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Sample records for stainless steel plate

  1. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-09-11

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate.

  2. Diffusion brazing nickel-plated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    To bond parts, sandwich assembly is made up of aluminum core, aluminum face sheet with brazing alloy interface, and nickel plated stainless steel part. Sandwich is placed between bottom and top glide sheet that is placed in stainless steel retort where assembly is bonded at 580 C.

  3. Diffusion brazing nickel-plated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    To bond parts, sandwich assembly is made up of aluminum core, aluminum face sheet with brazing alloy interface, and nickel plated stainless steel part. Sandwich is placed between bottom and top glide sheet that is placed in stainless steel retort where assembly is bonded at 580 C.

  4. 75 FR 81309 - Stainless Steel Plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-376 and 379 and 731-TA-788, 790-793 (Second Review)] Stainless Steel... stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate... steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and/or the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel...

  5. Nickel release from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Foussereau, J; Mantout, B; Baroux, B

    1994-10-01

    Nickel release from nickel-plated metals often induces allergic contact dermatitis, but, for nickel-containing stainless steels, the effect is not well-known. In this paper, AISI 304, 316L, 303 and 430 type stainless steels, nickel and nickel-plated materials were investigated. 4 tests were performed: patch tests, leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime (DMG) spot tests and electrochemical tests. Patch tests showed that 96% of the patients were intolerant to Ni-plated samples, and 14% to a high-sulfur stainless steel (303), while nickel-containing stainless steels with a low sulfur content elicited no reactions. Leaching experiments confirmed the patch tests: in acidic artificial sweat, Ni-plated samples released about 100 micrograms/cm2/week of nickel, while low-sulfur stainless steels released less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel, and AISI 303 about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week. Attention is drawn to the irrelevance of the DMG spot test, which reveals Ni present in the metal bulk but not its dissolution rate. Electrochemical experiments showed that 304 and 316 grades remain passive in the environments tested, while Ni-plated steels and AISI 303 can suffer significant cation dissolution. Thus, Ni-containing 304 and 316 steels should not induce contact dermatitis, while 303 should be avoided. A reliable nitric acid spot test is proposed to distinguish this grade from other stainless steels.

  6. 78 FR 34644 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel plate in coils (steel plate) from Belgium...: Scope of the Order The product covered by this order is certain stainless steel plate in...

  7. Guided growth by a stainless-steel tubular plate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Kao, Hsuan-Kai; Li, Wei-Chun; Yang, Wen-E; Chang, Chia-Hsieh

    2013-07-01

    Guided growth using titanium tension band plates is an advancement in the correction of angular deformity. We applied two-hole stainless-steel one-third tubular plates for the same purpose. There were 14 deformities around the knees in eight children, mean age 10.8 years at operation. The success rate was 92.9% (13/14). The average correction rate per month was 0.59° in the femur and 0.65° in the tibia. No premature physeal arrest, overcorrection, or rebound phenomenon was observed. A stainless-steel plate is a safe and effective option for guided growth surgery in countries where only stainless-steel plates are available.

  8. Electroless nickel plating on stainless steels and aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Procedures for applying an adherent electroless nickel plating on 303 SE, 304, and 17-7 PH stainless steels, and 7075 aluminum alloy was developed. When heat treated, the electroless nickel plating provides a hard surface coating on a high strength, corrosion resistant substrate.

  9. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  10. 76 FR 28809 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium; Termination of Five-Year Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium; Termination of Five-Year Review AGENCY: United States... review concerning the countervailing duty order on stainless steel plate from Belgium (75 FR 30777 and 75... its full five-year review of the countervailing duty order concerning stainless steel plate...

  11. 76 FR 50495 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan Determinations On the.... 1675(c)), that revocation of the countervailing duty order on stainless steel plate from South Africa and revocation of the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Korea,...

  12. 75 FR 64709 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Rescission of... ``Opportunity to Request Administrative Review'' of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel plate in coils... of an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel plate in coils...

  13. 76 FR 31588 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Rescission of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Rescission of Countervailing... countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on stainless steel plate in coils from Belgium. See Antidumping or... initiating an administrative review of the CVD order on stainless steel plate in coils from Belgium...

  14. 75 FR 30434 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Commission. ACTION: Institution of five-year reviews concerning the countervailing duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from... determine whether revocation of the countervailing duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium and...

  15. Immobilization of mesoporous silica particles on stainless steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqua, Luigi; Morra, Marco

    2017-03-01

    A preliminary study aimed to the nano-engineering of stainless steel surface is presented. Aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica is covalently and electrostatically anchored on the surface of stainless steel plates. The anchoring is carried out through the use of a nanometric spacer, and two different spacers are proposed (both below 2 nm in size). The first sample is obtained by anchoring to the stainless steel amino functionalized, a glutaryl dichloride spacer. This specie forms an amide linkage with the amino group while the unreacted acyl groups undergo hydrolysis giving a free carboxylic group. The so-obtained functionalized stainless steel plate is used as substrate for anchoring derivatized mesoporous silica particles. The second sample is prepared using 2-bromo-methyl propionic acid as spacer (BMPA). Successively, the carboxylic group of propionic acid is condensed to the aminopropyl derivatization on the external surface of the mesoporous silica particle through covalent bond. In both cases, a continuous deposition (coating thickness is around 10 μm) is obtained, in fact, XPS data do not reveal the metal elements constituting the plate. The nano-engineering of metal surfaces can represent an intriguing opportunity for producing long-term drug release or biomimetic surface.

  16. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-376 and 379 and 731-TA-788, 790-793 (Second Review)] Stainless Steel... countervailing duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan. SUMMARY:...

  17. Torsional Failure of Carbon Fiber Composite Plates Versus Stainless Steel Plates for Comminuted Distal Fibula Fractures.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William K; Morris, Randal P; Ward, Adam J; Carayannopoulos, Nikoletta L; Panchbhavi, Vinod K

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite implants are gaining popularity in orthopedics, but with few independent studies of their failure characteristics under supra-physiologic loads. The objective of this cadaveric study was to compare torsional failure properties of bridge plating a comminuted distal fibula fracture with carbon fiber polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composite and stainless steel one-third tubular plates. Comminuted fractures were simulated in 12 matched pairs of fresh-frozen human fibulas with 2-mm osteotomies located 3 cm proximal to the tibiotalar joint. Each fibula pair was randomized for fixation and implanted with carbon fiber and stainless steel 5-hole one-third tubular plates. The constructs were loaded in external rotation at a rate of 1-degree/sec until failure with a materials testing system. Torsional stiffness and mode of failure, as well as displacement, torque, and energy absorption for the first instance of failure and peak failure, were determined. Statistical analysis was performed with paired t tests and chi-square. There were no significant differences among the 12 pairs for torsional stiffness, first failure torque, peak failure displacement, peak failure torque, or peak failure energy. Stainless steel plates exhibited significantly higher displacement (P < .001) and energy absorption (P = .001) at the first indication of failure than the carbon fiber plates. Stainless steel plates permanently deformed significantly more often than the carbon fiber plates (P = .035). Carbon fiber plates exhibited no plastic deformation with delamination of the composite, and brittle catastrophic failure in 1 specimen. In a comminuted human fibula fracture fixation model, carbon fiber implants exhibited multiple pre-peak failures at significantly lower angles than the first failure for the stainless steel implants, with some delamination of composite layers and brittle catastrophic failure rather than plastic deformation. The torsional failure properties of carbon

  18. 76 FR 54207 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Italy: Revocation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Italy: Revocation of Antidumping Duty... antidumping duty order on stainless steel plate in coils (SSPC) from Italy. See Initiation of Five-Year... this order would not be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry...

  19. 75 FR 45605 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Correction to Notice of Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Correction to Notice of Final... following notice: Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... administrative review for all shipments of stainless steel plate in coils (``SSPC'') from Belgium entered,...

  20. 76 FR 53882 - Continuation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Orders: Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... International Trade Administration Continuation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Orders: Stainless Steel... on stainless steel plate in coils (SSPC) from Belgium, the Republic of Korea (Korea), South Africa... these AD and CVD orders would likely lead to a continuation or recurrence of material injury to an...

  1. Evaluation of silver-coated stainless steel bipolar plates for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ing-Bang

    In this study, computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology were applied to develop and produce stainless steel bipolar plates for DMFC (direct methanol fuel cell). Effect of surface modification on the cell performance of DMFC was investigated. Surface modifications of the stainless steel bipolar plates were made by the electroless plating method. A DMFC consisting of silver coated stainless steel as anode and uncoated stainless steel as cathode was assembled and evaluated. The methanol crossover rate (R c) of the proton exchange membrane (PEM) was decreased by about 52.8%, the efficiency (E f) of DMFC increased about 7.1% and amounts of methanol electro-oxidation at the cathode side (M co) were decreased by about 28.6%, as compared to uncoated anode polar plates. These measurements were determined by the transient current and mathematical analysis.

  2. Stainless Steel Bipolar Plates Deposited with Multilayer Films for PEMFC Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun; Yun, Young-Hoon

    2013-08-01

    A chromium nitride (CrN, Cr2N)/chromium (Cr)/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) system and a gold (Au)/titanium (Ti) system were separately deposited using a sputtering method and an E-beam method, respectively, onto stainless steel 316 and 304 plates. The XRD patterns of the deposited stainless steel plates showed the crystalline phase of typical indium-tin oxide and of metallic phases, such as chromium, gold, and the metal substrate, as well as those of external chromium nitride films. The nitride films were composed of two metal nitride phases that consisted of CrN and Cr2N compounds. The surface morphologies of the modified stainless steel bipolar plates were observed using atomic force microscopy and FE-SEM. The chromium nitride (CrN, Cr2N)/chromium (Cr)/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) multilayer that was formed on the stainless steel plates had a surface microstructural morphology that consisted of fine columnar grains 10 nm in diameter and 60 nm in length. The external gold films that were formed on the stainless steel plates had a grain microstructure approximately 100 nm in diameter. The grain size of the external surface of the stainless steel plates with the gold (Au)/titanium (Ti) system increased with increasing gold film thickness. The electrical resistances and water contact angles of the stainless steel bipolar plates that were covered with the multilayer films were examined as a function of the thickness of the ITO film or of the external gold film. In the corrosion test, ICP-MS results indicated that the gold (Au)/titanium (Ti) films showed relatively excellent chemical stability after exposure to H2SO4 solution with pH 3 at 80 °C.

  3. Electroless Plated Nanodiamond Coating for Stainless Steel Passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Korinko, P.; Spencer, W.; Stein, E.

    2016-09-15

    Tritium gas sample bottles and manifold components require passivation surface treatments to minimize the interaction of the hydrogen isotopes with surface contamination on the stainless steel containment materials. Conventional passivation processes using chemical and electrochemical means are usually insufficient to passivate tritium containment vessels and piping. Previous work demonstrated that both nitric acid and citric acid passivation on stainless steel would not prevent the catalyzed isotope exchange reaction H2 + D2 → 2HD, while electropolishing passivation resulted in surfaces that did not catalyze this hydrogen isotope exchange. The current vendor for surface passivation treatment, Tek-Vac Industries Inc., provided the best passivation technology for the stainless steel components used at SRTE. However, this vendor recently built gas sample bottles that failed to meet site criteria and has since ceased operations. The loss of this vendor created a source gap, as well as a knowledge gap. A practical and reliable robust process to develop tritium passive surfaces is needed.

  4. Stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lula, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the stainless steels for high-strength, heat-resistant or corrosion-resistant applications. It is a treatment of the properties and selection of stainless steels. Up-to-date information covers physical, mechanical and chemical properties of all stainless grades, including the new ferritic and duplex grades. The book covers physical metallurgy as well as processing and service characteristics, including service in corrosive environments. It deals with wrought and cast stainless steels and reviews fabrication from cold-forming to powder metallurgy.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Plasma Arc Brazed AISI 304L Stainless Steel and Galvanized Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yajuan; Li, Ruifeng; Yu, Zhishui; Wang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Plasma arc brazing is used to join the AISI 304L stainless steel and galvanized steel plate butt joints with the CuSi3Mn1 filler wire. The effect of parameters on weld surface appearance, interfacial microstructure, and composition distribution in the joint was studied. The microhardness and mechanical tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of the welded specimens. The results indicated that good appearance, bead shape, and sufficient metallurgical bonding could be obtained when the brazing process was performed with a wire feeding speed of 0.8 m/min, plasma gas flow rate of 3.0 l/min, welding current of 100 A, and welding speed of 27 cm/min. During plasma arc brazing process, the top corner of the stainless steel and galvanized steel plate were heated and melted, and the melted quantity of stainless steel was much more than that of the galvanized steel due to the thermal conductivity coefficient difference between the dissimilar materials. The microhardness test results shows that the microhardness value gradually increased from the side of the galvanized steel to the stainless steel in the joint, and it is good for improving the mechanical properties of joint. The tensile strength was a little higher than that of the brazing filler, and the fracture position of weld joint was at the base metal of galvanized steel plate.

  6. 75 FR 81966 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... countervailing duty order on stainless steel plate in coils from Belgium, covering the period January 1, 2009... Doc No: 2010-32863] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-423-809] Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of the...

  7. 75 FR 61699 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and Taiwan: Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea... orders on stainless steel plate in coils (SSPC) from Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and..., South Africa, South Korea, and Taiwan pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act. See Initiation of...

  8. 76 FR 75870 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Extension of Time... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel plate in coils from Belgium, covering...

  9. 76 FR 45511 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Initiation of Antidumping Duty Changed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... plate may also be further processed (e.g., cold- rolled, polished, etc.) provided that it maintains the... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Initiation of...'') is initiating a changed circumstances review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel...

  10. Protective coatings on stainless steel bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago, A. S.; Ansar, S. A.; Saruhan, B.; Schulz, U.; Lettenmeier, P.; Cañas, N. A.; Gazdzicki, P.; Morawietz, T.; Hiesgen, R.; Arnold, J.; Friedrich, K. A.

    2016-03-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is a promising technology for large H2 production from surplus electricity from renewable sources. However, the electrolyser stack is costly due to the manufacture of bipolar plates (BPP). Stainless steel can be used as an alternative, but it must be coated. Herein, dense titanium coatings are produced on stainless steel substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS). Further surface modification of the Ti coating with Pt (8 wt% Pt/Ti) deposited by physical vapour deposition (PVD) magnetron sputtering reduces the interfacial contact resistance (ICR). The Ti and Pt/Ti coatings are characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the coatings are evaluated in simulated and real PEM electrolyser environments, and they managed to fully protect the stainless steel substrate. In contrast, the absence of the thermally sprayed Ti layer between Pt and stainless steel leads to pitting corrosion. The Pt/Ti coating is tested in a PEM electrolyser cell for almost 200 h, exhibiting an average degradation rate of 26.5 μV h-1. The results reported here demonstrate the possibility of using stainless steel as a base material for the stack of a PEM electrolyser.

  11. Material Corrosion and Plate-Out Test of Types 304L and 316L Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    2001-02-06

    Corrosion and plate-out tests were performed on 304L and 316L stainless steel in pretreated Envelope B and Envelope C solutions. Flat coupons of the two stainless steels were exposed to 100 degrees C liquid and to 74 degrees C and 88 degrees C vapor above the solutions for 61 days. No significant corrosion was observed either by weight-loss measurements or by microscopic examination. Most coupons had small weight gains due to plate-out of solids, which remained to some extent even after 24-hour immersion in 1 N nitric acid at room temperature. Plate-out was more significant in the Envelope B coupons, with film thickness from less than 0.001 in. to 0.003-inches.

  12. High Nitrogen Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-19

    Hydrogen Embrittlement in Steel by the Increment Loading Technique. Fractography: After the stress-life fatigue tests, the fracture surface morphology...study was conducted to clarify the mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of high nitrogen stainless steel (HNSS) plates...Corrosion Cracking 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

  13. Design parameters of stainless steel plates for maximizing high frequency ultrasound wave transmission.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Mark; Leong, Thomas; Swiergon, Piotr; Juliano, Pablo; Knoerzer, Kai

    2015-09-01

    This work validated, in a higher frequency range, the theoretical predictions made by Boyle around 1930, which state that the optimal transmission of sound pressure through a metal plate occurs when the plate thickness equals a multiple of half the wavelength of the sound wave. Several reactor design parameters influencing the transmission of high frequency ultrasonic waves through a stainless steel plate were examined. The transmission properties of steel plates of various thicknesses (1-7 mm) were studied for frequencies ranging from 400 kHz to 2 MHz and at different distances between plates and transducers. It was shown that transmission of sound pressure through a steel plate showed high dependence of the thickness of the plate to the frequency of the sound wave (thickness ratio). Maximum sound pressure transmission of ∼ 60% of the incident pressure was observed when the ratio of the plate thickness to the applied frequency was a multiple of a half wavelength (2 MHz, 6mm stainless steel plate). In contrast, minimal sound pressure transmission (∼ 10-20%) was measured for thickness ratios that were not a multiple of a half wavelength. Furthermore, the attenuation of the sound pressure in the transmission region was also investigated. As expected, it was confirmed that higher frequencies have more pronounced sound pressure attenuation than lower frequencies. The spatial distribution of the sound pressure transmitted through the plate characterized by sonochemiluminescence measurements using luminol emission, supports the validity of the pressure measurements in this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Stanley R.; Korinko, Paul S.

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  15. Failure analysis of stainless steel femur fixation plate.

    PubMed

    Hussain, P B; Mohammad, M

    2004-05-01

    Failure analysis was performed to investigate the failure of the femur fixation plate which was previously fixed on the femur of a girl. Radiography, metallography, fractography and mechanical testing were conducted in this study. The results show that the failure was due to the formation of notches on the femur plate. These notches act as stress raisers from where the cracks start to propagate. Finally fracture occurred on the femur plate and subsequently, the plate failed.

  16. 76 FR 66271 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan, 64 FR 27756 (May 21, 1999); Notice of Amended Antidumping Duty Orders; Certain Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Canada, Italy, the Republic of Korea, South Africa... Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Canada, Italy, the Republic of Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan, 68 FR...

  17. Titanium versus Stainless-Steel Plating in the Surgical Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Sameer; Naran, Sanjay; Neral, Mithun; Wollstein, Ronit

    2016-12-01

    Our purpose was to compare postoperative complications and rate of plate removal in titanium and stainless-steel plating of distal radius fractures (DRF). Patients following DRF were randomly fixed with titanium or stainless-steel plates using the same plating system. Complications, second surgeries, and plate prominence were documented. A total of 41 patients were treated with stainless-steel and 22 with titanium plates. Average follow-up was 60 ± 5.6 months. There was no difference in demographics, fracture characteristics, or follow-up between the groups. Plate prominence was found in 50% of radiographs (mean distance: 1.4 mm). Four titanium plates and three stainless-steel plates were removed (11%). Mean time to plate removal was 18.4 ± 4.6 months. There was no difference in removal rates between the groups. Plate material and prominence, age, fracture comminution and smoking status were not associated with plate removal. Our results support using volar and dorsal plates regardless of the plate material.

  18. Investigation of residual stresses in a multipass weld in 1 in. stainless steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, S.; Fernandezbaca, J. A.; David, S. A.; Hubbard, C. R.; Holden, T. M.; Root, J. H.

    Residual stresses and strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction technique. The filler metal was type 308 stainless steel and the weld zone had a two phase microstructure in which the austenitic phase lattice parameter differs from the base metal. In these circumstances strain-free samples were taken from the weld zone area for analysis of the lattice parameters and ferrite content using neutron powder diffraction. Corrections for lattice parameter variation were applied permitting the calculation of residual strains and stresses in weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and base metal. One of the two welds was examined without stress relief and the other was given a stress relief treatment consisting of vibration at a frequency below the resonant condition during welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component (longitudinal) is found in the fusion zone near the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 400 +/- 50 MPa in tension. The normal stresses are generally close to zero although large fluctuations are found in the weld zone. The transverse stresses are as high as 200 MPa in the weld zone and decrease to 50 MPa +/- 40 MPa. The lattice parameter variation was equivalent to 5 x 10(exp -4) compressive strain and the ferrite content approached 9 percent at the center of the weld zone. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between vibratory-stress-relief treated and untreated plates fall within error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  19. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  20. Thermal distortion tests of aluminum and stainless steel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Bielick, E.; Fornek, T.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.

    1993-06-25

    An important upgrade to the STAR detector at the Brookhaven National Laboratory RHIC accelerator will be an electromagnetic calorimeter. One design being considered for this calorimeter involves cast lead modules covering {Delta}{phi} = 6{degree} and 0 {le} {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} {le} 1. These modules would consist of alternating layers of lead and sheets of plastic scintillator. The gaps for scintillator between the layers of lead would be created by parallel aluminum plates of thickness {approx_equal}6.6 mm = 0.260in. in the mold for the modules. These plates would need to be machined or ground to be reasonably flat, perhaps to {plus_minus}0.003in., and of uniform thickness from plate to plate. These requirements are imposed by the need to remove the plates from the casting after cooling, and to have good uniformity of the lead layer thickness, which gives good performance for the modules as a calorimeter. Aluminum was chosen for the plates because of its high coefficient of thermal expansion. An important cost in this calorimeter design is associated with the machining or grinding of the plates to proper thickness and flatness. In most cost estimates, it has been assumed that the mold parts could be used many times. This note describes a simple test which was conducted to investigate possible distortions in the plates after repeated heating to temperatures at which the lead would be poured into the mold and cooling.

  1. Hybrid/Tandem Laser-Arc Welding of Thick Low Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates =

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh

    High efficiency and long-term life of hydraulic turbines and their assemblies are of utmost importance for the hydropower industry. Usually, hydroelectric turbine components are made of thick-walled low carbon martensitic stainless steels. The assembly of large hydroelectric turbine components has been a great challenge. The use of conventional welding processes involves typical large groove design and multi-pass welding to fill the groove which exposes the weld to a high heat input creating relatively large fusion zone and heat affected zone. The newly-developed hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding technique is believed to offer a highly competitive solution to improve the overall hydro-turbine performance by combining the high energy density and fast welding speed of the laser welding technology with the good gap bridging and feeding ability of the gas metal arc welding process to increase the productivity and reduce the consumable material. The main objective of this research work is to understand different challenges appearing during hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) of thick gauge assemblies of low carbon 13%Cr- 4%Ni martensitic stainless steel and find a practical solution by adapting and optimizing this relatively new welding process in order to reduce the number of welding passes necessary to fill the groove gap. The joint integrity was evaluated in terms of microstructure, defects and mechanical properties in both as-welded and post-welded conditions. A special focus was given to the hybrid and tandem laser-arc welding technique for the root pass. Based on the thickness of the low carbon martensitic stainless steel plates, this work is mainly focused on the following two tasks: • Single pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick low carbon martensitic stainless steel. • Multi-pass hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding of 25-mm thick martensitic stainless steel.

  2. Ultrasonic butt welding of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hidai, Kazuaki; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Kanai, Ryoichi; Matsuura, Hisanori; Matsushima, Kaoru; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2002-05-01

    Welding characteristics of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens of 6.0 mm thickness by a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding system were studied. There are no detailed welding condition data of these specimens although the joining of these materials are required due to anticorrosive and high strength characteristics for not only large specimens but small electronic parts especially. These specimens of 6.0 mm thickness were welded end to end using a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding equipment with a vibration source using eight bolt-clamped Langevin type PZT transducers and a 50 kW static induction thyristor power amplifier. The stainless steel plate specimens electrolytically polished were joined with welding strength almost equal to the material strength under rather large vibration amplitude of 25 microm (peak-to-zero value), static pressure 70 MPa and welding time of 1.0-3.0 s. The hardness of stainless steel specimen adjacent to a welding surface increased about 20% by ultrasonic vibration.

  3. Chromium nitride films on stainless steel as bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Fu, Yu; Xu, Jun; Lin, Guoqiang; Hou, Ming

    A series of chromium nitride films are prepared on stainless steel substrates by pulsed bias arc ion plating (PBAIP) at different N 2 flow rate as bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The film chemical composition and phase structure are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The characterization results indicate that the nitrogen content of deposited films varies from 0.28 to 0.50, and the phase structure changes from mixtures of Cr + Cr 2N, pure Cr 2N through Cr 2N + CrN, to pure CrN. The interfacial contact resistance between samples and carbon paper is measured by Wang's method, and a minimum value of 5.8 mΩ cm 2 is obtained under 1.2 MPa compaction force. The anticorrosion property is examined by potentiodynamic test in the simulated corrosive circumstance of the PEMFC under 25 °C, and the lowest corrosive current density of 5.9 × 10 -7 A cm -2 is obtained at 0.6 V (vs. SCE). Stainless steel substrates coated by the film with lowest contact resistance are chosen as the bipolar plates to assemble cells. An average voltage value of 0.62 V is achieved at 500 mA cm -2, which is close to that of the cell with Ag-plated bipolar plates.

  4. Protective nitride formation on stainless steel alloys for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bing; Brady, Michael P; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; More, Karren Leslie; Young, David J; Tortorelli, Peter F; Payzant, E Andrew; Walker, Larry R

    2007-01-01

    Gas nitridation has shown excellent promise to form dense, electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant Cr-nitride surface layers on Ni-Cr base alloys for use as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. Due to the high cost of nickel, Fe-base bipolar plate alloys are needed to meet the cost targets for many PEMFC applications. Unfortunately, nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys typically leads to internal Cr-nitride precipitation rather than the desired protective surface nitride layer formation, due to the high permeability of nitrogen in these alloys. This paper reports the finding that it is possible to form a continuous, protective Cr-nitride (CrN and Cr{sub 2}N) surface layer through nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys. The key to form a protective Cr-nitride surface layer was found to be the initial formation of oxide during nitridation, which prevented the internal nitridation typically observed for these alloys, and resulted in external Cr-nitride layer formation. The addition of V to the alloy, which resulted in the initial formation of V{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, was found to enhance this effect, by making the initially formed oxide more amenable to subsequent nitridation. The Cr-nitride surface layer formed on model V-modified Fe-27Cr alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and low interfacial contact resistance under simulated PEMFC bipolar plate conditions.

  5. Protective nitride formation on stainless steel alloys for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Brady, M. P.; Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.; More, K. L.; Young, D. J.; Tortorelli, P. F.; Payzant, E. A.; Walker, L. R.

    2007-09-07

    Gas nitridation has shown excellent promise to form dense, electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant Cr-nitride surface layers on Ni–Cr base alloys for use as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. Due to the high cost of nickel, Fe-base bipolar plate alloys are needed to meet the cost targets for many PEMFC applications. Unfortunately, nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys typically leads to internal Cr-nitride precipitation rather than the desired protective surface nitride layer formation, due to the high permeability of nitrogen in these alloys. This paper reports the finding that it is possible to form a continuous, protective Cr-nitride (CrN and Cr2N) surface layer through nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys. The key to form a protective Cr-nitride surface layer was found to be the initial formation of oxide during nitridation, which prevented the internal nitridation typically observed for these alloys, and resulted in external Cr-nitride layer formation. The addition of V to the alloy, which resulted in the initial formation of V2O3–Cr2O3, was found to enhance this effect, by making the initially formed oxide more amenable to subsequent nitridation. The Cr-nitride surface layer formed on model V-modified Fe–27Cr alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and low interfacial contact resistance under simulated PEMFC bipolar plate conditions.

  6. Biomechanics of bone-fracture fixation by stiffness-graded plates in comparison with stainless-steel plates

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, VK; Ramakrishna, K; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2005-01-01

    Background In the internal fixation of fractured bone by means of bone-plates fastened to the bone on its tensile surface, an on-going concern has been the excessive stress-shielding of the bone by the excessively-stiff stainless-steel plate. The compressive stress-shielding at the fracture-interface immediately after fracture-fixation delays callus formation and bone healing. Likewise, the tensile stress-shielding of the layer of the bone underneath the plate can cause osteoporosis and decrease in tensile strength of this layer. Method In order to address this problem, we propose to use stiffness-graded plates. Accordingly, we have computed (by finite-element analysis) the stress distribution in the fractured bone fixed by composite plates, whose stiffness is graded both longitudinally and transversely. Results It can be seen that the stiffness-graded composite-plates cause less stress-shielding (as an example: at 50% of the healing stage, stress at the fracture interface is compressive in nature i.e. 0.002 GPa for stainless steel plate whereas stiffness graded plates provides tensile stress of 0.002 GPa. This means that stiffness graded plate is allowing the 50% healed bone to participate in loadings). Stiffness-graded plates are more flexible, and hence permit more bending of the fractured bone. This results in higher compressive stresses induced at the fractured faces accelerate bone-healing. On the other hand, away from the fracture interface the reduced stiffness and elastic modulus of the plate causes the neutral axis of the composite structure to be lowered into the bone resulting in the higher tensile stress in the bone-layer underneath the plate, wherein is conducive to the bone preserving its tensile strength. Conclusion Stiffness graded plates (with in-built variable stiffness) are deemed to offer less stress-shielding to the bone, providing higher compressive stress at the fractured interface (to induce accelerated healing) as well as higher tensile

  7. Mechanical Property Data 15-5PH (H1025) Stainless Steel Alloy: Hot-Rolled Plate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    fatigue data of unnotched 15 - 5PH stainless steel (H1025, longitudinal). - ~ ~ 5 l5PH Stumhuts Sisa Pmae. Csinuutae M al 110 -- R*01,Kf-3.0 R.T. 100 1.00...40 - 00 Lsishii. of. cruam Figure 2. Axial load fatigue data of notched 15 -SPH stainless steel (H1025, longitudinal). 3 I 20 15 - 5PH Stainless Stee...600 020 ; I I a -ALI AT 4W4C002 100 TO0 6W 30O 0 4 -5 0 07 Ufetime, Nw Cycles Figure 4. Axial load fatigue data of notched 15 - 5PH stainless steel

  8. Study on surface topography of 446M stainless steel as a bipolar plate on interfacial contact resistance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Min; Kim, Seok Nyeon; Kim, Jong Hee; Lee, Yun Yong; Kim, Kyoo Young

    2012-12-01

    The effect of the surface topography of 446M ferritic stainless steel as a bipolar plate for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is evaluated by interfacial contact resistance (ICR) measurement and finite element method (FEM) simulation. When the surface of stainless steel is in contact with the carbon paper under load, the surface roughness of stainless steel can affect the degree of deformation of the carbon fiber. Moreover, the higher deformation of carbon fiber under load in the rougher stainless steel could lead to larger real contact area between stainless steel and carbon fiber, and consequently the rough one has a lower ICR value than the fine one. The results suggest that the topography of stainless steel as a bipolar plate significantly affects the ICR. Furthermore, it was found that topography of bipolar plate is one of the key factors to decrease ICR.

  9. SnO2:F Coated Duplex Stainless Steel for PEM Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Duplex 2205 stainless steel was deposited with 0.6 {micro}m thick SnO2:F coating; coated steel was characterized for PEMFC bipolar plate application. Compared with bare alloy, interfacial contact resistance (ICR) values of the coated 2205 steel are higher. SnO2:F coating adds its own resistance to the air-formed film on the steel. In a PEMFC anode environment, a current peak of ca. 25 {micro}A/cm2 registered at ca. 30 min for coated 2205 steel. It stabilized at ca. 2.0 {approx} -1.0 {micro}A/cm2. This peak is related to the complicated process of coating dissolution and oxide-layer formation. Anodic-cathodic current transfer occurred at ca. 200 min polarization. In a PEMFC cathode environment, current was stable immediately after polarization. The stable current was ca. 0.5 {approx} 2.0 {micro}A/cm2 during the entire polarization period. AES depth profiles with tested samples and ICP analysis with the tested solutions confirmed the excellent corrosion resistance of the SnO2:F coated 2205 alloy in simulated PEMFC environments.

  10. Effect of grain refinement and electrochemical nitridation on corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel for bipolar plates in PEMFCs environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Hongyun, Luo

    2015-10-01

    The stain-induced nanocrystalline α'-martensite was obtained by cryogenic cold rolling at liquid-nitrogen temperature for 316L stainless steel. The electrochemical results showed nanocrystalline 316L stainless steel deteriorated its corrosion resistance in a typical proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment compared with coarse grained one. However, comparing with electrochemically nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, electrochemically nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel improved significantly corrosion resistance in the same environment, which was supported further by Mott-Shottky analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the nanocrystalline promoted the enrichment of nitrogen and chromium and inhibited form of NH3 on the surface, which could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel. The present study showed that the electrochemically nitrided 316L stainless steel was more suitable for the bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment than the untreated one, especially for nanocrystalline stainless steel.

  11. Corrosion resistance of a magnetic stainless steel ion-plated with titanium nitride.

    PubMed

    Hai, K; Sawase, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M; Baba, K; Hatada, R

    2000-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the corrosion resistance of a titanium nitride (TiN) ion-plated magnetic stainless steel (447J1) for the purpose of applying a magnetic attachment system to implant-supported prostheses made of titanium. The surface hardness of the TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy with varying TiN thickness was determined prior to the corrosion testing, and 2 micrometers thickness was confirmed to be appropriate. Ions released from the 447J1 alloy, TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy, and titanium into a 2% lactic acid aqueous solution and 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were determined by means of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Long-term corrosion behaviour was evaluated using a multisweep cyclic voltammetry. The ICP-AES results revealed that the 447J1 alloy released ferric ions into both media, and that the amount of released ions increased when the alloy was coupled with titanium. Although both titanium and the TiN-plated 447J1 alloy released titanium ions into lactic acid solution, ferric and chromium ions were not released from the alloy specimen for all conditions. Cyclic voltamograms indicated that the long-term corrosion resistance of the 447J1 alloy was considerably improved by ion-plating with TiN.

  12. 75 FR 67346 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils from South Korea: Correction to Final Results of the Expedited...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils from South Korea: Correction to Final Results... Co., Ltd. (POSCO), as well as the ``all others'' rate for South Korea. Specifically, the weighted-average margin for POSCO and the ``all others'' rate for South Korea, listed as 16.26 percent, should...

  13. 77 FR 73013 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 2010-2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... petitioners. No party requested a hearing. \\2\\ The petitioners are Alleghany Ludlum Corporation, North... Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Canada, Italy, the Republic of Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan... sanction. These final results of review are issued and published in accordance with sections 751(a)(1) and...

  14. Stainless steel versus titanium volar multi-axial locking plates for fixation of distal radius fractures: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Couzens, Gregory B; Peters, Susan E; Cutbush, Kenneth; Hope, Benjamin; Taylor, Fraser; James, Christopher D; Rankin, Carly R; Ross, Mark

    2014-03-11

    Distal radius fractures are among the most common fractures seen in the hospital emergency department. Of these, over 40% are considered unstable and require some form of fixation. In recent years with the advent of low profile plating, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) using volar plates has become the surgical treatment of choice in many hospitals. However, it is currently unknown which plating system has the lowest complication rate and/or superior clinical and radiological outcomes following surgery. Few studies have compared different types of plates, which may have various features, different plate and screw designs or may be manufactured from different materials (for example, stainless steel or titanium). This study will specifically investigate and compare the clinical and radiological outcomes and complication rates of two commonly used volar plating systems for fixation of distal radius fractures: one made from stainless steel (Trimed™ Volar Plate, Trimed™, California, USA) and the other made from titanium (Medartis® Aptus Volar Plate, Medartis®, Basel, Switzerland). The primary aim of this study is to determine if there is a difference on the Patient Reported Wrist Evaluation six months following ORIF using a volar plate for adult patients with a distal radius fracture. This study will implement a randomized prospective clinical trial study design evaluating the outcomes of two different types of volar plates: one plate manufactured from stainless steel (Trimed™ Volar Plate) and one plate manufactured from titanium (Medartis® Aptus Volar Plate). The surgery will be performed at a major trauma hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Outcome measures including function, adverse events, range of movement, strength, disability, radiological findings and health-related quality of life will be collected at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months following surgery. A parallel economic analysis will also be performed. This randomized clinical trial is due to

  15. Surface temperature distribution of GTA weld pools on thin-plate 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Kraus, H.G.

    1995-11-01

    A transient multidimensional computational model was utilized to study gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of thin-plate 304 stainless steel (SS). The model eliminates several of the earlier restrictive assumptions including temperature-independent thermal-physical properties. Consequently, all important thermal-physical properties were considered as temperature dependent throughout the range of temperatures experienced by the weld metal. The computational model was used to predict surface temperature distribution of the GTA weld pools in 1.5-mm-thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond with an earlier experimental study that produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. One of the motivations of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate excellent agreement, thereby verifying the model.

  16. Thin Pd membrane prepared on macroporous stainless steel tube filter by an in-situ multi-dimensional plating mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jianhua; Matsumura, Yasuyuki

    2004-11-07

    The big surface pores of a porous stainless steel (PSS) tube filter with marked roughness were jammed with aluminium hydroxide gel by a combination of ultrasonic vibration and vacuum suction, then a thin dense Pd membrane (6 microm) was plated in-situ on this pre-jammed filter by a multi-dimensional plating mechanism; after recovering the substrate pores by high temperature treatment, higher H2 permeance and complete H2 selectivity were obtained.

  17. Surface composition effect of nitriding Ni-free stainless steel as bipolar plate of polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Shironita, Sayoko; Nakatsuyama, Kunio; Souma, Kenichi; Umeda, Minoru

    2016-12-01

    In order to increase the corrosion resistance of low cost Ni-free SUS445 stainless steel as the bipolar plate of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, a nitriding surface treatment experiment was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere under vacuum conditions, while an Ar atmosphere was used for comparison. The electrochemical performance, microstructure, surface chemical composition and morphology of the sample before and after the electrochemical measurements were investigated using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), X-ray diffraction (XRD), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDS) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM) measurements. The results confirmed that the nitriding heat treatment not only increased the corrosion resistance, but also improved the surface conductivity of the Ni-free SUS445 stainless steel. In contrast, the corrosion resistance of the SUS445 stainless steel decreased after heat treatment in an Ar atmosphere. These results could be explained by the different surface compositions between these samples.

  18. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  19. Complexing agent and heavy metal removals from metal plating effluent by electrocoagulation with stainless steel electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kabdaşli, Işik; Arslan, Tülin; Olmez-Hanci, Tuğba; Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Tünay, Olcay

    2009-06-15

    In the present study, the treatability of a metal plating wastewater containing complexed metals originating from the nickel and zinc plating process by electrocoagulation using stainless steel electrodes was experimentally investigated. The study focused on the effect of important operation parameters on electrocoagulation process performance in terms of organic complex former, nickel and zinc removals as well as sludge production and specific energy consumption. The results indicated that increasing the applied current density from 2.25 to 9.0 mA/cm(2) appreciably enhanced TOC removal efficiency from 20% to 66%, but a further increase in the applied current density to 56.25 mA/cm(2) did not accelerate TOC removal rates. Electrolyte concentration did not affect the process performance significantly and the highest TOC reduction (66%) accompanied with complete heavy metal removals were achieved at the original chloride content ( approximately 1500 mg Cl/L) of the wastewater sample. Nickel removal performance was adversely affected by the decrease of initial pH from its original value of 6. Optimum working conditions for electrocoagulation of metal plating effluent were established as follows: an applied current density of 9 mA/cm(2), the effluent's original electrolyte concentration and pH of the composite sample. TOC removal rates obtained for all electrocoagulation runs fitted pseudo-first-order kinetics very well (R(2)>92-99).

  20. Immuno-inflammatory tissue reaction to stainless-steel and titanium plates used for internal fixation of long bones.

    PubMed

    Voggenreiter, Gregor; Leiting, Stefan; Brauer, Holger; Leiting, Peter; Majetschak, Matthias; Bardenheuer, Mark; Obertacke, Udo

    2003-01-01

    The immuno-inflammatory responses to stainless-steel (21 implants in 20 patients) and titanium plates (22 implants in 20 patients) used in the treatment of long bone fractures were studied immunohistochemically. All fractures healed without complications. In the soft tissue adjacent to the surface of the implants a dark discolouration of the tissue was visible in 18/21 stainless-steel and 20/22 titanium plates. Tissue specimens of all patients contained positive staining for macrophages (CD68-positive cells). Serial sections showed that the majority of cells were found to express the HLA-DR molecule indicating their activation. Many of the macrophages were surrounded by clusters of T-lymphocytes (CD3-positive cells). 17 out of 21 steel specimens and 15 out of 22 titanium specimens showed the infiltration of moderate amounts of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CD8-positive cells). Moderate amounts of B-lymphocytes (CD79alpha positive cells) were evident in four patients with steel and six patients with titanium implants. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate the presence of a marked inflammation and tissue reaction in the soft tissue covering stainless-steel and titanium plates used for internal fixation of fractures of long bones independently from the material used.

  1. Investigation of a fatigue failure in a stainless steel femoral plate.

    PubMed

    Marcomini, J B; Baptista, C A R P; Pascon, J P; Teixeira, R L; Reis, F P

    2014-10-01

    Surgical implants are exposed to severe working conditions and therefore a wide range of failure mechanisms may occur, including fatigue, corrosion, wear, fretting and combinations of them. The mechanical failures of metallic implants may also be influenced by several other factors, including the design, material, manufacturing, installation, postoperative complications and misuse. An 83-year-old patient suffered an oblique femoral shaft fracture due to a fall at home. A stainless steel locking compression plate (LCP) employed in the fracture reduction failed after four months and was sent back to the producer. A second LCP of the same type was implanted and also failed after six months. A failure analysis of the second femoral LCP is performed in this paper. The results demonstrate that poor material quality was decisive to the failure. The chemical analysis revealed a high P content in the steel, which is not in accordance to the standards. A combination of factors lead to LCP fracture and these include: brittle crack initiation due to phosphorus, segregation at grain boundaries, crack propagation due to cyclic loading and final fast fracture favored by the loss of ductility due to cold work.

  2. Niobized AISI 304 stainless steel bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixia; Sun, Juncai; Li, Pengbin; Jing, Bo; Li, Song; Wen, Zhongsheng; Ji, Shijun

    2012-06-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel (SS) has been niobized by a plasma surface diffusion alloying method. A 3 μm niobized layer with dominant niobium elements has been formed on the 304 SS surface and the performances of the niobized 304 SS has been examined and evaluated as bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Results show that the average contact angle with water for the niobized 304 SS is about 90.4°, demonstrating better hydrophobicity as compared with the untreated 304 SS (68.1°). The corrosion resistance of the 304 SS is considerably improved by the niobized layer with the corrosion current densities decreased at 0.2 and 0.4 μA cm-2 in simulated PEMFC anode purged with hydrogen and the cathode purged with air condition (0.05 M H2SO4 + 2 ppm F- solution at 70 °C), respectively. The interfacial contact resistance (ICR) for the as-prepared niobized 304 SS is 10.53 mΩ cm2 at the compaction of 140 N cm-2. Furthermore, after 4 h potentiostatic tests, the niobizied specimens exhibit much lower ICR than that for the untreated ones. Thus, the niobized layer can act as a conductively protective layer of the 304 SS bipolar plate for PEMFC.

  3. Corrosion kinetics of 316L stainless steel bipolar plate with chromiumcarbide coating in simulated PEMFC cathodic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, N. B.; Yu, H.; Xu, L. S.; Zhan, S.; Sun, M.; Kirk, Donald W.

    Stainless steel with chromium carbide coating is an ideal candidate for bipolar plates. However, the coating still cannot resist the corrosion of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environment. In this work, the corrosion kinetics of 316L stainless steel with chromium carbide is investigated in simulated PEMFC cathodic environment by combining electrochemical tests with morphology and microstructure analysis. SEM results reveal that the steel's surface is completely coated by Cr and chromium carbide but there are pinholes in the coating. After the coated 316L stainless steel is polarized, the diffraction peak of Fe oxide is found. EIS results indicate that the capacitive resistance and the reaction resistance first slowly decrease (2-32 h) and then increase. The potentiostatic transient curve declines sharply within 2000 s and then decreases slightly. The pinholes, which exist in the coating, result in pitting corrosion. The corrosion kinetics of the coated 316L stainless steel are modeled and accords the following equation: i0 = 7.6341t-0.5, with the corrosion rate controlled by ion migration in the pinholes.

  4. Properties of graphite-stainless steel composite in bipolar plates in simulated anode and cathode environments of PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Włodarczyk, Renata

    2014-09-01

    The use of a graphite-stainless steel composite as bipolar plates (BP) in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) has been evaluated. The study covers measurements of mechanical properties, microstructural examination, analysis of surface profile, wettability, porosity and corrosion resistance of the composite. The corrosion properties of the composite were examined in 0.1 mol·dm-3 H2SO4 + 2 ppm F- saturated with H2 or with O2 and in solutions with different pH: in Na2SO4+ 2 ppm F- (pH = 1.00, 3.00, 5.00) at 80 °C. The performed tests indicate that the graphite modified with stainless steel can be a good choice to be used as a bipolar plate in PEM fuel cells.

  5. Multilayer graphene for long-term corrosion protection of stainless steel bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoot, Adam C.; Camilli, Luca; Spiegelhauer, Susie-Ann; Yu, Feng; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by similar investigations recently published (Pu et al., 2015), we report a comparative corrosion study of three sets of samples relevant as bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: stainless steel, stainless steel with a nickel seed layer (Ni/SS) and stainless steel with Ni seed layer coated by a multi-layered graphene thin film (G/Ni/SS). The graphene film, synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD), has a moderate amount of defects according to Raman spectroscopy. Short/medium-term corrosion test shows no significant advantage of using G/Ni/SS rather than Ni/SS, both samples exhibiting a similar trend, thus questioning the short-term positive effect of graphene coatings. However, partial immersion in boiling seawater for three weeks reveals a clear superiority of the graphene coating with respect to steel just protected by Ni. After the test, the graphene film is still intact with unchanged defect density. Our results show that even non-perfect multilayer graphene films can considerably increase the lifetime of future-generation bipolar plates for fuel cells.

  6. Electrochemical behaviour and surface conductivity of niobium carbide-modified austenitic stainless steel bipolar plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixia; Sun, Juncai; Kang, Bin; Li, Song; Ji, Shijun; Wen, Zhongsheng; Wang, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    A niobium carbide diffusion layer with a cubic NbC phase surface layer (∼6 μm) and a Nb and C diffusion subsurface layer (∼1 μm) is fabricated on the surface of AISI 304 stainless steel (304 SS) bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) using plasma surface diffusion alloying. The electrochemical behaviour of the niobium carbide diffusion-modified 304 SS (Nb-C 304 SS) is investigated in simulated PEMFC environments (0.5 M H2SO4 and 2 ppm HF solution at 80 °C). Potentiodynamic, potentiostatic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that the niobium carbide diffusion layer considerably improves the corrosion resistance of 304 SS compared with untreated samples. The corrosion current density of Nb-C 304 SS is maintained at 0.058 μA cm-2 and 0.051 μA cm-2 under simulated anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. The interfacial contact resistance of Nb-C 304 SS is 8.47 mΩ cm2 at a compaction force of 140 N cm-2, which is significantly lower than that of the untreated sample (100.98 mΩ cm2). Moreover, only a minor increase in the ICR of Nb-C 304 SS occurs after 10 h potentiostatic tests in both cathodic and anodic environments.

  7. SnO2:F Coated Ferritic Stainless Steels for PEM Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Ferrite stainless steels (AISI441, AISI444, and AISI446) were successfully coated with 0.6 {micro}m thick SnO{sub 2}:F by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition and investigated in simulated PEMFC environments. The results showed that a SnO{sub 2}:F coating enhanced the corrosion resistance of the alloys in PEMFC environments, though the substrate steel has a significant influence on the behavior of the coating. ICP results from the testing solutions indicated that fresh AISI441 had the highest dissolution rates in both environments, and coating with SnO2:F significantly reduced the dissolution. Coating AISI444 also improved the corrosion resistance. Coating AISI446 steel further improved the already excellent corrosion resistance of this alloy. For coated steels, both potentiostatic polarizations and ICP results showed that the PEMFC cathode environment is much more corrosive than the anode one. More dissolved metallic ions were detected in solutions for PEMFC cathode environment than those in PEMFC anode environment. Sn{sup 2+} was detected for the coated AISI441 and AISI444 steels but not for coated AISI446, indicating that the corrosion resistance of the substrate has a significant influence on the dissolution of the coating. After coating, the ICR values of the coated steels increased compared to those of the fresh steels. The SnO{sub 2}:F coating seems add an additional resistance to the native air-formed film on these stainless steels.

  8. Tensile Stress-Strain Results for 304L and 316L Stainless-Steel Plate at Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; S. D. Snow; T. E. Rahl

    2007-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting moderate strain rate (10 to 200 per second) research on stainless steel materials in support of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). For this research, strain rate effects are characterized by comparison to quasi-static tensile test results. Considerable tensile testing has been conducted resulting in the generation of a large amount of basic material data expressed as engineering and true stress-strain curves. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of quasi-static tensile testing of 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steels in order to add to the existing data pool for these materials and make the data more readily available to other researchers, engineers, and interested parties. Standard tensile testing of round specimens in accordance with ASTM procedure A 370-03a were conducted on 304L and 316L stainless-steel plate materials at temperatures ranging from -20 °F to 600 °F. Two plate thicknesses, eight material heats, and both base and weld metal were tested. Material yield strength, Young’s modulus, ultimate strength, ultimate strain, failure strength and failure strain were determined, engineering and true stress-strain curves to failure were developed, and comparisons to ASME Code minimums were made. The procedures used during testing and the typical results obtained are described in this paper.

  9. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  10. NIOBIUM-CLAD 304L STAINLESS STEEL PEMFC BIPOLAR PLATE MATERIAL: TENSILE AND BEND PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Weil, K. Scott

    2007-06-01

    Niobium (Nb)-clad 304L stainless steel (SS) is currently under consideration for use as a bipolar plate material in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks. Because metal bipolar plates will likely be formed by stamping, the sheet metal properties of this material were characterized in both the as-rolled and an optimized annealed condition via a series of bend and quasi-static tensile tests. Results from tensile testing demonstrate that annealing significantly softens and thereby improves the ductility of the material. Bend test results indicate that springback is nearly independent of the bend direction relative to rolling direction for both the as-rolled and annealed conditions. In the as-rolled condition, springback is also nearly independent of specimen orientation (i.e. whether the cladding layer is on the inside or outside of the bend). However in the annealed condition, springback does depend on the cladding orientation relative to bending and was found in all cases to be substantially lower than that observed in the as-rolled condition. Microstructural analysis of the specimens indicates that two failure conditions can potentially arise, dependent on the thermomechanical condition of the material. In the as-rolled condition, failure initiates via fracture through the Nb cladding. In the annealed specimens, failure can occur by brittle fracture of an interfacial intermetallic layer that forms during the annealing treatment. This generates a series of crack-induced pores along the interface between the Nb cladding and the SS core, which eventually leads to ductile failure of the Nb cladding via localized necking. However the conditions required for this phenomenon to take place are fairly extreme and can be readily avoided in practice. In general, the results suggest that to achieve acceptable stamping tolerances, the material should be annealed prior to forming and the bipolar plate flow channel pattern should be designed such that extreme

  11. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  12. Lumped Parameter experiments for Single Mode Fiber Laser Cutting of Thin Stainless Steel Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Shengying; Jia, Ye; Han, Bing; Wang, Jun; Liu, Zongkai; Ni, Xiaowu; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian

    2017-06-01

    The present work reports the parameters on laser cutting stainless steel including workpiece thickness, cutting speed, defocus length and assisting gas pressure. The cutting kerf width, dross attachment and cut edge squareness deviation are examined to provide information on cutting quality. The results show that with the increasing thickness, the cutting speed decrease rate is about 27%. The optimal ranges of cutting speed, defocus length and gas pressure are obtained with maximum quality. The first section in your paper

  13. Coating stainless steel plates with Ag/TiO2 for chlorpyrifos decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Fattah, Wafa I.; Gobara, Mohammed M.; El-Hotaby, Walid; Mostafa, Sherif F. M.; Ali, Ghareib W.

    2016-05-01

    Spray coatings of either nanosilver (Ag), titanium (TiO2) or nanosilver titanium (Ag/TiO2) on stainless steel substrates prepared by sol-gel process were successfully achieved. The efficiency of the Ag/TiO2 coat onto 316 stainless steel surface towards cloropyrifos degradation as a chemical warfare agent (CWA) was proved. The crystalline structure and morphological characterization, as well as surface roughness measurements, were assessed. X-ray diffraction results proved the crystalline TiO2 anatase phase. The uniform distribution of Ag along with TiO2 nanoparticles was evidenced through transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy mapping. The hydrophilic nature of individual Ag, TiO2 and Ag/TiO2 coats was proved by contact angle measurements. The loading of Ag nanoparticles influenced positively the Ag/TiO2 coats surface roughness. The photocatalytic cloropyrifos degradation achieved about 50% within one-hour post UV treatment proving, therefore, the promising Ag/TiO2 continued decontamination efficiency. In conclusion, tuning the physical and morphological properties of TiO2 coated on stainless steel surface could be significantly enhanced by Ag nanoparticles incorporation. The developed Ag/TiO2 coat could be conveniently applied as CWA decontaminant.

  14. Nickel release from stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Mantout, B; Frappaz, A; Rousseau, D; Chabeau, G; Faure, M; Claudy, A

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, a study of nickel release and allergic contact dermatitis from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels was published in this journal. It was shown that low-sulfur stainless steel grades like AISI 304, 316L or 430 (S < or = 0.007%) release less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel in acid artificial sweat and elicit no reactions in patients already sensitized to nickel. In contrast, nickel-plated samples release around 100 micrograms/cm2/week of Ni and high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303-S approximately 0.3%) releases about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week in this acid artificial sweat. Applied on patients sensitized to nickel, these metals elicit positive reactions in 96% and 14%, respectively, of the patients. The main conclusion was that low-sulfur stainless steels like AISI 304, 316L or 430, even when containing Ni, should not elicit nickel contact dermatitis, while metals having a mean corrosion resistance like a high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303) or nickel-plated steel should be avoided. The determining characteristic was in fact the corrosion resistance in chloride media, which, for stainless steels, is connected, among other factors, to the sulfur content. Thus, a question remained concerning the grades with an intermediate sulfur content, around 0.03%, which were not studied. They are the object of the study presented in this paper. 3 tests were performed: leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime and HNO3 spot tests, and clinical patch tests; however, only stainless steels were tested: a low-sulfur AISI 304 and AISI 303 as references and 3 grades with a sulfur content around 0.03%: AISI 304L, AISI 304L added with Ca, AISI 304L+Cu. Leaching experiments showed that the 4 non-resulfurised grades released less than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week in acid sweat while the reulfurized AISI 303 released around or more than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week. This is explained by the poorer corrosion resistance of the resulfurized grade. Yet all these grades had the same

  15. Influence of Deposition Conditions on Fatigue Properties of Martensitic Stainless Steel with Tin Film Coated by Arc Ion Plating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Satoshi; Yonekura, Daisuke; Murakami, Ri-Ichi

    The surface properties like roughness etc. strongly influence the fatigue strength of high-tensile steel. To investigate the effect of surface condition and TiN coating on the fatigue strength of high-strength steel, four-point bending fatigue tests were carried out for martensitic stainless steel with TiN film coated using arc ion plating (AIP) method. This study, using samples that had been polished under several size of grind particle, examines the influence of pre-coating treatment on fatigue properties. A 2-µm-thick TiN film was deposited onto the substrate under three kinds of polishing condition. The difference of the hardness originated in the residual stress or thin deformation layer where the difference of the size of grinding particle of the surface polishing. And it leads the transformation of the interface of the substrate and the TiN film and improves fatigue limit.

  16. Graphene grown on stainless steel as a high-performance and ecofriendly anti-corrosion coating for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Nen-Wen; Shi, Gia-Nan; Liu, Yih-Ming; Sun, Xueliang; Chang, Jeng-Kuei; Sun, Chia-Liang; Ger, Ming-Der; Chen, Chun-Yu; Wang, Po-Chiang; Peng, You-Yu; Wu, Chia-Hung; Lawes, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the growth of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on SUS304 stainless steel and on a catalyzing Ni/SUS304 double-layered structure was investigated. The results indicated that a thin and multilayered graphene film can be continuously grown across the metal grain boundaries of the Ni/SUS304 stainless steel and significantly enhance its corrosion resistance. A 3.5 wt% saline polarization test demonstrated that the corrosion currents in graphene-covered SUS304 were improved fivefold relative to the corrosion currents in non-graphene-covered SUS304. In addition to enhancing the corrosion resistance of stainless steel, a graphene coating also ameliorates another shortcoming of stainless steel in a corrosive environment: the formation of a passive oxidation layer on the stainless steel surface that decreases conductivity. After a corrosion test, the graphene-covered stainless steel continued to exhibit not only an excellent low interfacial contact resistance (ICR) of 36 mΩ cm2 but also outstanding drainage characteristics. The above results suggest that an extremely thin, lightweight protective coating of graphene on stainless steel can act as the next-generation bipolar plates of fuel cells.

  17. Investigation of corrosion of commercial grade AISI 316L stainless steel liner plates in desalination plant conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Saricimen, H.; Jarrah, N.R.; Allam, I.M.

    1994-12-31

    The corrosion of AISI Type 316L stainless steel (316L SS) liner plates in the flash chambers of a multistage flash (MSF) desalination plant, located on the Arabian Gulf coast was investigated. The 316L SS liner plates developed severe corrosion within six years of operation. This study was conducted to develop an understanding of the mode and causes of corrosion of the liner plates, and to determine the effect of heat treatment (annealing or heat effect during welding) and temperature of salt solution on corrosion of the liner plates. Specimens of the liner plates were studied in as-received (AR) condition and after being heat treated (HT) at 900 C in air and air-cooled to room temperature. Electrochemical techniques were used to measure the corrosion of the specimens. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) installed with energy dispersive (ED) X-ray diffraction capability was used for identification of compositional and structural changes in the specimens during heat treatment and corrosion. The results showed that: (1) Commercial grade 316L SS is susceptible to pitting, crevice and grain boundary corrosion under the operating conditions in the desalination plant. The heat-affected-zone (HAZ) had larger grains and corroded more severely than other parts of the liner plates. (2) The liner plates had randomly distributed inclusions containing Ti, Cr, Mo, Mn, and S in the structure. (3) Measurement of the corrosion rate. (4) Metallographic investigation of the AR and HT samples.

  18. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  19. Biomechanical Comparison of Volar Fixed-Angle Locking Plates for AO C3 Distal Radius Fractures: Titanium Versus Stainless Steel With Compression.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Tyler; Momaya, Amit; Eberhardt, Alan; Chaudhari, Nilesh; Hunt, Thomas R

    2015-10-01

    To determine biomechanical differences between a fixed-angle locking volar titanium plate (VariAx; Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI) and a fixed-angle compression locking volar stainless steel plate (CoverLoc Volar Plate; Tornier, Amsterdam, Netherlands) in the fixation of simulated AO C3 distal radius fractures. Eighteen cadaveric upper extremities (9 matched pairs) with an average age of 54 years were tested. A 4-part AO C3 fracture pattern was created in each specimen. The fractures were reduced under direct vision and fixed with either the fixed-angle locking volar titanium plate or the fixed-angle compression locking volar stainless steel plate. Motion tracking analysis was then performed while the specimens underwent cyclic loading. Changes in displacement, rotation, load to failure, and mode of failure were recorded. The fragments, when secured with the fixed-angle compression locking stainless steel construct, demonstrated less displacement and rotation than the fragments secured with the fixed-angle locking titanium plate under physiological loading conditions. In the fixed-angle compression locking stainless steel group, aggregate displacement and rotation of fracture fragments were 5 mm and 3° less, respectively, than those for the fixed-angle locking titanium group. The differences between axial loads at mechanical failure and stiffness were not statistically significant. The compression locking stainless steel group showed no trend in mode of failure, and the locking titanium plate group failed most often by articular fixation failure (5 of 9 specimens). The fixed-angle compression locking stainless steel volar plate may result in less displacement and rotation of fracture fragments in the fixation of AO C3 distal radius fractures than fixation by the fixed-angle locking volar titanium plate. However, there were no differences between the plates in mechanical load to failure and stiffness. Fixation of distal radius AO C3 fracture patterns with the fixed

  20. Elastomer-induced crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel heat exchanger plates in sour amine service

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.G.; Baron, J.J.; Moffat, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    Types S31600 and S31254 stainless steel heat exchanger plates have suffered crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking under gaskets in rich amine service in a sour gas plant. The gasket material, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), has been used successfully for many years at other sour gas plants. Laboratory testing has duplicated the corrosion observed and shown that the mechanism is synergistic sulfide-halide attack. The use of a bromine plus chlorine-activated curing system for the EPDM rubber gaskets provided the necessary halides. Laboratory testing identified some nickel-based superalloys which were resistant to this corrosion and also demonstrated that essentially halogen-free, peroxide-cured EPDM gaskets do not cause attack of S31600 or S31254. The heat exchanger packs were replaced with S31600 plates and peroxide-cured EPDM gaskets having a specified total halogen concentration of 200 ppm maximum. Field operating experience has been excellent.

  1. Stainless steel tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.

    1995-12-31

    There is currently no recognized code or standard for the design, fabrication and construction of atmospheric and low pressure stainless steel tanks. At the present time these tanks are being designed to individual specifications, manufacturers standards or utilizing other codes and standards that may not be entirely applicable. Recognizing the need, the American Petroleum Institute will be publishing a new appendix to the API STD 650 Standard which will cover stainless steel tanks. The new Appendix was put together by a Task Group of selected individuals from the API Subcommittee of Pressure Vessels and Tanks from the Committee on Refinery Equipment. This paper deals with the development and basis of the new appendix. The new appendix will provide a much needed standard to cover the material, design, fabrication, erection and testing requirements for vertical, cylindrical, austenitic stainless steel aboveground tanks in nonrefrigerated service.

  2. Pre-oxidized and nitrided stainless steel alloy foil for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates. Part 2: Single-cell fuel cell evaluation of stamped plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toops, Todd J.; Brady, Michael P.; Tortorelli, Peter F.; Pihl, Josh A.; Estevez, Francisco; Connors, Daniel; Garzon, Fernando; Rockward, Tommy; Gervasio, Don; Mylan, William; Kosaraju, Sree Harsha

    Thermal (gas) nitridation of stainless steel alloys can yield low interfacial contact resistance (ICR), electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant nitride containing surface layers (Cr 2N, CrN, TiN, V 2N, VN, etc.) of interest for fuel cells, batteries, and sensors. This paper presents results of proton exchange membrane (PEM) single-cell fuel cell studies of stamped and pre-oxidized/nitrided developmental Fe-20Cr-4V weight percent (wt.%) and commercial type 2205 stainless steel alloy foils. The single-cell fuel cell behavior of the stamped and pre-oxidized/nitrided material was compared to as-stamped (no surface treatment) 904L, 2205, and Fe-20Cr-4V stainless steel alloy foils and machined graphite of similar flow field design. The best fuel cell behavior among the alloys was exhibited by the pre-oxidized/nitrided Fe-20Cr-4V, which exhibited ∼5-20% better peak power output than untreated Fe-20Cr-4V, 2205, and 904L metal stampings. Durability was assessed for pre-oxidized/nitrided Fe-20Cr-4V, 904L metal, and graphite plates by 1000+ h of cyclic single-cell fuel cell testing. All three materials showed good durability with no significant degradation in cell power output. Post-test analysis indicated no metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) occurred with the pre-oxidized and nitrided Fe-20Cr-4V or graphite plates, and only a minor amount of contamination with the 904L plates.

  3. Lanthanum oxide-coated stainless steel for bipolar plates in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jong Seol; Lee, Jun; Hwang, Hae Jin; Whang, Chin Myung; Moon, Ji-Woong; Kim, Do-Hyeong

    Solid oxide fuel cells typically operate at temperatures of about 1000 °C. At these temperatures only ceramic interconnects such as LaCrO 3 can be employed. The development of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) can potentially bring about reduced manufacturing costs as it makes possible the use of an inexpensive ferritic stainless steel (STS) interconnector. However, the STS suffers from Cr 2O 3 scale formation and a peeling-off phenomenon at the IT-SOFC operating temperature in an oxidizing atmosphere. Application of an oxidation protective coating is an effective means of providing oxidation resistance. In this study, we coated an oxidation protective layer on ferritic stainless steel using a precursor solution prepared from lanthanum nitrate, ethylene glycol, and nitric acid. Heating the precursor solution at 80 °C yielded a spinable solution for coating. A gel film was coated on a STS substrate by a dip coating technique. At the early stage of the heat-treatment, lanthanum-containing oxides such as La 2O 3 and La 2CrO 6 formed, and as the heat-treatment temperature was increased, an oxidation protective perovskite-type LaCrO 3 layer was produced by the reaction between the lanthanum-containing oxide and the Cr 2O 3 scale on the SUS substrate. As the concentration of La-containing precursor solution was increased, the amount of La 2O 3 and La 2CrO 6 phases was gradually increased. The coating layer, which was prepared from a precursor solution of 0.8 M, was composed of LaCrO 3 and small amounts of (Mn,Cr)O 4 spinel. A relatively dense coating layer without pin-holes was obtained by heating the gel coating layer at 1073 K for 2 h. Microstructures and oxidation behavior of the La 2O 3-coated STS444 were investigated.

  4. A Study on Deformation Behavior of 304L Stainless Steel During and After Plate Rolling at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourabdollah, P.; Serajzadeh, S.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, microstructural evolutions and mechanical properties of AISI 304L stainless steel were studied after rolling operations at elevated temperatures. Rolling experiments were conducted under warm and hot rolling conditions in the range of 600-1000 °C employing different reductions. Then, the developed microstructures and the mechanical properties of the steel were evaluated by means of uniaxial tensile testing, metallographic observations, and x-ray diffraction method. Besides, two-dimensional finite element analysis coupled with artificial neural network modeling was developed to assess thermo-mechanical behavior of the steel during and after rolling. The results show that inhomogeneities in strain and temperature distributions are reduced under warm rolling conditions. Static recrystallization can be operative under hot rolling conditions and relatively low reduction, i.e., reduction of 25%. However, for the case of higher reductions, the rate of recrystallization decreases considerably owing to severe temperature drop in the plate being rolled. Furthermore, the rolled plates show negative strain rate sensitivity while this phenomenon is affected by the rolling temperature.

  5. A Study on Deformation Behavior of 304L Stainless Steel During and After Plate Rolling at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourabdollah, P.; Serajzadeh, S.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, microstructural evolutions and mechanical properties of AISI 304L stainless steel were studied after rolling operations at elevated temperatures. Rolling experiments were conducted under warm and hot rolling conditions in the range of 600-1000 °C employing different reductions. Then, the developed microstructures and the mechanical properties of the steel were evaluated by means of uniaxial tensile testing, metallographic observations, and x-ray diffraction method. Besides, two-dimensional finite element analysis coupled with artificial neural network modeling was developed to assess thermo-mechanical behavior of the steel during and after rolling. The results show that inhomogeneities in strain and temperature distributions are reduced under warm rolling conditions. Static recrystallization can be operative under hot rolling conditions and relatively low reduction, i.e., reduction of 25%. However, for the case of higher reductions, the rate of recrystallization decreases considerably owing to severe temperature drop in the plate being rolled. Furthermore, the rolled plates show negative strain rate sensitivity while this phenomenon is affected by the rolling temperature.

  6. Conductive and corrosion behaviors of silver-doped carbon-coated stainless steel as PEMFC bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Hong-feng; Fu, Jie; Tian, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Ni-Cr enrichment on stainless steel SS316L resulting from chemical activation enabled the deposition of carbon by spraying a stable suspension of carbon nanoparticles; trace Ag was deposited in situ to prepare a thin continuous Ag-doped carbon film on a porous carbon-coated SS316L substrate. The corrosion resistance of this film in 0.5 mol·L-1 H2SO4 solution containing 5 ppm F- at 80°C was investigated using polarization tests. The results showed that the surface treatment of the SS316L strongly affected the adhesion of the carbon coating to the stainless steel. Compared to the bare SS316L, the Ag-doped carbon-coated SS316L bipolar plate was remarkably more stable in both the anode and cathode environments of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and the interface contact resistance between the specimen and Toray 060 carbon paper was reduced from 333.0 mΩ·cm2 to 21.6 mΩ·cm2 at a compaction pressure of 1.2 MPa.

  7. Ex vivo biomechanical evaluation of pigeon (Columba livia) cadaver intact humeri and ostectomized humeri stabilized with caudally applied titanium locking plate or stainless steel nonlocking plate constructs.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Brett G; Biskup, Jeffrey J; Weigel, Joseph P; Jones, Michael P; Xie, Xie; Liaw, Peter K; Tharpe, Josh L; Sharma, Aashish; Penumadu, Dayakar

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate mechanical properties of pigeon (Columba livia) cadaver intact humeri versus ostectomized humeri stabilized with a locking or nonlocking plate. SAMPLE 30 humeri from pigeon cadavers. PROCEDURES Specimens were allocated into 3 groups and tested in bending and torsion. Results for intact pigeon humeri were compared with results for ostectomized humeri repaired with a titanium 1.6-mm screw locking plate or a stainless steel 1.5-mm dynamic compression plate; the ostectomized humeri mimicked a fracture in a thin cortical bone. Locking plates were secured with locking screws (2 bicortical and 4 monocortical), and nonlocking plates were secured with bicortical nonlocking screws. Constructs were cyclically tested nondestructively in 4-point bending and then tested to failure in bending. A second set of constructs were cyclically tested non-destructively and then to failure in torsion. Stiffness, strength, and strain energy of each construct were compared. RESULTS Intact specimens were stiffer and stronger than the repair groups for all testing methods, except for nonlocking constructs, which were significantly stiffer than intact specimens under cyclic bending. Intact bones had significantly higher strain energies than locking plates in both bending and torsion. Locking and nonlocking plates were of equal strength and strain energy, but not stiffness, in bending and were of equal strength, stiffness, and strain energy in torsion. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results for this study suggested that increased torsional strength may be needed before bone plate repair can be considered as the sole fixation method for avian species.

  8. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  9. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-02-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  10. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  11. Pre-Oxidized and Nitrided Stainless Steel Foil for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Part 1 Corrosion, Interfacial Contact Resistance, and Surface Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; Meyer III, Harry M; More, Karren Leslie; Tortorelli, Peter F; McCarthy, Brian D

    2010-01-01

    Thermal (gas) nitridation of stainless steels can yield low interfacial contact resistance (ICR), electrically-conductive and corrosion-resistant nitride containing surfaces (Cr2N, CrN, TiN, V2N, VN, etc) of interest for fuel cells, batteries, and sensors. This paper presents the results of scale up studies to determine the feasibility of extending the nitridation approach to thin 0.1 mm stainless steel alloy foils for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. A major emphasis was placed on selection of alloy foil composition and nitidation conditions potentially capable of meeting the stringent cost goals for automotive PEMFC applications. Developmental Fe-20Cr-4V alloy and type 2205 stainless steel foils were treated by pre-oxidation and nitridation to form low-ICR, corrosion-resistant surfaces. Promising behavior was observed under simulated aggressive anode- and cathode- side bipolar plate conditions for both materials. Variation in ICR values were observed for treated 2205 foil, with lower (better) values generally observed for the treated Fe-20Cr-4V. This behavior was linked to the nature of the pre-oxidized and nitrided surface structure, which contained through surface layer thickness V-nitride particles in the case of Fe-20Cr-4V but near continuous chromia in the case of 2205 stainless steel. The implications of these findings for stamped bipolar plate foils are discussed.

  12. Pre-oxidized and nitrided stainless steel alloy foil for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates: Part 1. Corrosion, interfacial contact resistance, and surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, M. P.; Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.; Meyer, H. M.; More, K. L.; Tortorelli, P. F.; McCarthy, B. D.

    Thermal (gas) nitridation of stainless steel alloys can yield low interfacial contact resistance (ICR), electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant nitride containing surface layers (Cr 2N, CrN, TiN, V 2N, VN, etc.) of interest for fuel cells, batteries, and sensors. This paper presents results of scale-up studies to determine the feasibility of extending the nitridation approach to thin 0.1 mm stainless steel alloy foils for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. Developmental Fe-20Cr-4V alloy and type 2205 stainless steel foils were treated by pre-oxidation and nitridation to form low-ICR, corrosion-resistant surfaces. As-treated Fe-20Cr-4V foil exhibited target (low) ICR values, whereas 2205 foil suffered from run-to-run variation in ICR values, ranging up to 2× the target value. Pre-oxidized and nitrided surface structure examination revealed surface-through-layer-thickness V-nitride particles for the treated Fe-20Cr-4V, but near continuous chromia for treated 2205 stainless steel, which was linked to the variation in ICR values. Promising corrosion resistance was observed under simulated aggressive PEMFC anode- and cathode-side bipolar plate conditions for both materials, although ICR values were observed to increase. The implications of these findings for stamped bipolar plate foils are discussed.

  13. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  14. Solderability study of 63Sn-37Pb on zinc-plated and cadmium-plated stainless steel for the MC4636 lightning arrestor connector.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Edwin Paul; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Rejent, Jerome Andrew; Martin, Joseph J.

    2004-06-01

    Cadmium plating on metal surfaces is commonly used for corrosion protection and to achieve good solderability on the 304L stainless steel shell of the MC4636 lightning arrestor connector (LAC) for the W76-1 system. This study examined the use of zinc as a potential substitute for the cadmium protective surface finish. Tests were performed with an R and RMA flux and test temperatures of 230 C, 245 C, and 260 C. Contact angle, {theta}{sub c}, served as the generalized solderability metric. The wetting rate and wetting time parameters were also collected. The solderability ({theta}{sub c}) of the Erie Plating Cd/Ni coatings was better than that of similar Amphenol coatings. Although the {theta}{sub c} data indicated that both Cd/Ni platings would provide adequate solderability, the wetting rate and wetting time data showed the Amphenol coatings to have better performance. The Zn/Ni coatings exhibited non-wetting under all flux and temperature conditions. Based on the results of these tests, it has been demonstrated that zinc plating is not a viable alternate to cadmium plating for the LAC connectors.

  15. Numerical Simulation and Artificial Neural Network Modeling for Predicting Welding-Induced Distortion in Butt-Welded 304L Stainless Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanareddy, V. V.; Chandrasekhar, N.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthukumaran, S.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, artificial neural network modeling has been employed for predicting welding-induced angular distortions in autogenous butt-welded 304L stainless steel plates. The input data for the neural network have been obtained from a series of three-dimensional finite element simulations of TIG welding for a wide range of plate dimensions. Thermo-elasto-plastic analysis was carried out for 304L stainless steel plates during autogenous TIG welding employing double ellipsoidal heat source. The simulated thermal cycles were validated by measuring thermal cycles using thermocouples at predetermined positions, and the simulated distortion values were validated by measuring distortion using vertical height gauge for three cases. There was a good agreement between the model predictions and the measured values. Then, a multilayer feed-forward back propagation neural network has been developed using the numerically simulated data. Artificial neural network model developed in the present study predicted the angular distortion accurately.

  16. Stainless steel recycle FY94 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    1994-10-28

    The Materials Technology Section (MTS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was asked to demonstrate the practicality of recycling previously contaminated stainless steel components such as reactor heat exchanger heads, process water piping and slug buckets into 208 liters (55 gallon) drums and 2.8 cubic meter (100 ft{sup 3}) storage boxes. Radioactively contaminated stainless steel scrap will be sent to several industrial partners where it will be melted, decontaminated/cast into ingots, and rolled into plate and sheet and fabricated into the drums and boxes. As part of this recycle initiative, MTS was requested to demonstrate that radioactively contaminated Type 304L stainless steel could be remelted and cast to meet the applicable ASTM specification for fabrication of drums and boxes. In addition, MTS was requested to develop the technical basis of melt decontamination and establish practicality of using this approach for value added products. The findings presented in this investigation lead to the following conclusions: recycle of 18 wt% Cr-8 wt% Ni alloy can be achieved by melting Type 304 stainless steel in a air vacuum induction furnace; limited melt decontamination of the contaminated stainless steel was achieved, surface contamination was removed by standard decontamination techniques; carbon uptake in the as-cast ingots resulted from the graphite susceptor used in this experiment and is unavoidable with this furnace configuration. A new furnace optimized for melting stainless steel has been installed and is currently being tested for use in this program.

  17. 78 FR 79662 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... Corporation, North American Stainless, United Auto Workers Local 3303, Zanesville Armco Independent... From Belgium, Canada, Italy, the Republic of Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan, 64 FR 27756 (May 21, 1999..., Italy, the Republic of Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan, 68 FR 11520 (March 11, 2003); Notice of Amended...

  18. Probing Formability Improvement of Ultra-thin Ferritic Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate of PEMFC in Non-conventional Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Hyuk Jong; Barlat, Frédéric; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Formability increase in non-conventional forming profiles programmed in the servo-press was investigated using finite element analysis. As an application, forming experiment on a 0.15-mm-thick ferritic stainless steel sheet for a bipolar plate, a primary component of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, was conducted. Four different forming profiles were considered to investigate the effects of forming profiles on formability and shape accuracy. The four motions included conventional V motion, holding motion, W motion, and oscillating motion. Among the four motions, the holding motion, in which the slide was held for a certain period at the bottom dead point, led to the best formability. Finite element simulations were conducted to validate the experimental results and to probe the formability improvement in the non-conventional forming profiles. A creep model to address stress relaxation effect along with tool elastic recovery was implemented using a user-material subroutine, CREEP in ABAQUS finite element software. The stress relaxation and variable contact conditions during the holding and oscillating profiles were found to be the main mechanism of formability improvement.

  19. A metallurgical examination of fractured stainless-steel ASIF tibial plates.

    PubMed

    Richman, M H; Weltman, J K; Cole, A

    1976-08-01

    Between 1970 and 1973 99 tibial fractures were treated by rigid internal fixation with ASIF plates. The fractures were all regarded as sufficiently stable for exercise without weight bearing, thus needing no additional external support during the healing period. Four of the plates broke late in the healing period, after the onset of weight bearing. These fractures had some degree of delayed union with slight resorption of the bone ends, resulting in cyclical bending of the plate. Examination of 2 of the fractured plates by scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and optical metallography revealed that the primary cause of plate fracture was fatigue. There was no evidence that corrosion fatigue or inclusion content were factors leading to plate fracture.

  20. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  1. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  2. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  3. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions).

  4. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  5. An experimental study of the effect of stainless steel cladding on the structural integrity of flawed steel plates in bending

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.; Robinson, G.C.; Oland, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    A small crack near the inner surface of clad nuclear reactor pressure vessels is an important consideration in the safety assessment of the structural integrity of the vessel. Experimental results from tests on large clad and unclad plate specimens with surface flaws have shown that (1) a tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has arrested running flaws in clad plates under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured, and (2) the residual load-bearing capacity of clad plates with large subclad flaws significantly exceeded that of an unclad plate. The fracture surfaces of unclad plates suggest that the flaw evolves through alternately tunneling then breaking to the surface. In the case of clad plates, it is hypothesized that the tough, strong surface layer inhibits the tunneled flaw from propagating to the surface.

  6. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL BIOFILM ON STAINLESS STEEL BY HYPERSPECTRAL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, hyperspectral fluorescence imaging techniques were investigated for detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel plates typically used to manufacture food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures consisting of nonpathogenic E. coli, Pseudo...

  7. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  8. Effects of Mo content on microstructure and corrosion resistance of arc ion plated Ti-Mo-N films on 316L stainless steel as bipolar plates for polymer exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Kim, Kwang Ho; Shao, Zhigang; Wang, Feifei; Zhao, Shuang; Suo, Ni

    2014-05-01

    Bipolar plates are one of the most important components in PEMFC stack and have multiple functions, such as separators and current collectors, distributing reactions uniformly, and etc. Stainless steel is ideal candidate for bipolar plates owing to good thermal and electrical conductivity, good mechanical properties etc. However, stainless steel plate still cannot resist the corrosion of working condition. In this work, ternary Ti-Mo-N film was fabricated on 316L stainless steel (SS316L) as a surface modification layer to enhance the corrosion resistance. Effects of Mo content on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Ti-Mo-N films are systematically investigated by altering sputtering current of the Mo target. XRD results reveal that the preferred orientation changes from [111] to [220] direction as Mo content in the film increases. The synthesized Ti-Mo-N films form a substitutional solid solution of (Ti, Mo)N where larger Mo atoms replace Ti in TiN crystal lattice. The TiN-coated SS316L sample shows the best corrosion resistance. While Mo content in the Ti-Mo-N films increases, the corrosion resistance gradually degrades. Compared with the uncoated samples, all the Ti-Mo-N film coated samples show enhanced corrosion resistance in simulated PEMFC working condition.

  9. Multilayered Zr-C/a-C film on stainless steel 316L as bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Feifei; Peng, Linfa; Yi, Peiyun; Lai, Xinmin

    2016-05-01

    A multilayered zirconium-carbon/amorphous carbon (Zr-C/a-C) coating is synthesized by magnetron sputtering in order to improve the corrosion resistance and interfacial conductivity of stainless steel 316L (SS316L) as bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Zr-C/a-C film contains an outmost pure amorphous carbon layer and a sub zirconium containing carbon layer. Interfacial contact resistance (ICR) between carbon paper and coated SS316L decreases to 3.63 mΩ cm2 at 1.4 MPa. Potentiodynamic polarization results reveal that the corrosion potential of Zr-C/a-C coated sample is more positive than pure a-C coated sample and the current density is only 0.49 μA cm-2 at the cathode applied potential 0.6 V. Electrochemical impendence spectroscopy also indicates that multilayered Zr-C/a-C film coated SS316L has much higher charge transfer resistance than the bare sample. After potentiostatic polarization, ICR values are 3.92 mΩ cm2 and 3.82 mΩ cm2 in the simulated PEMFCs cathode and anode environment, respectively. Moreover, XPS analysis of the coated samples before and after potential holding tests shows little difference, which disclose the chemical stability of multilayered Zr-C/a-C film. Therefore, the multilayered Zr-C/a-C coating exhibits excellent performance in various aspects and is preferred for the application of stainless steel bipolar plates.

  10. An investigation of the typical corrosion parameters used to test polymer electrolyte fuel cell bipolar plate coatings, with titanium nitride coated stainless steel as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, A.; Kongstein, O. E.; Hamilton, P. J.; Oedegaard, A.; Svenum, I. H.; Cooke, K.

    2015-07-01

    Stainless steel bipolar plates (BPP) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have good manufacturability, durability and low costs, but inadequate corrosion resistance and elevated interfacial contact resistance (ICR) in the fuel cell environment. Thin film coatings of titanium nitride (TiN) of 1 μm in thickness, were deposited by means of physical vapour deposition (PVD) process on to stainless steel (SS) 316L substrates and were evaluated, in a series of tests, for their level of corrosion protection and ICR. In the ex-situ corrosion tests, variables such as applied potential, experimental duration and pH of the sulphate electrolyte at 80 °C were altered. The ICR values were found to increase after exposure to greater applied potentials and electrolytes of a higher pH. In terms of experimental duration, the ICR increased most rapidly at the beginning of each experiment. It was also found that the oxidation of TiN was accelerated after exposure to electrolytes of a higher pH. When coated BPPs were incorporated into an accelerated fuel cell test, the degradation of the fuel cell cathode resembled the plates that were tested at the highest anodic potential (1.4 VSHE).

  11. Reporting the Fatigue Life of 316L Stainless Steel Locking Compression Plate Implants: The Role of the Femoral and Tibial Biomechanics During the Gait.

    PubMed

    Rice, Devyn; Shaat, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the fatigue characteristics of femoral and tibial locking compression plate (LCP) implants are determined accounting for the knee biomechanics during the gait. A biomechanical model for the kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint during the complete gait cycle is proposed. The rotations of the femur, tibia, and patella about the knee joint during the gait are determined. Moreover, the patellar-tendon force (PT), quadriceps-tendon force (QT), the tibiofemoral joint force (TFJ), and the patellofemoral joint force (PFJ) through the standard gait cycle are obtained as functions of the body weight (BW). On the basis of the derived biomechanics of the knee joint, the fatigue factors of safety along with the fatigue life of 316L stainless steel femoral and tibial LCP implants are reported as functions of the BW and bone fracture location, for the first time. The reported results reveal that 316L stainless steel LCP implants for femoral surgeries are preferred for conditions in which the bone fracture is close to the knee joint and the BW is less than 80 kg. For tibial surgeries, 316L stainless steel LCP implants can be used for conditions in which the bone fracture is close to the knee joint and the BW is less than 100 kg. This study presents a critical guide for the determination of the fatigue characteristics of LCP implants. The obtained results reveal that the fatigue analyses should be performed on the basis of the body biomechanics to guarantee accurate designs of LCP implants for femoral and tibial orthopedic surgeries.

  12. Manufacturing and Performance Assessment of Stamped, Laser Welded, and Nitrided FeCrV Stainless Steel Bipolar Plates for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Dadheech, G; Bradley, J; Toops, Todd J; Meyer III, Harry M; Tortorelli, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    A manufacturing and single-cell fuel cell performance study of stamped, laser welded, and gas nitrided ferritic stainless steel foils in an advanced automotive bipolar plate assembly design was performed. Two developmental foil compositions were studied: Fee20Cre4V and Fee23Cre4V wt.%. Foils 0.1 mm thick were stamped and then laser welded together to create single bipolar plate assemblies with cooling channels. The plates were then surface treated by pre-oxidation and nitridation in N2e4H2 based gas mixtures using either a conventional furnace or a short-cycle quartz lamp infrared heating system. Single-cell fuel cell testing was performed at 80 C for 500 h at 0.3 A/cm2 using 100% humidification and a 100%/40% humidification cycle that stresses the membrane and enhances release of the fluoride ion and promotes a more corrosive environment for the bipolar plates. Periodic high frequency resistance potential-current scans during the 500 h fuel cell test and posttest analysis of the membrane indicated no resistance increase of the plates and only trace levels of metal ion contamination.

  13. Weldability of Additive Manufactured Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Pekkarinen, Joonas; Salminen, Antti

    Part size in additive manufacturing is limited by the size of building area of AM equipment. Occasionally, larger constructions that AM machines are able to produce, are needed, and this creates demand for welding AM parts together. However there is very little information on welding of additive manufactured stainless steels. The aim of this study was to investigate the weldability aspects of AM material. In this study, comparison of the bead on plate welds between AM parts and sheet metal parts is done. Used material was 316L stainless steel, AM and sheet metal, and parts were welded with laser welding. Weld quality was evaluated visually from macroscopic images. Results show that there are certain differences in the welds in AM parts compared to the welds in sheet metal parts. Differences were found in penetration depths and in type of welding defects. Nevertheless, this study presents that laser welding is suitable process for welding AM parts.

  14. Thermal Linear Expansion of Nine Selected AISI Stainless Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    stainless steels. The nine selected stainless steels are AISI 303, 304, 304L, 316, 317, 321, 347, 410 , and 430. The recoended values Include the...point of the stainless steels. The nine selected stainless steels are AISI 303, 304, 304L, 316, 317, 321, 347, 410 , and 430. The recommended values...Stainless Steel..................................26 8. AISI 410 Stainless Steel..................................29 9. AISI 430 Stainless Steel

  15. Development of New Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buck

    2005-08-30

    A new family of innovative martensitic stainless steels, 521-A, 521-B, and 521-C has been developed by Advanced Steel Technology, LLC (Trafford, PA) as high strength fastener (bolt) materials for use at moderate temperatures in turbine engines, including steam turbines, gas turbines, and aircraft engines. The primary objective of the development program was to create a martensitic stainless steel with high strength at moderate temperatures, and which could replace the expensive nickel-based superalloy IN 718 in some fasteners applications. A secondary objective was to replace conventional 12Cr steels such as AISI 422 used as blades, buckets and shafts that operate at intermediate temperatures in turbine engines with stronger steel. The composition of the new alloys was specifically designed to produce excellent mechanical properties while integrating heat treatment steps into production to reduce energy consumption during manufacturing. As a result, production costs and energy consumption during production of rolled bar products is significantly lower than conventional materials. Successful commercialization of the new alloys would permit the installed cost of certain turbine engines to be reduced without sacrificing high availability or operational flexibility, thereby enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. turbine engine manufacturers. Moreover, the domestic specialty steel industry would also benefit through increased productivity and reduced operating costs, while increasing their share of the international market for turbine engine fasteners, blades, buckets and shafts.

  16. Nano-composite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  17. Compressive Strength of Stainless-Steel Sandwiches at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Pride, Richard A.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from crippling tests of stainless-steel sandwich specimens in the temperature range from 80 F to 1,200 F. The specimens included resistance-welded 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with single-corrugated cores, type 301 stainless-steel sandwiches with double-corrugated cores, and brazed 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with honeycomb cores. The experimental strengths are compared with predicted buckling and crippling strengths. The crippling strengths were predicted from the calculated maximum strength of the individual plate elements of the sandwiches and from a correlation procedure which gives the elevated-temperature crippling strength when the experimental room-temperature crippling strengths are known. Photographs of some of the tested specimens are included to show the modes of failure.

  18. Effect of Bias Voltage on the Fatigue Life of Martensitic Stainless Steel with TiN Film Coated Using Arc Ion Plating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Satoshi; Yonekura, Daisuke; Murakami, Ri-Ichi

    To investigate the effect of TiN coating on the fatigue strength of high-strength steel, four-point bending fatigue tests were carried out for martensitic stainless steel with TiN film coated using arc ion plating (AIP) method. A 2-μm-thick TiN film was deposited onto the substrate surface under bias voltage of four kinds: VB = 0, -60, -160 and -260 V. For VB = 0, -160 V and -260 V, the fatigue limit increased. The highest fatigue limit of σmax = 900 MPa was obtained for VB = -160 V. But some samples for VB = -260 V showed the decrease of fatigue limit due to film delamination during the fatigue test. For VB = -60 V, the fatigue limit was unchanged by coating. As a result of a coating property analysis, the following conclusions were obtained. Fatigue crack propagation was almost independent of the bias voltage. Fatigue crack initiated from the subsurface in the substrate and the crack initiation behavior depended on the film property of the adhesion, residual stress, elastic modulus, and the film's hardness depended on the bias voltage especially for low fatigue stress level.

  19. From flint to stainless steel: observations on surgical instrument composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1993-01-01

    Man's failure to extract deeply embedded thorns and arrowheads, with bare hands and teeth, stimulated 'instrument substitutes' mimicking these appendages. Evidence from primitive communities suggest animal, plant and mineral items were employed, both before and after metal became the standard material of today's armamentarium. Changing surgical instrument composition has mirrored concurrent technology and manufacturing methods both of which are reviewed. Particular significance is accorded flint, bronze, crucible steel, thermal sterilisation, nickel-plate, stainless steel and disposable plastics. The paper is based on an exhibition From Flint to Stainless Steel on display at the College. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8215156

  20. Annealing induced interfacial layers in niobium-clad stainless steel developed as a bipolar plate material for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung Tae; Weil, K. Scott; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Bae, In-Tae; Pan, Jwo

    2010-05-01

    Niobium (Nb)-clad 304L stainless steel (SS) manufactured by cold rolling is currently under consideration for use as a bipolar plate material in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks. To make the fabrication of bipolar plates using the Nb-clad SS feasible, annealing may be necessary for the Nb-clad SS to reduce the springback induced by cold rolling. However, the annealing can develop an interfacial layer between the Nb cladding and the SS core and the interfacial layer plays a key role in the failure of the Nb-clad SS as reported earlier [JPS our work]. In this investigation, the Nb-clad SS specimens in as-rolled condition were annealed at different combinations of temperature and time. Based on the results of scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis, an annealing process map for the Nb-clad SS was obtained. The results of SEM analysis and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis also suggest that different interfacial layers occurred based on the given annealing conditions.

  1. Electrochemical behavior of nanocrystalline Ta/TaN multilayer on 316L stainless steel: Novel bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alishahi, M.; Mahboubi, F.; Mousavi Khoie, S. M.; Aparicio, M.; Hübner, R.; Soldera, F.; Gago, R.

    2016-08-01

    Insufficient corrosion resistance and surface conductivity are two main issues that plague large-scale application of stainless steel (SS) bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). This study explores the use of nanocrystalline Ta/TaN multilayer coatings to improve the electrical and electrochemical performance of polished 316L SS bipolar plates. The multilayer coatings have been deposited by (reactive) magnetron sputtering and characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The electrochemical behavior of bare and coated substrates has been evaluated in simulated PEMFC working environments by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarization tests at ambient temperature and 80 °C. The results show that the Ta/TaN multilayer coating increases the polarization resistance of 316L SS by about 30 and 104 times at ambient and elevated temperatures, respectively. The interfacial contact resistance (ICR) shows a low value of 12 mΩ × cm2 before the potentiostatic test. This ICR is significantly lower than for the bare substrate and remains mostly unchanged after potentiostatic polarization for 14 h. In addition, the high contact angle (92°) with water for coated substrates indicates a hydrophobic character, which can improve the water management within the cell in PEMFC stacks.

  2. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  3. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Syed Altaf; Kumar, Vadivel; Jayaram, Prithviraj

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires. Materials and Methods: We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets – titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel – using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated canine retraction was undertaken to evaluate the difference in frictional resistance between titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires. Results and Conclusion: We compared the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires, with the help of Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's “t” test, and post hoc multiple range test at level of <0.05 showed statistically significant difference in the mean values of all groups. Results demonstrated that the titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets of 0.018-inch and 0.022-inch slot had no significant variations in frictional résistance. The self-ligating bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the other groups. The titanium bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the stainless steel brackets. PMID:23066253

  4. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Syed Altaf; Kumar, Vadivel; Jayaram, Prithviraj

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires. We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets - titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel - using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated canine retraction was undertaken to evaluate the difference in frictional resistance between titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires. We compared the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires, with the help of Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's "t" test, and post hoc multiple range test at level of <0.05 showed statistically significant difference in the mean values of all groups. Results demonstrated that the titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets of 0.018-inch and 0.022-inch slot had no significant variations in frictional résistance. The self-ligating bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the other groups. The titanium bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the stainless steel brackets.

  5. Corrosion of stainless steel, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sedriks, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    The book describes corrosion characteristics in all the major and minor groups of stainless steels, namely, in austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardenable steels. Several chapters are spent on those special forms of corrosion that are investigated in the great detail in stainless steels, namely, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking. The influences of thermal treatment (heat affected zone cases), composition, and microstructure on corrosion are given good coverage. Corrosive environments include high temperature oxidation, sulfidation as well as acids, alkalis, various different petroleum plant environments, and even human body fluids (stainless steels are commonly used prosthetic materials).

  6. 78 FR 30271 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, South Africa, and Taiwan: Notice of Court Decision...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...), as clarified by Diamond Sawblades Mfrs. Coalition v. United States, 626 F.3d 1374 (Fed. Cir. 2010... ArcelorMittal Stainless Belgium N.V. v. United States, 694 F.3d 82 (Fed. Cir. 2012) (ArcelorMittal... States, 296 F.3d 1087 (Fed. Cir. 2002), and Tak Fat Trading Co. v. United States, 396 F. 3d 1378...

  7. High-temperature brazing of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Heisman, R. M.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Prevention of iron contamination of platens is eliminated by placing alumina/silica ceramic-fiber blankets between platens and carbon-steel plate. Carbon-steel plates provide rigidity and improve heat transfer.

  8. High-temperature brazing of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Heisman, R. M.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Prevention of iron contamination of platens is eliminated by placing alumina/silica ceramic-fiber blankets between platens and carbon-steel plate. Carbon-steel plates provide rigidity and improve heat transfer.

  9. Effects of specimen thickness and side-groove on fracture toughness of JN1 austenitic stainless steel rolled plate at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Y.; Horiguchi, K.; Kobori, T.

    1997-06-01

    In order to evaluate the fracture toughness (J{sub IC}) of JN1 austenitic stainless steel rolled plate, we performed elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests with standard and modified compact tension specimens at liquid helium temperature. These tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM standards E813-81 and E813-87 for determining J{sub IC} using the unloading compliance method to monitor crack growth. The effects of specimen thickness and side-groove on J{sub IC} and tearing modulus (T{sub mat}) are reported. The final value of physical crack extension was taken as the average of nine measurements using an optical microscope. Fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to verify the failure mechanisms. The effects of crack tunneling on the determination of J-integral resistance curves and valid J{sub IC} values, and a difference between ASTM standards E813-81 and E813-87 are also discussed.

  10. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-05-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

  11. Precise carbon control of fabricated stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, R.J.

    1975-12-01

    A process is described for controlling the carbon content of fabricated stainless steel components including the steps of heat treating the component in hydrogen atmospheres of varying dewpoints and carbon potentials.

  12. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  13. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  14. Development of a carburizing stainless steel alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, D.E. )

    1994-06-01

    A new carburizing stainless steel alloy that resists corrosion, heat, and fatigue has been developed for bearing and gear applications. Pyrowear 675 Stainless alloy is vacuum induction melted and vacuum arc remelted (VIM/VAR) for aircraft-quality cleanliness. Test results show that it has corrosion resistance similar to that of AISI Type 440-C stainless, and its rolling fatigue resistance is superior to that of AISI M50 (UNS K88165). In contrast to alloy gear steels and Type 440C, Pyrowear 675 maintains case hardness of HRC 60 at operating temperatures up to 200 C (400 F). Impact and fracture toughness are superior to that of other stainless bearing steels, which typically are relatively brittle and can break under severe service. Toughness is also comparable or superior to conventional noncorrosion-resistant carburizing bearing steels, such as SAE Types 8620 and 9310.

  15. Stainless Steels’ Resistance to Hydroerosion,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-30

    Omel’chenko, engineer, S. L. Millichenko, A. G. Aleksandrov, Candidates of Technical Sciences Thanks to a high corrosion resistance stainless steels have...has great significance. The resistance to hydroerosion of several of the most common types of stainless steels which have roughly the same corrosion ...the failure is first localized in the ferrite phase and occurs by means of plastic deformation and the development of fatigue micro- cracks both

  16. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  17. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  18. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-12-31

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors.

  19. Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) plates versus stainless steel dynamic compression plates in the treatment of fractures of the tibiae in dogs.

    PubMed

    Skirving, A P; Day, R; Macdonald, W; McLaren, R

    1987-11-01

    In a series of 14 dogs, fractures of both tibiae were caused by a "bone-breaker" designed in the authors' department and observed to produce a consistent and realistic canine fracture. One tibia was plated with a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) plate and the other with a dynamic compression (DC) plate. Roentgenographic examination demonstrated healing of the CFRP-plated tibiae with abundant callus, and almost total remodeling of the fracture callus between ten and 20 weeks. Biomechanical testing by three-point bending revealed little difference between the strength of union of the fractures at 12-16 weeks. At 20 weeks, although the numbers were too small for statistical confirmation, the CFRP-plated tibiae were consistently stronger than the DC-plated tibiae.

  20. Superplastic forming of stainless steel automotive components

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, B.; Elmer, J.; Carol, L.

    1997-02-06

    Exhaust emission standards are governmentally controlled standards, which are increasingly stringent, forcing alternate strategies to meet these standards. One approach to improve the efficiency of the exhaust emission equipment is to decrease the time required to get the catalytic converter to optimum operating temperature. To accomplish this, automotive manufacturers are using double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds to reduce heat loss of the exhaust gases to the converter. The current method to manufacture double wall stainless steel exhaust components is to use a low-cost alloy with good forming properties and extensively form, cut, assemble, and weld the pieces. Superplastic forming (SPF) technology along with alloy improvements has potential at making this process more cost effective. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and USCAR Low Emission Partnership (LEP) worked under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) to evaluate material properties, SPF behavior, and welding behavior of duplex stainless steel alloy for automotive component manufacturing. Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has a separate CRADA with the LEP to use SPF technology to manufacture a double wall stainless steel exhaust component. As a team these CRADAs developed and demonstrated a technical plan to accomplish making double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds.

  1. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450/sup 0/C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the ..cap alpha..' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 450/sup 0/C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 450/sup 0/C. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  3. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  4. Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steels in Biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román, Alejandra S.; Méndez, Claudia M.; Ares, Alicia E.

    The aim of this work was to study the corrosion behavior of stainless steels in biodiesel of vegetal origin, at room temperature, evaluating its properties according to the differences in the structures (austenitic, ferritic and austenitic — ferritic) and compositions of the materials. The biodiesel employed was obtained by industrially manufactured based on soybean oil as main raw material. The stainless steels used as samples for the tests were: AISI 304L, Sea Cure and Duplex 2205. For obtaining the desired data potentiodynamic polarization and weight loss trials were carried out. These studies were complemented by observations using an optical microscope. The weight loss study allowed the identification of low corrosion rates to the three stainless steels studied.

  5. Friction Drilling of Stainless Steels Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.; Lamikiz, A.

    2011-01-17

    This work describes the experimental study of the friction drilling process in stainless steel by means of an optimization of the machining conditions. For such purpose austenitic stainless steel with different thicknesses were analyzed through controlled tests at different rotation speeds and feed rates. On one hand, the torque and the thrust force were computed and monitorized. On the other hand, the dimensional tolerances of the holes were evaluated, mainly the accuracy of the hole diameter and the burr thickness at different depths. Another topic of interest inherent to this special technique is the temperature level reached during the friction process which is crucial when it comes to development of microstructural transformations.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  7. 77 FR 64545 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Scheduling of the final phase of countervailing duty and... retarded, by reason of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of drawn stainless steel... merchandise as ``drawn stainless steel sinks with single or multiple drawn bowls, with or without drain...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  10. 77 FR 1504 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on stainless steel wire rod From India would be likely to lead to continuation or... contained in USITC Publication 4300 (January 2012), entitled Stainless Steel Wire Rod From...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  13. 78 FR 21417 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... drawn stainless steel sinks from China, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the Harmonized Tariff... notification of a preliminary determinations by Commerce that imports of drawn stainless steel sinks from...

  14. Dendritic inhomogeneity of stainless maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnikova, S.I.; Drobot, A.V.; Shmelev, A.Y.; Vukelich, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated dendritic inhomogeneity in industrial ingots 630 mm (steel I) in diameter and 500 mm (steel II) in diameter. The variation in the degree of dendritic inhomogeneity was investigated over the height of the ingots and across the sections on an MS-46 microprobe. It was established that the elements can be placed in the following order in accordance with the degree of reduction in the liquation factor: titanium, molybdenum, nickel, chromium, and cobalt. Titanium and molybdenum exhibit forward liquation in both steels, and chromium in steel II. The distribution of nickel and chromium in the steel I ingots and cobalt in the steel II ingots is unconventional. Dendritic inhomogeneity, which must be considered in assigning the heat treatment for finished articles, develops during the crystallization of stainless maraging steels.

  15. 77 FR 28568 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; North American Stainless, (Stainless Steel), Ghent, KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... Steel), Ghent, KY Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as... authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the stainless steel mill of North American Stainless... subzone status for activity related to the manufacturing and distribution of stainless steel at...

  16. Laser Rewelding of 304L Stainless Steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, Michael Christopher; Rodelas, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Laser welding of 304L stainless steel during component fabrication has been found to alter the chemical composition of the steel due to material evaporation. During repair or rework, or during potential reuse/ rewelding of certain components, the potential exists to alter the composition to the extent that the material becomes prone to solidification cracking. This work aims to characterize the extent of this susceptibility in order to make informed decisions regarding rewelding practice and base metal chemistry allowances.

  17. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Ren, Yibin

    2010-01-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels. PMID:27877320

  18. Stainless steel mesh-acrylic cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Tysvaer, A T; Hovind, K H

    1977-03-01

    Twenty-four steel mesh-acrylic plates have been used for repair of skull defects in 1970-73. Three plates had to be removed due to complications, two due to infection and one due to an allergic reaction. The plate is easy to mould, strong, and light. The cosmetic results are excellent.

  19. Colorimetric values of esthetic stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Omachi, Koichi; Staninec, Michal

    2002-01-01

    The colorimetric values of two different kinds of esthetic stainless steel crowns were measured and compared with the colorimetric values of primary anterior teeth in Japanese children. The colorimetric values of resin composite-faced stainless steel crowns (Kinder Krown) and epoxy-coated stainless steel crowns (White Steel Crown) were measured with a color difference meter. The Commission Internationale de Eclairage L*, a*, b*, and delta E*ab values and Munsell value, chroma, and hue were calculated. The data were compared with previously reported colorimetric values of Japanese primary anterior teeth measured with the same color difference meter used in this study. Compared to Japanese primary anterior teeth, Kinder Krown Pedo I and Pedo II showed much higher L* values and lower hue; on the other hand, White Steel Crown showed much higher L*, a*, b* values, much higher value and chroma, and much lower hue. Color analysis revealed that the colors of the White Steel Crown and Kinder Krown Pedo I were substantially different from the color of Japanese primary anterior teeth. The color difference between Pedo II crowns and Japanese primary anterior teeth was relatively high, but the color of Pedo II might be acceptable for clinical use.

  20. Nickel-free duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Uggowitzer, P.J.; Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O.

    1998-12-04

    It is well known that nitrogen-alloying in steel produces a variety of exceptional properties such as high strength, high ductility and, eventually, resistance to stress corrosion cracking. High-nitrogen steels (HNS), therefore, have recently been developed to enhance the strength and corrosion resistance of stainless steels. However, due to a low solubility of nitrogen in a liquid steel under atmospheric pressure, the production of such high-nitrogen alloys needs high-pressure facilities that cause an extra cost. A possible route of developing high-nitrogen alloys under atmospheric pressure is to choose a duplex microstructure, where the amount of austenite and ferrite phase is nearly equal. A much lower nitrogen content is needed to maintain a 50% austenite phase compared with the necessary addition of nitrogen to reach a 100% austenitic microstructure. In addition, duplex stainless steels (DSS) with 40--60% ferrite can significantly improve the SCC-resistance. The objective of this work was to develop a new group of nickel-free, high strength and corrosion resistant DSS. Nickel was completely replaced by nitrogen in order to enhance SCC resistance and reduce the alloying element cost. The microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and cost analysis of new alloys are investigated in comparison with some commercial stainless steels.

  1. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel type 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel type 301 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  2. Materials data handbooks on stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Two handbooks which summarize latest available data have been published. Two types of stainless steels, alloy A-286 and Type 301, are described. Each handbook is divided into twelve chapters. Scope of information presented includes physical- and mechanical-property data at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures.

  3. Proof Testing Of Stainless-Steel Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng H.; Hendrickson, James A.; Bamford, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of development of method for nondestructive proof testing of bolts made of A286 stainless steel. Based on concept that the higher load bolt survives, the smaller the largest flaw and, therefore, the longer its fatigue life after test. Calculations and experiments increase confidence in nondestructive proof tests.

  4. Fabrication of stainless steel foil utilizing chromized steel strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loria, Edward A.

    1980-10-01

    Stainless steel foil has properties which are, in many respects, unmatched by alternative thin films. The high strength to weight ratio and resistance to corrosion and oxidation at elevated temperatures are generally advantageous. The aerospace and automotive industries have used Type 430 and 304 foil in turbine engine applications. Foil around 2 mils (5.1 × 10-3 cm) thick has been appropriate for the recuperator or heat exchanger and this product has also been used in honeycomb and truss-core structures. Further, such foil has been employed as a wrap to protect tool steel parts from contamination during heat treating. A large part of the high cost of producing stainless steel foil by rolling is due to the complicated and expensive rolling mill and annealing equipment involved. A method will be described which produces (solid) stainless steel foil from chromized (coated) steel which can be cheaper than the conventional processing stainless steel, such as Type 430, from ingot to foil. Also, the material is more ductile and less work hardenable during processing to foil and consequently intermediate annealing treatments are eliminated and scrap losses minimized.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  7. Emissivity of sodium wetted and oxidized Type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, N.L.; Craig, R.E.; Forsyth, D.R.; Novendstern, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    The emissivity of sodium wetted and oxidized Type 304 stainless steel was determined to provide data for calculating the heat flow through Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) reflector plates, located above the sodium pool, to the reactor closure head. An emissivity experiment using a Type 304 stainless steel specimen was performed in an inerted glovebox. Relatively high oxygen concentrations of 10,000 and 50 vppm were used in the argon/oxygen mixtures to reduce reaction time. Following wetting and oxidation, the specimen was heated to a maximum temperature of 450/sup 0/C and the emissivity of the oxidized coating was calculated. Results indicate that the emissivity of the coating ranged from 0.55 to 0.92.

  8. Long-Term Underground Corrosion of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

    2007-03-01

    In 1970, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) implemented the most ambitious and comprehensive long-term corrosion behavior test to date for stainless steels in soil environments. Over thirty years later, one of the six test sites was targeted to research subsurface contamination and transport processes in the vadose and saturated zones. This research directly applies to environmental management operational corrosion issues and long term stewardship scientific needs for understanding the behavior of waste forms and their near-field contaminant transport of chemical and radiological contaminants at nuclear disposal sites. This paper briefly describes the ongoing research and the corrosion analysis results of the stainless steel plate specimens recovered from the partial recovery of the first test site.

  9. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  10. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehemann, R. F.

    1985-11-01

    The similarities and differences in the stress corrosion cracking response of ferritic and austenitic stainless steels in chloride solutions will be examined. Both classes of materials exhibit a cracking potential: similar transient response (to loading) of the potential in open circuit tests or the current in potentiostatic tests and similar enrichment of chromium and depletion of iron in the film associated with localized corrosion processes. The ferritic steels are more resistant to localized corrosion than are the austenitic steels, which is responsible for the difference in the influence of prior thermal and mechanical history on cracking susceptibility of the two types of steel. Similarities in the fractography of stress corrosion cracks and those produced by brittle delayed failure during cathodic charging of the ferritic steels indicate that hydrogen embrittlement is involved in the failure process.

  12. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurry—usually lime or limestone—creates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  13. The stainless steel beneficial reuse integrated demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.; Lutz, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Process water heat exchangers at SRS contains over 95% 304 stainless steel which could be recycled back to DOE in a ``controlled release`` manner, that is, the radioactive scrap metal (RSM) could be reprocessed into new reusable products for return to DOE for use within the DOE Complex. In 1994, a demonstration was begun to recycle recycle contaminated stainless steel by melting 60 tons of RSM and refabricating it into containers for long-term temporary storage. The demonstration covers the entire recycle chain; the melting and the fabrication are to be done through subcontracts with private industry. Activity level of RSM to be supplied to industry is less than one curie total; the average specific activity level of the cobalt-60 which will be imbedded in the final products was estimated to be 117 pico curies per gram (4.31 becquerels/gram).

  14. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Phillips, Nathaniel Steven

    2006-01-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  15. Dislocation substructure in fatigued duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J. . Lab. de Mecanique de Lille Inst. of Physical Metallurgy, Brno . Academy of Sciences); Degallaix, S. . Lab. de Mecanique de Lille); Kruml, T. . Academy of Sciences)

    1993-12-15

    Cyclic plastic straining of crystalline materials results in the formation of specific dislocation structures. Considerable progress in mapping and understanding internal dislocation structures has been achieved by studying single crystal behavior: however, most structural materials have a polycrystalline structure and investigations of polycrystals in comparison to single crystal behavior of simple metals prove to be very useful in understanding more complex materials. There are some classes of materials, however, with complicated structure which do not have a direct equivalent in single crystalline form. Moreover, the specific dimensions and shapes of individual crystallites play an important role both in the cyclic stress-strain response of these materials and in the formation of their interior structure in cyclic straining. Austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel, which is a kind of a natural composite, is a material of this type. The widespread interest in the application of duplex steels is caused by approximately doubled mechanical properties and equal corrosion properties, when compared with classical austenitic stainless steels. Fatigue resistance of these steels as well as the surface damage evolution in cyclic straining have been studied; however, much less is known about the internal substructure development in cyclic straining. In this study the dislocation arrangement in ferritic and austenitic grains of the austenitic-ferritic duplex steel alloyed with nitrogen and cyclically strained with two strain amplitudes, is reported and compared to the dislocation arrangement found in single and polycrystals of austenitic and ferritic materials of a similar composition and with the surface relief produced in cyclic plastic straining.

  16. Properties of cryogenically worked metals. [stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Kiefer, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine whether the mechanical properties of cryogenically worked 17-7PH stainless steel are suitable for service from ambient to cryogenic temperatures. It was determined that the stress corrosion resistance of the cryo-worked material is quite adequate for structural service. The tensile properties and fracture toughness at room temperature were comparable to titanium alloy 6Al-4V. However, at cryogenic temperatures, the properties were not sufficient to recommend consideration for structural service.

  17. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  18. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  19. Softened-Stainless-Steel O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Waters, William I.

    1993-01-01

    In fabrication of O-ring of new type, tube of 304 stainless steel bent around mandril into circle and welded closed into ring. Ring annealed in furnace to make it soft and highly ductile. In this condition, used as crushable, deformable O-ring seal. O-ring replacements used in variety of atmospheres and temperatures, relatively inexpensive, fabricated with minimum amount of work, amenable to one-of-a-kind production, reusable, and environmentally benign.

  20. CO2 laser welding of AISI 321stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, A.; Hamdani, A. H.; Akhter, R.

    2014-06-01

    CO2 laser welding of AISI 321austenitic stainless steel has been carried out. Bead on plate welds on 2 mm thick steel were performed with 450W CO2 laser at speeds ranging from 200 to 900 mm/min. It was observed that weld depth and width was decreased with increasing the speed at constant laser power. Butt welds on different sheet thickness of 1, 2 and 2.5 mm were performed with laser power of 450 W and at speed 750, 275 and 175 mm/min, respectively. The microstructures of the welded joints and the heat affected zones (HAZ) were examined by optical microscopy and SEM. The austenite/delta ferrite microstructure was reported in the welded zone. The microhardness and tensile strength of the welded joints were measured and found almost similar to base metal due to austenitic nature of steel.

  1. Withdrawal Strength and Bending Yield Strength of Stainless Steel Nails

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that stainless steel nails have superior corrosion performance compared to carbon steel or galvanized nails in treated wood; however, their mechanical fastening behavior is unknown. In this paper, the performance of stainless steel nails is examined with respect to two important properties used in wood connection design: withdrawal strength...

  2. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels.

  3. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  4. The use of stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Seale, N Sue

    2002-01-01

    The stainless steel crown (SSC) is an extremely durable restoration with several clear-cut indications for use in primary teeth including: following a pulpotomy/pulpectomy; for teeth with developmental defects or large carious lesions involving multiple surfaces where an amalgam is likely to fail; and for fractured teeth. In other situations, its use is less clear cut, and caries risk factors, restoration longevity and cost effectiveness are considerations in decisions to use the SSC. The literature on caries risk factors in young children indicates that children at high risk exhibiting anterior tooth decay and/or molar caries may benefit by treatment with stainless steel crowns to protect the remaining at-risk tooth surfaces. Studies evaluating restoration longevity, including the durability and lifespan of SSCs and Class II amalgams demonstrate the superiority of SSCs for both parameters. Children with extensive decay, large lesions or multiple surface lesions in primary molars should be treated with stainless steel crowns. Because of the protection from future decay provided by their feature of full coverage and their increased durability and longevity, strong consideration should be given to the use of SSCs in children who require general anesthesia. Finally, a strong argument for the use of the SSC restoration is its cost effectiveness based on its durability and longevity.

  5. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a “total impact energy” approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper.

  6. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other types of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.

  7. Decontaminating and Melt Recycling Tritium Contaminated Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1995-04-03

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and several university and industrial partners are evaluating recycling radioactively contaminated stainless steel. The goal of this program is to recycle contaminated stainless steel scrap from US Department of Energy national defense facilities. There is a large quantity of stainless steel at the DOE Savannah River Site from retired heavy water moderated Nuclear material production reactors (for example heat exchangers and process water piping), that will be used in pilot studies of potential recycle processes. These parts are contaminated by fission products, activated species, and tritium generated by neutron irradiation of the primary reactor coolant, which is heavy (deuterated) water. This report reviews current understanding of tritium contamination of stainless steel and previous studies of decontaminating tritium exposed stainless steel. It also outlines stainless steel refining methods, and proposes recommendations based on this review.

  8. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich ..cap alpha..' and Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by ..cap alpha..' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 450/sup 0/C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450/sup 0/C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed.

  9. Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.

    1995-08-01

    Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging.

  10. A Stem Analysis of Two Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-25

    slightly faster rate than the 303 stainless steel powder and therefore few usable specimens were obtained by electropolishing . The unsuccessful...CONCLUSIONS Rapid solidification processing of a high- sulphur austenitic type 303 stainless steel produces a significant refinement in the...A STEM ANALYSTS OF TWO RAPIDLY SOLIDIFIED STAINLESS STEELS . (U) UN D MAR 80 T F KELLY, J B VANDER SANDE NOBOI-76-C-0171 UNLSSFE7Minrnc UNCLASSIFIED

  11. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants. PMID:26593645

  12. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-11-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants.

  13. Weldment for austenitic stainless steel and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagnall, Christopher; McBride, Marvin A.

    1985-01-01

    For making defect-free welds for joining two austenitic stainless steel mers, using gas tungsten-arc welding, a thin foil-like iron member is placed between the two steel members to be joined, prior to making the weld, with the foil-like iron member having a higher melting point than the stainless steel members. When the weld is formed, there results a weld nugget comprising melted and then solidified portions of the joined members with small portions of the foil-like iron member projecting into the solidified weld nugget. The portions of the weld nugget proximate the small portions of the foil-like iron member which project into the weld nugget are relatively rich in iron. This causes these iron-rich nugget portions to display substantial delta ferrite during solidification of the weld nugget which eliminates weld defects which could otherwise occur. This is especially useful for joining austenitic steel members which, when just below the solidus temperature, include at most only a very minor proportion of delta ferrite.

  14. Stainless steel leaches nickel and chromium into foods during cooking.

    PubMed

    Kamerud, Kristin L; Hobbie, Kevin A; Anderson, Kim A

    2013-10-02

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan, cooking times of 2-20 h, 10 consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After 6 h of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold, respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34-fold and Cr increased approximately 35-fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, although significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage.

  15. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  16. Disinfection of Preexisting Contamination of BACILLUS CEREUS on Stainless Steel when Using Glycoconjugate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, Casey; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Stainless steel is ubiquitous in our modern world, however it can become contaminated. This can endanger our health. The aim of our study is to disinfect stainless steel using Bacillus cereus as a model organism. Bacillus cereus is a microbe that is ubiquitous in nature, specifically soil. B. cereus is known to cause illness in humans. To prevent this, we propose to use a glycoconjugate solution (GS) for disinfection of stainless steel after it is contamination by B. cereus spores. In this study, two GS (9, 10) were tested for disinfection effectiveness on B. cereus spores on the surface of stainless steel foil (AISI-Series 200/300/400, THERMA-FOIL, Dayville, CT 0241). The disinfection rate of each GS was assessed by exposing the steel surface to B. cereus spores first and allowing them to settle for 24 hours. GS was used to treat the contaminated surface. The steel is washed and the resulting solution is plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The GS with the fewest colony forming unit (CFU) formed on TSA is determined to be the most efficient during disinfection. Results show that both GS demonstrate a strong ability to disinfect B. cereus spores. Between the two, GS 9 shows the highest disinfection efficacy by killing approximately 99.5% of spores. This is a drastic improvement over the 0-20% disinfection of the control. Based on this we find that studied GS do have the capacity to act as a disinfectant on stainless steel.

  17. Disinfection of preexisting contamination of bacillus cereus on stainless steel when using glycoconjugate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, Casey; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-10

    Stainless steel is ubiquitous in our modern world, however it can become contaminated. This can endanger our health. The aim of our study is to disinfect stainless steel using Bacillus cereus as a model organism. Bacillus cereus is a microbe that is ubiquitous in nature, specifically soil. B. cereus is known to cause illness in humans. To prevent this, we propose to use a glycoconjugate solution (GS) for disinfection of stainless steel after it is contamination by B. cereus spores. In this study, two GS (9, 10) were tested for disinfection effectiveness on B. cereus spores on the surface of stainless steel foil (AISI-Series 200/300/400, THERMA-FOIL, Dayville, CT 0241). The disinfection rate of each GS was assessed by exposing the steel surface to B. cereus spores first and allowing them to settle for 24 hours. GS was used to treat the contaminated surface. The steel is washed and the resulting solution is plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The GS with the fewest colony forming unit (CFU) formed on TSA is determined to be the most efficient during disinfection. Results show that both GS demonstrate a strong ability to disinfect B. cereus spores. Between the two, GS 9 shows the highest disinfection efficacy by killing approximately 99.5% of spores. This is a drastic improvement over the 0-20% disinfection of the control. Based on this we find that studied GS do have the capacity to act as a disinfectant on stainless steel.

  18. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  19. Fracture mechanism of borated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.Y.; Soliman, S.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Balliett, T.A.

    2000-05-01

    The mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of irradiated and unirradiated boron containing Type 304 stainless steel are studied. Four different batches with different boron weight percentages are used. One of these batches was manufactured by a conventional wrought technique, while the others were manufactured by a powder metallurgy technique. The irradiated specimens were subjected to a fluence level of 5 x 10{sup 19} or 1 {times} 10{sup 21} n/m{sup 2}. The mechanical and fracture tests were performed at temperatures of 233, 298, and 533 K. No significant effects on the mechanical properties or fracture behavior were observed as a result of neutron irradiation and/or temperature. The ductility and toughness of the borated steel were found to decrease with increasing boron content. The effect of boride on void nucleation and linkage was found to play an important role in the fracture behavior of borated steel.

  20. 77 FR 58355 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China... Department'') initiated antidumping and countervailing duty investigations of drawn stainless steel sinks... countervailing duty determination.\\2\\ \\1\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of...

  1. 3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES THAT INTRODUCED SMOKE INTO UNIT; FLOOR IS UNPAINTED STEEL - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  2. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts).

  3. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; Muransky, Ondrej; Sisneros, Thomas A.

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250 MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.

  4. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; ...

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250more » MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.« less

  5. Underwater cutting technology of thick stainless steel with YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Itaru; Okazaki, Koki; Shima, Seishi; Kurihara, Kenji; Yuguchi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Ikuko

    2003-03-01

    In nuclear power plants, irradiated materials like Control Rod (CR) should be stored underwater after service. Due to reducing the storage space, underwater cutting technology is expected. In this study, we developed underwater cutting technology of thick stainless steel with YAG laser in order to cut used CR. Preliminary tests were performed with flat plate test-pieces to optimize the cutting conditions. Due to creating a local dry area between nozzle and test-piece, high-pressure air was blown from the nozzle. Underwater laser cutting was carried out by laser irradiation power of 4 kW, changing the parameters of cutting speed, distance between the nozzle and test-piece, and thickness of the test-piece. We also investigated the wastes like dross and aerosols by laser cutting. Amount of dross was approximately 0.1 kg/m after cutting a 14 mm thick stainless steel plate, which is estimated to be less than other cutting method. Based on these results, we developed underwater cutting system of CR test-piece with YAG laser as a mock-up test. In the cutting torch, there was tracking system was introduced to keep the distance between the nozzle and the test-piece constant, and cutting monitor was also set-in to detect whether the test-piece was successfully cut or not. We have already tried to cut the CR test-piece with this facility and successfully cut in half.

  6. Corrosive effect of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic on stainless-steel screws during implantation into man.

    PubMed

    Tayton, K

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion of stainless-steel screws used to fix carbon-fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) plates to human fractures was compared with the corrosion on similar screws used to fix stainless-steel AO plates. Corrosive changes were noted in both sets of screws with similar frequency and severity; however, the stainless-steel plates were 'in situ' almost twice as long as the CFRP ones, showing that the corrosive changes occurred more rapidly on screws in contact with CFRP. Nevertheless, over the implantation time necessary for bone healing, corrosion was very mild and there is no clinical contra-indication to the use of stainless-steel and CFRP together in this particular application.

  7. Barnacle cement: An etchant for stainless steel 316L?

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, R; Kumar, R; Doble, M; Venkatesan, R

    2010-09-01

    Localized corrosion of stainless steel beneath the barnacle-base is an unsolved issue for the marine industry. In this work, we clearly bring out for the first time the role of the barnacle cement in acting as an etchant, preferentially etching the grain boundaries, and initiating the corrosion process in stainless steel 316L. The investigations include structural characterization of the cement and corroded region, and also chemical characterization of the corrosion products generated beneath the barnacle-base. Structural characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the morphological changes in the cement structure across the interface of the base-plate and the substrate, modification of the steel surface by the cement and the corrosion pattern beneath the barnacle-base. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the corrosion products show that they are composed of mainly oxides of iron thereby implying that the corrosion is aerobic in nature. A model for the etching and corrosion mechanism is proposed based on our observations.

  8. Barnacle cement: an etchant for stainless steel 316L?

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, R; Kumar, R; Doble, M; Venkatesan, R

    2010-09-01

    Localized corrosion of stainless steel beneath the barnacle-base is an unsolved issue for the marine industry. In this work, we clearly bring out for the first time the role of the barnacle cement in acting as an etchant, preferentially etching the grain boundaries, and initiating the corrosion process in stainless steel 316L. The investigations include structural characterization of the cement and corroded region, and also chemical characterization of the corrosion products generated beneath the barnacle-base. Structural characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the morphological changes in the cement structure across the interface of the base-plate and the substrate, modification of the steel surface by the cement and the corrosion pattern beneath the barnacle-base. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the corrosion products show that they are composed of mainly oxides of iron thereby implying that the corrosion is aerobic in nature. A model for the etching and corrosion mechanism is proposed based on our observations.

  9. The effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructure of ferritic and duplex stainless steels welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkarinen, J.; Kujanpää, V.

    This study is focused to determine empirically, which microstructural changes occur in ferritic and duplex stainless steels when heat input is controlled by welding parameters. Test welds were done autogenously bead-on-plate without shielding gas using 5 kW fiber laser. For comparison, some gas tungsten arc welds were made. Used test material were 1.4016 (AISI 430) and 1.4003 (low-carbon ferritic) type steels in ferritic steels group and 1.4162 (low-alloyed duplex, LDX2101) and 1.4462 (AISI 2205) type steels in duplex steels group. Microstructural changes in welds were identified and examined using optical metallographic methods.

  10. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  11. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  12. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  13. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  14. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  15. 77 FR 23752 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... (April 2012), entitled Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from China: Investigation Nos. 701-TA-489 and...

  16. Descaling: Removal of Heat-Treat Scale from Stainless Steels,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Several panels of 17-7 PH stainless steels were cleaned by various procedures and heat-treated to the TH 1050 condition. The cleaning procedre which... 1050 and examined for harmful effects. The preferred procedure for producing clean scale-free heat-treated stainless steel parts was to treat the parts

  17. Recommended Stainless Steel Welding Procedures for Corps of Engineers Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Two stainless steel welding methods are investigated for potential use in Corps of Engineers construction. The methods-gas tungsten-arc welding ( GTAW ...electron microscopy. Results show that GTAW and SMAW provide sound welds in the two stainless steels tested. Moreover, using low-carbon electrodes and

  18. Coating method enables low-temperature brazing of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaman, F. D.

    1965-01-01

    Gold coated stainless steel tubes containing insulated electrical conductors are brazed at a low temperature to a copper coated stainless steel sealing block with a gold-copper eutectic. This produces an effective seal without using flux or damaging the electrical conductors.

  19. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATION. STAINLESS STEEL WAS MACHINED IN SIDE A OF THE BUILDING, BEGINNING IN 1957. (4/24/78) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  20. New Method For Joining Stainless Steel to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    In new process, edge of stainless-steel sheet is perforated, and joined to titanium by resistance seam welding. Titanium flows into perforations, forming a strong interlocking joint. Process creates a quasi-metallurgical bond between the thin sheets of stainless steel and titanium.

  1. THE CLEANING OF 303 STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T H

    2004-04-20

    The sulfur found on the surfaces of stainless steel 303 (SS303) after nitric acid passivation originated from the MnS inclusions in the steel. The nitric acid attacked and dissolved these MnS inclusions, and redeposited micron-sized elemental sulfur particles back to the surface. To develop an alternative passivation procedure for SS303, citric and phosphoric acids have been evaluated. The experimental results show neither acid causes a significant amount of sulfur deposit. Thus, these two acids can be used as alternatives to nitric acid passivation for NIF applications. For SS303 previously passivated by nitric acid, NaOH soak can be used as a remedial cleaning process to effectively remove the sulfur deposits.

  2. Submerged arc fillet welds between mild steel and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kotecki, D.J.; Rajan, V.B.

    1997-02-01

    Submerged arc fillet welds between mild steel and Type 304 stainless steel, made with ER309L wire, may contain no ferrite and be at risk of hot cracking, or they may be sufficiently diluted that they transform to martensite with both hot cracking risk and low ductility. This situation is most prevalent when direct current electrode positive (DCEP) polarity is used and when the flange is the mild steel part of the T-joint. A flux that adds chromium to the weld can somewhat alleviate this tendency. Direct current electrode negative (DCEN) polarity greatly reduces this tendency by limiting dilution. Fillet weld compositions and dilutions are obtained for a number of welding conditions and fluxes.

  3. Attachment of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli to stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Lucia; Fegan, Narelle; Dykes, Gary A

    2007-04-01

    Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) are important foodborne pathogens causing gastrointestinal disease worldwide. Bacterial attachment to food surfaces, such as stainless steel may lead to cross contamination of foods and subsequent foodborne disease. A variety of STEC isolates, including E. coli O157:H7/H- strains, were grown in planktonic (broth) and sessile (agar) culture, following which initial attachment to stainless steel was determined using epifluorescence microscopy. Experiments were performed to determine whether the number of bacteria attached to stainless steel differed between STEC strains and between the two modes of growth. No relationship was found between STEC strains and the number of bacteria attached to stainless steel. Five STEC strains, including one non-toxigenic O157 isolate, attached in significantly greater (p<0.05) numbers to stainless steel following growth in planktonic culture compared to sessile culture. In contrast, two clinical strains of O157:H7 attached in significantly greater (p<0.05) numbers following growth in sessile culture compared to planktonic culture. Thirteen out of twenty E. coli strains showed no significant difference (p>0.05) in attachment when grown in planktonic or sessile culture. The change of interfacial free energy between the bacterial strains and stainless steel was calculated and the influence of free energy in attachment was determined. Although a significant variation (p<0.05) in free energy values was found between STEC strains, no correlation was found between free energy values and bacterial counts on stainless steel. In addition, no correlation was also found between bacterial hydrophobicity and surface charge values or production of surface structures (type I fimbriae or flagella) (previously determined) with the number of bacteria attached to stainless steel. The results of this study suggest that different growth conditions (planktonic and sessile) can influence the attachment of STEC to

  4. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  5. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  6. Antibacterial polyelectrolyte micelles for coating stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Falentin-Daudré, Céline; Faure, Emilie; Svaldo-Lanero, Tiziana; Farina, Fabrice; Jérôme, Christine; Van De Weerdt, Cécile; Martial, Joseph; Duwez, Anne-Sophie; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2012-05-08

    In this study, we report on the original synthesis and characterization of novel antimicrobial coatings for stainless steel by alternating the deposition of aqueous solutions of positively charged polyelectrolyte micelles doped with silver-based nanoparticles with a polyanion. The micelles are formed by electrostatic interaction between two oppositely charged polymers: a polycation bearing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine units (DOPA, a major component of natural adhesives) and a polyanion (poly(styrene sulfonate), PSS) without using any block copolymer. DOPA units are exploited for their well-known ability to anchor to stainless steel and to form and stabilize biocidal silver nanoparticles (Ag(0)). The chlorine counteranion of the polycation forms and stabilizes biocidal silver chloride nanoparticles (AgCl). We demonstrate that two layers of micelles (alternated by PSS) doped with silver particles are enough to impart to the surface strong antibacterial activity against gram-negative E. coli. Moreover, micelles that are reservoirs of biocidal Ag(+) can be easily reactivated after depletion. This novel water-based approach is convenient, simple, and attractive for industrial applications.

  7. Assessment of thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for assessing thermal embrittlement and predicting Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness J-R curve of cast stainless steel components under Light Water Reactor operating conditions from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Fracture properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. A common ``predicted lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  8. Characterization of friction stir welded joint of low nickel austenitic stainless steel and modified ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Mounarik; Das, Hrishikesh; Ahn, Eun Yeong; Hong, Sung Tae; Kim, Moon-Jo; Han, Heung Nam; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar stainless steels, low nickel austenitic stainless steel and 409M ferritic stainless steel, is experimentally investigated. Process responses during FSW and the microstructures of the resultant dissimilar joints are evaluated. Material flow in the stir zone is investigated in detail by elemental mapping. Elemental mapping of the dissimilar joints clearly indicates that the material flow pattern during FSW depends on the process parameter combination. Dynamic recrystallization and recovery are also observed in the dissimilar joints. Among the two different stainless steels selected in the present study, the ferritic stainless steels shows more severe dynamic recrystallization, resulting in a very fine microstructure, probably due to the higher stacking fault energy.

  9. Global stainless steel cycle exemplifies China's rise to metal dominance.

    PubMed

    Reck, Barbara K; Chambon, Marine; Hashimoto, Seiji; Graedel, T E

    2010-05-15

    The use of stainless steel, a metal employed in a wide range of technology applications, has been characterized for 51 countries and the world for the years 2000 and 2005. We find that the global stainless steel flow-into-use increased by more than 30% in that 5 year period, as did additions to in-use stocks. This growth was mainly driven by China, which accounted for almost half of the global growth in stainless steel crude production and which tripled its flow into use between 2000 and 2005. The global stainless steel-specific end-of-life recycling rate increased from 66% (2000) to 70% (2005); the landfilling rate was 22% for both years, and 9% (2000) to 12% (2005) was lost into recycled carbon and alloy steels. Within just 5 years, China passed such traditionally strong stainless steel producers and users as Japan, USA, Germany, and South Korea to become the dominant player of the stainless steel industry. However, China did not produce any significant stainless steel end-of-life flows in 2000 or 2005 because its products-in-use are still too new to require replacements. Major Chinese discard flows are expected to begin between 2015 and 2020.

  10. PORTABLE HYPERSPECTRAL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING SYSTEM FOR DETECTION OF BIOFILM ON STAINLESS STEEL COUPON

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging, as a rapid nondestructive method, was used to investigate detection of bacterial contamination on the surfaces of food processing equipment. In this study, stainless steel plates typically used to manufacture food processing equipment was utilized to gro...

  11. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  12. 76 FR 1599 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... results of its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from Brazil. The... stainless steel bar (SSB) from Brazil. See Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of...

  13. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-03-04

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  14. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred. PMID:28773285

  15. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  16. A mortality study among mild steel and stainless steel welders.

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, J J; Wild, P; Haguenoer, J M; Faucon, D; De Gaudemaris, R; Mur, J M; Mereau, M; Gary, Y; Toamain, J P; Birembaut, Y

    1993-01-01

    A mortality study was carried out in conjunction with the European mortality study among welders coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The study was aimed at assessing risks for lung cancer in relation to exposure to asbestos, welding fumes containing chromium and nickel, and tobacco smoke. The study included a cohort of 2721 welders and an internal comparison group of 6683 manual workers employed in 13 factories in France. The mortality of the two cohorts was studied from 1975 to 1988 by the historical prospective method. Job histories of welders were traced including welding processes used, metals welded, and proportion of worktime spent in welding. Data on smoking habits were collected from medical records. The observed number of deaths were compared with those expected (standardised mortality ratio (SMR)) based on national rates with adjustments for age, sex, and calendar time. The smoking habits of 87% of the whole study population were known. The distribution of welders and controls according to smoking was not statistically different. The overall mortality was slightly higher for welders (SMR = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.89-1.18) than for controls (SMR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99). For lung cancer, the SMR was 1.24 (95% CI 0.75-1.94) for welders, whereas the corresponding value was lower for controls (SMR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.68-1.26). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.59 among non-shipyard mild steel welders (95% CI 0.73-3.02). This contrasted with the results for all stainless steel welders (SMR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.19-2.69), and for stainless steel welders predominantly exposed to chromium VI (SMR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.12-3.71). Moreover, SMRs for lung cancer for mild steel welders tended to increase with duration of exposure and time since first exposure, leading to significant excesses for duration > or = 20 years and latency > or = 20 years. Such a pattern was not found for stainless steel welders. PMID:8457490

  17. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  18. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  19. Automatic Welding of Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    To determine if the use of automatic welding would allow reduction of the radiographic inspection requirement, and thereby reduce fabrication costs, a series of welding tests were performed. In these tests an automatic welder was used on stainless steel tubing of 1/2, 3/4, and 1/2 inch diameter size. The optimum parameters were investigated to determine how much variation from optimum in machine settings could be tolerate and still result in a good quality weld. The process variables studied were the welding amperes, the revolutions per minute as a function of the circumferential weld travel speed, and the shielding gas flow. The investigation showed that the close control of process variables in conjunction with a thorough visual inspection of welds can be relied upon as an acceptable quality assurance procedure, thus permitting the radiographic inspection to be reduced by a large percentage when using the automatic process.

  20. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  1. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  2. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  3. [Study on biocompatibility of MIM 316L stainless steel].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohui; Zhu, Shaihong; Li, Yiming; Zhao, Yanzhong; Zhou, Kechao; Huang, Boyun

    2007-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the biocompatibility of metal powder injection molding (MIM) 316L stainless steel. The percentage of S-period cells was detected by flow cytometry after L929 cells being incubated with extraction of MIM 316L stainless steel, and titanium implant materials for clinical application were used as control. In addition, both materials were implanted in animals and the histopathological evaluations were carried out. The statistical analyses show that there are no significant differences between the two groups (P > 0.05), which demonstrate that MIM 316L stainless steel has good biocompatibility.

  4. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  5. 76 FR 87 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; ThyssenKrupp Steel and Stainless USA, LLC; (Stainless and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; ThyssenKrupp Steel and Stainless USA, LLC; (Stainless and Carbon Steel Products) Calvert, AL Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act... establish a special- purpose subzone at the stainless and carbon steel products manufacturing facility...

  6. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-07-01

    An electrometallurgical treatment process has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to convert various types of spent nuclear fuels into stable storage forms and waste forms for repository disposal. The first application of this process will be to treat spent fuel alloys from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Three distinct product streams emanate from the electrorefining process: (1) refined uranium; (2) fission products and actinides extracted from the electrolyte salt that are processed into a mineral waste form; and (3) metallic wastes left behind at the completion of the electrorefining step. The third product stream (i.e., the metal waste stream) is the subject of this paper. The metal waste stream contains components of the chopped spent fuel that are unaffected by the electrorefining process because of their electrochemically ``noble`` nature; this includes the cladding hulls, noble metal fission products (NMFP), and, in specific cases, zirconium from metal fuel alloys. The selected method for the consolidation and stabilization of the metal waste stream is melting and casting into a uniform, corrosion-resistant alloy. The waste form casting process will be carried out in a controlled-atmosphere furnace at high temperatures with a molten salt flux. Spent fuels with both stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding are being evaluated for treatment; thus, stainless steel-rich and Zircaloy-rich waste forms are being developed. Although the primary disposition option for the actinides is the mineral waste form, the concept of incorporating the TRU-bearing product into the metal waste form has enough potential to warrant investigation.

  7. Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding Between UNS S31603 Austenitic Stainless Steel and UNS S32750 Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoro, Maria Claudia; Pereira, Victor Ferrinho; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2015-02-01

    In order to verify the viability of dissimilar UNS S31603 austenitic and UNS S32750 superduplex stainless steels joined by friction stir welding, 6-mm-thick plates were welded using a PCBN-WRe tool. The welded joints were performed in position control mode at rotational speeds of 100 to 300 rpm and a feed rate of 100 mm/min. The joints performed with 150 and 200 rpm showed good appearance and no defects. The metallographic analysis of both joints showed no internal defects and that the material flow pattern is visible only in the stirred zone (SZ) of the superduplex steel. On the SZ top, these patterns are made of regions of different phases (ferrite and austenite), and on the bottom and central part of the SZ, these patterns are formed by alternated regions of different grain sizes. The ferrite grains in the superduplex steel are larger than those in the austenitic ones along the SZ and thermo-mechanically affected zone, explained by the difference between austenite and ferrite recrystallization kinetics. The amount of ferrite islands present on the austenitic steel base metal decreased near the SZ interface, caused by the dissolving of the ferrite in austenitic matrix. No other phases were found in both joints. The best weld parameters were found to be 200 rpm rotation speed, 100 mm/min feed rate, and tool position control.

  8. Application of lap laser welding technology on stainless steel railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxiao; Wang, Chunsheng; He, Guangzhong; Li, Wei; Liu, Liguo

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steel railway vehicles with so many advantages, such as lightweight, antirust, low cost of maintenance and simple manufacturing process, so the production of high level stainless steel railway vehicles has become the development strategy of European, American and other developed nations. The current stainless steel railway vehicles body and structure are usually assembled by resistance spot welding process. The weak points of this process are the poor surface quality and bad airtight due to the pressure of electrodes. In this study, the partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated to resolve the problems, by controlling the laser to stop at the second plate in the appropriate penetration. The lap laser welding joint of stainless steel railway vehicle car body with partial penetration has higher strength and surface quality than those of resistance spot welding joint. The biggest problem of lap laser welding technology is to find the balance of the strength and surface quality with different penetrations. The mechanism of overlap laser welding of stainless steel, mechanical tests, microstructure analysis, the optimization of welding parameters, analysis of fatigue performance, the design of laser welding stainless steel railway vehicles structure and the development of non-destructive testing technology were systematically studied before lap laser welding process to be applied in manufacture of railway vehicles. The results of the experiments and study show that high-quality surface state and higher fatigue strength can be achieved by the partial penetration overlap laser welding of the side panel structure, and the structure strength of the car body can be higher than the requirements of En12663, the standard of structural requirements of railway vehicles bodies. Our company has produced the stainless steel subway and high way railway vehicles by using overlap laser welding technology. The application of lap laser welding will be a big

  9. The effects of carbon and nitrogen on the corrosion resistance of type 316 stainless steel to liquid lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. G.; Frankham, S. A.

    1982-06-01

    Type 316 stainless steel plates have been exposed at 600°C to liquid lithium containing carbon and nitrogen at various chemical activities for periods of up to 672 h. The corrosion products Li 9CrN 5 and M 23C 6 have been identified on the plate surfaces and in the grain boundaries. Scanning electron microscopy has shown preferential nickel and chromium depletion at the steel surface in lithium with high nitrogen content. The diffusion coefficient of carbon in type 316 stainless steel from a lithium source was found to be 6.5 × 10 t 1¯5 m 2/s.

  10. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  11. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, A. B.; Abramov, V. Ya.; Belous, V. N.

    1996-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K = Cr eff - αC eff, where α-thermodynamic coefficient, Cr eff-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and C eff-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 × 10 22 n/cm 2 fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC.

  12. Reduction of liquid metal embrittlement in copper-brazed stainless steel joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, T.; Fedorov, V.; Elßner, M.; Wagner, G.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Due to its very good formability and the low raw material cost, pure copper in form of foils is commonly used to braze plate heat exchangers made of stainless steel. The difference in the electrochemical potentials of brazing filler and base material leads to corrosion effects in contact with electrolytes. This may lead to leakages, which decrease the reliability of the heat exchanger during service in potable water. The dissolution of the emerging corrosion products of brazing filler and base material induces the migration of heavy metal ions, such as Cu2+ and Ni2+, into the potable water. The so-called liquid metal embrittlement, which takes place during the brazing process, may intensify the corrosion. The brazing filler infiltrates the stainless steel along the grain boundaries and causes an embrittlement. This paper deals with the determination of the grain boundary erosion dependent on the degree of deformation and heat treatment of the stainless steel AISI 316L.

  13. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  14. A Study of the Efficiency of High-strength, Steel, Cellular-core Sandwich Plates in Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Aldie E , Jr; Semonian, Joseph W

    1956-01-01

    Structural efficiency curves are presented for high-strength, stainless-steel, cellular-core sandwich plates of various proportions subjected to compressive end loads for temperatures of 80 F and 600 F. Optimum proportions of sandwich plates for any value of the compressive loading intensity can be determined from the curves. The efficiency of steel sandwich plates of optimum proportions is compared with the efficiency of solid plates of high-strength steel and aluminum and titanium alloys at the two temperatures.

  15. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    2004-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as σ and χ can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (σ + χ) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, σ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and χ by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by

  16. Nafion coated stainless steel for anti-biofilm application.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li Juan; Pang, Li Qing; Che, Li Ming; Wu, Xue E; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2013-11-01

    Biofilms can adhere to most surfaces and have caused a wide range of problems in various industrial processes as well as daily life activities. In this work, the anti-biofilm ability of Nafion-coated stainless steel surface was investigated and our results showed that stainless steel discs coated with 1% Nafion can significantly reduce E. coli adhesion. Nafion has a large amount of negatively charged sulphonate groups, and the findings of this study suggest that the negative surface charge can greatly reduce bacterial adhesion through increasing the electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged bacterial cells and Nafion coated stainless steel surface. The roughness of coated and uncoated stainless steel discs made no significant differences while the hydrophobic of the discs increased after coated with Nafion.

  17. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  19. Stainless-steel elbows formed by spin forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Large seamless austenitic stainless steel elbows are fabricated by spin forging /rotary shear forming/. A specially designed spin forging tool for mounting on a hydrospin machine has been built for this purpose.

  20. Systems design of high performance stainless steels II. Prototype characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. E.; Olson, G. B.

    2000-10-01

    Within the framework of a systems approach, the design of a high performance stainless steel integrated processing/structure/property/performance relations with mechanistic computational models. Using multicomponent thermodynamic and diffusion software platforms, the models were integrated to design a carburizable, secondary-hardening, martensitic stainless steel for advanced gear and bearing applications. Prototype evaluation confirmed the predicted martensitic transformation temperature and the desired carburizing and tempering responses, achieving a case hardness of R c 64 in the secondary-hardened condition without case primary carbides. Comparison with a commercial carburizing stainless steel demonstrated the advantage of avoiding primary carbides to resist quench cracking associated with a martensitic start temperature gradient reversal. Based on anodic polarization measurements and salt-spray testing, the prototype composition exhibited superior corrosion resistance in comparison to the 440C stainless bearing steel, which has a significantly higher alloy Cr concentration.

  1. Electrolytic etching process provides effective bonding surface on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Electrolytic etching process prepares surfaces of a stainless steel shell for reliable, high strength adhesive bonding to dielectric materials. The process uses a 25 percent aqueous solution of phosphoric acid.

  2. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  3. 27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF WASHINGTON, MISSOURI. VIEW LOOKING NORTH TOWARD VAULT OF THE TWELVE APOSTLES - Stone Hill Winery, 401 West Twelfth Street, Hermann, Gasconade County, MO

  4. Ultrasonics permits brazing complex stainless steel assembly without flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration of an assembly of stainless steel instrumentation tubes ensures brazing without flux. Vibration with an ultrasonic transducer permits the brazing material to flow down each tube in contact with a seal plug installed in a pressure vessel wall.

  5. Cavitation erosion of duplex and super duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.T.; Man, H.C.; Cheng, F.T.

    1998-10-05

    Owing to their excellent corrosion resistance, stainless steels are widely used both in the marine, urban water, chemical and food industries. In addition to the corrosive environment, high fluid flow speeds are always encountered for components used in these industries. The cavitation characteristics of S30400 and S31600 austenitic stainless steels and duplex stainless steels were studied in detail by a number of authors. It was generally agreed that S30400 has higher cavitation erosion resistance than that of S31600 due to higher tendency of strain induced martensitic transformation under high impulse of stress. A considerable number of results on stress corrosion cracking characteristics of SDSS and duplex stainless steels have been published but data concerning their cavitation erosion property are extremely rare.

  6. Corrosion fatigue of surgical stainless steel in synthetic physiological solution.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, J R; Holte, R N

    1981-03-01

    Fatigue tests conducted both in air and synthetic physiological solution show that the fatigue strength of surgical stainless steel in synthetic physiological solution is about 10% lower than the strength in air for a given endurance level. It is proposed that surgical stainless steel which is normally passive in physiological solution suffers corrosion fatigue because of susceptibility to crevice corrosion which occurs at extrusions and intrusions (crevices) on the surface thereby shortening the crack initiation time and the fatigue life.

  7. Measurement of intergranular attack in stainless steel using ultrasonic energy

    DOEpatents

    Mott, Gerry; Attaar, Mustan; Rishel, Rick D.

    1989-08-08

    Ultrasonic test methods are used to measure the depth of intergranular attack (IGA) in a stainless steel specimen. The ultrasonic test methods include a pitch-catch surface wave technique and a through-wall pulse-echo technique. When used in combination, these techniques can establish the extent of IGA on both the front and back surfaces of a stainless steel specimen from measurements made on only one surface.

  8. Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.

    1988-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

  9. Decomposition of energetic chemicals contaminated with iron or stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Chervin, Sima; Bodman, Glenn T; Barnhart, Richard W

    2006-03-17

    Contamination of chemicals or reaction mixtures with iron or stainless steel is likely to take place during chemical processing. If energetic and thermally unstable chemicals are involved in a manufacturing process, contamination with iron or stainless steel can impact the decomposition characteristics of these chemicals and, subsequently, the safety of the processes, and should be investigated. The goal of this project was to undertake a systematic approach to study the impact of iron or stainless steel contamination on the decomposition characteristics of different chemical classes. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the decomposition reaction by testing each chemical pure, and in mixtures with iron and stainless steel. The following classes of energetic chemicals were investigated: nitrobenzenes, tetrazoles, hydrazines, hydroxylamines and oximes, sulfonic acid derivatives and monomers. The following non-energetic groups were investigated for contributing effects: halogens, hydroxyls, amines, amides, nitriles, sulfonic acid esters, carbonyl halides and salts of hydrochloric acid. Based on the results obtained, conclusions were drawn regarding the sensitivity of the decomposition reaction to contamination with iron and stainless steel for the chemical classes listed above. It was demonstrated that the most sensitive classes are hydrazines and hydroxylamines/oximes. Contamination of these chemicals with iron or stainless steel not only destabilizes them, leading to decomposition at significantly lower temperatures, but also sometimes causes increased severity of the decomposition. The sensitivity of nitrobenzenes to contamination with iron or stainless steel depended upon the presence of other contributing groups: the presence of such groups as acid chlorides or chlorine/fluorine significantly increased the effect of contamination on decomposition characteristics of nitrobenzenes. The decomposition of sulfonic acid derivatives and tetrazoles

  10. An understanding of HSLA-65 plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, K.

    2006-02-01

    HSLA-65 plate steels can be produced using one of five plate manufacturing techniques: normalizing, controlled rolling (CR), controlled rolling followed by accelerated cooling (CR-AC), direct quenching and tempering (DQT), or conventional quenching and tempering (Q&T). The HSLA-65 steels are characterized by low carbon content and low alloy content, and they exhibit a low carbon equivalent that allows improved plate weldability. These characteristics in turn (a) provide the steel plate with a refined microstructure that ensures high strength and toughness; (b) eliminate or substantially reduce the need for preheating during welding; (c) resist susceptibility to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) when fusion (arc) welded using low heat-input conditions; and (d) depending on section thickness, facilitate high heat-input welding (about 2 kJ/mm) without significant loss of strength or toughness in the HAZ. However, application of this plate manufacturing process and of these controls produces significant differences in the metallurgical structure and range of mechanical properties of the HSLA-65 plate steels both among themselves and versus conventional higher strength steel (HSS) plates. For example, among the HSLA-65 plate steels, those produced by Q&T exhibit minimal variability in mechanical properties, especially in thicker plates. Besides variability in mechanical properties depending on plate thickness, the CR and CR-AC plate steels exhibit a relatively higher yield strength to ultimate tensile strength (YS/UTS) ratio than do DQT and Q&T steels. Such differences in processing and properties of HSLA-65 plate steels could potentially affect the selection and control of various secondary fabrication practices, including arc welding. Consequently, fabricators must exercise extreme caution when transferring allowable limits of certified secondary fabrication practices from one type of HSLA-65 plate steel to another, even for the

  11. Comparison of titanium and Robinson stainless steel stapes piston prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lippy, William H; Burkey, John M; Schuring, Arnold G; Berenholz, Leonard P

    2005-09-01

    Although stainless steel stapes prostheses have generally been considered magnetic resonance imaging safe, there is concern that this may change with the development of more powerful imaging systems. The objective of the study was to determine whether a titanium piston stapes prosthesis would be audiometrically and surgically equivalent to a Robinson stainless steel piston for stapedectomy. Retrospective chart review. Private otology practice. In all, 50 patients underwent stapedectomy with a Gyrus titanium piston prosthesis. These patients were matched on the basis of age and preoperative bone-conduction scores with patients who underwent stapedectomy with a Robinson stainless steel piston prosthesis. Audiometric results are analyzed, and surgical complications noted. There was no significant difference between groups in hearing improvement or postoperative air-bone gap. The mean four-frequency hearing improvement was 27.7 dB for the stainless steel group and 27.8 dB for the titanium group. The mean postoperative air-bone gap was 2.65 dB for the stainless steel group and 2.60 for the titanium group. Neither group had a surgical complication. The titanium stapes prosthesis is a good alternative to a stainless steel prosthesis.

  12. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  13. Performance of ferritic stainless steels for automobile muffler corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tarutani, Y.; Hashizume, T.

    1995-11-01

    Corrosion behavior of ferritic stainless steels was studied in artificial exhaust gas condensates containing corrosive ions such as Cl{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. Continuous immersion tests in flasks and Dip and Dry tests by using the alternate corrosion tester with a heating system clarified the effects of chromium and molybdenum additions on the corrosion resistance of a ferritic stainless steel in the artificial exhaust gas condensates. Effects of surface oxidation on the corrosion behavior were investigated in a temperature range of 573K to 673K. Oxidation of 673K reduced the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels in the artificial environment of the automobile muffler. Particulate matter deposited on the muffler inner shell from the automobile exhaust gas was also examined. Deposited particulate matter increased the corrosion rate of the ferritic stainless steel. Finally, the authors also investigated the corrosion of the automobile mufflers made of Type 436L ferritic stainless steel with 18% chromium-1.2% molybdenum after 24 months, in Japan. The sets of results clarified that Type 436L ferritic stainless steel as the material for the automobile muffler exhibited acceptable corrosion resistance.

  14. Low-temperature creep of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic deformation under constant load (creep) in austenitic stainless steels has been measured at temperatures ranging from 4 K to room temperature. Low-temperature creep data taken from past and unreported austenitic stainless steel studies are analyzed and reviewed. Creep at cryogenic temperatures of common austenitic steels, such as AISI 304, 310 316, and nitrogen-strengthened steels, such as 304HN and 3116LN, are included. Analyses suggests that logarithmic creep (creep strain dependent on the log of test time) best describe austenitic stainless steel behavior in the secondary creep stage and that the slope of creep strain versus log time is dependent on the applied stress/yield strength ratio. The role of cold work, strain-induced martensitic transformations, and stacking fault energy on low-temperature creep behavior is discussed. The engineering significance of creep on cryogenic structures is discussed in terms of the total creep strain under constant load over their operational lifetime at allowable stress levels.

  15. Microstructure, Properties and Weldability of Duplex Stainless Steel 2101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    The continuous development of duplex stainless steels (DSSs) is due to their excellent corrosion resistance in aggressive environments and their mechanical strength, which is usually twice of conventional austenitic stainless steels (ASSs). In this paper, a designed lean duplex stainless steel 2101, with the alloy design of reduced nickel content and increased additions of manganese and nitrogen, is studied by being partly compared with typical ASS 304L steels. The microstructure, mechanical properties, impact toughness, corrosion resistance and weldability of the designed DSS 2101 were conducted. The results demonstrated that both 2101 steel and its weldment show excellent mechanical properties, impact toughness and corrosion resistance, so DSS 2101 exhibits good comprehensive properties and can be used to replace 304L in numerous applications.

  16. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  17. The effect of stainless steel overlay cladding on corrosion fatigue crack propagation in pressure vessel steel in PWR primary coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Bramwell, I.L.; Tice, D.R.; Worswick, D.; Heys, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    The growth of sub-critical cracks in pressure boundary materials in light water reactors is assessed using codified procedures, but the presence of the overlay-welded stainless steel cladding on the pressure vessel is not normally taken into consideration because of the difficulty in demonstrating clad integrity for the lifetime of the plant. In order to investigate any possible effect of the cladding layer on crack propagation, tests have been performed using two types of specimen. The first was sputter ion plated with a thin layer of austenitic stainless steel to simulate the electrochemical and oxide effects due to the cladding, whilst the second used an overlay clad specimen to investigate the behavior of a crack propagating from the austenitic into the ferritic material. Testing was carried out under cyclic loading conditions in well controlled simulated PWR primary water. At 288 C, the presence of stainless steel in contact with the low alloy steel did not enhance crack propagation in PWR primary coolant compared to unclad or unplated specimens. There was limited evidence that at 288 C under certain loading conditions, in both air and PWR water, there may be an effect of the cladding which reduces crack growth rates, at least for a short distance of crack propagation into the low alloy steel. Crack growth rates in the ferritic steel at 130 C were higher for both the plated and clad specimens than found in previous tests under similar conditions on the unclad material. However, the crack growth rates were bounded by current ASME 11 Appendix A recommendations for defects exposed to water and at low R ratio. There was no evidence of environmental enhancement of crack propagation in the stainless steel in clad specimens. The results indicate that the current approach of ignoring the cladding for assessment purposes is conservative at plant operating temperature.

  18. Fabrication of stainless steel clad tubing. [gas pressure bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of producing stainless steel clad carbon steel tubing by a gas pressure bonding process was evaluated. Such a tube product could provide substantial chromium savings over monolithic stainless tubing in the event of a serious chromium shortage. The process consists of the initial assembly of three component tubesets from conventionally produced tubing, the formation of a strong metallurgical bond between the three components by gas pressure bonding, and conventional cold draw and anneal processing to final size. The quality of the tubes produced was excellent from the standpoint of bond strength, mechanical, and forming properties. The only significant quality problem encountered was carburization of the stainless clad by the carbon steel core which can be overcome by further refinement through at least three different approaches. The estimated cost of clad tubing produced by this process is greater than that for monolithic stainless tubing, but not so high as to make the process impractical as a chromium conservation method.

  19. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Powell, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  20. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  1. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C.

    2012-07-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  2. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  3. Micro-electrospray with stainless steel emitters.

    PubMed

    Shui, Wenqing; Yu, Yanling; Xu, Xuejiao; Huang, Zhenyu; Xu, Guobing; Yang, Pengyuan

    2003-01-01

    The physical processes underlying micro-electrospray (micro-ES) performance were investigated using a stainless steel (SS) emitter with a blunt tip. Sheathless micro-ES could be generated at a blunt SS tip without any tapering or sanding if ESI conditions were optimized. The Taylor cone was found to shrink around the inner diameter of the SS tubing, which permitted a low flow rate of 150 nL/min for sheathless microspray on the blunt tip (100 microm i.d. x 400 microm o.d.). It is believed that the wettability and/or hydrophobicity of SS tips are responsible for their micro-ES performance. The outlet orifice was further nipped to reduce the size of the spray cone and limit the flow rate to 50-150 nL/min, resulting in peptide detection down to attomole quantities consumed per spectrum. The SS emitter was also integrated into a polymethylmethacrylate microchip and demonstrated satisfactory performance in the analysis and identification of a myoglobin digest.

  4. Creep cavitation in 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.W.; Argon, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    Creep cavitation in 304 stainless steel at 0.5 T/sub m/ was investigated. Two specially developed techniques were used to study the nucleation and growth of grain-boundary cavities. It was found that cavities nucleated heterogeneously throughout the creep history and those observed were well in their growth stage. Comparison of these observations with the theory for cavity nucleation requires that a high interfacial stress be present. Experiments suggest that such stress concentrations are present in the early stages of boundary sliding, and in additional transients associated with intermittent sliding of boundaries throughout the creep life. It was found that microstructural variations such as those caused by twins which strongly affect initial particle densities on boundaries can alter cavitation behavior drastically. Our results also show that wedge cracks are the result of accelerated linking of growing cavities in the triple point region of stress concentration and are not a separate phenomenon. Furthermore, at higher strain rates growth of cavities can be accelerated by grain boundary sliding. Lastly, evidence is given to support the view that in engineering alloys which contain complex phas constitutents particularly along grain-boundaries, cavitation in long term service is likely to be caused by cavities nucleated in connection with a prior cold forming operation. 15 figures.

  5. Corrosion of stainless steel during acetate production

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, J.S.; Lester, G.C.

    1996-07-01

    Corrosion of types 304, 304L, 316, and 316L stainless steel (SS) during the esterification of acetic acid and alcohol or glycol ether was investigated. The catalyst for this reaction, sulfuric acid or para-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA), was shown to cause more corrosion on reactor equipment than CH{sub 3}COOH under the process conditions commonly practiced in industry. The corrosive action of the catalyst occurred only in the presence of water. Thus, for the batch processes, corrosion occurred mostly during the initial stage of esterification, where water produced by the reaction created an aqueous environment. After water was distilled off, the corrosion rate declined to a negligible value. The corrosion inhibitor copper sulfate, often used in industrial acetate processes, was found to work well for a low-temperature process (< 95 C) such as in production of butyl acetate, but it accelerated corrosion in the glycol ether acetate processes where temperatures were > 108 C. Process conditions that imparted low corrosion rates were determined.

  6. Characterization of stainless steel 304 tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J.; Brooks, M.A.; Kervin, J.E.

    1995-10-16

    Earlier studies have shown that stainless steel 304 (SS304) containing martensite is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. This generated concern regarding the structural integrity of SS304 tubing we use in the W87 pit tube. During surveillance operations, the pit tube undergoes a series of bending and straightening as it goes through a number of surveillance cycles. This motivated the study to characterize austenitic SS304 tubing obtained from Rocky Flats. The tubes continued to display structural soundness even after numerous repeated bending and straightening cycles. The minimum and maximum number of bends to failure occurred after 13 and 16 cycles, respectively. After 5 bends, both the inner and outer surfaces of the tubing showed no microcracks. When the bent tubing samples were pressurized and tested using deuterium at 74{degrees}C and at {approximately}78{degrees}C, they failed away from the bent area. Thus deuterium embrittlement of the bent SS304 tubing should not be a problem. Moreover, to increase our 95% confidence level to 5 bends, we are planning to perform at least four additional bends to failure tests.

  7. Hybrid Laser-arc Welding of 17-4 PH Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Sreshta, Harold; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-06-01

    17-4 PH stainless steel has wide applications in severe working conditions due to its combination of good corrosion resistance and high strength. The weldability of 17-4 PH stainless steel is challenging. In this work, hybrid laser-arc welding was developed to weld 17-4 PH stainless steel. This method was chosen based on its advantages, such as deep weld penetration, less filler materials, and high welding speed. The 17-4 PH stainless steel plates with a thickness of 19 mm were successfully welded in a single pass. During the hybrid welding, the 17-4 PH stainless steel was immensely susceptible to porosity and solidification cracking. The porosity was avoided by using nitrogen as the shielding gas. The nitrogen stabilized the keyhole and inhibited the formation of bubbles during welding. Solidification cracking easily occurred along the weld centerline at the root of the hybrid laser-arc welds. The microstructural evolution and the cracking susceptibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel were investigated to remove these centerline cracks. The results showed that the solidification mode of the material changed due to high cooling rate at the root of the weld. The rapid cooling rate caused the transformation from ferrite to austenite during the solidification stage. The solidification cracking was likely formed as a result of this cracking-susceptible microstructure and a high depth/width ratio that led to a high tensile stress concentration. Furthermore, the solidification cracking was prevented by preheating the base metal. It was found that the preheating slowed the cooling rate at the root of the weld, and the ferrite-to-austenite transformation during the solidification stage was suppressed. Delta ferrite formation was observed in the weld bead as well no solidification cracking occurred by optimizing the preheating temperature.

  8. Engineering study for a melting, casting, rolling and fabrication facility for recycled contaminated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    This Preliminary Report is prepared to study the facilities required for recycling contaminated stainless steel scrap into plate which will be fabricated into boxes suitable for the storage of contaminated wastes and rubble. The study is based upon the underlying premise that the most cost effective way to produce stainless steel is to use the same processes employed by companies now in production of high quality stainless steel. Therefore, the method selected for this study for the production of stainless steel plate from scrap is conventional process using an Electric Arc Furnace for meltdown to hot metal, a Continuous Caster for production of cast slabs, and a Reversing Hot Mill for rolling the slabs into plate. The fabrication of boxes from the plate utilizes standard Shears, Punch Presses and welding equipment with Robotic Manipulators. This Study presumes that all process fumes, building dusts and vapors will be cycled through a baghouse and a nuclear grade HEPA filter facility prior to discharge. Also, all process waste water will be evaporated into the hot flue gas stream from the furnace utilizing a quench tank; so there will be no liquid discharges from the facility and all vapors will be processed through a HEPA filter. Even though HEPA filters are used today in controlling radioactive contamination from nuclear facilities there is a sparsity of data concerning radioactivity levels and composition of waste that may be collected from contaminated scrap steel processing. This report suggests some solutions to these problems but it is recommended that additional study must be given to these environmental problems.

  9. Stainless steel tube-based cell cryopreservation containers.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wei-Hung; Yu, Zong-Yan; Wu, Wei-Te

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on increasing the freezing rate in cell vitrification cryopreservation by using a cryopreservation container possessing rigid mechanical properties and high heat-transfer efficiency. Applying a fast freezing rate in vitrification cryopreservation causes a rapid temperature change in the cryopreservation container and has a substantial impact on mechanical properties; therefore, a highly rigid cryopreservation container that possesses a fast freezing rate must be developed. To produce a highly rigid cryopreservation container possessing superior heat transfer efficiency, this study applies an electrochemical machining (ECM) method to an ANSI 316L stainless steel tube to treat the surface material by polishing and roughening, thereby increasing the freezing rate and reducing the probability of ice crystal formation. The results indicated that the ECM method provided high-quality surface treatment of the stainless steel tube. This method can reduce internal surface roughness in the stainless steel tube, thereby reducing the probability of ice crystal formation, and increase external surface roughness, consequently raising convection heat-transfer efficiency. In addition, by thinning the stainless steel tube, this method reduces heat capacity and thermal resistance, thereby increasing the freezing rate. The freezing rate (3399 ± 197 °C/min) of a stainless steel tube after interior and exterior polishing and exterior etching by applying ECM compared with the freezing rate (1818 ± 54 °C/min) of an original stainless steel tube was increased by 87%, which also exceeds the freezing rate (2015 ± 49 °C/min) of an original quartz tube that has a 20% lower heat capacity. However, the results indicated that increasing heat-transferring surface areas and reducing heat capacities cannot effectively increase the freezing rate of a stainless steel tube if only one method is applied; instead, both techniques must be implemented concurrently to improve the

  10. Machinability of a Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Discharge Microdrilling

    SciTech Connect

    Coteata, Margareta; Pop, Nicolae; Slatineanu, Laurentiu; Schulze, Hans-Peter; Besliu, Irina

    2011-05-04

    Due to the chemical elements included in their structure for ensuring an increased resistance to the environment action, the stainless steels are characterized by a low machinability when classical machining methods are applied. For this reason, sometimes non-traditional machining methods are applied, one of these being the electrochemical discharge machining. To obtain microholes and to evaluate the machinability by electrochemical discharge microdrilling, test pieces of stainless steel were used for experimental research. The electrolyte was an aqueous solution of sodium silicate with different densities. A complete factorial plan was designed to highlight the influence of some input variables on the sizes of the considered machinability indexes (electrode tool wear, material removal rate, depth of the machined hole). By mathematically processing of experimental data, empirical functions were established both for stainless steel and carbon steel. Graphical representations were used to obtain more suggestive vision concerning the influence exerted by the considered input variables on the size of the machinability indexes.

  11. Stress Relaxation in Tensile Deformation of 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Li, Jiaojiao; Ding, Wei; Zhao, Shuangjun; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Improved ductility by stress relaxation has been reported in different kinds of steels. The influence of stress relaxation and its parameters on the ductility of 304 stainless steel has not been established so far. Stress relaxation behavior during tensile tests at different strain rates is studied in 304 stainless steel. It is observed that stress relaxation can obviously increase the elongation of 304 stainless steel in all cases. The elongation improvement of interrupted tension reaches to 14.9% compared with monotonic tension at 0.05 s-1. Contradicting with the published results, stress drop during stress relaxation increases with strain at all strain rates. It is related with dislocation motion velocity variation and martensitic transformation.

  12. Enhancement of Stainless Steel's Mechanical Properties via Carburizing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Alias, S. K.; Abdullah, B.; Hafiz Mohd Bakri, Mohd.; Hafizuddin Jumadin, Muhammad; Mat Shah, Muhammad Amir

    2016-11-01

    Carburizing process is a method to disperse carbon into the steel surface in order to enhance its mechanical properties such as hardness and wear resistance. This paper study investigates the effect of carburizing temperature to the carbon dispersion layer in stainless steel. The standard AISI 304 stainless steel was carburized in two different temperatures which were 900°C and 950°C. The effect of carbon dispersion layers were observed and the results indicated that the increasing value of the average dispersion layer from 1.30 mm to 2.74 mm thickness was found to be related to increment of carburizing holding temperature . The increment of carbon thickness layer also resulted in improvement of hardness and tensile strength of carburized stainless steel.

  13. Mechanical characteristics of welded joints between different stainless steels grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of mechanical characteristics of welded joints is one of the most important tasks that allow determining their functional properties. Due to the very high, still rising, cost of some stainless steels it is justified, on economic grounds, welding austenitic stainless steel with steels that are corrosion-resistant like duplex ones. According to forecasts the price of corrosion resistant steels stil can increase by 26 ÷ 30%. For technical reasons welded joints require appropriate mechanical properties such as: tensile strength, bending, ductility, toughness, and resistance to aggressive media. Such joints are applied in the construction of chemical tankers, apparatus and chemical plants and power steam stations. Using the proper binder makes possible the welds directly between the elements of austenitic stainless steels and duplex ones. It causes that such joits behave satisfactorily in service in such areas like maritime constructions and steam and chemical plants. These steels have high mechanical properties such as: the yield strength, the tensile strength and the ductility as well as the resistance to general corrosion media. They are resistant to both pitting and stress corrosions. The relatively low cost of production of duplex steels, in comparison with standard austenitic steels, is inter alia, the result of a reduced amount of scarce and expensive Nickel, which is seen as a further advantage of these steels.

  14. Magnetic properties of stainless steels at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Paul; Goodell, Jennifer; Molt, Robert

    2009-07-01

    The magnetic properties of ten types of ferritic and martensitic stainless steels have been measured at room temperature and at 77 K. The steel samples studied were in the annealed state as received from the manufacturer. Our room temperature measurements indicate significantly harder magnetic properties than those quoted in the ASM International Handbook, which studied fully annealed stainless steel samples. Despite having harder magnetic properties than fully annealed steels some of the as-received steels still display soft magnetic properties adequate for magnetic applications. The carbon content of the steels was found to affect the permeability and coercive force, with lower-carbon steels displaying significantly higher permeability and lower coercive force. The decrease in coercive force with reduced carbon content is attributed to fewer carbide inclusions which inhibit domain wall motion. Cooling to 77 K resulted in harder magnetic properties. Averaged over the ten steels tested the maximum permeability decreased by 8%, the coercive force increased by 14%, and the residual and saturation flux densities increased by 4% and 3%, respectively. The change in coercive force when cooled is comparable to the theoretical prediction for iron, based on a model of domain wall motion inhibited by inclusions. The modest changes of the magnetic properties indicate that the stainless steels can still be used in magnetic applications at very low temperatures.

  15. [Restoration of composite on etched stainless steel crowns. (1)].

    PubMed

    Goto, G; Zang, Y; Hosoya, Y

    1990-01-01

    Object of investigation The retention of composite resin to etched stainless steel crowns was tested as a possible method for restoring primary anterior teeth. Method employed 1) SEM observation Stainless steel crowns (Sankin Manufacture Co.) were etched with an aqua resia to create surface roughness and undercut to retain the composite resin to the crowns. Etching times were 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 20 minutes, then washed in a 70% alcohol solution using an ultrasonic washer and dried. A total of 96 etched samples and non etched control samples were observed through the scanning electron microscope (Hitachi 520). 2) Shear bond strength test Stainless steel crowns were etched in an aqua resia from 1 to 20 minutes, then washed and dried. Composite resin (Photo Clearfil A, Kuraray Co.) with the bonding agent was placed on the crowns and the shear bond strength was tested in 56 samples using an Autograph (DCS-500, Shimazu). Results 1) SEM observation showed that the etching surface of stainless steel crowns created surface roughness and undercut. The most desirable surface was obtained in the 3 to 5 minute etching time specimens. 2) The highest bond strength was obtained in a 3 minute etching specimen. It was 42.12 MPa, although 29.26 MPa in mean value. Conclusion Etching with an aqua resia increased the adherence of composite resin to the surface of stainless steel crowns.

  16. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  17. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; dos Santos Pires, Ana Clarissa; Queiroz Fialho Júnior, José Felício; Lelis, Carini Aparecida; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. In addition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The preconditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry. PMID:24031951

  18. Aging of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1984-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are evaluated to determine the expected embrittlement of cast components during the operating lifetime of reactors and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. This presentation describes the status of the program. Data for the metallurgical characterization of the various cast stainless steels used in the investigation are presented. Charpy impact tests on short-term aged material indicate that CF-3 stainless steels are less susceptible to embrittlement than CF-8 or CF-8M stainless steels. Microstructural characterization of cast stainless steels that were obtained from Georg Fischer Co. and aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400/sup 0/C reveals the formation of four different types of precipitates that are not ..cap alpha..'. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase is primarily due to pinning of the dislocations by two of these precipitates, designated as Type M and Type X. The ferrite phase is embrittled after approx. 8 y at 300/sup 0/C and shows cleavage fracture. Examination of the fracture surfaces of the impact-test specimens indicates that the toughness of the long-term aged material is determined by the austenite phase. 8 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch. Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  20. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mabruri, Efendi Anwar, Moch Syaiful Prifiharni, Siska Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-04-19

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  1. Aluminum and stainless steel tubes joined by simple ring and welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townhill, A.

    1967-01-01

    Duranel ring is used to join aluminum and stainless steel tubing. Duranel is a bimetal made up of roll-bonded aluminum and stainless steel. This method of joining the tubing requires only two welding operations.

  2. Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on 4340 Steel Substrate for Aircraft Landing Gear Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4149 EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR...March 2010 – 01 March 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR...Code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on

  3. Effects of simulated inflammation on the corrosion of 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Emily K; Brooks, Richard P; Ehrensberger, Mark T

    2017-02-01

    Stainless steel alloys, including 316L, find use in orthopaedics, commonly as fracture fixation devices. Invasive procedures involved in the placement of these devices will provoke a local inflammatory response that produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and an acidic environment surrounding the implant. This study assessed the influence of a simulated inflammatory response on the corrosion of 316L stainless steel. Samples were immersed in an electrolyte representing either normal or inflammatory physiological conditions. After 24h of exposure, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICPMS) were used to evaluate differences in corrosion behavior and ion release induced by the inflammatory conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate surface morphology and corrosion products formed on the sample surface. Inflammatory conditions, involving the presence of H2O2 and an acidic pH, significantly alter the corrosion processes of 316L stainless steel, promoting aggressive and localized corrosion. It is demonstrated that particular consideration should be given to 316L stainless steel implants with crevice susceptible areas (ex. screw-head/plate interface), as those areas may have an increased probability of rapid and aggressive corrosion when exposed to inflammatory conditions.

  4. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Stainless Steel Components

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, William H.; Lou, Xiaoyuan; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Webber, David

    2016-09-01

    This collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric Company aimed to evaluate the mechanical properties, microstructure, and porosity of the additively manufactured 316L stainless steel by ORNL’s Renishaw AM250 machine for nuclear application. The program also evaluated the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of the same material in high temperature water environments. Results show the properties of this material to be similar to the properties of 316L stainless steel fabricated additively with equipment from other manufacturers with slightly higher porosity. The stress corrosion crack growth rate is similar to that for wrought 316L stainless steel for an oxygenated high temperature water environment and slightly higher for a hydrogenated high temperature water environment. Optimized heat treatment of this material is expected to improve performance in high temperature water environments.

  5. Practical handbook of stainless steels and nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, S.

    1999-07-01

    This new handbook is an up-to-date technical guide to the grades, properties, fabrication characteristics, and applications of stainless steels and nickel alloys. The individual chapters were written by industry experts and focus on the key properties and alloy characteristics important in material selection and specification as well as the practical factors that influence the development and application of these materials. The contents include: alloy grades and their welding and fabrication characteristics and their application; monel metal; iron-based and nickel-based alloys; ferritic, austenitic, superaustenitic, and martensitic stainless steels; hastelloys; alloys 20, G, and 825; AOD and new refining technology; duplex stainless steels; 6-Mo alloys; corrosion-resistant castings; specification cross-reference tables; trade names; hardness conversions; list of common abbreviations.

  6. Wastewater minimization at a stainless steel manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward-Browne, A.; Ackroyd, D.S.; Dave, B.B.

    1996-08-01

    As the environmental regulations associated with discharging water from industrial installations become increasingly more stringent and water in some areas becomes more scarce, water costs, both for purchase and disposal, become increasingly more expensive. So the importance of reusing and recycling water is heightened. This paper investigates the desire of a stainless steel manufacturing plant to improve the final product surface quality. Simple upgrading of the once-through rinsing process would have presented operational problems for the on-site effluent treatment plant and exceeded site discharge limits. A more innovative approach was sought. Explained are the stages taken to audit the plant, the initial work in proposing water recycle options and a computer modeling methodology for predicting water chemistry and economics. In conclusion, the stainless steel manufacturer discusses the implementation of the recycle project. Not only are the operational demands met, but the recycle option actually provides a return on investment to the stainless steel manufacturer rather than an additional cost.

  7. Qualification of large diameter duplex stainless steel girth welds intended for low temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, K.; Robinson, A.G.; Rogers, P.F.

    1996-12-31

    British Gas recently had a requirement to fabricate some UNS31803 duplex stainless steel pipework for an offshore topsides process plant. The pipework had a maximum diameter of 600mm, with a corresponding wall thickness of 18mm, and it was designed to operate at a minimum temperature of {minus}40 C. There is a lack of published toughness data for girth welds in duplex stainless steel at this thickness and minimum design temperature. Additionally, toughness requirements for girth welds in current pipework and pressure vessel codes are based on experience with carbon steels. As a result, a program of work has been carried out to study the Charpy, CTOD and wide plate toughness of girth welds in 22%Cr duplex stainless steel pipework. The welds were produced using a typical gas tungsten arc/gas metal arc pipework fabrication procedure. In addition, non-destructive evaluation trials have been carried out on a deliberately defective weld using radiography and ultrasonics. It was demonstrated that double wall single image {gamma}-radiography, single wall single image and panoramic X-radiography, and conventional shear wave ultrasonics were all able to detect planar root defects varying from 3 to 7mm in depth. There was good agreement between the sizes recorded by ultrasonics and those measured from macrosections. Small scale mechanical tests demonstrated that welds with overmatching tensile properties, and low temperature toughness properties which were acceptable to specification, could be produced. Wide plate tests demonstrated that defect size calculations from BS PD7493 were conservative.

  8. Study of electroless Ni-W-P alloy coating on martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitasari, Arini; Mabruri, Efendi

    2016-04-01

    Electroless nickel phospor (Ni-P) is widely used in many industries due to their corrosion and wear resistance, coating uniformity, and ability to coat non-conductive surfaces. The unique properties of tungsten such as high hardness, higher melting point, lower coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and high tensile strength have created a lot of interest in developing ternary Ni-W-P alloys. This article presents the study of electroless Ni-W-P alloys coating using acid or alkaline bath on martensitic stainless steel. Nickel sulfate and sodium tungstate were used as nickel and tungsten sources, respectively, and sodium hypophosphite was used as a reducing agent. Acid or alkaline bath refer to bath pH condition was adjusted by adding sulfuric acid. Martensitic stainless steel was immersed in Ni-W-P bath for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The substrate of martensitic stainless steel was subjected to pre-treatment (polishing and cleaning) and activation prior to electroless plating. The plating characteristics were investigated for concentration ratio of nickel and hypophosphite (1:3), sodium tungstate concentration 0,1 M, immersion time (15 min, 30 min, 60 min), and bath condition (acid, alkaline). The electroless Ni-W-P plating was heat treated at 400°C for 1 hour. Deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and corrosion measurement system (CMS).

  9. Study of electroless Ni-W-P alloy coating on martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitasari, Arini Mabruri, Efendi

    2016-04-19

    Electroless nickel phospor (Ni-P) is widely used in many industries due to their corrosion and wear resistance, coating uniformity, and ability to coat non-conductive surfaces. The unique properties of tungsten such as high hardness, higher melting point, lower coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and high tensile strength have created a lot of interest in developing ternary Ni-W-P alloys. This article presents the study of electroless Ni-W-P alloys coating using acid or alkaline bath on martensitic stainless steel. Nickel sulfate and sodium tungstate were used as nickel and tungsten sources, respectively, and sodium hypophosphite was used as a reducing agent. Acid or alkaline bath refer to bath pH condition was adjusted by adding sulfuric acid. Martensitic stainless steel was immersed in Ni-W-P bath for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The substrate of martensitic stainless steel was subjected to pre-treatment (polishing and cleaning) and activation prior to electroless plating. The plating characteristics were investigated for concentration ratio of nickel and hypophosphite (1:3), sodium tungstate concentration 0,1 M, immersion time (15 min, 30 min, 60 min), and bath condition (acid, alkaline). The electroless Ni-W-P plating was heat treated at 400°C for 1 hour. Deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and corrosion measurement system (CMS).

  10. Development of ion-plated aluminide diffusion coatings for thermal cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion protection of a nickel-based superalloy and a stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsawy, Abdel Raouf

    This project was carried out at the University of Toronto and Cametoid Ltd of Whitby, Ontario. Ohno continuous casting; a novel net shape casting technique, was used to generate, Al-Y, Al-Ce, Al-La, and Al-Si-Y, in form of 1.6 to 1.7 mm diameter alloy wires. These alloy wires exhibited suitable properties for use as feed materials to an Ion Vapor Deposition facility. The deposition parameters were optimized to provide coatings with a compact and cohesive columnar structure with reduced porosity and diffusion barriers that were essential to ensure the success of the diffusion process in the subsequent stage. Solid-state diffusion heat treatment processes were developed in order to form the stable aluminide phases, AlNi and FeAl, on IN738 and S310 substrates, respectively. Experiments simulating the coating service conditions and environments encountered during the prospective aerospace and fuel cell applications were conducted to evaluate the performance of each aluminide coating developed during this study. Thermal cyclic oxidation and molten sulfate corrosion studies were performed on coated IN738 pins at 1050°C and 900°C, respectively, simulating the service environment of turbine engine blades and other hot section components. Molten carbonate corrosion behavior was investigated for coated S310 coupons that were immersed in, or covered with a thin film of molten carbonate, at 650°C, in air plus 30%CO2, to simulate the operating conditions of the cathode-side separator plates of molten carbonate fuel cells. The behavior of the reactive elements, yttrium, cerium, lanthanum, and silicon in enhancing the adhesion of the protective aluminum oxide scale was determined by weight variation experiments, structural examination and compositional analysis. The influence of the base material elements, nickel, chromium, and iron, on the formation of protective oxides was investigated. All coatings were found to provide significant improvement for thermal cyclic oxidation

  11. Comparative study of the wear of UHMWPE with zirconia ceramic and stainless steel femoral heads in artificial hip joints.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, B; Fisher, J; Dowson, D; Hardaker, C; Brummitt, K

    1994-05-01

    The wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) when sliding against zirconia ceramic and stainless steel counterfaces has been compared in a pin-on-plate reciprocator and in a hip joint simulator. A lower wear factor was found for the UHMWPE when sliding on the zirconia ceramic counterfaces in the pin-on-plate tests. In the hip joint simulator test, the acetabular cups articulating on zirconia heads showed consistently lower volume changes than the cups articulating on stainless steel heads. The higher volume changes found with the stainless steel heads were associated with an increased roughness of the femoral heads during the tests. This roughening was caused by the adherence of a rough polymer transfer film.

  12. Radiation embrittlement of manganese-stabilized martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1986-12-01

    Fractographic examination has been performed on selected Charpy specimens of manganese stabilized martensitic stainless steels in order to identify the cause of irradiation embrittlement. Embrittlement was found to be partly due to enhanced failure at grain boundaries arising from precipitation. Microstructural examination of a specimen irradiated at higher temperature has demonstrated the presence of Fe-Cr-Mn chi phase, a body centered cubic intermetallic phase known to cause embrittlement. This work indicated that manganese stabilized martensitic stainless steels are prone to intermetallic phase formation which is detrimental to mechanical properties.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  14. Isothermal and Cyclic Aging of 310S Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrens, Coralie; Lacaze, Jacques; Malard, Benoit; Dupain, Jean-Luc; Poquillon, Dominique

    2017-06-01

    Unusual damage and high creep strain rates have been observed on components made of 310S stainless steel subjected to thermal cycles between room temperature and 1143 K (870 °C). Microstructural characterization of such components after service evidenced high contents in sigma phase which formed first from δ-ferrite and then from γ-austenite. To get some insight into this microstructural evolution, isothermal and cyclic aging of 310S stainless steel has been studied experimentally and discussed on the basis of numerical simulations. The higher contents of sigma phase observed after cyclic agings than after isothermal treatments are clearly associated with nucleation triggered by thermal cycling.

  15. Comparison of carbon fiber and stainless steel root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Payne, J A

    1996-02-01

    This in vitro study compared physical properties of root canal posts made of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy resin with those of stainless steel posts. Three-point bending tests were used to derive the transverse modulus of elasticity of the posts. Resin composite cores on the posts were subjected to tensile forces to test the bonds between the cores and posts. Carbon fiber posts appeared to have adequate rigidity for their designed purpose. The bond strength of the resin composite cores to the carbon fiber posts was significantly less than that to the stainless steel posts.

  16. Passive Films Formed on Stainless Steels in Phosphate Buffer Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Claudia Marcela; Burgos, Rodrigo Elvio; Bruera, Florencia; Ares, Alicia Esther

    The behaviour of passive films formed on directionally solidified stainless steels, 18Cr10N2Mo0.08C, 18Cr14N8Mo0.03C and 18Cr10Ni8Mo0.08C, in different areas that were formed during solidification (columnar, columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) and equiaxed) was studied using electrochemical testing in Na2HPO4 with / without NaCl. The behavior of stainless steel in the presence of phosphate chlorides is the best compared to non-chloride phosphate.

  17. Corrosion evaluation of stainless steel root weld shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Gorog, M.; Sawyer, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of five shielding methods for gas tungsten arc root pass welds, on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was evaluated in two laboratory solutions. The first experiment was performed in 6% ferric chloride solution, a test designed to corrode stainless steel. The second experiment was performed in a simulated paper machine white water solution that contained hydrogen peroxide. Argon shielding produced excellent results by maintaining corrosion resistance in both solutions. Nitrogen purging and flux coated TIG rod techniques produced variable results. Paste fluxes and welding without shielding are not recommended for root protection. They performed very poorly with the welds corroding in both tests.

  18. The use of titanium and stainless steel in fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J S; Richards, R G

    2010-11-01

    The use of metal in fracture fixation has demonstrated unrivalled success for many years owing to its high stiffness, strength, biological toleration and overall reliable function. The most prominent materials used are electropolished stainless steel and commercially pure titanium, along with the more recent emergence of titanium alloys. Despite the many differences between electropolished stainless steel and titanium, both materials provide a relatively predictable clinical outcome, and offer similar success for fulfilling the main biomechanical and biological requirements of fracture fixation despite distinctive differences in implant properties and biological responses. This article explores these differences by highlighting the limitations and advantages of both materials, and addresses how this translates to clinical success.

  19. Microstructure and texture of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haitao Bi Hongyun; Li Xin; Xu Zhou

    2008-12-15

    The microstructure, texture and grain boundary character distribution of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The addition of alloying elements such as Ti and Nb to ferritic stainless steel causes the formation of TiN, NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb. The textures of cold rolled samples were dominated by the {alpha}-fiber, while the textures of annealed samples exhibit a very strong {gamma}-fiber. The changes in texture are closely related to the grain boundary characteristics.

  20. Calculations of Stainless Steel-Aluminum Alloy Clad Forming Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Peng

    Base on the Hosford's higher order yield criteria, the forming limit diagram of clad was developed with M-K theory at the positive strain ratio. The relationship of forming limit with thickness ratio, thickness irregular coefficient and the exponent of yield function were analyzed. The result show that the forming limit of clad material is between those of its component materials, and increases with the rising of stainless steel thickness ratio and the thickness irregular coefficient. So the forming limit can be improved by increase the stainless steel thickness ratio and improve the surface condition of the clad materials.

  1. Ozone decay on stainless steel and sugarcane bagasse surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza-Corrêa, Jorge A.; Oliveira, Carlos; Amorim, Jayr

    2013-07-01

    Ozone was generated using dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure to treat sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production. It was shown that interaction of ozone molecules with the pretreatment reactor wall (stainless steel) needs to be considered during bagasse oxidation in order to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. The decomposition coefficients for ozone on both materials were determined to be (3.3 ± 0.2) × 10-8 for stainless steel and (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-7 for bagasse. The results have indicated that ozone decomposition has occurred more efficiently on the biomass material.

  2. 78 FR 4383 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty... the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (SSB) from Brazil. The period of review (POR) is... Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil'' dated concurrently with this...

  3. 76 FR 76437 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record... revocation of the antidumping duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan would... Publication 4280 (December 2011), entitled Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe from Korea and...

  4. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  5. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  6. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  7. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  8. 77 FR 39735 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines Determination On the basis...)), that revocation of the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings From Italy... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4337 (June 2012), entitled Stainless Steel...

  9. 77 FR 3231 - Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY: Import Administration... antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel wire rods from India would likely lead to continuation or... reviews of the antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel wire rods (``wire rods'') from...

  10. 77 FR 60673 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping...'') preliminarily determines that drawn stainless steel sinks (``drawn sinks'') from the People's Republic of China... unfinished, regardless of type of finish, gauge, or grade of stainless steel. Mounting clips,...

  11. 77 FR 39467 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty... the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from India. The review..., 2012, the Department published Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results and...

  12. 78 FR 7395 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty... the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (SSB) from India. The period of review (POR) is... Review: Stainless Steel Bar from India'' dated concurrently with this notice (``Preliminary...

  13. 77 FR 18211 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Initiation...'') petition concerning imports of drawn stainless steel sinks from the People's Republic of China (``PRC... Antidumping and Countervailing Duties Against Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from the People's Republic of...

  14. 76 FR 18518 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip in Coils From Mexico: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip in Coils From Mexico: Rescission of... stainless steel sheet and strip in coils from Mexico. The period of review is July 1, 2009, through June 30... American Stainless, and AK Steel Corporation (collectively ``petitioners''), we are now rescinding...

  15. 76 FR 31585 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... International Trade Administration Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of... stainless steel flanges from India. The period of review is February 1, 2010, through January 22, 2011... stainless steel flanges from India. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or...

  16. 75 FR 39663 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... of its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil... results of its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar...

  17. 75 FR 67689 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty... antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil. The review covers one producer/ exporter of... Department published in the Federal Register an antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar...

  18. The Cold Gas-Dynamic Spray and Characterization of Microcrystalline Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    DYNAMIC SPRAY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROCRYSTALLINE AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL by Jonathan F. Schiel September 2014 Thesis Advisor: Luke...MICROCRYSTALLINE AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL 5. FUNDING NUMBERS DWAM31009 6. AUTHOR(S) Jonathan F. Schiel 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...spray process applied to the deposition of stainless steel coatings. Cold spray deposition is a relatively new process utilized to create corrosion

  19. 75 FR 32503 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From Italy, Japan, Korea, Spain, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From Italy, Japan, Korea, Spain, and Taiwan Determinations On the basis...)), that revocation of the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel wire rod from Italy, Japan, Korea... contained in USITC Publication 4154 (May 2010), entitled Stainless Steel Wire Rod from Italy, Japan, Korea...

  20. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... 564 (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. SUMMARY: The... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead to...

  1. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan AGENCY... Korea and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, Japan... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and...

  2. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure pipe... injured or threatened with material injury by reason of LTFV imports of welded stainless steel...

  3. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  4. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burstein, G T; Hutchings, I M; Sasaki, K

    2000-10-19

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase transformation occurs that causes significant changes in the bulk and surface mechanical properties of the alloy. This martensitic phase can also be generated in stainless-steel surfaces by cathodic charging, as a consequence of lattice strain generated by absorbed hydrogen. Heat treatment of the steel to temperatures of several hundred degrees can result in loss of the martensitic structure, but this alters the bulk properties of the alloy. Here we show that martensitic structures in stainless steel can be removed by appropriate electrochemical treatment in aqueous solutions at much lower temperature than conventional annealing treatments. This electrochemically induced annealing process allows the hardness of cold-worked stainless steels to be maintained, while eliminating the brittle martensitic phase from the surface. Using this approach, we are able to anneal the surface and near-surface regions of specimens that contain rolling-induced martensite throughout their bulk, as well as those containing surface martensite induced by grinding. Although the origin of the electrochemical annealing process still needs further clarification, we expect that this treatment will lead to further development in enhancing the surface properties of metals.

  5. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstein, G. T.; Hutchings, I. M.; Sasaki, K.

    2000-10-01

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase transformation occurs that causes significant changes in the bulk and surface mechanical properties of the alloy. This martensitic phase can also be generated in stainless-steel surfaces by cathodic charging, as a consequence of lattice strain generated by absorbed hydrogen. Heat treatment of the steel to temperatures of several hundred degrees can result in loss of the martensitic structure, but this alters the bulk properties of the alloy. Here we show that martensitic structures in stainless steel can be removed by appropriate electrochemical treatment in aqueous solutions at much lower temperature than conventional annealing treatments. This electrochemically induced annealing process allows the hardness of cold-worked stainless steels to be maintained, while eliminating the brittle martensitic phase from the surface. Using this approach, we are able to anneal the surface and near-surface regions of specimens that contain rolling-induced martensite throughout their bulk, as well as those containing surface martensite induced by grinding. Although the origin of the electrochemical annealing process still needs further clarification, we expect that this treatment will lead to further development in enhancing the surface properties of metals.

  6. No genotoxicity of a new nickel-free stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, L; Cervellati, M; Campoccia, D; Prati, C; Breschi, L; Arciola, C R

    2005-01-01

    Stainless steel is a metallic alloy largely employed in orthopedics, maxillofacial surgery and orthodontic therapy. However, the presence in its composition of a high quantity of nickel, an agent known to trigger toxic, allergic and cancerogenous responses in humans, is cause of some concern. In this study, we have investigated the in vitro mutagenicity and genotoxicity of a new nickel-free stainless steel, namely P558, in comparison to the conventional stainless steel AISI 316L. The cytogenetic effects were evaluated by studying the frequency of Sister Chromatid Exchanges (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations. Ames test was performed to detect the mutagenic activity. Both P558 and AISI 316L did not cause any significant increase in the average number of SCE and in chromosomal aberrations, either with or without metabolic activation. Furthermore, the Ames test showed that the extracts of both P558 and of AISI 316L are not mutagenic. Overall, these findings prove that P558 is devoid of genotoxicity and mutagenicity. The present results, together with other previous interesting observations that P558 promotes osseointegration, suggest that this new nickel-free stainless steel can represent a better alternative to other conventional steel alloys.

  7. Bactericidal behavior of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Ma, Yong; Lin, Naiming; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Stainless steels are one of the most common materials used in health care environments. However, the lack of antibacterial advantage has limited their use in practical application. In this paper, antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different Cu contents have been prepared by plasma surface alloying technology (PSAT). The steel surface with Cu content 90 wt.% (Cu-SS) exhibits strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) within 3 h. Although the Cu-containing surface with Cu content 2.5 wt.% (CuNi-SS) can also kill all tested bacteria, this process needs 12 h. SEM observation of the bacterial morphology and an agarose gel electrophoresis were performed to study the antibacterial mechanism of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces against E. coli. The results indicated that Cu ions are released when the Cu-containing surfaces are in contact with bacterial and disrupt the cell membranes, killing the bacteria. The toxicity of Cu-alloyed surfaces does not cause damage to the bacterial DNA. These results provide a scientific explanation for the antimicrobial applications of Cu-containing stainless steel. The surfaces with different antibacterial abilities could be used as hygienic surfaces in healthcare-associated settings according to the diverse requirement of bactericidal activities.

  8. Preparation and characterization of 304 stainless steel/Q235 carbon steel composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenning; Feng, Lajun; Feng, Hui; Cao, Ying; Liu, Lei; Cao, Mo; Ge, Yanfeng

    The composite material of 304 stainless steel reinforced Q235 carbon steel has been prepared by modified hot-rolling process. The resulted material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, three-electrode method, fault current impact method, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that metallurgical bond between the stainless steel layer and carbon steel substrate has been formed. The composite material exhibited good electrical conductivity and thermal stability. The average grounding resistance of the composite material was about 13/20 of dip galvanized steel. There has no surface crack and bubbling formed after fault current impact. The composite material led to a significant decrease in the corrosion current density in soil solution, compared with that of hot dip galvanized steel and bare carbon steel. On the basis polarization curve and EIS analyses, it can be concluded that the composite material showed improved anti-corrosion property than hot-dip galvanized steel.

  9. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel

    PubMed Central

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D; Tuckart, Walter R; Broitman, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic–plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally. PMID:28904837

  10. Inhibition of Hydrogen Absorption during Plating of High Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    resistor driven by a PbO2 electrode. Voltage across the resistor was recorded versus time on a Soltec Model 1242 strip chart recorder. Most plating...was 2.0 cm2 . This cell is shown in Figure 2. PbO2 Electrode Preparation: A strip of 430 stainless steel, 0.5 inch by three inches was prepared by...150 mL of ether and 0.69 g of hygroscopic, water insoluble viscous oil product was recovered. Prussian Blue: Prussian blue was deposited cathodically

  11. Localized corrosion of stainless steels in ammonium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsen, O.; Aromaa, J.; Tavi, M.; Virtanen, J.

    1997-05-01

    Ammonium chloride deposition is a well-known problem in oil refining. When these deposits form in a moist environment, they are corrosive to carbon steel. When unexpected corrosion problems are faced, the material is often changed to alloys like stainless steels (SS). Electrochemical measurements were used to study the corrosion resistance of SS in ammonium chloride environments with different chloride contents and at different temperatures.

  12. 37. REDUCTION PLANT DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. REDUCTION PLANT - DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased within an outer steel shell (top half missing). As fish were tumbled by the rotating screen, they were cooked and dried by live steam piped into the dryer through overhead pipes. The dryer is mounted on a slight angle, aiding the process by moving the drying fish towards the exhaust end of the dryer. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  13. Stainless steels with improved strength for service at 760 C and above

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1998-03-01

    An evaluation was undertaken of modified 25Cr-20Ni stainless steels and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel for advanced energy applications at 760 C (1,400 F) and higher. It was found that good fabricability, strength, and ductility could be produced in the modified steels. Stress rupture data to beyond 10,000 h showed that the strengths of the modified steels were more than double that for type 310H stainless steel.

  14. Transuranic contamination of stainless steel in nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, Timothy; Banford, Anthony W.; Thompson, Olivia R.; Carey, Thomas; Schild, Dieter; Geist, Andreas; Sharrad, Clint A.

    2017-09-01

    Stainless steels coupons have been exposed to transuranic species in conditions representative of those found in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Stainless steel was prepared to different surface finishes and exposed to nitric acid of varying concentrations containing 237Np, 239Pu or 243Am for one month at 50 °C. Contamination by these transuranics has been observed on all surfaces exposed to the solution through the use of autoradiography. This technique showed that samples held in 4 M HNO3 bind 2-3 times as much radionuclide as those held in 10.5 M HNO3. It was also found that the polished steel surfaces generally took up more transuranic contamination than the etched and ;as received; steel finishes. The extent of corrosion on the steel surfaces was found, by scanning electron microscopy, to be greater in solutions containing Np and Pu in comparison to that observed from contact with Am containing solutions, indicating that redox activity of transuranics can influence the mechanism of stainless steel corrosion.

  15. Improved quantitative recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from stainless steel surfaces using a one-ply composite tissue.

    PubMed

    Vorst, Keith L; Todd, Ewen C D; Rysert, Elliot T

    2004-10-01

    Four sampling devices, a sterile environmental sponge (ES), a sterile cotton-tipped swab (CS), a sterile calcium alginate fiber-tipped swab (CAS), and a one-ply composite tissue (CT), were evaluated for quantitative recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from a food-grade stainless steel surface. Sterile 304-grade stainless steel plates (6 by 6 cm) were inoculated with approximately 106 CFU/cm2 L. monocytogenes strain Scott A and dried for 1 h. The ES and CT sampling devices were rehydrated in phosphate buffer solution. After plate swabbing, ES and CT were placed in 40 ml of phosphate buffer solution, stomached for 1 min and hand massaged for 30 s. Each CS and CAS device was rehydrated in 0.1% peptone before swabbing. After swabbing, CS and CAS were vortexed in 0.1% peptone for 1 min. Samples were spiral plated on modified Oxford agar with modified Oxford agar Rodac Contact plates used to recover any remaining cells from the stainless steel surface. Potential inhibition from CT was examined in both phosphate buffer solution and in a modified disc-diffusion assay. Recovery was 2.70, 1.34, and 0.62 log greater using CT compared with ES, CS, and CAS, respectively, with these differences statistically significant (P < 0.001) for ES and CT and for CAS, CS, and CT (P < 0.05). Rodac plates were typically overgrown following ES, positive after CS and CAS, and negative after CT sampling. CT was noninhibitory in both phosphate buffer solution and the modified disc-diffusion assay. Using scanning electron microscopy, Listeria cells were observed on stainless steel plates sampled with each sampling device except CT. The CT device, which is inexpensive and easy to use, represents a major improvement over other methods in quantifying L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surfaces and is likely applicable to enrichment of environmental samples.

  16. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  17. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  18. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution.

  19. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  20. Graphene Nanoplatelets Based Protective and Functionalizing Coating for Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Jayanta; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Sammelselg, Väino

    2015-09-01

    Stainless steel is the most widely used alloy for many industrial and everyday applications, and protection of this alloy substrate against corrosion is an important industrial issue. Here we report a promising application of graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets as effective corrosion inhibitors for AISI type 304 stainless steel alloy. The graphene oxide and graphene coatings on the stainless steel substrates were prepared using spin coating techniques. Homogeneous and complete surface coverage by the graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets were observed with a high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The corrosion inhibition ability of these materials was investigated through measurement of open circuit potential and followed by potentiodymamic polarization analysis in aqueous sodium chloride solution before and after a month of immersion. Analyzed result exhibits effective corrosion inhibition for both substrates coated with graphene oxide or graphene nanoplatelets by increasing corrosion potential, pitting potential and decreasing passive current density. The corrosion inhibition ability of the coated substrates has not changed even after the long-term immersion. The result showed both graphene materials can be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor for the stainless steel substrates, which would certainly increase lifetime the substrate. However, long-term protection ability of the graphene coated susbtsrate showed somewhat better inhibition performance than the ones coated with graphene oxide.

  1. Stainless Steel Crown Placement Utilizing the Hall Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-23

    FROM: 59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 8 MAR 2017 1. Your paper, entitled Stainless Steel Crown Placement Utilizing the Hall...Lenox Pointe NE, Atlanta, GA 30324; 23-25 MAR 20 17 D 11e. OTHER (Describe: name of meeting, city, state, and date of meeting.) 12. EXPECTED DATE

  2. Battery and fuel cell electrodes containing stainless steel charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Zuckerbrod, David; Gibney, Ann

    1984-01-01

    An electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon particles; (ii) stainless steel particles; (iii) a nonwetting agent; and (iv) a catalyst, where at least one current collector contacts said composite.

  3. Metal release from stainless steel in biological environments: A review.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2015-03-29

    Due to its beneficial corrosion resistance, stainless steel is widely used in, e.g., biomedical applications, as surfaces in food contact, and for products intended to come into skin contact. Low levels of metals can be released from the stainless steel surface into solution, even for these highly corrosion resistant alloys. This needs to be considered in risk assessment and management. This review aims to compile the different metal release mechanisms that are relevant for stainless steel when used in different biological settings. These mechanisms include corrosion-induced metal release, dissolution of the surface oxide, friction-induced metal release, and their combinations. The influence of important physicochemical surface properties, different organic species and proteins in solution, and of biofilm formation on corrosion-induced metal release is discussed. Chemical and electrochemical dissolution mechanisms of the surface oxides of stainless steel are presented with a focus on protonation, complexation/ligand-induced dissolution, and reductive dissolution by applying a perspective on surface adsorption of complexing or reducing ligands and proteins. The influence of alloy composition, microstructure, route of manufacture, and surface finish on the metal release process is furthermore discussed as well as the chemical speciation of released metals. Typical metal release patterns are summarized.

  4. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  5. Nanoparticle Treated Stainless Steel Filters for Metal Vapor Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Korinko, Paul; Coopersmith, Kaitlin J.; Summer, Ansley J.; Lewis, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    The ability to sequester vapor phase radioactive compounds during industrial processes reduces the exposure of workers and the environment to dangerous radioactive materials. Nanomaterials have a lot of potential in this area because they typically demonstrate size- and shape-dependent properties with higher reactivity than bulk. This is due to the increased surface area-to-volume ratio and quantum size effects. In this report, we developed a gold nanomaterial-treated stainless steel filter, namely wools and coupons, that can be efficiently used for zinc vapor sequestration. Without nanoparticle modification, stainless steel coupons do not react or alloy with Zn. Gold nanomaterials were grown onto various stainless steel filters using solution chemistry that is amenable to scaling up. Materials were characterized by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering before and after exposure to zinc vapors. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirm the formation of gold-zinc alloys after Zn vapor exposure. The effect of surface topography on nanoparticle morphology, size and loading density were also investigated, and stainless steel surface defects were found to have an impact on the Au NP growth and subsequently Zn sequestration.

  6. Brazing of Stainless Steel to Various Aluminum Alloys in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuying; Suzumura, Akio; Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Yamazaki, Takahisa

    Brazing of a stainless steel to various aluminum alloys was carried out using an Al-Si filler metal and a fluoride-active flux in air. The brazeability was remarkably different by the aluminum alloys and the brazing conditions. It was considered that the differences were originated with the compositions of base metals and the filler metal, the solidus temperature and the partially melting behavior of the aluminum alloys, and the behavior of the surface oxide film layers of both base metals. On the other hand, the obstruction of brazeability was identified as the rapid reaction between the aluminum alloys and the brazing filler metal, which makes the molten brazing filler metal disappear at the joining interface before the wetting occurs to the stainless steel. Taking this phenomena into consideration, it was attempted to make previous wetting of the brazing filler to the stainless steel before brazing to the aluminum alloys. This method provided the successful brazed joints for the most combinations of the stainless steel and the aluminum alloys.

  7. Laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Laves intermetallics have a significant effect on properties of metal waste forms being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These waste forms are stainless steel-zirconium alloys that will contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel by electrometallurgical treatment. The baseline waste form composition for stainless steel-clad fuels is stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr). This article presents results of neutron diffraction measurements, heat-treatment studies and mechanical testing on SS-15Zr alloys. The Laves intermetallics in these alloys, labeled Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 2+x}, have both C36 and C15 crystal structures. A fraction of these intermetallics transform into (Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 23}Zr{sub 6} during high-temperature annealing; the authors have proposed a mechanism for this transformation. The SS-15Zr alloys show virtually no elongation in uniaxial tension, but exhibit good strength and ductility in compression tests. This article also presents neutron diffraction and microstructural data for a stainless steel-42 wt.% zirconium (SS-42Zr) alloy.

  8. Method of forming dynamic membrane on stainless steel support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Joseph L. (Inventor); Brandon, Craig A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A suitable member formed from sintered, powdered, stainless steel is contacted with a nitrate solution of a soluble alkali metal nitrate and a metal such as zirconium in a pH range and for a time sufficient to effect the formation of a membrane of zirconium oxide preferably including an organic polymeric material such as polyacrylic acid.

  9. Bending Behavior of Porous Sintered Stainless Steel Fiber Honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Shuiping; Wan, Zhenping; Lu, Longsheng; Tang, Yong

    2017-02-01

    A novel porous honeycomb-type substrate has been developed using solid-state sintering stainless steel fibers. The porous sintered stainless steel fiber honeycombs (PSSSFH) are composed of a skeleton of sintered stainless steel fibers, three-dimensionally interconnected porous structures and multiple parallel microchannels. The bending behavior of the PSSSFH is investigated using three-point bending tests. Four stages, including an elastic stage, a yielding stage with a plateau, a hardening stage and a failure stage, are observed during the bending process of the PSSSFH. In the initial yielding stage, the bending forces increase slowly with displacement increasing, and then a yielding plateau follows, which is unique compared with other porous materials. Moreover, the structure parameters of the PSSSFH are varied to investigate the influence on the bending strength. It is determined that the multiple parallel microchannels can enhance the bending strength of porous stainless steel fiber sintered substrates (PSSFSS) and do not influence the variation trend of bending strength of PSSFSS with porosity increasing. The open ratio is conducive to increasing the bending strength, and the microchannel diameters ranging from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm have little influence on the bending strength. In addition, both the increasing of sintering temperature and sintering time can strengthen the PSSSFH.

  10. Cataract Section Across Temporary Stainless-Steel Sutures

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, R. Keith

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of the technique described was to combine the advantages of a cleanedged Graefe-knife incision with those of safety and near-perfect apposition offered by preplaced sutures: a preliminary to cataract extraction. Uncuttable preplaced 2-mm. stainless steel sutures were finally replaced after completion of the incision by attached braided silk for closure purposes. PMID:14291461

  11. Bending Behavior of Porous Sintered Stainless Steel Fiber Honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Shuiping; Wan, Zhenping; Lu, Longsheng; Tang, Yong

    2016-12-01

    A novel porous honeycomb-type substrate has been developed using solid-state sintering stainless steel fibers. The porous sintered stainless steel fiber honeycombs (PSSSFH) are composed of a skeleton of sintered stainless steel fibers, three-dimensionally interconnected porous structures and multiple parallel microchannels. The bending behavior of the PSSSFH is investigated using three-point bending tests. Four stages, including an elastic stage, a yielding stage with a plateau, a hardening stage and a failure stage, are observed during the bending process of the PSSSFH. In the initial yielding stage, the bending forces increase slowly with displacement increasing, and then a yielding plateau follows, which is unique compared with other porous materials. Moreover, the structure parameters of the PSSSFH are varied to investigate the influence on the bending strength. It is determined that the multiple parallel microchannels can enhance the bending strength of porous stainless steel fiber sintered substrates (PSSFSS) and do not influence the variation trend of bending strength of PSSFSS with porosity increasing. The open ratio is conducive to increasing the bending strength, and the microchannel diameters ranging from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm have little influence on the bending strength. In addition, both the increasing of sintering temperature and sintering time can strengthen the PSSSFH.

  12. Quantitative measurement and modeling of sensitization development in stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Atteridge, D.G.

    1992-09-01

    The state-of-the-art to quantitatively measure and model sensitization development in austenitic stainless steels is assessed and critically analyzed. A modeling capability is evolved and validated using a diverse experimental data base. Quantitative predictions are demonstrated for simple and complex thermal and thermomechanical treatments. Commercial stainless steel heats ranging from high-carbon Type 304 and 316 to low-carbon Type 304L and 316L have been examined including many heats which correspond to extra-low-carbon, nuclear-grade compositions. Within certain limits the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test was found to give accurate and reproducible measurements of the degree of sensitization (DOS) in Type 304 and 316 stainless steels. EPR test results are used to develop the quantitative data base and evolve/validate the quantitative modeling capability. This thesis represents a first step to evolve methods for the quantitative assessment of structural reliability in stainless steel components and weldments. Assessments will be based on component-specific information concerning material characteristics, fabrication history and service exposure. Methods will enable fabrication (e.g., welding and repair welding) procedures and material aging effects to be evaluated and ensure adequate cracking resistance during the service lifetime of reactor components. This work is being conducted by the Oregon Graduate Institute with interactive input from personnel at Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  13. 304L stainless steel resistance to cesium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.E.

    1998-08-27

    B and W Hanford Company have two Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Type 4 canisters filled with cesium chloride (CsCl) originally produced at WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility). These canisters are constructed of 304L stainless steel per drawing ORNL 970-294. Instead of removing the CsCl from the Type 4 canisters and repacking into an Inner Capsule, it is intended (for ALARA, schedule and cost purposes) that the Type 4 canisters be decontaminated (scrubbed) and placed [whole] inside a Type ``W`` overpack. The overpack is constructed from 316L stainless steel. Several tests have been run by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) over the. years documenting the corrosion compatibility of 316L SS with CsCl (Bryan 1989 and Fullam 1972). However, no information for 304L SS compatibility is readily available. This document estimates the corrosion resistance of 304L stainless steel in a WESF CsCl environment as it compares with that of 316L stainless steel.

  14. 73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks for bi-sodium sulfate/water coolant solution at first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. Nanoparticle Treated Stainless Steel Filters for Metal Vapor Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Korinko, Paul; Coopersmith, Kaitlin J.; Summer, Ansley J.; Lewis, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    The ability to sequester vapor phase radioactive compounds during industrial processes reduces the exposure of workers and the environment to dangerous radioactive materials. Nanomaterials have a lot of potential in this area because they typically demonstrate size- and shape-dependent properties with higher reactivity than bulk. This is due to the increased surface area-to-volume ratio and quantum size effects. In this report, we developed a gold nanomaterial-treated stainless steel filter, namely wools and coupons, that can be efficiently used for zinc vapor sequestration. Without nanoparticle modification, stainless steel coupons do not react or alloy with Zn. Gold nanomaterials were grown onto various stainless steel filters using solution chemistry that is amenable to scaling up. Materials were characterized by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering before and after exposure to zinc vapors. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirm the formation of gold-zinc alloys after Zn vapor exposure. The effect of surface topography on nanoparticle morphology, size and loading density were also investigated, and stainless steel surface defects were found to have an impact on the Au NP growth and subsequently Zn sequestration.

  16. Plastic plus stainless-steel fibers make resilient, impermeable material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirra, J. R.

    1965-01-01

    Plastic material combined with stainless-steel fibers and molded under heat and pressure into a desired configuration is both soft enough to deform under a load and resilient enough to return to its original shape when the load is removed.

  17. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel alloy A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel alloy A-286 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  18. Nanoparticle treated stainless steel filters for metal vapor sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Korinko, Paul; Coopersmith, Kaitlin J.; Summer, Ansley J.; Lewis, Rebecca

    2016-12-07

    The ability to sequester vapor phase radioactive compounds during industrial processes reduces the exposure of workers and the environment to dangerous radioactive materials. Nanomaterials have a lot of potential in this area because they typically demonstrate size- and shape-dependent properties with higher reactivity than bulk. This is due to the increased surface area-to-volume ratio and quantum size effects. In this report, we developed a gold nanomaterial-treated stainless steel filter, namely wools and coupons, that can be efficiently used for zinc vapor sequestration. Without nanoparticle modification, stainless steel coupons do not react or alloy with Zn. Gold nanomaterials were grown onto various stainless steel filters using solution chemistry that is amenable to scaling up. Materials were characterized by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering before and after exposure to zinc vapors. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirm the formation of gold-zinc alloys after Zn vapor exposure. Furthermore, the effect of surface topography on nanoparticle morphology, size and loading density were also investigated, and stainless steel surface defects were found to have an impact on the Au NP growth and subsequently Zn sequestration.

  19. Nanoparticle treated stainless steel filters for metal vapor sequestration

    DOE PAGES

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Korinko, Paul; ...

    2016-12-07

    The ability to sequester vapor phase radioactive compounds during industrial processes reduces the exposure of workers and the environment to dangerous radioactive materials. Nanomaterials have a lot of potential in this area because they typically demonstrate size- and shape-dependent properties with higher reactivity than bulk. This is due to the increased surface area-to-volume ratio and quantum size effects. In this report, we developed a gold nanomaterial-treated stainless steel filter, namely wools and coupons, that can be efficiently used for zinc vapor sequestration. Without nanoparticle modification, stainless steel coupons do not react or alloy with Zn. Gold nanomaterials were grown ontomore » various stainless steel filters using solution chemistry that is amenable to scaling up. Materials were characterized by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering before and after exposure to zinc vapors. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirm the formation of gold-zinc alloys after Zn vapor exposure. Furthermore, the effect of surface topography on nanoparticle morphology, size and loading density were also investigated, and stainless steel surface defects were found to have an impact on the Au NP growth and subsequently Zn sequestration.« less

  20. [The question of nickel release from stainless steel cooking pots].

    PubMed

    Vrochte, H; Schätzke, M; Dringenberg, E; Wölwer-Rieck, U; Büning-Pfaue, H

    1991-09-01

    For three items of foods (rhubarb, spinach, sauerkraut) the possible release of nickel (by means of AAS) was analysed, a release which may be caused by a possible corrosive effect of the concerned (oxalic-, milk-, vinegar-) acids (as well as common salt) within a normal domestic food-preparation. For this analysis stainless steel cooking pots of different manufacturers, various types and in a representative selection and quantity were taken into consideration; the detailed analyses were extended so far that clear statistical evaluations were possible. This method complies regulations for accuracy to determine traces of heavy metal. For all three analysed food-stuffs an identical result was reached that no nickel release from the stainless steel cooking pots into the food was found. Differences of the various stainless steel cooking pots with regard to their surfaces' quality or their origin (manufacturers) were not yielded, either. All detected concentrations of nickel are within the reach of the natural nickel content of the analysed food-stuffs and their amount is even much lower than other food's content of nickel. This leads up to the conclusion that the former view of a possible nickel release of stainless steel cooking pots has to be revised because these assumptions were not confirmed in the presented results of this analysis and therefore have to be regarded as not correct.

  1. 6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LEVEL4; ENTRAILS WERE DROPPED INTO CHUTE, THEN PASSED THROUGH THE FLOOR TO THE GUT SHANTY ON LEVEL 3 TO BE SORTED AND CLEANED - Rath Packing Company, Hog Dressing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  2. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, LOOKING EAST; SMOKEHOUSE UNITS WERE BUILT BY DRYING SYSTEMS COMPANY, DIVISION OF MICHIGAN OVEN COMPANY, MORTON GROVE, ILLINOIS - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  3. Simulation Computation of 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Ruipeng; Li, Changrong; Wang, Fuming; Hu, Lifu

    The solidification structure of 430 ferritic stainless steel has been calculated in the solidification process by using 3D-CAFE model under the condition of water cooling. The calculated results consistent with those obtained from experiment. Under watercooling condition, the solidification structure consists of chilled layer, columnar grain zone, transition zone and equiaxed grain zone.

  4. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  5. New equation of state for stainless steel 347

    SciTech Connect

    Boettger, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    A new SESAME equation of state (EOS) for stainless steel 347 has been generated using the computer program GRIZZLY, and has been added to the SESAME EOS library as material number 4271. This new EOS is superior to its predecesser (material number 4270) in several respects.

  6. No corrosion of 304 stainless steel implant after 40 years of service.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, D J; Pereira, B P

    2004-07-01

    When exposed to 0.9% NaCl type 304 stainless steel undergoes severe pitting corrosion within a matter of days. However, a Sherman plate fabricated from type 304 stainless steel remained inside a patient's arm for almost 40 years without any visible indications of corrosion. Given the previous understanding of the pathological environments this was considered quite remarkable. It is proposed that the low dissolved oxygen levels found in human-body fluids makes the long-term in vivo environment much more benign than would be anticipated from in vitro experiments. Furthermore, it is proposed that previous cases of localized pitting corrosion on stainless steel implants most likely arose due to the development of short-term aggressive conditions due to pathological changes in the surrounding tissue as a result of the trauma of the implant procedure. In the present case the Sherman plate was sufficiently small that the surrounding tissue was not aggravated sufficiently to lead to the development of such an environment aggressive. The conclusion that surgical implants are at most risk during the first few weeks of service implies that short-term corrosion protection methods, such as coatings, may be more effective than previously thought.

  7. Phase formation at bonded vanadium and stainless steel interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, T.S.E.

    1992-01-01

    The interface between vanadium bonded to stainless steel was studies to determine whether a brittle phase formed during three joining operations. Inertia friction welds between V and 21-6-9 stainless steel were examined using TEM. In the as-welded condition, a continuous, polygranular intermetallic layer about 0.25 {mu}m thick was present at the interface. This layer grew to about 50 {mu}m thick during heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for two hours. Analysis of electron diffraction patterns confirmed that this intermetallic was the {omega} phase. The interface between vanadium and type 304, SANDVIK SAF 2205, and 21-6-9 stainless steel bonded by a co-extrusion process had intermetallic particles at the interface in the as-extruded condition. Heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for two hours caused these particles to grow into continuous layers in all three cases. Based on the appearance, composition and hardness of this interfacial intermetallic, it was also concluded to be {omega} phase. Bonding V to type 430 stainless steel by co-extrusion caused V-rich carbides to form at the interface due to the higher concentration of C in the type 430 than in the other stainless steels investigated. The carbide particles initially present grew into a continuous layer during a two-hour heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C. Co-hipping 21-6-9 stainless steel tubing with V rod resulted in slightly more concentric specimens than the co-extruded ones, but a continuous layer of the {omega} phase formed during the hipping operation. This brittle layer could initiate failure during subsequent forming operations. The vanadium near the stainless steel interface in the co-extruded and co-hipped tubing in some cases was harder than before heat treatment. It was concluded that this hardening was due to thermal straining during cooling following heat treatment and that thermal strains might present a greater problem than seen here when longer tubes are used in actual applications.

  8. 76 FR 13357 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip in Coils From Mexico; Correction Notice to Amended Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip in Coils From Mexico; Correction Notice to... administrative review for stainless steel sheet and strip in coils from Mexico. See Stainless Steel Sheet and.... See Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip in Coils from Mexico; Final Results of Antidumping...

  9. Effect of texture on corrosion behavior of AISI 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi Kumar, B. . E-mail: ravik@nmlindia.org; Singh, Raghuvir; Mahato, Bhupeshwar; De, P.K.; Bandyopadhyay, N.R.; Bhattacharya, D.K.

    2005-02-15

    Electrochemical behavior of austenitic AISI 304 stainless steel in two different solutions is presented here. Effect of cold rolling conditions on corrosion behavior of the steel is studied with respect to strain-induced {alpha}'-martensite phase, residual stress, and texture of both the austenite and {alpha}'-martensite phases. The annealed steel plate has been unidirectionally cold, rolled-up to 90% reductions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique has been employed to quantify the volume fractions of austenite and martensite phases and to study the textural development in the steel in rolled conditions. The presence of close pack crystallographic planes parallel to the specimen surface found to improve the corrosion properties.

  10. Removal of long-lived 222Rn daughters by electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnee, R. W.; Bowles, M. A.; Bunker, R.; McCabe, K.; White, J.; Cushman, P.; Pepin, M.; Guiseppe, V. E.

    2013-08-01

    Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the 222Rn decay chain on detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay. Removal of tens of microns of material via electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing radon daughters implanted into material surfaces. Some applications, however, require the removal of uniform and significantly smaller thicknesses. Here, we demonstrate that electropolishing < 1 μm from stainless-steel plates reduces the contamination efficiently, by a factor > 100. Examination of electropolished wires with a scanning electron microscope confirms that the thickness removed is reproducible and reasonably uniform. Together, these tests demonstrate the effectiveness of removal of radon daughters for a proposed low-radiation, multi-wire proportional chamber (the BetaCage), without compromising the screener's energy resolution. More generally, electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel may effectively remove radon daughters without compromising precision-machined parts.

  11. Study on Thermal Physical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Dong; Jun-mao, Qie; Hao-hua, Deng

    The DIL402C thermal dilatometer and STA449C thermal analyzer were employed to test the linear expansion and contraction coefficient, CP and DSC curve of 304 stainless steel. The result showed that the linear expansion coefficient range was 20.9700×10-6˜21.5712×10-6 and the linear contraction coefficient range was 21.2528×10-6˜21.9471×10-6. The linear expansion and contraction coefficient were higher than other steel grade, so the 304 stainless steel belonged to the crack sensitive steel. Because of the crystal phase transformation occurred during the 1000˜1400 °C,the curve of CP fluctuated obviously and the defects of casting blank occurred easily. Chosen 1414°C as the liquidus temperature of 304 stainless steel based on the analysis results of DSC. The curve of DSC was unsmooth during 1450˜1100°C, the crystal phase transformation occurs and thermal stability of slab was inferior.When the initial solidified shell formed in this temperature range,the thickness of the shell would be nonuniform and the surface defects occurred more easily.

  12. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  13. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-05-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  14. Stainless steel valves with enhanced performance through microstructure optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barani, A. A.; Boukhattam, M.; Haggeney, M.; Güler, S.

    2017-08-01

    Compressor valves are made of hardened and tempered martensitic steels. The main design criterion for the material selection is the fatigue performance of the material under bending loads. In some cases impact loads and corrosive atmospheres additionally act on the part. For the first time, the microstructure of the most commonly used stainless steel and its influence on the properties relevant for flapper valves is presented and described in this paper. It is demonstrated how the tensile properties of a martensitic stainless steel can be enhanced by tailoring the microstructure. Electron back scatter diffraction method is carried out to explain the changes in monotonic mechanical properties. Through a modified heat treatment the martensite microstructure is refined resulting in an increase of yield and ultimate tensile strength and at the same time a significant increase of elongation.

  15. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, J.H.; Rawers, J.C.; Alman, D.E.

    2007-04-01

    Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.

  16. Achievement of a superpolish on bare stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Casstevens, John M.

    1997-11-01

    We report the achievement of a superpolished surface, suitable for x-ray reflection, on bare stainless steel. The rms roughness obtained on various samples varied from 2.2 to 4.2 angstroms, as measured by an optical profiler with a bandwidth 0.29 - 100 mm-1. The type 17-4 PH precipitation-hardening stainless steel used to make the mirrors is also capable of ultrastability and has good manufacturability. This combination of properties makes it an excellent candidate material for mirror substrates. We describe the successful utilization of this type of steel in making elliptical-cylinder mirrors for a soft-x-ray microprobe system at the Advanced Light Source, and discuss possible reasons for its unusual stability and polishability.

  17. Achievement of a superpolish on bare stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Casstevens, J.

    1997-08-01

    We report the achievement of a superpolished surface, suitable for x-ray reflection, on bare stainless steel. The rms roughness obtained on various samples varied from 2.2 to 4.2 {angstrom}, as measured by an optical profiler with a bandwidth 0.29-100 mm{sup -1}. The type 17-4 PH precipitation-hardening stainless steel used to make the mirrors is also capable of ultrastability and has good manufactureability. This combination of properties makes it an excellent candidate material for mirror substrates. We describe the successful utilization of this type of steel in making elliptical-cylinder mirrors for a soft-x-ray microprobe system at the Advanced Light Source, and discuss possible for its unusual stability and polishability.

  18. Ultrasonic guided wave detection of scatterers on large clad steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peng; Harley, Joel B.; Berges, Mario; Junker, Warren R.; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2016-04-01

    "Clad steel" refers to a thick carbon steel structural plate bonded to a corrosion resistant alloy (CRA) plate, such as stainless steel or titanium, and is widely used in industry to construct pressure vessels. The CRA resists the chemically aggressive environment on the interior, but cannot prevent the development of corrosion losses and cracks that limit the continued safe operation of such vessels. At present there are no practical methods to detect such defects from the exposed outer surface of the thick carbon steel plate, often necessitating removing such vessels from service and inspecting them visually from the interior. In previous research, sponsored by industry to detect and localize damage in pressurized piping systems under operational and environmental changes, we investigated a number of data-driven signal processing methods to extract damage information from ultrasonic guided wave pitch-catch records. We now apply those methods to relatively large clad steel plate specimens. We study a sparse array of wafer-type ultrasonic transducers adhered to the carbon steel surface, attempting to localize mass scatterers grease-coupled to the stainless steel surface. We discuss conditions under which localization is achieved by relatively simple first-arrival methods, and other conditions for which data-driven methods are needed; we also discuss observations of plate-like mode properties implied by these results.

  19. Survival and transfer of microorganisms from kitchen sponges to surfaces of stainless steel and polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Eliandra Mirlei; Scapin, Diane; Tondo, Eduardo César

    2013-03-14

    Contaminated sponges might lead to cross-contamination in kitchens since they can transfer microorganisms to surfaces where microorganisms can survive for hours or days and contaminate food. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the transfer and the survival of bacteria from kitchen sponges to surfaces of AISI 316 stainless steel and polyethylene. Twenty-four sponges were collected from industrial kitchens in the state of Rio Grande do Sul and aseptically split into two equal parts. One part was subjected to enumeration of heterotrophic microorganisms, faecal coliforms, coagulase-positive Staphylococcus and search detection of Salmonella enterica. The other part was rubbed on surfaces of AISI 316 stainless steel (12 sponges) or polyethylene (12 sponges). The transfer and survival of microorganisms was quantified by swab collection and pour-plate method using plate count agar. All sponges were contaminated by heterotrophic microorganisms (average of 6.8 log CFU/sponge) and 83.3% with faecal coliforms (average of 5 log CFU/sponge). None of the sponges were contaminated by S. enterica and/or coagulase-positive Staphylococcus. The average transfer of microorganisms varied between 3.3 and 5.5 log CFU/cm2 for stainless steel and from 3.5 to 5.6 log CFU/cm2 for polyethylene. Although the survival rate decreased over time, more than 1 log CFU/cm2 of heterotrophic microorganisms survived after 24 hours on both surfaces. The sponges used in food services were significantly contaminated and could transfer large amounts of microorganisms to surfaces of AISI 316 stainless steel and polyethylene.

  20. Aging degradation of cast stainless steels: Effects on mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1987-06-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water operating conditions. Mechanical property data are presented from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 450, 400, 350, 320, and 290/sup 0/C. The results indicate that thermal aging increases the tensile strength and decreases the impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus of the steels. Also, the ductile-to-brittle transition curve shifts to higher temperatures. The fracture toughness results are consistent with the Charpy-impact data, i.e., the relative reduction in J/sub IC/ is similar to the relative decrease in impact energy. The ferrite content and concentration of C in the steel have a strong effect on the overall process of low-temperature embrittlement. The low-carbon CF-3 steels are the most resistant and Mo-containing CF-8M steels are most susceptible to embrittlement. Weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundaries by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the kinetics and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M steels, particularly after aging at temperatures greater than or equal to400/sup 0/C. The influence of N content and distribution of ferrite on loss of toughness are discussed. The data also indicate that existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 280 to 450/sup 0/C, i.e., extrapolation of high-temperature data to reactor temperatures may not be valid for some compositions of cast stainless steel.

  1. Antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis and biological characteristics of antibacterial stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Ren, Ling; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Nan; Yang, Ke; Zhong, Ming

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the possibility of an alternative to the traditional orthodontic stainless steel implants, the antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and the related cytotoxicity of a type 304 Cu bearing antibacterial stainless steel were studied. The results indicated that the antibacterial stainless steel showed excellent antibacterial property against P. gingivalis, compared with the control steel (a purchased medical grade 304 stainless steel). Compared to the control steel, there were fewer bacteria on the surface of the antibacterial stainless steel, with significant difference in morphology. The cytotoxicities of the antibacterial stainless steel to both MG-63 and KB cells were all grade 1, the same as those of the control steel. There were no significant differences in the apoptosis rates on MG-63 and KB cells between the antibacterial stainless steel and the control steel. This study demonstrates that the antibacterial stainless steel is possible to reduce the incidence of implant-related infections and can be a more suitable material for the micro-implant than the conventional stainless steel in orthodontic treatment.

  2. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  3. Wetting Properties of Liquid Lithium on Stainless Steel and Enhanced Stainless Steel Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, P.; Xu, W.; Raman, P.; Andruczyk, D.; Ruzic, D. N.; Curreli, D.

    2012-10-01

    Research into lithium as a first wall material has proven its ability to effectively getter impurities and reduce recycling of hydrogen ions at the wall. Current schemes for introducing lithium into a fusion device consist of lithium evaporators, however, as these devices evolve from pulsed to steady state, new methods will need to be employed such as the LIMIT concept of UIUC, or thin flowing film lithium walls. Critical to their implementation is understanding the interactions of liquid lithium with various surfaces. One such interaction is the wetting of materials by lithium, which may be characterized by the contact angle between the lithium and the surface. Experiments have been performed at UIUC into the contact angle of liquid lithium with a given surface, as well as methods to increase it. To reduce the oxidation rate of the droplets, the experiments were performed in vacuum, using a lithium injector to deposit drops on each surface. Among the materials investigated are stainless steel, both untreated and coated with a diamond like carbon (DLC) layer, molybdenum, and boronized molybdenum. The contact angle and its dependence on temperature is measured.

  4. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  5. High-speed fiber laser cutting of thick stainless steel for dismantling tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Sung; Oh, Seong Yong; Park, Hyunmin; Chung, Chin-Man; Seon, Sangwoo; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Lim; Choi, Byung-Seon; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2017-09-01

    A high-speed fiber laser cutting technology of thick steels for dismantling tasks was achieved using a 6-kW fiber laser system. At first, a new cutting head for efficient cutting of thick steels was developed, which was composed by a collimator with a focal length of 160 mm and mirror-type focusing objects with a long focal length of 600 mm. The long focal length of the focusing object made it possible for the beam size to be small through the thick cutting material and the cutting efficiency was expected to increase compared with the short focal length. In addition, folding the beam facilitated the compact cutting head with a size of 160 mm (width) × 80 mm (height) × 640 mm (length) and a weight of 6.9 kg. In the cutting experiment, the laser beam was delivered to the cutting head by a 25-m long process fiber with a core diameter of 100 μm. The cutting performances were studied against the thicknesses of stainless steel plates. A maximum cutting speed of 72 mm/min was obtained for the 60-mm thick stainless steel plate cutting and the cut specimen showed an excellent kerf shape and a narrow kerf width. To the best of our knowledge, this cutting speed was higher than other previously reported results when cutting with a 6-kW laser power.

  6. Fracture properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of stainless steel cladding to increase the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws depends greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). 10 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Robust Passivation of Martensitic Stainless Steel for Water Cleaning Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Walter; Chung, Wendy; Loop, Ken; Powell, Mark; Shatz, Tom

    Corrosion of hardened martensitic stainless steels used in magnetic disk drives is problematic because the rusting surface becomes a source of particulate contamination that can compromise the operational performance and reliability of the file. Corrosion of the stainless steels can be initiated by either atmospheric moisture or during aqueous based cleaning of the parts that typically occurs during their manufacturing steps or prior to file build. Aqueous based cleaning is commonplace since CFC cleaning solvents are losing favor because they are expensive and are discouraged by the EPA for their environmentally "unfriendly" nature. Passivation of the stainless stees can be accomplished by thermal treatment or chemical means, using nitric acid. Four techniques (1 thermal and 3 chemical) were evaluated in this study on two base materials, 440C and X105CrMo17. Natural passivation initiated by abrasive polishing was also tested. Corrosion tests were performed on specimens made of 440C and X105CrMo17 rails, the martensitic type, using electropotential in a basic electrolyte and electropotential in an acidic electrolyte. To understand the importance of metallurgical, physical and chemical variables and how they could influence the rail's corrosion resistance, three measurements were taken: 1. Grain size and carbide distribution using EDS. 2. Surface morphology. 3. Auger electron spectroscopy to determine the iron/chrome ratio and the chrome oxide layer thickness. When properly done, thermal and chemical passivation are excellent methods to make martensitic stainless steels corrosion resistant and water cleanable. Natural passivation when initiated by abrasive polishing does not perform well. Passivation is imparted to the stainless steel by the high chromium/low iron content at the surface and by a thin, chrome oxide layer at the surface.

  8. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  9. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  10. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  11. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  12. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  13. Stainless Steel Cladding Of Structural Steels By CO2 Laser Welding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovico, A.; Daurelio, G.; Arcamone, O.

    1989-01-01

    Steel cladding processes are usually performed in different ways: hot roll cladding, strip cladding, weld cladding, explosion forming. For the first time, a medium power (2 KW c.w.) CO2 laser was used to clad structural steels (Fe 37C), 3 and 5 mm thick, with austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and AISI 316), 0.5 and 1.5 mm thick. The cladding technique we have developed uses the laser penetration welding process.

  14. Surface modifications of nitrogen-plasma-treated stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröning, P.; Nowak, S.; Schlapbach, L.

    1993-03-01

    Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and optical microscopy we have investigated the chemical composition and the morphology of stainless steel surfaces after low-pressure nitrogen-plasma treatment. AISI 440C and AISI 316L steels were treated at room temperature and at 600°C in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)N 2 plasma with different negative RF-bias potentials (in the range of 0 to 200 V). The formation of CrN on the steel surface was observed at high treatment temperature as well as at room temperature. Already at room temperature, a bias higher than 20 V results in preferential Fe sputtering and the formation of a surface rich in CrN. At high temperature ( T = 600°C) treatment the N 2 plasma changes the morphology of the steel surface completely, etching in some crystallographic orientation increases the roughness of the surface dramatically. The segregation of Cr, Mo, Mn, and Si forms a top surface layer with practically no Fe. To obtain pure CrN on the steel surface a negative bias is necessary to remove Mn and Si compounds from the surface. Since CrN has a NaCl structure like TiN with a lattice mismatch of only 2.1%, we believe that a N 2 plasma treatment improves the adhesion of TiN coatings on stainless steels, by the formation of a CrN interface compound.

  15. Infectivity of scrapie prions bound to a stainless steel surface.

    PubMed Central

    Zobeley, E.; Flechsig, E.; Cozzio, A.; Enari, M.; Weissmann, C.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The transmissible agent of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is not readily destroyed by conventional sterilization and transmissions by surgical instruments have been reported. Decontamination studies have been carried out thus far on solutions or suspensions of the agent and may not reflect the behavior of surface-bound infectivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As a model for contaminated surgical instruments, thin stainless-steel wire segments were exposed to scrapie agent, washed exhaustively with or without treatment with 10% formaldehyde, and implanted into the brains of indicator mice. Infectivity was estimated from the time elapsing to terminal disease. RESULTS: Stainless steel wire (0.15 x 5 mm) exposed to scrapie-infected mouse brain homogenate and washed extensively with PBS retained the equivalent of about 10(5) LD50 units per segment. Treatment with 10% formaldehyde for 1 hr reduced this value by only about 30-fold. CONCLUSIONS: The model system we have devised confirms the anecdotal reports that steel instruments can retain CJD infectivity even after formaldehyde treatment. It lends itself to a systematic study of the conditions required to effectively inactivate CJD, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and scrapie agent adsorbed to stainless steel surfaces such as those of surgical instruments. PMID:10448646

  16. Reducing tool wear when machining austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, J.H.; Kosa, T.

    1998-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered more difficult to machine than carbon steels due to their high work hardening rate, large spread between yield and ultimate tensile strength, high toughness and ductility, and low thermal conductivity. These characteristics can result in a built-up edge or excessive tool wear during machining, especially when the cutting speed is too high. The practical solution is to lower the cutting speed until tool life reaches an acceptable level. However, lower machining speed negatively impacts productivity. Thus, in order to overcome tool wear at relatively high machining speeds for these alloys, on-going research is being performed to improve cutting fluids, develop more wear-resistant tools, and to modify stainless steels to make them less likely to cause tool wear. This paper discusses compositional modifications to the two most commonly machined austenitic stainless steels (Type 303 and 304) which reduced their susceptibility to tool wear, and allowed these grades to be machined at higher cutting speeds.

  17. Ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardening stainless steel laser weldings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurelio, Giuseppe; Ludovico, Antonio D.; Panagopoulos, Christos N.; Tundo, Corrado

    1998-07-01

    Even if many steels and alloys have been welded on the last years, nowadays there are some other stainless steel alloys that need a further comprehension when they have to be welded. Typically these alloys are martensitic and precipitation hardening ones that still present some problems to be weld, i.e. hot cracks, fragile beads, an excessive grain size and other surface defects. In this work some martensitic stainless steels of which a AISI 420B, a AISI 440C and a AISI 630 have been studied. The last one is always with a martensitic structure but, in particular, some interesting mechanical properties are reached by a precipitation hardening process. This research has experimented and studied the mechanical and technological properties of the welds obtained on the above cited AISI 420B, AISI 440C and AISI 630, welded by 1.5 kW CO2 laser. The results have also been compared with the ones obtained on ferritic stainless steels AISI 430 and 430F. A technological characterization of the welds has followed as metallographic tests and evaluations, microhardness, tensile and fatigue tests.

  18. Cathodic properties of different stainless steels in natural seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, R.; Bardal, E.

    1985-05-01

    The cathodic properties of a number of stainless steels, which were exposed to natural seawater flowing at 0 to 2.5 m/s and polarized to potentials from -300 to -950 mV SCE, have been studied. The current density development at constant potential and the free corrosion potential during the exposure time were recorded continuously. At the end of the exposure period, after approximately 28 to 36 days of exposure, polarization curves were determined. After one to three weeks of exposure, depending on the water velocity, microbiological activity on the surface caused an increase in the current density requirement of the specimen. An explanation for the mechanism behind the current density increase caused by slime production from marine bacteria may be increased exchange current density, i/sub 0/. There was no measurable calcareous deposit on the stainless steel surfaces at the end of the exposure periods.

  19. Interaction of cobalt with a stainless steel oxide surface

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.B. )

    1991-01-01

    The deposition of radioactive cobalt ions from aqueous solutions in the pH range from 1 to 12 onto the internal surface of a stainless steel vessel or pipework can lead to the buildup of tenacious surface activity. For liquid streams of low specific activity (measured in becquerels per millilitre), the surface activity buildup may create a more dominant gamma radiation field than the activity suspended in the liquid. Failure to adequately predict this buildup for an operational nuclear plant can lead to an underestimate of potential gamma dose rates. This may lead to an economic penalty if additional shielding or other protective measures are necessary following plant operation. A theoretical method of determining the cobalt mass/activity deposition from aqueous liquor onto stainless steel is outlined in this paper. A validation of the method is given, and the limits of its application are discussed.

  20. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  1. Kinetic evaluation of intergranular fracture in austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, E.P.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    A second, higher-dose threshold exists for irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in non-oxidizing environments. The data supporting this concept have stimulated interest in the mechanical aspects of intergranular (IG) fracture. Cracking in a non-oxidizing environment suggests that mechanically-induced IG fracture may play an important role in the IASCC mechanism under these conditions. Radiation alters deformation processes in austenitic alloys and may influence the fracture mode during either in-situ or post-irradiation straining. Radiation effects that must be considered include radiation strengthening, radiation creep and radiation-induced flow localization. The present evaluation relates these radiation-induced phenomena to IG fracture relevant to IASCC. The evaluation indicates that radiation strengthening retards matrix deformation and allows intergranular fracture to occur at higher stresses and lower temperatures than expected for unirradiated stainless steel.

  2. Stainless steel porous substrates produced by tape casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercadelli, Elisa; Gondolini, Angela; Pinasco, Paola; Sanson, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    In this work the technological issues related to the production of tape cast large-area porous stainless steel supports for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) applications were carefully investigated. The slurry formulation was optimized in terms of amount and nature of the organic components needed: rice starch and polymethyl metacrylate were found to be, respectively, the most suitable pore former and binder because easily eliminated during the thermal treatment in reducing atmosphere. The compatibility of the binder system chosen with the most widely used solvents for screen printing inks was also evaluated. Finally the influence of the sintering temperature and of the refractory supports to be used during the thermal treatments onto the production of porous stainless steel supports was discussed. The whole process optimization allows to produce flat, crack-free metallic substrate 900-1000 μm thick, dimensions up to 5×5 cm and with a tailored porosity of 40% suitable for SOFCs application.

  3. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, Tania M.

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  4. Characterization of Austenitic Stainless Steels Deformed at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmunger, Mattias; Chai, Guocai; Eriksson, Robert; Johansson, Sten; Moverare, Johan J.

    2017-10-01

    Highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels are promising candidates to replace more expensive nickel-based alloys within the energy-producing industry. The present study investigates the deformation mechanisms by microstructural characterization, mechanical properties and stress-strain response of three commercial austenitic stainless steels and two commercial nickel-based alloys using uniaxial tensile tests at elevated temperatures from 673 K (400 °C) up to 973 K (700 °C). The materials showed different ductility at elevated temperatures which increased with increasing nickel content. The dominating deformation mechanism was planar dislocation-driven deformation at elevated temperature. Deformation twinning was also a noticeable active deformation mechanism in the heat-resistant austenitic alloys during tensile deformation at elevated temperatures up to 973 K (700 °C).

  5. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  6. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  7. Lifetest investigations with stainless steel/water heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenzel, W. D.; Kraehling, H.

    Life tests were conducted on water heat pipes, made from four different alloys of stainless steel, at operation temperatures of 120, 160, 220, and 320 C in a reflux boiler mode for more than 20,000 hr. Other parameters varied during the tests included capillary structure, pretreatment and cleaning of the components, additional oxidation of the inner surface, filling procedures, amoung of liquid change, the number of ventings, and the duration of the reaction runs. The best results were obtained with pipes containing stainless steels with molybdenum alloy additions and with carbon contents of greater than 0.03%; with components which formed a protective surface layer; with the use of double-distilled water that had been ultrasonically degassed; with repeated ventings during the initial reaction run of 500 hr minimum duration; and with the addition of gaseous oxygen into the heat pipe during the reaction run with subsequent venting.

  8. Surface treatment and corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oravcová, M.; Palček, P.; Zatkalíková, V.; Tański, T.; Król, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this article results from corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L after different surface treatments are published. “As received” surface and surface after grinding resulted in lower resistance to pitting corrosion in physiological solution than electrochemically polished in H3PO4+H2SO4+H2O. Electropolishing also improved the surface roughness in comparison with the “as received” surface. Deposition of Al2O3 nanometric ALD coating improves the corrosion resistance of stainless steel in chloride-containing environment by shifting the breakdown potential toward more positive values. This oxide coating not only improves the corrosion resistance but it also affects the wettability of the surface, resulting in hydrophobic surface.

  9. Duplex stainless steels for the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsson, E.; Olsson, J.

    1999-07-01

    The metallurgy and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel, particularly with regards to applications in the pulp and paper industry, are described. Practical experiences from pressure vessel installations in cooking plants and bleach plants as well as from non-pressurized items in different parts along the fiber line, are given. The paper also reviews corrosion test results presented previously and compares these with recent test data and the practical experiences. Though most of the installations have been successful, some cases of corrosion attacks on duplex stainless steel have been reported, although these are very limited in number: one digester, one calorifier, two pulp storage towers, and two bleach plant filter washers, of a total of more than 700 identified installations.

  10. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.

    1999-01-13

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposal of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The baseline waste form for spent fuels from the EBR-II reactor is a stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article briefly reviews the microstructure of various SS-Zr waste form alloys and presents results of immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests performed on these alloys. The electrochemical tests show that the corrosion behavior of SS-Zr alloys is comparable to those of other alloys being considered for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The immersion tests demonstrate that the SS-Zr alloys are resistant to selective leaching of fission product elements and, hence, suitable as candidates for high-level nuclear waste forms.

  11. Corrosion testing of stainless steel-zirconium metal waste form.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.

    1998-12-14

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposition of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste forms contain irradiated cladding hulls, components of the alloy fuel, noble metal fission products, and actinide elements. The baseline waste form is a stainless steel-15 wt% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article presents microstructure and some of the corrosion studies being conducted on the waste form alloys. Electrochemical corrosion, immersion corrosion, and vapor hydration tests have been performed on various alloy compositions to evaluate corrosion behavior and resistance to selective leaching of simulated fission products. The SS-Zr waste forms are successful at the immobilization and retention of fission products and show potential for acceptance as high-level nuclear waste forms.

  12. New hermetic sealing material for vacuum brazing of stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, S.; Wiehl, G.; Silze, F.

    2016-03-01

    For vacuum brazing applications such as in vacuum interrupter industry Hermetic Sealing Materials (HSM) with low partial pressure are widely used. AgCu28 dominates the hermetic sealing market, as it has a very good wetting behavior on copper and metallized ceramics. Within recent decades wetting on stainless steel has become more and more important. However, today the silver content of HSMs is more in focus than in the past decades, because it has the biggest impact on the material prices. Umicore Technical Materials has developed a new copper based HSM, CuAg40Ga10. The wettability on stainless steel is significantly improved compared to AgCu28 and the total silver content is reduced by almost 44%. In this article the physical properties of the alloy and its brazed joints will be presented compared to AgCu28.

  13. STAINLESS STEEL INTERACTIONS WITH SALT CONTAINING PLUTONIUM OXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Z.; Chandler, G.; Dunn, K.; Stefek, T.; Summer, M.

    2010-02-01

    Salt containing plutonium oxide materials are treated, packaged and stored within nested, stainless steel containers based on requirements established in the DOE 3013 Standard. The moisture limit for the stored materials is less than 0.5 weight %. Surveillance activities which are conducted to assess the condition of the containers and assure continuing 3013 container integrity include the destructive examination of a select number of containers to determine whether corrosion attack has occurred as a result of stainless steel interactions with salt containing plutonium oxides. To date, some corrosion has been observed on the innermost containers, however, no corrosion has been noted on the outer containers and the integrity of the 3013 container systems is not expected to be compromised over a 50 year storage lifetime.

  14. Characterization of Austenitic Stainless Steels Deformed at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmunger, Mattias; Chai, Guocai; Eriksson, Robert; Johansson, Sten; Moverare, Johan J.

    2017-07-01

    Highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels are promising candidates to replace more expensive nickel-based alloys within the energy-producing industry. The present study investigates the deformation mechanisms by microstructural characterization, mechanical properties and stress-strain response of three commercial austenitic stainless steels and two commercial nickel-based alloys using uniaxial tensile tests at elevated temperatures from 673 K (400°C) up to 973 K (700°C). The materials showed different ductility at elevated temperatures which increased with increasing nickel content. The dominating deformation mechanism was planar dislocation-driven deformation at elevated temperature. Deformation twinning was also a noticeable active deformation mechanism in the heat-resistant austenitic alloys during tensile deformation at elevated temperatures up to 973 K (700°C).

  15. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  16. Sensitization and IGSCC susceptibility prediction in stainless steel pipe weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Atteridge, D.G.; Simmons, J.W.; Li, Ming; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1991-11-01

    An analytical model, based on prediction of chromium depletion, has been developed for predicting thermomechanical effects on austenitic stainless steel intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility. Model development and validation is based on sensitization development analysis of over 30 Type 316 and 304 stainless steel heats. The data base included analysis of deformation effects on resultant sensitization development. Continuous Cooling sensitization behavior is examined and modelled with and without strain. Gas tungsten are (GTA) girth pipe weldments are also characterized by experimental measurements of heat affected zone (HAZ) temperatures, strains and sensitization during/after each pass; pass by pass thermal histories are also predicted. The model is then used to assess pipe chemistry changes on IGSCC resistance.

  17. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Cherubini, J.H.

    1963-05-14

    A process is described for separating uranium from a nuclear fuel element comprising a uranium-containing core and a ferritic stainless steel clad by heating said element in a non-carburizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range 850-1050 un. Concent 85% C, rapidly cooling the heated element through the temperature range 815 un. Concent 85% to 650 EC to avoid annealing said steel, and then contacting the cooled element with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to selectively dissolve the uranium. (AEC)

  18. Surface nanocrystallization of stainless steel for reduced biofilm adherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Davis, Elisabeth M.; Hodges, Robert S.; Irvin, Randall T.; Li, D. Y.

    2008-08-01

    Stainless steel is one of the most common metallic biomedical materials. For medical applications, its resistance to the adherence of biofilms is of importance to the elimination or minimization of bacterial infections. In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a process combining surface nanocrystallization and thermal oxidation (or a recovery heat treatment in air) for reducing the biofilm's adherence to stainless steel. During this treatment, a target surface was sandblasted and the resultant dislocation cells in the surface layer were turned into nanosized grains by a subsequent recovery treatment in air. This process generated a more protective oxide film that blocked the electron exchange or reduced the surface activity more effectively. As a result, the biofilm's adherence to the treated surface was markedly minimized. A synthetic peptide was utilized as a substitute of biofilms to evaluate the adhesion between a treated steel surface and biofilms using an atomic force microscope (AFM) through measuring the adhesive force between the target surface and a peptide-coated AFM tip. It was shown that the adhesive force decreased with a decrease in the grain size of the steel. The corresponding surface electron work function (EWF) of the steel was also measured, which showed a trend of variation in EWF with the grain size, consistent with corresponding changes in the adhesive force.

  19. 77 FR 13631 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China; Institution and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China; Institution and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase... the United States is materially retarded, by reason of imports from China of drawn stainless...

  20. Ion beam nitriding of single and polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Abrasonis, G.; Riviere, J.P.; Templier, C.; Declemy, A.; Pranevicius, L.; Milhet, X.

    2005-04-15

    Polycrystalline and single crystalline [orientations (001) and (011)] AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was implanted at 400 deg. C with 1.2 keV nitrogen ions using a high current density of 0.5 mA cm{sup -2}. The nitrogen distribution profiles were determined using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The structure of nitrided polycrystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using glancing incidence and symmetric x-ray diffraction (XRD) while the structure of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using x-ray diffraction mapping of the reciprocal space. For identical treatment conditions, it is observed that the nitrogen penetration depth is larger for the polycrystalline samples than for the single crystalline ones. The nitrogen penetration depth depends on the orientation, the <001> being more preferential for nitrogen diffusion than <011>. In both type of samples, XRD analysis shows the presence of the phase usually called 'expanded' austenite or {gamma}{sub N} phase. The lattice expansion depends on the crystallographic plane family, the (001) planes showing an anomalously large expansion. The reciprocal lattice maps of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel demonstrate that during nitriding lattice rotation takes place simultaneously with lattice expansion. The analysis of the results based on the presence of stacking faults, residual compressive stress induced by the lattice expansion, and nitrogen concentration gradient indicates that the average lattice parameter increases with the nitrided layer depth. A possible explanation of the anomalous expansion of the (001) planes is presented, which is based on the combination of faster nitriding rate in the (001) oriented grains and the role of stacking faults and compressive stress.

  1. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  2. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-08-07

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  3. Laser surface modification of 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Dey, Sangeetha; Muthuchamy, Adiyen A; Janaki Ram, G D; Das, Mitun; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2017-02-28

    Medical grade 316L stainless steel was laser surface melted (LSM) using continuous wave Nd-YAG laser in argon atmosphere at 1 and 5 mm/s. The treated surfaces were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction to study the influence of top surface crystallographic orientation and type of grain boundaries on corrosion resistance, wettability, and biocompatibility. The laser scan velocity was found to have a marginal influence on the surface roughness and the type of grain boundaries. However, the crystal orientation density was found to be relatively high in 1 mm/s samples. The LSM samples showed a higher concentration of {101} and {123} planes parallel to the sample surface as well as a higher fraction of low-angle grain boundaries. The LSM samples were found to exhibit better surface wettability and enhanced the viability and proliferation of human fetal osteoblast cells in vitro when compared to the untreated samples. Further, the corrosion protection efficiency of 316L stainless steel was improved up to 70% by LSM in as-processed condition. The increased concentration of {101} and {123} planes on surfaces of LSM samples increases their surface energy, which is believed to be responsible for the improved in vitro cell proliferation. Further, the increased lattice spacing of these planes and high concentration of low-energy grain boundaries in LSM samples would have contributed to the better in vitro corrosion resistance than untreated 316L stainless steel. Our results indicate that LSM can be a potential treatment option for 316L stainless steel-based biomedical devices to improve biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  4. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  5. An improved method for stainless steel wire mesh cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Forni, C; Pagni, C A

    1985-07-01

    A method for stainless steel wire mesh cranioplasty is described. The method has proved simple and quick. Cosmetic results have been very good and no complications have been observed so far. This method seems particularly suitable in very large skull defects. It seems to reduce the incidence of the major complications of the wire mesh cranioplasties, viz. lifting of the margins, depression of the prosthetic vault and electrolytic interference with the circulating fluids.

  6. Survey on Metals Contained in Stainless Steel Kitchenware and Tableware.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Yuu; Haneishi, Nahoko; Suzuki, Kumi; Ogimoto, Mami; Takanashi, Mayu; Tomioka, Naoko; Uematsu, Yoko; Monma, Kimio

    2017-01-01

    Stainless steel kitchenware and tableware on sale in Japan were investigated. Surface elemental composition ratios of 172 samples were analyzed by the fluorescence X-ray method. High levels of manganese (9.59-20.03%)were detected in 17 samples. This finding was confirmed by ICP analysis. Next, we conducted migration tests. Samples conformed to the Italian Specific Migration Limits. Moreover, lead and antimony were not detected in these samples, in accordance with the Japanese Food Sanitation Law.

  7. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  8. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  9. 76 FR 34964 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... FR 5559 (February 1, 2011). On February 28, 2011, Venus Wire Industries Pvt. Ltd (``Venus'') and... review of Venus, Ambica Steels Limited (``Ambica''), Atlas Stainless Corporation (``Atlas Stainless..., Chandan, Facor, Grand Foundry, India Steel, Meltroll, Mukand, Sindia Steels, Snowdrop and Venus....

  10. 75 FR 973 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded stainless steel pipes (WSSP) from the... review covers one respondent, SeAH Steel Corporation (SeAH). We preliminarily determine that sales...

  11. Characterization of bulk stainless steel joints developed through microwave hybrid heating

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Amit; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Das, Shantanu

    2014-05-01

    Processing of metallic materials through microwave heating is a challenging area of research. In the present work, joining of stainless steel-316 to stainless steel-316 in the bulk form has been carried out by placing stainless steel-316 powder at the interface and through targeted heating using microwave hybrid heating. The trials were carried out in a multimode microwave applicator at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and power 900 W. The developed joints were characterized using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope and measurement of Vicker's microhardness, porosity and tensile strength. The X-ray diffraction spectrum of the developed joint shows the presence of chromium carbide, iron carbide and iron silicide phases that eventually contribute to enhancement of the microhardness of the joint. The scanning electron microscope micrographs confirm classical metallurgical bonding between the substrate and the interface (molten powder) layer; the epitaxial growth rate was observed adjacent to the fusion zone. The average observed Vicker's microhardness in the joint zone on the grain boundary was significantly higher than that inside the grains due to the presence of various hard phases at the grain boundaries. Evaluation of the tensile strength of the joints showed an average ultimate tensile strength of 425.0 MPa with an average elongation of 9.44%. - Highlights: • Joining of stainless steel (SS-316) plates using microwave hybrid heating • Epitaxial growth rate observed adjacent to the fusion zone of welded joint • The ultimate tensile strength of the order of 425.0 MPa with 9.44% elongation.

  12. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  13. Thermo-mechanical behavior of stainless steel knitted structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdani, Syed Talha Ali; Fernando, Anura; Maqsood, Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    Heating fabric is an advanced textile material that is extensively researched by the industrialists and the scientists alike. Ability to create highly flexible and drapeable heating fabrics has many applications in everyday life. This paper presents a study conducted on the comparison of heatability of knitted fabric made of stainless steel yarn. The purpose of the study is to find a suitable material for protective clothing against cold environments. In the current research the ampacity of stainless steel yarn is observed in order to prevent the overheating of the heating fabrics. The behavior of the knitted structure is studied for different levels of supply voltage. Infrared temperature sensing is used to measure the heat generated from the fabrics in order to measure the temperature of the fabrics without physical contact. It is concluded that interlock structure is one of the most suited structures for knitted heating fabrics. As learnt through this research, fabrics made of stainless steel yarn are capable of producing a higher level of heating compared to that of knitted fabric made using silver coated polymeric yarn at the same supply voltage.

  14. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  15. Iodine susceptibility of pseudomonads grown attached to stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonads were adapted to grow in phosphate-buffered water and on stainless steel surfaces to study the iodine sensitivity of attached and planktonic cells. Cultures adapted to low nutrient growth were incubated at room temperature in a circulating reactor system with stainless steel coupons to allow biofilm formation on the metal surfaces. In some experiments, the reactor was partially emptied and refilled with buffer at each sampling time to simulate a "fill-and-draw" water system. Biofilms of attached bacteria, resuspended biofilm bacteria, and reactor suspension, were exposed to 1 mg l-1 iodine for 2 min. Attached bacterial populations which established on coupons within 3 to 5 days displayed a significant increase in resistance to iodine. Increased resistance was also observed for resuspended cells from the biofilm and planktonic bacteria in the system suspension. Generally, intact biofilms and resuspended biofilm cells were most resistant, followed by planktonic bacteria and phosphate buffer cultures. Thus, biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces within water systems can result in significantly increased disinfection resistance of commonly-occurring water-borne bacteria that may enhance their ability to colonise water treatment and distribution systems.

  16. Iodine susceptibility of pseudomonads grown attached to stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonads were adapted to grow in phosphate-buffered water and on stainless steel surfaces to study the iodine sensitivity of attached and planktonic cells. Cultures adapted to low nutrient growth were incubated at room temperature in a circulating reactor system with stainless steel coupons to allow biofilm formation on the metal surfaces. In some experiments, the reactor was partially emptied and refilled with buffer at each sampling time to simulate a "fill-and-draw" water system. Biofilms of attached bacteria, resuspended biofilm bacteria, and reactor suspension, were exposed to 1 mg l-1 iodine for 2 min. Attached bacterial populations which established on coupons within 3 to 5 days displayed a significant increase in resistance to iodine. Increased resistance was also observed for resuspended cells from the biofilm and planktonic bacteria in the system suspension. Generally, intact biofilms and resuspended biofilm cells were most resistant, followed by planktonic bacteria and phosphate buffer cultures. Thus, biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces within water systems can result in significantly increased disinfection resistance of commonly-occurring water-borne bacteria that may enhance their ability to colonise water treatment and distribution systems.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  18. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  19. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-28

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr–rich α'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of δ-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  20. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.

  1. Austenitic stainless steel patterning by plasma assisted diffusion treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwiec, T.; Marcos, G.; Thiriet, T.; Guo, Y.; Belmonte, T.

    2009-09-01

    The new concept of surface texturing or surface patterning on austenitic stainless steel by plasma assisted diffusion treatment is presented in this paper. It allows the creation of uniform micro or nano relief with regularly shaped asperities or depressions. Plasma assisted diffusion treatments are based on the diffusion of nitrogen and/or carbon in a metallic material at moderate to elevated temperatures. Below 420°C, a plasma assisted nitriding treatment of austenitic stainless steel produces a phase usually called expanded austenite. Expanded austenite is a metastable nitrogen supersaturated solid solution with a disordered fcc structure and a distorted lattice. The nitrided layer with the expanded austenite is highly enriched in nitrogen (from 10 to 35 at%) and submitted to high compressive residual stresses. From mechanical consideration, it is shown that the only possible deformation occurs in the direction perpendicular to the surface. Such an expansion of the layer from the initial surface of the substrate to the gas phase is used here for surface patterning of stainless steel parts. The surface patterning is performed by using masks (TEM grid) and multi-dipolar plasmas.

  2. Electrochemical-induced dissolution of stainless steel files.

    PubMed

    Amaral, C C F; Ormiga, F; Gomes, J A C P

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of the dissolution process when hand stainless steel files are polarized in solutions containing chloride and fluoride to promote their dissolution. Redox curves and anodic polarization curves were obtained to determine the conditions necessary for the dissolution of stainless steel endodontic files. Anodic polarization of sizes 20 and 30 files was performed, and a t-test (P < 0.05) was used to compare the weight loss, the time of dissolution and the electrical charge generated by both groups of files. Fragments were polarized in simulated root canals to evaluate the dissolution process. After the tests, a size 10 K-file was used to verify the possibility of bypassing the fragment. Radiographic analysis of the simulated canals was used before and after the tests to verify fragment dissolution. A progressive consumption of the sizes 20 and 30 files was observed with total polarization times of 7.0 and 9.0 min, respectively. Files with the larger diameters exhibited greater weight loss, longer times of dissolution and generated a greater electrical charge during the active dissolution process (t-test, P < 0.05). After 60 min, the anodic polarization of file fragments in simulated root canals resulted in their partial dissolution. A 60-min anodic polarization of stainless steel K-file fragments in simulated root canals resulted in their partial dissolution. The fragments could be bypassed after the test. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich α'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of δ-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  4. Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

  5. Mechanical Behavior and Fractography of 304 Stainless Steel with High Hydrogen Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M.

    2003-02-05

    Hydrogen embrittlement of 304 stainless steel with different hydrogen concentrations has been investigated. An electrochemical technique was used to effectively charge the high level of hydrogen into 304 stainless steel in a short period of time. At 25 ppm of hydrogen, 304 stainless steel loses 10 percent of its original mechanical strength and 20 percent plasticity. Although the ductile feature dominates the fractography, the brittle crown area near the outer surface shows the intergranular rupture effected by hydrogen. At 60 ppm of hydrogen, 304 stainless steel loses 23 percent of its strength and 38 percent plasticity, where the brittle mode dominates the fracture of the materials. Experimental results show that hydrogen damage to the performance of 304 stainless steel is significant even at very low levels. The fractograph analysis indicates the high penetration ability of hydrogen in 304 stainless steel. This work also demonstrates the advantages of the electrochemical charging technique in the study of hydrogen embrittlement.

  6. Research Investigation of Armor Plate Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-02-20

    location at which the ballistic limits were determined. Ballistic limits and average hardness values from the 16 duplicate plates are given in Table 10 ...OF ARMOR PLATE STEELS Plate Nuzuber %C %.Mn %Si %Ni. %Cr %Mo %cu *7111 .46 1.58 .20 . 10 /.20 7276 .50 1.07 .3o 7277 .39 .35 .23 7278 .47 .91 .26 7279...26 2.3/2.7 7328 .34 .89 .20 1.3/1.7 .35/.46 * 7329 .34 .88 .25 1.3/1.7 10 /.20 7330 .46 .86 .24 .25/.35 : 10 /.20 734 .46 .84 .29 W 5. 35 7341 .34 .94

  7. Cryogenic Thermal Absorptance Measurements on Small-Diameter Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, James; Jahromi, Amir; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope includes a mechanical cryocooler which cools its detectors to their 6 Kelvin operating temperature. The coolant gas flows through several meters of small-diameter stainless steel tubing, which is exposed to thermal radiation from its environment. Over much of its length this tubing is gold-plated to minimize the absorption of this radiant heat. In order to confirm that the cryocooler will meet MIRI's requirements, the thermal absorptance of this tubing was measured as a function of its environment temperature. We describe the measurement technique and present the results.

  8. Cryogenic thermal absorptance measurements on small-diameter stainless steel tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, James; Jahromi, Amir; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope includes a mechanical cryocooler which cools its detectors to their 6 K operating temperature. The coolant gas flows through several meters of small-diameter stainless steel tubing, which is exposed to thermal radiation from its environment. Over much of its length this tubing is gold-plated to minimize the absorption of this radiant heat. In order to confirm that the cryocooler will meet MIRI's requirements, the thermal absorptance of this tubing was measured as a function of its environment temperature. We describe the measurement technique and present the results.

  9. Particle Impact Ignition Test Data on a Stainless Steel Hand Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the particle impact ignition test of a stainless steel hand valve. The impact of particles is a real fire hazard with stainless steel hand valves, however 100 mg of particulate can be tolerated. Since it is unlikely that 100 mg of stainless steel contaminant particles can be simultaneously released into this type of valve in the WSTF configuration, this is acceptable and within statistical confidence as demonstrated by testing.

  10. New research progressing of surface modification of medical 316L stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin; Ba, Dechun; Wang, Qing; Guo, Deyu

    2013-12-01

    316L stainless steels are widely used in clinical and medical fields because of their comprehensive performance. This paper analyses the current development situation and major existing problems of medical 316L stainless steels. The new methods and research achievement of surface modification in recent years are described in detail. It indicates that surface modification is an effective way to solve clinical application problems, and provides new opportunities for medical 316L stainless steels in medical applications.

  11. Exposure to stainless steel welding fumes and lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, B; Hansen, K S; Kjuus, H; Persson, P G

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel welding is associated with exposure to metals including hexavalent chromium and nickel. This study is a meta-analysis of five studies of stainless steel welders and the occurrence of lung cancer. Asbestos exposure and smoking habits have been taken into account. The calculated pooled relative risk estimate was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.28-2.93. This result suggests a causal relation between exposure to stainless steel welding and lung cancer. PMID:8199684

  12. Evaluation of stainless steel cladding for use in current design LWRs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, A.; Santucci, J.; Lindquist, K.; Yario, W.; Stern, G.; Goldstein, L.; Joseph, L.

    1982-12-01

    The design of stainless steel-clad LWR fuel and its performance at steady-state, transient, and accident conditions were reviewed. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits and disadvantages of substituting stainless steel-clad fuel for the currently used Zircaloy-clad fuel. For a large, modern PWR, the technology and the fuel-cycle costs of stainless steel- and Zircaloy-clad fuels were compared.

  13. Stainless steel and silicon direct interface synthesis: Chemical bonding effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Michael J.

    Planar stainless steel/stainless steel interfaces, with and without a titanium interlayer and silicon/silicon interfaces have been produced in an ultra high vacuum (UHV) diffusion bonding/deposition instrument. Interface synthesis was accomplished by diffusion bonding two substrates after subjecting the substrate surfaces to a variety of pre-bonding treatments including heat treating, ion-beam sputter cleaning and thin film deposition. Chemical characterization was performed in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) prior to deposition and/or bonding and ex situ by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Additionally, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study interfaces before and after bonding. Diffusion bonding behavior of stainless steel depends strongly on the chemistry of the surfaces to be bonded. Very smooth, mechanically polished and lapped substrates would bond completely in UHV in 1 hour at 1000°C under 3.5 MPa uniaxial pressure, if the native oxide on the substrates was removed by ion beam cleaning. No voids were observed in these bonded interfaces as studied by TEM and the strength was equal to the unbonded bare material. When an electron beam deposited, 200 A titanium interlayer was added to the stainless steel interface, while bonding under the same conditions, mechanical tensile testing resulted in very low strength when compared with that of chemically clean stainless steel interfaces. Analytical inspection of the interfaces, performed with EELS, EDS, and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) coupled with images from TEM and SEM, showed the reason for the significantly reduced strength is a result of limited contact area and delamination between titanium carbide particles precipitated in the interface. Silicon wafers bicrystals were synthesized by bonding two single-crystal substrates. Silicon wafers were

  14. Development of a compact laminar flow heat exchanger with stainless steel micro-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, N.; Nagai, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Asakura, H.; Obata, M.

    2001-05-01

    The present paper describes the design concept and manufacturing of a new compact laminar flow heat exchanger with stainless-steel micro-tubes for helium refrigerators. In the temperature range of less than 20 K, aluminum plate fin type heat exchangers exhibit a remarkable fall of performance characteristics as a compact heat exchanger. We presented in a previous paper that some compact heat exchangers with good performance in the temperature range of less than 4 K are required for a subcooled He II refrigerator cycle to be worked with 3He turbo-compressors (F. Doty, et al., A new look at the closed brayton cycle, Proceedings, IECEC-90 Reno, NV, 1991, p. 116). For this requirement, we developed a micro-tube strip counter flow type heat exchanger, which consists of 12 elements with a total of 4800 stainless steel micro-tubes. Each element is formed with 400 tubes and a newly developed vacuum brazing method was applied for the bonding to the side plate. Each tube has an inner diameter of 0.5 mm, an outer diameter of 0.7 mm and is 310 mm long. We developed a cladding plate with two layers of gold brazing sheet sandwiched inside. In aerodynamic and thermal design of the element, the laminar flow conditions were adopted for the flows of inner and outer tubes to keep a high heat transfer rate and a low pressure loss.

  15. Analysis of Deep Drawing Process for Stainless Steel Micro-Channel Array

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Chia; Lin, Jiang-Cheng; Lee, Rong-Mao

    2017-01-01

    The stainless steel bipolar plate has received much attention due to the cost of graphite bipolar plates. Since the micro-channel of bipolar plates plays the role of fuel flow field, electric connector and fuel sealing, an investigation of the deep drawing process for stainless steel micro-channel arrays is reported in this work. The updated Lagrangian formulation, degenerated shell finite element analysis, and the r-minimum rule have been employed to study the relationship between punch load and stroke, distributions of stress and strain, thickness variations and depth variations of individual micro-channel sections. A micro-channel array is practically formed, with a width and depth of a single micro-channel of 0.75 mm and 0.5 mm, respectively. Fractures were usually observed in the fillet corner of the micro-channel bottom. According to the experimental results, more attention should be devoted to the fillet dimension design of punch and die. A larger die fillet can lead to better formability and a reduction of the punch load. In addition, the micro-channel thickness and the fillet radius have to be taken into consideration at the same time. Finally, the punch load estimated by the unmodified metal forming equation is higher than that of experiments. PMID:28772782

  16. Analysis of Deep Drawing Process for Stainless Steel Micro-Channel Array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsung-Chia; Lin, Jiang-Cheng; Lee, Rong-Mao

    2017-04-18

    The stainless steel bipolar plate has received much attention due to the cost of graphite bipolar plates. Since the micro-channel of bipolar plates plays the role of fuel flow field, electric connector and fuel sealing, an investigation of the deep drawing process for stainless steel micro-channel arrays is reported in this work. The updated Lagrangian formulation, degenerated shell finite element analysis, and the r-minimum rule have been employed to study the relationship between punch load and stroke, distributions of stress and strain, thickness variations and depth variations of individual micro-channel sections. A micro-channel array is practically formed, with a width and depth of a single micro-channel of 0.75 mm and 0.5 mm, respectively. Fractures were usually observed in the fillet corner of the micro-channel bottom. According to the experimental results, more attention should be devoted to the fillet dimension design of punch and die. A larger die fillet can lead to better formability and a reduction of the punch load. In addition, the micro-channel thickness and the fillet radius have to be taken into consideration at the same time. Finally, the punch load estimated by the unmodified metal forming equation is higher than that of experiments.

  17. 78 FR 7451 - Clad Steel Plate From Japan; Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... COMMISSION Clad Steel Plate From Japan; Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on clad steel plate from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... contained in USITC Publication 4370 (January 2013), entitled Clad Steel Plate from Japan: Investigation No...

  18. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  19. Superplastic Forming of Duplex Stainless Steel for Aerospace Part

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Yoon, Jong-Hoon; Yoo, Joon-Tae; Yi, Young-Moo

    2011-08-22

    In this study, the high temperature forming behavior of duplex stainless steel has been characterized and the outer shell of a combustion chamber was fabricated with pressure difference of hot gas. It consists of two parts which are the outer skin made of stainless steel to sustain the internal pressure and the inner shell made of copper alloy for regenerative cooling channels. Two outer skins partitioned to half with respect to the symmetric axis was prepared by hot gas forming process with a maximum pressure of 7 MPa following to FEM analysis. For inner layer, copper alloy was machined for cooling channels and then placed in the gas pressure welding fixture. It is shown that the optimum condition of gas pressure welding is 7 MPa at 890 deg. C, for one hour. EDX analysis and scanning electron microscope micrograph confirm the atomic diffusion process is observed at the interface and copper atoms diffuse into steel, while iron and chrome atoms diffuse into copper. The result shows that the manufacturing method with superplastic forming and gas pressure welding of steel and copper alloy has been successful for near net shape manufacturing of scaled combustion chamber of launch vehicle.

  20. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from shippingport reactor components.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    1995-06-07

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approx}13 y at {approx}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approx}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and JIC of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approx}8 y of service.

  1. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from Shippingport reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approximately}13 y at {approximately}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approximately}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approximately} 15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approximately} 8 y of service.

  2. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments.

  3. Fabrication of stainless steel spherical anodes for use with boat-mounted boom electroshocker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, Patrick J.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    1992-01-01

    A frugal method of fabricating spherical anodes from stainless steel mixing bowls is presented. We believe that the purported mechanical disadvantages of using spherical electrodes are largely unfounded.

  4. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott–Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  5. Improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel by nanocrystalline and electrochemical nitridation in artificial saliva solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jinlong; Liang, Tongxiang

    2015-12-01

    The fluoride ion in artificial saliva significantly changed semiconductor characteristic of the passive film formed on the surface of 316L stainless steels. The electrochemical results showed that nanocrystalline α‧-martensite improved corrosion resistance of the stainless steel in a typical artificial saliva compared with coarse grained stainless steel. Moreover, comparing with nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, corrosion resistance of the nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel was also improved significantly, even in artificial saliva solution containing fluoride ion. The present study showed that the cryogenic cold rolling and electrochemical nitridation improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel for the dental application.

  6. Correlation Between Shear Punch and Tensile Strength for Low-Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudi, R.; Sadeghi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The deformation behavior of AISI 1015 low-carbon steel, and AISI 304 stainless steel sheets was investigated by uniaxial tension and the shear punch test (SPT). Both materials were cold rolled to an 80% thickness reduction and subsequently annealed in the temperature range 25-850 °C to produce a wide range of yield and ultimate strength levels. The correlations between shear punch and tensile yield and ultimate stresses were established empirically. Different linear relationships having different slopes and intercepts were found for the low-carbon and stainless steel sheets, and the possible parameters affecting the correlation were discussed. It was shown that, within limits, yield and tensile strength of thin steel sheets can be predicted from the shear data obtained by the easy-to-perform SPT.

  7. Practical method of diffusion-welding steel plate in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.; Moore, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    Method is ideal for critical service requirements where parent metal properties are equaled in notch toughness, stress rupture and other characteristics. Welding technique variations may be used on a variety of materials, such as carbon steels, alloy steels, stainless steels, ceramics, and reactive and refractory materials.

  8. Sensitization and tunneling corrosion of austenitic type 347 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Teodoro, C.A.; Wolynec, S.

    1998-02-01

    Sensitization of type 347 (UNS S34700) austenitic stainless steel (SS) samples removed from forged bars was investigated using the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) method and the weight-loss technique of ASTM A 262, Practice B., A normal and a low-carbon steel were investigated. After solution-annealing at 1,050 C, the two steels were submitted to sensitization treatments at 550 C, 670 C, 790 C, and 910 C for times varying from 1 h to 130 h. The steel with normal carbon content also was solution-annealed at 1.140 C and submitted to the same sensitization treatments for times varying from 1 h to 62 h. Correlation between results obtained by the two techniques was very poor. The lack of correlation was ascribed to tunneling corrosion, which is typical of forged steels, in addition to intergranular corrosion resulting from sensitization. The electrochemical test was most sensitive to corrosion by sensitization. The Practice B test did not discriminate between the two types of attack. The steel solution-annealed at higher temperature was more susceptible to sensitization.

  9. The interaction between nitride uranium and stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shornikov, D. P.; Nikitin, S. N.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Yurlova, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium nitride is most popular nuclear fuel for Fast Breeder Reactor New Generation. In-pile experiments at reactor BOR-60 was shown an interaction between nitride fuel and stainless steel in the range of 8-11% burn up (HA). In order to investigate this interaction has been done diffusion tests of 200 h and has been shown that the reaction occurs in the temperature range 1000-1100 ° C. UN interacted with steel in case of high pollution oxygen (1000-2000 ppm). Also has been shown to increase interaction UN with EP-823 steel in the presence of cesium. In this case the interaction layer had a thickness about 2-3 μm. Has been shown minimal interaction with new ODS steel EP-450. The interaction layer had a thickness less then 2 μm. Did not reveal the influence of tellurium and iodine increased interaction. It was show compatibility at 1000 °C between UN and EP-450 ODS steel, chrome steel, alloying aluminium and silicium.

  10. Chromium in biological samples from low-level exposed stainless steel and mild steel welders

    SciTech Connect

    Bonde, J.P.; Christensen, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium is of concern because of the carcinogenic action of this metal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate internal exposure to chromium in welders who were exposed to low levels of chromium. Chromium in urine, blood, and seminal fluid was determined among 60 welders and 45 referents. The concentration of chromium in urine and blood did not change across a workshift or across a 3-wk break in exposure. However, stainless-steel and mild-steel welders who were exposed to low levels of chromium and steel welders who were mildly exposed had significantly increased levels of chromium in post-shift urine (mean 2.1 nmol/mmol creatinine (standard deviation (SD) = 1.0) and 1.3 nmol/mmol creatinine (SD = 0.5), respectively) compared with referents (mean 0.7 nmol/mmol creatinine (SD = 0.3)). Pre-shift blood chromium concentrations showed a similar variation between exposed workers and referents. Subgroups of stainless-steel welders had very high levels of chromium in seminal fluid. This finding may, however, be explained by nonoccupational factors and, therefore, warrants further study. Attention should focus on the potential risk of delayed health effects among stainless-steel and mild-steel welders who heretofore were not thought to be at risk from chromium exposure.

  11. Pitting and crevice corrosion of stainless steels in ammonium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsen, O.; Aromaa, J.; Virtanen, J.; Tavi, M.

    1995-09-01

    Carbon steel is the most commonly used construction material in oil refining. Ammonium chloride deposition is a well known problem in oil refining. When these deposits form in a moist environment, they are corrosive to carbon steel. When unexpected corrosion problems are faced the material is often changed zn to alloys like stainless steels. The main drawback of stainless steels is that they are prone to different forms of localized corrosion, especially in the presence of halides. In this paper the use of electrochemical measurements to study the corrosion resistance of stainless steels is discussed.

  12. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels.

  13. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  14. Moessbauer measurements of microstructural change in aged duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kirihigashi, A.; Sakamoto, N.; Yamaoka, T.; Nasu, S.

    1995-08-01

    A duplex stainless steel (ASME SA351 CF8M) has usually been manufactured by a continuous casting technique. It consists of a paramagnetic austenite phase and a ferromagnetic ferrite phase. It has been known that the ferrite phase decomposition occurs in this steel after aging between 300 and 450 C. As a result of phase decomposition, a Fe-rich phase and a Cr-rich phase are produced in the ferrite phase. It is difficult to detect the phase decomposition even by not only optical microscopy but also transmission electron microscopy, since the decomposed structure is very fine. However, Moessbauer measurements that can detect the magnetic hyperfine field of magnetic substance may detect the microstructural change. An averaged magnetic hyperfine field increases in the ferrite phase, due to the production of the Fe-rich phase which has high magnetic hyperfine field. Therefore, the authors investigated the phase decomposition of the duplex stainless steel caused by aging, utilization Moessbauer spectroscopy which has capability of detecting this structural change in the atomic level quantitatively. The authors also investigated the potential of backscattering Moessbauer method for NDE technique.

  15. Cold Spray Repair of Martensitic Stainless Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccoli, M.; Cornacchia, G.; Maestrini, D.; Marconi, G. P.; Roberti, R.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of using cold spray as repair technique of martensitic stainless steel components was evaluated through laboratory investigations. An austenitic stainless steel feedstock powder was chosen, instead of soft metals powders like nickel, copper, or aluminum, used for repairing components made in light alloy or cast iron. The present study directly compares the microstructure, the residual stresses, and the micro-hardness of repairs obtained by cold spray and by TIG welding, that is commonly used as repair technique in large steel components. XRD and optical metallographic analysis of the repairs showed that cold spray offers some advantages, inducing compressive residual stresses in the repair and avoiding alterations of the interface between repair and base material. For these reasons, a heat treatment after the cold spray repair is not required to restore the base material properties, whereas a post-weld heat treatment is needed after the welding repair. Cold spray repair also exhibits a higher micro-hardness than the welding repair. In addition, the cavitation erosion resistance of a cold spray coating was investigated through ultrasonic cavitation tests, and the samples worn surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Corrosion of carbon steels, stainless steels, and titanium in aqueous lithium bromide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Guinon, J.L.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Perez-Herranz, V. . Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear); Lacoste, G. )

    1994-03-01

    Effects of lithium bromide (LiBr) concentration, pH, temperature, exposure time, and the action of some inhibitors on corrosion of several carbon (C) steels, stainless steels (SS), and a titanium (Ti) alloy were studied. Corrosion rates were determined by the polarization resistance method and compared to rates determined by weight-loss measurements. Pitting potentials (E[sub p]) were evaluated in neutral LiBr solution and with different inhibitors. Pit density and average pit depth depended on the metal tested, with lowest values for Ti, the next lowest values for type 316 SS (UNS S31600), and the highest values for UNS G41350 tempered steel.

  17. Stress Induce Martensitic Transformations in Hydrogen Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul

    2013-04-01

    In austenitic type stainless steels, hydrogen concentration gradients formed during electrochemical charging and followed by hydrogen loss during aging, at room temperature, surface stresses, and martensitic phases α'-BCC and ɛ-HCP developed. The basic relationship between the X-ray diffraction peak broadening and the hydrogen gradients, formed during charging and aging at room temperature in such austenitic stainless steels, were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the impact of stresses must be considered in the discussion of phase transformations due to hydrogenation. Austenitic stainless steels based on iron-nickel-chromium, have relatively low stacking fault energy γSFE and undergo: quenching to low temperatures, plastic deformation, sensitization heat treatments, high pressure (≥3-5 × 109 Pa) by hydrogen or other gases, electrochemical charging (when the sample is cathode) and when is irradiation by various ions the samples in vacuum. All the above mentioned induce formation of ɛ and α' in the face-centered cubic (FCC) austenite γ matrix. The highest stresses cause formation of mainly α' phase and ɛ-martensite, and both are involved in plastic deformation processes and promoting crack propagation at the surface. In 310 steel, the crack propagation is based on deformation processes following ɛ-martensitic formation only. Formations of ɛ- and α'-martensites were noted along the fracture surfaces and ahead of the crack tip. The cracks propagated through the ɛ-martensitic plates, which formed along the active slip planes, while α' phase was always found in the high-stress region on the ends of the ligaments from both sides of the crack surfaces undergoing propagation.

  18. Stress Induce Martensitic Transformations in Hydrogen Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In austenitic type stainless steels, hydrogen concentration gradients formed during electrochemical charging and followed by hydrogen loss during aging, at room temperature, surface stresses, and martensitic phases α'-BCC and ɛ-HCP developed. The basic relationship between the X-ray diffraction peak broadening and the hydrogen gradients, formed during charging and aging at room temperature in such austenitic stainless steels, were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the impact of stresses must be considered in the discussion of phase transformations due to hydrogenation. Austenitic stainless steels based on iron-nickel-chromium, have relatively low stacking fault energy γSFE and undergo: quenching to low temperatures, plastic deformation, sensitization heat treatments, high pressure (≥3-5 × 109 Pa) by hydrogen or other gases, electrochemical charging (when the sample is cathode) and when is irradiation by various ions the samples in vacuum. All the above mentioned induce formation of ɛ and α' in the face-centered cubic (FCC) austenite γ matrix. The highest stresses cause formation of mainly α' phase and ɛ-martensite, and both are involved in plastic deformation processes and promoting crack propagation at the surface. In 310 steel, the crack propagation is based on deformation processes following ɛ-martensitic formation only. Formations of ɛ- and α'-martensites were noted along the fracture surfaces and ahead of the crack tip. The cracks propagated through the ɛ-martensitic plates, which formed along the active slip planes, while α' phase was always found in the high-stress region on the ends of the ligaments from both sides of the crack surfaces undergoing propagation.

  19. Osteogenic ability of Cu-bearing stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ling; Wong, Hoi Man; Yan, Chun Hoi; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Yang, Ke

    2015-10-01

    A newly developed copper-bearing stainless steel (Cu-SS) by directly immobilizing proper amount of Cu into a medical stainless steel (317L SS) during the metallurgical process could enable continuous release of trace amount of Cu(2+) ions, which play the key role to offer the multi-biofunctions of the stainless steel, including the osteogenic ability in the present study. The results of in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that Cu(2+) ions from Cu-SS could promote the osteogenic differentiation by stimulating the Alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity and the osteogenic gene expressions (Col1a1, Opn, and Runx2), and enhancing the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts cultured on its surface. The in vivo test further proved that more new bone tissue formed around the Cu-SS implant with more stable bone-to-implant contact in comparison with the 317L SS. In addition, Cu-SS showed satisfied biocompatibility according to the results of in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo histocompatibility, and its daily released amount of Cu(2+) ions in physiological saline solution was at trace level of ppb order (1.4 ppb/cm(2) ), which is rather safe to human health. Apart from these results, it was also found that Cu-SS could inhibit the happening of inflammation with lower TNF-α expression in the bone tissue post implantation compared with 317L SS. In addition to good biocompatibility, the overall findings demonstrated that the Cu-SS possessed obvious ability of promoting osteogenesis, indicating a unique application advantage in orthopedics.

  20. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.