The form of localized corrosion known as pitting often initiates preferentially at microstructural inhomogeneities. The pit initiation resistance, therefore, is controlled by the characteristics of the initiation sites, rather than by the bulk material composition. This investigation correlates the pit initiation resistance, as measured by critical pitting potentials, with preferred pit initiation sites for 3 martensitic stainless steels. Pit initiation sites are determined by secondary electron (SE) and backscattered electron (BSE) imaging and energy dispersive and wavelength dispersive spectrometries (EDS and WDS) with a scalling electron microscope (SEM) and an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA).

  19. Influence of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of 13 Wt Pct Cr-Type Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Si-Yuan; Yao, Ke-Fu; Chen, Yun-Bo; Wang, Miao-Hui; Ge, Xue-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and the electrochemical properties of a typical corrosion-resistant plastic mold steel in Cl--containing solution were studied in this research. Through X-ray diffraction patterns, SEM and TEM analysis, it was found that the sequence of the precipitates in the steels tempered at 573 K, 773 K, and 923 K (300 °C, 500 °C, and 650 °C) was θ-M3C carbides, nano-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, and micro/submicron-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, respectively. The results of the electrochemical experiments showed that the pitting potential of the as-quenched martensitic stainless steels increased with the austenitizing temperature. However, the corrosion resistance of the steels would decreased after tempering, especially when tempered at 773 K (500 °C), no passivation regime could be found in the polarization curve of the MSSs and no effective passive film could be formed on the steels in Cl--containing environments. The present results suggested that the temperature around 773 K (500 °C) should be avoided for tempering process of MSS used as plastic molds.

  20. Magnetic fields from electric toothbrushes promote corrosion in orthodontic stainless steel appliances but not in titanium appliances.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Takashi; Ohkuma, Kazuo; Oda, Hirotake; Sano, Natsuki; Batbayar, Nomintsetseg; Terashima, Yukari; Sato, Soh; Terada, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    Electric toothbrushes are widely used, and their electric motors have been reported to produce low-frequency electromagnetic fields that induced electric currents in metallic objects worn by the users. In this study, we showed that electric toothbrushes generated low-frequency magnetic fields (MFs) and induced electric currents in orthodontic appliances in artificial saliva (AS), which accelerated corrosion in stainless steel (SUS) appliances, but not in titanium (Ti) appliances; the corrosion was evaluated by using an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer and a three-dimensional laser confocal microscope. The pH of AS used for appliance immersion did not change during or after MF exposure. These results suggested that MF-induced currents from electric toothbrushes could erode SUS appliances, but not Ti appliances, because of their high corrosion potentials. Further studies are required to clarify the mechanisms of metallic corrosion by induced currents in dental fields, which may trigger metal allergies in patients.

  1. Nuclear Repository steel canister: experimental corrosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporuscio, F.; Norskog, K.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Spent Fuel & Waste Science & Technology campaign evaluates various generic geological repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. This experimental work analyzed and characterized the canister corrosion and steel interface mineralogy of bentonite-based EBS 304 stainless steel (SS), 316 SS, and low-carbon steel coupons in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. Experiments contrasted EBS with and without an argillite wall rock. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming simulated the clay buffer and Opalinus Clay represented the wall rock. Redox conditions were buffered at the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based brine was chosen to replicate generic granitic groundwater compositions, while Opalinous Clay groundwater was used in the wall rock series of experiments. Most experiments were run at 150 bar and 300°C for 4 to 6 weeks and one was held at elevated conditions for 6 months. The two major experimental mixtures were 1) brine-bentonite clay- steel, and 2) brine-bentonite clay-Opalinus Clay-steel. Both systems were equilibrated at a high liquid/clay ratio. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment were evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. In total 4291 measurements were obtained: 2500 measured steel corrosion depths and 1791 were of phyllosilicate mineral reactions/growths at the interface. The low carbon steel corrosion mechanism was via pit corrosion, while 304 SS and 316 SS were by general corrosion. The low carbon steel corrosion rate (1.95 μm/day) was most rapid. The 304 SS corrosion rate (0.37 μm/day) was slightly accelerated versus the 316 SS corrosion rate (0.26 μm/day). Note that the six month 316 SS experiment shows inhibited corrosion rates (0.07 μm/day). This may be in part due to mantling by the Fe-saponite/chlorite authigenic minerals. All phyllosilicate growth rates at the interface exhibit similar growth rate patterns to the steels (i.e. LCS>304>316> 316 six month).

  2. Development of stress corrosion cracking resistant welds of 321 stainless steel by simple surface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankari, Kamal; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    We hereby report a simple surface engineering technique to make AISI grade 321 stainless steel (SS) welds resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride environment. Heat exchanger tubes of AISI 321 SS, welded either by (a) laser beam welding (LBW) or by (b) metal inert gas welding (MIG) were used for the study. The welds had high magnitude of tensile residual stresses and had undergone SCC in chloride environment while in service. The welds were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, the welded surfaces were subjected to buffing operation followed by determination of residual stress distribution and surface roughness by XRD and surface profilometer measurements respectively. The susceptibility of the welds to SCC was tested in buffed and un-buffed condition as per ASTM G-36 in boiling MgCl2 for 5 h and 10 h, followed by microstructural characterization by using optical microscope and FESEM. The results showed that the buffed surfaces (both welds and base material) were resistant to SCC even after 10 h of exposure to boiling MgCl2 whereas the un-buffed surfaces underwent severe SCC for the same exposure time. Buffing imparted high magnitude of compressive stresses on the surface of stainless steel together with reduction in its surface roughness and reduction in plastic strain on the surface which made the welded surface, resistant to chloride assisted SCC. Buffing being a very simple, portable and economic technique can be easily adapted by the designers as the last step of component fabrication to make 321 stainless steel welds resistant to chloride assisted SCC.

  3. Arc brazing of austenitic stainless steel to similar and dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschini, Jamie Ian

    There is a desire within both the stainless steel and automotive industries to introduce stainless steel into safety critical areas such as the crumple zone of modem cars as a replacement for low carbon mild steel. The two main reasons for this are stainless steel's corrosion resistance and its higher strength compared with mild steel. It has been anticipated that the easiest way to introduce stainless steel into the automotive industry would be to incorporate it into the existing design. The main obstacle to be overcome before this can take place is therefore how to join the stainless steel to the rest of the car body. In recent times arc brazil g has been suggested as a joining technique which will eliminate many of the problems associated with fusion welding of zinc coated mild steel to stainless steel.Similar and dissimilar parent material arc brazed joints were manufactured using three copper based filler materials and three shielding gases. The joints were tested in terms of tensile strength, impact toughness and fatigue properties. It was found that similar parent material stainless steel joints could be produced with a 0.2% proof stress in excess of the parent material and associated problems such as Liquid Metal Embrittlement were not experienced. Dissimilar parent material joints were manufactured with an ultimate tensile strength in excess of that of mild steel although during fatigue testing evidence of Liquid Metal Embrittlement was seen lowering the mean fatigue load.At the interface of the braze and stainless steel in the similar material butt joints manufactured using short circuit transfer, copper appeared to penetrate the grain boundaries of the stainless steel without embrittling the parent material. Further microscopic investigation of the interface showed that the penetration could be described by the model proposed by Mullins. However, when dissimilar metal butt joints were manufactured using spray arc transfer, penetration of copper into the

  4. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  5. Investigation of the Microstructural, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Grade A Ship Steel-Duplex Stainless Steel Composites Produced via Explosive Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Yakup; Kahraman, Nizamettin; Durgutlu, Ahmet; Gülenç, Behçet

    2017-08-01

    Grade A ship-building steel-AISI 2304 duplex stainless steel composite plates were manufactured via explosive welding. The AISI 2304 plates were used to clad the Grade A plates. Optical microscopy studies were conducted on the joining interface for characterization of the manufactured composite plates. Notch impact, tensile-shear, microhardness, bending and twisting tests were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the composites. In addition, the surfaces of fractured samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and neutral salt spray (NSS) and potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to examine corrosion behavior. Near the explosion zone, the interface was completely flat, but became wavy as the distance from the explosion zone increased. The notch impact tests indicated that the impact strength of the composites decreased with increasing distance from the explosion zone. The SEM studies detected brittle behavior below the impact transition temperature and ductile behavior above this temperature. Microhardness tests revealed that the hardness values increased with increasing distance from the explosion zone and mechanical tests showed that no visible cracking or separation had occurred on the joining interface. The NSS and potentiodynamic polarization tests determined that the AISI 2304 exhibited higher corrosion resistance than the Grade A steel.

  6. In-Plant Corrosion Study of Steels in Distillery Effluent Treatment Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A. K.

    2015-05-01

    The present study deals with corrosion and performance of steels observed in an effluent treatment plant (ETP) of a distillery. For this purpose, the metal coupons were exposed in primary (untreated effluent) and secondary tank (anaerobic treatment effluent) of the ETP. The extent of attack has been correlated with the composition of the effluent with the help of laboratory immersion and electrochemical tests. Untreated distillery effluent found to be more corrosive than the anaerobic-treated effluents and is assigned due to chloride, phosphate, calcium, nitrate, and nitrite ions, which enhances corrosivity at acidic pH. Mild steel showed highest uniform and localized corrosion followed by stainless steels 304L and 316L and lowest in case of duplex 2205.

  7. Electrochemical Micromachining with Fiber Laser Masking for 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohai; Wang, Shuming; Wang, Dong; Tong, Han

    2017-10-01

    In order to fabricate micro structure, the combined machining of electrochemical micro machining (EMM) and laser masking for 304 stainless steel was studied. A device of composite machining of EMM with laser masking was developed, and the experiments of EMM with laser masking were carried out. First, by marking pattern with fiber laser on the surface of 304 stainless steel, the special masking layer can be formed. Through X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the corrosion resistance of laser masking layer was analyzed. It is proved by XPS that the iron oxide and chromium oxide on the surface of stainless steel generates due to air oxidation when laser scanning heats. Second, the localization and precision of EMM are improved, since the marking patterns forming on the surface of stainless steel by laser masking play a protective role in the process of subsequent EMM when the appropriate parameters of EMM are selected. At last, the shape and the roughness of the machined samples were measured by SEM and optical profilometer and analyzed. The results show that the rapid fabrication of micro structures on the 304 stainless steel surface can be achieved by EMM with fiber laser masking, which has a good prospect in the field of micro machining.

  8. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other typesmore » of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.« less

  9. Corrosion-free precast prestressed concrete piles made with stainless steel reinforcement : construction, test and evaluation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-01

    The use of duplex high-strength stainless steel (HSSS) grade 2205 prestressing strand and : austenitic stainless steel (SS) grade 304 spiral wire reinforcement is proposed as a replacement of : conventional prestressing steel, in order to provide a 1...

  10. Difference in metallic wear distribution released from commercially pure titanium compared with stainless steel plates.

    PubMed

    Krischak, G D; Gebhard, F; Mohr, W; Krivan, V; Ignatius, A; Beck, A; Wachter, N J; Reuter, P; Arand, M; Kinzl, L; Claes, L E

    2004-03-01

    Stainless steel and commercially pure titanium are widely used materials in orthopedic implants. However, it is still being controversially discussed whether there are significant differences in tissue reaction and metallic release, which should result in a recommendation for preferred use in clinical practice. A comparative study was performed using 14 stainless steel and 8 commercially pure titanium plates retrieved after a 12-month implantation period. To avoid contamination of the tissue with the elements under investigation, surgical instruments made of zirconium dioxide were used. The tissue samples were analyzed histologically and by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for accumulation of the metals Fe, Cr, Mo, Ni, and Ti in the local tissues. Implant corrosion was determined by the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With grades 2 or higher in 9 implants, steel plates revealed a higher extent of corrosion in the SEM compared with titanium, where only one implant showed corrosion grade 2. Metal uptake of all measured ions (Fe, Cr, Mo, Ni) was significantly increased after stainless steel implantation, whereas titanium revealed only high concentrations for Ti. For the two implant materials, a different distribution of the accumulated metals was found by histological examination. Whereas specimens after steel implantation revealed a diffuse siderosis of connective tissue cells, those after titanium exhibited occasionally a focal siderosis due to implantation-associated bleeding. Neither titanium- nor stainless steel-loaded tissues revealed any signs of foreign-body reaction. We conclude from the increased release of toxic, allergic, and potentially carcinogenic ions adjacent to stainless steel that commercially pure Ti should be treated as the preferred material for osteosyntheses if a removal of the implant is not intended. However, neither material provoked a foreign-body reaction in the local tissues, thus cpTi cannot be

  11. Investigation of galvanic corrosion in laser-welded stainless steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Chi-Tat; Fong, Siu Lung; Cheng, Fai Tsun; Man, Hau-Chung

    2004-10-01

    In the present study, bead-on-plate specimens of 1-mm sheets of austenitic and duplex stainless steels were fabricated by laser penetration welding with a 2.5-kW CW Nd:YAG laser. The galvanic corrosion behavior of laser-weldment (LW) against as-received (AR) specimens with an area rato of 1:1 in 3.5% NaCL solution was studied by means of a zero-resistance ammeter. The free corrosion potentials of as-received specimens were found to be considerably higher than those of laser weldments, indicating that the weldments are more active and always act as anodes. The ranking of galvanic current densities (IG) of the couples in ascending order is: AR S31603-LW S31603 < AR S31803-LW S31803 < AR S32760-LW S32760 < AR S30400-LW S30400. For the galvanic couple between AR S30400 and LW S30400, the IG is the highest (78.6 nA/cm2) because large amount of δ-ferrite in the weld zone acts as active sites. On the other hand, the IG of the galvanic couple between AR S31603 and LW S31603 is the lowest (-26 nA/cm2) because no δ-ferrite is present after laser welding. The recorded IG of all couples revealed constantly low values (in the rnage of nA/cm2) and sometimes stayed negative, which indicated polarity reversal.

  12. Oxide inclusions in laser additive manufactured stainless steel and their effects on impact toughness and stress corrosion cracking behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xiaoyuan; Andresen, Peter L.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2018-02-01

    Intergranular and intragranular Si and Mn rich oxide inclusions are present in laser additive manufactured austenitic stainless steel. The uniform oxide dispersions in additive manufactured material promoted early initiation of microvoids and reduced its impact toughness relative to powder metallurgy (hot isostatic pressing) and wrought materials. For stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water, the silica inclusions along the grain boundaries preferentially dissolved and appeared to accelerate oxidation and caused extensive crack branching.

  13. Stress Corrosion Behavior of 12Cr Martensite Steel for Steam Turbine LP Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianjian, Wang; Yubing, Pei; Zhenhuan, Gao; Hua, Fan; Gongxian, Yang

    With the development of capacity and efficiency of coal-fired thermal power plant, the length of Low Pressure (LP) last-stage blade of steam turbine became longer. Therefore, the design static stress of blade gets closer or even higher than the yield strength of material. Because of the special operation condition of LP last stage blade, the stress corrosion crack of 12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-N Martensite stainless steel may happen especially at the root of the blade where designed the highest static stress. In this paper, the stress corrosion behavior of 12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-N Martensite stainless steels used for steam turbine LP last stage blade in 3vol% NaCl solution was studied, the constant stress is about 95%, 85%, 65% and 35% of yield stress respectively and the test was lasted for 3000 hours, the stress corrosion behavior was studied and then, the effect of shot penning strengthen for anti-stress corrosion property of 12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-N Martensitic steel was studied. The results showed that the purity of steel affects the stress corrosion behavior huge especially at the high and medium stress condition. The shot penning cannot enhances the anti-stress corrosion property of the 12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-N steel at high tensile constant stress condition, however it will make the anti-stress corrosion property better when the stress is low.

  14. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Ting; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-07-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%-40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V8C7, M7C3, and M23C6 were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content. No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. The corrosion resistance of the clads was decreased with the increase in the VC content, demonstrating the negative effect of VC on the corrosion resistance of AISI 420 stainless steel

  15. Development of cast alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOE PAGES

    Muralidharan, G.; Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; ...

    2016-09-06

    Cast Fe-Ni-Cr chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels with Ni levels up to 45 wt. % are used at high temperatures in a wide range of industrial applications that demand microstructural stability, corrosion resistance, and creep strength. Although alumina scales offer better corrosion protection at these temperatures, designing cast austenitic alloys that form a stable alumina scale and achieve creep strength comparable to existing cast chromia-forming alloys is challenging. This work outlines the development of cast Fe-Ni-Cr-Al austenitic stainless steels containing about 25 wt. % Ni with good creep strength and the ability to form a protective alumina scale for use atmore » temperatures up to 800 C - 850 C in H 2O-, S-, and C- containing environments. Creep properties of the best alloy were comparable to that of HK-type cast chromia-forming alloy along with improved oxidation resistance typical of alumina-forming alloys. Lastly, challenges in the design of cast alloys and a potential path to increasing the temperature capability are discussed.« less

  16. Investigation of thermal spray coatings on austenitic stainless steel substrate to enhance corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel M.

    The research is aimed to evaluate thermal spray coatings to address material issues in supercritical and ultra-supercritical Rankine cycles. The primary purpose of the research is to test, evaluate, and eventually implement a coating to improve corrosion resistance and increase efficiency of coal fired power plants. The research is performed as part of a comprehensive project to evaluate the ability of titanium, titanium carbide, or titanium diboride powders to provide fireside corrosion resistance in supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam boilers, specifically, coal driven boilers in Illinois that must utilize high sulfur and high chlorine content coal. [1] The powder coatings that were tested are nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) and titanium di-boride (TiB2) powders that were synthesized by a patented process at Southern Illinois University. The powders were then sent to Gas Technology Institute in Chicago to coat steel coupons by HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) thermal spray technique. The powders were coated on an austenitic 304H stainless steel substrate which is commonly found in high temperature boilers, pipelines, and heat exchangers. The samples then went through various tests for various lengths of time under subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical conditions. The samples were examined using a scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction techniques to study microstructural changes and then determined which coating performed best.

  17. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul, E-mail: rahulunnikrishnannair@gmail.com; Idury, K.S.N. Satish, E-mail: satishidury@gmail.com; Ismail, T.P., E-mail: tpisma@gmail.com

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metalmore » arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure

  18. High Nitrogen Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-19

    STAINLESS STEEL by E. U. Lee R. Taylor 19 July 2011 Approved for...NAWCADPAX/TR-2011/162 19 July 2011 HIGH NITROGEN STAINLESS STEEL by E. U. Lee R. Taylor RELEASED BY...REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER High Nitrogen Stainless Steel 5b. GRANT

  19. Effect of molybdenum additions on the microstructures and corrosion behaviours of 316L stainless steel-based alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Rahman, T.; Ebert, W. L.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2018-02-28

    Alloys were made by alloying 5, 10, 15, 17.5, and 20 wt % Mo with Type 316L stainless steel. Sigma phases containing 21–29 wt % Mo formed along the austenite grain boundaries with the addition of 5 wt % Mo and increased with additions up to 15 wt % Mo, but they decreased with further additions. Laves phases containing 33–40 wt % Mo co-precipitated at additions of 10 wt % Mo which increased with further Mo increases. The corrosion resistance, assessed by potentiodynamic polarisation in a 10 mM NaCl solution adjusted to pH 4, increased relative to Type 316L formore » alloys made with 5 and 10 wt % added Mo, but decreased with further additions due to preferential corrosion of the Laves phase. The alloy made with 10 wt % added Mo had the highest corrosion resistance due primarily to the high Mo content of the austenite.« less

  20. Corrosion studies using potentiodynamic and EIS electrochemical techniques of welded lean duplex stainless steel UNS S82441

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brytan, Z.; Niagaj, J.; Reiman, Ł.

    2016-12-01

    The corrosion characterisation of lean duplex stainless steel (1.4662) UNS S82441 welded joints using the potentiodynamic test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M NaCl solution are discussed. The influence of autogenous TIG welding parameters (amount of heat input and composition of shielding gases like Ar and Ar-N2 and an Ar-He mixture), as well as A-TIG welding was studied. The influence of welding parameters on phase balance, microstructural changes and the protective properties of passive oxide films formed at the open circuit potential or during the anodic polarisation were studied. From the results of the potentiodynamic test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of TIG and A-TiG, welded joints show a lower corrosion resistance compared to non-welded parent metal, but introducing heat input properly during welding and applying shielding gases rich in nitrogen or helium can increase austenitic phase content, which is beneficial for corrosion resistance, and improves surface oxide layer resistance in 1 M NaCl solution.

  1. Effect of molybdenum additions on the microstructures and corrosion behaviours of 316L stainless steel-based alloys

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Rahman, T.; Ebert, W. L.; Indacochea, J. E.

    Alloys were made by alloying 5, 10, 15, 17.5, and 20 wt % Mo with Type 316L stainless steel. Sigma phases containing 21–29 wt % Mo formed along the austenite grain boundaries with the addition of 5 wt % Mo and increased with additions up to 15 wt % Mo, but they decreased with further additions. Laves phases containing 33–40 wt % Mo co-precipitated at additions of 10 wt % Mo which increased with further Mo increases. The corrosion resistance, assessed by potentiodynamic polarisation in a 10 mM NaCl solution adjusted to pH 4, increased relative to Type 316L formore » alloys made with 5 and 10 wt % added Mo, but decreased with further additions due to preferential corrosion of the Laves phase. The alloy made with 10 wt % added Mo had the highest corrosion resistance due primarily to the high Mo content of the austenite.« less

  2. Nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of stress corrosion cracking damage in sensitized 304 stainless steel

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Morlock, Florian, E-mail: fmorlock3@gatech.edu; Jacobs, Laurence J., E-mail: fmorlock3@gatech.edu; Kim, Jin-Yeon, E-mail: fmorlock3@gatech.edu

    2015-03-31

    This research uses nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves to characterize stress corrosion cracking (SCC) damage in welded 304 Stainless Steel (304 SS). 304 SS is widely used in reactor pressure vessels, where a corrosive environment in combination with applied stress due to high internal pressures can cause SCC. Welds and the nearby heat affected zones (HAZ) in the vessel material are especially sensitive to SCC damage. SCC damage results in microstructural changes such as dislocation formation and microcrack initiation that in the long term lead to reduced structural integrity and material failure. Therefore, the early detection of SCC is crucial tomore » ensure safe operation. It has been shown that the microstructural changes caused by SCC can generate higher harmonic waves when excited harmonically. This research considers different levels of SCC damage induced in samples of welded 304 SS by applying stress to a specimen held in a corrosive medium (Sodium Thiosulfate). A nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave is introduced in the material and the fundamental and the second harmonic waves are measured using wedge detection. The nonlinearity parameter that relates the fundamental and the second harmonic amplitudes, is computed to quantify the SCC damage in each sample. These results are used to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonlinear Rayleigh waves to characterize SCC damage.« less

  3. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc (SMA) welds made with Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microstructures of the welds were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) mainly to determine the morphology, phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Hardness, tensile and ductility bend tests were carried out to determine mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance using a GillAC basic electrochemical system. Constant load type testing was carried out to study stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of welds. The investigation results shown that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in favourable microstructure and completely solidified as single phase coarse austenite. Mechanical properties of SMA welds are found to be inferior when compared to that of base metal and is due to coarse and dendritic structure.

  4. Chemical, corrosion and topographical analysis of stainless steel implants after different implantation periods.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Armitage, David Andrew; Knowles, Jonathan Campbell; Szade, Jacek; Korlacki, Wojciech; Marciniak, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work is to examine the corrosion properties, chemical composition, and material-implant interaction after different periods of implantation of plates used to correct funnel chest. The implants are made of 316L stainless steel. Examinations are carried out on three implants: new (nonimplanted) and two implanted for 29 and 35 months. The corrosion study reveals that in the potential range that could occur in the physiological condition the new bar has the lowest current density and the highest corrosion potential. This indicates that the new plate has the highest corrosion resistance and the corrosion resistance could be reduced during implantation by the instruments used during the operation. XPS analysis reveals changes in the surface chemistry. The longer the implantation time the more carbon and oxygen are observed and only trace of elements such as Cr, Mo are detected indicating that surface is covered by an organic layer. On some parts of the implants whitish tissue is observed: the thickness of which increased with the time of implantation. This tissue was identified as an organic layer; mainly attached to the surface on the areas close to where the implant was bent to attain anatomical fit and thus where the implant has higher surface roughness. The study indicates that the chest plates are impaired by the implantation procedure and contact with biological environment. The organic layer on the surface shows that the implant did not stay passive but some reactions at the tissue-implant interface occurred. These reactions should be seen as positive, as it indicates that the implants were accepted by the tissues. Nevertheless, if the implants react, they may continue to release chromium, nickel, and other harmful ions long term as indicated by lower corrosion resistance of the implants following implantation.

  5. Brazing process provides high-strength bond between aluminum and stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huschke, E. G., Jr.; Nord, D. B.

    1966-01-01

    Brazing process uses vapor-deposited titanium and an aluminum-zirconium-silicon alloy to prevent formation of brittle intermetallic compounds in stainless steel and aluminum bonding. Joints formed by this process maintain their high strength, corrosion resistance, and hermetic sealing properties.

  6. Testing of brazed and welded connections of stainless-steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    Test procedures and results are given for three types of semipermanent sleeve-type connections for stainless-steel tubing. Subject to the limited resistances to corrosion and vibration, all three types are found to be suitable for extremes in reliability and environment, if given close control during manufacture.

  7. Stainless steel valves with enhanced performance through microstructure optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barani, A. A.; Boukhattam, M.; Haggeney, M.; Güler, S.

    2017-08-01

    Compressor valves are made of hardened and tempered martensitic steels. The main design criterion for the material selection is the fatigue performance of the material under bending loads. In some cases impact loads and corrosive atmospheres additionally act on the part. For the first time, the microstructure of the most commonly used stainless steel and its influence on the properties relevant for flapper valves is presented and described in this paper. It is demonstrated how the tensile properties of a martensitic stainless steel can be enhanced by tailoring the microstructure. Electron back scatter diffraction method is carried out to explain the changes in monotonic mechanical properties. Through a modified heat treatment the martensite microstructure is refined resulting in an increase of yield and ultimate tensile strength and at the same time a significant increase of elongation.

  8. Corrosion resistance of high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels in super-critical pressurized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. S.; Kimura, A.

    2007-08-01

    The effects of alloying elements, such as Cr and Al, on corrosion resistance in super critical pressurized water (SCPW) have been investigated to develop corrosion resistant oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels. Corrosion tests were performed in a SCPW (783 K, 25 MPa) environment. Weight gain was measured after exposure to the SCPW, and then oxide layers were analyzed by low angle X-ray diffraction and SEM microscopy. The weight gains of all high-Cr ODS steels are smaller than an austenitic stainless steel (SUS316L). More uniform and thinner oxidation layers were observed on the ODS steels after corrosion compared to those on 9Cr martensitic steel and SUS316L.

  9. Super-hydrophobic multi-walled carbon nanotube coatings for stainless steel.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Francesco; Castrucci, Paola; Scarselli, Manuela; Nanni, Francesca; Cacciotti, Ilaria; De Crescenzi, Maurizio

    2015-04-10

    We have taken advantage of the native surface roughness and the iron content of AISI 316 stainless steel to directly grow multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) random networks by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at low-temperature (1000°C) without the addition of any external catalysts or time-consuming pre-treatments. In this way, super-hydrophobic MWCNT films on stainless steel sheets were obtained, exhibiting high contact angle values (154°C) and high adhesion force (high contact angle hysteresis). Furthermore, the investigation of MWCNT films with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals a two-fold hierarchical morphology of the MWCNT random networks made of hydrophilic carbonaceous nanostructures on the tip of hydrophobic MWCNTs. Owing to the Salvinia effect, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic composite surface of the MWCNT films supplies a stationary super-hydrophobic coating for conductive stainless steel. This biomimetical inspired surface not only may prevent corrosion and fouling, but also could provide low friction and drag reduction.

  10. Trial use of a stainless steel-clad steel bar in a new concrete bridge deck in Virginia.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Virginia Transportation Research Council's effort to identify cost-effective, corrosion-resistant reinforcing bars that can be used in concrete bridges exposed to heavy salting, a 316L stainless steel-clad bar was tested in a new bridg...

  11. Summary of available data for estimating chloride-induced SCC crack growth rates for 304/316 stainless steel.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David

    The majority of existing dry storage systems used for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) consist of a welded 304 stainless steel container placed within a passively-ventilated concrete or steel overpack. More recently fielded systems are constructed with dual certified 304/304L and in some cases, 316 or 316L. In service, atmospheric salts, a portion of which will be chloride bearing, will be deposited on the surface of these containers. Initially, the stainless steel canister surface temperatures will be high (exceeding the boiling point of water in many cases) due to decay heat from the SNF. As the SNF cools over time, themore » container surface will also cool, and deposited salts will deliquesce to form potentially corrosive chloride-rich brines. Because austenitic stainless steels are prone to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (CISCC), the concern has been raised that SCC may significantly impact long-term canister performance. While the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to CISCC in the general sense is well known, the behavior of SCC cracks (i.e., initiation and propagation behavior) under the aforementioned atmospheric conditions is poorly understood.« less

  12. Intergranular Corrosion Behavior of 304LN Stainless Steel Heat Treated at 623 K (350 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Kumar, Mukesh; Ghosh, Mainak; Das, Gautam; Singh, P. K.; Chattoraj, I.

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature sensitization of 304LN stainless steel from the two pipes, differing slightly in chemical composition, has been investigated; specimens were aged at 623 K (350 °C) for 20,000 hours and evaluated for intergranular corrosion and degree of sensitization. The base and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the 304LN-1 appear resistant to sensitization, while 304LN-2 revealed a "dual" type microstructure at the transverse section and HAZ. The microstructure at 5.0-mm distance from the fusion line indicates qualitatively less sensitization as compared to that at 2.0 mm. The 304LN-2 base alloy shows overall lower degree of sensitization values as compared to the 304LN-1. A similar trend of degree of sensitization was observed in the HAZ where it was higher in the 304LN-1 as compared to the 304LN-2. The weld zone of both the stainless steels suffered from cracking during ASTM A262 practice E, while the parent metals and HAZs did not show such fissures. A mottled image within the ferrite lamella showed spinodal decomposition. The practice E test and transmission electron microscopy results indicate that the interdendritic regions may suffer from failure due to carbide precipitation and due to the evolution of brittle phase from spinodal decomposition.

  13. In-Pile Tests for IASCC Growth Behavior of Irradiated 316L Stainless Steel under Simulated BWR Condition in JMTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kasahara, Shigeki; Ise, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Junichi; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has an in-pile irradiation test plan to evaluate in-situ effects of neutron/γ-ray irradiation on stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth of irradiated stainless steels using the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). SCC growth rate and its dependence on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) are different between in-pile test and post irradiation examination (PIE). These differences are not fully understood because of a lack of in-pile data. This paper presents a systematic review on SCC growth data of irradiated stainless steels, an in-pile test plan for crack growth of irradiated SUS316L stainless steel under simulated BWR conditions in the JMTR, and the development of the in-pile test techniques.

  14. Effects of Nitrogen and Tensile Direction on Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Ni-Free FeCrMnC-Based Duplex Stainless Steels

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Sangshik

    2017-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Ni-free duplex stainless steels containing N and C (Febalance-19Cr-8Mn-0.25C-(0.03, 0.21)N, in wt %) was investigated by using a slow strain rate test (SSRT) in air and aqueous NaCl solution with different tensile directions, including parallel (longitudinal) and perpendicular (transverse) to the rolling direction. It was found that alloying N was effective in increasing the resistance to SCC, while it was higher along the longitudinal direction than the transverse direction. The SCC susceptibility of the two alloys was assessed based on the electrochemical resistance to pitting corrosion, the corrosion morphology, and the fractographic analysis. PMID:28772651

  15. Use of Carbon Steel for Construction of Post-combustion CO 2 Capture Facilities: A Pilot-Scale Corrosion Study

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Li, Wei; Landon, James; Irvin, Bradley

    Corrosion studies were carried out on metal coated and noncoated carbon steel as well as stainless steel in a pilot-scale post-combustion CO 2 capture process. Aqueous 30 wt % monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent was used without any chemical additive for antioxidation to examine a worst-case scenario where corrosion is not mitigated. The corrosion rate of all carbon steels was almost zero in the absorber column and CO 2 lean amine piping except for Ni-coated carbon steel (<1.8 mm/yr). Ni 2Al 3/Al 2O 3 precoated carbon steels showed initial protection but lost their integrity in the stripping column and CO 2 richmore » amine piping, and severe corrosion was eventually observed for all carbon steels at these two locations. Stainless steel was found to be stable and corrosion resistant in all of the sampling locations throughout the experiment. This study provides an initial framework for the use of carbon steel as a potential construction material for process units with relatively mild operating conditions (temperature less than 80 °C), such as the absorber and CO 2 lean amine piping of a post-combustion CO 2 capture process. As a result, it also warrants further investigation of using carbon steel with more effective corrosion mitigation strategies for process units where harsh environments are expected (such as temperatures greater than 100 °C).« less

  16. Use of Carbon Steel for Construction of Post-combustion CO 2 Capture Facilities: A Pilot-Scale Corrosion Study

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Wei; Landon, James; Irvin, Bradley; ...

    2017-04-13

    Corrosion studies were carried out on metal coated and noncoated carbon steel as well as stainless steel in a pilot-scale post-combustion CO 2 capture process. Aqueous 30 wt % monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent was used without any chemical additive for antioxidation to examine a worst-case scenario where corrosion is not mitigated. The corrosion rate of all carbon steels was almost zero in the absorber column and CO 2 lean amine piping except for Ni-coated carbon steel (<1.8 mm/yr). Ni 2Al 3/Al 2O 3 precoated carbon steels showed initial protection but lost their integrity in the stripping column and CO 2 richmore » amine piping, and severe corrosion was eventually observed for all carbon steels at these two locations. Stainless steel was found to be stable and corrosion resistant in all of the sampling locations throughout the experiment. This study provides an initial framework for the use of carbon steel as a potential construction material for process units with relatively mild operating conditions (temperature less than 80 °C), such as the absorber and CO 2 lean amine piping of a post-combustion CO 2 capture process. As a result, it also warrants further investigation of using carbon steel with more effective corrosion mitigation strategies for process units where harsh environments are expected (such as temperatures greater than 100 °C).« less

  17. Corrosion Behavior of Steels in Supercritical CO 2 for Power Cycle Applications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Repukaiti, Richard; Teeter, Lucas; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret

    In order to understand issues with corrosion of heat exchanger materials in direct supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO 2) power cycles, a series of autoclave exposure experiments and electrochemical experiments have been conducted. Corrosion behaviors of 347H stainless steel and P91 martensitic-ferrtic steel in sCO 2 environment have been compared. In autoclave exposure tests performed at 50°C- 245°C and 80 bar. Mass change measurements, surface characterization, and corrosion product analysis have been conducted to understand the corrosion behavior of steels in sCO 2 containing H 2O and O 2. Electrochemical tests performed at room temperature and 50°C, a simulation environment ofmore » water condensation phase with dissolved CO 2 was prepared to evaluate the corrosion resistance of materials. From both types of experiments, generally 347H showed higher corrosion resistance than P91.« less

  18. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  19. The effect of ozonated cooling water on the corrosion behavior of stainless steel, titanium and copper alloys. Ozone biocidal action on sessile and planktonic bacteria

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Videla, H.A.; Guiamet, P.S.; Mele, M.F.L. de

    1999-11-01

    Two aspects of ozone utilization as sole chemical treatment for cooling water demand a better understanding: (a) the effect of dissolved ozone on the corrosion behavior of heat exchanger structural materials and (b) the biocidal action of ozone on bacterial biofilms. To assess the effect of ozone dissolved in synthetic cooling water on the corrosion behavior of different structural materials (stainless steel; 70:30 copper-nickel; aluminum brass and titanium), voltamperometric experiments and corrosion potential vs. time measurements were made at ozone concentrations between 0.1 and 1.2 ppm. Present results show that the passive behavior of stainless steel and titanium is notmore » affected by dissolved ozone whereas copper alloys are susceptible to corrosion in the presence of ozone. To study the biocidal action of various concentrations of dissolved ozone against planktonic and sessile bacteria, liquid cultures and biofilms of Pseudomonas fluorescense, formed on different structural materials, were used at different contact times. The results show that dissolved ozone is an effective biocide for controlling planktonic cells but its effectiveness decreases in the presence of sessile bacteria and the extracellular polymeric matrix of the biofilm. It is suggested that the penetration of ozone through the biofilm depends on the simultaneous diffusion and reaction of the biocide with the biofilm matrix which may exhibit local differences in biomass distribution and hydrodynamic conditions.« less

  20. Evaluation of Pad 18 Spent Mercury Gold Trap Stainless Steel Container Failure

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Skidmore, E.

    Failure of the Pad 18 spent mercury gold trap stainless steel waste container is principally attributed to corrosion induced by degradation of plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) waste packaging material. Dehydrochlorination of pPVC polymer by thermal and/or radiolytic degradation is well-known to evolve HCl gas, which is highly corrosive to stainless steel and other metals in the presence of moisture. Degradation of the pPVC packaging material was likely caused by radiolysis in the presence of tritium gas within the waste container, though other degradation mechanisms (aging, thermo-oxidation, plasticizer migration) over 30 years storage may have contributed. Corrosion was also likely enhancedmore » by the crevice in the container weld design, and may have been enhanced by the presence of tritiated water. Similar non-failed spent mercury gold trap waste containers did not show radiographic evidence of plastic packaging or trapped free liquid within the container. Therefore, those containers are not expected to exhibit similar failures. Halogenated polymers such as pPVC subject to degradation can evolve halide gases such as HCl, which is corrosive in the presence of moisture and can generate pressure in sealed systems.« less

  1. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  2. Reduced platelet adhesion and improved corrosion resistance of superhydrophobic TiO₂-nanotube-coated 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoling; Yang, Yun; Hu, Ronggang; Lin, Changjian; Sun, Lan; Vogler, Erwin A

    2015-01-01

    Superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays were fabricated on 316L stainless steel (SS) to improve corrosion resistance and hemocompatibility of SS. Vertically-aligned superhydrophilic amorphous TNTs were fabricated on SS by electrochemical anodization of Ti films deposited on SS. Calcination was carried out to induce anatase phase (superhydrophilic), and fluorosilanization was used to convert superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. The morphology, structure and surface wettability of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle goniometry. The effects of surface wettability on corrosion resistance and platelet adhesion were investigated. The results showed that crystalline phase (anatase vs. amorphous) and wettability strongly affected corrosion resistance and platelet adhesion. The superhydrophilic amorphous TNTs failed to protect SS from corrosion whereas superhydrophobic amorphous TNTs slightly improved corrosion resistance of SS. Both superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic anatase TNTs significantly improved corrosion resistance of SS. The superhydrophilic amorphous TNTs minimized platelet adhesion and activation whereas superhydrophilic anatase TNTs activated the formation of fibrin network. On the contrary, both superhydrophobic TNTs (superhydrophobic amorphous TNTs and superhydrophobic anatase TNTs) reduced platelet adhesion significantly and improved corrosion resistance regardless of crystalline phase. Superhydrophobic anatase TNTs coating on SS surface offers the opportunity for the application of SS as a promising permanent biomaterial in blood contacting biomedical devices, where both reducing platelets adhesion/activation and improving corrosion resistance can be effectively combined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Corrosion of Metals in Aqueous Film-Forming Foams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CORROSION), (*FIRE EXTINGUISHERS, STAINLESS STEEL), (*STAINLESS STEEL, (* FOAM , CORROSION), PH FACTOR, CHLORIDES, FLUORIDES, STEEL, NICKEL ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, NAVAL EQUIPMENT, AIRCRAFT CARRIERS, SEA WATER, COMPATIBILITY.

  4. Evaluation by the Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation Test of Aged Ferritic Stainless Steel Intergranular Corrosion Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Braham, C.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental design method was used to determine the effect of factors that significantly affect the response of the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test in controlling the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of UNS S43000 (AISI 430) ferritic stainless steel. The test response is expressed in terms of the reactivation/activation current ratio ( I r / I a pct). Test results analysed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method show that the molarity of the H2SO4 electrolyte and the potential scanning rate have a more significant effect on the DL-EPR test response than the temperature and the depassivator agent concentration. On the basis of these results, a study was conducted in order to determine the optimal operating conditions of the test as a nondestructive technique for evaluating IGC resistance of ferritic stainless steel components. Three different heat treatments are considered in this study: solution annealing (nonsensitized), aging during 3 hours at 773 K (500 °C) (slightly sensitized), and aging during 2 hours at 873 K (600 °C) (highly sensitized). The aim is to find the operating conditions that simultaneously ensure the selectivity of the attack (intergranular and chromium depleted zone) and are able to detect the effect of low dechromization. It is found that a potential scanning rate of 2.5 mV/s in an electrolyte composed of H2SO4 3 M solution without depassivator, at a temperature around 293 K (20 °C), is the optimal operating condition for the DL-EPR test. Using this condition, it is possible to assess the degree of sensitization (DOS) to the IGC of products manufactured in ferritic stainless steels rapidly, reliably, and quantitatively. A time-temperature-start of sensitization (TTS) diagram for the UNS S43000 (France Inox, Villepinte, France) stainless steel was obtained with acceptable accuracy by this method when the IGC sensitization criterion was set to I r / I a > 1 pct. This diagram is in

  5. Comparative study: Degree of sensitization and intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of type 304 stainless steel

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Muraleedharan, P.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B.; Rodriguez, P.

    1996-10-01

    An attempt was made to correlate the susceptibility of type 304 stainless steel sensitized by isothermal exposures from 500 C to 700 C to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in boiling 20% sodium chloride solution to the degree of sensitization (DOS) measured using the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test. No systematic correlation was detected over the entire time-temperature regime. However, for a given sensitizing temperature, IGSCC susceptibility increased with increasing DOS up to a certain value, with no further increase thereafter. This behavior was attributed to the difference in sensitivities of the EPR and IGSCC tests to chromium depletion atmore » the grain boundaries (GB) during the sensitizing heat treatments.« less

  6. Properties of cryogenically worked metals. [stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Kiefer, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine whether the mechanical properties of cryogenically worked 17-7PH stainless steel are suitable for service from ambient to cryogenic temperatures. It was determined that the stress corrosion resistance of the cryo-worked material is quite adequate for structural service. The tensile properties and fracture toughness at room temperature were comparable to titanium alloy 6Al-4V. However, at cryogenic temperatures, the properties were not sufficient to recommend consideration for structural service.

  7. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  8. Corrosion of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldment in Chloride Medium Containing Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, P. J.; Singh Raman, R. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Raman, R.

    2008-11-01

    Influence of changes in microstructure caused due to welding on microbiologically influenced corrosion of a duplex stainless steel was studied by exposing the weldment and parent metal to chloride medium containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Identically prepared coupons (same area and surface finish) exposed to sterile medium were used as the control. Etching-type attack was observed in the presence of SRB, which was predominant in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the weldment. The anodic polarization studies indicated an increase in current density for coupon exposed to SRB-containing medium as compared to that obtained for coupon exposed to sterile medium. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations after anodic polarization revealed that the attack was preferentially in the ferrite phase of HAZ of the weldment, whereas it was restricted to the austenite phase of the parent metal.

  9. Improvement of corrosion resistance of low-alloy steels by resurfacing using multifunction cavitation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijiri, Masataka; Yoshimura, Toshihiko

    2018-02-01

    Low-alloy steels are based on carbon steel in combination with several percent or less (in many cases, 1 mass%) alloying elements, and they offer improved resistance to corrosion at a cost slightly higher than that of carbon steel. However, these materials do not exhibit the same corrosion resistance as stainless steel. The authors have previously developed a novel multifunction cavitation (MFC) technique, which combines ultrasonic cavitation with water jet cavitation. In this study, MFC was used to modify the surface of Cr-Mo steel (SCM435) and Ni-Cr-Mo steel (SNCM630). MFC was found to improve the residual stress value of the material as the result of surface modification while also imparting high strength and superior corrosion resistance.

  10. Protective coatings on stainless steel bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago, A. S.; Ansar, S. A.; Saruhan, B.; Schulz, U.; Lettenmeier, P.; Cañas, N. A.; Gazdzicki, P.; Morawietz, T.; Hiesgen, R.; Arnold, J.; Friedrich, K. A.

    2016-03-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is a promising technology for large H2 production from surplus electricity from renewable sources. However, the electrolyser stack is costly due to the manufacture of bipolar plates (BPP). Stainless steel can be used as an alternative, but it must be coated. Herein, dense titanium coatings are produced on stainless steel substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS). Further surface modification of the Ti coating with Pt (8 wt% Pt/Ti) deposited by physical vapour deposition (PVD) magnetron sputtering reduces the interfacial contact resistance (ICR). The Ti and Pt/Ti coatings are characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the coatings are evaluated in simulated and real PEM electrolyser environments, and they managed to fully protect the stainless steel substrate. In contrast, the absence of the thermally sprayed Ti layer between Pt and stainless steel leads to pitting corrosion. The Pt/Ti coating is tested in a PEM electrolyser cell for almost 200 h, exhibiting an average degradation rate of 26.5 μV h-1. The results reported here demonstrate the possibility of using stainless steel as a base material for the stack of a PEM electrolyser.

  11. Electrochemical characterization of AISI 316L stainless steel in contact with simulated body fluid under infection conditions.

    PubMed

    López, Danián Alejandro; Durán, Alicia; Ceré, Silvia Marcela

    2008-05-01

    Titanium and cobalt alloys, as well as some stainless steels, are among the most frequently used materials in orthopaedic surgery. In industrialized countries, stainless steel devices are used only for temporary implants due to their lower corrosion resistance in physiologic media when compared to other alloys. However, due to economical reasons, the use of stainless steel alloys for permanent implants is very common in developing countries. The implantation of foreign bodies is sometimes necessary in the modern medical practice. However, the complex interactions between the host and the can implant weaken the local immune system, increasing the risk of infections. Therefore, it is necessary to further study these materials as well as the characteristics of the superficial film formed in physiologic media in infection conditions in order to control their potential toxicity due to the release of metallic ions in the human body. This work presents a study of the superficial composition and the corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel and the influence of its main alloying elements when they are exposed to an acidic solution that simulates the change of pH that occurs when an infection develops. Aerated simulated body fluid (SBF) was employed as working solution at 37 degrees C. The pH was adjusted to 7.25 and 4 in order to reproduce normal body and disease state respectively. Corrosion resistance was measured by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and anodic polarization curves.

  12. Effect of Solution Annealing on Susceptibility to Intercrystalline Corrosion of Stainless Steel with 20% Cr and 8% Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taiwade, R. V.; Patil, A. P.; Patre, S. J.; Dayal, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    In general, as-received (AR) austenitic stainless steels (ASSs) contain complex carbide precipitates due to manufacturing operations, subsequent annealing treatment, or due to the fabrication processes such as welding. The presence of pre-existing carbides leads to cumulative sensitization and make the steel susceptible to intercrystalline corrosion (ICC)/intergranular corrosion (IGC) which causes premature failure during service. Solution annealing (SA) is one of the ways to deal with such situations. In this present investigation, the AR (hot rolled and mill annealed) chromium-nickel (Cr-Ni) ASS is compared with SA Cr-Ni ASS. The extent of ICC/IGC was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by various electrochemical tests including ASTM standard A-262 Practice A and Practice E, double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The degree of sensitization for hot rolled mill annealed AR condition is found to be substantially higher (51.55%) than that of SA condition (26.9%) for thermally aged samples (at 700 °C). The chemical composition across the grain boundary was measured using electron probe micro-analyzer for both (AR and SA) conditions and confirms that the pre-sensitization effect was completely removed after SA treatment.

  13. An investigation of the typical corrosion parameters used to test polymer electrolyte fuel cell bipolar plate coatings, with titanium nitride coated stainless steel as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, A.; Kongstein, O. E.; Hamilton, P. J.; Oedegaard, A.; Svenum, I. H.; Cooke, K.

    2015-07-01

    Stainless steel bipolar plates (BPP) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have good manufacturability, durability and low costs, but inadequate corrosion resistance and elevated interfacial contact resistance (ICR) in the fuel cell environment. Thin film coatings of titanium nitride (TiN) of 1 μm in thickness, were deposited by means of physical vapour deposition (PVD) process on to stainless steel (SS) 316L substrates and were evaluated, in a series of tests, for their level of corrosion protection and ICR. In the ex-situ corrosion tests, variables such as applied potential, experimental duration and pH of the sulphate electrolyte at 80 °C were altered. The ICR values were found to increase after exposure to greater applied potentials and electrolytes of a higher pH. In terms of experimental duration, the ICR increased most rapidly at the beginning of each experiment. It was also found that the oxidation of TiN was accelerated after exposure to electrolytes of a higher pH. When coated BPPs were incorporated into an accelerated fuel cell test, the degradation of the fuel cell cathode resembled the plates that were tested at the highest anodic potential (1.4 VSHE).

  14. Laser-assisted electrochemical micromachining of mould cavity on the stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohai; Wang, Shuming; Wang, Dong; Tong, Han

    2018-02-01

    In order to fabricate the micro mould cavities with complex structures on 304 stainless steel, laser-assisted electrochemical micromachining (EMM) based on surface modification by fiber laser masking was studied,and a new device of laser-assisted EMM was developed. Laser marking on the surface of 304 stainless steel can first be realized by fiber laser heating scanning. Through analysis of X ray diffraction analysis (XRD), metal oxide layer with predefined pattern can be formed by laser marking, and phase transformation can also occur on the 304 stainless steel surface, which produce the laser masking layer with corrosion resistance. The stainless steel surface with laser masking layer is subsequently etched by EMM, the laser masking layer severs as the temporary protective layer without relying on lithography mask, the fabrication of formed electrodes is also avoided, so micro pattern cavities can fast be fabricated. The impacts on machining accuracy during EMM with laser masking were discussed to optimize machining parameters, such as machining voltage, electrolyte concentration, duty cycle of pulse power supply and electrode gap size, the typical mould cavities 23μm deep were fabricated under the optimized parameters.

  15. Development of a chromium-free consumable for joining stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards, Jeffrey William

    Government regulations in the United States (OSHA Standards: 1910; 1915; 1917; 1918; 1926) and abroad are decreasing allowable exposure levels of hexavalent chromium to welding related personnel. The latest OSHA ruling in 2006 reduced the permissible exposure limit of airborne hexavalent chromium from 52 to 5 mug m-3. Achieving the new level may not be practical from an engineering controls standpoint during the fabrication of tightly enclosed stainless steel components such as the inside of ship hulls and boiler vessels. One method of addressing this problem is to implement a chromium-free welding consumable that provides equivalent mechanical performance and corrosion characteristics to current stainless steel welding consumables. This project was aimed at developing such a consumable and evaluating its suitability for replacement of current stainless steel consumables such as E308L-16. A new shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) consumable based on the Ni-Cu-Ru system was developed for austenitic stainless steel welding. The focus of this work was evaluating the mechanical properties, weldability, and fume formation characteristics of the various iterations of consumables developed. Welds deposited on Type 304 stainless steel were evaluated with weldability tests including: mechanical testing, hot ductility testing, Strain-to-fracture testing, Transverse Varestraint testing, and button melting. Mechanical properties of weld deposits of each consumable were found to exceed minimum values of Type 304 stainless steel based on tensile testing. Guide bend testing showed that weld deposits met minimum weld ductility requirements for stainless steel consumables, such as E308-16. Hot ductility testing revealed a narrow crack susceptible region (33 to 54°C) indicating a low susceptibility to weld metal liquation cracking. GTA welds exhibited superior ductility when compared to SMA welds. This was attributed to a lack of slag inclusions in the weld deposit, which are

  16. Blasting and Passivation Treatments for ASTM F139 Stainless Steel for Biomedical Applications: Effects on Surface Roughness, Hardening, and Localized Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Adriana L. Lemos; Kang, Kyung Won; Bonetto, Rita D.; Llorente, Carlos L.; Bilmes, Pablo D.; Gervasi, Claudio A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the combination of good biofunctionality and biocompatibility at low cost, AISI 316 low carbon vacuum melting (LVM) stainless steel, as considered in ASTM F139 standard, is often the first choice for medical implants, particularly for use in orthopedic surgery. Proper surface finish must be provided to ensure adequate interactions of the alloy with human body tissues that in turn allows the material to deliver the desired performance. Preliminary studies performed in our laboratory on AISI 316LVM stainless steel surfaces modified by glass bead blasting (from industrial supplier) followed by different nitric acid passivation conditions disclosed the necessity to extend parameters of the surface treatments and to further consider roughness, pitting corrosion resistance, and surface and subsurface hardening measurements, all in one, as the most effective characterization strategy. This was the approach adopted in the present work. Roughness assessment was performed by means of amplitude parameters, functional parameters, and an estimator of the fractal dimension that characterizes surface topography. We clearly demonstrate that the blasting treatment should be carried out under controlled conditions in order to obtain similar surface and subsurface properties. Otherwise, a variation in one of the parameters could modify the surface properties, exerting a profound impact on its application as biomaterial. A passivation step is necessary to offset the detrimental effect of blasting on pitting corrosion resistance.

  17. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of model austenitic stainless steel.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.

    1999-10-26

    Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted on model austenitic stainless steel (SS) alloys that were irradiated at 289 C in He. After irradiation to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup 2} and {approx} 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV), significant heat-to-heat variations in the degree of intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC and TGSCC) were observed. At {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, a high-purity heat of Type 316L SS that contains a very low concentration of Si exhibited the highest susceptibility to IGSCC. In unirradiated state, Types 304 andmore » 304L SS did not exhibit a systematic effect of Si content on alloy strength. However, at {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, yield and maximum strengths decreased significantly as Si content was increased to >0.9 wt.%. Among alloys that contain low concentrations of C and N, ductility and resistance to TGSCC and IGSCC were significantly greater for alloys with >0.9 wt.% Si than for alloys with <0.47 wt.% Si. Initial data at {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} were also consistent with the beneficial effect of high Si content. This indicates that to delay onset of and reduce susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), at least at low fluence levels, it is helpful to ensure a certain minimum concentration of Si. High concentrations of Cr were also beneficial; alloys that contain <15.5 wt.% Cr exhibited greater susceptibility to IASCC than alloys with {approx}18 wt.% Cr, whereas an alloy that contains >21 wt.% Cr exhibited less susceptibility than the lower-Cr alloys under similar conditions.« less

  18. Optimizing Heat Treatment Process of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni Martensitic Stainless of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, M. S.; Prifiharni, S.; Mabruri, E.

    2017-05-01

    The Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni stainless steels are modified into martensitic stainless steels for steam turbine blades application. The working temperature of steam turbine was around 600 - 700 °C. The improvement properties of turbine blade material is necessary to maintain steam turbine work. The previous research revealed that it has corrosion resistance of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni which is better than 13Cr stainless steels in the chloride environment. In this work, the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and hardness of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni stainless steels has been studied. The steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging. The steels were austenitized at 1000, 1050, and 1100 °C for 1 hour and were tempered at 600, 650, and 700 °C for 1 hour. The steels were then subjected to metallographic observation and hardness test of Rockwell C. The optimal heat treatment of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni was carried out austenitized in 1050 °C and tempered in 600 - 700 °C.

  19. Corrosion behavior of steels in liquid lead bismuth with low oxygen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Saito, Shigeru

    2008-02-01

    Corrosion tests in pots were conducted to elucidate corrosion behavior of various steels in liquid lead-bismuth for 3000 h under the condition of an oxygen concentration of 5 × 10 -8 wt% at 450 °C and an oxygen concentration of 3 × 10 -9 wt% at 550 °C, respectively. Significant corrosion was not observed at 450 °C for ferritic/martensitic steels, F82H, Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, 410SS, 430SS except 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. Pb-Bi penetration into steels and dissolution of elements into Pb-Bi were severe at 550 °C even for ferritic/martensitic steels. Typical dissolution attack occurred for pure iron both at 550 °C without surface Fe 3O 4 and at 450 °C with a thin Fe 3O 4 film. Ferritization due to dissolution of Ni and Cr, and Pb-Bi penetration were recognized for austenitic stainless steels, 316SS and 14Cr-16Ni-2Mo steel at both temperatures of 450 °C and 550 °C. The phenomena were mitigated for 18Cr-20Ni-5Si steel. In some cases oxide films could not be a corrosion barrier in liquid lead-bismuth.

  20. Corrosion of stainless steels in the riser during co-processing of bio-oils in a fluid catalytic cracking pilot plant

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, M. P.; Keiser, J. R.; Leonard, D. N.; ...

    2017-01-31

    Co-processing of bio-oils with conventional petroleum-based feedstocks is an attractive initial option to make use of renewable biomass as a fuel source while leveraging existing refinery infrastructures. But, bio-oils and their processing intermediates have high concentrations of organic oxygenates, which, among their other negative qualities, can result in increased corrosion issues. A range of stainless steel alloys (409, 410, 304L, 316L, 317L, and 201) was exposed at the base of the riser in a fluid catalytic cracking pilot plant while co-processing vacuum gas oil with pine-derived pyrolysis bio-oils that had been catalytically hydrodeoxygenated to ~ 2 to 28% oxygen. Wemore » studied the processing using a catalyst temperature of 704 °C, a reaction exit temperature of 520 °C, and total co-processing run times of 57–75 h. External oxide scaling 5–30 μm thick and internal attack 1–5 μm deep were observed in these short-duration exposures. The greatest extent of internal attack was observed for co-processing with the least stabilized bio-oil, and more so for types 409, 410, 304L, 316L, 317L stainless steel than for type 201. Finally, the internal attack involved porous Cr-rich oxide formation, associated with local Ni-metal enrichment and S-rich nanoparticles, primarily containing Cr or Mn. Implications for alloy selection and corrosion are discussed.« less

  1. Corrosion of stainless steels in the riser during co-processing of bio-oils in a fluid catalytic cracking pilot plant

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Brady, M. P.; Keiser, J. R.; Leonard, D. N.

    Co-processing of bio-oils with conventional petroleum-based feedstocks is an attractive initial option to make use of renewable biomass as a fuel source while leveraging existing refinery infrastructures. But, bio-oils and their processing intermediates have high concentrations of organic oxygenates, which, among their other negative qualities, can result in increased corrosion issues. A range of stainless steel alloys (409, 410, 304L, 316L, 317L, and 201) was exposed at the base of the riser in a fluid catalytic cracking pilot plant while co-processing vacuum gas oil with pine-derived pyrolysis bio-oils that had been catalytically hydrodeoxygenated to ~ 2 to 28% oxygen. Wemore » studied the processing using a catalyst temperature of 704 °C, a reaction exit temperature of 520 °C, and total co-processing run times of 57–75 h. External oxide scaling 5–30 μm thick and internal attack 1–5 μm deep were observed in these short-duration exposures. The greatest extent of internal attack was observed for co-processing with the least stabilized bio-oil, and more so for types 409, 410, 304L, 316L, 317L stainless steel than for type 201. Finally, the internal attack involved porous Cr-rich oxide formation, associated with local Ni-metal enrichment and S-rich nanoparticles, primarily containing Cr or Mn. Implications for alloy selection and corrosion are discussed.« less

  2. A Comparative Study of the Corrosion Behavior of Three Stainless Steels in an Eutectic (Li,Na,K)2CO3 Melt with and without (Na,K)Cl Additives at 973K in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, C. L.; Liu, Y.

    2011-04-01

    The ternary carbonate eutectic mixture of Li2CO3, K2CO3 and Na2CO3 as a heat transfer and storage medium has excellent thermophysical properties, but with high viscidity as compared with some other inorganic salts such as chlorides and nitrates. The addition of chlorides or fluorides to molten carbonates may improve their fluidity, but possibly making the melt become more corrosive. In this study, the corrosion behavior of type 304, 310 and 316 stainless steels in an eutectic (Li,Na,K)2CO3 melt with and without an eutectic mixture of NaCl and KCl at 973K in air have been examined. The experimental results indicated that 310 steel shows a much better corrosion resistance in molten carbonates than both 304 and 316 steels, due to the formation of a continuous LiCrO2 scale. The addition of chlorides to carbonates melt accelerated the corrosion of the steels, especially 310 steel, producing scales with more porosity.

  3. Characteristic of Low Temperature Carburized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istiroyah; Pamungkas, M. A.; Saroja, G.; Ghufron, M.; Juwono, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Low temperature carburizing process has been carried out on austenitic stainless steel (ASS) type AISI 316L, that contain chromium in above 12 at%. Therefore, conventional heat treatment processes that are usually carried out at high temperatures are not applicable. The sensitization process due to chromium migration from the grain boundary will lead to stress corrosion crack and decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel. In this study, the carburizing process was carried out at low temperatures below 500 °C. Surface morphology and mechanical properties of carburized specimens were investigated using optical microscopy, non destructive profilometer, and Vicker microhardness. The surface roughness analysis show the carburising process improves the roughness of ASS surface. This improvement is due to the adsorption of carbon atoms on the surface of the specimen. Likewise, the hardness test results indicate the carburising process increases the hardness of ASS.

  4. Characterization and prediction of carbon steel corrosion in diluted seawater containing pentaborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2018-01-01

    This study addresses the influence of Na2B10O16, which may be used for criticality control of fuel debris in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in diluted artificial seawater. The corrosion forms of carbon steel were categorized as uniform corrosion, localized corrosion, and passivity based on the balance between the dilution ratio of artificial seawater and the concentration of Na2B10O16. The changes in corrosion forms were arranged on a water quality region map. Passivity was maintained by adding 3.7 × 10-2 M or more of Na2B10O16 to artificial seawater with a dilution ratio of 100-fold or more. The criticality control of the fuel debris and corrosion mitigation of the carbon steel components may be achieved simultaneously in the water quality. The prediction of the corrosion form of carbon steel was attempted by the extended Larson-Skold Index (LSI) = ([Cl-] + 2[SO42-])/([HCO3-] + 2[B10O162-]). However, because the passivating action of B10O162- was remarkably stronger than that of HCO3-, the prediction was difficult under the simple addition of equivalent concentrations. The localized corrosion of carbon steel under the addition of Na2B10O16 preferentially occurred from the crevices of the test specimens, as was the case in stainless steel.

  5. Joining dissimilar stainless steels for pressure vessel components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zheng; Han, Huai-Yue

    1994-03-01

    A series of studies was carried out to examine the weldability and properties of dissimilar steel joints between martensitic and austenitic stainless steels - F6NM (OCr13Ni4Mo) and AISI 347, respectively. Such joints are important parts in, e.g. the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). This kind of joint requires both good mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and a stable magnetic permeability besides good weldability. The weldability tests included weld thermal simulation of the martensitic steel for investigating the influence of weld thermal cycles and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the mechanical properties of the heat-affected zone (HAZ); implant testing for examining the tendency for cold cracking of martensitic steel; rigid restraint testing for determining hot crack susceptibility of the multi-pass dissimilar steel joints. The joints were subjected to various mechanical tests including a tensile test, bending test and impact test at various temperatures, as well as slow strain-rate test for examining the stress corrosion cracking tendency in the simulated environment of a primary circuit of a PWR. The results of various tests indicated that the quality of the tube/tube joints is satisfactory for meeting all the design requirements.

  6. Characterization of friction stir welded joint of low nickel austenitic stainless steel and modified ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Mounarik; Das, Hrishikesh; Ahn, Eun Yeong; Hong, Sung Tae; Kim, Moon-Jo; Han, Heung Nam; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar stainless steels, low nickel austenitic stainless steel and 409M ferritic stainless steel, is experimentally investigated. Process responses during FSW and the microstructures of the resultant dissimilar joints are evaluated. Material flow in the stir zone is investigated in detail by elemental mapping. Elemental mapping of the dissimilar joints clearly indicates that the material flow pattern during FSW depends on the process parameter combination. Dynamic recrystallization and recovery are also observed in the dissimilar joints. Among the two different stainless steels selected in the present study, the ferritic stainless steels shows more severe dynamic recrystallization, resulting in a very fine microstructure, probably due to the higher stacking fault energy.

  7. Study of electroless Ni-W-P alloy coating on martensitic stainless steel

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Nikitasari, Arini, E-mail: arini-nikitasari@yahoo.com; Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: efendi-lipi@yahoo.com

    Electroless nickel phospor (Ni-P) is widely used in many industries due to their corrosion and wear resistance, coating uniformity, and ability to coat non-conductive surfaces. The unique properties of tungsten such as high hardness, higher melting point, lower coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and high tensile strength have created a lot of interest in developing ternary Ni-W-P alloys. This article presents the study of electroless Ni-W-P alloys coating using acid or alkaline bath on martensitic stainless steel. Nickel sulfate and sodium tungstate were used as nickel and tungsten sources, respectively, and sodium hypophosphite was used as a reducing agent. Acidmore » or alkaline bath refer to bath pH condition was adjusted by adding sulfuric acid. Martensitic stainless steel was immersed in Ni-W-P bath for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The substrate of martensitic stainless steel was subjected to pre-treatment (polishing and cleaning) and activation prior to electroless plating. The plating characteristics were investigated for concentration ratio of nickel and hypophosphite (1:3), sodium tungstate concentration 0,1 M, immersion time (15 min, 30 min, 60 min), and bath condition (acid, alkaline). The electroless Ni-W-P plating was heat treated at 400°C for 1 hour. Deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and corrosion measurement system (CMS).« less

  8. Electron mediators accelerate the microbiologically influenced corrosion of 304 stainless steel by the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiyu; Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Yang, Ke; Gu, Tingyue

    2015-02-01

    In the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) caused by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), iron oxidation happens outside sessile cells while the utilization of the electrons released by the oxidation process for sulfate reduction occurs in the SRB cytoplasm. Thus, cross-cell wall electron transfer is needed. It can only be achieved by electrogenic biofilms. This work hypothesized that the electron transfer is a bottleneck in MIC by SRB. To prove this, MIC tests were carried out using 304 stainless steel coupons covered with the Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757) biofilm in the ATCC 1249 medium. It was found that both riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), two common electron mediators that enhance electron transfer, accelerated pitting corrosion and weight loss on the coupons when 10ppm (w/w) of either of them was added to the culture medium in 7-day anaerobic lab tests. This finding has important implications in MIC forensics and biofilm synergy in MIC that causes billions of dollars of damages to the US industry each year. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrochemical properties of 316L stainless steel with culturing L929 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hiromoto, Sachiko; Hanawa, Takao

    2005-01-01

    Potentiodynamic polarization and impedance tests were carried out on 316L stainless steel with culturing murine fibroblast L929 cells to elucidate the corrosion behaviour of 316L steel with L929 cells and to understand the electrochemical interface between 316L steel and cells, respectively. Potential step test was carried out on 316L steel with type I collagen coating and culturing L929 cells to compare the effects of collagen and L929 cells. The open-circuit potential of 316L steel slightly shifted in a negative manner and passive current density increased with cells, indicating a decrease in the protective ability of passive oxide film. The pitting potential decreased with cells, indicating a decrease in the pitting corrosion resistance. In addition, a decrease in diffusivity at the interface was indicated from the decrease in the cathodic current density and the increase in the diffusion resistance parameter in the impedance test. The anodic peak current in the potential step test decreased with cells and collagen. Consequently, the corrosion resistance of 316L steel decreases with L929 cells. In addition, collagen coating would provide an environment for anodic reaction similar to that with culturing cells. PMID:16849246

  10. Formation of microstructural features in hot-dip aluminized AISI 321 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huilgol, Prashant; Rajendra Udupa, K.; Udaya Bhat, K.

    2018-02-01

    Hot-dip aluminizing (HDA) is a proven surface coating technique for improving the oxidation and corrosion resistance of ferrous substrates. Although extensive studies on the HDA of plain carbon steels have been reported, studies on the HDA of stainless steels are limited. Because of the technological importance of stainless steels in high-temperature applications, studies of their microstructural development during HDA are needed. In the present investigation, the HDA of AISI 321 stainless steel was carried out in a pure Al bath. The microstructural features of the coating were studied using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed that the coating consists of two regions: an Al top coat and an aluminide layer at the interface between the steel and Al. The Al top coat was found to consist of intermetallic phases such as Al7Cr and Al3Fe dispersed in an Al matrix. Twinning was observed in both the Al7Cr and the Al3Fe phases. Furthermore, the aluminide layer comprised a mixture of nanocrystalline Fe2Al5, Al7Cr, and Al. Details of the microstructural features are presented, and their formation mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Respiratory status of stainless steel and mild steel welders.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, P L; Kalliomäki, K; Korhonen, O; Nordman, H; Rahkonen, E; Vaaranen, V

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-three full-time stainless steel and 29 mild steel welders from one shipyard were examined clinically, and their lung function was measured. The stainless steel welders had used both tungsten inert-gas (low-fume concentration) and manual metal-arc (MMA) (high-fume concentration) welding methods. The individual exposure of the welders was estimated based on the time spent doing MMA welding, the amount of retained contaminants in the lungs (magnetopulmography), and urinary chromium excretion. The results suggest that there is a greater prevalence of small airway disease among shipyard mild steel MMA welders than among stainless steel welders. Among the stainless steel welders the impairment of lung function parameters was associated with the MMA welding method. The type of welding, then, is important when the health hazards of welders are studied, and welders cannot be regarded as a single, homogeneous group.

  12. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo; Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enrichedmore » region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.« less

  13. SEM and EDX Study of Stainless Steels, Suggested as Human Body Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simitchiiska, R. N.; Ivanova, D.; Fachikov, L.

    2018-06-01

    The most important requirement for any material used as an implant is to be biocompatible and not to cause undesirable effects in the human body. Corrosion of implants is included in the topic of biocompatibility because it is a determining factor in their sustainability and seamless fulfillment of their functional purpose. The work presents the results obtained in the comparative study of two austenitic stainless steels (Cr18Ni9 and Cr18Mn12N) in two models of artificial saliva, accepted as environments for testing the corrosion behavior of materials for these aims. The nature of the corrosion attack, the composition of the corrosion products at 37°C and the pH 5.5 and pH 6.75 of the model media were determined using physical methods such as SEM and EDX of investigation and analysis. It was found that Cr18Mn12N steel (0.61 % N), exhibits higher corrosion resistance.

  14. Effect of the Crevice Former on the Corrosion Behavior of 316L Stainless Steel in Chloride-Containing Synthetic Tap Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Hong; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Woo-Cheol

    2018-05-01

    To restrain the failure of the plate heat exchanger (PHE) in customer boiler working fluid, the effect of crevice former type on the corrosion behavior of the 316L stainless steel plate was investigated using electrochemical methods and surface analyses in chloride-containing synthetic tap water (60 °C). The localized corrosion under metal-metal crevice condition was initiated more easily than that under the metal-gasket crevice condition due to the restricted mass transport at the gasket crevice mouth. However, the anodic current under the metal-metal crevice condition was lower than that under metal-gasket crevice condition at a higher anodic potential, indicating that that the metal dissolution under EPDM crevice would be higher than that under metal crevice under the accelerated corrosion condition. Because narrow crevice gap that was formed under gasket accelerated the anodic dissolution at the crevice mouth, the perforation tendency under metal-gasket crevice condition is much higher than that under metal-metal crevice condition. As a result, the crevice geometry, especially the crevice gap, mainly affected the corrosion behavior of PHE material.

  15. Effect of the Crevice Former on the Corrosion Behavior of 316L Stainless Steel in Chloride-Containing Synthetic Tap Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Hong; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Woo-Cheol

    2018-03-01

    To restrain the failure of the plate heat exchanger (PHE) in customer boiler working fluid, the effect of crevice former type on the corrosion behavior of the 316L stainless steel plate was investigated using electrochemical methods and surface analyses in chloride-containing synthetic tap water (60 °C). The localized corrosion under metal-metal crevice condition was initiated more easily than that under the metal-gasket crevice condition due to the restricted mass transport at the gasket crevice mouth. However, the anodic current under the metal-metal crevice condition was lower than that under metal-gasket crevice condition at a higher anodic potential, indicating that that the metal dissolution under EPDM crevice would be higher than that under metal crevice under the accelerated corrosion condition. Because narrow crevice gap that was formed under gasket accelerated the anodic dissolution at the crevice mouth, the perforation tendency under metal-gasket crevice condition is much higher than that under metal-metal crevice condition. As a result, the crevice geometry, especially the crevice gap, mainly affected the corrosion behavior of PHE material.

  16. Effects of nitrogen in shielding gas on microstructure evolution and localized corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel welding joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Chao

    2017-05-01

    The effects of nitrogen addition in shielding gas on microstructure evolution and localized corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) welds were studied. N2-supplemented shielding gas facilitated the primary austenite formation, suppressed the Cr2N precipitation in weld root, and increased the microhardnesses of weld metal. Furthermore, N2-supplemented shielding gas increased pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of austenite, but which decreased slightly PREN of ferrite. The modified double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation in 2 M H2SO4 + 1 M HCl was an effective method to study the localized corrosion of the different zones in the DSS welds. The adding 2% N2 to pure Ar shielding gas improved the localized corrosion resistance in the DSS welds, which was due to compensation for nitrogen loss and promoting nitrogen further solution in the austenite phases, suppression of the Cr2N precipitation in the weld root, and increase of primary austenite content with higher PREN than the ferrite and secondary austenite. Secondary austenite are prone to selective corrosion because of lower PREN compared with ferrite and primary austenite. Cr2N precipitation in the pure Ar shielding weld root and heat affected zone caused the pitting corrosion within the ferrite and the intergranular corrosion at the ferrite boundary. In addition, sigma and M23C6 precipitation resulted in the intergranular corrosion at the ferrite boundary.

  17. Influence of High Pulsed and Continuous Magnetic Fields on the Corrosion and Microstructure of Metallic Conductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-31

    stainless steel , 416 stainless steel , 1018 steel , and 8620 steel as these offer structural integrity as well as both magnetic and...corrosion rate of untreated materials such as 304 stainless steel , 416 stainless steel , 1018 steel , 8620 steel . It is believed that the magnetic field...at characterizing the impact of a magnetic field on the corrosion behavior of the selected alloys, namely, 304 austenitic stainless steel

  18. Corrosion behaviour of stainless steels in flowing LBE at low and high oxygen concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, A.; Azzati, M.; Benamati, G.; Gessi, A.; Long, B.; Scaddozzo, G.

    2004-11-01

    The corrosion behaviours of austenitic steel AISI 316L and martensitic steel T91 were investigated in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 400 °C. The tests were performed in the LECOR and CHEOPE III loops, which stood for the low oxygen concentration and high oxygen concentration in LBE, respectively. The results obtained shows that steels were affected by dissolution at the condition of low oxygen concentration ( C[O 2] = 10 -8-10 -10 wt%) and were oxidized at the condition of high oxygen concentration ( C[O 2] = 10 -5-10 -6 wt%). The oxide layers detected are able to protect the steels from dissolution in LBE. Under the test condition adopted, the austenitic steel behaved more resistant to corrosion induced by LBE than the martensitic steel.

  19. Impact of saline aquifer water on surface and shallow pit corrosion of martensitic stainless steels during exposure to CO2 environment (CCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfennig, Anja; Kranzmann, Axel

    2018-05-01

    Pipe steels suitable for carbon capture and storage technology (CCS) require resistance against the corrosive environment of a potential CCS-site, e.g. heat, pressure, salinity of the aquifer, CO2-partial pressure. Samples of different mild and high alloyed stainless injection-pipe steels partially heat treated: 42CrMo4, X20Cr13, X46Cr13, X35CrMo4 as well as X5CrNiCuNb16-4 were kept at T=60 °C and ambient pressure as well as p=100 bar for 700 h - 8000 h in a CO2-saturated synthetic aquifer environment similar to possible geological on-shore CCS-sites in the northern German Basin. Main corrosion products are FeCO3 and FeOOH. Corrosion rates obtained at 100 bar are generally much lower than those measured at ambient pressure. Highest surface corrosion rates are 0.8 mm/year for 42CrMo4 and lowest 0.01 mm/year for X5CrNiCuNb16-4 in the vapour phase at ambient pressure. At 100 bar the highest corrosion rates are 0.01 mm/year for 42CrMo4, X20Cr13 (liquid phase), X46Cr13 and less than 0.01 mm/year for X35CrMo4 and X5CrNiCuNb16-4 after 8000 h of exposure with no regard to atmosphere. Martensitic microstructure offers good corrosion resistance.

  20. Interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of brazed aluminum / stainless steel - joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.; Elßner, M.; Uhlig, T.; Wagner, G.

    2017-03-01

    Due to the demand of mass and cost reduction, joints based on dissimilar metals become more and more interesting. Especially there is a high interest for joints between stainless steel and aluminum, often necessary for example for automotive heat exchangers. Brazing offers the possibilities to manufacture several joints in one step at, in comparison to fusion welding, lower temperatures. In the recent work, aluminum / stainless steel - joints are produced by induction brazing using an AlSi10 filler and a non-corrosive flux. The mechanical properties are determined by tensile shear tests as well as fatigue tests at ambient and elevated temperatures. The microstructure of the brazed joints and the fracture surfaces of the tested samples are investigated by SEM.

  1. Evaluation of Joint Performance on High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Which is Expected to Have Higher Allergy Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kouichi

    Austenitic stainless steel, which includes nickel for stabilizing austenitic structure, is used for various purposes, for example, for structural material, corrosion-resistant material, biomaterial etc. Nickel is set as one of the rare metals and economizing on nickel as the natural resources is required. On the other hand, nickel is one of the metals that cause metallic allergy frequently. Therefore, high nitrogen stainless steel, where nitrogen stabilizes austenitic structure instead of nickel, has been developed in Japan and some of the foreign countries for the above reason. When high nitrogen stainless steel is fused and bonded, dissolved nitrogen is released to the atmospheric area, and some of the material properties will change. In this study, we bonded high nitrogen stainless steel by stud welding process, which is able to bond at short time, and we evaluate joint performance. We have got some interesting results from the other tests and examinations.

  2. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion: Global Phenomena, Local Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-17

    Chandrasekaran and Dexter 1993) who suggested that Epl, for a stainless steel covered by a biofilm might be different from that measured in an abiotic...1985) observed that the presence of a biofilm dramatically increased the current density required to polarize stainless steel to a potential of... biofilms on corrosion potential and oxygen reduction of stainless steel . Corrosion 44 (10) 717-723. Dexter, SC and Maruthamuthu. S (2001). Reponse of

  3. Moessbauer spectroscopy study on the corrosion resistance of plasma nitrided ASTM F138 stainless steel in chloride solution

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Souza, S.D. de; Olzon-Dionysio, M., E-mail: dmod@df.ufscar.br; Basso, R.L.O.

    2010-10-15

    Plasma nitriding of ASTM F138 stainless steel samples has been carried out using dc glow discharge under 80% H{sub 2}-20% N{sub 2} gas mixture, at 673 K, and 2, 4, and 7 h time intervals, in order to investigate the influence of treatment time on the microstructure and the corrosion resistance properties. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, besides electrochemical tests in NaCl aerated solution. A modified layer of about 6 {mu}m was observed for all the nitrided samples, independent of nitriding time. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows broadmore » {gamma}{sub N} phase peaks, signifying a great degree of nitrogen supersaturation. Besides {gamma}{sub N,} the Moessbauer spectroscopy results indicated the occurrence of {gamma}' and {epsilon} phases, as well as some other less important phases. Corrosion measurements demonstrate that the plasma nitriding time affects the corrosion resistance and the best performance is reached at 4 h treatment. It seems that the {epsilon}/{gamma}' fraction ratio plays an important role on the resistance corrosion. Additionally, the Moessbauer spectroscopy was decisive in this study, since it was able to identify and quantify the iron phases that influence the corrosion resistance of plasma nitrided ASTM F138 samples.« less

  4. Effect of concentration of hyaluronic acid and NaCl on corrosion behavior of 316L austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansod, Ankur V.; Khobragade, Nilay N.; Giradkar, Karansagar V.; Patil, Awanikumar P.

    2017-11-01

    Due to low cost and easily available material, 316L stainless steel (SS) is used for biomedical implants. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of 316L (SS) was studied as a function of the concentration of simulated biological fluid (hyaluronic acid), the influence of Cl- and the combined effect of NaCl and hyaluronic acid (HA). For the electrochemical tests, potentiodynamic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were undertaken. With the increase in HA concentration, corrosion rate increases. Whereas, with the addition of NaCl to HA the solution, the corrosion resistance of the sample was enhanced. Also, in pure NaCl solution, the corrosion current density (i corr) increased as compared to bare HA and HA  +  NaCl. This is due to the adhesion property of the HA on the sample surface. EIS result agrees with the findings of potentiodynamic polarization tests. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was executed to analyze the passive film formed in the solution of HA and NaCl on 316L SS. XPS spectra confirms the formation of the passive film containing chromium oxide and hydroxides. Also, the formation of MoO2 helps in improving better corrosion resistance. The peak of nitrogen was observed in the sample immersed in HA solution. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was carried out to analyze the surface morphology.

  5. Preformed posterior stainless steel crowns: an update.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1999-02-01

    For almost 50 years, dentists have used stainless steel crowns for primary and permanent posterior teeth. No other type of restoration offers the convenience, low cost, durability, and reliability of such crowns when interim full-coronal coverage is required. Preformed stainless steel crowns have improved over the years. Better luting cements have been developed and different methods of crown manipulation have evolved. This article reviews stainless steel crown procedures for primary and permanent posterior teeth. Step-by-step placement of a primary molar stainless steel crown is documented and permanent molar stainless steel crown restoration is described. A method for repairing a worn-through crown also is reviewed.

  6. Effect of Inhibitor Agents Addition on Corrosion Resistance Performance of Titania Sol-Gel Coatings Applied on 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanaghi, Ali; Chu, Paul K.; Moradi, Hadi

    Hybrid organic-inorganic coatings are deposited on 304 stainless steel substrates by the sol-gel technique to improve the corrosion resistance. A titania-based nanostructured hybrid sol-gel coating is impregnated with three different microencapsulated healing agents (inhibitors) including cerium, Benzotriazole (BTA), and 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8H). Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are performed to investigate the barrier performance properties. The optimum conditions to achieve corrosion protective coatings for 304 stainless steel were determined. The Nyquist plots demonstrate that the activation time of the coating containing 8H as an organic healing agent shows improved behavior when compared to other coatings including cerium and BTA. Cerium as an inorganic healing agent is second and BTA is third and minimum. An increase in the impedance parameters such as resistance and capacitance as a function of immersion time is achieved in a 3.5wt.% NaCl solution by using healing agents such as BTA. Actually, over the course of immersion, the barrier performance behavior of the coatings changes and reduction of the impedance observed from the coatings containing Ce and 8H discloses deterioration of the protection system after immersion for 96h of immersion in the 3.5% NaCl solution. However, after 96h of immersion time, the concentration of chloride ions is high and causes increase in defects, micro cracks, hole on the surface of hybrid titania nanostructured coating containing Ce and 8H by destruction of coating, and also hybrid titania nanostructured coating containing BTA; BTA is released from coating to improve the resistance of passive film, which is created on the surface.

  7. Implementation of Remote Corrosion-Monitoring Sensor for Mission-Essential Structures at Okinawa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    with voluminous corrosion products. Martensitic stainless steels are susceptible to pitting and chlo- ride stress corrosion cracking in marine... steel , zinc- rich epoxy-coated steel , phenolic coated steel and bare type 410 stainless steel . (The steel panels were A36 steel .) The racks were...and ER probes were installed on building number 125. The coupons were mounted to an aluminum frame using stainless steel bolts and nylon spacer

  8. Hydrogen effects in duplex stainless steel welded joints - electrochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.; Łabanowski, J.; Ćwiek, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work results on the influence of hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded joints are described. The results were discussed by taking into account three different areas on the welded joint: weld metal (WM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal. The corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in a synthetic sea water. The conclusion is that, hydrogen may seriously deteriorate the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 DSS welded joints. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions. WM region has been revealed as the most sensitive to hydrogen action.

  9. Effects of Ag and Cu ions on the microbial corrosion of 316L stainless steel in the presence of Desulfovibrio sp.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Tuba; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Arkan, Simge; Cansever, Nurhan

    2016-08-01

    The utilization of Ag and Cu ions to prevent both microbial corrosion and biofilm formation has recently increased. The emphasis of this study lies on the effects of Ag and Cu ions on the microbial corrosion of 316L stainless steel (SS) induced by Desulfovibrio sp. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization were used to analyze the corrosion behavior. The biofilm formation, corrosion products and Ag and Cu ions on the surfaces were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and elemental mapping. Through circuit modeling, EIS results were used to interpret the physicoelectric interactions between the electrode, biofilm and culture interfaces. EIS results indicated that the metabolic activity of Desulfovibrio sp. accelerated the corrosion rate of SS in both conditions with and without ions. However, due to the retardation in the growth of Desulfovibrio sp. in the presence of Ag and Cu ions, significant decrease in corrosion rate was observed in the culture with the ions. In addition, SEM and EIS analyses revealed that the presence of the ions leads to the formation on the SS of a biofilm with different structure and morphology. Elemental analysis with EDS detected mainly sulfide- and phosphorous-based corrosion products on the surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Sulfur Content on the Corrosion Resistance of 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, S. S. M.; Pardal, J. M.; Martins, T. R. B.; da Silva, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    According to specification standards, the basic chemical composition of steel 17-4PH for special and critical applications is 15-17% Cr, 3.0-5.0% Ni, 3.0-5.0% Cu, 0.07% C (max) and 0.15-0.45% (Nb + Ta) (wt.%). The maximum sulfur content is 0.030%. However, as it will be shown in this work, this maximum limit for sulfur is too high for services where high corrosion resistance is necessary. Two samples of 17-4PH steel with similar base compositions, but quite different sulfur contents (0.027% and 0.001%S), were compared with respect to pitting corrosion and sensitization. Both materials were heat treated according to commercial treatments A, H900, H1100, H1150 and H1150D (ASTM A-1082). Two corrosion tests were applied to compare the steels. The first one was the double-loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (DL-EPR) test in 0.25 M H2SO4 + 0.01 KSCN solution, which is used to measure the degree of sensitization. The second test was the anodic polarization in 3.5%NaCl solution, commonly used to evaluate the pitting corrosion resistance. Detailed microstructural characterization by magnetic measurements, light optical and scanning electron microscopy was performed. As main conclusion, despite that both steels have chemical compositions in accordance with the standards, the steel with higher sulfur was much more susceptible to pitting and sensitization.

  11. Effect of Fluoride on Nickel-Titanium and Stainless Steel Orthodontic Archwires: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Heravi, Farzin; Moayed, Mohamad Hadi; Mokhber, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The commonly used Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) archwires in orthodontic treatment are often exposed to fluoride-containing mouthwashes. The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate and compare the corrosion resistance of three commercially available NiTi archwires exposed to 0.05 wt% and 0.2 wt% fluoride mouthwashes. Materials and Methods: Three different types of NiTi archwires, 0.016″ in diameter, from Dentaurum, Global, and GAC, and a stainless steel archwire from Dentaurum were examined to assess their corrosion resistance in Fusayama-Meyer artificial saliva and in two other artificial saliva containing 0.05 wt% and 0.2 wt% sodium fluoride (NaF). After the primary setup of wires, they were tested by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarization and corrosion potential/time analyses. Their surfaces were evaluated using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). Results: The results showed that all the wires were passive in artificial saliva. In contrast, by adding fluoride ions to the solution, the decrease in the archwires’ corrosion resistance was in direct proportion to the increase in fluoride concentration. Conclusion: The NiTi wires experienced deterioration of their corrosion properties under the effect of fluoride but not as much as the stainless steel archwires. PMID:26005454

  12. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    component usage. PH 13-8Mo is a precipitation-hardenable martensitic stainless steel combining excellent corrosion resistance with strength. Custom 465 is...a martensitic , age-hardenable stainless steel capable of about 1,724 MPa (250 ksi) UTS when peak-aged (H900 condition). Especially, this steel can...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Five high strength steels (4340, 300M, AerMet 100, Ferrium S53, and Hy-Tuf) and four stainless steels (High Nitrogen, 13

  13. External stress-corrosion cracking of a 1.22-m-diameter type 316 stainless steel air valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Telesman, Jack; Moore, Allan S.; Johnson, Dereck F.; Kuivinen, David E.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the cause of the failure of a massive AISI Type 316 stainless steel valve which controlled combustion air to a jet engine test facility. Several through-the-wall cracks were present near welded joints in the valve skirt. The valve had been in outdoor service for 18 years. Samples were taken in the cracked regions for metallographic and chemical analyses. Insulating material and sources of water mist in the vicinity of the failed valve were analyzed for chlorides. A scanning electron microscope was used to determine whether foreign elements were present in a crack. On the basis of the information generated, the failure was characterized as external stress-corrosion cracking. The cracking resulted from a combination of residual tensile stress from welding and the presence of aqueous chlorides. Recommended countermeasures are included.

  14. High-Power Diode Laser-Treated 13Cr4Ni Stainless Steel for Hydro Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2014-06-01

    The cast martensitic chromium nickel stainless steels such as 13Cr4Ni, 16Cr5Ni, and 17Cr4Ni PH have found wide application in hydro turbines. These steels have adequate corrosion resistance with good mechanical properties because of chromium content of more than 12%. The 13Cr4Ni stainless steel is most widely used among these steels; however, lacks silt, cavitation, and water impingement erosion resistances (SER, CER, and WIER). This article deals with characterizing 13Cr4Ni stainless steel for silt, cavitation, and water impingement erosion; and studying its improved SER, CER, and WIER behavior after high-power diode laser (HPDL) surface treatment. The WIER and CER have improved significantly after laser treatment, whereas there is a marginal improvement in SER. The main reason for improved WIER and CER is due to its increased surface hardness and formation of fine-grained microstructure after HPDL surface treatment. CER and WIER of HPDL-treated 13Cr4Ni stainless steel samples have been evaluated as per ASTM G32-2003 and ASTM G73-1978, respectively; and these were correlated with microstructure and mechanical properties such as ultimate tensile strength, modified ultimate resilience, and microhardness. The erosion damage mechanism, compared on the basis of scanning electron micrographs and mechanical properties, is discussed and reported in this article.

  15. Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippold, John C.; Kotecki, Damian J.

    2005-03-01

    Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels, the first book in over twenty years to address welding metallurgy and weldability issues associated with stainless steel, offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of these topics currently available. The authors emphasize fundamental metallurgical principles governing microstructure evolution and property development of stainless steels, including martensistic, ferric, austenitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. They present a logical and well-organized look at the history, evolution, and primary uses of each stainless steel, including detailed descriptions of the associated weldability issues.

  16. Office of Naval Research Overview of Corrosion S&T Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-02

    a carbon induced passivity for LTCSS treated austenitic stainless steels - Low temp. allows interstitial C diffusion, but not substitutional...paraequilibrium carburization mechanism(s) that lead to the enhanced corrosion resistance seaw ater crevice corrosion on 316 Stainless Steel LTC...Treated 316 untreated LTC process TTT diagram LTCSS Surface Modification: • Carbon concentrations > 12 at. % in 316 stainless steel while maintaining

  17. Accumulation of radioactive corrosion products on steel surfaces of VVER type nuclear reactors. I. 110mAg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Gábor; Baradlai, Pál; Varga, Kálmán; Myburg, Gerrit; Schunk, János; Tilky, Péter; Stoddart, Paul

    Formation, presence and deposition of corrosion product radionuclides (such as 60Co, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe and/or 110mAg) in the primary circuits of water-cooled nuclear reactors (PWRs) throw many obstacles in the way of normal operation. During the course of the work presented in this series, accumulations of such radionuclides have been studied at austenitic stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOST 5632-61) surfaces (this austenitic stainless steel corresponds to AISI 321). Comparative experiments have been performed on magnetite-covered carbon steel (both materials are frequently used in some Soviet VVER type PWRs). For these laboratory-scale investigations a combination of the in situ radiotracer `thin gap' method and voltammetry is considered to be a powerful tool due to its high sensitivity towards the detection of the submonolayer coverages of corrosion product radionuclides. An independent technique (XPS) is also used to characterize the depth distribution and chemical state of various contaminants in the passive layer formed on austenitic stainless steel. In the first part of the series the accumulation of 110mAg has been investigated. Potential dependent sorption of Ag + ions (cementation) is found to be the predominant process on austenitic steel, while in the case of magnetite-covered carbon steel the silver species are mainly depleted in the form of Ag 2O. The XPS depth profile of Ag gives an evidence about the embedding of metallic silver into the entire passive layer of the austenitic stainless steel studied.

  18. Corrosion Characteristics of Ni-Based Hardfacing Alloy Deposited on Stainless Steel Substrate by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Abraham, Geogy; Kumar, Santosh; Bhattacharyya, Kaustava; Keskar, Nachiket; Kushwaha, R. P.; Rao, Ramana; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, corrosion characteristics of a nickel-based Ni-Mo-Cr-Si hardfacing alloy having 32Mo, 15Cr, and 3Si (wt pct) as alloying elements, deposited on stainless steel SS316L substrate by laser cladding, have been presented. Corrosion behavior of the laser clad layer was evaluated in reducing (0.1 M HCl) and oxidizing (0.5 M HNO3) environments, in comparison with the reference substrate SS316L, using electrochemical potentiodynamic technique at room temperature. The corrosion mechanisms have been evaluated on the basis of microstructural and microchemical analysis using scanning electron microscopy attached with energy-dispersive spectrometry. Passivity behavior of the laser clad layer was studied in 0.5 M H2SO4, using the potentiostatic technique and analyzing the passive layer by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si exhibited higher pitting corrosion resistance in chloride (reducing) environment, indicated by much higher breakdown potential ( 0.8 VSCE) and the absence of pitting as compared to substrate SS316L ( 0.3 VSCE). However, in oxidizing (0.5 M HNO3) environment, both the laser clad layer and substrate SS316L showed excellent and similar corrosion resistance exhibiting high breakdown potential ( 0.85 VSCE) and wide passivation range ( 0.8 VSCE) with low passive current density ( 4 to 7 × 10-6 A/cm2). The stable passive layer formed on laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si after exposure in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at constant potential 0.6 VSCE (within the passive range), consisted oxides of Mo as Mo+4 (MoO2) and Mo+6 (MoO4)-2, Cr as Cr3+ (mixture of both Cr2O3 and Cr (OH)3), and Si as Si4+(SiO2), which have contributed to passivation and repassivation and therefore excellent corrosion behavior.

  19. Defining the Post-Machined Sub-surface in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, N.; Sunil Kumar, B.; Kain, V.; Birbilis, N.; Joshi, S. S.; Sivaprasad, P. V.; Chai, G.; Durgaprasad, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Samajdar, I.

    2018-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels grades, with differences in chemistry, stacking fault energy, and thermal conductivity, were subjected to vertical milling. Anodic potentiodynamic polarization was able to differentiate (with machining speed/strain rate) between different post-machined sub-surfaces in SS 316L and Alloy A (a Cu containing austenitic stainless steel: Sanicroe 28™), but not in SS 304L. However, such differences (in the post-machined sub-surfaces) were revealed in surface roughness, sub-surface residual stresses and misorientations, and in the relative presence of sub-surface Cr2O3 films. It was shown, quantitatively, that higher machining speed reduced surface roughness and also reduced the effective depths of the affected sub-surface layers. A qualitative explanation on the sub-surface microstructural developments was provided based on the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity values. The results herein represent a mechanistic understanding to rationalize the corrosion performance of widely adopted engineering alloys.

  20. Defining the Post-Machined Sub-surface in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, N.; Sunil Kumar, B.; Kain, V.; Birbilis, N.; Joshi, S. S.; Sivaprasad, P. V.; Chai, G.; Durgaprasad, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Samajdar, I.

    2018-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels grades, with differences in chemistry, stacking fault energy, and thermal conductivity, were subjected to vertical milling. Anodic potentiodynamic polarization was able to differentiate (with machining speed/strain rate) between different post-machined sub-surfaces in SS 316L and Alloy A (a Cu containing austenitic stainless steel: Sanicroe 28™), but not in SS 304L. However, such differences (in the post-machined sub-surfaces) were revealed in surface roughness, sub-surface residual stresses and misorientations, and in the relative presence of sub-surface Cr2O3 films. It was shown, quantitatively, that higher machining speed reduced surface roughness and also reduced the effective depths of the affected sub-surface layers. A qualitative explanation on the sub-surface microstructural developments was provided based on the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity values. The results herein represent a mechanistic understanding to rationalize the corrosion performance of widely adopted engineering alloys.

  1. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  2. Corrosion initiation and propagation behavior of corrosion resistant concrete reinforcing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Michael F.

    The life of a concrete structure exposed to deicing compounds or seawater is often limited by chloride induced corrosion of the steel reinforcement. In this study, the key material attributes that affect the corrosion initiation and propagation periods were studied. These included material composition, surface condition, ageing time, propagation behavior during active corrosion, morphology of attack, and type of corrosion products generated by each rebar material. The threshold chloride concentrations for solid 316LN stainless steel, 316L stainless steel clad over carbon steel, 2101 LDX, MMFX-2, and carbon steel rebar were investigated using electrochemical techniques in saturated calcium hydroxide solutions. Surface preparation, test method, duration of period exposed to a passivating condition prior to introduction of chloride, and presence of cladding defects all affected the threshold chloride concentration obtained. A model was implemented to predict the extension of time until corrosion initiation would be expected. 8 years was the predicted time to corrosion initiation for carbon steel. However, model results confirmed that use of 316LN may increase the time until onset of corrosion to 100 years or more. To assess the potential benefits afforded by new corrosion resistant rebar alloys from a corrosion resistance standpoint the corrosion propagation behavior and other factors that might affect the risk of corrosion-induced concrete cracking must also be considered. Radial pit growth was found to be ohmically controlled but repassivation occurred more readily at high potentials in the case of 316LN and 2101 stainless steels. The discovery of ohmically controlled propagation enabled transformation of propagation rates from simulated concrete pore solution to less conductive concrete by accounting for resistance changes in the surrounding medium. The corrosion propagation behavior as well as the morphology of attack directly affects the propensity for concrete

  3. Focal osteolysis at the junctions of a modular stainless-steel femoral intramedullary nail.

    PubMed

    Jones, D M; Marsh, J L; Nepola, J V; Jacobs, J J; Skipor, A K; Urban, R M; Gilbert, J L; Buckwalter, J A

    2001-04-01

    During routine follow-up of patients treated with a three-piece stainless-steel modular femoral nail, osteolysis and periosteal reaction around the modular junctions of some of the nails were noted on radiographs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, etiology, and clinical relevance of these radiographic findings. Forty-four femoral fractures or nonunions in forty-two patients were treated with a modular stainless-steel femoral intramedullary nail. Seventeen nails were excluded, leaving twenty-seven intramedullary nails in twenty-seven patients for this study. All patients had had a femoral diaphyseal fracture; nineteen had had an acute fracture and eight, a nonunion. These twenty-seven patients returned for radiographs, a physical examination, assessment of functional outcomes, assessment of thigh pain with a visual analog scale, determination of serum chromium levels, and nail removal if desired. A control group of sixteen patients treated with a one-piece stainless-steel femoral intramedullary nail was evaluated with use of the same outcome measures and was compared with the group treated with the modular femoral nail with regard to prevalence of thigh pain and serum chromium levels. Twelve modular femoral nails were removed according to the study protocol. The modular nail junctions were analyzed for corrosion products, and histopathologic analysis of tissue specimens from the femoral canal was performed. The twenty-seven patients were seen at a mean of twenty-one months after fracture fixation; twenty-six of the twenty-seven fractures healed. Twenty-three femora had at least one of three types of abnormalities-osteolysis, periosteal reaction, or cortical thickening--localized to one or both modular junctions. Eighteen patients had severe reactions, defined as osteolysis of > or =2 mm, cortical thickening of > or =5 mm, and/or a periosteal reaction (group 1). Nine patients had mild or no reactions (group 2). Serum chromium levels in group 1

  4. The crevice corrosion behavior of chromium stainless steel and nickel base alloys in a reverse osmosis plant utilizing seawater

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Al-Odwani, A.; Carew, J.; Al-Hashem, A.

    1999-11-01

    The crevice corrosion tests were performed on UNS S31603, UNS S31703, UNS S31726, UNS S31254, UNS N08904, UNS N625, UNS N825 and UNS N276 was investigated in seawater and neutral brine solution using a multiple crevice washer assembly. PTFE multiple-crevice washers were bolted to both sides of the test specimens with PTFE bolts and nuts. The specimens were exposed to seawater flowing at a rate of 100 L/h for periods of 3,000 h and 6,000 h. Duplicate specimens were immersed in a plexiglass cell containing the flowing seawater at a temperature of 30 C. The results showed that all themore » tested coupons were susceptible to some degree of crevice corrosion attack. However, the stainless steels were the most severely affected. The degree of crevice corrosion attack for the nickel base alloys decreased as the percentage of molybdenum content in the alloys increased. Destruction of the passive layer by the concentration of chloride or acidity and reduction of hydrogen ions at the crevices is believed to be the cause of the crevice attack.« less

  5. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels andmore » is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.« less

  6. In-vitro long term and electrochemical corrosion resistance of cold deformed nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2014-07-01

    This work was focused on the evaluation of the corrosion behavior of deformed (10% and 20% cold work) and annealed (at 1050 °C for 15 min followed by water quenching) Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) in simulated body fluid at 37°C using weight loss method (long term), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to understand the surface morphology of the alloys after polarization test. It has been observed that cold working had a significant influence on the corrosion resistant properties of these alloys. The weight loss and corrosion rates were observed to decrease with increasing degree of cold working and nitrogen content in the alloy. The corrosion resistance of the material is directly related to the resistance of the passive oxide film formed on its surface which was enhanced with cold working and nitrogen content. It was also observed that corrosion current densities were decreased and corrosion potentials were shifted to more positive values. By seeing pit morphology under SEM, shallower and smaller pits were associated with HNSs and cold worked samples, indicating that corrosion resistance increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold deformation. X-ray diffraction profiles of annealed as well as deformed alloys were revealed and there is no evidence for formation of martensite or any other secondary phases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Aged AISI 316L Stainless Steel Sensitization to Intergranular Corrosion: Comparison Between Microstructural Electrochemical and Analytical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Sahlaoui, H.; Braham, C.

    2007-06-01

    The evaluation of the degree of sensitization (DOS) to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of a commercial AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel aged at temperatures ranging from 550 °C to 800 °C during 100 to 80,000 hours was carried out using three different assessment methods. (1) The microstructural method coupled with the Strauss standard test (ASTM A262). This method establishes the kinetics of the precipitation phenomenon under different aging conditions, by transmission electronic microscope (TEM) examination of thin foils and electron diffraction. The subsequent chromium-depleted zones are characterized by X-ray microanalysis using scanning transmission electronic microscope (STEM). The superimposition of microstructural time-temperature-precipitation (TTP) and ASTM A262 time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams provides the relationship between aged microstructure and IGC. Moreover, by considering the chromium-depleted zone characteristics, sensitization and desensitization criteria could be established. (2) The electrochemical method involving the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test. The operating conditions of this test were initially optimized using the experimental design method on the bases of the reliability, the selectivity, and the reproducibility of test responses for both annealed and sensitized steels. The TTS diagram of the AISI 316L stainless steel was established using this method. This diagram offers a quantitative assessment of the DOS and a possibility to appreciate the time-temperature equivalence of the IGC sensitization and desensitization. (3) The analytical method based on the chromium diffusion models. Using the IGC sensitization and desensitization criteria established by the microstructural method, numerical solving of the chromium diffusion equations leads to a calculated AISI 316L TTS diagram. Comparison of these three methods gives a clear advantage to the nondestructive DL-EPR test when it is

  8. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of Custom 455 stainless steel alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical and stress corrosion properties are presented of vacuum melted Custom 455 stainless steel alloy bar (1.0-inch diameter) and sheet (0.083-inch thick) material aged at 950 F, 1000 F, and 1050 F. Low temperature mechanical properties were determined at temperatures of 80 F, 0 F, -100 F, and -200 F. For all three aging treatments, the ultimate tensile and 0.2 percent offset yield strengths increased with decreasing test temperatures while the elongation held fairly constant down to -100 F and decreased at -200 F. Reduction in Area decreased moderately with decreasing temperature for the longitudinal round (0.250-inch diameter) specimens. Notched tensile strength and charpy V-notched impact strength decreased with decreasing test temperature. For all three aging treatments, no failures were observed in the unstressed specimens or the specimens stressed to 50, 75, and 100 percent of their yield strengths for 180 days of alternate immersion testing in a 3.5 percent NaCl solution. As indicated by the results of tensile tests performed after alternate immersion testing, the mechanical properties of Custom 455 alloy were not affected by stress or exposure under the conditions of the evaluation.

  9. Improvement of localised corrosion resistance of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel joints made by gas metal arc welding under electromagnetic interaction of low intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rentería, M. A.; López-Morelos, V. H.; García-Hernández, R.; Dzib-Pérez, L.; García-Ochoa, E. M.; González-Sánchez, J.

    2014-12-01

    The resistance to localised corrosion of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel plates joined by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) under the effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) was evaluated with sensitive electrochemical methods. Welds were made using two shielding gas mixtures: 98% Ar + 2% O2 (M1) and 97% Ar + 3% N2 (M2). Plates were welded under EMILI using the M1 gas with constant welding parameters. The modified microstructural evolution in the high temperature heat affected zone and at the fusion zone induced by application of EMILI during welding is associated with the increase of resistance to localised corrosion of the welded joints. Joints made by GMAW using the shielding gas M2 without the application of magnetic field presented high resistance to general corrosion but high susceptibility to undergo localised attack.

  10. An assessment of ultra fine grained 316L stainless steel for implant applications.

    PubMed

    Muley, Sachin Vijay; Vidvans, Amey N; Chaudhari, Gajanan P; Udainiya, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Ultra fine-grained metals obtained by severe plastic deformation exhibit higher specific strength that is useful for many applications and show promise for use as body implants. This work studied the microstructural evolution, mechanical and sliding wear behavior and corrosion behavior of 316L stainless steel warm multi axially forged at 600°C. Microstructural evolution studied using electron backscatter diffraction technique and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation of ultra fine-grained structure. Average grain size reduced from 30μm to 0.86μm after nine strain steps. A combination of Hall-Petch strengthening and strain hardening increased the hardness. Improved sliding wear resistance is attributed to a transition from micro cutting to wedge-forming mode of abrasive wear. Load-bearing orthopedic implants often fail from pitting initiated corrosion fatigue. Potentiodynamic tests, cyclic polarization, and FeCl3 immersion tests revealed enhanced pitting resistance of forged steel that is confirmed by Mott-Schottky analysis. This is ascribed to an increase in the grain boundary volume, and homogenization of pit inducing impurities and non-metallic phases due to severe deformation, which influenced the passive film properties. These model studies on 316L steel demonstrate that severely deformed ultra fine-grained metals have potential to deliver improved implant performance. This model study on 316L steel demonstrates that severely deformed ultra fine-grained (UFG) metals have potential to deliver improved load-bearing implant performance. It is as interesting as is unclear as to how such severely deformed UFG material behaves electrochemically in the corrosive body fluids. This work is on studying the inter-relationship between structure, and mechanical, wear, and corrosion behavior of warm multiaxially forged (MAFed) UFG 316L stainless steel. Warm MAF is a bulk processing method capable of yielding large volume of UFG material and is an easily

  11. An Investigation into Stress Corrosion Cracking of Dissimilar Metal Welds with 304L Stainless Steel and Alloy 82 in High Temperature Pure Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Huang, Guan-Ru; Tsai, Chuen-Horng; Wang, Mei-Ya

    For a better understanding toward stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in dissimilar metal welds with 304L stainless steel and Alloy 82, the SCC growth behavior in the transition regions of weld joints was investigated via slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests in 280 oC pure water with a dissolve oxygen level of 300 ppb. Prior to the SSRT tests, samples with dissimilar metal welds were prepared and underwent various pretreatments, including post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), shot peening, solution annealing, and mechanical grinding. In addition to the SSRT tests, measurements of degree of sensitization and micro-hardness on the transition regions of the metal welds were also conducted. According to the test results, the samples having undergone PWHTs exhibited relatively high degrees of sensitization. Distinct decreases in hardness were observed in the heat-affected zones of the base metals in all samples. Furthermore, the fracture planes of all samples after the SSRT tests were located at the stainless steel sides and were in parallel with the fusion lines. Among the treating conditions investigated in this study, a PWHT would pose a detrimental effect on the samples in the aspects of mechanical property and degree of SCC. Solution annealing would lead to the greatest improvement in ductility and SCC retardation, and shot peening would provide the treated samples with a positive improvement in ductility and corrosion retardation, but not to a great extent.

  12. Impact of Magnetic Stirring on Stainless Steel Integrity: Effect on Biopharmaceutical Processing.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher; Wilson, Kelly; Kim, Yoen Joo; Xie, Min; Wang, William K; Wendeler, Michaela

    2017-11-01

    Stainless steel containers are widely used in the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical industry for the storage of buffers, process intermediates, and purified drug substance. They are generally held to be corrosion resistant, biocompatible, and nonreactive, although it is well established that trace amounts of metal ions can leach from stainless steel equipment into biopharmaceutical products. We report here that the use of stainless steel containers in conjunction with magnetic stirring bars leads to significantly aggravated metal contamination, consisting of both metal particles and significantly elevated metal ions in solution, the degree of which is several orders of magnitude higher than described for static conditions. Metal particles are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with electron-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and metal content in solution is quantitated at different time points by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The concentration of iron, chromium, nickel, and manganese increases with increasing stirring time and speed. We describe the impact of buffer components on the extent of metal particles and ions in solution and illustrate the effect on model proteins. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of the corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels exposed to static liquid Pb Bi at 450 and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Y.; Futakawa, M.; Saito, S.

    2005-08-01

    Static corrosion tests of various steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450 °C and 550 °C for 3000 h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior in liquid Pb-Bi. Corrosion depth decreases at 450 °C with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic steels or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr does not occur in the three austenitic steels at 450 °C. Corrosion depth of ferritic/martensitic steels also decreases at 550 °C with increasing Cr content in steels whereas corrosion depth of austenitic steels, JPCA and 316SS becomes larger due to ferritization caused by dissolution of Ni at 550 °C than that of ferritic/martensitic steels. An austenitic stainless steel containing about 5%Si exhibits fine corrosion resistance at 550 °C because the protective Si oxide film is formed and prevents dissolution of Ni and Cr.

  14. A dual-electrochemical cell to study the biocorrosion of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Lopes, F A; Perrin, S; Féron, D

    2007-01-01

    The presence of microorganisms on metal surfaces can alter the local physical/chemical conditions and lead to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). The goal of the present work was to study the effect of a mixed aerobic-anaerobic biofilm on the behaviour of stainless steel (316 L) in underground conditions. Rather than testing different bacteria or consortia, investigations were based on the mechanisms of MIC. Mixed biofilms were simulated by the addition of glucose oxidase to reproduce the aerobic conditions and by sulphide or sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for the anaerobic conditions. A double thermostated electrochemical cell has been developed to study the coupling between aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Results suggested a transfer of electrons from the stainless steel sample of the anaerobic cell to the stainless steel sample of the aerobic one. Inorganic sulphide was replaced by SRB in the anaerobic cell revealing an increase of the galvanic current which may be explained by an effect of lactate and/or acetate on the anodic reaction or by a high sulphide concentration in the biofilm. The results of this study underline that the dual-electrochemical cell system is representative of phenomena present in natural environments and should be considered as an option when studying MIC.

  15. An Electrochemical Processing Strategy for Improving Tribological Performance of Aisi 316 Stainless Steel Under Grease Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jiaojuan; Li, Maolin; Lin, Naiming; Zhang, Xiangyu; Qin, Lin; Tang, Bin

    2014-12-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance of AISI 316 stainless steel (316 SS) under grease lubrication, electrochemical processing was conducted on it to obtain a rough (surface texturing-like) surface by making use of the high sensitivity of austenitic stainless steel to pitting corrosion in Cl--rich environment. Numerous corrosion pits or micro-ditches acted as micro-reservoirs on the obtained surface. While the grease could offer consistent lubrication, and then improve the tribological performance of 316 SS. Tribological behaviors of raw 316 SS and the treated sample were measured using a reciprocating type tribometer sliding against GCr15 steel counterpart under dry and grease lubrication conditions. The results showed that the mass losses of the two samples were in the same order of magnitude, and the raw sample exhibited lower friction coefficient in dry sliding. When the tests were conducted under grease lubrication condition, the friction coefficients and mass losses of the treated sample were far lower than those of the raw 316 SS. The tribological performance of 316 SS under grease lubrication was drastically improved after electrochemical processing.

  16. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  17. Fracture-tough, corrosion-resistant bearing steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles allowing design of stainless bearing steels with enhanced toughness and stress corrosion resistance has involved both investigation of basic phenomena in model alloys and evaluation of a prototype bearing steel based on a conceptual design exercise. Progress in model studies has included a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) study of the kinetics of interfacial segregation of embrittling impurities which compete with the kinetics of alloy carbide precipitation in secondary hardening steels. These results can define minimum allowable carbide precipitation rates and/or maximum allowable free impurity contents in these ultrahigh strength steels. Characterization of the prototype bearing steel designed to combine precipitated austenite transformation toughening with secondary hardening shows good agreement between predicted and observed solution treatment response including the nature of the high temperature carbides. An approximate equilibrium constraint applied in the preliminary design calculations to maintain a high martensitic temperature proved inadequate, and the solution treated alloy remained fully austenitic down to liquid nitrogen temperature rather than transforming above 200 C. The alloy can be martensitically transformed by cryogenic deformation, and material so processed will be studied further to test predicted carbide and austenite precipitation behavior. A mechanistically-based martensitic kinetic model was developed and parameters are being evaluated from available kinetic data to allow precise control of martensitic temperatures of high alloy steels in future designs. Preliminary calculations incorporating the prototype stability results suggest that the transformation-toughened secondary-hardening martensitic-stainless design concept is still viable, but may require lowering Cr content to 9 wt. pct. and adding 0.5 to 1.0 wt. pct. Al. An alternative design approach based on strain-induced martensitic transformation during

  18. Effect of cold rolling on the microstructural, magnetic, mechanical, and corrosion properties of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanhaei, S.; Gheisari, Kh.; Alavi Zaree, S. R.

    2018-06-01

    This study has evaluated the effect of different levels of cold rolling (from 0 to 50%) on the microstructural, magnetic, and mechanical properties and the corrosion behavior of 316L austenitic stainless steel in NaCl (1 mol/L) + H2SO4 (0.5 mol/L) solution. Microstructural examinations using optical microscopy revealed the development of a morphological texture from coaxial to elongated grains during the cold-rolling process. Phase analysis carried out on the basis of X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of the ferromagnetic α'-martensite phase under the stresses applied during cold rolling. This finding is in agreement with magnetic measurements using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Mechanical properties determined by tensile and Vickers microhardness tests demonstrated an upward trend in the hardness-to-yield strength ratio with increasing cold-rolling percentage, representing a reduction in the material's work-hardening ability. Uniform and localized corrosion parameters were estimated via potentiodynamic polarization corrosion tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In contrast to the uniform corrosion, wherein the corrosion current density increased with increasing cold-working degree because of the high density of microstructural defects, the passive potential range and breakdown potential increased by cold working, showing greater resistance to pit nucleation. Although pits were formed, the cold-rolled material repassivation tendency decreased because of the broader hysteresis anodic loop, as confirmed experimentally by observation of the microscopic features after electrochemical cyclic polarization evaluations.

  19. CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 & 316L STAINLESS STEEL

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-06-27

    The Effluent Treatment Facility has developed a method to regenerate spent resin from the groundwater pump and treat intercepting chrome(VI) plumes (RPP-RPT-32207, Laboratory Study on Regeneration of Spent DOWEX 21K 16-20 Mesh Ion Exchange Resin). Subsequent laboratory studies have shown that the chrome(VI) may be reduced to chrome(III) by titrating with sodium metabisulfite to an oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of +280 mV at a pH of 2. This test plan describes the use of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization techniques to ascertain the electrochemical corrosion and pitting propensity of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducingmore » the solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiver tank or concentrate tank.« less

  20. 77 FR 28568 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; North American Stainless, (Stainless Steel), Ghent, KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... Status; North American Stainless, (Stainless Steel), Ghent, KY Pursuant to its authority under the... application to the Board for authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the stainless steel mill of... stainless steel at the facility of North American Stainless, located in Ghent, Kentucky (Subzone 29L), as...

  1. Influence of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welding joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Jianli

    2017-02-01

    The influences of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel joints welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with different shielding gas compositions were studied by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and potentiostatic and potentiodynamic polarization methods The adding 2% N2 in shielding gas facilitated primary austenite formation in GTAW weld metal (WM) and suppressed Cr2N precipitation in GTAW weld root. In the HAZ, the banded microstructure disappeared while the coarse ferrite grains maintained same orientation as the banded ferrite in the BM. In the WM, the ferrite had one single orientation throughout a grain, whereas several families of austenite appeared. The austenite both in BM and WM enriched in Ni and nitro`gen, while Cr and Mo were concentrated in the ferrite and thus no element showed clear dendritic distribution in the WM (ER2209 and E2209T1). In addition, the secondary austenite had higher Ni content but lower Cr and Mo content than the primary austenite. The N2-supplemented shielding gas promoted nitrogen solid-solution in the primary and secondary austenite. Furthermore, the secondary austenite had relatively lower pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) than the ferrite and primary austenite, thereby resulting in its preferential corrosion. The Cr2N precipitation led to relatively poor resistance to pitting corrosion in three HAZs and pure Ar shielding GTAW weld root. The N2-supplemented shielding gas improved pitting corrosion resistance of GTAW joint by increasing PREN of secondary austenite and suppressing Cr2N precipitation. In addition, the FCAW WM had much poorer resistance to pitting corrosion than the GTAW WM due to many O-Ti-Si-Mn inclusions. In the BM, since the austenite with lower PREN compared

  2. Hot Corrosion at Air-Ports in Kraft Recovery Boilers

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Russell, James H.

    2003-01-01

    Hot corrosion can occur on the cold-side of airports in Kraft recovery boilers. The primary corrosion mechanism involves the migration of sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide vapors through leaks in the furnace wall at the airports and their subsequent condensation. It has been reported that stainless steel is attacked much faster than carbon steel in composite tubes, and that carbon steel tubing, when used with a low-chromium refractory, does not exhibit this type of corrosion. For hot corrosion fluxing of metal oxides, either acidic or basic fluxing takes place, with a solubility minimum at the basicity of transition between themore » two reactions. For stainless steel, if the basicity of the fused salt is between the iron and chromium oxide solubility minima, then a synergistic effect can occur that leads to rapid corrosion. The products of one reaction are the reactants of the other, which eliminates the need for rate-controlling diffusion. This effect can explain why stainless steel is attacked more readily than carbon steel.« less

  3. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 316L Stainless Steel Filling Friction Stir-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Nakata, K.; Tsumura, T.; Fujii, H.; Ikeuchi, K.; Michishita, Y.; Fujiya, Y.; Morimoto, M.

    2014-10-01

    Keyhole left at 316L stainless steel friction stir welding/friction stir processing seam was repaired by filling friction stir welding (FFSW). Both metallurgical and mechanical bonding characteristics were obtained by the combined plastic deformation and flow between the consumable filling tool and the wall of the keyhole. Two ways based on the original conical and modified spherical keyholes, together with corresponding filling tools and process parameters were investigated. Microstructure and mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel FFSW joints were evaluated. The results showed that void defects existed at the bottom of the refilled original conical keyhole, while excellent bonding interface was obtained on the refilled modified spherical keyhole. The FFSW joint with defect-free interface obtained on the modified spherical keyhole fractured at the base metal side during the tensile test due to microstructural refinement and hardness increase in the refilled keyhole. Moreover, no σ phase but few Cr carbides were formed in the refilled zone, which would not result in obvious corrosion resistance degradation of 316L stainless steel.

  4. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  5. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-10

    Hossain and B. J, O’Toole: Stress Corrosion Cracking of Martensitic Stainless Steel for Transmutation Application, Presented at 2003 International...SCC of marternsitic stainless steel by Roy,[12] and learn the annealing effect on SCC of carbon steel by Haruna.[13] The application of slow...observations. In his study on SCC of AISI 304 stainless steel , Roychowdhury[3] detected no apparent SCC in solutions containing 1 ppm thiosulfate and

  6. Effect of chloride ion on corrosion behavior of SUS316L-grade stainless steel in nitric acid solutions containing seawater components under γ-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Y.; Ambai, H.; Takeuchi, M.; Iijima, S.; Uchida, N.

    2017-09-01

    Concerning the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, we investigated the effect of chloride ion on the corrosion behavior of SUS316L stainless steel, which is a typical material for the equipment used in reprocessing, in HNO3 solution containing seawater components, including under γ-ray irradiation condition. Electrochemical and immersion tests were carried out using a mixture of HNO3 and artificial seawater (ASW). In the HNO3 solution containing high amounts of ASW, the cathodic current densities increased and uniform corrosion progressed. This might be caused by strong oxidants, such as Cl2 and NOCl, generated in the reaction between HNO3 and Cl- ions. The corrosion rate decreased with the immersion time at low concentrations of HNO3, while it increased at high concentrations. Under γ-ray irradiation condition, the corrosion rate decreased due to the suppression of the cathodic reactions by the reaction between the above oxidants and HNO2 generated by radiolysis.

  7. An Industrial Perspective on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Some Commercially Used Carbon Steels and Corrosion-Resistant Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Yugo; Daigo, Yuzo; Sugahara, Katsuo

    2017-08-01

    Commercial metals and alloys like carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-based super alloys frequently encounter the problem of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) and resulting failure in engineering components. This article aims to provide a perspective on three critical industrial applications having EAC issues: (1) corrosion and cracking of carbon steels in automotive applications, (2) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in salt production and processing, and (3) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water. The review focuses on current industrial-level understanding with respect to corrosion fatigue, hydrogen-assisted cracking, or stress corrosion cracking, as well as the dominant factors affecting crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, some ongoing industrial studies and directions of future research are also discussed.

  8. Electrochemical Corrosion and In Vitro Bioactivity of SiO2:ZrO2-Coated 316L Stainless Steel in Simulated Body Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, A.; Rajendran, N.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of Si:Zr ratio on the in vitro bioactivity and electrochemical corrosion behavior of SiO2:ZrO2-mixed oxide-coated 316L stainless steel (SS) was evaluated in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 72, 120, and 168 h. Growth of Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was accelerated when Si content in the coating was increased. The Zr content in the coating improved the corrosion resistance of 316L SS rather than accelerating the HAp growth. When the Si:Zr ratio was 50:50, the coating exhibited significant improvement in corrosion resistance as well as HAp growth. The mechanism of HAp growth was proposed based on the change in surface zeta potential values of the coatings. Potentiodynamic polarization studies revealed about 10 and 5 times reduction in corrosion current density ( i corr) values for SiO2:ZrO2 (50:50)-coated 316L SS after 168 h of immersion compared to SiO2, ZrO2, and Si:Zr (70:30) coatings in SBF solutions thus confirming the superior corrosion resistance. The equivalent circuit parameters derived from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies further confirmed significant improvement in charge transfer resistance value even after 168 h of exposure.

  9. Effect of Heat Input on Geometry of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Bead on Low Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Manas Kumar; Hazra, Ritesh; Mondal, Ajit; Das, Santanu

    2018-05-01

    Among different weld cladding processes, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) cladding becomes a cost effective, user friendly, versatile method for protecting the surface of relatively lower grade structural steels from corrosion and/or erosion wear by depositing high grade stainless steels onto them. The quality of cladding largely depends upon the bead geometry of the weldment deposited. Weld bead geometry parameters, like bead width, reinforcement height, depth of penetration, and ratios like reinforcement form factor (RFF) and penetration shape factor (PSF) determine the quality of the weld bead geometry. Various process parameters of gas metal arc welding like heat input, current, voltage, arc travel speed, mode of metal transfer, etc. influence formation of bead geometry. In the current experimental investigation, austenite stainless steel (316) weld beads are formed on low alloy structural steel (E350) by GMAW using 100% CO2 as the shielding gas. Different combinations of current, voltage and arc travel speed are chosen so that heat input increases from 0.35 to 0.75 kJ/mm. Nine number of weld beads are deposited and replicated twice. The observations show that weld bead width increases linearly with increase in heat input, whereas reinforcement height and depth of penetration do not increase with increase in heat input. Regression analysis is done to establish the relationship between heat input and different geometrical parameters of weld bead. The regression models developed agrees well with the experimental data. Within the domain of the present experiment, it is observed that at higher heat input, the weld bead gets wider having little change in penetration and reinforcement; therefore, higher heat input may be recommended for austenitic stainless steel cladding on low alloy steel.

  10. Electro-mechanical coupling of semiconductor film grown on stainless steel by oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Wang, G.; Guo, L. Q.; Qiao, L. J.; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2013-09-01

    Electro-mechanical coupling phenomenon in oxidation film on stainless steel has been discovered by using current-sensing atomic force microscopy, along with the I-V curves measurements. The oxidation films exhibit either ohmic, n-type, or p-type semiconductor properties, according to the obtained I-V curves. This technique allows characterizing oxidation films with high spatial resolution. Semiconductor properties of oxidation films must be considered as additional stress corrosion cracking mechanisms.

  11. Seawater Corrosion of Fasteners in Various Structural Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    17 - 4PH stainless steel. The seven bolt materials were: 2024 aluminum, anodized ASTM grade 5 steel, 304 and 316 stainless steels, A286 stain- less...performed well in titanium structures. Use of MP35N, A286, and 304 stainless steel fasteners for constantly immersed 17 - 4PH stainless steel structures...would have been satisfactory only if sealant was not used and if protection had been provided to the 17 - 4PH to minimize crevice corrosion. Additional

  12. Yb-fibre Laser Welding of 6 mm Duplex Stainless Steel 2205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolut, M.; Kong, C. Y.; Blackburn, J.; Cashell, K. A.; Hobson, P. R.

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is one of the materials of choice for structural and nuclear applications, having high strength and good corrosion resistance when compared with other grades of stainless steel. The welding process used to join these materials is critical as transformation of the microstructure during welding directly affects the material properties. High power laser welding has recently seen an increase in research interest as it offers both speed and flexibility. This paper presents an investigation into the important parameters affecting laser welding of DSS grade 2205, with particular focus given to the critical issue of phase transformation during welding. Bead-on-plate melt-run trials without filler material were performed on 6mm thick plates using a 5 kW Yb-fibre laser. The laser beam was characterized and a Design of Experiment approach was used to quantify the impact of the process parameters. Optical metallographic methods were used to examine the resulting microstructures.

  13. Effect of ferrite transformation on the tensile and stress corrosion properties of type 316 L stainless steel weld metal thermally aged at 873 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, H.; Khatak, H. S.; Seshadri, S. K.; Gnanamoorthy, J. B.; Rodriguez, P.

    1995-07-01

    This article deals with the effect of the microstructural changes, due to transformation of delta ferrite, on the associated variations that take place in the tensile and stress corrosion properties of type 316 L stainless steel weld deposits when subjected to postweld heat treatment at 873 K for prolonged periods (up to 2000 hours). On aging for short durations (up to 20 hours), carbide/ carbonitride was the dominant transformation product, whereas sigma phase was dominant at longer aging times. The changes in the tensile and stress corrosion behavior of the aged weld metal have been attributed to the two competitive processes of matrix softening and hardening. Yield strength (YS) was found to depend predominantly on matrix softening only, while sig-nificant changes in the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and the work-hardening exponent, n, occurred due to matrix hardening. Ductility and stress corrosion properties were considerably affected by both factors. Fractographic observations on the weld metal tested for stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) indicated a combination of transgranular cracking of the austenite and interface cracking.

  14. 77 FR 1504 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-638 (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Wire... stainless steel wire rod From India would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury... USITC Publication 4300 (January 2012), entitled Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India: Investigation No...

  15. Comparison of corrosion performance of grade 316 and grade 347H stainless steels in molten nitrate salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trent, M. C.; Goods, S. H.; Bradshaw, R. W.

    2016-05-01

    Stainless steel samples machined from SA-312 TP316 and SA-213 TP347H pipe were exposed to a molten nitrate salt environment at 600°C (1112°F) for up to 3000 hours in order to generate corrosion rates for use in concentrated solar power (CSP) facilities. Descaled weight loss measurements were made at 1000, 2000, and 3000 hours, with optical and scanning electron microscopy being performed on samples at the longest exposure time. The 316 and 347H alloys exhibited metal losses of 4.4 and 4.8 um respectively at 3000 hours. A linear fit to the data sets yielded annualized metal loss rates of 8.4 and 8.8 um/yr. The oxides were relatively uniform in thickness and multilayered. The inner layer consisted of a (Fe, Cr)-spinel with appreciable amounts of Mn while the outer layer was an oxide composed of only Fe. No pitting, intergranular attack, or other localized attack was found, despite the presence of a sensitized microstructure in both alloys and chloride impurity in the salt mixture. The observations presented here indicate that the two alloys perform quite comparably with respect to molten salt-induced corrosion and in that regard; either would be expected to perform satisfactorily in the intended application.

  16. Influence of localized deformation on A-286 austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, L.; Savoie, M.; Delafosse, D.

    2007-06-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of precipitation-strengthened A-286 austenitic stainless steel was first investigated at room temperature under 0.2% plastic strain control. LCF led to hardening for the first 20 cycles and then to significant softening. LCF-induced dislocation microstructure was characterized using both bright and dark-field imaging techniques in transmission electron microscopy. Cycling softening was correlated with the formation of precipitate-free localized deformation bands. The effect of these precipitate-free localized deformation bands on A-286 stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in PWR primary water was then examined by means of constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests at 320 °C and 360 °C. Comparative CERT tests were performed on companion specimens with similar yield stress but pre-fatigued to a few cycles (4-8) or between 125 and 200 cycles. Specimens pre-fatigued to a few cycles with no precipitate-free localized deformation bands exhibited little susceptibility to intergranular SCC (IGSCC). In contrast, the presence of precipitate-free localized deformation bands formed by pre-fatigue to between 125 and 200 cycles strongly promoted IGSCC. The interest of the approach used in this study is to provide insight into the role of localized deformation in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  17. Effect of copper addition on mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial property of 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Xi, Tong; Shahzad, M Babar; Xu, Dake; Sun, Ziqing; Zhao, Jinlong; Yang, Chunguang; Qi, Min; Yang, Ke

    2017-02-01

    The effects of addition of different Cu content (0, 2.5 and 3.5wt%) on mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial performance of 316L austenitic stainless steel (SS) after solution and aging treatment were investigated by mechanical test, transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electrochemical corrosion, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and antibacterial test. The results showed that the Cu addition and heat treatment had no obvious influence on the microstructure with complete austenite features. The yield strength (YS) after solution treatment was almost similar, whereas the aging treatment obviously increased the YS due to formation of tiny Cu-rich precipitates. The pitting and protective potential of the solution treated Cu-bearing 316L SS in 0.9wt% NaCl solution increased with increasing Cu content, while gradually declined after aging, owing to the high density Cu-rich precipitation. The antibacterial test proved that higher Cu content and aging were two compulsory processes to exert good antibacterial performance. The XPS results further indicated that aging enhanced the Cu enrichment in passive film, which could effectively stimulate the Cu ions release from the surface of passive film. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of Microstructure and Shot Peening Treatment on Corrosion Resistance of AISI F55-UNS S32760 Super Duplex Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Ciuffini, Andrea Francesco; Barella, Silvia; Peral Martínez, Luis Borja; Mapelli, Carlo; Fernández Pariente, Inés

    2018-06-19

    Shot peening is a surface process commonly used in the aeronautic and automotive industries to improve fatigue resistance. Shot peening is proven to be beneficial in the fatigue behavior of components, but rarely has its influence on wear and pitting corrosion resistance been evaluated. In this work, shot peening was performed on AISI F55-UNS S32760 super-duplex stainless steel samples previously submitted to various thermal treatments, to obtain different initial microstructures and properties. Samples have been characterized in terms of microstructure morphology, local chemical composition, microhardness of each constituent phase, and energy dissipation modes. The enhanced properties provided by shot peening has been evaluated through residual stress depth profiles and Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) using X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface hardness, surface roughness, and corrosion resistance through salt spray fog tests. The 1400 °C solution thermal treatment was identified as the optimum initial condition, which maximizes the advantages of the shot peening treatment, even pitting corrosion resistance. These results are related to the uniformity of austenite and ferrite in terms of microstructure morphology, micromechanical properties, and alloying elements distribution.

  19. Coupling mechanism between wear and oxidation processes of 304 stainless steel in hydrogen peroxide environments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Conglin; Yuan, Chengqing; Bai, Xiuqin; Li, Jian; Qin, Honglin; Yan, Xinping

    2017-05-24

    Stainless steel is widely used in strongly oxidizing hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) environments. It is crucial to study its wear behaviour and failure mode. The tribological properties and oxidation of 304 stainless steel were investigated using a MMW-1 tribo-tester with a three-electrode setup in H 2 O 2 solutions with different concentrations. Corrosion current densities (CCDs), coefficients of frictions (COFs), wear mass losses, wear surface topographies, and metal oxide films were analysed and compared. The results show that the wear process and oxidation process interacted significantly with each other. Increasing the concentration of H 2 O 2 or the oxidation time was useful to form a layer of integrated, homogeneous, compact and thick metal oxide film. The dense metal oxide films with higher mechanical strengths improved the wear process and also reduced the oxidation reaction. The wear process removed the metal oxide films to increase the oxidation reaction. Theoretical data is provided for the rational design and application of friction pairs in oxidation corrosion conditions.

  20. The effect of mucin, fibrinogen and IgG on the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Ti alloy and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Chao, Zhang; Yaomu, Xiao; Chufeng, Liu; Conghua, Liu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, Ni-Ti alloy and stainless steal were exposed to artificial saliva containing fibrinogen, IgG or mucin, and the resultant corrosion behavior was studied. The purpose was to determine the mechanisms by which different types of protein contribute to corrosion. The effect of different proteins on the electrochemical resistance of Ni-Ti and SS was tested by potentiodynamic polarization, and the repair capacity of passivation film was tested by cyclic polarization measurements. The dissolved corrosion products were determined by ICP-OES, and the surface was analyzed by SEM and AFM. The results showed fibrinogen, IgG or mucin could have different influences on the susceptibility to corrosion of the same alloy. Adding protein lead to the decrease of corrosion resistance of SS, whereas protein could slow down the corrosion process of Ni-Ti. For Ni-Ti, adding mucin could enhance the corrosion stability and repair capacity of passivation film. The susceptibility to pitting corrosion of Ni-Ti and stainless steal in fibrinogen AS is not as high as mucin and IgG AS. There are different patterns of deposition formation on the metal surface by different types of protein, which is associated with their effects on the corrosion process of the alloys.

  1. Nickel and chromium ion release from stainless steel bracket on immersion various types of mouthwashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihardjanti, M.; Ismah, N.; Purwanegara, M. K.

    2017-08-01

    The stainless steel bracket is widely used in orthodontics because of its mechanical properties, strength, and good biocompatibility. However, under certain conditions, it can be susceptible to corrosion. Studies have reported that the release of nickel and chromium ions because of corrosion can cause allergic reactions in some individuals and are mutagenic. The condition of the oral environment can lead to corrosion, and one factor that can alter the oral environment is mouthwash. The aim of this study was to measure the nickel and chromium ions released from stainless steel brackets when immersed in mouthwash and aquadest. The objects consisted of four groups of 17 maxillary premolar brackets with .022 slots. Each group was immersed in a different mouthwash and aquadest and incubated at 37 °C for 30 days. After 30 days of immersion, the released ions were measured using the ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer). For statistical analysis, both the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used. The results showed differences among the four groups in the nickel ions released (p < 0.05) and the chromium ions released (p < 0.5). In conclusion, the ions released as a result of mouthwash immersion have a small value that is below the limit of daily intake recommended by the World Health Organization.

  2. Development of Custom 465® Corrosion-Resisting Steel for Landing Gear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daymond, Benjamin T.; Binot, Nicolas; Schmidt, Michael L.; Preston, Steve; Collins, Richard; Shepherd, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Existing high-strength low-alloy steels have been in place on landing gear for many years owing to their superior strength and cost performance. However, there have been major advances in improving the strength of high-performance corrosion-resisting steels. These materials have superior environmental robustness and remove the need for harmful protective coatings such as chromates and cadmium now on the list for removal under REACH legislation. A UK government-funded collaborative project is underway targeting a refined specification Custom 465® precipitation hardened stainless steel to replace the current material on Airbus A320 family aircraft main landing gear, a main fitting component developed by Messier-Bugatti-Dowty. This is a collaborative project between Airbus, Messier-Bugatti-Dowty, and Carpenter Technology Corporation. An extensive series of coupon tests on four production Heats of the material have been conducted, to obtain a full range of mechanical, fatigue, and corrosion properties. Custom 465® is an excellent replacement to the current material, with comparable tensile strength and fracture toughness, better ductility, and very good general corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Fatigue performance is the only significant area of deficit with respect to incumbent materials, fatigue initiation being often related to carbo-titanium-nitride particles and cleavage zones.

  3. Surface-protein interactions on different stainless steel grades: effects of protein adsorption, surface changes and metal release.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Y; Wang, X; Hedberg, J; Lundin, M; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2013-04-01

    Implantation using stainless steels (SS) is an example where an understanding of protein-induced metal release from SS is important when assessing potential toxicological risks. Here, the protein-induced metal release was investigated for austenitic (AISI 304, 310, and 316L), ferritic (AISI 430), and duplex (AISI 2205) grades in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution containing either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LSZ). The results show that both BSA and LSZ induce a significant enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide of all stainless steel grades. Both proteins induced an enhanced extent of released iron, chromium, nickel and manganese, very significant in the case of BSA (up to 40-fold increase), whereas both proteins reduced the corrosion resistance of SS, with the reverse situation for iron metal (reduced corrosion rates and reduced metal release in the presence of proteins). A full monolayer coverage is necessary to induce the effects observed.

  4. Fracture-tough, high hardness stainless steel and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A cryogenically-formed and tempered stainless steel is provided having improved fracture toughness and corrosion resistance at a given hardness level, such as, for example, of at least about Rc 60 for bearing applications. The steel consists essentially of, in weight %, about 21 to about 24% Co, about 11 to about 13% Cr, about 7 to about 9% Ni, about 0.1 to about 0.5% Mo, about 0.2 to about 0.3% V, about 0.28 to about 0.32% C, and the balance iron. The steel includes a cryogenically-formed martensitic microstructure tempered to include about 5 to about 10 volume % post-deformation retained austenite dispersed therein and M.sub.2 C-type carbides, where M is Cr, Mo, V, and/or Fe, dispersed in the microstructure.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  10. Surface modification of superaustenitic and maraging stainless steels by low-temperature gas-phase carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, Johannes

    Low-temperature gas-phase carburization of 316L austenitic stainless steel was developed in recent years by the Swagelok company. This process generates great mechanical and electrochemical surface properties. Hardness, wear resistance, fatigue behavior, and corrosion resistance are dramatically improved, while the formation of carbides is effectively suppressed. This new technique is of technical, economical, but especially of scientific interest because the surface properties of common stainless steel can be enhanced to a level of more sophisticated and more expensive superalloys. The consequential continuation of previous research is the application of the carburization process to other steel grades. Differences in chemical composition, microstructure, and passivity between the various alloys may cause technical problems and it is expected that the initial process needs to be optimized for every specific material. This study presents results of low-temperature carburization of AL-6XN (superaustenitic stainless steel) and PH13-8Mo (precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel). Both alloys have been treated successfully in terms of creating a hardened surface by introducing high amounts of interstitially dissolved carbon. The surface hardness of AL-6XN was increased to 12GPa and is correlated with a colossal carbon supersaturation at the surface of up to 20 at.%. The hardened case develops a carburization time-dependent thickness between 10mum after one carburization cycle and up to 35mum after four treatments and remains highly ductile. Substantial broadening of X-ray diffraction peaks in low-temperature carburized superaustenitic stainless steels are attributed to the generation of very large compressive biaxial residual stresses. Those large stresses presumably cause relaxations of the surface, so-called undulations. Heavily expanded regions of carburized AL-6XN turn ferromagnetic. Non-carburized AL-6XN is known for its outstanding corrosion resistance

  11. The formation of periodic micro/nano structured on stainless steel by femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Caizhen; Gao, Wei; Ye, Yayun; Jiang, Yong; Xu, Shizhen; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-07-01

    Stainless steel surface was irradiated by linear polarized laser (800 nm, 35 fs, 4 Hz and 0.7 J/cm2) with different pulse numbers. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM/EDS) was used for detailed morphology, microstructure and composition studies. The wettability of irradiated steel surface was tested by Interface Tensiometer JC-2000X and compared with untreated stainless steel. Results showed that micro/nanostripes with different periods were formed. The period increased with the increasing pulse numbers from 450 nm for 90 pulses to 500 nm for 180 pulses. The orientation of those stripes was parallel with the laser beam polarization. Nanoparticles were observed on those periodic structures. EDS indicated that the atomic ratio of Cr increased and the atomic ratios of Fe and Ni decreased after laser irradiation, which may enhance the corrosion resistance due to the Cr-rich layer. The prepared structure exhibited hydrophobic property without further treatment. The formation mechanism of micro/nanoperiodic structures was also explored.

  12. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  13. Enhancement of anticorrosion property of 304 stainless steel using silane coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Sultan; Matin, Asif; Madhan Kumar, A.; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Laoui, Tahar

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, silane coatings based on glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane/methyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS/MTMS) and silica nanoparticles were prepared by a sol-gel method. A simple dip-coating method was applied for film deposition and the effect of immersion time and number of immersion cycles on corrosion behavior of 304 stainless steel (SS) was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) was used to study the surface morphology and elemental composition of the modified surfaces. The corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated SS substrates was studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.6 M sodium chloride solution. Our results showed that the presence of coatings improved the anti-corrosion property of SS substrates. The coating with a dipping time of 10 min and 3 dipping cycles exhibited the best protection efficiency compared to other coatings and the uncoated substrate. SEM/EDS findings and contact angle measurements supported the conclusions drawn from the corrosion study.

  14. Corrosive effect of the type of soil in the systems of grounding more used (copper and stainless steel) for local soil samples from the city of Tunja (Colombia), by means of electrochemical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, L.; Salas, Y.; Blanco, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this work electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion behaviour of copper and stainless steel electrodes, used in grounding varying soil type with which they react. A slight but significant change in the corrosion rate, linear polarization resistance and equivalent parameters in the technique of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy circuit was observed. Electrolytes in soils are slightly different depending on laboratory study, but the influence was noted in the retention capacity of water, mainly due to clays, affecting ion mobility and therefore measures such as the corrosion rate. Behaviour was noted in lower potential for copper corrosion, though the corrosion rate regardless of the type of soil, was much higher for electrodes based on copper, by several orders of magnitude.

  15. Electromagnetic non-destructive technique for duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, João Vicente; Camerini, Cesar; Pereira, Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a two-phase (ferrite and austenite) material, which exhibits an attractive combination of mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance, being commonly employed for equipment of petrochemical plants, refining units and oil & gas platforms. The best properties of DSS are achieved when the phases are in equal proportions. However, exposition to high temperatures (e.g. welding process) may entail undesired consequences, such as deleterious phases precipitation (e.g. sigma, chi) and different proportion of the original phases, impairing dramatically the mechanical and corrosion properties of the material. A detailed study of the magnetic behavior of DSS microstructure with different ferrite austenite ratios and deleterious phases content was accomplished. The non destructive method evaluates the electromagnetic properties changes in the material and is capable to identify the presence of deleterious phases into DSS microstructure.

  16. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  17. Stainless steel leaches nickel and chromium into foods during cooking.

    PubMed

    Kamerud, Kristin L; Hobbie, Kevin A; Anderson, Kim A

    2013-10-02

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan, cooking times of 2-20 h, 10 consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After 6 h of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold, respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34-fold and Cr increased approximately 35-fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, although significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage.

  18. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  19. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meric de Bellefon, G.; van Duysen, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details.

  20. Fe-SAPONITE and Chlorite Growth on Stainless Steel in Hydrothermal Engineered Barrier Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshire, M. C.; Caporuscio, F. A.; McCarney, M.

    2012-12-01

    The United States recently has initiated the Used Fuel Disposition campaign to evaluate various generic geological repositories for the disposal of high-level, spent nuclear fuel within environments ranging from hard-rock, salt/clay, to deep borehole settings. Previous work describing Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) for repositories focused on low temperature and pressure conditions. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize the stability and alteration of a bentonite-based EBS with different waste container materials in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. All experiments were run at ~150 bar and 125 to 300 C for ~1 month. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming was used in the experiments as the clay buffer material. The redox conditions for each system were buffered along the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve using Fe3O4 and Feo filings. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based salt solution was chosen to replicate deep groundwater compositions. The experimental mixtures were 1) salt solution-clay; 2) salt solution -clay-304 stainless steel; and 3) salt solution -clay-316 stainless steel with a water/bentonite ratio of ~9. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment was evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. No smectite illitization was observed in these reactions. However, it appears that K-smectite was produced, possibly providing a precursor to illitization. It is unclear whether reaction times were sufficient for bentonite illitization at 212 and 300 C or whether conditions conducive to illite formation were obtained. The more notable clay mineral reactions occurred at the stainless steel surfaces. Authigenic chlorite and Fe-saponite grew with their basal planes near perpendicular to the steel plate, forming a 10 - 40 μm thick 'corrosion' layer. Partial dissolution of the steel plates was the likely iron source for chlorite/saponite formation; however, dissolution of the Feo/Fe3O4 may also have acted as an iron source

  1. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of a Newly Developed Novel Lean Duplex Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanjun; Hu, Jincheng; Li, Jin; Jiang, Laizhu; Liu, Tianwei; Wu, Yanping

    2014-09-12

    The effect of annealing temperature (1000-1150 °C) on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion behavior of a newly developed novel lean duplex stainless steel with 20.53Cr-3.45Mn-2.08Ni-0.17N-0.31Mo was studied by means of optical metallographic microscopy (OMM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM), scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), uniaxial tensile tests (UTT), and potentiostatic critical pitting temperature (CPT). The results showed that tensile and yield strength, as well as the pitting corrosion resistance, could be degraded with annealing temperature increasing from 1000 up to 1150 °C. Meanwhile, the elongation at break reached the maximum of 52.7% after annealing at 1050 °C due to the effect of martensite transformation induced plasticity (TRIP). The localized pitting attack preferentially occurred at ferrite phase, indicating that the ferrite phase had inferior pitting corrosion resistance as compared to the austenite phase. With increasing annealing temperature, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of ferrite phase dropped, while that of the austenite phase rose. Additionally, it was found that ferrite possessed a lower Volta potential than austenite phase. Moreover, the Volta potential difference between ferrite and austenite increased with the annealing temperature, which was well consistent with the difference of PREN.

  2. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of a Newly Developed Novel Lean Duplex Stainless Steel

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanjun; Hu, Jincheng; Li, Jin; Jiang, Laizhu; Liu, Tianwei; Wu, Yanping

    2014-01-01

    The effect of annealing temperature (1000–1150 °C) on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion behavior of a newly developed novel lean duplex stainless steel with 20.53Cr-3.45Mn-2.08Ni-0.17N-0.31Mo was studied by means of optical metallographic microscopy (OMM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM), scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), uniaxial tensile tests (UTT), and potentiostatic critical pitting temperature (CPT). The results showed that tensile and yield strength, as well as the pitting corrosion resistance, could be degraded with annealing temperature increasing from 1000 up to 1150 °C. Meanwhile, the elongation at break reached the maximum of 52.7% after annealing at 1050 °C due to the effect of martensite transformation induced plasticity (TRIP). The localized pitting attack preferentially occurred at ferrite phase, indicating that the ferrite phase had inferior pitting corrosion resistance as compared to the austenite phase. With increasing annealing temperature, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of ferrite phase dropped, while that of the austenite phase rose. Additionally, it was found that ferrite possessed a lower Volta potential than austenite phase. Moreover, the Volta potential difference between ferrite and austenite increased with the annealing temperature, which was well consistent with the difference of PREN. PMID:28788201

  3. Diagnosing, Measuring and Monitoring Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    ESEM to study marine biofilms on stainless steel surfaces. They observed a gelatinous layer in which bacteria and microalgae were embedded...calculate corrosion rales, but rather changes due lo the presence of a biofilm . Angell el al. (1995) used a concentric ring 304 stainless steel electrode...Telegdi el al. (1998) used AFM to image biofilm formation , extracellular polymer production and subsequent corrosion. Many of the conclusions about

  4. Effect of Host Media on Microbial Influenced Corrosion due to Desulfotomaculum nigrificans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lata, Suman; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, Ajay K.

    2013-04-01

    This article reports about the tests carried to investigate microbial-induced corrosion on stainless steels due to sulfate-reducing bacteria sp. Desulfotomaculum nigrificans in different host media. Stainless steel 304L, 316L, and 2205 were selected for the test. Modified Baar's media (BM), sodium chloride solution, and artificial sea water (SW) were used as test solutions in anaerobic conditions. Electrochemical polarization and immersion test were performed to estimate the extent of corrosion rate and pitting on stainless steels. SEM/EDS were used to study the details inside/outside pits formed on the corroded samples. Biofilm formed on corroded coupons was analyzed for its components by UV/Visible spectroscopy. Corrosion attack on the test samples was observed maximum in case of exposure to SW followed by NaCl solution, both having sulfide and chloride whereas stainless steel exposed to BM, having sulfide, showed minimum attack. Tendency of extracellular polymeric substances to bind metal ions is observed to be responsible for governing the extent of corrosion attack.

  5. Investigation of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of S30400 and S31600 stainless steels exposed to commercial soldering flux containing zinc chloride

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Nguyen, D.T.

    1995-10-01

    A corrosion investigation was conducted to determine corrosion behavior and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of S30400 and S31600 stainless steel exposed to soldering flux paste containing 25 wt% zinc chloride. Electrochemical test results indicated that soldering flux paste was not corrosive to S30400 and S31600 at room temperature. The wax phase (light phase) of soldering flux was also not corrosive to S30400 and S31600. However, the heavy phase of solder flux was corrosive to S30400 and S31600 at elevated temperatures. In heavy phase, S30400 did not passivate, while S31600 passivated at temperatures up to 80 C while no passivitymore » was observed at 85 C and above. AC impedance test results showed that S30400 and S31600 corroded at rates of less than 0.1 mpy in solder flux pastes at room temperature. In the soldering flux heavy phase, corrosion rates were about 2 mpy or less for S30400 at temperatures up to 75 C and S31600 at temperatures up to 70 C. However, corrosion rates of S30400 in the soldering flux heavy phase increased to 5, 8, 10, and 22 mpy at 80, 85, 90, and 95 C while corrosion rates of S31600 sst in the soldering flux heavy phase increased to 4, 5, 7, and 11, and 30 mpy at 75, 80, 85, 90 and 95 C, respectively. CERT results revealed that no SCC susceptibility when S30400 and S31600 were exposed to soldering flux paste at room temperature and wax phase at 65 and 95 C. However, both test alloys were susceptible to transgranular SCC when exposed to the soldering flux heavy phase at temperatures of 65+ C. Severity of SCC increased with temperature increase. SCC fractures were characterized by reduction of ductility and numerous SCC secondary cracks on the specimen gage length. The most severe SCC fracture was observed on a S30400 specimen partially submersed in the soldering flux heavy phase and partially submersed in the soldering flux wax phase at 95 C. No similar cracking was observed on S31600.« less

  6. Caustic stress corrosion tests for the LLTR

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Indig, M.E.

    1976-05-01

    A series of tests have been performed in order to determine the effects of the caustic resulting from the Na/H/sub 2/O reaction on the materials used in the LLTR-MSG series of testing. Stainless steel, 2 /sup 1///sub 4/ Cr--1 Mo and carbon steel have been evaluated. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility and general corrosion are reported. Over the range of temperature, caustic concentration and heating rate tested the stainless steel stressed to 90% of yield or above suffered cracking. Whereas, the 2-/sup 1///sub 4/ Cr--1 Mo and carbon steel were not cracked.

  7. Corrosion protection of reusable surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sadiq; Bernardo, Mildred

    2002-01-01

    To understand the corrosion properties of surgical scissors, 416 stainless steel disks and custom electrodes were used as simulated surfaces under various conditions. These simulated surfaces were exposed to tap water and 400-ppm synthetic hard water as Ca2CO3 under different conditions. The samples were evaluated by various techniques for corrosion potential and the impact of environmental conditions on the integrity of the passive film. The electrodes were used to monitor the corrosion behavior by potentiodynamic polarization technique in water both in the presence and absence of a cleaning product. The surface topography of the 416 stainless steel disks was characterized by visual observations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the surface chemistry of the passive film on the surface of the scissors was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results suggest that surgical instruments made from 416 stainless steel are not susceptible to uniform corrosion; however, they do undergo localized corrosion. The use of suitable cleaning products can offer protection against localized corrosion during the cleaning step. More importantly, the use of potentiodynamic polarization techniques allowed for a quick and convenient approach to evaluate the corrosion properties of surgical instruments under a variety of simulated-use environmental conditions.

  8. Laser etching of austenitic stainless steels for micro-structural evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghra, Chetan; Kumar, Aniruddha; Sathe, D. B.; Bhatt, R. B.; Behere, P. G.; Afzal, Mohd

    2015-06-01

    Etching is a key step in metallography to reveal microstructure of polished specimen under an optical microscope. A conventional technique for producing micro-structural contrast is chemical etching. As an alternate, laser etching is investigated since it does not involve use of corrosive reagents and it can be carried out without any physical contact with sample. Laser induced etching technique will be beneficial especially in nuclear industry where materials, being radioactive in nature, are handled inside a glove box. In this paper, experimental results of pulsed Nd-YAG laser based etching of few austenitic stainless steels such as SS 304, SS 316 LN and SS alloy D9 which are chosen as structural material for fabrication of various components of upcoming Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpakkam India were reported. Laser etching was done by irradiating samples using nanosecond pulsed Nd-YAG laser beam which was transported into glass paneled glove box using optics. Experiments were carried out to understand effect of laser beam parameters such as wavelength, fluence, pulse repetition rate and number of exposures required for etching of austenitic stainless steel samples. Laser etching of PFBR fuel tube and plug welded joint was also carried to evaluate base metal grain size, depth of fusion at welded joint and heat affected zone in the base metal. Experimental results demonstrated that pulsed Nd-YAG laser etching is a fast and effortless technique which can be effectively employed for non-contact remote etching of austenitic stainless steels for micro-structural evaluation.

  9. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred. PMID:28773285

  10. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-03-04

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  11. Nitride alloy layer formation of duplex stainless steel using nitriding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleque, M. A.; Lailatul, P. H.; Fathaen, A. A.; Norinsan, K.; Haider, J.

    2018-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) shows a good corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties. However, DSS performance decrease as it works under aggressive environment and at high temperature. At the mentioned environment, the DSS become susceptible to wear failure. Surface modification is the favourable technique to widen the application of duplex stainless steel and improve the wear resistance and its hardness properties. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to nitride alloy layer on the surface of duplex stainless steel by the nitriding process temperature of 400°C and 450°C at different time and ammonia composition using a horizontal tube furnace. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyzer are used to analyse the morphology, composition and the nitrided alloy layer for treated DSS. The micro hardnesss Vickers tester was used to measure hardness on cross-sectional area of nitrided DSS. After nitriding, it was observed that the hardness performance increased until 1100 Hv0.5kgf compared to substrate material of 250 Hv0.5kgf. The thickness layer of nitride alloy also increased from 5μm until 100μm due to diffusion of nitrogen on the surface of DSS. The x-ray diffraction results showed that the nitride layer consists of iron nitride, expanded austenite and chromium nitride. It can be concluded that nitride alloy layer can be produced via nitriding process using tube furnace with significant improvement of microstructural and hardness properties.

  12. Effect of flowing sodium on corrosion and tensile properties of AISI type 316LN stainless steel at 823 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivai Bharasi, N.; Thyagarajan, K.; Shaikh, H.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Bera, Santanu; Kalavathy, S.; Gurumurthy, K.; Tyagi, A. K.; Dayal, R. K.; Rajan, K. K.; Khatak, H. S.

    2008-07-01

    AISI type 316LN stainless steel was exposed to flowing sodium in mass transfer loop (MTL) at 823 K for 16 000 h and then examined for changes in the tensile properties due to the mass transfer and corrosion effects. Comparisons in microstructural and mechanical properties were made between annealed, thermally aged and sodium exposed materials. Microstructural examination of thermally aged and sodium exposed materials revealed precipitation of carbides at the grain boundaries. The sodium exposed samples contained a degraded layer at the surface up to a depth of around 10 μm and a surface carburized layer of about 30 μm. There was about 15% increase in yield strength and a decrease of about 20% in ductility for the sodium exposed material vis-a-vis thermally aged material and this was attributed to carburization effects and microstructural changes.

  13. A Study on Structural, Corrosion, and Sensitization Behavior of Ultrafine and Coarse Grain 316 Stainless Steel Processed by Multiaxial Forging and Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiahosseini, Seyed Rahim; Mohammadi Baygi, Seyyed Javad; Khalaj, Gholamreza; Khoshakhlagh, Ali; Samadipour, Razieh

    2018-01-01

    Cubic specimens from AISI 316 stainless steel were multiaxially forged to 15 passes and annealed at 1200 °C for 1, 2, and 3 h and finally sensitized at 700 °C for 24 h. Examination of samples indicated that the hardness of the annealed samples was reduced from 153 to 110, 81, and 74 HV for as-received sample and under 1, 2, and 3 h of annealing, and increased from 245 to 288 HV for samples forged at 3 and 7 passes. However, no significant changes were observed in a large number of passes and at about 300 HV. Degree of sensitization of samples was increased to approximately 27.3% at 3-h annealing but reduced to 1.23% by 15 passes of MF. The potentiodynamic polarization test shows that the breakdown potentials decreased with annealing time from 0.6 to - 102 (mV/SCE) for as-received and 3-h annealed specimen. These potentials increased to approximately - 16.5 mV with the increase in MF passes to 15. These observations indicated that the chromium carbide deposition affects Cr-depleted zone, which can subsequently affect the degree of sensitization and pitting corrosion resistance of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel.

  14. Aluminum Coating Influence on Nitride Layer Performance Deposited by MO-CVD in Fluidized Bed on Austenitic Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Găluşcă, D. G.; Perju, M. C.; Nejneru, C.; Burduhos Nergiş, D. D.; Lăzărescu, I. E.

    2018-06-01

    The modification of surface properties by duplex treatments, involving the overlapping of two surface treatment techniques, has been established as an intelligent solution to create new applications for the substrate metallic material. There are driveline components operating under very tough wear and corrosion conditions, with high temperature and humidity variations. Such components are usually made of high Cr and Ni stainless steel and for the hardening of surfaces it is recommended a thermo chemical treatment. Since stainless steels, especially austenitic stainless steels, are difficult to nitride, experimental studies focus on increasing the depth of the nitride layer and surface hardness. Achieving the goal involves changing active layer chemical composition by introducing aluminum in the surface layer. In order to find a solution, a new surface treatment technique is produced by combining aluminum thin films by MO-CVD in a fluidized bed using a triisobutylaluminum precursor with a thermo chemical nitriding treatment.

  15. Compositional depth profiles of the type 316 stainless steel undergone the corrosion in liquid lithium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Ke, Chuan; Liu, Xiang; Gou, Fujun; Duan, Xuru; Zhao, Yong

    2017-12-01

    Liquid metal lithium cause severe corrosion on the surface of metal structure material that used in the blanket and first wall of fusion device. Fast and accurate compositional depth profile measurement for the boundary layer of the corroded specimen will reveal the clues for the understanding and evaluation of the liquid lithium corrosion process as well as the involved corrosion mechanism. In this work, the feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the compositional depth profile analysis of type 316 stainless steel which was corroded by liquid lithium in certain conditions was demonstrated. High sensitivity of LIBS was revealed especially for the corrosion medium Li in addition to the matrix elements of Fe, Cr, Ni and Mn by the spectral analysis of the plasma emission. Compositional depth profile analysis for the concerned elements which related to corrosion was carried out on the surface of the corroded specimen. Based on the verified local thermodynamic equilibrium shot-by-shot along the depth profile, the matrix effect was evaluated as negligible by the extracted physical parameter of the plasmas generated by each laser pulse in the longitudinal depth profile. In addition, the emission line intensity ratios were introduced to further reduce the impact on the emission line intensity variations arise from the strong inhomogeneities on the corroded surface. Compositional depth profiles for the matrix elements of Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn and the corrosion medium Li were constructed with their measured relative emission line intensities. The distribution and correlations of the concerned elements in depth profile may indicate the clues to the complicated process of composition diffusion and mass transfer. The results obtained demonstrate the potentiality of LIBS as an effective technique to perform spectrochemical measurement in the research fields of liquid metal lithium corrosion.

  16. Effects of chloride ion concentration and pH values on the corrosion behavior of Cr12Ni3Co12Mo4W ultra-high-strength martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-yan; Dong, Chao-fang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiao-gang; Zhong, Ping

    2016-11-01

    The effects of Cl- ion concentration and pH values on the corrosion behavior of Cr12Ni3Co12Mo4W ultra-high-strength martensitic stainless steel (UHSMSS) were investigated by a series of electrochemical tests combined with observations by stereology microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A critical Cl- ion concentration was found to exist (approximately 0.1wt%), above which pitting occurred. The pitting potential decreased with increasing Cl- ion concentration. A UHSMSS specimen tempered at 600°C exhibited a better pitting corrosion resistance than the one tempered at 400°C. The corrosion current density and passive current density of the UHSMSS tempered at 600°C decreased with increasing pH values of the corrosion solution. The pits developed a shallower dish geometry with increasing polarization potential. A lacy cover on the pits of the UHSMSS tempered at 400°C accelerated pitting, whereas corrosion products deposited in the pits of the UHSMSS tempered at 600°C hindered pitting.

  17. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a...

  20. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a...

  1. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  2. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of irradiated model austenitic stainless steel alloys.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chung, H. M.; Karlsen, T. M.; Ruther, W. E.

    Slow-strain-rate tensile tests (SSRTs) and posttest fractographic analyses by scanning electron microscopy were conducted on 16 austenitic stainless steel (SS) alloys that were irradiated at 289 C in He. After irradiation to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} and {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} (E >1 MeV), significant heat-to-heat variations in the degree of intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC and TGSCC) were observed. Following irradiation to a fluence of {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}, a high-purity laboratory heat of Type 316L SS (Si {approx} 0.024 wt%) exhibited the highest susceptibility to IGSCC. The other 15 alloysmore » exhibited negligible susceptibility to IGSCC at this low fluence. The percentage of TGSCC on the fracture surfaces of SSRT specimens of the 16 alloys at {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV) could be correlated well with N and Si concentrations; all alloys that contained <0.01 wt.% N and <1.0 wt. % Si were susceptible, whereas all alloys that contained >0.01 wt.% N or >1.0 wt.% Si were relatively resistant. High concentrations of Cr were beneficial. Alloys that contain <15.5 wt.% Cr exhibited greater percentages of TGSCC and IGSCC than those alloys with {approx}18 wt.% Cr, whereas an alloy that contains >21 wt.% Cr exhibited less susceptibility than the lower-Cr alloys under similar conditions.« less

  4. Electrochemical and passive behaviour of tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in concrete environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Li, Baosong; Ying, Guobing

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the electrochemical behavior and semiconducting properties of a tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete solution in presence of NaCl were estimated by conventional electrochemical methods such as potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and capacitance measurement (Mott-Schottky approach). The surface passive film was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results revealed a good agreement between pitting corrosion, electrochemical behaviour, and electronic properties. The p and n-type bilayer structure passive film were observed. The increase of Sn4+ oxide species in the passive film shows no beneficial effects on the pitting corrosion. In addition, the dehydration of the passive film was further discussed.

  5. Corrosion of 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures: Studies at constant temperature and fixed oxygen potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Jacob, K. T.; Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Corrosion of SAE 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures was studied at a constant temperature of 1150 K. Reactive gas mixtures were chosen to yield a constant oxygen potential of approximately 6 x 10 to the minus 13th power/cu Nm and sulfur potentials ranging from 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm to 33 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm. The kinetics of corrosion were determined using a thermobalance, and the scales were analyzed using metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Two corrosion regimes, which were dependent on sulfur potential, were identified. At high sulfur potentials (p sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 2.7 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were high, the kinetics obeyed a linear rate equation, and the scales consisted mainly of sulfide phases similar to those observed from pure sulfication. At low sulfur potentials (P sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were low, the kinetics obeyed a parabolic rate equation, and scales consisted mainly of oxide phases.

  6. Characterization and Strain-Hardening Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Dwivedi, Dheerendra Kumar; Jain, Pramod Kumar

    2017-12-01

    In this study, friction stir-welded joint of 3-mm-thick plates of 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS) was characterized in light of microstructure, x-ray diffraction analysis, hardness, tensile strength, ductility, corrosion and work hardening properties. The FSW joint made of ferritic stainless steel comprises of three distinct regions including the base metal. In stir zone highly refined ferrite grains with martensite and some carbide precipitates at the grain boundaries were observed. X-ray diffraction analysis also revealed precipitation of Cr23C6 and martensite formation in heat-affected zone and stir zone. In tensile testing of the transverse weld samples, the failure eventuated within the gauge length of the specimen from the base metal region having tensile properties overmatched to the as-received base metal. The tensile strength and elongation of the longitudinal (all weld) sample were found to be 1014 MPa and 9.47%, respectively. However, in potentiodynamic polarization test, the corrosion current density of the stir zone was highest among all the three zones. The strain-hardening exponent for base metal, transverse and longitudinal (all weld) weld samples was calculated using various equations. Both the transverse and longitudinal weld samples exhibited higher strain-hardening exponents as compared to the as-received base metal. In Kocks-Mecking plots for the base metal and weld samples at least two stages of strain hardening were observed.

  7. Investigating the effect of the high power and high speed CO2 laser surface melting on the residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidi, Muhannad A.; McCarthy, Eanna; Brabazon, Dermot

    2018-05-01

    This study is investigating the effect of the laser surface melting of 316L stainless steel cylindrical samples on the surface residual stresses and the corrosion resistance. A high speed CO2 laser beam with power range of 300-500 W was used in pulse mode to initiate the surface melting in an argon and argon-nitrogen atmosphere. The produced samples were cross sectioned and the elastic modulus and nano-hardness test were carried out showing no alteration between the modified and the bulk material. A noticeable degradation in the corrosion resistance was found due to the formation of the chromium carbide and chromium nitride which act as electrolytic cells in addition to the disruption of the free chromium content at the melted zone.

  8. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Moon, Joonoh, E-mail: mjo99@kims.re.kr; Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-08-15

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasingmore » δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr{sub 2}N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite.« less

  9. Cathodic behaviour of stainless steel in coastal Indian seawater: calcareous deposits overwhelm biofilms.

    PubMed

    Eashwar, M; Subramanian, G; Palanichamy, S; Rajagopal, G; Madhu, S; Kamaraj, P

    2009-01-01

    Type-316 stainless steel (SS) was investigated as the cathode in galvanic couples in full-strength seawater from the Gulf of Mannar on the southeast coast of India. Tests were devised to examine the impact of SS cathodes on anode materials with or without the accrual of marine biofilms. Biofilmed SS cathodes significantly enhanced the rate of corrosion of nickel, causing noble shifts in the couple potentials. With mild steel and zinc as the anodes, calcareous deposits developed quite rapidly on the SS cathodes and led to a significant reduction of bacterial numbers. The calcareous deposits also caused substantial reduction of galvanic corrosion rates for mild steel, whereas there was no difference for zinc. The deposits were identified by XRD as essentially carbonates, oxides and hydroxides of calcium and magnesium. Potentiodynamic polarization performed on the actual couples after disconnection and equilibration provided reasonable interpretations of the galvanic corrosion trends. Data from this work suggest that a potential of about -0.70 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) should provide optimum protection of SS in warmer, full-strength seawater that supports the precipitation of calcareous deposits. The criterion commonly recommended for temperate conditions of lower water temperature and estuarine waters of lower alkalinity is -1.0 V (SCE).

  10. Composition-controlled active-passive transition and corrosion behavior of Fe-Cr(Mo)-Zr-B bulk amorphous steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jiajia; Wu, Yidong; Wang, Tan; Liu, Yanhui; Hui, Xidong

    2018-07-01

    Various corrosive environments in daily life and industry have put forward high requirement on corrosion resistance of metals, especially steels. Unlike the strict demand in Cr content of crystalline stainless steels, amorphous steels (ASs) with lower Cr content can be endowed with outstanding corrosion resistance, while the intrinsic mechanism is not fully understood. Herein, we present a novel Fe92-x-y-zCrxMoyZr8Bz (6 ≤ x ≤ 40, 0 ≤ y ≤ 22, and 12 ≤ z ≤ 18) bulk amorphous steel (BAS) forming system and reveal the synergistic effect of Cr and Mo in determining the chemical stability of oxide films. It has been found the Fe92-x-zCrxZr8Bz BASs with 1 mm in diameter display a Cr-controlling active-passive transition at the Cr threshold of ∼25% in 1 M hydrochloric acid. When adding minor Mo into the BASs, the Cr threshold can be remarkably reduced by forming favorable hexavalent Mo oxides. The generation of Mo6+ is facilitated by atomic selective dissolution at the interface and can promote the passivation. In contrast, when the Cr content of the Mo-doped glasses exceeds 25%, few Mo6+ oxides would produce as the prior formation of protective passive films inhibits the further oxidation of Mo. Therefore, manipulating the active-passive transition properly is crucial to designing ASs with high stainlessness.

  11. Low-temperature creep of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic deformation under constant load (creep) in austenitic stainless steels has been measured at temperatures ranging from 4 K to room temperature. Low-temperature creep data taken from past and unreported austenitic stainless steel studies are analyzed and reviewed. Creep at cryogenic temperatures of common austenitic steels, such as AISI 304, 310 316, and nitrogen-strengthened steels, such as 304HN and 3116LN, are included. Analyses suggests that logarithmic creep (creep strain dependent on the log of test time) best describe austenitic stainless steel behavior in the secondary creep stage and that the slope of creep strain versus log time is dependent on the applied stress/yield strength ratio. The role of cold work, strain-induced martensitic transformations, and stacking fault energy on low-temperature creep behavior is discussed. The engineering significance of creep on cryogenic structures is discussed in terms of the total creep strain under constant load over their operational lifetime at allowable stress levels.

  12. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  13. Facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces from austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304) by chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Mirzaei, Ali; Kim, Hyoun Woo; Kim, Sang Sub

    2018-05-01

    Stainless steels are among the most common engineering materials and are used extensively in humid areas. Therefore, it is important that these materials must be robust to humidity and corrosion. This paper reports the fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces from austenitic stainless steel (type AISI 304) using a facile two-step chemical etching method. In the first step, the stainless steel plates were etched in a HF solution, followed by a fluorination process, where they showed a water contact angle (WCA) of 166° and a sliding angle of 5° under the optimal conditions. To further enhance the superhydrophobicity, in the second step, they were dipped in a 0.1 wt.% NaCl solution at 100 °C, where the WCA was increased to 168° and the sliding angle was decreased to ∼2°. The long-term durability of the fabricated superhydrophobic samples for 1 month storage in air and water was investigated. The potential applicability of the fabricated samples was demonstrated by the excellent superhydrophobicity after 1 month. In addition, the self-cleaning properties of the fabricated superhydrophobic surface were also demonstrated. This paper outlines a facile, low-cost and scalable chemical etching method that can be adopted easily for large-scale purposes.

  14. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  15. Evaluation of AISI Type 304 stainless steel as a suitable surface material for evaluating the efficacy of peracetic acid-based disinfectants against Clostridium difficile spores.

    PubMed

    Black, Elaine; Owens, Krista; Staub, Richard; Li, Junzhong; Mills, Kristen; Valenstein, Justin; Hilgren, John

    2017-01-01

    Disinfectants play an important role in controlling microbial contamination on hard surfaces in hospitals. The effectiveness of disinfectants in real life can be predicted by laboratory tests that measure killing of microbes on carriers. The modified Quantitative Disk Carrier Test (QCT-2) is a standard laboratory method that employs American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) Type 430 stainless steel carriers to measure hospital disinfectant efficacy against Clostridium difficile spores. The formation of a rust-colored precipitate was observed on Type 430 carriers when testing a peracetic acid (PAA)-based disinfectant with the QCT-2 method. It was hypothesized that the precipitate was indicative of corrosion of the Type 430 carrier, and that corrosion could impact efficacy results. The objective of this study was to compare the suitability of AISI Type 430 to Type 304 stainless steel carriers for evaluating PAA-based disinfectants using the QCT-2 method. Type 304 is more corrosion-resistant than Type 430, is ubiquitous in healthcare environments, and is used in other standard methods. Suitability of the carriers was evaluated by comparing their impacts on efficacy results and PAA degradation rates. In efficacy tests with 1376 ppm PAA, reductions of C. difficile spores after 5, 7 and 10 minutes on Type 430 carriers were at least about 1.5 log10 lower than reductions on Type 304 carriers. In conditions simulating a QCT-2 test, PAA concentration with Type 430 carriers was reduced by approximately 80% in 10 minutes, whereas PAA concentration in the presence of Type 304 carriers remained stable. Elemental analyses of residues on each carrier type after efficacy testing were indicative of corrosion on the Type 430 carrier. Use of Type 430 stainless steel carriers for measuring the efficacy of PAA-based disinfectants should be avoided as it can lead to an underestimation of real life sporicidal efficacy. Type 304 stainless steel carriers are recommended as a suitable

  16. Evaluation of AISI Type 304 stainless steel as a suitable surface material for evaluating the efficacy of peracetic acid-based disinfectants against Clostridium difficile spores

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Krista; Staub, Richard; Li, Junzhong; Mills, Kristen; Valenstein, Justin; Hilgren, John

    2017-01-01

    Disinfectants play an important role in controlling microbial contamination on hard surfaces in hospitals. The effectiveness of disinfectants in real life can be predicted by laboratory tests that measure killing of microbes on carriers. The modified Quantitative Disk Carrier Test (QCT-2) is a standard laboratory method that employs American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) Type 430 stainless steel carriers to measure hospital disinfectant efficacy against Clostridium difficile spores. The formation of a rust-colored precipitate was observed on Type 430 carriers when testing a peracetic acid (PAA)-based disinfectant with the QCT-2 method. It was hypothesized that the precipitate was indicative of corrosion of the Type 430 carrier, and that corrosion could impact efficacy results. The objective of this study was to compare the suitability of AISI Type 430 to Type 304 stainless steel carriers for evaluating PAA-based disinfectants using the QCT-2 method. Type 304 is more corrosion-resistant than Type 430, is ubiquitous in healthcare environments, and is used in other standard methods. Suitability of the carriers was evaluated by comparing their impacts on efficacy results and PAA degradation rates. In efficacy tests with 1376 ppm PAA, reductions of C. difficile spores after 5, 7 and 10 minutes on Type 430 carriers were at least about 1.5 log10 lower than reductions on Type 304 carriers. In conditions simulating a QCT-2 test, PAA concentration with Type 430 carriers was reduced by approximately 80% in 10 minutes, whereas PAA concentration in the presence of Type 304 carriers remained stable. Elemental analyses of residues on each carrier type after efficacy testing were indicative of corrosion on the Type 430 carrier. Use of Type 430 stainless steel carriers for measuring the efficacy of PAA-based disinfectants should be avoided as it can lead to an underestimation of real life sporicidal efficacy. Type 304 stainless steel carriers are recommended as a suitable

  17. Active-passive corrosion of iron-chromium-nickel alloys in hot concentrated sulphuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Joseph R.

    1999-11-01

    In the manufacture of sulphuric acid more stringent environmental standards and operation economics have forced the industry to improve product utilization, energy efficiency and reliability. A key to improving both the thermal efficiency and reliability is the use and/or development of more corrosion resistance materials including stainless steels, especially in the parts of the plant that handle the condensed acid. Application of more corrosion resistant material requires a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism involved in concentrated H2SO4-H2O (>90 wt.%) solutions. While corrosion kinetics of carbon steel, the traditional material of construction, are relatively well understood, this is much less true in the case of the cyclic active-passive corrosion of stainless steels. Models proposed to explain the cyclic active-passive corrosion involve a periodic formation of either a protective metal sulphate film or an insoluble sulphur layer. To better understand the reactivity and/or passivity of stainless steel in concentrated H2SO4-H2O solutions a study employing immersion and electrochemical techniques, including rotating electrodes, was conducted in order to clarify the following: (1) The state of stainless steel passivity. (2) The conditions in which passivity is stable. (3) The role played by the major alloying elements in establishing and maintaining the passive state. The study involved evaluating the corrosion behaviour of stainless steels S30403 and S43000 along with iron, chromium and nickel in 93.5 wt.% H2SO4 at temperatures between 25--80°C. Major discoveries of the study include: (1) A content of 17--18 wt.% chromium is sufficient to anodically passivate S43000 as the potential is made more noble. Passivity is not stable and requires anodic polarization. (2) Alloyed nickel plays an active role in improving the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. A content of 8 wt.% nickel is sufficient promote a periodic passivation of the base Fe-(17

  18. Electropolishing effect on roughness metrics of ground stainless steel: a length scale study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Doron; Harel, David; Hirsch, Baruch

    2018-03-01

    Electropolishing is a widely-used electrochemical surface finishing process for metals. The electropolishing of stainless steel has vast commercial application, such as improving corrosion resistance, improving cleanness, and brightening. The surface topography characterization is performed using several techniques with different lateral resolutions and length scales, from atomic force microscopy in the nano-scale (<0.1 µm) to stylus and optical profilometry in the micro- and mesoscales (0.1 µm-1 mm). This paper presents an experimental length scale study of the surface texture of ground stainless steel followed by an electropolishing process in the micro and meso lateral scales. Both stylus and optical profilometers are used, and multiple cut-off lengths of the standard Gaussian filter are adopted. While the commonly used roughness amplitude parameters (Ra, Rq and Rz) fail to characterize electropolished textures, the root mean square slope (RΔq) is found to better describe the electropolished surfaces and to be insensitive to scale.

  19. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainlessmore » steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.« less

  20. Effect of current and travel speed variation of TIG welding on microstructure and hardness of stainless steel SS 316L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatimurti, Wikan; Abdillah, Fakhri Aulia; Kurniawan, Budi Agung; Rochiem, Rochman

    2018-04-01

    One of the stainless steel types that widely used in industry is SS 316L, which is austenitic stainless steel. One of the welding methods to join stainless steel is Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), which can affect its morphology, microstructure, strength, hardness, and even lead to cracks in the weld area due to the given heat input. This research has a purpose of analyzing the relationship between microstructure and hardness value of SS 316L stainless steel after TIG welding with the variation of current and travel speed. The macro observation shows a distinct difference in the weld metal and base metal area, and the weld form is not symmetrical. The metallographic test shows the phases that formed in the specimen are austenite and ferrite, which scattered in three welding areas. The hardness test showed that the highest hardness value found in the variation of travel speed 12 cm/min with current 100 A. Welding process and variation were given do not cause any defects in the microstructure, such as carbide precipitation and sigma phase, means that it does not affect the hardness and corrosion resistance of all welded specimen.

  1. Osteoblast and monocyte responses to 444 ferritic stainless steel intended for a magneto-mechanically actuated fibrous scaffold.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Vera N; Spear, Rose L; Brooks, Roger A; Markaki, Athina E

    2011-10-01

    The rationale behind this work is to design an implant device, based on a ferromagnetic material, with the potential to deform in vivo promoting osseointegration through the growth of a healthy periprosthetic bone structure. One of the primary requirements for such a device is that the material should be non-inflammatory and non-cytotoxic. In the study described here, we assessed the short-term cellular response to 444 ferritic stainless steel; a steel, with a very low interstitial content and a small amount of strong carbide-forming elements to enhance intergranular corrosion resistance. Two different human cell types were used: (i) foetal osteoblasts and (ii) monocytes. Austenitic stainless steel 316L, currently utilised in many commercially available implant designs, and tissue culture plastic were used as the control surfaces. Cell viability, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were measured. In addition, cells were stained with alizarin red and fluorescently-labelled phalloidin and examined using light, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that the osteoblast cells exhibited a very similar degree of attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation on all surfaces. Measurement of lactate dehydrogenase activity and tumour necrosis factor alpha protein released from human monocytes indicated that 444 stainless steel did not cause cytotoxic effects or any significant inflammatory response. Collectively, the results suggest that 444 ferritic stainless steel has the potential to be used in advanced bone implant designs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stainless and stainless-clad reinforcement for highway bridge use.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    Stainless steel as concrete reinforcement has been in use for several decades. Although highly resistant to corrosion, and able to provide greater than 100 years maintenance-free service life, the main drawback to widespread use has been the cost of ...

  3. Evaluation of rolling contact fatigue of induction heated 13Cr-2Ni-2Mo Stainless steel bar with Si3N4-ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadoiwa, Ariyasu; Mizobe, Koshiro; Kida, Katsuyuki

    2018-03-01

    13Cr % martensitic stainless steels were used in various industry, because they have excellent corrosion resistance and high hardness among other stainless steels. They are also expected as a bearing material, however, the research on rolling contact fatigue (RCF) is not enough. In this study, 13Cr-2Ni-2Mo stainless steels were quenched by induction heating and their RCF lives were evaluated. A Si3N4-ball was used in order to apply higher stress (Pmax = 5.6 GPa) than our previous tests (Pmax=5.3 GPa), in a single-ball RCF testing machine. It was found that the basic life (L10) was 2.20×106 cycles and Median life (L50) was 6.04×106 cycles. In addition, Weibull modulus became higher than the previous tests.

  4. Marine corrosion of mild steel at Lumut, Perak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Ong Shiou; Potty, Narayanan Sambu; Liew, Mohd. Shahir

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion rate of structural steels in the adverse marine and offshore environments affects the economic interest of offshore structures since the loss of steel may have significant impact on structural safety and performance. With more emphasis to maintain existing structures in service for longer time and hence to defer replacement costs, there is increasing interest in predicting corrosion rate at a given location for a given period of exposure once the protection coating or cathodic protection is lost. The immersion depth, salinity, steel composition and water pollution will be taken into account. Various corrosion allowances are prescribed for structural members by different standards. There are no studies to determine the appropriate corrosion allowance for steel structures in marine environment in Malaysia. The objectives of the research are to determine the nature and rate of corrosion in mm/year for steel structures in marine environment. It also tries to identify whether the corrosion rate is affected by differences in the chemical composition of the steels, and microalgae. Two sets of corrosion coupons of Type 3 Steel consisting of mild steel were fabricated and immersed in seawater using steel frames. The corrosion rate of the coupon in mm/ per year is estimated based on the material weight loss with time in service. The results are compared with recommendations of the code.

  5. 78 FR 21417 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... steel sinks from China, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the... notification of a preliminary determinations by Commerce that imports of drawn stainless steel sinks from China...

  6. Colorimetric values of esthetic stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Omachi, Koichi; Staninec, Michal

    2002-01-01

    The colorimetric values of two different kinds of esthetic stainless steel crowns were measured and compared with the colorimetric values of primary anterior teeth in Japanese children. The colorimetric values of resin composite-faced stainless steel crowns (Kinder Krown) and epoxy-coated stainless steel crowns (White Steel Crown) were measured with a color difference meter. The Commission Internationale de Eclairage L*, a*, b*, and delta E*ab values and Munsell value, chroma, and hue were calculated. The data were compared with previously reported colorimetric values of Japanese primary anterior teeth measured with the same color difference meter used in this study. Compared to Japanese primary anterior teeth, Kinder Krown Pedo I and Pedo II showed much higher L* values and lower hue; on the other hand, White Steel Crown showed much higher L*, a*, b* values, much higher value and chroma, and much lower hue. Color analysis revealed that the colors of the White Steel Crown and Kinder Krown Pedo I were substantially different from the color of Japanese primary anterior teeth. The color difference between Pedo II crowns and Japanese primary anterior teeth was relatively high, but the color of Pedo II might be acceptable for clinical use.

  7. Peculiarities of steel and alloy electrochemical and corrosion behavior after laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, Tat'yana G.; Kosyrev, Feliks K.; Rodin, Anatoly V.; Sayapin, V. P.

    1997-04-01

    Different types of laser processing can significantly increase the corrosion resistance of constructive materials, secure higher levels of metal properties in comparison with standard protection from corrosion and can be successfully used for industrial application. The research carried out in TRINITI during the last 10 years allowed us to create a data base about corrosion behavior in different chemical media of various metals, alloys and steels after welding, melting, surface alloying, etc. on technological continuous-wave carbon-dioxide-laser with average power up to 5 kilowatt. The investigated materials were subdivided into two groups: (1) without changes of phases composition after laser processing (pure metals, stainless steels); and (2) exposed to structural and phase changes under laser-matter interaction (carbon steels with different carbon content). It has allowed us to investigate the peculiarities of corrosion process mechanism depending on matter surface structure and phase composition both on laser irradiation regimes. Our research was based on the high sensitive electrochemical analysis combined with other corrosion and physical methods. The essential principles of electrochemical analysis are next. There are two main processes on metal under the interaction with electrolyte solution: anodic reaction -- which means the metal oxidation or transition of metal kations into solution; cathodic reaction -- the reoxidation of the ions or molecular of the solution. They are characterizing by the values of current densities and the rates of these reactions are dependent upon the potential arising on the metal-solution frontier. The electrochemical reactions kinetic investigations gives a unique possibility for the research of metal structure and corrosion behavior even in the case of small thickness of laser processed layers.

  8. Comparison of titanium and Robinson stainless steel stapes piston prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lippy, William H; Burkey, John M; Schuring, Arnold G; Berenholz, Leonard P

    2005-09-01

    Although stainless steel stapes prostheses have generally been considered magnetic resonance imaging safe, there is concern that this may change with the development of more powerful imaging systems. The objective of the study was to determine whether a titanium piston stapes prosthesis would be audiometrically and surgically equivalent to a Robinson stainless steel piston for stapedectomy. Retrospective chart review. Private otology practice. In all, 50 patients underwent stapedectomy with a Gyrus titanium piston prosthesis. These patients were matched on the basis of age and preoperative bone-conduction scores with patients who underwent stapedectomy with a Robinson stainless steel piston prosthesis. Audiometric results are analyzed, and surgical complications noted. There was no significant difference between groups in hearing improvement or postoperative air-bone gap. The mean four-frequency hearing improvement was 27.7 dB for the stainless steel group and 27.8 dB for the titanium group. The mean postoperative air-bone gap was 2.65 dB for the stainless steel group and 2.60 for the titanium group. Neither group had a surgical complication. The titanium stapes prosthesis is a good alternative to a stainless steel prosthesis.

  9. Temperature dependence of corrosion of ferritic stainless steel in dual atmosphere at 600-800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnegren, Patrik; Sattari, Mohammad; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2018-07-01

    The ferritic stainless steel AISI 441 (EN 1.4509) is exposed for 1000 h to air - 3% H2O on one side and to Ar - 5% H2 - 3% H2O on the other at temperatures 600, 700, and 800 °C. Conditions are chosen to mimic the environment of metallic interconnects in an operating solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). At 600 °C, ∼25 μm thick Fe2O3/(Fe,Cr)3O4 forms on large parts of the air side of the samples. Reference samples exposed to air - 3% H2O on both sides form thin protective layers of (Cr,Mn)3O4/Cr2O3 at the same temperature. At higher temperatures, 700 and 800 °C, all samples form protective layers of (Cr,Mn)3O4/Cr2O3 regardless of exposure to single or dual atmosphere. It is concluded that corrosion resistance in a dual atmosphere has an inverse dependence on temperature. Different hypotheses for the underlying cause for the dual atmosphere effect are discussed and compared to the experimental data.

  10. Effect of irrigation and stainless steel drills on dental implant bed heat generation.

    PubMed

    Bullon, B; Bueno, E F; Herrero, M; Fernandez-Palacin, A; Rios, J V; Bullon, P; Gil, F J

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is assessing the influence of the use of different drill types and external irrigation on heat generation in the bone. In-vitro study to compare two different sequences for implant-bed preparation by means of two stainless steels: precipitation-hardening stainless steel (AISI 420B) (K drills), and martensitic stainless steel (AISI 440) (S drills). Besides, the drilled sequences were realized without irrigation, and with external irrigation by means of normal saline solution at room temperature. The study was realized on bovine ribs using: K without irrigation (KSI) and with irrigation (KCI) and S without irrigation (SSI) and with irrigation (SCI) with five drills for each system. Each drill was used 100 times. Bone temperature was measured with a thermocouple immediately after drilled. Average bone temperature with irrigation was for K drills 17.58±3.32 °C and for S drills 16.66±1.30 °C. Average bone temperature without irrigation was for K drills 23.58±2.94 °C and for S drills 19.41±2.27 °C. Statistically significant differences were found between K without irrigation versus S with irrigation and K with irrigation (p<0.05, Bonferroni correction). Lower temperature variation coefficient throughout the 50 measurements was observed in irrigated groups (K=5.6%, S=5.1% vs. without irrigation groups K=9.4%, S=9.3%). The first K drill generated more heat than the remaining drills. No significant differences were detected among temperature values in any of the analyzed drill groups. Unlike irrigation, drill use and type were observed to have no significant impact on heat generation. The stainless steel AISI 420B presents better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance than AISI440.

  11. The Passive Film Growth Mechanism of New Corrosion-Resistant Steel Rebar in Simulated Concrete Pore Solution: Nanometer Structure and Electrochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jin-yang; Wang, Danqian; Chu, Hong-yan; Ma, Han; Liu, Yao; Gao, Yun; Shi, Jinjie; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    An elaborative study was carried out on the growth mechanism and properties of the passive film for a new kind of alloyed corrosion-resistant steel (CR steel). The passive film naturally formed in simulated concrete pore solutions (pH = 13.3). The corrosion resistance was evaluated by various methods including open circuit potential (OCP), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Meanwhile, the 2205 duplex stainless steel (SS steel) was evaluated for comparison. Moreover, the passive film with CR steel was studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and the Mott‑Schottky approach. The results showed that the excellent passivity of CR steel could be detected in a high alkaline environment. The grain boundaries between the fine passive film particles lead to increasing Cr oxide content in the later passivation stage. The filling of cation vacancies in the later passivation stage as well as the orderly crystalized inner layer contributed to the excellent corrosion resistance of CR steel. A passive film growth model for CR steel was proposed. PMID:28772772

  12. The Passive Film Growth Mechanism of New Corrosion-Resistant Steel Rebar in Simulated Concrete Pore Solution: Nanometer Structure and Electrochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Yang; Wang, Danqian; Chu, Hong-Yan; Ma, Han; Liu, Yao; Gao, Yun; Shi, Jinjie; Sun, Wei

    2017-04-14

    An elaborative study was carried out on the growth mechanism and properties of the passive film for a new kind of alloyed corrosion-resistant steel (CR steel). The passive film naturally formed in simulated concrete pore solutions (pH = 13.3). The corrosion resistance was evaluated by various methods including open circuit potential (OCP), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Meanwhile, the 2205 duplex stainless steel (SS steel) was evaluated for comparison. Moreover, the passive film with CR steel was studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and the Mott‑Schottky approach. The results showed that the excellent passivity of CR steel could be detected in a high alkaline environment. The grain boundaries between the fine passive film particles lead to increasing Cr oxide content in the later passivation stage. The filling of cation vacancies in the later passivation stage as well as the orderly crystalized inner layer contributed to the excellent corrosion resistance of CR steel. A passive film growth model for CR steel was proposed.

  13. Influence of Austenitizing Heat Treatment on the Properties of the Tempered Type 410-1Mo Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabruri, E.; Syahlan, Z. A.; Sahlan; Prifiharni, S.; Anwar, M. S.; Chandra, S. A.; Romijarso, T. B.; Adjiantoro, B.

    2017-05-01

    The modified 410-1Mo stainless steel has been developed with higher tensile strength and elongation compared to the standard 410 stainless steel. This paper reports the influence of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure, hardness, impact resistance and corrosion resistance of the modified 410-1Mo steel. The steel samples were prepared by a process sequence of induction melting, hot forging, annealing, hardening, and tempering. The microstructure of the tempered steels revealed additional phase of delta ferrite at pre-austenitizing temperatures of 950 to 1050 °C and disappeared at a temperature of 1100 °C. The steels which underwent pre-austenitizing at 1100 °C showed the largest sized lath martensite and the largest amount of retained austenite. The tempered steels maintained hardness at austenitizing temperatures of 950 °C to 1000 °C and showed an increasing hardness at austenitizing temperatures from 1000 to 1100 °C. At a range of austenitizing temperatures, it was investigated that the steels exhibited higher impact resistance at 1050 °C. The tempered steels that were pre-austenitized at 950 °C and 1100 °C showed the lowest pitting potential due to the existence of carbides and coarse-high carbon martensite, respectively.

  14. Improving the corrosion wear resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by particulate reinforced Ni matrix composite alloying layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Zhuo, Chengzhi; Tao, Jie; Jiang, Shuyun; Liu, Linlin

    2009-01-01

    In order to overcome the problem of corrosion wear of AISI 316L stainless steel (SS), two kinds of composite alloying layers were prepared by a duplex treatment, consisting of Ni/nano-SiC and Ni/nano-SiO2 predeposited by brush plating, respectively, and subsequent surface alloying with Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu by a double glow process. The microstructure of the two kinds of nanoparticle reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layers was investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of composite alloying layers compared with the Ni-based alloying layer and 316L SS under different conditions was characterized by potentiodynamic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results showed that under alloying temperature (1000 °C) conditions, amorphous nano-SiO2 particles still retained the amorphous structure, whereas nano-SiC particles were decomposed and Ni, Cr reacted with SiC to form Cr6.5Ni2.5Si and Cr23C6. In static acidic solution, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer. However, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is prominently superior to that of the Ni-based alloying layer under acidic flow medium condition and acidic slurry flow condition. The corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiC particles interlayer is evidently lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer, but higher than that of 316L SS under all test conditions. The results show that the highly dispersive nano-SiO2 particles are helpful in improving the corrosion wear resistance of the Ni-based alloying layer, whereas carbides and silicide phase are deleterious to that of the Ni-based alloying layer due to the fact that the preferential removal of the matrix around the precipitated phase takes place by the chemical

  15. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burstein, G T; Hutchings, I M; Sasaki, K

    2000-10-19

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase tran