Science.gov

Sample records for stand structure alter

  1. Altered structural development and accelerated succession from intermediate-scale wind disturbance in Quercus stands on the Cumberland Plateau, USA

    Treesearch

    Stephen D White; Justin L. Hart; Callie J. Schweitzer; Daniel C. Dey

    2015-01-01

    Natural disturbances play important roles in shaping the structure and composition of all forest ecosystems and can be used to inform silvicultural practices. Canopy disturbances are often classified along a gradient ranging from highly localized, gap-scale events to stand-replacing events. Wind storms such as downbursts, derechos, and low intensity tornadoes typically...

  2. Bark beetles and dwarf mistletoe interact to alter downed woody material, canopy structure, and stand characteristics in northern Colorado ponderosa pine

    Treesearch

    Jennifer G. Klutsch; Russell D. Beam; William R. Jacobi; Jose F. Negron

    2014-01-01

    Due to the recent outbreaks of bark beetles in western U.S.A., research has focused on the effects of tree mortality on forest conditions, such as fuel complexes and stand structure. However, most studies have addressed outbreak populations of bark beetles only and there is a lack of information on the effect of multiple endemic, low level populations of biotic...

  3. Stand density, stand structure, and species composition in transition oak stands of northwestern Pennsylvania

    Treesearch

    S.L. Stout

    1991-01-01

    Transition stands, those containing species associated with both the northern hardwood and oak-hickory forest types, are important to forest diversity in northwestern Pennsylvania. These stands have high value for a variety of forest uses, including timber production, wildlife habitat, and aesthetics. Diameter distributions are characteristically stratified by species...

  4. Vegetation Recovery and Stand Structure Following a Prescribed Stand-Replacement Burn in Sand Pine Scrub

    Treesearch

    Cathryn H. Greenberg

    2003-01-01

    Vegetation and stand structure of sand pine scrub in central Florida, USA, were measured before a prescribed stand-replacement burn and for > 8 y afterward. Herbaceous species richness peaked within 16 months postburn, then gradually declined, although significant differences were detected only between 16 months and > 8 y postburn. Twenty-two plant species...

  5. The effects of stand structure after thinning on the growth of an Allegheny hardwood stand

    Treesearch

    David A. Marquis; Richard L. Ernst

    1991-01-01

    A 50-year-old Allegheny hardwood stand in which the crown canopy had stratified into distinct species groups was thinned to 60% relative density leaving dramatically different stand structures and species composition. Treatments included combined thinning, thin from middle, thin from above, thin from below, and unthinned control. Individual tree growth was stimulated...

  6. Bark beetle-induced tree mortality alters stand energy budgets due to water budget changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, David E.; Ewers, Brent E.; Pendall, Elise; Frank, John; Kelly, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Insect outbreaks are major disturbances that affect a land area similar to that of forest fires across North America. The recent mountain pine bark beetle (D endroctonus ponderosae) outbreak and its associated blue stain fungi (Grosmannia clavigera) are impacting water partitioning processes of forests in the Rocky Mountain region as the spatially heterogeneous disturbance spreads across the landscape. Water cycling may dramatically change due to increasing spatial heterogeneity from uneven mortality. Water and energy storage within trees and soils may also decrease, due to hydraulic failure and mortality caused by blue stain fungi followed by shifts in the water budget. This forest disturbance was unique in comparison to fire or timber harvesting because water fluxes were altered before significant structural change occurred to the canopy. We investigated the impacts of bark beetles on lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) stand and ecosystem level hydrologic processes and the resulting vertical and horizontal spatial variability in energy storage. Bark beetle-impacted stands had on average 57 % higher soil moisture, 1.5 °C higher soil temperature, and 0.8 °C higher tree bole temperature over four growing seasons compared to unimpacted stands. Seasonal latent heat flux was highly correlated with soil moisture. Thus, high mortality levels led to an increase in ecosystem level Bowen ratio as sensible heat fluxes increased yearly and latent heat fluxes varied with soil moisture levels. Decline in canopy biomass (leaf, stem, and branch) was not seen, but ground-to-atmosphere longwave radiation flux increased, as the ground surface was a larger component of the longwave radiation. Variability in soil, latent, and sensible heat flux and radiation measurements increased during the disturbance. Accounting for stand level variability in water and energy fluxes will provide a method to quantify potential drivers of ecosystem processes and services as well as lead to greater

  7. Persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation have altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, Brad D; Wolf, Erik J

    2015-07-01

    Increases in spinal loading have been related to altered movements of the lower back during gait among persons with lower limb amputation, movements which are self-perceived by these individuals as contributing factors in the development of low back pain. However, the relationships between altered trunk kinematics and associated changes in lumbosacral kinetics during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements in this population have not yet been assessed. Three-dimensional lumbosacral kinetics (joint moments and powers) were compared between 9 persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation (wearing both a powered and passive knee device), and 9 uninjured controls, performing five consecutive sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements. During sit-to-stand movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls. During stand-to-sit movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were also significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls, with the exception of sagittal joint powers. Minimal differences in kinetic measures were noted between the powered and passive knee devices among persons with transfemoral amputation across all conditions. Altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements, important activities of daily living, may play a biomechanical role in the onset and/or recurrence of low back pain or injury among persons with lower-limb amputation.

  8. Stand structure and stocking control in Appalachian mixed hardwoods

    Treesearch

    George R., Jr. Trimble; H. Clay Smith

    1976-01-01

    Uneven-aged management using a "q" technique for structure control is discussed for Appalachian mixed hardwoods. The success in attaining stand structure goals with periodic selection cuts was evaluated. Where these goals had not been reached, the authors speculated, on the basis of current stand conditions, whether they would be reached, and if so, when. For...

  9. Effects of fir sawyer beetle on spatial structure of Siberian fir stands

    Treesearch

    Vladimir L. Gavrikov; Valentina P. Vetrova

    1991-01-01

    Insects not only use plants for food and habitat; they also change plant populations by influencing their structure and dynamics. This influence is evidenced in the alteration of the spatial structure of a stand. The fir sawyer, Monochamus urussovi Fisch. (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is the most abundant xylophagous insect injuring siberian fir,

  10. Altered movement strategies in sit-to-stand task in persons with transtibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Özyürek, Seher; Demirbüken, İlkşan; Angın, Salih

    2014-08-01

    Sit-to-stand movement is an essential function for participation in many activities of daily living. Although this movement is one of the most important functional tasks, there is limited research investigating strategies of sit-to-stand movement in transtibial amputees. To examine movement strategies of the sit-to-stand task in persons with transtibial amputation and healthy non-amputated individuals. Cross-sectional study. A total of 12 male unilateral transtibial amputees and 19 healthy male subjects participated in this study. Sit-to-stand movement was evaluated in terms of weight transfer time, weight-bearing symmetry, sway velocity, and rising index by using Balance Master System. Participants in both groups exhibited similar weight-bearing transfer time (p > 0.05). Transtibial amputees demonstrated significantly greater weight-bearing asymmetry, higher sway velocity, and lower rising index than healthy subjects during the sit-to-stand transfer movement (p < 0.05). Transtibial amputees were unable to use the same movement strategies during a sit-to-stand task as healthy individuals; therefore, they had to develop new strategies to perform this task. Little is known about the altered movement strategies during sit-to-stand task in transtibial amputees. The results of the study might provide some new insight into the motor components of the sit-to-stand movement in persons with transtibial amputation for both clinicians and researchers. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  11. Advanced Standing and Bridge Courses: Structures and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GlenMaye, Linnea F.; Lause, Timothy W.; Bolin, Brien L.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the issue of advanced standing in MSW programs in light of the new Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). Advanced standing structures of MSW programs were studied using a purposive sample consisting of 203 MSW program directors with a response rate of 28% (N=58). The results indicate that slightly more than 15%…

  12. [Effects of crop tree release on stand growth and stand structure of Cunninghamia lanceolata plantation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-qiang; Wang, Yi-xiang; Yang, Yi; Zhu, Ting-ting; Zhu, Xu-dan

    2015-02-01

    Crop trees were selected in a 26-year-old even-aged Cunninghamia lanceolata plantation in Lin' an, and compared in plots that were released and unreleased to examine growth and structure responses for 3 years after thinning. Crop tree release significantly increased the mean increments of diameter and volume of individual tree by 1.30 and 1.25 times relative to trees in control stands, respectively. The increments of diameter and volume of crop trees were significantly higher than those of general trees in thinning plots, crop trees and general trees in control plots, which suggested that the responses from different tree types to crop tree release treatment were different. Crop tree release increased the average distances of crop trees to the nearest neighboring trees, reducing competition among crop trees by about 68.2%. 3-year stand volume increment for thinning stands had no significant difference with that of control stands although the number of trees was only 81.5% of the control. Crop trees in thinned plots with diameters over than 14 cm reached 18.0% over 3 years, compared with 12.0% for trees without thinning, suggesting that crop tree release benefited the larger individual trees. The pattern of tree locations in thinning plots tended to be random, complying with the rule that tree distribution pattern changes with growth. Crop tree release in C. lanceolata plantation not only promoted the stand growth, but also optimized the stand structure, benefiting crop trees sustained rapid growth and larger diameter trees production.

  13. 12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 41 of 148; file no. 1320/92, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications No. OC1-55-72-(Rev.); Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 43 of 148; file no. AF 1320/94, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. 27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL FRAMING ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. ENG-04353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 27 of 148; file no. 1320/78. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, Rev. B; date: 15 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. 5. "TEST STAND 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. "TEST STAND 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/17, Rev. A. Stamped: AS BUILT; NO CHANGES. Date of Revision A: 11/1/50. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Reconstructed old-growth forest stand structure and composition of two stands on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington state

    Treesearch

    David H. Peter; Constance A. Harrington

    2010-01-01

    We reconstructed the stand structure and composition for two western Washington old-growth forest stands harvested around 1930 (named Fresca and Rail) from field and historical data. Both old-growth stands had a codominant or dominant 250-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) overstory with a few scattered older Douglas-fir....

  18. The effects of partial cutting on stand structure and growth of western hemlock-Sitka spruce stands in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deal, R.L.; Tappeiner, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of partial cutting on species composition, new and residual-tree cohorts, tree size distribution, and tree growth was evaluated on 73 plots in 18 stands throughout southeast Alaska. These partially cut stands were harvested 12-96 years ago, when 16-96% of the former stand basal area was removed. Partial cutting maintained stand structures similar to uncut old-growth stands, and the cutting had no significant effects on tree species composition. The establishment of new-tree cohorts was positively related to the proportion of basal-area cut. The current stand basal area, tree species composition, and stand growth were significantly related to trees left after harvest (p < 0.001). Trees that were 20-80 cm dbh at the time of cutting had the greatest tree-diameter and basal-area growth and contributed the most to stand growth. Diameter growth of Sitka spruce and western hemlock was similar, and the proportion of stand basal-area growth between species was consistent for different cutting intensities. Concerns about changing tree species composition, lack of spruce regeneration, and greatly reduced stand growth and vigor with partial cuts were largely unsubstantiated. Silvicultural systems based on partial cutting can provide rapidly growing trees for timber production while maintaining complex stand structures with mixtures of spruce and hemlock trees similar to oldgrowth stands.

  19. Forest stand structure of the northern spotted owl's foraging habitat.

    Treesearch

    Malcolm P. North; Jerry F. Franklin; Andrew B. Carey; Eric D. Forsman; Tom. Hamer

    1999-01-01

    Although the spotted owl's close association with old growth has been extensively studied, it more difficult to identify and quantify the abundance of particular stand structures associated with preferred owl foraging sites. Old-growth forests have a suite of characteristics that distinguish them from younger forests but which also make it difficult to isolate...

  20. Advanced Standing Revisited: Current Status, Structure, and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremner, Judith; Zastrow, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A 2004 national survey of CSWE-accredited MSW programs addresses three major questions. (1) Do advanced standing students perform as well as (or better than) traditional social work graduate students? (2) What should be the educational continuum between undergraduate and graduate programs? (3) What is the current status and structure of advanced…

  1. Potential effect of stand structure on belowground allocation

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Dean

    2001-01-01

    Stand structure affects two key variables that affect biomass allocation to the stem: leaf area and height to the center of the crown. By translating wind forces into bending moment, these variables generate bending stress within a stem. The uniform stress axiom of stem formation can be used to calculate current stem mass for a given bending moment and stem allocation...

  2. 10. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/14, Rev. B. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. B; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 9. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG 04-35350-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/13. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, no change; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 15. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; STRUCTURAL STEEL; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; STRUCTURAL STEEL; PLAN & DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG 04-353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/34, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. A, no change; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 13. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/18, Rev. D. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. D, no change; Date: 18 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. 16. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; STRUCTURAL STEEL; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; STRUCTURAL STEEL; ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS." Specifications No. ENG 04353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/35, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. A; Date: 29 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 12. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/16, Rev. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 26 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/15, Rev. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 4. "TEST STAND NO. 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PLAN AND ELEVATION." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PLAN AND ELEVATION." Specifications No. OC11-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/12 REV. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Alteration Of Nutrient Status By Manipulation Of Composition And Density In A Shortleaf Pine-Hardwood Stand

    Treesearch

    Hal O. Liechty; Valerie L. Sawyer; Michael G. Shelton

    2002-01-01

    Abstract - Uneven-aged management is used to promote adequate pine reproduction and control species composition of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.)-hardwood stands in the Interior Highlands of the southern United States. The modification of pine-hardwood composition in these stands has the potential to alter nutrient pools and availability since...

  11. Spatial-dependent resonance mode and frequency of rotationally periodic structures subjected to standing wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongsheng; Wang, Shiyu

    2017-09-01

    This work examines the distinct resonance vibration of rotationally periodic structures. An analytical model of a sample stepped-plate structure subjected to standing wave excitation is developed by elasticity theory. Spatial-dependent resonance mode and resonance frequency are formulated by perturbation-superposition method. Different from the natural mode and natural frequency, a sinusoidal fluctuation of the resonance frequency is identified between the two split natural frequencies for single standing wave excitation. The resonance mode does not have preferred orientation because it is determined by excitation orientation. The resonance behaviors are different from those near the repeated natural frequencies. The response to a standing wave pair is also calculated and compared with that to the mathematically equivalent traveling wave, where significant difference is identified. The results indicate that purer traveling wave can be created by using a standing wave pair with pre-selected spatial phase and excitation frequency. Reverse traveling direction can be realized by altering excitation frequency. A test rig is designed and fabricated for verification purpose. The experiment validates that the response near the split natural frequencies is in phase with the external standing wave excitation. The resonance frequency varies with the excitation orientation for the split natural frequencies but it remains constant for the repeated natural frequencies. Potential applications of the spatial-dependent resonance mode and frequency are presented.

  12. Growth of site trees and stand structure in mixed stands of Pacific silver fir and western hemlock.

    Treesearch

    Marshall D. Murray; Peggy C. Leonard

    1990-01-01

    Height and diameter growth of Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis Dougl. ex Forbes) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) site trees, as well as overall stand structure on 0.15-acre plots, were analyzed in mixed stands 43 to 57 years old in breast height age at six locations in western Washington. These mixed...

  13. Stand Structure and Composition 32 Years after Precommercial Thinning Treatments in a Mixed Northern Conifer Stand in Central Maine

    Treesearch

    Aaron R. Weiskittel; Laura S. Kenefic; Rongxia Li; John Brissette

    2011-01-01

    The effects of four precommercial thinning (PCT) treatments on an even-aged northern conifer stand in Maine were investigated by examining stand structure and composition 32 years after treatment. Replicated treatments applied in 1976 included: (1) control (no PCT), (2) row thinning (rowthin; 5-ft-wide row removal with 3-ft-wide residual strips), (3) row thinning with...

  14. Changing stand structure and regional growth reductions in Georgia's natural pine stands

    Treesearch

    W.A. Bechtold; G.A. Ruark; F.T. Lloyd

    1991-01-01

    Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data indicate reductions in the growth of naturally regenerated pines in Georgia between the two latest measurement periods (1961-1972 vs. 1972-1982). Analysis of Covariance was used to adjust stand-level basal area growth rates for differences between periods in stand age, stand density, site index, mortality, and hardwood...

  15. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    For several decades large reverberant chambers and most recently direct field acoustic testing have been used in the aerospace industry to test larger structures with low surface densities such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify them and to detect faults in the design and fabrication. It has been reported that in reverberant chamber and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes may strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware (Reference 1). In this paper results from a recent reverberant chamber acoustic test of a composite reflector are discussed. These results provide further convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave and structural modes coupling phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to alert test organizations to this phenomenon so that they can account for the potential increase in structural responses and ensure that flight hardware undergoes safe testing. An understanding of the coupling phenomenon may also help minimize the over and/or under testing that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues.

  16. Simulating historical disturbance regimes and stand structures in old-forest ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forests

    Treesearch

    Mike Hillis; Vick Applegate; Steve Slaughter; Michael G. Harrington; Helen Smith

    2001-01-01

    Forest Service land managers, with the collaborative assistance from research, applied a disturbance based restoration strategy to rehabilitate a greatly-altered, high risk Northern Rocky Mountain old-forest ponderosa pine-Douglas-fir stand. Age-class structure and fire history for the site have been documented in two research papers (Arno and others 1995, 1997)....

  17. Comparison of riparian and upland forest stand structure and fuel loads in beetle infested watersheds, southern Rocky Mountains

    Treesearch

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Robert Hubbard; Roberto Bazan

    2015-01-01

    Extensive outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB), spruce beetle (SB), and other insects are altering forest stand structure throughout western North America, and thereby contributing to the heterogeneity of fuel distribution. In forested watersheds, conifer-dominated riparian forests frequently occur as narrow linear features in the landscape mosaic and contribute to...

  18. Model for multi-stand management based on structural attributes of individual stands

    Treesearch

    G.W. Miller; J. Sullivan

    1997-01-01

    A growing interest in managing forest ecosystems calls for decision models that take into account attribute goals for large forest areas while continuing to recognize the individual stand as a basic unit of forest management. A dynamic, nonlinear forest management model is described that schedules silvicultural treatments for individual stands that are linked by multi-...

  19. Free-Standing Photonic Crystal Films with Gradient Structural Colors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Liu, Cihui; Ye, Baofen; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-03-23

    Hydrogel colloidal crystal composite materials have a demonstrated value in responsive photonic crystals (PhCs) via controllable stimuli. Although they have been successfully exploited to generate a gradient of color distribution, the soft hydrogels have limitations in terms of stability and storage caused by dependence on environment. Here, we present a practical strategy to fabricate free-standing PhC films with a stable gradient of structural colors using binary polymer networks. A colloidal crystal hydrogel film was prepared for this purpose, with continuously varying photonic band gaps corresponding to the gradient of the press. Then, a second polymer network was used to lock the inside non-close-packed PhC structures and color distribution of the hydrogel film. It was demonstrated that our strategy could bring about a solution to the angle-dependent structural colors of the PhC films by coating the surface with special microstructures.

  20. RF Choke for Standing Wave Structures and Flanges

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, Anahid; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    SLAC participates in the U.S. High Gradient collaboration whose charter includes basic studies of rf breakdown properties in accelerating structures. These studies include experiments with different materials and construction methods for single cell standing wave accelerating structures. The most commonly used method of joining cells of such structures is the high temperature bonding and/or brazing in hydrogen and/or vacuum. These high temperature processes may not be suitable for some of the new materials that are under consideration. We propose to build structures from cells with an rf choke, taking the cell-to-cell junction out of the electromagnetic field region. These cells may be clamped together in a vacuum enclosure, the choke joint ensuring continuity of rf currents. Next, we propose a structure with a choke joint in a high gradient cell and a view port which may allow us microscopic, in-situ observation of the metal surface during high power tests. And third, we describe the design of a TM01 choke flange for these structures.

  1. Forest stand structure from airborne polarimetric InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzter, H.; Saich, P.; Luckman, A. J.; Skinner, L.; Grant, J.

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric SAR at short wavelengths can be used to retrieve stand height of forests. We evaluate the precision of tree height estimation from airborne single-pass interferometric E-SAR data at X-band VV polarisation and repeat-pass L-band polarimetric data. General yield class curves were used to estimate tree height from planting year, tree species and yield class data provided by the Forest Enterprise. The data were compared to tree height estimates from X-VV single-pass InSAR and repeat-pass polarimetric InSAR at L-band acquired by DLR's E-SAR during the SHAC campaign 2000. The effect of gap structure and incidence angle on retrieval precision of tree height from interferometric SAR is analysed. Appropriate correction methods to improve tree height retrieval are proposed. The coherent microwave model CASM is used with a Lindenmayer system tree model to simulate the observed underestimation of stand height in the presence of gaps.

  2. Long-term stand growth of interior ponderosa pine stands in response to structural modifications and burning treatments in northeastern California

    Treesearch

    Justin S. Crotteau; Martin W. Ritchie

    2014-01-01

    The Blacks Mountain Experimental Research Project created two distinct overstory structural classes (high structural diversity [HiD]; low-structural diversity [LoD]) across 12 stands and subsequently burned half of each stand. We analyzed stand-level growth 10 years after treatment and then modeled individual tree growth to forecast stand-level growth 10–20 years after...

  3. Elevated Air Humidity Changes Soil Bacterial Community Structure in the Silver Birch Stand

    PubMed Central

    Truu, Marika; Ostonen, Ivika; Preem, Jens-Konrad; Lõhmus, Krista; Nõlvak, Hiie; Ligi, Teele; Rosenvald, Katrin; Parts, Kaarin; Kupper, Priit; Truu, Jaak

    2017-01-01

    Soil microbes play a fundamental role in forest ecosystems and respond rapidly to changes in the environment. Simultaneously with the temperature increase the climate change scenarios also predict an intensified hydrological cycle for the Baltic Sea runoff region. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of elevated air humidity on the top soil microbial community structure of a silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) stand by using a free air humidity manipulation facility (FAHM). The bacterial community structures of bulk soil and birch rhizosphere were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing of bacteria-specific16S rRNA gene fragments and quantification of denitrification related genes. The increased air humidity altered both bulk soil and rhizosphere bacterial community structures, and changes in the bacterial communities initiated by elevated air humidity were related to modified soil abiotic and biotic variables. Network analysis revealed that variation in soil bacterial community structural units is explained by altered abiotic conditions such as increased pH value in bulk soil, while in rhizosphere the change in absorptive root morphology had a higher effect. Among root morphological traits, the absorptive root diameter was strongest related to the bacterial community structure. The changes in bacterial community structures under elevated air humidity are associated with shifts in C, N, and P turnover as well as mineral weathering processes in soil. Increased air humidity decreased the nir and nosZ gene abundance in the rhizosphere bacterial community. The potential contribution of the denitrification to the N2O emission was not affected by the elevated air humidity in birch stand soil. In addition, the study revealed a strong link between the bacterial community structure, abundance of denitrification related genes, and birch absorptive root morphology in the ecosystem system adaptation to elevated air humidity. PMID:28421053

  4. Structural Characteristics of an Old-Growth Coast Redwood Stand in Mendocino County, California

    Treesearch

    Gregory A. Giusti

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares stand characteristics of Old Growth coastal redwood stand densities and forest structure found throughout the northern tier of the range of coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens). Tree densities are relatively low compared to commercially managed stands of coast redwood. Tree size classes distributions vary from 254cm...

  5. SEISMOLOGY OF STANDING KINK OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Arregui, I.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2010-10-20

    We investigate standing kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a prominence fine structure modeled as a straight and cylindrical magnetic tube only partially filled with the prominence material and with its ends fixed at two rigid walls representing the solar photosphere. The prominence plasma is partially ionized and a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer is included between the prominence thread and the coronal medium. Thus, ion-neutral collisions and resonant absorption are the damping mechanisms considered. Approximate analytical expressions of the period, the damping time, and their ratio are derived for the fundamental mode in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. We find that the dominant damping mechanism is resonant absorption, which provides damping ratios in agreement with the observations, whereas ion-neutral collisions are irrelevant for damping. The values of the damping ratio are independent of both the prominence thread length and its position within the magnetic tube, and coincide with the values for a tube fully filled with the prominence plasma. The implications of our results in the context of the MHD seismology technique are discussed, pointing out that the reported short-period (2-10 minutes) and short-wavelength (700-8000 km) thread oscillations may not be consistent with a standing mode interpretation and could be related to propagating waves. Finally, we show that the inversion of some prominence physical parameters, e.g., Alfven speed, magnetic field strength, transverse inhomogeneity length scale, etc., is possible using observationally determined values of the period and damping time of the oscillations along with the analytical approximations of these quantities.

  6. Wildlife response to stand structure of deciduous woodlands

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Hodorff; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Raymond L. Linder

    1988-01-01

    Deciduous woodlands provide important habitat for wildlife but comprise Fraxinus pennsylvanica) woodlands in northwestern South Dakota. Closed-canopy stands were multilayered communities with dense...

  7. Bark beetle effects on fuel profiles across a range of stand structures in Douglas-fir forests of Greater Yellowstone.

    PubMed

    Donato, Daniel C; Harvey, Brian J; Romme, William H; Simard, Martin; Turner, Monica G

    2013-01-01

    Consequences of bark beetle outbreaks for forest wildfire potential are receiving heightened attention, but little research has considered ecosystems with mixed-severity fire regimes. Such forests are widespread, variable in stand structure, and often fuel limited, suggesting that beetle outbreaks could substantially alter fire potentials. We studied canopy and surface fuels in interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii v. glauca) forests in Greater Yellowstone, Wyoming, USA, to determine how fuel characteristics varied with time since outbreak of the Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae). We sampled five stands in each of four outbreak stages, validated for pre-outbreak similarity: green (undisturbed), red (1-3 yr), gray (4-14 yr), and silver (25-30 yr). General linear models were used to compare variation in fuel profiles associated with outbreak to variation associated with the range of stand structures (dense mesic forest to open xeric parkland) characteristic of interior Douglas-fir forest. Beetle outbreak killed 38-83% of basal area within stands, generating a mix of live trees and snags over several years. Canopy fuel load and bulk density began declining in the red stage via needle drop and decreased by approximately 50% by the silver stage. The dead portion of available canopy fuels peaked in the red stage at 41%. After accounting for background variation, there was little effect of beetle outbreak on surface fuels, with differences mainly in herbaceous biomass (50% greater in red stands) and coarse woody fuels (doubled in silver stands). Within-stand spatial heterogeneity of fuels increased with time since outbreak, and surface-to-crown continuity decreased and remained low because of slow/sparse regeneration. Collectively, results suggest reduced fire potentials in post-outbreak stands, particularly for crown fire after the red stage, although abundant coarse fuels in silver stands may increase burn residence time and heat release. Outbreak

  8. Microgravity does not alter plant stand gas exchange of wheat at moderate light levels and saturating CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Monje, O; Stutte, G; Chapman, D

    2005-10-01

    Plant stand gas exchange was measured nondestructively in microgravity during the Photosynthesis Experiment Subsystem Testing and Operations experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station. Rates of evapotranspiration and photosynthesis measured in space were compared with ground controls to determine if microgravity directly affects whole-stand gas exchange of Triticum aestivum. During six 21-day experiment cycles, evapotranspiration was determined continuously from water addition rates to the nutrient delivery system, and photosynthesis was determined from the amount of CO2 added to maintain the chamber CO2 concentration setpoint. Plant stand evapotranspiration, net photosynthesis, and water use efficiency were not altered by microgravity. Although leaf area was significantly reduced in microgravity-grown plants compared to ground control plants, leaf area distribution was not affected enough to cause significant differences in the amounts of light absorbed by the flight and ground control plant stands. Microgravity also did not affect the response of evapotranspiration to changes in chamber vapor pressure difference of 12-day-old wheat plant stands. These results suggest that gravity naïve plants grown at moderate light levels (300 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) behave the same as ground control plants. This implies that future plant-based regenerative life support systems can be sized using 1 g data because water purification and food production rates operate at nearly the same rates as in 1 g at moderate light levels. However, it remains to be verified whether the present results are reproducible in plants grown under stronger light levels.

  9. Application of Lidar remote sensing to the estimation of forest canopy and stand structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefsky, Michael Andrew

    A new remote sensing instrument, SLICER (Scanning Lidar Imager of Canopies by Echo Recovery), has been applied to the problem of remote sensing the canopy and stand structure of two groups of deciduous forests, Tulip Poplar-Oak stands in the vicinity of Annapolis, MD. and bottomland hardwood stands near Williamston, NC. The ability of the SLICER instrument to remotely sense the vertical distribution of canopy structure (Canopy Height Profile), bulk canopy transmittance, and several indices of canopy height has been successfully validated using twelve stands with coincident field and SLICER estimates of canopy structure. Principal components analysis has been applied to canopy height profiles from both field sites, and three significant factors were identified, each closely related to the amount of foliage in a recognizable layer of the forest, either understory, midstory, or overstory. The distribution of canopy structure to these layers is significantly correlated with the size and number of stems supporting them. The same layered structure was shown to apply to both field and SLICER remotely sensed canopy height profiles, and to apply to SLICER remotely sensed canopy profiles from both the bottomland hardwood stands in the coastal plain of North Carolina, and to mesic Tulip-Poplars stands in the upland coastal plain of Maryland. Linear regressions have demonstrated that canopy and stand structure are correlated to both a statistically significant and useful degree. Stand age and stem density is more highly correlated to stand height, while stand basal area and aboveground biomass are more closely related to a new measure of canopy structure, the quadratic mean canopy height. A geometric model of canopy structure has been shown to explain the differing relationships between canopy structure and stand basal area for stands of Eastern Deciduous Forest and Douglas Fir Forest.

  10. Patterns of covariance between forest stand and canopy structure in the Pacific Northwest.

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Lefsky; Andrew T. Hudak; Warren B. Cohen; S.A. Acker

    2005-01-01

    In the past decade, LIDAR (light detection and ranging) has emerged as a powerful tool for remotely sensing forest canopy and stand structure, including the estimation of aboveground biomass and carbon storage. Numerous papers have documented the use of LIDAR measurements to predict important aspects of forest stand structure, including aboveground biomass. Other...

  11. Stand and cohort structures of old-growth Pinus resinosa-dominated forests of northern Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Shawn Fraver; Brian J. Palik

    2012-01-01

    The wide range of stand and age-cohort structures in these old-growth P. resinosa stands depicts pre-settlement forests more complex than those of the single-cohort, post-stand-replacing-fire model that has guided regional forest management. Within-stand patchiness of cohort age structures implies disturbances operating at scales smaller than...

  12. Groundwater Availability Alters Soil-plant Nutrient Cycling in a Stand of Invasive, N-fixing Phreatophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, B. D.; Miyazawa, Y.; Hughes, F.; Ostertag, R.; Kettwich, S. K.; MacKenzie, R.; Dulaiova, H.; Waters, C. A.; Bishop, J.; Giambelluca, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    N-fixing phreatophytic trees are common in arid and semi-arid regions worldwide, and can play significant roles in modifying hydrology and soil-plant nutrient cycling where they are present. In light of reductions in groundwater levels in many arid regions we estimated annual transpiration rates at a stand level, and alterations to C, N and P accretion in soils as a function of groundwater depth in a ca.120 year old stand of Prosopis pallida along an elevation gradient in coastal leeward Hawaii. We measured sapflow and stand level sapwood area to quantify transpiration, and calculated groundwater transpiration rates using P. pallida stem water δ18O values. By measuring soil resistivity, we were able to compare the volume of groundwater transpired by these trees to groundwater depth across the stand. We examined nutrient deposition and accretion in soils in lowland areas of the stand with accessible shallow groundwater, compared to upland areas with no groundwater access, as indicated by stem water δ18O values. Resistivity results suggested that groundwater was at a height close to sea level throughout the stand. Transpiration was around 1900 m3 ha-1 year-1 in the areas of the stand closest to the sea (where groundwater was at around 1-4 m below ground level) and decreased to around a tenth of that volume where groundwater was not accessible. Litterfall rates over the course of the year studied were 17 times greater at lowland sites, but this litterfall contributed ca. 24 times the N, and 35 times the P of upland sites. Thus, groundwater access contributed to the total mass of nitrogen and phosphorus deposited in the form of litter through higher litter quantity and quality. Total N content of soils was 4.7 times greater and inorganic N pools were eight times higher at lowland plots. These results suggest that groundwater depth can have strong effects on soil-plant nutrient cycling, so that reductions in the availability of shallow groundwater are likely to impact

  13. Structural lumber from dense stands of small-diameter Douglas-fir trees.

    Treesearch

    David W. Green; Eini C. Lowell; Roland. Hernandez

    2005-01-01

    Small-diameter trees growing in overstocked dense stands are often targeted for thinning to reduce fire hazard and improve forest health and ecosystem diversity. In the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain regions, Douglas-fir can be a predominant species in such stands. In this study, mechanical properties and grade yield of structural products were estimated for 2 by...

  14. Conversion of Successionally Stable Even-Aged Oak Stands to an Uneven-Aged Structure

    Treesearch

    Edward F. Loewenstein; James M. Guldin

    2004-01-01

    Developing a silvicultural prescription to convert an even-aged or unmanaged oak stand to an uneven-aged structure depends in large part on the length of time the existing overstory will live. Four conversion prescriptions, representing three initial stand conditions, are presented. Each prescription partitions the cut of the original overstory differently in time and...

  15. Object-oriented classification of forest structure from light detection and ranging data for stand mapping

    Treesearch

    Alicia A. Sullivan; Robert J. McGaughey; Hans-Erik Andersen; Peter. Schiess

    2009-01-01

    Stand delineation is an important step in the process of establishing a forest inventory and provides the spatial framework for many forest management decisions. Many methods for extracting forest structure characteristics for stand delineation and other purposes have been researched in the past, primarily focusing on high-resolution imagery and satellite data. High-...

  16. Detection of forest stand-level spatial structure in ectomycorrhizal fungal communities

    Treesearch

    Erik A. Lilleskov; Thomas D. Bruns; Thomas R. Horton; D. Lee Taylor; Paul Grogan

    2004-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) communities are highly diverse at the stand level. To begin to understand what might lead to such diversity, and to improve sampling designs, we investigated the spatial structure of these communities. We used EMF community data from a number of studies carried out in seven mature and one recently fire-initiated forest stand. We applied...

  17. Frequent fire alters nitrogen transformations in ponderosa pine stands of the inland northwest.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Thomas H; Sala, Anna

    2006-10-01

    Recurrent, low-severity fire in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)/interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) forests is thought to have directly influenced nitrogen (N) cycling and availability. However, no studies to date have investigated the influence of natural fire intervals on soil processes in undisturbed forests, thereby limiting our ability to understand ecological processes and successional dynamics in this important ecosystem of the Rocky Mountain West. Here, we tested the standing hypothesis that recurrent fire in ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forests of the Inland Northwest decreases total soil N, but increases N turnover and nutrient availability. We compared soils in stands unburned over the past 69-130 years vs. stands exposed to two or more fires over the last 130 years at seven distinct locations in two wilderness areas. Mineral soil samples were collected from each of the seven sites in June and July of 2003 and analyzed for pH, total C and N, potentially mineralizable N (PMN), and extractable NH4+, NO3-, PO4(-3), Ca+2, Mg+2, and K+. Nitrogen transformations were assessed at five sites by installing ionic resin capsules in the mineral soil in August of 2003 and by conducting laboratory assays of nitrification potential and net nitrification in aerobic incubations. Total N and PMN decreased in stands subjected to multiple fires. This loss of total N and labile N was not reflected in concentrations of extractable NH4+ and NO3-. Rather, multiple fires caused an increase in NO3 sorbed on ionic resins, nitrification potential, and net nitrification in spite of the burned stands not having been exposed to fire for at least 12-17 years. Charcoal collected from a recent fire site and added to unburned soils increased nitrification potential, suggesting that the decrease of charcoal in the absence of fire may play an important role in N transformations in fire-dependent ecosystems in the long term. Interestingly, we found no consistent effect of

  18. Dementia alters standing postural adaptation during a visual search task in older adult men

    PubMed Central

    Joŕdan, Azizah J.; McCarten, J. Riley; Rottunda, Susan; Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Manor, Brad; Wade, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of dementia on standing postural adaptation during performance of a visual search task. We recruited 16 older adults with dementia and 15 without dementia. Postural sway was assessed by recording medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) center-of-pressure when standing with and without a visual search task; i.e., counting target letter frequency within a block of displayed randomized letters. ML sway variability was significantly higher in those with dementia during visual search as compared to those without dementia and compared to both groups during the control condition. AP sway variability was significantly greater in those with dementia as compared to those without dementia, irrespective of task condition. In the ML direction, the absolute and percent change in sway variability between the control condition and visual search (i.e., postural adaptation) was greater in those with dementia as compared to those without. In contrast, postural adaptation to visual search was similar between groups in the AP direction. As compared to those without dementia, those with dementia identified fewer letters on the visual task. In the non-dementia group only, greater increases in postural adaptation in both the ML and AP direction, correlated with lower performance on the visual task. The observed relationship between postural adaptation during the visual search task and visual search task performance—in the non-dementia group only—suggests a critical link between perception and action. Dementia reduces the capacity to perform a visual-based task while standing and thus appears to disrupt this perception-action synergy. PMID:25770830

  19. Long-term monitoring of diversity and structure of two stands of an Atlantic Tropical Forest.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Écio Souza; Carvalho, Warley Augusto Caldas; Santos, Rubens Manoel; Gastauer, Markus; Garcia, Paulo Oswaldo; Fontes, Marco Aurélio Leite; Coelho, Polyanne Aparecida; Moreira, Aline Martins; Menino, Gisele Cristina Oliveira; Oliveira-Filho, Ary Teixeira

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to report the long-term monitoring of diversity and structure of the tree community in a protected semideciduous Atlantic Forest in the South of Minas Gerais State, Southeast Brazil. The study was conducted in two stands (B and C), each with 26 and 38 10 m x 30 m plots. Censuses of stand B were conducted in 2000, 2005 and 2011, and stand C in 2001, 2006 and 2011. In both stands, the most abundant and important species for biomass accumulation over the inventories were trees larger than 20 cm of diameter, which characterize advanced successional stage within the forest. The two surveyed stands within the studied forest presented differences in structure, diversity and species richness over the time.

  20. Structural attributes of two old-growth Cross Timbers stands in western Arkansas

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg; David W. Stahle; K. Chris Cerny

    2012-01-01

    Comprised of largely non-commercial, xeric, oak-dominated forests, the Cross Timbers in Arkansas have been heavily altered over the last two centuries, and thus only scattered parcels of old-growth timber remain. We inventoried and mapped two such stands on Fort Chaffee Military Training Center in Sebastian County, Arkansas. The west-facing Christmas Knob site is...

  1. Stocking and structure for maximum growth in sugar maple selection stands.

    Treesearch

    Thomas R. Crow; Carl H. Tubbs; Rodney D. Jacobs; Robert R. Oberg

    1981-01-01

    The impacts of stocking, structure, and cutting cycle on basal area, cubic foot volume, board foot volume, and diameter growth are considered. Recommendations are provided for maximum growth in uneven-aged sugar maple stands.

  2. Competition alters tree growth responses to climate at individual and stand scales

    Treesearch

    Kevin Ford; Ian K. Breckheimer; Jerry F. Franklin; James A. Freund; Steve J. Kroiss; Andrew J. Larson; Elinore J. Theobald; Janneke. HilleRisLambers

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how climate affects tree growth is essential for assessing climate change impacts on forests, but is complicated by the effects of competition, which strongly influences growth and could alter how forests respond to climate change. We characterized the joint effects of climate and competition on diameter growth in the mountain forests of Mount Rainier...

  3. Altered Structural Connectome in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DeSalvo, Matthew N.; Douw, Linda; Tanaka, Naoaki; Reinsberger, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study differences in the whole-brain structural connectomes of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all individuals gave signed informed consent. Sixty-direction diffusion-tensor imaging and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MP-RAGE) magnetic resonance imaging volumes were analyzed in 24 patients with left TLE and in 24 healthy control subjects. MP-RAGE volumes were segmented into 1015 regions of interest (ROIs) spanning the entire brain. Deterministic white matter tractography was performed after voxelwise tensor calculation. Weighted structural connectivity matrices were generated by using the pairwise density of connecting fibers between ROIs. Graph theoretical measures of connectivity networks were compared between groups by using linear models with permutation testing. Results Patients with TLE had 22%–45% reduced (P < .01) distant connectivity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, temporal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus, compared with that in healthy subjects. However, local connectivity, as measured by means of network efficiency, was increased by 85%–270% (P < .01) in the medial and lateral frontal cortices, insular cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and occipital cortex in patients with TLE as compared with healthy subjects. Conclusion This study suggests that TLE involves altered structural connectivity in a network that reaches beyond the temporal lobe, especially in the default mode network. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24475828

  4. Estimating structural attributes of Douglas-fir/western hemlock forest stands from Landsat and SPOT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Warren B.; Spies, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between spectral and texture variables derived from SPOT HRV 10 m panchromatic and Landsat TM 30 m multispectral data and 16 forest stand structural attributes is evaluated to determine the utility of satellite data for analysis of hemlock forests west of the Cascade Mountains crest in Oregon and Washington, USA. Texture of the HRV data was found to be strongly related to many of the stand attributes evaluated, whereas TM texture was weakly related to all attributes. Data analysis based on regression models indicates that both TM and HRV imagery should yield equally accurate estimates of forest age class and stand structure. It is concluded that the satellite data are a valuable source for estimation of the standard deviation of tree sizes, mean size and density of trees in the upper canopy layers, a structural complexity index, and stand age.

  5. Estimating structural attributes of Douglas-fir/western hemlock forest stands from Landsat and SPOT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Warren B.; Spies, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between spectral and texture variables derived from SPOT HRV 10 m panchromatic and Landsat TM 30 m multispectral data and 16 forest stand structural attributes is evaluated to determine the utility of satellite data for analysis of hemlock forests west of the Cascade Mountains crest in Oregon and Washington, USA. Texture of the HRV data was found to be strongly related to many of the stand attributes evaluated, whereas TM texture was weakly related to all attributes. Data analysis based on regression models indicates that both TM and HRV imagery should yield equally accurate estimates of forest age class and stand structure. It is concluded that the satellite data are a valuable source for estimation of the standard deviation of tree sizes, mean size and density of trees in the upper canopy layers, a structural complexity index, and stand age.

  6. Post-fire stand structure impacts carbon storage within Siberian larch forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, H. D.; Natali, S.; Loranty, M. M.; Mack, M. C.; Davydov, S. P.; Zimov, N.

    2015-12-01

    Increased fire severity within boreal forests of the Siberian Arctic has the potential to alter forest stand development thereby altering carbon (C) accumulation rates and storage during the post-fire successional interval. One potential change is increased stand density, which may result from fire consumption of the soil organic layer and changes to the seedbed that favor germination and establishment of larch trees during early succession. In this study, we evaluated above- and belowground C pools across 12 stands of varying tree density within a single 75-year old fire scar located near Cherskii, Sakha Republic, Russia. In each stand, we inventoried the size and density of larch trees and large shrubs (Salix and Betula spp.), and in combination with with allometric equations, estimated aboveground contribution to C pools. We quantified woody debris C pools using the line intercept method. We sampled belowground C pools in the soil organic layer + upper (0-10 cm) mineral soil and coarse roots (> 2 mm diameter) using sediment cores and 0.25 x 0.25-m trenches, respectively. We found that high density stands store ~ 20% more C (~7,500 g C m-2) than low density stands (~5,800 g C m-2). In high density stands, about 35% more C is stored aboveground within live larch trees (1650 g C m-2) compared to low density stands (940 g C m-2), and about 15% more C is stored in the soil organic layer and upper mineral soil. Coarse root C was 20% higher in high density stands (~475 g C m-2) compared to those with low density (~350 g C m-2). Less C was stored in large shrubs in high density stands, both in aboveground portions and coarse roots, but these amounts were relatively small (< 10% of total C pools). A fire-driven shift to denser larch stands could increase C storage, leading to a negative feedback to climate, but the combined effects of density on C dynamics, summer and winter albedo, and future fire regimes will interact to determine the magnitude of any vegetation

  7. Stand Structural Controls on Evapotranspiration in Native and Invaded Tropical Montane Cloud Forest in Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giambelluca, T. W.; Delay, J. K.; Asner, G. P.; Martin, R. E.; Nullet, M. A.; Huang, M.; Mudd, R. G.; Takahashi, M.

    2008-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) in Hawai'i are important zones of water input and stores of critically important native plant and animal species. Invasion by alien tree species threatens these forests and may alter the hydrological services they provide. At two TMCF sites in Hawai'i, one within native Metrosideros polymorpha forest and the other at a site heavily invaded by Psidium cattleianum, we are conducting measurements of stand-level evapotranspiration (ET), transpiration (using sapflow techniques), energy balance, and related processes. Previously presented results showed that ET as a function of available energy was 27% higher at the invaded site than the native site, with the difference rising to 53% during dry- canopy periods. In this presentation, mechanisms for the observed higher ET rate at the invaded site are explored. The difference in measured xylem flow velocities of native and alien trees cannot explain the observed stand level ET difference. Tree basal area is lower at the invaded site than the native site, again contrary to the ET difference. However, the alien trees have much smaller stem diameters, on average, than the native trees, with little or no heartwood. Hence, the cross-sectional xylem area is much greater in the invaded stand, facilitating higher transpiration rates. These results demonstrate the importance of stand structural controls on ET and raise questions about whether higher ET is a transient feature of the succession or a persistent characteristic of invasive trees.

  8. Tunable device properties of free-standing inorganic/organic flexible hybrid structures obtained by exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Amitha; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2012-06-01

    We report the fabrication of free-standing flexible inorganic/organic hybrid structures by exfoliating ZnO nanostructured films from the flat indium tin oxide (ITO)/silicon/sapphire substrates using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). Strong interaction between ZnO and PEDOT:PSS and the thermomechanical response of PEDOT:PSS are the key issues for the exfoliation to prevail. The performance of the free-standing hybrid structures as rectifiers and photodetectors is better as compared to ITO supported hybrid structures. It is also shown that device properties of hybrid structures can be tuned by using different electrode materials.

  9. Structural alterations of skeletal muscle in copd

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sunita; Brooks, Dina; Carvalho, Celso R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease associated with a systemic inflammatory response. Peripheral muscle dysfunction has been well characterized in individuals with COPD and results from a complex interaction between systemic and local factors. Objective: In this narrative review, we will describe muscle wasting in people with COPD, the associated structural changes, muscle regenerative capacity and possible mechanisms for muscle wasting. We will also discuss how structural changes relate to impaired muscle function and mobility in people with COPD. Key Observations: Approximately 30–40% of individuals with COPD experience muscle mass depletion. Furthermore, muscle atrophy is a predictor of physical function and mortality in this population. Associated structural changes include a decreased proportion and size of type-I fibers, reduced oxidative capacity and mitochondrial density mainly in the quadriceps. Observations related to impaired muscle regenerative capacity in individuals with COPD include a lower proportion of central nuclei in the presence or absence of muscle atrophy and decreased maximal telomere length, which has been correlated with reduced muscle cross-sectional area. Potential mechanisms for muscle wasting in COPD may include excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), altered amino acid metabolism and lower expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma-coactivator 1-alpha mRNA. Despite a moderate relationship between muscle atrophy and function, impairments in oxidative metabolism only seems weakly related to muscle function. Conclusion: This review article demonstrates the cellular modifications in the peripheral muscle of people with COPD and describes the evidence of its relationship to muscle function. Future research will focus on rehabilitation strategies to improve muscle wasting and maximize function. PMID:24678302

  10. 26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG043535572; Drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 25 of 148; file no. 1320/76. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. Array structure design handbook for stand alone photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didelot, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    This handbook will permit the user to design a low-cost structure for a variety of photovoltaic system applications under 10 kW. Any presently commercially available photovoltaic modules may be used. Design alternatives are provided for different generic structure types, structural materials, and electric interfaces. The use of a hand-held calculator is sufficient to perform the necessary calculations for the array designs.

  12. Modelling Variable Fire Severity in Boreal Forests: Effects of Fire Intensity and Stand Structure

    PubMed Central

    Miquelajauregui, Yosune; Cumming, Steven G.; Gauthier, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming clear that fires in boreal forests are not uniformly stand-replacing. On the contrary, marked variation in fire severity, measured as tree mortality, has been found both within and among individual fires. It is important to understand the conditions under which this variation can arise. We integrated forest sample plot data, tree allometries and historical forest fire records within a diameter class-structured model of 1.0 ha patches of mono-specific black spruce and jack pine stands in northern Québec, Canada. The model accounts for crown fire initiation and vertical spread into the canopy. It uses empirical relations between fire intensity, scorch height, the percent of crown scorched and tree mortality to simulate fire severity, specifically the percent reduction in patch basal area due to fire-caused mortality. A random forest and a regression tree analysis of a large random sample of simulated fires were used to test for an effect of fireline intensity, stand structure, species composition and pyrogeographic regions on resultant severity. Severity increased with intensity and was lower for jack pine stands. The proportion of simulated fires that burned at high severity (e.g. >75% reduction in patch basal area) was 0.80 for black spruce and 0.11 for jack pine. We identified thresholds in intensity below which there was a marked sensitivity of simulated fire severity to stand structure, and to interactions between intensity and structure. We found no evidence for a residual effect of pyrogeographic region on simulated severity, after the effects of stand structure and species composition were accounted for. The model presented here was able to produce variation in fire severity under a range of fire intensity conditions. This suggests that variation in stand structure is one of the factors causing the observed variation in boreal fire severity. PMID:26919456

  13. Modelling Variable Fire Severity in Boreal Forests: Effects of Fire Intensity and Stand Structure.

    PubMed

    Miquelajauregui, Yosune; Cumming, Steven G; Gauthier, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming clear that fires in boreal forests are not uniformly stand-replacing. On the contrary, marked variation in fire severity, measured as tree mortality, has been found both within and among individual fires. It is important to understand the conditions under which this variation can arise. We integrated forest sample plot data, tree allometries and historical forest fire records within a diameter class-structured model of 1.0 ha patches of mono-specific black spruce and jack pine stands in northern Québec, Canada. The model accounts for crown fire initiation and vertical spread into the canopy. It uses empirical relations between fire intensity, scorch height, the percent of crown scorched and tree mortality to simulate fire severity, specifically the percent reduction in patch basal area due to fire-caused mortality. A random forest and a regression tree analysis of a large random sample of simulated fires were used to test for an effect of fireline intensity, stand structure, species composition and pyrogeographic regions on resultant severity. Severity increased with intensity and was lower for jack pine stands. The proportion of simulated fires that burned at high severity (e.g. >75% reduction in patch basal area) was 0.80 for black spruce and 0.11 for jack pine. We identified thresholds in intensity below which there was a marked sensitivity of simulated fire severity to stand structure, and to interactions between intensity and structure. We found no evidence for a residual effect of pyrogeographic region on simulated severity, after the effects of stand structure and species composition were accounted for. The model presented here was able to produce variation in fire severity under a range of fire intensity conditions. This suggests that variation in stand structure is one of the factors causing the observed variation in boreal fire severity.

  14. Simple Runoff Control Structures Stand Test of Time

    Treesearch

    Dean M. Knighton

    1984-01-01

    Diversion terraces and detention basins constructed along the field-forest edge in the Driftless Area reduce farmland runoff and subsequent gullying in the forest below for many years. The structures are inexpensive and simple to build.

  15. Bacteriorhodopsin: Would the real structural intermediates please stand up?

    PubMed

    Wickstrand, Cecilia; Dods, Robert; Royant, Antoine; Neutze, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest known light driven proton pump and has been heavily studied using structural methods: eighty four X-ray diffraction, six electron diffraction and three NMR structures of bR are deposited within the protein data bank. Twenty one X-ray structures report light induced structural changes and changes induced by mutation, changes in pH, thermal annealing or X-ray induced photo-reduction have also been examined. We argue that light-induced structural changes that are replicated across several studies by independent research groups are those most likely to represent what is happening in reality. We present both internal distance matrix analyses that sort deposited bR structures into hierarchal trees, and difference Fourier analysis of deposited X-ray diffraction data. An internal distance matrix analysis separates most wild-type bR structures according to their different crystal forms, indicating how the protein's structure is influenced by crystallization conditions. A similar analysis clusters eleven studies of illuminated bR crystals as one branch of a hierarchal tree with reproducible movements of the extracellular portion of helix C towards helix G, and of the cytoplasmic portion of helix F away from helices A, B and G. All crystallographic data deposited for illuminated crystals show negative difference density on a water molecule (Wat402) that forms H-bonds to the retinal Schiff Base and two aspartate residues (Asp85, Asp212) in the bR resting state. Other recurring difference density features indicated reproducible side-chain, backbone and water molecule displacements. X-ray induced radiation damage also disorders Wat402 but acts via cleaving the head-groups of Asp85 and Asp212. A remarkable level of agreement exists when deposited structures and crystallographic observations are viewed as a whole. From this agreement a unified picture of the structural mechanism of light-induced proton pumping by bR emerges. This article is

  16. Percent canopy cover and stand structure statistics from the Forest Vegetation Simulator

    Treesearch

    Nicholas L. Crookston; Albert R. Stage

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of percent canopy cover generated by the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) are corrected for crown overlap using an equation presented in this paper. A comparison of the new cover estimate to some others is provided. The cover estimate is one of several describing stand structure. The structure descriptors also include major species, ranges of diameters, tree...

  17. Cold test results of a standing wave muffin-tin structure at X-band

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.J.; Hanna, S.M.; Henke, H.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.; Whittum, D.

    1996-11-01

    A muffin-tin structure is chosen to study high gradient acceleration in the millimeter wavelength range. In order to understand the electromagnetic field characteristics, a standing wave structure operating at a frequency around 11.4 GHz was built. Cold test measurements were performed and results are presented. Comparisons with theoretical predictions based on computer simulation are shown.

  18. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Jeffrey; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery

    2010-11-04

    We are investigating a standing wave structure with an rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  19. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-05-25

    We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  20. Monitoring stand structure in mature coastal Douglas-fir forests: effect of plot size.

    Treesearch

    Andrew. Gray

    2003-01-01

    National and regional interest in the distribution and trends of forest habitat structure and diversity have placed demands on forest inventories for accurate stand-level data. a primary need in the coastal Pacific Northwest of the United States is information on the extent and rate of development of mature forest structure. The objective of this study was to evaluate...

  1. Influence of whole-tree harvesting on stand composition and structure in the oak-pine type

    Treesearch

    James W. McMinn

    1989-01-01

    Oak-pine stands in the Upper Piedmont of Georgia were harvested with small fellerbunchers in both the dormant season and early growing season to 1 -inch and 4-inch lower diameter limits. After 9 years of natural stand development, both season and intensity of harvesting significantly influenced species composition and stand structure. Areas harvested during the growing...

  2. Response of ground-dwelling spider assemblages to prescribed fire following stand structure manipulation in the southern Cascade Range

    Treesearch

    Nancy E. Gillette; Richard S. Vetter; Sylvia R. Mori; Carline R. Rudolph; Dessa R. Welty

    2008-01-01

    We assessed spider (Arachnida: Araneae) responses to prescribed fire following stand s tructure treatments in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex P. & C. Laws.) stands in the Cascade Range of California. Stands were logged or left untreated to create three levels of structural diversity. We logged one treatment to minimize old-growth...

  3. Temporal Structure of Support Surface Translations Drive the Temporal Structure of Postural Control During Standing

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Troy J.; Myers, Sara A.; Kyvelidou, Anastasia; Mukherjee, Mukul

    2015-01-01

    A healthy biological system is characterized by a temporal structure that exhibits fractal properties and is highly complex. Unhealthy systems demonstrate lowered complexity and either greater or less predictability in the temporal structure of a time series. The purpose of this research was to determine if support surface translations with different temporal structures would affect the temporal structure of the center of pressure (COP) signal. Eight healthy young participants stood on a force platform that was translated in the anteroposterior direction for input conditions of varying complexity: white noise, pink noise, brown noise, and sine wave. Detrended fluctuation analysis was used to characterize the long-range correlations of the COP time series in the AP direction. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed differences among conditions (P < .001). The less complex support surface translations resulted in a less complex COP compared to normal standing. A quadratic trend analysis demonstrated an inverted-u shape across an increasing order of predictability of the conditions (P < .001). The ability to influence the complexity of postural control through support surface translations can have important implications for rehabilitation. PMID:25994281

  4. Stand structural diversity rather than species diversity enhances aboveground carbon storage in secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Arshad; Yan, En-Rong; Chen, Han Y. H.; Chang, Scott X.; Zhao, Yan-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Ming-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Stand structural diversity, typically characterized by variances in tree diameter at breast height (DBH) and total height, plays a critical role in influencing aboveground carbon (C) storage. However, few studies have considered the multivariate relationships of aboveground C storage with stand age, stand structural diversity, and species diversity in natural forests. In this study, aboveground C storage, stand age, tree species, DBH and height diversity indices, were determined across 80 subtropical forest plots in Eastern China. We employed structural equation modelling (SEM) to test for the direct and indirect effects of stand structural diversity, species diversity, and stand age on aboveground C storage. The three final SEMs with different directions for the path between species diversity and stand structural diversity had a similar goodness of fit to the data. They accounted for 82 % of the variation in aboveground C storage, 55-59 % of the variation in stand structural diversity, and 0.1 to 9 % of the variation in species diversity. Stand age demonstrated strong positive total effects, including a positive direct effect (β = 0.41), and a positive indirect effect via stand structural diversity (β = 0.41) on aboveground C storage. Stand structural diversity had a positive direct effect on aboveground C storage (β = 0.56), whereas there was little total effect of species diversity as it had a negative direct association with, but had a positive indirect effect, via stand structural diversity, on aboveground C storage. The negligible total effect of species diversity on aboveground C storage in the forests under study may have been attributable to competitive exclusion with high aboveground biomass, or a historical logging preference for productive species. Our analyses suggested that stand structural diversity was a major determinant for variations in aboveground C storage in the secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China. Hence, maintaining tree DBH and

  5. Bark Beetles as Significant Forest Disturbances: Estimating Susceptibility Based On Stand Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicke, J. A.; Jenkins, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    In the western United States, bark beetle outbreaks affect millions of hectares of forests. These disturbances have multiple effects on ecosystems, including modifications to biogeochemical cycles, interactions with fire, and changes in land cover type and species composition. In recent years, extensive outbreaks have occurred in multiple forest ecosystems in the West, thought to be caused by climate variability and stand structure. In this study, we focus on epidemics of mountain pine beetle. We used USDA Forest Service inventories and a model to estimate lodgepole pine susceptibility to mountain pine beetle attack in the West. The model considers stand age, stem density, and percentage of large lodgepole pine to estimate stand susceptibility. Over 150,000 trees in 4454 plots across the western United States were used to compute susceptibility at the plot scale as well as map susceptibility at the county scale. We found that regional susceptibility was high (estimated potential of losses of 34% of stand basal area) for 2.8 Mha, or 46%, of lodgepole pine forests. The highest susceptibility occurred in the Rocky Mountains, with lower susceptibility in coastal states. This study reveals that a substantial fraction of lodgepole pine forest could be subjected to bark beetle outbreaks under current climate conditions. Because climate and weather affect beetle populations, projected future warming will influence outbreak regimes. Thus, forest ecosystems in the West may experience more frequent, extensive, and/or severe disturbances than in recent decades due to current stand structure, and these disturbances may be intensified under climate change.

  6. Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides produced by mutant bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  7. The Influence of Stand Density and Structure on Growth of Northern Hardwoods in New England

    Treesearch

    Dale S. Solomon

    1977-01-01

    Growth of northern hardwoods over a 10-year period was studied in plots that were treated to produce residual densities of 40, 60, 80, and 100 square feet of basal area per acre with stand structures of 30, 45 and 60 percent sawtimber. Both diameter and basal area growth are tabulated by treatment and species.

  8. A data structure for describing sampling designs to aid in compilation of stand attributes

    Treesearch

    John C. Byrne; Albert R. Stage

    1988-01-01

    Maintaining permanent plot data with different sampling designs over long periods within an organization, and sharing such information between organizations, requires that common standards be used. A data structure for the description of the sampling design within a stand is proposed. It is composed of just those variables and their relationships needed to compile...

  9. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline.

  10. Influence of elevation on bark beetle community structure in ponderosa pine stands of northern Arizona

    Treesearch

    Andrew Miller; Kelly Barton; Joel McMillin; Tom DeGomez; Karen Clancy; John Anhold

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an abstract only) Bark beetles killed more than 20 million ponderosa pine trees in Arizona during 2002-2004. Historically, bark beetle populations remained endemic and ponderosa pine mortality was limited to localized areas in Arizona. Consequently, there is a lack of information on bark beetle community structure in ponderosa pine stands of...

  11. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Bradford, John B; Lauenroth, William K

    2014-08-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline.

  12. Floristic diversity, stand structure, and composition 11 years after herbicide site preparation

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller; Robert S. Boyd; M. Boyd. Edwards

    1999-01-01

    This study tested for effects of site preparation herbicides applied at high labeled rates 11 years earlier on plant species richness, diversity, and stand structure and composition. Four study sites in three physiographic provinces were established in central Georgia in 1984. Six herbicide treatments were included on each site: hexazinone liquid, hexazinone pellets,...

  13. Stand-structural effects on Heterobasidion abietinum-related mortality following drought events in Abies pinsapo.

    PubMed

    Linares, Juan Carlos; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Bowker, Matthew A; Ochoa, Victoria; Carreira, José Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Climate change may affect tree-pathogen interactions. This possibility has important implications for drought-prone forests, where stand dynamics and disease pathogenicity are especially sensitive to climatic stress. In addition, stand structural attributes including density-dependent tree-to-tree competition may modulate the stands' resistance to drought events and pathogen outbreaks. To assess the effects of stand structure on root-rot-related mortality after severe droughts, we focused on Heterobasidion abietinum mortality in relict Spanish stands of Abies pinsapo, a drought-sensitive fir. We compared stand attributes and tree spatial patterns in three plots with H. abietinum root-rot disease and three plots without root-rot. Point-pattern analyses were used to investigate the scale and extent of mortality patterns and to test hypotheses related to the spread of the disease. Dendrochronology was used to date the year of death and to assess the association between droughts and growth decline. We applied a structural equation modelling approach to test if tree mortality occurs more rapidly than predicted by a simple distance model when trees are subjected to high tree-to-tree competition and following drought events. Contrary to expectations of drought mortality, the effect of precipitation on the year of death was strong and negative, indicating that a period of high precipitation induced an earlier tree death. Competition intensity, related to the size and density of neighbour trees, also induced an earlier tree death. The effect of distance to the disease focus was negligible except in combination with intensive competition. Our results indicate that infected trees have decreased ability to withstand drought stress, and demonstrate that tree-to-tree competition and fungal infection act as predisposing factors of forest decline and mortality.

  14. Network community structure alterations in adult schizophrenia: identification and localization of alterations

    PubMed Central

    Lerman-Sinkoff, Dov B.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests functional connectivity alterations in schizophrenia. While findings have been mixed, evidence points towards a complex pattern of hyper-connectivity and hypo-connectivity. This altered connectivity can be represented and analyzed using the mathematical frameworks provided by graph and information theory to represent functional connectivity data as graphs comprised of nodes and edges linking the nodes. One analytic technique in this framework is the determination and analysis of network community structure, which is the grouping of nodes into linked communities or modules. This data-driven technique finds a best-fit structure such that nodes in a given community have greater connectivity with nodes in their community than with nodes in other communities. These community structure representations have been found to recapitulate known neural-systems in healthy individuals, have been used to identify novel functional systems, and have identified and localized community structure alterations in a childhood onset schizophrenia cohort. In the present study, we sought to determine whether community structure alterations were present in an adult onset schizophrenia cohort while stringently controlling for sources of imaging artifacts. Group level average graphs in healthy controls and individuals with schizophrenia exhibited visually similar network community structures and high amounts of normalized mutual information (NMI). However, testing of individual subject community structures identified small but significant alterations in community structure with alterations being driven by changes in node community membership in the somatosensory, auditory, default mode, salience, and subcortical networks. PMID:26793435

  15. Seeing the forest for the heterogeneous trees: stand-scale resource distributions emerge from tree-scale structure.

    PubMed

    Boyden, Suzanne; Montgomery, Rebecca; Reich, Peter B; Palik, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Forest ecosystem processes depend on local interactions that are modified by the spatial pattern of trees and resources. Effects of resource supplies on processes such as regeneration are increasingly well understood, yet we have few tools to compare resource heterogeneity among forests that differ in structural complexity. We used a neighborhood approach to examine understory light and nutrient availability in a well-replicated and large-scale variable-retention harvesting experiment in a red pine forest in Minnesota, USA. The experiment included an unharvested control and three harvesting treatments with similar tree abundance but different patterns of retention (evenly dispersed as well as aggregated retention achieved by cutting 0.1- or 0.3-ha gaps). We measured light and soil nutrients across all treatments and mapped trees around each sample point to develop an index of neighborhood effects (NI). Field data and simulation modeling were used to test hypotheses that the mean and heterogeneity of resource availability would increase with patchiness because of greater variation in competitive environments. Our treatments dramatically altered the types and abundances of competitive neighborhoods (NI) in each stand and resulted in significantly nonlinear relationships of light, nitrogen and phosphorus availability to NI. Hence, the distribution of neighborhoods in each treatment had a significant impact on resource availability and heterogeneity. In dense control stands, neighborhood variation had little impact on resource availability, whereas in more open stands (retention treatments), it had large effects on light and modest effects on soil nutrients. Our results demonstrate that tree spatial pattern can affect resource availability and heterogeneity in explainable and predictable ways, and that neighborhood models provide a useful tool for scaling heterogeneity from the individual tree to the stand. These insights are needed to anticipate the outcomes of

  16. Rotated sigmoid structures in managed uneven-aged northern hardwood stands: a look at the Burr Type III distribution

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey H. Gove; Mark J. Ducey; William B. Leak; Lianjun Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Stand structures from a combined density manipulation and even- to uneven-aged conversion experiment on the Bartlett Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA) were examined 25 years after initial treatment for rotated sigmoidal diameter distributions. A comparison was made on these stands between two probability density functions for fitting these residual structures:...

  17. Object-based semi-automatic approach for forest structure characterization using lidar data in heterogeneous Pinus sylvestris stands

    Treesearch

    C. Pascual; A. Garcia-Abril; L.G. Garcia-Montero; S. Martin-Fernandez; W.B. Cohen

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a two-stage approach for characterizing the structure of Pinus sylvestris L. stands in forests of central Spain. The first stage was to delimit forest stands using eCognition and a digital canopy height model (DCHM) derived from lidar data. The polygons were then clustered into forest structure types based on the DCHM data...

  18. Fuel reduction treatments affect stand structure of hardwood forests in Western North Carolina and Southern Ohio, USA

    Treesearch

    Thomas A. Waldrop; Daniel A. Yaussy; Ross J. Phillips; Todd A. Hutchinson; Lucy Brudnak; Ralph E.J. Boerner

    2008-01-01

    Prescribed fire and mechanical treatments were tested at the two hardwood sites of the National Fire and Fire Surrogate Study (southern and central Appalachian regions) for impacts to stand structure. After two fires and one mechanical treatment, no treatment or treatment combination restored stand structure to historical levels. Burning alone had little impact on...

  19. Stand structure and composition provide differential tree-ring growth signals in eastern U.S. forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. R.; Rollinson, C.; Dye, A.; Pederson, N.; Moore, D. J.; Trouet, V.

    2016-12-01

    The assumption that a single dominant climatic factor synchronizes regional forest growth response is the foundation of annually resolved climate reconstructions. However, growth-limiting factors affect individual trees and in complex forests, such as those in the eastern U.S., these limitations may not be uniform across the entire stand. Forest structure and composition can influence climate growth responses and result in multiple growth signals recorded in the tree rings that may not be isolated using conventional techniques. To address this issue, we collected tree cores from five eastern U.S. forest stands that are influenced by large-scale climate factors as well as small-scale ecological pressures, such as competition between individuals. We used generalized additive mixed models to form multivariate models of tree growth at the site-, species-, and canopy class-levels that account for the simultaneous influences that climate and size factors exert on growth through time. Species- and canopy position-specific models adhere more closely to observations (R2 = 0.73 and R2 = 0.71, respectively) than the site-level model (R2 = 0.60). Across all models, sensitivities to temperature and size are more dynamic through time than precipitation sensitivity. Size is the primary limiting factor as trees establish during the juvenile phase and temperature and precipitation limit growth as stands mature and individuals emerge into the canopy. We see that the species response to climate is relatively well conserved across all sites, but the dynamic nature of the size effect unique to each site alters the expressed limiting factor. We find that sub-canopy individuals show an opposite response to temperature than that the dominant and intermediate strata, likely due to the microclimate conditions created by a stratified canopy. Tree growth is thus limited by a combination of climatological and forest structural factors (i.e. canopy class) and growth limitations vary through

  20. Composition, structure, and intra-stand spatial patterns along a disturbance severity gradient in a Quercus stand

    Treesearch

    Lauren E. Cox; Justin L. Hart; Daniel C. Dey; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2016-01-01

    Natural forest disturbances, which drive succession and development, differ in extent, severity, and return interval and range from frequent, gap-scale disturbances, to infrequent stand-replacing events. Most studies have focused on natural disturbances near the ends of the disturbance severity gradient and relatively little quantitative information is available on...

  1. Structural Alterations in the Cornea from Exposure to Infrared Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    mylar disks that were preformed - 4- to match the corneal curvature. The disks were attached 0 at their edges to excised corneas using cyanoacrylate ...ICFIECOP JHU/APL TG 1364 JULY 1985 (0 FINAL Technical Memorandum STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS IN THE CORNEA FROM EXPOSURE TO INFRARED RADIATION R. A...Structural Alterations in the Cornea from Exposure to Infrared Radiation 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) R. A. Farrell, R. L. McCally, C. B. Bargeron, and W. R. Green

  2. Prescribed fire effects on structure in uneven-aged stands of loblolly and shortleaf pines

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Cain; T. Bently Wigley; Derik J. Reed

    1998-01-01

    Structure was assessed in uneven-aged stands of loblolly (Pinus taeda) and shortleaf pine (P. echinata) that were subjected to prescribed winter burns on cycles of 0, 3, 6, and 9 years. Vegetation assessments were made in late summer of 1990, 10 years after a single hardwood control treatment (basal injection of non-pine woody plants >2.5 cm in groundline diameter...

  3. Stand dynamics and tree coexistence in an analytical structured model: the role of recruitment.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Óscar; Bravo de la Parra, Rafael; López-Marcos, Juan C; Zavala, Miguel A

    2013-09-21

    Understanding the mechanisms of coexistence and niche partitioning in plant communities is a central question in ecology. Current theories of forest dynamics range between the so-called neutral theories which assume functional equivalence among coexisting species to forest simulators that explain species assemblages as the result of tradeoffs in species individual strategies at several ontogenetic stages. Progress in these questions has been hindered by the inherent difficulties of developing analytical size-structured models of stand dynamics. This precludes examination of the relative importance of each mechanism on tree coexistence. In previous simulation and analytical studies emphasis has been given to interspecific differences at the sapling stage, and less so to interspecific variation in seedling recruitment. In this study we develop a partial differential equation model of stand dynamics in which competition takes place at the recruitment stage. Species differ in their size-dependent growth rates and constant mortality rates. Recruitment is described as proportional to the basal area of conspecifics, to account for fecundity and seed supply per unit of basal area, and is corrected with a decreasing function of species specific basal area to account for competition. We first analyze conditions for population persistence in monospecific stands and second we investigate conditions of coexistence for two species. In the monospecific case we found a stationary stand structure based on an inequality between mortality rate and seed supply. In turn, intra-specific competition does not play any role on the asymptotic extinction or population persistence. In the two-species case we found that coexistence can be attained when the reciprocal negative effect on recruitment follows a given relation with respect to intraspecific competition. Specifically a tradeoff between recruitment potential (i.e. shade tolerance or predation avoidance) and fecundity or growth rate

  4. Altered gene expression correlates with DNA structure.

    PubMed

    Kohwi, Y; Kohwi-Shigematsu, T

    1991-12-01

    We examined the participation of triplex DNA structure in gene regulation using a poly(dG)-poly(dC) sequence as a model. We show that a poly(dG)-poly(dC) sequence, which can adopt an intramolecular dG.dG.dC triplex under superhelical strain, strongly augments gene expression when placed 5' to a promoter. The activity of this sequence exhibits a striking length dependency: dG tracts of 27-30 bp augment the expression of a reporter gene to a level comparable to that observed with the polyoma enhancer in mouse LTK- cells, whereas tracts of 35 bp and longer have virtually no effect. A supercoiled plasmid containing a dG tract of 30 bp competes in vivo for a trans-acting factor as revealed by reduction in the reporter gene transcription driven by the (dG)29/promoter of the test plasmid, while dGs of 35 bp and longer in the competition plasmid failed to compete. In purified supercoiled plasmid DNA at a superhelical density of -0.05, dG tracts of 32 bp and longer form a triplex, whereas those of 30 bp and shorter remain double-stranded under a PBS solution. These results suggest that a localized superhelical strain can exist, at least transiently, in mouse LTK- cells, and before being relaxed by topoisomerases this rapidly induces dG tracts of 35 bp and longer to adopt a triplex preventing the factor from binding. Thus, these data suggest that a poly(dG)-poly(dC) sequence can function as a negative regulator by adopting an intramolecular triple helix structure in vivo.

  5. Historical (1899) age and structural characteristics of an old-growth northern hardwood stand in New York State

    Treesearch

    William B. Leak; Mariko. Yamasaki

    2012-01-01

    Based on records taken during a harvest operation in 1899 on more than 400 trees in a northern hardwood stand in upper New York State, age and structural characteristics, including growth patterns, were developed and summarized. Age and size characteristics indicate that this was an exemplary old-growth stand similar in character to current old-growth examples in the...

  6. Lightning Protection and Structural Bonding for the B2 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    With the privatization of the space industry, NASA has entered a new era. To explore deeper parts of the solar system, NASA is developing a new spacecraft, the Space Launch System (SLS), capable of reaching these destinations, such as an asteroid or Mars. However, the test stand that is capable of testing the stage has been unused for many years. In addition to the updating/repair of the stand, more steel is being added to fully support the SLS. With all these modifications, the lightning protection system must be brought up to code to assure the protection of all personnel and assets. Structural bonding is a part of the lightning protection system. The focus of this project was to assure proper structural bonding. To begin, all relevant technical standards and the construction specifications were reviewed. This included both the specifications for the lightning protection and for general construction. The drawings were reviewed as well. From the drawings, bolted structural joints were reviewed to determine whether bonding was necessary. Several bolted joints were determined to need bonding according to the notes in the drawings. This exceeds the industry standards. The bolted joints are an electrically continuous joint. During tests, the stand experiences heavy vibration that may weaken the continuity of the bolted joint. Therefore, the secondary bonding is implemented to ensure that the structural joint has low resistance. If the structural joint has a high resistance because of corrosion, a potential gradient can occur that can cause a side flash. Damage, injury, or death can occur from a side flash so they are to be prevented. A list of the identified structural joints was compiled and sent to the contractor to be bonded. That covers the scope of this project.

  7. Quantitative adsorbate structure determination for quasicrystals using x-ray standing waves.

    PubMed

    Diehl, R D; Li, H I; Su, S Y; Mayer, A; Stanisha, N A; Ledieu, J; Lovelock, K R J; Jones, Robert G; Deyko, A; Wearing, L H; McGrath, R; Chaudhuri, A; Woodruff, D P

    2014-09-05

    The quantitative structure determination of adsorbed species on quasicrystal surfaces has so far appeared to present insurmountable problems. The normal incidence standing x-ray wave field technique offers a simple solution, without extensive data sets or large computations. Its application to quasicrystals raises several conceptual difficulties that are related to the phase problem in x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate their solution for the case of Si atoms adsorbed on the decagonal Co-rich modification of the Al-Co-Ni quasicrystal to determine the local structure, comprising 6-atom clusters in particular hollow sites.

  8. Quantitative Adsorbate Structure Determination for Quasicrystals Using X-Ray Standing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, R. D.; Li, H. I.; Su, S. Y.; Mayer, A.; Stanisha, N. A.; Ledieu, J.; Lovelock, K. R. J.; Jones, Robert G.; Deyko, A.; Wearing, L. H.; McGrath, R.; Chaudhuri, A.; Woodruff, D. P.

    2014-09-01

    The quantitative structure determination of adsorbed species on quasicrystal surfaces has so far appeared to present insurmountable problems. The normal incidence standing x-ray wave field technique offers a simple solution, without extensive data sets or large computations. Its application to quasicrystals raises several conceptual difficulties that are related to the phase problem in x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate their solution for the case of Si atoms adsorbed on the decagonal Co-rich modification of the Al-Co-Ni quasicrystal to determine the local structure, comprising 6-atom clusters in particular hollow sites.

  9. Bioenergy harvesting impacts on ecologically important stand structure and habitat characteristics.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, Caitlin E; Keeton, William S

    2012-10-01

    Demand for forest bioenergy fuel is increasing in the northern forest region of eastern North America and beyond, but ecological impacts, particularly on habitat, of bioenergy harvesting remain poorly explored in the peer-reviewed literature. Here, we evaluated the impacts of bioenergy harvests on stand structure, including several characteristics considered important for biodiversity and habitat functions. We collected stand structure data from 35 recent harvests in northern hardwood-conifer forests, pairing harvested areas with unharvested reference areas. Biometrics generated from field data were analyzed using a multi-tiered nonparametric uni- and multivariate statistical approach. In analyses comparing harvested to reference areas, sites that had been whole-tree harvested demonstrated significant differences (relative negative contrasts, P < 0.05) in snag density, large live-tree density, well-decayed downed coarse woody debris volume, and structural diversity index (H) values, while sites that had not been whole-tree harvested did not exhibit significant differences. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses suggested that the strongest predictors of structural retention, as indicated by downed woody debris volumes and H index, were silvicultural treatment and equipment type rather than the percentage of harvested volume allocated to bioenergy uses. In general, bioenergy harvesting impacts were highly variable across the study sites, suggesting a need for harvesting guidelines aimed at encouraging retention of ecologically important structural attributes.

  10. Stand structure and dynamics of sand pine differ between the Florida panhandle and peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drewa, P.B.; Platt, W.J.; Kwit, C.; Doyle, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    Size and age structures of stand populations of numerous tree species exhibit uneven or reverse J-distributions that can persist after non-catastrophic disturbance, especially windstorms. Among disjunct populations of conspecific trees, alternative distributions are also possible and may be attributed to more localized variation in disturbance. Regional differences in structure and demography among disjunct populations of sand pine (Pinus clausa (Chapm. ex Engelm.) Vasey ex Sarg.) in the Florida panhandle and peninsula may result from variation in hurricane regimes associated with each of these populations. We measured size, age, and growth rates of trees from panhandle and peninsula populations and then compiled size and age class distributions. We also characterized hurricanes in both regions over the past century. Size and age structures of panhandle populations were unevenly distributed and exhibited continuous recruitment; peninsula populations were evenly sized and aged and exhibited only periodic recruitment. Since hurricane regimes were similar between regions, historical fire regimes may have been responsible for regional differences in structure of sand pine populations. We hypothesize that fires were locally nonexistent in coastal panhandle populations, while periodic high intensity fires occurred in peninsula populations over the past century. Such differences in local fire regimes could have resulted in the absence of hurricane effects in the peninsula. Increased intensity of hurricanes in the panhandle and current fire suppression patterns in the peninsula may shift characteristics of sand pine stands in both regions. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  11. BVOC emission in Norway spruce: the effect of stand structure, high temperature and ozone levels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi, Emanuele; Guidolotti, Gabriele; Večeřová, Kristýna; Esposito, Raffaela; Lusini, Ilaria; Juráň, Stanislav; Urban, Otmar; Calfapietra, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) is a widely distributed conifer species in the boreal zone and mountain areas of central Europe and is a moderate emitter of volatile organic compounds (BVOC). Although the vaporization and diffusion processes from resin ducts were generally considered to be the main processes for monoterpene emissions in conifers, recently it has been showed that a significant portion (up to one third) of monoterpene emissions of Norway spruce can originate from novel biosynthesis, thus depending on photosynthetic processes. For this reason, both biosynthesis and emission are strongly influenced by the environment and the stand structure. They increase with both increasing light and temperature during the warmer periods, although those are the periods with the higher ozone concentration that usually act as an inhibitor of both assimilation and isoprenoids synthesis and emission. On the other hand, stand structure can play an important role, because the photosynthetic capacity is influenced by temperature and light conditions through the canopy. In order to assess the effects of stand structure, temperature and ozone on isoprenoids emission of Norway spruce we carried out field and laboratory experiments. In the experimental field campaigns we measured: assimilation and BVOC emission from needles of sun and shade layers within the canopy of the spruce forest present at the Bily Kriz experimental research site (Moravian-Silesian Beskydy Mountains, 49° 33' N, 18° 32' E, NE of Czech Republic, 908 m a.s.l.). Moreover in the same layers we measured continuously concentration of BVOCs in the air using a PTR-TOF-MS. In laboratory we analyzed the effects of short-term exposure to high temperature and high ozone concentrations on branches of spruce trees collected at the Bily Kriz experimental research site. Preliminary results show that in Norway spruce both stand structure and environmental conditions influenced the gas exchange and BVOC emission rates

  12. On the RF Distribution System for a Set of Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    In this paper, we study the RF feeding system for a set of standing-wave accelerator structures. To avoid the initial reflections produced by the structures, sometimes these structures are fed in pairs through a four-port 3-dB Hybrid. We present an extension to this system for an arbitrary number of accelerator structures and show it is always possible to cancel the reflection back to the source. The necessary and sufficient condition for this to happen depends only on the spacing between accelerator structures. In this system, the structures are not fed in a binary hierarchal system, rather in series with a set of directional couplers designed to bleed off an equal amount of power to each accelerator structure in the set. We study the sensitivity of such a system to errors resulting from the differences in accelerator structures spacing. We also study the sensitivity of the system to component imperfections, such as the finite directivity of the directional couplers, and the residual reflections from the loads that are attached to these couplers. We also study the system under fault conditions, such as a breakdown in an accelerator structure or a feed waveguide.

  13. Changes in stand structure and tree vigor with repeated prescribed fire in an Appalachian hardwood forest

    Treesearch

    Mary A. Arthur; Beth A. Blankenship; Angela Schörgendorfer; David L. Loftis; Heather D. Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Without large scale disturbances to alter forest structure and open the canopy, historically oak-dominated forests of the central and Appalachian hardwood regions of eastern North America are shifting to dominance by shade-tolerant, ‘mesophytic’ species. In response, prescribed fire is applied with increasing frequency and spatial extent to decrease non-oak species and...

  14. Response of a southern pine community to readjustment of stand structure

    Treesearch

    K.W. Outcalt; D.G. Brockway

    2001-01-01

    Widespread treatments are needed to restore ecological integrity to southern forest, but reintroduction of fire into these altered communities, is difficult. This study measured the effect on plant community structure and composition of an alternative mechanical treatment. In April, diameter was measured for tree stems grater than 5cm, while cover and frequency of...

  15. Fatigue does not conjointly alter postural and cognitive performance when standing in a shooting position under dual-task conditions.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, José Luis; García-Massó, Xavier; Paillard, Thierry; Noé, Frédéric

    2017-04-03

    This study investigated the effects of fatigue on balance control and cognitive performance in a standing shooting position. Nineteen soldiers were asked to stand while holding a rifle (single task - ST). They also had to perform this postural task while simultaneously completing a cognitive task (dual task - DT). Both the ST and DT were performed in pre- and post-fatigue conditions. In pre-fatigue, participants achieved better balance control in the DT than in the ST, thus suggesting that the increased cognitive activity associated with the DT improves balance control by shifting the attentional focus away from a highly automatised activity. In post-fatigue, balance control was degraded in both the ST and DT, while reaction time was enhanced in the first minutes following the fatiguing exercise without affecting the accuracy of response in the cognitive task, which highlights the relative independent effects of fatigue on balance control and cognitive performance.

  16. Altered Resting Brain Function and Structure in Professional Badminton Players

    PubMed Central

    Di, Xin; Zhu, Senhua; Wang, Pin; Ye, Zhuoer; Zhou, Ke; Zhuo, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Neuroimaging studies of professional athletic or musical training have demonstrated considerable practice-dependent plasticity in various brain structures, which may reflect distinct training demands. In the present study, structural and functional brain alterations were examined in professional badminton players and compared with healthy controls using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting-state functional MRI. Gray matter concentration (GMC) was assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and resting-brain functions were measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and seed-based functional connectivity. Results showed that the athlete group had greater GMC and ALFF in the right and medial cerebellar regions, respectively. The athlete group also demonstrated smaller ALFF in the left superior parietal lobule and altered functional connectivity between the left superior parietal and frontal regions. These findings indicate that badminton expertise is associated with not only plastic structural changes in terms of enlarged gray matter density in the cerebellum, but also functional alterations in fronto-parietal connectivity. Such structural and functional alterations may reflect specific experiences of badminton training and practice, including high-capacity visuo-spatial processing and hand-eye coordination in addition to refined motor skills. PMID:22840241

  17. Altered resting brain function and structure in professional badminton players.

    PubMed

    Di, Xin; Zhu, Senhua; Jin, Hua; Wang, Pin; Ye, Zhuoer; Zhou, Ke; Zhuo, Yan; Rao, Hengyi

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of professional athletic or musical training have demonstrated considerable practice-dependent plasticity in various brain structures, which may reflect distinct training demands. In the present study, structural and functional brain alterations were examined in professional badminton players and compared with healthy controls using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting-state functional MRI. Gray matter concentration (GMC) was assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and resting-brain functions were measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and seed-based functional connectivity. Results showed that the athlete group had greater GMC and ALFF in the right and medial cerebellar regions, respectively. The athlete group also demonstrated smaller ALFF in the left superior parietal lobule and altered functional connectivity between the left superior parietal and frontal regions. These findings indicate that badminton expertise is associated with not only plastic structural changes in terms of enlarged gray matter density in the cerebellum, but also functional alterations in fronto-parietal connectivity. Such structural and functional alterations may reflect specific experiences of badminton training and practice, including high-capacity visuo-spatial processing and hand-eye coordination in addition to refined motor skills.

  18. Population structure of Adenostoma fasciculatum in mature stands of chamise chaparral in the southern Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Parsons, D.J.; Rundel, P.W.

    1984-01-01

    In the low elevation chaparral areas of Sequoia National Park, California, pure stands of chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum) are periodically rejuvenated by fire. Mature stands showed considerable variability in density and total biomass even though a positive correlation exists between the two. Mature stands showed a preponderance of individuals in the smaller size classes (inverse-J shape distribution). Dead shrubs found in mature stands also tended to be in the smaller size classes. This relatively high mortality of small individuals is important to post-fire stand development. In addition, resprout and seedling biomass one year after fire both showed inverse-J shaped size-class structures. A positive correlation existed between the preburn basal area of a shrub and its first year resprout biomass. Shrub biomass and distance to nearest neighbor were poorly correlated. A significant correlation existed between stand density and a stand's variance-to-mean ratio, indicating a trend toward more regular spacing as density increases. Pre-burn and fire-induced mortality tended to move the stand towards a more clumped distribution. Seedlings replaced dead individuals after a fire and thus restored regular spacing.

  19. 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence Review for: The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on February 3-4, 2014. The SRP reviewed the new Evidence Report for the Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response (from here on referred to as the 2013 Immune Evidence Report), as well as the Research Plan for this Risk that is in the current version of the Human Research Program’s (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP).

  20. Post-impact alteration of the Manson impact structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossey, L. J.; Mccarville, P.

    1993-01-01

    Core materials from the Manson impact site (Manson, Iowa) are examined in order to evaluate post-impact alteration processes. Diagenetic interpretation of post-impact events is based on petrologic, mineralogic, and geochemical investigation of core materials including the following: target strata, disturbed and disrupted strata, ejecta, breccias, microbreccias, and impact melt. The diagenetic study utilizes research cores obtained by the continental scientific drilling project (CSDP) at the Manson structure, as well as core and cuttings of related materials. Samples include impactites (breccias, microbreccias, and melt material), crater fill material (sedimentary clast breccias), disturbed and disrupted target rocks, and reference target material (Amoco Eisheid No. 1 materials). The study of multiple cores will permit development of a regional picture of post-impact thermal history. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) provide a detailed description of authigenic and alteration mineralogy from diverse lithologies encountered in research drill cores at the Manson impact structure, and (2) identify and relate significant post-impact mineral alteration to post-impact thermal regime (extent and duration). Results will provide mineralogical and geochemical constraints on models for post-impact processes including the following: infilling of the crater depression; cooling and hydrothermal alteration of melt rocks; and subsequent long-term, low-temperature alteration of target rocks, breccias, and melt rocks. Preliminary petrologic and x-ray diffraction examination of fracture linings and void fillings from research core M1 indicate the presence of quartz, chlorite, mixed-layer clays, gypsum/anhydrite, calcite, and minor pyrite.

  1. Tree microhabitat structures as indicators of biodiversity in Douglas-fir forests of different stand ages and management histories in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.A.

    Treesearch

    Alexa K. Michel; Susanne. Winter

    2009-01-01

    In this study, microhabitat structures in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests were defined and their frequency and abundance in natural stands and stands of varying active management histories and stand ages was compared. Indicator microhabitat structures for natural forests were determined and the relationship of the abundance of...

  2. Coherence and Structural Design of Free-Standing Gratings for Atom-Wave Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooks, Michael; Tiberio, Richard; Chapman, Michael; Hammond, Troy; Smith, Edward; Lenef, Alan; Rubenstein, Richard; Pritchard, David; Adams, Scott; Ferrera, Juan; Carter, James; Smith, Henry

    1995-12-01

    Improvements in electron-beam writing techniques have allowed us to compensate for electron-beam system drift, making feasible the exposure of 800×800 µ m gratings with period as small as 0.14 µ m. Placement errors due to drift, calibration errors, and nonplanar substrates are measured with verniers. Gratings patterned with interferometric photolithography provide an absolute reference for a measure of stage nonlinearity (runout.) Simulation of fracture formation in silicon nitride films has given us a tool for the prediction of structures that will fail during fabrication, and a way of evaluating stress relief patterns in arbitrary structures. We have used two sets of simple patterns to identify the critical stress intensity factors in thin, free-standing films of nonstoichiometric silicon nitride.

  3. Damping Effect Studies for X-band Normal Conducting High Gradient Standing Wave Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, S.; Li, Z.; Tantawi, S.G.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Wang, J.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The Multi-TeV colliders should have the capability to accelerate low emittance beam with high rf efficiency, X-band normal conducting high gradient accelerating structure is one of the promising candidate. However, the long range transverse wake field which can cause beam emittance dilution is one of the critical issues. We examined effectiveness of dipole mode damping in three kinds of X-band, {pi}-mode standing wave structures at 11.424GHz with no detuning considered. They represent three damping schemes: damping with cylindrical iris slot, damping with choke cavity and damping with waveguide coupler. We try to reduce external Q factor below 20 in the first two dipole bands, which usually have very high (R{sub T}/Q){sub T}. The effect of damping on the acceleration mode is also discussed.

  4. Warming alters community size structure and ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Dossena, Matteo; Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Grey, Jonathan; Montoya, José M; Perkins, Daniel M; Trimmer, Mark; Woodward, Guy

    2012-08-07

    Global warming can affect all levels of biological complexity, though we currently understand least about its potential impact on communities and ecosystems. At the ecosystem level, warming has the capacity to alter the structure of communities and the rates of key ecosystem processes they mediate. Here we assessed the effects of a 4°C rise in temperature on the size structure and taxonomic composition of benthic communities in aquatic mesocosms, and the rates of detrital decomposition they mediated. Warming had no effect on biodiversity, but altered community size structure in two ways. In spring, warmer systems exhibited steeper size spectra driven by declines in total community biomass and the proportion of large organisms. By contrast, in autumn, warmer systems had shallower size spectra driven by elevated total community biomass and a greater proportion of large organisms. Community-level shifts were mirrored by changes in decomposition rates. Temperature-corrected microbial and macrofaunal decomposition rates reflected the shifts in community structure and were strongly correlated with biomass across mesocosms. Our study demonstrates that the 4°C rise in temperature expected by the end of the century has the potential to alter the structure and functioning of aquatic ecosystems profoundly, as well as the intimate linkages between these levels of ecological organization.

  5. Warming alters community size structure and ecosystem functioning

    PubMed Central

    Dossena, Matteo; Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Grey, Jonathan; Montoya, José M.; Perkins, Daniel M.; Trimmer, Mark; Woodward, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Global warming can affect all levels of biological complexity, though we currently understand least about its potential impact on communities and ecosystems. At the ecosystem level, warming has the capacity to alter the structure of communities and the rates of key ecosystem processes they mediate. Here we assessed the effects of a 4°C rise in temperature on the size structure and taxonomic composition of benthic communities in aquatic mesocosms, and the rates of detrital decomposition they mediated. Warming had no effect on biodiversity, but altered community size structure in two ways. In spring, warmer systems exhibited steeper size spectra driven by declines in total community biomass and the proportion of large organisms. By contrast, in autumn, warmer systems had shallower size spectra driven by elevated total community biomass and a greater proportion of large organisms. Community-level shifts were mirrored by changes in decomposition rates. Temperature-corrected microbial and macrofaunal decomposition rates reflected the shifts in community structure and were strongly correlated with biomass across mesocosms. Our study demonstrates that the 4°C rise in temperature expected by the end of the century has the potential to alter the structure and functioning of aquatic ecosystems profoundly, as well as the intimate linkages between these levels of ecological organization. PMID:22496185

  6. Imputing forest structure attributes from stand inventory and remotely sensed data in western Oregon, USA

    Treesearch

    Andrew T. Hudak; A. Tod Haren; Nicholas L. Crookston; Robert J. Liebermann; Janet L. Ohmann

    2014-01-01

    Imputation is commonly used to assign reference stand observations to target stands based on covariate relationships to remotely sensed data to assign inventory attributes across the entire landscape. However, most remotely sensed data are collected at higher resolution than the stand inventory data often used by operational foresters. Our primary goal was to compare...

  7. Effects of intermediate-severity disturbance on composition and structure in mixed Pinus-hardwood stands

    Treesearch

    Benjamin Trammell; Justin Hart; Callie Schweitzer; Daniel C. Dey; Michael Steinberg

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, forest managers intend to create or maintain mixed Pinus-hardwood stands. This stand assemblage may be driven by a variety of objectives but is often motivated by the desire to enhance native forest diversity and promote resilience to perturbations. Documenting the effects of natural disturbances on species composition and stand...

  8. Effect of Forest Structural Change on Carbon Storage in a Coastal Metasequoia glyptostroboides Stand

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiangrong; Yu, Mukui; Wu, Tonggui

    2013-01-01

    Forest structural change affects the forest's growth and the carbon storage. Two treatments, thinning (30% thinning intensity) and underplanting plus thinning, are being implemented in a coastal Metasequoia glyptostroboides forest shelterbelt in Eastern China. The vegetation carbon storage significantly increased in the underplanted and thinned treatments compared with that in the unthinned treatment (P < 0.05). The soil and litterfall carbon storage in the underplanted treatment were significantly higher than those in the unthinned treatment (P < 0.05). The total forest ecosystem carbon storage in the underplanted and thinned treatments increased by 35.3% and 26.3%, respectively, compared with that in the unthinned treatment, an increase that mainly came from the growth of vegetation aboveground. Total ecosystem carbon storage showed no significant difference between the underplanted and thinned treatments (P > 0.05). The soil light fraction organic carbon (LFOC) was significantly higher at the 0–15 cm soil layer in the thinned and underplanted stands compared with that in the unthinned stand (P < 0.05). The soil respiration of the underplanted treatment was significantly higher than that of the unthinned treatment only in July (P < 0.05). This study concludes that 30% thinning and underplanting after thinning could be more favorable to carbon sequestration for M. glyptostroboides plantations in the coastal areas of Eastern China. PMID:24187525

  9. Antemortem Differential Diagnosis of Dementia Pathology using Structural MRI: Differential-STAND

    PubMed Central

    Vemuri, Prashanthi; Simon, Gyorgy; Kantarci, Kejal; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Josephs, Keith A.; Knopman, David S.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2011-01-01

    The common neurodegenerative pathologies underlying dementia are Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD) and Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Our aim was to identify patterns of atrophy unique to each of these diseases using antemortem structural-MRI scans of pathologically-confirmed dementia cases and build an MRI-based differential diagnosis system. Our approach of creating atrophy maps using structural-MRI and applying them for classification of new incoming patients is labeled Differential-STAND (Differential-diagnosis based on STructural Abnormality in NeuroDegeneration). Pathologically-confirmed subjects with a single dementing pathologic diagnosis who had an MRI at the time of clinical diagnosis of dementia were identified: 48 AD, 20 LBD, 47 FTLD-TDP (pathology-confirmed FTLD with TDP-43). Gray matter density in 91 regions-of-interest was measured in each subject and adjusted for head-size and age using a database of 120 cognitively normal elderly. The atrophy patterns in each dementia type when compared to pathologically-confirmed controls mirrored known disease-specific anatomic patterns: AD-temporoparietal association cortices and medial temporal lobe; FTLD-TDP-frontal and temporal lobes and LBD-bilateral amygdalae, dorsal midbrain and inferior temporal lobes. Differential-STAND based classification of each case was done based on a mixture model generated using bisecting k-means clustering of the information from the MRI scans. Leave-one-out classification showed reasonable performance compared to the autopsy gold-standard and clinical diagnosis: AD (sensitivity:90.7%; specificity:84 %), LBD (sensitivity:78.6%; specificity:98.8%) and FTLD-TDP (sensitivity:84.4%; specificity:93.8%). The proposed approach establishes a direct a priori relationship between specific topographic patterns on MRI and “gold standard” of pathology which can then be used to predict underlying dementia pathology in new incoming patients. PMID:21195775

  10. Influence of Anthropogenic Disturbances on Stand Structural Complexity in Andean Temperate Forests: Implications for Managing Key Habitat for Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Forest attributes and their abundances define the stand structural complexity available as habitat for faunal biodiversity; however, intensive anthropogenic disturbances have the potential to degrade and simplify forest stands. In this paper we develop an index of stand structural complexity and show how anthropogenic disturbances, namely fire, logging, livestock, and their combined presence, affect stand structural complexity in a southern Global Biodiversity Hotspot. From 2011 to 2013, we measured forest structural attributes as well as the presence of anthropogenic disturbances in 505 plots in the Andean zone of the La Araucanía Region, Chile. In each plot, understory density, coarse woody debris, number of snags, tree diameter at breast height, and litter depth were measured, along with signs of the presence of anthropogenic disturbances. Ninety-five percent of the plots showed signs of anthropogenic disturbance (N = 475), with the combined presence of fire, logging, and livestock being the most common disturbance (N = 222; 44% of plots). The lowest values for the index were measured in plots combining fire, logging, and livestock. Undisturbed plots and plots with the presence of relatively old fires (> 70 years) showed the highest values for the index of stand structural complexity. Our results suggest that secondary forests < 70-year post-fire event, with the presence of habitat legacies (e.g. snags and CWD), can reach a structural complexity as high as undisturbed plots. Temperate forests should be managed to retain structural attributes, including understory density (7.2 ± 2.5 # contacts), volume of CWD (22.4 ± 25.8 m3/ha), snag density (94.4 ± 71.0 stems/ha), stand basal area (61.2 ± 31.4 m2/ha), and litter depth (7.5 ± 2.7 cm). Achieving these values will increase forest structural complexity, likely benefiting a range of faunal species in South American temperate forests. PMID:28068349

  11. Influence of Anthropogenic Disturbances on Stand Structural Complexity in Andean Temperate Forests: Implications for Managing Key Habitat for Biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Caviedes, Julián; Ibarra, José Tomás

    2017-01-01

    Forest attributes and their abundances define the stand structural complexity available as habitat for faunal biodiversity; however, intensive anthropogenic disturbances have the potential to degrade and simplify forest stands. In this paper we develop an index of stand structural complexity and show how anthropogenic disturbances, namely fire, logging, livestock, and their combined presence, affect stand structural complexity in a southern Global Biodiversity Hotspot. From 2011 to 2013, we measured forest structural attributes as well as the presence of anthropogenic disturbances in 505 plots in the Andean zone of the La Araucanía Region, Chile. In each plot, understory density, coarse woody debris, number of snags, tree diameter at breast height, and litter depth were measured, along with signs of the presence of anthropogenic disturbances. Ninety-five percent of the plots showed signs of anthropogenic disturbance (N = 475), with the combined presence of fire, logging, and livestock being the most common disturbance (N = 222; 44% of plots). The lowest values for the index were measured in plots combining fire, logging, and livestock. Undisturbed plots and plots with the presence of relatively old fires (> 70 years) showed the highest values for the index of stand structural complexity. Our results suggest that secondary forests < 70-year post-fire event, with the presence of habitat legacies (e.g. snags and CWD), can reach a structural complexity as high as undisturbed plots. Temperate forests should be managed to retain structural attributes, including understory density (7.2 ± 2.5 # contacts), volume of CWD (22.4 ± 25.8 m3/ha), snag density (94.4 ± 71.0 stems/ha), stand basal area (61.2 ± 31.4 m2/ha), and litter depth (7.5 ± 2.7 cm). Achieving these values will increase forest structural complexity, likely benefiting a range of faunal species in South American temperate forests.

  12. Photosynthetic pathway alters hydraulic structure and function in woody plants.

    PubMed

    Kocacinar, Ferit; Sage, Rowan F

    2004-04-01

    Xylem structure and function is proposed to reflect an evolutionary balance between demands for efficient movement of water to the leaf canopy and resistance to cavitation during high xylem tension. Water use efficiency (WUE) affects this balance by altering the water cost of photosynthesis. Therefore species of greater WUE, such as C(4) plants, should have altered xylem properties. To evaluate this hypothesis, we assessed the hydraulic and anatomical properties of 19 C(3) and C(4) woody species from arid regions of the American west and central Asia. Specific conductivity of stem xylem ( K(s) ) was 16%-98% lower in the C(4) than C(3) shrubs from the American west. In the Asian species, the C(3) Nitraria schoberi had similar and Halimodendron halodendron higher K(s) values compared with three C(4) species. Leaf specific conductivity ( K(L); hydraulic conductivity per leaf area) was 60%-98% lower in the C(4) than C(3) species, demonstrating that the presence of the C(4) pathway alters the relationship between leaf area and the ability of the xylem to transport water. C(4) species produced similar or smaller vessels than the C(3) shrubs except in Calligonum, and most C(4) shrubs exhibited higher wood densities than the C(3) species. Together, smaller conduit size and higher wood density indicate that in most cases, the C(4) shrubs exploited higher WUE by altering xylem structure to enhance safety from cavitation. In a minority of cases, the C(4) shrubs maintained similar xylem properties but enhanced the canopy area per branch. By establishing a link between C(4) photosynthesis and xylem structure, this study indicates that other phenomena that affect WUE, such as atmospheric CO(2) variation, may also affect the evolution of wood structure and function.

  13. Twenty-four years after theYellowstone Fires: Are postfire lodgepole pine stands converging in structure and function?

    PubMed

    Turner, Monica G; Whitby, Timothy G; Tinker, Daniel B; Romme, William H

    2016-05-01

    Disturbance and succession have long been of interest in ecology, but how landscape patterns of ecosystem structure and function evolve following large disturbances is poorly understood. After nearly 25 years, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) forests that regenerated after the 1988 Yellowstone Fires (Wyoming, USA) offer a prime opportunity to track the fate of disturbance-created heterogeneity in stand structure and function in a wilderness setting. In 2012, we resampled 72 permanent plots to ask (1) How have postfire stand structure and function changed between 11 and 24 yr postfire, and what variables explain these patterns and changes? (2) How has landscape-level (among-stand) variability in postfire stand structure and function changed between 11 and 24 yr postfire? We expected to see evidence of convergence beginning to emerge, but also that initial postfire stem density would still determine trajectories of biomass accumulation. After 24 yr, postfire lodgepole pine density remained very high (mean = 21,738 stems/ha, range = 0-344,067 stems/ha). Stem density increased in most plots between 11 and 24 yr postfire, but declined sharply where 11-yr-postfire stem density was > 72,000 stems/ha. Stems were small in high-density stands, but stand-level lodgepole pine leaf area, foliage biomass, and live aboveground biomass increased over time and with increasing stem density. After 24 yr, mean annual lodgepole pine aboveground net primary production (ANPP) was high (mean = 5 Mg · ha⁻¹ · yr⁻¹, range = 0-16.5 Mg · ha⁻¹ · yr⁻¹). Among stands, lodgepole pine ANPP increased with stem density, which explained 69% of the variation; another 8% of the variation was explained by environmental covariates. Early patterns of postfire lodgepole pine regeneration, which were contingent on prefire serotiny and fire severity, remained the dominant driver of stand structure and function. We observed mechanisms that would lead to convergence in stem density

  14. Electronic structure and magnetism of samarium and neodymium adatoms on free-standing graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, Agnieszka L.; Shick, Alexander B.; Máca, František; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure of selected rare-earth atoms adsorbed on a free-standing graphene was investigated using methods beyond the conventional density functional theory (DFT+U , DFT+HIA, and DFT+ED). The influence of the electron correlations and the spin-orbit coupling on the magnetic properties has been examined. The DFT+U method predicts both atoms to carry local magnetic moments (spin and orbital) contrary to a nonmagnetic f6 (J =0 ) ground-state configuration of Sm in the gas phase. Application of DFT +Hubbard-I (HIA) and DFT +exact diagonalization (ED) methods cures this problem, and yields a nonmagnetic ground state with six f electrons and J =0 for the Sm adatom. Our calculations show that Nd adatom remains magnetic, with four localized f electrons and J =4.0 . These conclusions could be verified by STM and XAS experiments.

  15. Travelling and standing envelope solitons in discrete non-linear cyclic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grolet, Aurelien; Hoffmann, Norbert; Thouverez, Fabrice; Schwingshackl, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Envelope solitons are demonstrated to exist in non-linear discrete structures with cyclic symmetry. The analysis is based on the Non-Linear Schrodinger Equation for the weakly non-linear limit, and on numerical simulation of the fully non-linear equations for larger amplitudes. Envelope solitons exist for parameters in which the wave equation is focussing and they have the form of shape-conserving wave packages propagating roughly with group velocity. For the limit of maximum wave number, where the group velocity vanishes, standing wave packages result and can be linked via a bifurcation to the non-localised non-linear normal modes. Numerical applications are carried out on a simple discrete system with cyclic symmetry which can be seen as a reduced model of a bladed disk as found in turbo-machinery.

  16. A stand-alone demography and landscape structure module for Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieradzik, L. P.; Haverd, V.; Smith, B.; Cook, G. D.; Briggs, P.; Roxburgh, S.; Liedloff, A.; Meyer, C.; Canadell, J.

    2013-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new approach for the simulation of woody ecosystem stand dynamics, demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity suitable for continental to global applications and designed for coupling to the terrestrial ecosystem component of any earth system model (Haverd et al., 2013). The approach is encoded in a model called Populations-Order-Physiology (POP). We demonstrate the behaviour and performance of POP coupled to the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange model (CABLE) for two contrasting applications: (i) to the Northern Australian Tropical Transect, featuring gradients in savanna vegetation cover, rainfall and fire disturbance and (ii) to a set of globally distributed forest locations coinciding with observations of forest biomass allometry. Along the Northern Australian Tropical Transect, CABLE-POP is able to simultaneously reproduce observation-based estimates of key functional and structural variables, namely gross primary production, tree foliage projective cover, basal area and maximum tree height. This application particularly demonstrates the ability of POP to quantify the contributions of drought and fire to tree mortality. Drought is manifested as an increase in mortality due to a decline in growth efficiency, while fires are treated as partial disturbance events, with tree mortality depending on tree size and fire intensity. In the application to global forests, POP is integrated with global forest data by calibrating it against paired observations of stem biomass and number density. The calibrated POP model is then coupled with CABLE and the coupled model is evaluated against leaf-stem allometry observations from forest stands ranging in age from 20 to 400 years. Results indicate that, in contrast to simulations from many global land surface models (Wolf et al., 2011), simulated biomass pools conform well with observed allometry. We conclude that POP, which can readily be coupled to the terrestrial carbon cycle

  17. Structural alterations in small resistance arteries in obesity.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano; De Ciuceis, Carolina; Porteri, Enzo; Semeraro, Francesco; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti

    2012-01-01

    In cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, small resistance arteries may show the presence of structural alterations. In particular, in essential hypertension, an increased media-to-lumen ratio of subcutaneous small arteries with no change in the total amount of vascular wall tissue (eutrophic remodelling) has already been described several years ago. Similar alterations have been demonstrated also in patients with diabetes mellitus and obesity; in this case, however, a more evident contribution of vascular smooth muscle cell growth (hypertrophic remodelling) is present. This review addresses the effects of obesity on small resistance artery structure. Similar to diabetic patients, obese patients show an increased media-to-lumen ratio of subcutaneous small arteries, which appears associated with hypertrophic remodelling, as demonstrated by an increase in media cross-sectional area. Endothelial dysfunction evaluated as vasodilator response to acetylcholine has also been observed. Several studies have shown that increased media-to-lumen ratio of subcutaneous small resistance arteries possesses a prognostic significance in relation to cardiovascular outcome. Appropriate antihypertensive treatment may improve microvascular alterations both in essential hypertension and in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In obesity, a pronounced weight loss may improve microvascular structure. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the effects of other pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions in obesity. © 2011 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2011 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  18. Structural complexity and developmental stage after an intermediate-scale wind disturbance on an upland Quercus stand

    Treesearch

    Lauren E. Cox; Justin L. Hart; Callie J. Schweitzer; Daniel C. Dey

    2017-01-01

    Promoting stand structural complexity is an increasingly popular silvicultural objective, as complex structures are hypothesized to be more resistant and resilient to perturbations. On April 20, 2011 in Lawrence County, Alabama, an EF1 tornado tracked 5 km, leaving a patchwork mosaic of disturbed areas. In summer 2014, we established a 100 m × 200 m (2 ha) rectangular...

  19. Changes in stand structure and composition after restoration treatments in low elevation dry forests of northeastern Oregon.

    Treesearch

    Andrew Youngblood; Kerry L. Metlen; Kent. Coe

    2006-01-01

    In many fire-dependent forests in the United States, changes occurring in the last century have resulted in overstory structures, conifer densities, down woody structure and understory plant communities that deviate from those described historically. With these changes, many forests are presumed to be unsustainable. Broad-scale treatments are proposed to promote stand...

  20. Soil Microbial Community Structure and Metabolic Activity of Pinus elliottii Plantations across Different Stand Ages in a Subtropical Area.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeyan; Haack, Stacey Elizabeth; Lin, Wenxiong; Li, Bailian; Wu, Linkun; Fang, Changxun; Zhang, Zhixing

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play an essential role in the forest ecosystem as an active component. This study examined the hypothesis that soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity would vary with the increasing stand ages in long-term pure plantations of Pinus elliottii. The phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) combined with community level physiological profiles (CLPP) method was used to assess these characteristics in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii. We found that the soil microbial communities were significantly different among different stand ages of P. elliottii plantations. The PLFA analysis indicated that the bacterial biomass was higher than the actinomycic and fungal biomass in all stand ages. However, the bacterial biomass decreased with the increasing stand ages, while the fungal biomass increased. The four maximum biomarker concentrations in rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii for all stand ages were 18:1ω9c, 16:1ω7c, 18:3ω6c (6,9,12) and cy19:0, representing measures of fungal and gram negative bacterial biomass. In addition, CLPP analysis revealed that the utilization rate of amino acids, polymers, phenolic acids, and carbohydrates of soil microbial community gradually decreased with increasing stand ages, though this pattern was not observed for carboxylic acids and amines. Microbial community diversity, as determined by the Simpson index, Shannon-Wiener index, Richness index and McIntosh index, significantly decreased as stand age increased. Overall, both the PLFA and CLPP illustrated that the long-term pure plantation pattern exacerbated the microecological imbalance previously described in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii, and markedly decreased the soil microbial community diversity and metabolic activity. Based on the correlation analysis, we concluded that the soil nutrient and C/N ratio most significantly contributed to the variation of soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity in different stand ages of P

  1. Soil Microbial Community Structure and Metabolic Activity of Pinus elliottii Plantations across Different Stand Ages in a Subtropical Area

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeyan; Haack, Stacey Elizabeth; Lin, Wenxiong; Li, Bailian; Wu, Linkun; Fang, Changxun; Zhang, Zhixing

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play an essential role in the forest ecosystem as an active component. This study examined the hypothesis that soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity would vary with the increasing stand ages in long-term pure plantations of Pinus elliottii. The phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) combined with community level physiological profiles (CLPP) method was used to assess these characteristics in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii. We found that the soil microbial communities were significantly different among different stand ages of P. elliottii plantations. The PLFA analysis indicated that the bacterial biomass was higher than the actinomycic and fungal biomass in all stand ages. However, the bacterial biomass decreased with the increasing stand ages, while the fungal biomass increased. The four maximum biomarker concentrations in rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii for all stand ages were 18:1ω9c, 16:1ω7c, 18:3ω6c (6,9,12) and cy19:0, representing measures of fungal and gram negative bacterial biomass. In addition, CLPP analysis revealed that the utilization rate of amino acids, polymers, phenolic acids, and carbohydrates of soil microbial community gradually decreased with increasing stand ages, though this pattern was not observed for carboxylic acids and amines. Microbial community diversity, as determined by the Simpson index, Shannon-Wiener index, Richness index and McIntosh index, significantly decreased as stand age increased. Overall, both the PLFA and CLPP illustrated that the long-term pure plantation pattern exacerbated the microecological imbalance previously described in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii, and markedly decreased the soil microbial community diversity and metabolic activity. Based on the correlation analysis, we concluded that the soil nutrient and C/N ratio most significantly contributed to the variation of soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity in different stand ages of P

  2. Estimating stand structure using discrete-return lidar: an example from low density, fire prone ponderosa pine forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, S. A.; Burke, I.C.; Box, D. O.; Kaufmann, M. R.; Stoker, Jason M.

    2005-01-01

    The ponderosa pine forests of the Colorado Front Range, USA, have historically been subjected to wildfires. Recent large burns have increased public interest in fire behavior and effects, and scientific interest in the carbon consequences of wildfires. Remote sensing techniques can provide spatially explicit estimates of stand structural characteristics. Some of these characteristics can be used as inputs to fire behavior models, increasing our understanding of the effect of fuels on fire behavior. Others provide estimates of carbon stocks, allowing us to quantify the carbon consequences of fire. Our objective was to use discrete-return lidar to estimate such variables, including stand height, total aboveground biomass, foliage biomass, basal area, tree density, canopy base height and canopy bulk density. We developed 39 metrics from the lidar data, and used them in limited combinations in regression models, which we fit to field estimates of the stand structural variables. We used an information–theoretic approach to select the best model for each variable, and to select the subset of lidar metrics with most predictive potential. Observed versus predicted values of stand structure variables were highly correlated, with r2 ranging from 57% to 87%. The most parsimonious linear models for the biomass structure variables, based on a restricted dataset, explained between 35% and 58% of the observed variability. Our results provide us with useful estimates of stand height, total aboveground biomass, foliage biomass and basal area. There is promise for using this sensor to estimate tree density, canopy base height and canopy bulk density, though more research is needed to generate robust relationships. We selected 14 lidar metrics that showed the most potential as predictors of stand structure. We suggest that the focus of future lidar studies should broaden to include low density forests, particularly systems where the vertical structure of the canopy is important

  3. On the structure and topography of free-standing chemically modified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, N. R.; Pandey, P. A.; Beanland, R.; Rourke, J. P.; Lupo, U.; Rowlands, G.; Römer, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The mechanical, electrical and chemical properties of chemically modified graphene (CMG) are intrinsically linked to its structure. Here, we report on our study of the topographic structure of free-standing CMG using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron diffraction. We find that, unlike graphene, suspended sheets of CMG are corrugated and distorted on nanometre length scales. AFM reveals not only long-range (100 nm) distortions induced by the support, as previously observed for graphene, but also short-range corrugations with length scales down to the resolution limit of 10 nm. These corrugations are static not dynamic, and are significantly diminished on CMG supported on atomically smooth substrates. Evidence for even shorter-range distortions, down to a few nanometres or less, is found by electron diffraction of suspended CMG. Comparison of the experimental data with simulations reveals that the mean atomic displacement from the nominal lattice position is of order 10% of the carbon-carbon bond length. Taken together, these results suggest a complex structure for CMG where heterogeneous functionalization creates local strain and distortion.

  4. A highly specific coding system for structural chromosomal alterations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Frías, M L; Martínez-Fernández, M L

    2013-04-01

    The Spanish Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECEMC, from the name in Spanish) has developed a very simple and highly specific coding system for structural chromosomal alterations. Such a coding system would be of value at present due to the dramatic increase in the diagnosis of submicroscopic chromosomal deletions and duplications through molecular techniques. In summary, our new coding system allows the characterization of: (a) the type of structural anomaly; (b) the chromosome affected; (c) if the alteration affects the short or/and the long arm, and (d) if it is a non-pure dicentric, a non-pure isochromosome, or if it affects several chromosomes. We show the distribution of 276 newborn patients with these types of chromosomal alterations using their corresponding codes according to our system. We consider that our approach may be useful not only for other registries, but also for laboratories performing these studies to store their results on case series. Therefore, the aim of this article is to describe this coding system and to offer the opportunity for this coding to be applied by others. Moreover, as this is a SYSTEM, rather than a fixed code, it can be implemented with the necessary modifications to include the specific objectives of each program. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Brain structural alterations associated with young women with subthreshold depression.

    PubMed

    Li, Haijiang; Wei, Dongtao; Sun, Jiangzhou; Chen, Qunlin; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-05-18

    Neuroanatomical abnormalities in patients with major depression disorder (MDD) have been attracted great research attention. However, the structural alterations associated with subthreshold depression (StD) remain unclear and, therefore, require further investigation. In this study, 42 young women with StD, and 30 matched non-depressed controls (NCs) were identified based on two-time Beck Depression Inventory scores. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region of interest method were used to investigate altered gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter volume (WMV) among a non-clinical sample of young women with StD. VBM results indicated that young women with StD showed significantly decreased GMV in the right inferior parietal lobule than NCs; increased GMV in the amygdala, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus; and increased WMV in the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Together, structural alterations in specific brain regions, which are known to be involved in the fronto-limbic circuits implicated in depression may precede the occurrence of depressive episodes and influence the development of MDD.

  6. Brain structural alterations associated with young women with subthreshold depression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haijiang; Wei, Dongtao; Sun, Jiangzhou; Chen, Qunlin; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Neuroanatomical abnormalities in patients with major depression disorder (MDD) have been attracted great research attention. However, the structural alterations associated with subthreshold depression (StD) remain unclear and, therefore, require further investigation. In this study, 42 young women with StD, and 30 matched non-depressed controls (NCs) were identified based on two-time Beck Depression Inventory scores. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region of interest method were used to investigate altered gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter volume (WMV) among a non-clinical sample of young women with StD. VBM results indicated that young women with StD showed significantly decreased GMV in the right inferior parietal lobule than NCs; increased GMV in the amygdala, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus; and increased WMV in the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Together, structural alterations in specific brain regions, which are known to be involved in the fronto-limbic circuits implicated in depression may precede the occurrence of depressive episodes and influence the development of MDD. PMID:25982857

  7. Altered nuclear structure in myotonic dystrophy type 1-derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, R; Hernández-Hernández, O; Magaña, J J; González-Ramírez, R; García-López, E S; Cisneros, B

    2015-02-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystem genetic disorder caused by a triplet nucleotide repeat expansion in the 3' untranslated region of the Dystrophia Myotonica-Protein Kinase (DMPK) gene. DMPK gene transcripts containing CUG expanded repeats accumulate in nuclear foci and ultimately cause altered splicing/gene expression of numerous secondary genes. The study of primary cell cultures derived from patients with DM1 has allowed the identification and further characterization of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology in the natural context of the disease. In this study we show for the first time impaired nuclear structure in fibroblasts of DM1 patients. DM1-derived fibroblasts exhibited altered localization of the nuclear envelope (NE) proteins emerin and lamins A/C and B1 with concomitant increased size and altered shape of nuclei. Abnormal NE organization is more common in DM1 fibroblasts containing abundant nuclear foci, implying expression of the expanded RNA as determinant of nuclear defects. That transient expression of the DMPK 3' UTR containing 960 CTG but not with the 3' UTR lacking CTG repeats is sufficient to generate NE disruption in normal fibroblasts confirms the direct impact of mutant RNA on NE architecture. We also evidence nucleoli distortion in DM1 fibroblasts by immunostaining of the nucleolar protein fibrillarin, implying a broader effect of the mutant RNA on nuclear structure. In summary, these findings reveal that NE disruption, a hallmark of laminopathy disorders, is a novel characteristic of DM1.

  8. Prolonged weight-shift and altered spinal coordination during sit-to-stand in practitioners of the Alexander Technique

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Gurfinkel, Victor S; Horak, Fay B; Day, Brian L

    2011-01-01

    The Alexander Technique (AT) is used to improve postural and movement coordination and has been reported to be clinically beneficial, however its effect on movement coordination is not well-characterized. In this study we examined the sit-to-stand (STS) movement by comparing coordination (phasing, weight-shift and spinal movement) between AT teachers (n=15) and matched control subjects (n=14). We found AT teachers had a longer weight-shift (p<0.001) and shorter momentum transfer phase (p=0.01), than control subjects. AT teachers also increased vertical foot force monotonically, rather than unweighting the feet prior to seat-off, suggesting they generate less forward momentum with hip flexors. The prolonged weight-shift of AT teachers occurred over a greater range of trunk inclination, such that their weight shifted continuously onto the feet while bringing the body mass forward. Finally, AT teachers had greatly reduced spinal bending during STS (cervical, p<0.001; thoracic, p<0.001; lumbar, p<0.05). We hypothesize that the low hip joint stiffness and adaptive axial postural tone previously reported in AT teachers underlies this novel “continuous” STS strategy by facilitating eccentric contractions during weight-shift. PMID:21782443

  9. Pseudo arylsulfatase A deficiency: evidence for a structurally altered enzyme.

    PubMed

    Fluharty, A L; Meek, W E; Kihara, H

    1983-04-15

    Analysis of arylsulfatase A from pseudo arylsulfatase A deficiency fibroblasts by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoradiochemical nitrocellulose blot radiography revealed two subunit bands which migrated faster than subunit bands of enzyme from normal fibroblasts. Immunoreactive material was present only at levels comparable to enzyme activity. These findings imply that arylsulfatase A in pseudodeficiency is structurally altered, but it is catalytically equivalent to normal arylsulfatase A. This altered enzyme must be the product of the pseudodeficiency gene since no immunoreactive product of the metachromatic leukodystrophy gene could be detected in metachromatic leukodystrophy cells by the procedure employed. It is not clear from the present data if the attenuated arylsulfatase A activity in pseudodeficiency results from a decreased rate of synthesis or an increased lability of the mutant enzyme.

  10. Ectomycorrhizal community structure in a healthy and a Phytophthora-infected chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) stand in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Blom, Jan Maarten; Vannini, Andrea; Vettraino, Anna Maria; Hale, Michael D; Godbold, Douglas L

    2009-11-01

    Ink disease caused by Phytophthora cambivora is a major disease of sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa). In two C. sativa stands in central Italy, one (Montesanti) that is infected with P. cambivora and the trees showing symptoms of ink disease and another healthy stand (Puzzella), the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) community structure was investigated. On the roots of the surviving trees of the diseased stand, 29 different ECM species were determined compared to 23 in the healthy stand. Eleven ECM species were common to both stands; however, a number of species were unique to one of the stands. Cenococcum geophilum was dominant at both sites, but the percentage colonisation was much higher at Montesanti (40.8%) compared to Puzzella (27.2%). There was a switch in species from Russula vesca, Russula lepida and Russula azurea at Puzzella to Russula nigricans, R. lepida and Russula delica at Montesanti. Both R. vesca and R. azurea were found only at the Puzzella site. At the diseased site, the ECMs formed had a smaller root tip diameter, and the ECM at the healthy site had more abundant extramatrical hyphae.

  11. Climatic Stress during Stand Development Alters the Sign and Magnitude of Age-Related Growth Responses in a Subtropical Mountain Pine.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Benito, Paloma; Madrigal-González, Jaime; Young, Sarah; Mercatoris, Pierre; Cavin, Liam; Huang, Tsurng-Juhn; Chen, Jan-Chang; Jump, Alistair S

    2015-01-01

    The modification of typical age-related growth by environmental changes is poorly understood, In part because there is a lack of consensus at individual tree level regarding age-dependent growth responses to climate warming as stands develop. To increase our current understanding about how multiple drivers of environmental change can modify growth responses as trees age we used tree ring data of a mountain subtropical pine species along an altitudinal gradient covering more than 2,200 m of altitude. We applied mixed-linear models to determine how absolute and relative age-dependent growth varies depending on stand development; and to quantify the relative importance of tree age and climate on individual tree growth responses. Tree age was the most important factor for tree growth in models parameterised using data from all forest developmental stages. Contrastingly, the relationship found between tree age and growth became non-significant in models parameterised using data corresponding to mature stages. These results suggest that although absolute tree growth can continuously increase along tree size when trees reach maturity age had no effect on growth. Tree growth was strongly reduced under increased annual temperature, leading to more constant age-related growth responses. Furthermore, young trees were the most sensitive to reductions in relative growth rates, but absolute growth was strongly reduced under increased temperature in old trees. Our results help to reconcile previous contrasting findings of age-related growth responses at the individual tree level, suggesting that the sign and magnitude of age-related growth responses vary with stand development. The different responses found to climate for absolute and relative growth rates suggest that young trees are particularly vulnerable under warming climate, but reduced absolute growth in old trees could alter the species' potential as a carbon sink in the future.

  12. Antemortem MRI based STructural Abnormality iNDex (STAND)-scores correlate with postmortem Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage.

    PubMed

    Vemuri, Prashanthi; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Kantarci, Kejal; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Shiung, Maria S; Knopman, David S; Boeve, Bradley F; Petersen, Ronald C; Dickson, Dennis W; Jack, Clifford R

    2008-08-15

    The clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) does not exactly match the pathological findings at autopsy in every subject. Therefore, in-vivo imaging measures, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) that reflect underlying pathology, would be clinically useful independent supplementary measures of disease stage. We have developed an algorithm that extracts atrophy information from individual patient's 3D MRI scans and assigns a STructural Abnormality iNDex (STAND)-score to the scan based on the degree of atrophy in comparison to patterns extracted from a large library of clinically well characterized AD and CN (cognitively normal) subject's MRI scans. STAND-scores can be adjusted for demographics to give adjusted-STAND (aSTAND)-scores which are >0 for subjects with brains identified as abnormal by the algorithm. Since histopathological findings are considered to represent the "ground truth", our objective was to assess the sensitivity of aSTAND-scores to pathological AD staging. This was done by comparing antemortem MRI based aSTAND-scores with postmortem grading of disease severity in 101 subjects who had both antemortem MRI and postmortem Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) staging. We found a rank correlation of 0.62 (p<0.0001) between Braak NFT stage and aSTAND-scores. The results show that optimally extracted information from MRI scans such as STAND-scores accurately capture the severity of neuronal pathology and can be used as an independent approximate surrogate marker for in-vivo pathological staging as well as for early identification of AD in individual subjects.

  13. The evaluation of different forest structural indices to predict the stand aboveground biomass of even-aged Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests in Kunduz, Northern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ercanli, İlker; Kahriman, Aydın

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the effect of stand structural diversity, including the Shannon, improved Shannon, Simpson, McIntosh, Margelef, and Berger-Parker indices, on stand aboveground biomass (AGB) and developed statistical prediction models for the stand AGB values, including stand structural diversity indices and some stand attributes. The AGB prediction model, including only stand attributes, accounted for 85 % of the total variance in AGB (R (2)) with an Akaike's information criterion (AIC) of 807.2407, Bayesian information criterion (BIC) of 809.5397, Schwarz Bayesian criterion (SBC) of 818.0426, and root mean square error (RMSE) of 38.529 Mg. After inclusion of the stand structural diversity into the model structure, considerable improvement was observed in statistical accuracy, including 97.5 % of the total variance in AGB, with an AIC of 614.1819, BIC of 617.1242, SBC of 633.0853, and RMSE of 15.8153 Mg. The predictive fitting results indicate that some indices describing the stand structural diversity can be employed as significant independent variables to predict the AGB production of the Scotch pine stand. Further, including the stand diversity indices in the AGB prediction model with the stand attributes provided important predictive contributions in estimating the total variance in AGB.

  14. Structure and composition of altered riparian forests in an agricultural Amazonian landscape.

    PubMed

    Nagy, R Chelsea; Porder, Stephen; Neill, Christopher; Brando, Paulo; Quintino, Raimundo Mota; do Nascimento, Sebastiâo Aviz

    2015-09-01

    Deforestation and fragmentation influence the microclimate, vegetation structure, and composition of remaining patches of tropical forest. In the southern Amazon, at the frontier of cropland expansion, forests are converted and fragmented in a pattern that leaves standing riparian forests whose dimensions are mandated by the Brazilian National Forest Code. These altered riparian forests share many characteristics of well-studied upland forest fragments, but differ because they remain connected to larger areas of forest downstream, and because they may experience wetter soil conditions because reduction of forest cover in the surrounding watershed raises groundwater levels and increases stream runoff. We compared forest regeneration, structure, composition, and diversity in four areas of intact riparian forest and four areas each of narrow, medium, and wide altered riparian forests that have been surrounded by agriculture since the early 1980s. We found that seedling abundance was reduced by as much as 64% and sapling abundance was reduced by as much as 67% in altered compared to intact riparian forests. The most pronounced differences between altered and intact forest occurred near forest edges and within the narrowest sections of altered riparian forests. Woody plant species composition differed and diversity was reduced in altered forests compared to intact riparian forests. However, despite being fragmented for several decades, large woody plant biomass and carbon storage, the number of live or dead large woody plants, mortality rates, and the size distribution of woody plants did not differ significantly between altered and intact riparian forests. Thus, even in these relatively narrow forests with high edge: area ratios, we saw no evidence of the increases in mortality and declines in biomass that have been found in other tropical forest fragment studies. However, because of the changes in both species community and reduced regeneration, it is unclear how long

  15. Factors controlling Eucalyptus productivity: How water availability and stand structure alter production and carbon allocation

    Treesearch

    Michael G. Ryan; Jose Luiz Stape; Dan Binkley; Sebastiao Fonseca; Rodolfo A. Loos; Ernesto N. Takahashi; Claudio R. Silva; Sergio R. Silva; Rodrigo E. Hakamada; Jose Mario Ferreira; Augusto M. N. Lima; Jose Luiz Gava; Fernando P. Leite; Helder B. Andrade; Jacyr M. Alves; Gualter G. C. Silva

    2010-01-01

    Wood production varies substantially with resource availability, and the variation in wood production can result from several mechanisms: increased photosynthesis, and changes in partitioning of photosynthesis to wood production, belowground flux, foliage production or respiration. An understanding of the mechanistic basis for patterns in wood production...

  16. Which structural features stand behind micelization of ionic liquids? Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship studies.

    PubMed

    Barycki, Maciej; Sosnowska, Anita; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2017-02-01

    Different ions constituting ionic liquids (ILs) change their properties, including the Critical Micelization Concentration (CMC). It is possible to identify and quantitatively describe specific structural ions' features having influence on the micelization of ILs. Moreover, it should be possible to verify, whether the phenomenon of micelization is governed by the influence of the single ion only, rather than being a sum of both ions' mutual influence. The qualitative and quantitative description of the structural properties responsible for micelles formation was performed with the use of the Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) approach. Structural features were expressed with help of the molecular GEometry, Topology, and Atom-Weights AssemblY (GETAWAY) descriptors system. The QSPR model was properly validated and its quality and usability was additionally proven by applying it to predict the CMC for 15,000 computationally designed ILs. It was the first model to the CMC assessment for ILs. The analysis showed that longer (containing big hydrophobic domain), less spherical and not "folded" cations as well as bigger anions are the main factors causing the decrease of CMC. According to the presented model, the influence of cations and anions is independent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Altered postural control strategies in quiet standing more than 20 years after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Stensdotter, Ann-Katrin; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte

    2016-05-01

    To explore long-term consequences of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on postural sway and control strategies during bilateral quiet standing, in subjects treated with or without reconstructive surgery compared to uninjured controls. 70 individuals who had unilateral ACL rupture 23±2.4 years ago (33 received ACL reconstructive surgery, ACLR, and 37 had physiotherapy only, ACLPT) and 33 uninjured matched controls (CTRL) (mean age 46±5.3) stood quietly with eyes closed for 3min on a firm and on a compliant surface, respectively. Center of pressure (CoP) was registered with a force plate and postural sway was calculated from center of mass (CoM) derived from 3D kinematics. Sway density (SD) analyses of CoP assessed distance and duration of stable phases. The torque controlling postural sway was estimated from CoP-CoM. Comparisons across conditions to CTRL revealed larger CoP-CoM-area in ACLR (p=0.017, CI: 10.95, 143.10), but not in ACLPT. Mean distance between SD-peaks was greater for ACLR (p<0.001, CI: 1.73, 5.31) than for ACLPT (p=0.006, CI: 0.56, 4.12) relative to CTRL. Duration of SD-peaks was smaller for both ACLR and ACLPT (p<0.001, CI: -4.04, -1.23 and -3.82, -1.03, respectively) compared to CTRL. CoM-area in the ACL-groups did not differ from CTRL. ACL-injured subjects demonstrated greater postural control efforts than CTRL but without significant differences in postural sway. Control efforts were thus not directly associated with sway and further research should be focused on variance in postural control strategies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Solving surface structures from normal incidence X-ray standing wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basham, Mark; Bennett, Roger A.

    2007-09-01

    A program is provided to determine structural parameters of atoms in or adsorbed on surfaces by refinement of atomistic models towards experimentally determined data generated by the normal incidence X-ray standing wave (NIXSW) technique. The method employs a combination of Differential Evolution Genetic Algorithms and Steepest Descent Line Minimisations to provide a fast, reliable and user friendly tool for experimentalists to interpret complex multidimensional NIXSW data sets. Program summaryProgram title: NIXSW Planewave Solver Catalogue identifier: ADZE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 16 874 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 631 874 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Borland C++ Builder 5 Computer: Any Windows Compatible Operating system: Windows 2000 and XP RAM: <10 MB Classification: 7.4 Nature of problem: Using NIXSW experimental data to calculate atomic positions of adsorbates. Restrictions: Data from substrates must have cubic, tetragonal or orthorhombic crystal structures i.e. with 90° between conventional cell axes. Running time: Seconds-minutes dependant on the number of plane waves and the number of atomic sites.

  19. Stand structure and growth of Abies magnifica responded to five thinning levels in northeastern California, USA

    Treesearch

    Jianwei Zhang; William W. Oliver

    2006-01-01

    A 60-year old red fir stand with 23,950 stems per ha was thinned to five stand densities. Thinning occurred in 1972, 1976, and 1980. Height, DBH, and crown characteristics were measured seven times at four- to seven-year intervals from 1972 to 2002. Tree rings were measured retrospectively to determine growth of individual years. Periodic annual increment (PAI) was...

  20. Effect of diameter limits and stand structure on relative density indices: a case study

    Treesearch

    Robert O. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    An understory of shade-tolerant species often develops in stands in the Douglas-fir region of western Washington and Oregon and can have a disproportionate effect on relative density indices, such as Reineke stand density index and Curtis relative density. The effects of such understories and of other departures from The even-aged condition are illustrated with...

  1. Effects of dwarf mistletoe on stand structure of lodgepole pine forests 21-28 years post-mountain pine beetle epidemic in central Oregon.

    PubMed

    Agne, Michelle C; Shaw, David C; Woolley, Travis J; Queijeiro-Bolaños, Mónica E

    2014-01-01

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests are widely distributed throughout North America and are subject to mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemics, which have caused mortality over millions of hectares of mature trees in recent decades. Mountain pine beetle is known to influence stand structure, and has the ability to impact many forest processes. Dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum) also influences stand structure and occurs frequently in post-mountain pine beetle epidemic lodgepole pine forests. Few studies have incorporated both disturbances simultaneously although they co-occur frequently on the landscape. The aim of this study is to investigate the stand structure of lodgepole pine forests 21-28 years after a mountain pine beetle epidemic with varying levels of dwarf mistletoe infection in the Deschutes National Forest in central Oregon. We compared stand density, stand basal area, canopy volume, proportion of the stand in dominant/codominant, intermediate, and suppressed cohorts, average height and average diameter of each cohort, across the range of dwarf mistletoe ratings to address differences in stand structure. We found strong evidence of a decrease in canopy volume, suppressed cohort height, and dominant/codominant cohort diameter with increasing stand-level dwarf mistletoe rating. There was strong evidence that as dwarf mistletoe rating increases, proportion of the stand in the dominant/codominant cohort decreases while proportion of the stand in the suppressed cohort increases. Structural differences associated with variable dwarf mistletoe severity create heterogeneity in this forest type and may have a significant influence on stand productivity and the resistance and resilience of these stands to future biotic and abiotic disturbances. Our findings show that it is imperative to incorporate dwarf mistletoe when studying stand productivity and ecosystem recovery processes in lodgepole pine forests because of its potential to

  2. Effects of Dwarf Mistletoe on Stand Structure of Lodgepole Pine Forests 21-28 Years Post-Mountain Pine Beetle Epidemic in Central Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Agne, Michelle C.; Shaw, David C.; Woolley, Travis J.; Queijeiro-Bolaños, Mónica E.

    2014-01-01

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests are widely distributed throughout North America and are subject to mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemics, which have caused mortality over millions of hectares of mature trees in recent decades. Mountain pine beetle is known to influence stand structure, and has the ability to impact many forest processes. Dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum) also influences stand structure and occurs frequently in post-mountain pine beetle epidemic lodgepole pine forests. Few studies have incorporated both disturbances simultaneously although they co-occur frequently on the landscape. The aim of this study is to investigate the stand structure of lodgepole pine forests 21–28 years after a mountain pine beetle epidemic with varying levels of dwarf mistletoe infection in the Deschutes National Forest in central Oregon. We compared stand density, stand basal area, canopy volume, proportion of the stand in dominant/codominant, intermediate, and suppressed cohorts, average height and average diameter of each cohort, across the range of dwarf mistletoe ratings to address differences in stand structure. We found strong evidence of a decrease in canopy volume, suppressed cohort height, and dominant/codominant cohort diameter with increasing stand-level dwarf mistletoe rating. There was strong evidence that as dwarf mistletoe rating increases, proportion of the stand in the dominant/codominant cohort decreases while proportion of the stand in the suppressed cohort increases. Structural differences associated with variable dwarf mistletoe severity create heterogeneity in this forest type and may have a significant influence on stand productivity and the resistance and resilience of these stands to future biotic and abiotic disturbances. Our findings show that it is imperative to incorporate dwarf mistletoe when studying stand productivity and ecosystem recovery processes in lodgepole pine forests because of its potential to

  3. Influences of stand structure and fuel treatments on wildfire severity at Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest, northeastern California

    Treesearch

    Julie N. Symons; Dean H. K. Fairbanks; Carl N. Skinner

    2008-01-01

    This study utilizes forest stand structures and fuel profiles to evaluate the influence of different types of silvicultural treatments on fire severity in the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest (BMEF), located within Lassen National Forest of northeastern California. We compare the severity of fire, assessed based on tree crown and bole scorch on 100 ha experimental...

  4. Leaf area and structural changes after thinning in even-aged Picea rubens and Abies balsamea stands in Maine, USA

    Treesearch

    R. Justin DeRose; Robert S. Seymour

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that changes in leaf area index (LAIm2 m-2) and mean stand diameter following thinning are due to thinning type and residual density. The ratios of pre- to postthinning diameter and LAI were used to assess structural changes between replicated crown, dominant, and low thinning treatments to 33% and 50% residual density in even-aged Picea rubens...

  5. Structural characteristics of forest stands within home ranges of Mexican spotted owls in Arizona and New Mexico

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; William M. Block; Steven H. Ackers

    2003-01-01

    As part of a set of studies evaluating home-range size and habitat use of radio-marked Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida), we sampled structural characteristics of forest stands within owl home ranges on two study areas in Arizona and New Mexico. Study areas were dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)-Gambel...

  6. Composition, structure, and dynamics of a mature, unmanaged, pine-dominated old-field stand in southeastern Arkansas

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg; Eric Heitzman

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the composition and structure of a mature, second-growthPinus taeda (Loblolly Pine) and Pinus echinata (Shortleaf Pine)-dominatedold-field stand. Now owned by the University of Arkansas, this 22.5-ha parcel justoutside of the city of Monticello, AR, has been protected as a de facto natural area

  7. Yellow pine regeneration as a function of fire severity and post-burn stand structure in the southern Appalachian Mountains

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Jenkins; Robert N. Klein; Virginia L. McDaniel

    2011-01-01

    We used pre- and post-burn fire effects data from six prescribed burns to examine post-burn threshold effects of stand structure (understory density, overstory density, shrub cover, duff depth, and total fuel load) on the regeneration of yellow pine (Pinus subgenus Diploxylon) seedlings and cover of herbaceous vegetation in six prescribed-fire management units located...

  8. Forest stand structure and pattern of old-growth western hemlock/Douglas-fir and mixed-conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Malcolm North; Jiquan Chen; Brian Oakley; Bo Song; Mark Rudnicki; Andrew Gray; Jim Innes

    2004-01-01

    With fire suppression, many western forests are expected to have fewer gaps and higher stem density of shade-tolerant species as light competition becomes a more significant influence on stand pattern and composition. We compared species composition, structure, spatial pattern, and environmental factors such as light and soil moisture between two old-growth forests:...

  9. Fuel mass and stand structure after post-fire logging of a severely burned ponderosa pine forest in northeastern Oregon.

    Treesearch

    J.D. McIver; R. Ottmar

    2006-01-01

    Stand structure and downed woody fuel mass were measured in four replicate units for each of three treatments (unlogged control, commercial harvest, and fuel reduction harvest) following the 1996 Summit Wildfire in northeastern Oregon. Commercial and fuel-reduction harvest resulted in a significant decrease in tree density and tree basal areas. The total downed woody...

  10. Stand structure, recruitment and growth dynamics in mixed subalpine spruce and Swiss stone pine forests in the Eastern Carpathians.

    PubMed

    Popa, Ionel; Nechita, Constantin; Hofgaard, Annika

    2017-11-15

    Natural subalpine forests are considered to be sensitive to climate change, and forest characteristics are assumed to reflect the prevalent disturbance regime. We hypothesize that stand history determines different stand structures. Based on large full inventory datasets (including tree biometric data, spatial coordinates, tree age, and basal area increment) we assessed the size structure, tree recruitment dynamics and radial growth patterns in three permanent plots along an altitudinal gradient in a mixed coniferous forest (Picea abies and Pinus cembra) in the Eastern Carpathians. Both discrete disturbances (large scale or small scale) and chronic disturbances (climate change) were identified as drivers of stand structure development in the studied plots. A stand replacing wind disturbance generated a unimodal bell-shaped size and age distribution for both species characterized by a sharp increase in post-disturbance recruitment. By contrast, small-scale wind-caused gaps led to a negative exponential diameter distribution for spruce and a left-asymmetric unimodal for pine. Climate-driven infilling processes in the upper subalpine forest were reflected as J-shaped size and age distributions for both species, but with pine predating spruce. The growth patterns for both species demonstrated an increased basal area increment since the early 1900s, with an emphasis in the last few decades, irrespective of stand history. Pine demonstrated a competitive advantage compared to spruce due to the higher growth rate and size at the same age. Recognition of combined discrete and chronic disturbances as drivers of the tree layer characteristics in a subalpine coniferous forest is essential in both stand history analyses and growth predictions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stand density relationships

    Treesearch

    John C. Tappeiner

    2013-01-01

    Th inning stands (managing their densities) aff ects the development of trees and understory plants as individuals, as well as stand-level characteristics like structure, microclimate, and stand growth, habitat for various species, and fuel and potential fi re severity. Th ese characteristics and the rate of changes are aff ected by thinning severity—the reduction in...

  12. Extinction order and altered community structure rapidly disrupt ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Trond H; Williams, Neal M; Kremen, Claire

    2005-05-01

    By causing extinctions and altering community structure, anthropogenic disturbances can disrupt processes that maintain ecosystem integrity. However, the relationship between community structure and ecosystem functioning in natural systems is poorly understood. Here we show that habitat loss appeared to disrupt ecosystem functioning by affecting extinction order, species richness and abundance. We studied pollination by bees in a mosaic of agricultural and natural habitats in California and dung burial by dung beetles on recently created islands in Venezuela. We found that large-bodied bee and beetle species tended to be both most extinction-prone and most functionally efficient, contributing to rapid functional loss. Simulations confirmed that extinction order led to greater disruption of function than predicted by random species loss. Total abundance declined with richness and also appeared to contribute to loss of function. We demonstrate conceptually and empirically how the non-random response of communities to disturbance can have unexpectedly large functional consequences.

  13. Changes to oak woodland stand structure and ground flora composition caused by thinning and burning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinkead, Carter O.; Kabrick, John M.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Grabner, Keith W.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to quantify the cumulative effects of prescribed burning and thinning on forest stocking and species composition at a woodland restoration experiment site in the Ozark Highlands of Missouri. Our study used four treatments (burn, harvest, harvest and burn, control) on three slope position and aspect combinations (south, north, ridge) replicated in three complete blocks. Harvested stands were thinned from below to 40 percent residual stocking. Two prescribed fires were applied to both burn and harvest-burn treatment units in a 5-year period. Results reflect changes that have taken place over a 6-year period, from pretreatment conditions to 1 year after the last fire. In this period, there was a 10-percent reduction in the stocking in burned stands compared to control and a 6-percent reduction in harvested and burned stands compared to harvested stands. Compared to the control, percentage ground cover of woodland indicators was seven times greater in burned stands, six times greater in harvested stands, and 22 percent greater in harvested and burned stands. Th ere was no significant (P > 0.05) interaction between aspect and treatment on stocking or ground flora cover. Th is study indicated that silvicultural treatments do achieve various goals that are common to managers who aim to restore woodland communities.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide-induced structural alterations of RNAse A.

    PubMed

    Lasch, P; Petras, T; Ullrich, O; Backmann, J; Naumann, D; Grune, T

    2001-03-23

    Proteins exposed to oxidative stress are degraded via proteolytic pathways. In the present study, we undertook a series of in vitro experiments to establish a correlation between the structural changes induced by mild oxidation of the model protein RNase A and the proteolytic rate found upon exposure of the modified protein toward the isolated 20 S proteasome. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used as a structure-sensitive probe. We report here strong experimental evidence for oxidation-induced conformational rearrangements of the model protein RNase A and, at the same time, for covalent modifications of amino acid side chains. Oxidation-related conformational changes, induced by H(2)O(2) exposure of the protein may be monitored in the amide I region, which is sensitive to changes in protein secondary structure. A comparison of the time- and H(2)O(2) concentration-dependent changes in the amide I region demonstrates a high degree of similarity to spectral alterations typical for temperature-induced unfolding of RNase A. In addition, spectral parameters of amino acid side chain marker bands (Tyr, Asp) revealed evidence for covalent modifications. Proteasome digestion measurements on oxidized RNase A revealed a specific time and H(2)O(2) concentration dependence; at low initial concentration of the oxidant, the RNase A turnover rate increases with incubation time and concentration. Based on these experimental findings, a correlation between structural alterations detected upon RNase A oxidation and proteolytic rates of RNase A is established, and possible mechanisms of the proteasome recognition process of oxidatively damaged proteins are discussed.

  15. Model independent x-ray standing wave analysis of periodic multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunin, S. N.; Pashaev, E. M.; Subbotin, I. A.; Makhotkin, I. A.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Zoethout, E.; Chuev, M. A.; Louis, E.; Seregin, S. Yu.; Novikov, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2014-04-07

    We present a model independent approach for the analysis of X-ray fluorescence yield modulated by an X-ray standing wave (XSW), that allow a fast reconstruction of the atomic distribution function inside a sample without fitting procedure. The approach is based on the direct regularized solution of the system of linear equations that characterizes the fluorescence yield. The suggested technique was optimized for, but not limited to, the analysis of periodic layered structures where the XSW is formed under Bragg conditions. The developed approach was applied to the reconstruction of the atomic distribution function for LaN/BN multilayers with 50 periods of 43 Å thick layers. The object is especially difficult to analyze with traditional methods, as the estimated thickness of the interface region between the constituent materials is comparable to the individual layer thicknesses. However, using the suggested technique, it was possible to reconstruct width of the La atomic distribution showing that the La atoms stay localized within the LaN layers and interfaces and do not diffuse into the BN layer. The analysis of the reconstructed profiles showed that the positions of the center of the atomic distribution function can be estimated with an accuracy of 1 Å.

  16. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  17. Estimating needle litterfall in Scots pine based on photosynthesis and stand structural development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ťupek, Boris; Kulmala, Liisa; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2014-05-01

    Needle leaf litter modelled with constant foliar biomass turnover rates or with constant proportion of gross primary production (GPP) may underestimate the climate change driven impacts on ecosystem carbon balance. Changing climate may have adverse effects e.g. on the timing of the needle leaf development and shedding quantity, which means litter-induced variation may become more pronounced. In this study, we investigated whether the meteorological conditions, GPP, and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) can be used to predict more precisely trends and inter-annual variation of needle litterfall. Mutual dependence of these factors would imply mechanistic linkages between precise estimation of leaf litter and precise estimates of GPP, which is driven byfAPAR. The fAPAR depends on the quantity of active foliage in canopy that depends on carbon allocation to the foliage. The needle litterfall, needle cohort counts, and basic tree measurements were conducted between 1992 and 2012 on 7 Scots pine stands across Finland. Meteorological conditions for each stand were available from the nearest weather station. The GPP was estimated with a semi-empirical ecosystem model calibrated to Finnish environment given meteorological conditions and fAPAR as inputs. The fAPAR depended on the modelled foliage and measured litterfall. Litterfall was estimated as a difference between two fAPAR estimates. First based on allometric foliage models and second based on allometric foliage models scaled annually with the needle growth model. We tested our predictions against data from two FLUXNET eddy covariance sites Hyytiälä and Sodankylä located in southern and northern Finland. We found that the non-functional longevity of the needle lifespan (sum of the period when GPP is close to zero) was strongly correlated with the mean annual GPP level, and could be used for estimating the mean number of the needle cohorts. The inter-annual variation of the number of

  18. [Soil microbial community structure of monoculture and mixed plantation stands of native tree species in south subtropical China].

    PubMed

    Luo, Da; Shi, Zuo-Min; Tang, Jing-Chao; Liu, Shi-Rong; Lu, Li-Hua

    2014-09-01

    The effects of three plantation stands, Erythrophleumf ordii (EF), Pinus massoniana (PM), and their mixed plantation (MP), on soil microbial biomass and microbial community structure in south subtropical China were studied by the method of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis. The results showed that the amounts of microbial total PLFAs and PLFAs of each microbial group in these three plantation stand soils were significantly higher in dry season than in rainy season. In dry season, the amounts of microbial total PLFAs, bacteria PLFAs, fungi PLFAs, and actinomycetes PLFAs were the highest in the PM soil, moderate in the MP soil, and the lowest in the EF soil. But in rainy season, the amounts of microbial total PLFAs, bacteria PLFAs, fungi PLFAs, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) PLFAs in the EF soil were higher than in the MP soil, and were significantly higher than in the PM soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the variations in soil microbial community structure composition were affected by both plantation types and seasons. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of soil microbial community structure and environmental factors showed that soil temperature and moisture, pH, total nitrogen content, and ammonium nitrogen content had significant correlations with PLFA signatures. In addition, the ratio of fungi PLFAs to bacteria PLFAs in the MP soil was the highest among the three stand soils within the whole year, indicating that mixed plantation stands could facilitate the stability of the soil ecosystem.

  19. Structural alterations of the erythrocyte membrane proteins in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Ioannis K; Margetis, Panagiotis I; Antonelou, Marianna H; Koliopoulos, John X; Gartaganis, Sotirios P; Margaritis, Lukas H; Papassideri, Issidora S

    2007-08-01

    Several rheological disorders of the erythrocytes, such as increased aggregation and decreased deformability, have been observed in diabetes mellitus and have been implicated in the development of diabetic microangiopathy. Structural alterations of the erythrocyte membrane proteins caused by the diabetic process may be at the origin of those observations. In the present study, we searched for erythrocyte membrane protein alterations in diabetic retinopathy. We examined peripheral blood samples from 40 type-2 diabetic patients with diabetic retinopathy of variable severity (19 males and 21 females, mean age 66.8 years, Group A) and we compared them with samples from 19 type-2 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy (13 males and six females, mean age 66.5 years, Group B) and 16 healthy volunteers (eight males and eight females, mean age 65.6 years, Group C). Erythrocyte membrane ghosts from all samples were subjected to SDS-PAGE, and the electrophoretic pattern of transmembrane and cytoskeletal proteins was analysed for each sample. The protein quantification of each electrophoretic band was accomplished through scanning densitometry. No significant deviations from normal electrophoresis were observed in Groups B and C, apart from an increase in band 8 in two samples from Group B (11%). In contrast, in 14 samples from Group A (35%) we detected increases in protein band 8 and/or membrane-bound haemoglobin along with a decrease in spectrin. Moreover, increased mobility of band 3, an aberrant high molecular weight (MW) (> 255 kDa) band and a low MW (42 kDa) band were evident in ten samples from Group A (25%). Glycophorins were altered in 46% of Group-A patients versus 38% of Group-B patients. Females and patients with long duration of diabetes presented more electrophoretic abnormalities. Structural alterations of the erythrocyte membrane proteins are shown for the first time in association with diabetic retinopathy. Their detection may serve as a blood marker

  20. THE PERIOD RATIO FOR STANDING KINK AND SAUSAGE MODES IN SOLAR STRUCTURES WITH SIPHON FLOW. I. MAGNETIZED SLABS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bo; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Chen Yanjun

    2013-04-20

    In the applications of solar magneto-seismology, the ratio of the period of the fundamental mode to twice the period of its first overtone, P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2}, plays an important role. We examine how field-aligned flows affect the dispersion properties, and hence the period ratios, of standing modes supported by magnetic slabs in the solar atmosphere. We numerically solve the dispersion relations and devise a graphic means to construct standing modes. For coronal slabs, we find that the flow effects are significant for the fast kink and sausage modes alike. For the kink ones, they may reduce P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2} by up to 23% compared with the static case, and the minimum allowed P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2} can fall below the lower limit analytically derived for static slabs. For the sausage modes, while introducing the flow reduces P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2} by typically {approx}< 5% relative to the static case, it significantly increases the threshold aspect ratio only above which standing sausage modes can be supported, meaning that their detectability is restricted to even wider slabs. In the case of photospheric slabs, the flow effect is not as strong. However, standing modes are distinct from the coronal case in that standing kink modes show a P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2} that deviates from unity even for a zero-width slab, while standing sausage modes no longer suffer from a threshold aspect ratio. We conclude that transverse structuring in plasma density and flow speed should be considered in seismological applications of multiple periodicities to solar atmospheric structures.

  1. Lignin structural alterations in thermochemical pretreatments with limited delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-02

    Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion, and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading thermochemical pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these thermochemical pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification thermochemical pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.

  2. Lignin structural alterations in thermochemical pretreatments with limited delignification

    DOE PAGES

    Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; ...

    2015-08-02

    Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion,more » and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading thermochemical pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these thermochemical pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification thermochemical pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.« less

  3. 5-Formylcytosine alters the structure of the DNA double helix.

    PubMed

    Raiber, Eun-Ang; Murat, Pierre; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Beraldi, Dario; Luisi, Ben F; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    The modified base 5-formylcytosine (5fC) was recently identified in mammalian DNA and might be considered to be the 'seventh' base of the genome. This nucleotide has been implicated in active demethylation mediated by the base excision repair enzyme thymine DNA glycosylase. Genomics and proteomics studies have suggested an additional role for 5fC in transcription regulation through chromatin remodeling. Here we propose that 5fC might affect these processes through its effect on DNA conformation. Biophysical and structural analysis revealed that 5fC alters the structure of the DNA double helix and leads to a conformation unique among known DNA structures including those comprising other cytosine modifications. The 1.4-Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a DNA dodecamer comprising three 5fCpG sites shows how 5fC changes the geometry of the grooves and base pairs associated with the modified base, leading to helical underwinding.

  4. Stepwise deprotonation of sumanene: electronic structures, energetics and aromaticity alterations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Petrukhina, Marina A; Rogachev, Andrey Yu

    2017-08-16

    The first comprehensive theoretical investigation of structural, energetic, and electronic changes in a sumanene skeleton, C21H12, upon a step-wise deprotonation process is performed. This study is complemented by a detailed consideration of aromaticity in target bowl-shaped systems, including neutral sumanene and its three deprotonated anions, namely C21H11(1-), C21H10(2-), and C21H9(3-). In order to obtain the most reliable and method-independent characteristics, a set of aromatic descriptors of different nature has been applied. It included structure-based HOMA, topological descriptors PDI and FLU, as well as magnetic NICS and ACID. The calculation results reveal that the neutral sumanene can be best described as mechanically bent triphenylene, in which π-conjugation is mostly localized over three peripheral 6-membered rings. Sequential deprotonation changed the system from the localized mono-anionic to semi-localized di-anionic, and eventually to the fully delocalized tri-anionic sumanenyl species. Structural changes, namely, bond equalization upon the deprotonation process, are in excellent agreement with alterations observed in electronic structures and aromaticity. Deprotonation results in a significant reduction of the barrier for a bowl-to-bowl transition only in the tri-anionic sumanenyl system, whereas the first and the second deprotonation steps show no notable effect. This clearly indicates that only complete aromatization of the sumanene core in C21H9(3-) leads to a substantial increase of bowl flexibility.

  5. Community Structure and Standing Stock of Epibenthic Zooplankton at Five Sites in Grays Harbor, Washington

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    particularly Eurytemora americana and Acartia clausi . Density and standing crop were somewhat higher at the DODJM 1473 EJITION OF I NOV 65 IS...Eurytemora americana and Acartia clausi . Density and standing crop were somewhat higher at the 0.0-m tidal elevations than at +2.1-r, except at the Marsh...Eurytemora americansa and such. coastal marine forms as Acartia clausi . However, the harpacticoid Leimia vaga, which was dominant in the 0.0-n collection at

  6. Structural brain alterations associated with dyslexia predate reading onset

    PubMed Central

    Raschle, Nora Maria; Chang, Maria; Gaab, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported reduced activation in parietotemporal and occipitotemporal areas in adults and children with developmental dyslexia compared to controls during reading and reading related tasks. These patterns of regionally reduced activation have been linked to behavioral impairments of reading-related processes (e.g., phonological skills and rapid automatized naming). The observed functional and behavioral differences in individuals with developmental dyslexia have been complemented by reports of reduced gray matter in left parietotemporal, occipitotemporal areas, fusiform and lingual gyrus and the cerebellum. An important question for education is whether these neural differences are present before reading is taught. Developmental dyslexia can only be diagnosed after formal reading education starts. However, here we investigate whether the previously detected gray matter alterations in adults and children with developmental dyslexia can already be observed in a small group of pre-reading children with a family-history of developmental dyslexia compared to age and IQ-matched children without a family-history (N = 20/mean age: 5:9 years; age range 5:1–6:5 years). Voxel-based morphometry revealed significantly reduced gray matter volume indices for pre-reading children with, compared to children without, a family-history of developmental dyslexia in left occipitotemporal, bilateral parietotemporal regions, left fusiform gyrus and right lingual gyrus. Gray matter volume indices in left hemispheric occipitotemporal and parietotemporal regions of interest also correlated positively with rapid automatized naming. No differences between the two groups were observed in frontal and cerebellar regions. This discovery in a small group of children suggests that previously described functional and structural alterations in developmental dyslexia may not be due to experience-dependent brain changes but may be present at birth or

  7. Structural brain alterations associated with dyslexia predate reading onset.

    PubMed

    Raschle, Nora Maria; Chang, Maria; Gaab, Nadine

    2011-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported reduced activation in parietotemporal and occipitotemporal areas in adults and children with developmental dyslexia compared to controls during reading and reading related tasks. These patterns of regionally reduced activation have been linked to behavioral impairments of reading-related processes (e.g., phonological skills and rapid automatized naming). The observed functional and behavioral differences in individuals with developmental dyslexia have been complemented by reports of reduced gray matter in left parietotemporal, occipitotemporal areas, fusiform and lingual gyrus and the cerebellum. An important question for education is whether these neural differences are present before reading is taught. Developmental dyslexia can only be diagnosed after formal reading education starts. However, here we investigate whether the previously detected gray matter alterations in adults and children with developmental dyslexia can already be observed in a small group of pre-reading children with a family-history of developmental dyslexia compared to age and IQ-matched children without a family-history (N = 20/mean age: 5:9 years; age range 5:1-6:5 years). Voxel-based morphometry revealed significantly reduced gray matter volume indices for pre-reading children with, compared to children without, a family-history of developmental dyslexia in left occipitotemporal, bilateral parietotemporal regions, left fusiform gyrus and right lingual gyrus. Gray matter volume indices in left hemispheric occipitotemporal and parietotemporal regions of interest also correlated positively with rapid automatized naming. No differences between the two groups were observed in frontal and cerebellar regions. This discovery in a small group of children suggests that previously described functional and structural alterations in developmental dyslexia may not be due to experience-dependent brain changes but may be present at birth or

  8. Deamidation accelerates amyloid formation and alters amylin fiber structure

    PubMed Central

    Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Buchanan, Lauren E.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Deamidation of asparagine and glutamine is the most common non-enzymatic, post-translational modification. Deamidation can influence the structure, stability, folding, and aggregation of proteins and has been proposed to play a role in amyloid formation. However there are no structural studies of the consequences of deamidation on amyloid fibers, in large part because of the difficulty of studying these materials using conventional methods. Here we examine the effects of deamidation on the kinetics of amyloid formation by amylin, the causative agent of type 2 diabetes. We find that deamidation accelerates amyloid formation and the deamidated material is able to seed amyloid formation by unmodified amylin. Using site-specific isotope labeling and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we show that fibers formed by samples that contain deamidated polypeptide contain reduced amounts of β-sheet. Deamidation leads to disruption of the N-terminal β-sheet between Ala-8 and Ala-13, but β-sheet is still retained near Leu-16. The C-terminal sheet is disrupted near Leu-27. Analysis of potential sites of deamidation together with structural models of amylin fibers reveals that deamidation in the N-terminal β-sheet region may be the cause for the disruption of the fiber structure at both the N- and C-terminal β-sheet. Thus, deamidation is a post-translational modification that creates fibers which have an altered structure, but can still act as a template for amylin aggregation. Deamidation is very difficult to detect with standard methods used to follow amyloid formation, but isotope labeled IR spectroscopy provides a means for monitoring sample degradation and investigating the structural consequences of deamidation. PMID:22734583

  9. Age-class structure of old growth ponderosa pine/douglas-fir stands and its relationship to fire history. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Arno, S.F.; Scott, J.H.; Hartwell, M.G.

    1995-04-01

    Describes age structure of nine old growth ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir stands in western Montana. Interprets the influence of past fires and 20th century five exclusion on stand structure. Gives implications for management to restore and maintain these forests for multiple resource values.

  10. The structural factor of hypertension: large and small artery alterations.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stéphane; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2015-03-13

    Pathophysiological studies have extensively investigated the structural factor in hypertension, including large and small artery remodeling and functional changes. Here, we review the recent literature on the alterations in small and large arteries in hypertension. We discuss the possible mechanisms underlying these abnormalities and we explain how they accompany and often precede hypertension. Finally, we propose an integrated pathophysiological approach to better understand how the cross-talk between large and small artery changes interacts in pressure wave transmission, exaggerates cardiac, brain and kidney damage, and lead to cardiovascular and renal complications. We focus on patients with essential hypertension because this is the most prevalent form of hypertension, and describe other forms of hypertension only for contrasting their characteristics with those of uncomplicated essential hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Consequential secondary structure alterations and aggregation during prolonged casein glycation.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Supriya; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2013-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) of casein is a process used not just to ameliorate the quality of dairy products but also to increase the shelf life of canned foods, including baby milk supplements. Incubation of κ-casein with reducing sugars for 15 days at physiological temperature showed the formation of a molten globule state at day 9 and 12 during fructation and glucation respectively. This state exhibits substantial secondary structure and maximum ANS binding. Later on, glycation resulted in the formation of aggregates at day 12 in presence of fructose and day 15 in presence of glucose. Aggregates possess extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and FTIR. These aggregates showed altered tryptophan environment, decrease ANS binding relative to molten globule state and increase in Thioflavin T fluorescence. Aggregates were also accompanied by the accumulation of AGEs, indicative of structural damage to the protein and formation of potentially harmful species at the physiological level. Fructose was more reactive than glucose and thus caused early and significant changes in the protein. From our studies, we conclude that controlling the extent of the Maillard reaction in the food industry is essential to counter its negative effects and expand its safety spectrum.

  12. Altered osteoblast structure and function in parabolic flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong-Quan, Dai; Ying-Hui, Li; Fen, Yang; Bai, Ding; Ying-Jun, Tan

    Introduction Bone loss has a significant impact on astronauts during spaceflight being one of the main obstacles preventing interplanetary missions However the exact mechanism is not well understood In the present study we investigated the effects of acute gravitational changes generated by parabolic flight on the structure and function of osteoblasts ROS17 2 8 carried by airbus A300 Methods The alteration of microfilament cytoskeleton was observed by the Texas red conjugated Phalloidin and Alexa Fluor 488 conjugated DNase I immunofluorescence stain ALP activity and expression COL1A1 expression osteocalcin secrete which presenting the osteoblast function were detected by modified calcium and cobalt method RT-PCR and radioimmunity methods respectively Results The changed gravity induced the reorganization of microfilament cytoskeleton of osteoblast After 3 hours parabolic flight F-actin of osteoblast cytoskeleton became more thickness and directivity whereas G-actin reduced and relatively concentrated at the edge of nucleus observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy This phenomenon is identical with structure alternation observed in hypergravity but the osteoblast function decrease The excretion of osteocalcin the activity and mRNA expression of ALP decrease but the COL1A1 expression has no changes These results were similar to the changes in simulated or real microgravity Conclusion Above results suggest that short time gravity alternative change induce osteoblast structure and function

  13. Structural brain alterations can be detected early in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Renee; Wu, Ying; Sammet, Christina L.; Shoukry, Alfred; Epstein, Leon G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Brain changes occurring early in HIV infection are not well characterized. The Chicago Early HIV Infection Study aimed to evaluate the presence and extent of structural brain alterations using quantitative MRI. Methods: Forty-three HIV and 21 control subjects were enrolled. Mean length of infection was estimated as less than 1 year based on assay results. High-resolution neuroanatomical images were acquired. Automated image analysis was used to derive measurements for total brain, ventricular volume, and for tissue classes (total and cortical gray matter, white matter, and CSF). A separate image analysis algorithm was used to calculate measurements for individual brain regions. Cognitive function was assessed by neuropsychological evaluation. Results: Reductions were quantified in total (p = 0.0547) and cortical (p = 0.0109) gray matter in the HIV group. Analysis of individual brain regions with a separate image analysis algorithm revealed consistent findings of reductions in cerebral cortex (p = 0.042) and expansion of third ventricle (p = 0.046). The early HIV group also demonstrated weaker performance on several neuropsychological tests, with the most pronounced difference in psychomotor speed (p = 0.001). Conclusions: This cross-sectional brain volumetric study indicates structural alterations early in HIV infection. The findings challenge the prevailing assumption that the brain is spared in this period. Revisiting the question of the brain's vulnerability to processes unfolding in the initial virus-host interaction and the early natural history may yield new insights into neurologic injury in HIV infection and inform neuroprotection strategies. PMID:23197750

  14. Roberts syndrome: New evidence supporting an altered metaphase chromatin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, X.M.; Schultz, E.L.; Tonk, V.

    1994-09-01

    Roberts syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease clinically manifested in the newborn by mental and growth retardation, tetraphocomelia, and a variety of craniofacial abnormalities. Cell lines derived from RS patients exhibit subtle mutagen hypersensitivity and cytogenetic abnormalities which include random chromosome loss and the splaying of heterochromatic chromosomal regions. The latter, typically detected on C-banded metaphases, has been used prenatally for the diagnosis of RS. To gain further insights into the RS defect, we have examined a number of parameters related to metaphase chromatin structure, with observations as follows. (1) The heterochromatic splaying associated with RS was found to be visible on G- as well as C-banded metaphases. (2) Quantitative evaluations using fluorescence image analysis revealed that RS metaphase chromosomes bind DAPI less efficiently than chromosomes from normal cells. (3) Denaturation of chromosomal DNA with either a C-banding procedure or 70% formamide at 70{degree}C each produced an aberrant hybridization pattern on RS chromosomes in FISH experiments employing biotinylated total human DNA as probe. (4) RS cells exhibited a >3-fold increase in sensitivity to VM-26, a potent inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Collectively, the aforementioned data support the notion that the primary defect in RS results in an altered metaphase chromatin structure.

  15. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gayarre, Javier; Sanchez, David; Sanchez-Gomez, Francisco J.; Terron, Maria C.; Llorca, Oscar; Perez-Sala, Dolores . E-mail: dperezsala@cib.csic.es

    2006-11-03

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-PGJ{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}) and PGA{sub 1} in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA{sub 1} and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ{sub 2} at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles.

  16. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure.

    PubMed

    Gayarre, Javier; Sánchez, David; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Terrón, María C; Llorca, Oscar; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2006-11-03

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and PGA(1) in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA(1) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ(2) or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2) at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles.

  17. A case of rectal neuroendocrine carcinoma in a patient with long-standing ulcerative colitis involving alterations of the p16-Rb pathway.

    PubMed

    Norose, Tomoko; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Imai, Hideyuki; Shibata, Hideki; Suzuki, Reika; Isobe, Tomohide; Asonuma, Kunio; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi; Takimoto, Masafumi

    2017-10-01

    The patient was a 54-year-old male who had been suffering from extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) for 17 years. Colonoscopy revealed an elevated lesion in the affected rectum, and its biopsy demonstrated neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC). The surgical specimen obtained on laparoscopic high anterior resection showed extensive active inflammatory and dysplastic lesions and three grossly visible multifocal malignant lesions: a polypoid fungating tumor of NEC (type 1, 20 mm in diameter, pT3) that had been preoperatively noticed, a polypoid fungating tumor of adenocarcinoma (type 1, 22 mm, pT2) and a protruded sessile polypoid tumor (0-Is, 5 mm, pTis) of adenocarcinoma. The NEC was adjacently accompanied by dysplasia-carcinoma sequential lesions and showed a diffuse immunohistochemical overexpression of p53 and p16 proteins and the loss of Rb with no abnormal immunohistochemical staining of microsatellite instability markers and no KRAS mutations. Fifteen months later, the patient showed liver metastasis from the NEC component, followed by bone and spinal metastasis; he died 22 months after the initial diagnosis. A rare case of lethal NEC arising from long-standing extensive UC was reported. The NEC appeared to be UC-related, not incidental, and complicated by progression from dysplasia to carcinoma involving alterations of the p16-Rb pathway. © 2017 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Postimpact hydrothermal alteration of the Manson impact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarville, P.; Crossey, L. J.

    1994-07-01

    Core materials from the Manson impact structure (MIS), Manson, Iowa, are examined in order to evaluate postimpact alteration processes. Interpretation of the high-temperature postimpact hydrothermal system is based on mineralogic investigation. MIS rocks from the M1, M7, M8, and M10 cores obtained by the continental scientific drilling project (CSDP) in 1991 and 1992 are used in this study. All lithologies, including the sedimentary clast breccias (SCB), crystalline clast breccias (CCB), and central peak crystalline peaks (CPC), have been described previously. Emphasis is placed on fluid conduits that cross-cut all these lithologies. Analytical techniques include petrography, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The minerals are grouped according to their temperatures of occurrence in modern geothermal systems. The highest temperatures in the MIS are represented by a garnet and ferroactinolite assemblage (assemblage I). Assemblage II contains epidote, prehnite, and wollastonite, which represents slightly lower temperatures in the system. The existence of laumontite, quartz, and adularia defines a third assemblage. Assemblage IV is defined by calcite and clays, and represents the lowest alteration temperature at the MIS. These temperature-sensitive calc-silicates serve to constrain the fluid temperatures of the MIS hydrothermal system. Assemblage I suggests that the system reached over 300 C. Successively decreasing temperatures through time, approaching ambient temperatures, are suggested by the lower temperature assemblages II, III, and IV. A model for the cooling history of the MIS is reported elsewhere. The distribution of these high-temperature minerals points to the central uplift, not the melt sheet, as being the heat source for the system.

  19. Comparison of tree size structure and growth for partially harvested and even-aged hemlock-spruce stands in southeast Alaska

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Deal; Troy Heithecker; Eric K. Zenner

    2010-01-01

    The effects of partial cutting on tree size structure and stand growth were evaluated in 52 plots in 13 stands in southeast Alaska that were partially harvested 53 to 96 years ago and compared with 50-year-old even-aged stands that developed after clearcutting. The net basal-area growth was greater in the partially cut plots than in the uncut plots, and basal-area...

  20. Accounting for density reduction and structural loss in standing dead trees: Implications for forest biomass and carbon stock estimates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Domke, Grant M; Woodall, Christopher W; Smith, James E

    2011-11-24

    Standing dead trees are one component of forest ecosystem dead wood carbon (C) pools, whose national stock is estimated by the U.S. as required by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Historically, standing dead tree C has been estimated as a function of live tree growing stock volume in the U.S.'s National Greenhouse Gas Inventory. Initiated in 1998, the USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis program (responsible for compiling the Nation's forest C estimates) began consistent nationwide sampling of standing dead trees, which may now supplant previous purely model-based approaches to standing dead biomass and C stock estimation. A substantial hurdle to estimating standing dead tree biomass and C attributes is that traditional estimation procedures are based on merchantability paradigms that may not reflect density reductions or structural loss due to decomposition common in standing dead trees. The goal of this study was to incorporate standing dead tree adjustments into the current estimation procedures and assess how biomass and C stocks change at multiple spatial scales. Accounting for decay and structural loss in standing dead trees significantly decreased tree- and plot-level C stock estimates (and subsequent C stocks) by decay class and tree component. At a regional scale, incorporating adjustment factors decreased standing dead quaking aspen biomass estimates by almost 50 percent in the Lake States and Douglas-fir estimates by more than 36 percent in the Pacific Northwest. Substantial overestimates of standing dead tree biomass and C stocks occur when one does not account for density reductions or structural loss. Forest inventory estimation procedures that are descended from merchantability standards may need to be revised toward a more holistic approach to determining standing dead tree biomass and C attributes (i.e., attributes of tree biomass outside of sawlog portions). Incorporating density reductions and structural

  1. Fragmentation alters stream fish community structure in dendritic ecological networks.

    PubMed

    Perkin, Joshuah S; Gido, Keith B

    2012-12-01

    Effects of fragmentation on the ecology of organisms occupying dendritic ecological networks (DENs) have recently been described through both conceptual and mathematical models, but few hypotheses have been tested in complex, real-world ecosystems. Stream fishes provide a model system for assessing effects of fragmentation on the structure of communities occurring within DENs, including how fragmentation alters metacommunity dynamics and biodiversity. A recently developed habitat-availability measure, the "dendritic connectivity index" (DCI), allows for assigning quantitative measures of connectivity in DENs regardless of network extent or complexity, and might be used to predict fish community response to fragmentation. We characterized stream fish community structure in 12 DENs in the Great Plains, USA, during periods of dynamic (summer) and muted (fall) discharge regimes to test the DCI as a predictive model of fish community response to fragmentation imposed by road crossings. Results indicated that fish communities in stream segments isolated by road crossings had reduced species richness (alpha diversity) relative to communities that maintained connectivity with the surrounding DEN during summer and fall. Furthermore, isolated communities had greater dissimilarity (beta diversity) to downstream sites notisolated by road crossings during summer and fall. Finally, dissimilarity among communities within DENs decreased as a function of increased habitat connectivity (measured using the DCI) for summer and fall, suggesting that communities within highly connected DENs tend to be more homogeneous. Our results indicate that the DCI is sensitive to community effects of fragmentation in riverscapes and might be used by managers to predict ecological responses to changes in habitat connectivity. Moreover, our findings illustrate that relating structural connectivity of riverscapes to functional connectivity among communities might aid in maintaining metacommunity

  2. Stand-level forest structure and avian habitat: Scale dependencies in predicting occurrence in a heterogeneous forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, K.M.; Keeton, W.S.; Donovan, T.M.; Mitchell, B.

    2008-01-01

    We explored the role of stand-level forest structure and spatial extent of forest sampling in models of avian occurrence in northern hardwood-conifer forests for two species: black-throated blue warbler (Dendroica caerulescens) and ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus). We estimated site occupancy from point counts at 20 sites and characterized the forest structure at these sites at three spatial extents (0.2, 3.0, and 12.0 ha). Weight of evidence was greatest for habitat models using forest stand structure at the 12.0-ha extent and diminished only slightly at the 3.0-ha extent, a scale that was slightly larger than the average territory size of both species. Habitat models characterized at the 0.2-ha extent had low support, yet are the closest in design to those used in many of the habitat studies we reviewed. These results suggest that the role of stand-level vegetation may have been underestimated in the past, which will be of interest to land managers who use habitat models to assess the suitability of habitat for species of concern. Copyright ?? 2008 by the Society of American Foresters.

  3. Linguistic and Structural Analyses of Stand-Alone Literature Reviews: Seventy-Five Years of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Heidi Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to offer a multifaceted overview of stand-alone literature reviews. These texts, literature reviews published unattached to research articles, have existed for centuries but remained largely unstudied by linguists. Thus, the goal of this project is to present these reviews' situational, grammatical, and…

  4. Linguistic and Structural Analyses of Stand-Alone Literature Reviews: Seventy-Five Years of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Heidi Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to offer a multifaceted overview of stand-alone literature reviews. These texts, literature reviews published unattached to research articles, have existed for centuries but remained largely unstudied by linguists. Thus, the goal of this project is to present these reviews' situational, grammatical, and…

  5. Effect of stand density and structure on the abundance of northern red oak advance reproduction

    Treesearch

    Gary W. Miller

    1997-01-01

    Regenerating northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) on high-quality growing sites is a continuing problem in the central Appalachian region. Competing species usually exhibit faster height growth after regeneration harvests compared to oak reproduction. The probability of advance oak reproduction becoming codominant in the new stand is positively...

  6. The carbon consequences of thinning techniques: stand structure makes a difference

    Treesearch

    Coeli Hoover; Susan Stout

    2007-01-01

    Using results from a 25-year study of thinning in a northwestern Pennsylvania Allegheny hardwood stand, we assess whether and how thinning method affected carbon sequestration and merchantable volume production. Plots were thinned to similar residual relative density by removing trees from different portions of the diameter distribution. Plots that were thinned from...

  7. Age structure of a southern pine stand following 72 years of uneven-aged silviculture

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg

    2012-01-01

    Work on uneven-aged silviculture in southern pine stands on the Crossett Experimental Forest (CEF) began in the 1930s, when a number of 16.2-ha compartments were placed into a series of demonstration projects and studies (Reynolds 1980). Two of these compartments, the Good and Poor Farm Forestry Forties, have been maintained continuously in this silvicultural regime...

  8. Stand structure and local distribution of Phytophthora ramorum in Oregon forests

    Treesearch

    E. Peterson; M. Botts; E. Hansen

    2009-01-01

    The Phytophthora ramorum eradication program in effect in Oregon has allowed for the rapid detection of new infection foci, typically before they develop within each stand and expand into adjacent sites. Yet despite gallant efforts, new locations that previously harbored no apparent infection have been identified each year since the original...

  9. Growth, yield, and structure of extended rotation Pinus resinosa stands in Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Christel C. Kern

    2010-01-01

    Extended rotations are increasingly used to meet ecological objectives on forestland; however, information about long-term growth and yield of these systems is lacking for most forests in North America. Additionally, long-term growth responses to repeated thinnings in older stands have received little attention. We addressed these needs by examining the growth and...

  10. Forest Stand Canopy Structure Attribute Estimation from High Resolution Digital Airborne Imagery

    Treesearch

    Demetrios Gatziolis

    2006-01-01

    A study of forest stand canopy variable assessment using digital, airborne, multispectral imagery is presented. Variable estimation involves stem density, canopy closure, and mean crown diameter, and it is based on quantification of spatial autocorrelation among pixel digital numbers (DN) using variogram analysis and an alternative, non-parametric approach known as...

  11. Altered structural connectivity and trait anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Suk; Han, Kiwan; Lee, Seung-Koo; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2014-09-05

    This study tested association between anhedonia scores and white matter integrity in order to investigate the neural basis of trait anhedonia in schizophrenia. A total of 31 patients with schizophrenia and 33 healthy controls underwent diffusion weighted imaging and scoring of trait anhedonia using the Physical Anhedonia Scale. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we found that fractional anisotropy values of some white matter regions were differently correlated with Physical Anhedonia Scale scores between the two groups. The white matter regions that were more significantly correlated with trait anhedonia in patients than in controls included the left side of the cingulum, splenium of the corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus I and II, anterior thalamic radiation, and optic radiation. Of these regions, fractional anisotropy values in the cingulum and superior longitudinal fasciculus II were positively correlated with trait anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that alterations in structural connectivity within large-scale brain networks, including the default mode and central executive networks, may contribute to the development of trait anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia.

  12. Alteration of Golgi Structure by Stress: A Link to Neurodegeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Miranda, Eduardo A.; Sinnl, Markus; Farhan, Hesso

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is well-known for its role as a sorting station in the secretory pathway as well as for its role in regulating post-translational protein modification. Another role for the Golgi is the regulation of cellular signaling by spatially regulating kinases, phosphatases, and GTPases. All these roles make it clear that the Golgi is a central regulator of cellular homeostasis. The response to stress and the initiation of adaptive responses to cope with it are fundamental abilities of all living cells. It was shown previously that the Golgi undergoes structural rearrangements under various stress conditions such as oxidative or osmotic stress. Neurodegenerative diseases are also frequently associated with alterations of Golgi morphology and many stress factors have been described to play an etiopathological role in neurodegeneration. It is however unclear whether the stress-Golgi connection plays a role in neurodegenerative diseases. Using a combination of bioinformatics modeling and literature mining, we will investigate evidence for such a tripartite link and we ask whether stress-induced Golgi arrangements are cause or consequence in neurodegeneration. PMID:26617486

  13. Structure and Composition of Vegetation of Longleaf Pine Plantations Compared to Natural Stands Occurring Along an Environmental Gradient at the Savannah River Site

    Treesearch

    Gregory P. Smith; Victor B. Shelburne; Joan L. Walker

    2002-01-01

    Fifty-four plots in 33-43 year old longleaf pine plantations were compared to 30 remnant plots in longleaf stands on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Within these stands, the structure and composition of primarily the herb layer relative to a presumed soil moisture or soil texture gradient was studied using the North Carolina Vegetation Survey methodology....

  14. Composition and Structure of a l930s-Era Pine-Hardwood Stand in Arkansas

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an unmanaged 1930s-era pine-hardwood stand on a minor stream terrace in Ashley County, AR. Probably inventoried as a part of an early growth and yield study, the sample plot was approximately 3.2 ha in size and contained at least 21 tree species. Loblolly pine comprised 39.1% of all stems, followed by willow oak (12.7%), winged elm (9.6%), sweetgum...

  15. Analysis of aspen stand structure and composition in the Western U.S.: implications for management

    Treesearch

    J. D. Shaw

    2004-01-01

    Aspen communities in the western U.S. are considered at risk because of low levels of disturbance and high levels of herbivory by wild and domestic ungulates. There appears to be a trend toward the loss of aspen-dominated stands West-wide. In some cases the loss is caused by succession, with shade-tolerant conifers becoming dominant. On dry sites where aspen is...

  16. Magmatism significantly alters the thermal structure of the wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees Jones, D. W.; Katz, R. F.; Rudge, J. F.; Tian, M.

    2016-12-01

    The temperature structure of the mantle wedge is typically modelled as a balance between thermal diffusion and advection by the solid mantle [e.g., 1]. The thermal state of the wedge promotes melting and melt transport in the natural system, but the thermal consequences of these processes have been neglected from previous models. We show that advective transport of sensible and latent heat by liquid magma can locally alter the temperature structure from canonical models by up to 200K. Liquids are liberated from the subducting slab by de-volatilization reactions. They trigger melting and become silicic en route to the surface, where they cause arc volcanism. These liquids transport heat advectively, and consume or supply latent heat as they melt or freeze. To analyse these effects, we parameterise melting in the presence of volatile species. We combine this with a one-dimensional "melting-column model," previously used to understand mid-ocean ridge volcanism. Our calculations highlight the thermal and chemical response to melt transport across the mantle wedge. Finally, we solve two-dimensional geodynamic models with a prescribed slab flux [2]. These models allow us to identify the most thermally significant fluxes of melt in the system. Perturbations of 200K are found at the base of the overriding lithosphere. This thermal signature of melt migration should be considered when interpreting heat flow, petrologic and seismic data [e.g., 3]. Such a thermal perturbation is likely to affect the chemistry of arc volcanoes, the solid mantle flow and, perhaps, the location of the volcanos themselves [4]. [1] van Keken, P. E., Currie, C., King, S. D., Behn, M. D., Cagnioncle, A., He, J., et al. (2008). A community benchmark for subduction zone modeling. PEPI, doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2008.04.015 [2] Wilson, C. R., Spiegelman, M., van Keken, P. E., & Hacker, B. R. (2014). Fluid flow in subduction zones: The role of solid rheology and compaction pressure. EPSL, doi:10.1016/j

  17. 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel Research Plan Review for: The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a meeting with representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP) Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element and HRP management on February 3-4, 2014 in Houston, TX to review the updated Research Plan for the Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response in the HRP Integrated Research Plan. The SRP is impressed with the work the immune discipline has done since the 2012 SRP review and agrees with the new wording of the Gaps, no longer questions, now statements. The SRP also likes the addition of adding targets for closing the Gaps, but it is not clear how they got to some of the interim stages (interval percentages). A major concern that the SRP has mentioned since the initial 2009 SRP meeting is that there is still not enough emphasis on the interdisciplinary aspect of the immune risk associated with other risks (i.e., nutrition, radiation, etc.). The SRP recommends that a "translational SRP" or advisory group be developed that is composed of members from all of the HRP SRPs. The SRP also thinks that the immune discipline should consider a more systems biology approach. Lastly, the SRP is concerned that the risks observed in research from low Earth orbit (LEO) missions may not accurately reflect all the risks of longer duration flight beyond LEO. Also, there does not seem to be a concern for immune responses that may occur when someone is in space longer than six months, for example, a Mars mission would take three years. The absence of disease in past and current flight scenarios does not mean the risk may not be there in future flight settings.

  18. 18 CFR 1304.209 - Land-based structures/alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Land-based structures... APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND OTHER ALTERATIONS TVA-Owned Residential Access Shoreland § 1304.209 Land-based structures/alterations. (a) Except for...

  19. 18 CFR 1304.209 - Land-based structures/alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Land-based structures... APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND OTHER ALTERATIONS TVA-Owned Residential Access Shoreland § 1304.209 Land-based structures/alterations. (a) Except for...

  20. Alterations in chromatin structure during early sea urchin embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Savić, A; Richman, P; Williamson, P; Poccia, D

    1981-01-01

    Sea urchin sperm before fertilization possess the longest nucleosome repeat length yet determined for any chromatin. By the time the fertilized egg gives rise to a blastula or gastrula embryo, the chromatin has a considerably shorter repeat length and, in addition, a sequence of different histone variants of H1, H2A, and H2B has appeared. We have investigated the relationship between these variations in histone composition and concomitant alterations in chromatin structure during the earliest stages of embryogenesis in two species of sea urchin. In contrast to the long repeat distance in sperm, chromatin loaded with cleavage stage histones has a much smaller repeat. Later stages containing predominantly alpha histones display an intermediate spacing. More detailed analysis of the events in the first cell cycle was carried out with polyspermically fertilized eggs. During the first 30 min after fertilization, in which sperm-specific H1 is completely replaced by cleavage-stage H1, the male pronuclear repeat remains unchanged. The decrease toward the repeat length of cleavage stages begins at about the time of DNA synthesis. Higher degrees of polyspermy extend the length of the cell cycle, including the duration of S phase and the length of time to reach the first chromosome condensation. At these higher degrees of polyspermy, the decrease in repeat length is also slowed. We conclude that the adjustment of the arrangement of nucleosomes in embryonic chromatin from that found in sperm can occur within the first cell cycle and that its timing is cell-cycle dependent. The adjustment is separable from a corresponding change in H1 composition. Images PMID:6943576

  1. Influence of nutrient availability, stand age, and canopy structure on isoprene flux in a Eucalyptus saligna experimental forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Jennifer L.; Giardina, Christian P.; Knohl, Alexander; Lerdau, Manuel T.

    2006-06-01

    Eucalyptus plantations occupy approximately 10 million ha of land in the tropics and, increasingly, afforestation and reforestation projects are relying on this genus to provide rapid occupation of degraded sites, large quantities of high-quality wood products, and high rates of carbon sequestration. Members of the genus Eucalyptus are also very high emitters of isoprene, the dominant volatile organic compound emitted by trees in tropical ecosystems, which significantly influences the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. While fertilization growth response of these trees has been intensively studied, little is known about how fertilization and tree age alter isoprene production from plantations of these trees. Here we examined the effects of fertilization and tree age on leaf-level isoprene flux from 2- and 6-year-old trees in a Eucalyptus saligna experimental forest in Hawaii. Leaf-level emission at a given canopy height did not differ between fertilized and unfertilized 6-year-old trees likely because leaf nitrogen content did not vary with fertilization. Across treatments, however, the standardized emission rate of isoprene (emission at a standard light and temperature) followed patterns of leaf N content and declined with canopy depth. Although leaf nitrogen content was similar between 2-year and 6-year fertilized trees, leaf-level emission rates declined with stand age. Surprisingly, despite differences in stand leaf area and leaf area distribution, modeled canopy-level isoprene flux was similar across stands varying in fertilization and tree age. Model results suggest that leaf area index was high enough in all treatments to absorb most of the light penetrating the canopy, leading to similar canopy flux rates despite the very different sized canopies.

  2. Edaphic, salinity, and stand structural trends in chronosequences of native and non-native dominated riparian forests along the Colorado River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, David M.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2012-01-01

    Tamarix spp. are introduced shrubs that have become among the most abundant woody plants growing along western North American rivers. We sought to empirically test the long-held belief that Tamarix actively displaces native species through elevating soil salinity via salt exudation. We measured chemical and physical attributes of soils (e.g., salinity, major cations and anions, texture), litter cover and depth, and stand structure along chronosequences dominated by Tamarix and those dominated by native riparian species (Populus or Salix) along the upper and lower Colorado River in Colorado and Arizona/California, USA. We tested four hypotheses: (1) the rate of salt accumulation in soils is faster in Tamarix-dominated stands than stands dominated by native species, (2) the concentration of salts in the soil is higher in mature stands dominated by Tamarix compared to native stands, (3) soil salinity is a function of Tamarix abundance, and (4) available nutrients are more concentrated in native-dominated stands compared to Tamarix-dominated stands. We found that salt concentration increases at a faster rate in Tamarix-dominated stands along the relatively free-flowing upper Colorado but not along the heavily-regulated lower Colorado. Concentrations of ions that are known to be preferentially exuded by Tamarix (e.g., B, Na, and Cl) were higher in Tamarix stands than in native stands. Soil salt concentrations in older Tamarix stands along the upper Colorado were sufficiently high to inhibit germination, establishment, or growth of some native species. On the lower Colorado, salinity was very high in all stands and is likely due to factors associated with floodplain development and the hydrologic effects of river regulation, such as reduced overbank flooding, evaporation of shallow ground water, higher salt concentrations in surface and ground water due to agricultural practices, and higher salt concentrations in fine-textured sediments derived from naturally saline

  3. Incidence, size and spatial structure of clones in second-growth stands of coast redwood, Sequoia sempervirens (Cupressaceae).

    PubMed

    Douhovnikoff, Vladimir; Cheng, Adelaide M; Dodd, Richard S

    2004-07-01

    The ecology and evolutionary potential of coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) is significantly influenced by the important role clonal spread plays in its reproduction and site persistence. In nine second-growth stands, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) were used to identify redwood clonal architecture. Clones (multistem genets) dominated sites by representing an average of 70% of stems measured, ranging in size from two to 20 stems. As a result, a relatively small number of genets can monopolize a disproportionate amount of site resources, are more likely to persist over time, and have greater on-site genetic representation. Clones were not limited to fairy-ring structures, but consisted of a wide range of shapes including concentric rings, ring chains, disjunct, and linear structures. Between-ramet distances of up to 40 m were measured, indicating that clonal reproduction is not limited to basal stump resprouting. Clonal structure in second-growth stands was similar to earlier reports from old growth, emphasizing the importance of site persistence and long-term, gradual site development. Smaller ramet numbers per genet in old growth is probably due to local within-genet self thinning. Management and conservation of redwoods will benefit from a better understanding of the dynamics and structure of clonal spread in these forests.

  4. An alter-centric perspective on employee innovation: The importance of alters' creative self-efficacy and network structure.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Travis J; Venkataramani, Vijaya; Labianca, Giuseppe Joe

    2017-09-01

    While most social network studies of employee innovation behavior examine the focal employees' ("egos'") network structure, we employ an alter-centric perspective to study the personal characteristics of employees' network contacts-their "alters"-to better understand employee innovation. Specifically, we examine how the creative self-efficacy (CSE) and innovation behavior of employees' social network contacts affects their ability to generate and implement novel ideas. Hypotheses were tested using a sample of 144 employees in a U.S.-based product development organization. We find that the average CSE of alters in an employee's problem solving network is positively related to that employee's innovation behavior, with this relationship being mediated by these alters' average innovation behavior. The relationship between the alters' average innovation behavior and the employee's own innovation behavior is strengthened when these alters have less dense social networks. Post hoc results suggest that having network contacts with high levels of CSE also leads to an increase in ego's personal CSE 1 year later in cases where the employee's initial level of CSE was relatively low. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Phylogenetic structure of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities of western hemlock changes with forest age and stand type.

    PubMed

    Lim, SeaRa; Berbee, Mary L

    2013-08-01

    On Vancouver Island, British Columbia, fertilization with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) following clearcutting increases growth of western hemlock. To explore whether fertilization also resulted in ectomycorrhizal fungal communities that were more or less similar to neighboring unlogged stands, we sampled roots from western hemlock from three replicate plots from each of five different, well-characterized, forest stand types that differed in site type, and in logging and fertilization history. We harvested four samples of 100 ectomycorrhizal root tips from each plot, a total of 60 samples per stand type. From each sample, we analyzed fungal ribosomal internal transcribed spacers and 28S DNA, sequencing 15-29 clones per sample and 60-116 clones per plot. We detected 147 fungal operational taxonomic units among a total of 1435 sequences. Craterellus tubaeformis was frequently present and resulted in a pattern of phylogenetic overdispersion in the fungal communities. Fungal species composition was strongly correlated with foliar nitrogen concentration. However, other site quality factors were also important because the fertilized regenerating hemlock and mature hemlock-amabilis fir forests had similar foliar nitrogen content but little overlap in fungal species. Compared with unfertilized regenerating forests, fungal communities in N + P-fertilized regenerating forests had significantly more species overlap with old growth forests. However, the fungal communities of all regenerating forest were similar to one another and all differed significantly from older forests. By correlating fungal clades with habitats, this research improves understanding of how forest management can contribute to maintaining diverse ectomycorrhizal fungal communities across a landscape.

  6. A stand-alone tree demography and landscape structure module for Earth system models: integration with global forest data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverd, V.; Smith, B.; Nieradzik, L. P.; Briggs, P. R.

    2014-02-01

    Poorly constrained rates of biomass turnover are a key limitation of Earth system models (ESM). In light of this, we recently proposed a new approach encoded in a model called Populations-Order-Physiology (POP), for the simulation of woody ecosystem stand dynamics, demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity. POP is suitable for continental to global applications and designed for coupling to the terrestrial ecosystem component of any ESM. POP bridges the gap between first generation Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs) with simple large-area parameterisations of woody biomass (typically used in current ESMs) and complex second generation DVMs, that explicitly simulate demographic processes and landscape heterogeneity of forests. The key simplification in the POP approach, compared with second-generation DVMs, is to compute physiological processes such as assimilation at grid-scale (with CABLE or a similar land surface model), but to partition the grid-scale biomass increment among age classes defined at sub grid-scale, each subject to its own dynamics. POP was successfully demonstrated along a savanna transect in northern Australia, replicating the effects of strong rainfall and fire disturbance gradients on observed stand productivity and structure. Here, we extend the application of POP to a range of forest types around the globe, employing paired observations of stem biomass and density from forest inventory data to calibrate model parameters governing stand demography and biomass evolution. The calibrated POP model is then coupled to the CABLE land surface model and the combined model (CABLE-POP) is evaluated against leaf-stem allometry observations from forest stands ranging in age from 3 to 200 yr. Results indicate that simulated biomass pools conform well with observed allometry. We conclude that POP represents a preferable alternative to large-area parameterisations of woody biomass turnover, typically used in current ESMs.

  7. Stand Structure and Substrate Diversity as Two Major Drivers for Bryophyte Distribution in a Temperate Montane Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Niu, Shuai; Li, Peikun; Jia, Hongru; Wang, Hailiang; Ye, Yongzhong; Yuan, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the major drivers of bryophyte distribution is the first step to protecting bryophyte diversity. Topography, forest, substrates (ground, tree trunks, roots, rocks, and rotten wood), and spatial factor, which factors are the major drivers of bryophyte distribution? In this study, 53 plots were set in 400 m(2) along the elevation gradient in Xiaoqinling, China. All bryophytes in the plots were collected and identified. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between bryophyte and substrate diversity. We compared the patterns of overall bryophyte diversity and diversity of bryophytes found on the ground, tree, and rock along elevational gradients. Canonical correspondence analysis was applied to relate species composition to selected environmental variables. The importance of topography, forest, substrates, and spatial factors was determined by variance partitioning. A total of 1378 bryophyte specimens were collected, and 240 species were identified. Bryophyte diversity was closely related to substrate diversity. The overall bryophyte diversity significantly increased with elevation; however, the response varied among ground, tree, and rock bryophytes. Tree diversity and herb layer were considered important environmental factors in determining bryophyte distribution. Species abundance was best explained by stand structure (17%), and species diversity was best explained by stand structure (35%) and substrate (40%). Results directly indicated that substrate diversity can improve bryophyte species diversity. The effects of micro-habitat formed by stand structure and substrate diversity were higher than those of spatial processes and topography factors on bryophyte distribution. This study proved that the determinant factors influencing bryophyte diversity reflect the trends in recent forest management, providing a real opportunity to improve forest biodiversity conservation.

  8. Stand Structure and Substrate Diversity as Two Major Drivers for Bryophyte Distribution in a Temperate Montane Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Niu, Shuai; Li, Peikun; Jia, Hongru; Wang, Hailiang; Ye, Yongzhong; Yuan, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the major drivers of bryophyte distribution is the first step to protecting bryophyte diversity. Topography, forest, substrates (ground, tree trunks, roots, rocks, and rotten wood), and spatial factor, which factors are the major drivers of bryophyte distribution? In this study, 53 plots were set in 400 m2 along the elevation gradient in Xiaoqinling, China. All bryophytes in the plots were collected and identified. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between bryophyte and substrate diversity. We compared the patterns of overall bryophyte diversity and diversity of bryophytes found on the ground, tree, and rock along elevational gradients. Canonical correspondence analysis was applied to relate species composition to selected environmental variables. The importance of topography, forest, substrates, and spatial factors was determined by variance partitioning. A total of 1378 bryophyte specimens were collected, and 240 species were identified. Bryophyte diversity was closely related to substrate diversity. The overall bryophyte diversity significantly increased with elevation; however, the response varied among ground, tree, and rock bryophytes. Tree diversity and herb layer were considered important environmental factors in determining bryophyte distribution. Species abundance was best explained by stand structure (17%), and species diversity was best explained by stand structure (35%) and substrate (40%). Results directly indicated that substrate diversity can improve bryophyte species diversity. The effects of micro-habitat formed by stand structure and substrate diversity were higher than those of spatial processes and topography factors on bryophyte distribution. This study proved that the determinant factors influencing bryophyte diversity reflect the trends in recent forest management, providing a real opportunity to improve forest biodiversity conservation. PMID:28603535

  9. Structure and energetics of standing eddies in the winter Northern Hemisphere simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model and the GLA Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yen-Huei; Chen, Tsing-Chang

    1986-01-01

    The structure and maintenance of standing eddies in the NCAR Community Climate Model and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres Climate Model are examined. The energy equations and data used in the study, and the differences between the two GCMs are discussed. The three-dimensional structure (height, temperature, and vertical velocity) and potential and kinetic energies and thermal and dynamic interactions of the standing eddies are described.

  10. Free-standing Si/SiO II superlattices: fabrication procedure and optical, structural, and light-emitting properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, S.; Sinkkonen, J.; Khriachtchev, L.; Räsänen, M.; Sitnikova, A.

    2006-04-01

    The Si/SiO II superlattices were prepared by a molecular beam deposition method, high temperature furnace annealing (1100 °C), and back-side Si wafer etching in tetramethyl ammonium solution. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy show that the layered structure is not preserved during high temperature treatment. The etching of the substrate increases photoluminescence of the Si/SiO II material. Optical waveguiding was realized for the free-standing sample demonstrating its reasonable optical quality and providing the optical parameters.

  11. Bat activity in relation to fire and fire surrogate treatments in southern pine stands

    Treesearch

    Susan C. Loeb; Thomas A. Waldrop

    2008-01-01

    Forest managers often use thinning and prescribed burning to reduce the risk of wildfire and insect outbreaks. Because thinning and burning alter the structure of forest stands and may affect insect prey abundance, they may change the suitability of stands for bats. Our objective was to test the effects of thinning and burning on bat foraging and commuting activity in...

  12. The electronic structure of quasi-free-standing germanene on monolayer MX (M = Ga, In; X = S, Se, Te).

    PubMed

    Ni, Zeyuan; Minamitani, Emi; Ando, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2015-07-15

    For the first time by using the ab initio density functional theory, the stability and electronic structures of germanene on monolayer GaS, GaSe, GaTe and InSe have been investigated. Germanene preserves its buckled-honeycomb structure on all the studied substrates similar to the free-standing case. Moreover, germanene stays neutral and preserves its Dirac-cone-like band structure on monolayer GaTe and InSe. In these two cases, a bandgap of 0.14-0.16 eV opens at the Dirac point of germanene, while the effective masses remain as small as 0.05-0.06 times the free-electron mass. The estimated carrier mobility is up to 2.2 × 10(5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). These features show that monolayer GaTe and InSe are promising as substrates for germanene devices.

  13. Correlations of Flow Structure and Particle Deposition with Structural Alterations in Severe Asthmatic Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sanghun; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Wenzel, Sally; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-11-01

    Severe asthmatics are characterized by alterations of bifurcation angle, hydraulic diameter, circularity of the airways, and local shift of air-volume functional change. The characteristics altered against healthy human subjects can affect flow structure and particle deposition. A large-eddy-simulation (LES) model for transitional and turbulent flows is utilized to study flow characteristics and particle deposition with representative healthy and severe asthmatic lungs. For the subject-specific boundary condition, local air-volume changes are derived with two computed tomography images at inspiration and expiration. Particle transport simulations are performed on LES-predicted flow fields. In severe asthmatics, the elevated air-volume changes of apical lung regions affect the increased particle distribution toward upper lobes, especially for small particles. The constricted airways are significantly correlated with high wall shear stress, leading to the increased pressure drop and particle deposition. The structural alterations of bifurcation angle, circularity and hydraulic diameter in severe asthmatics are associated with the increase of particle deposition, wall shear stress and wall thickness. NIH Grants: U01-HL114494, R01-HL094315 and S10-RR022421. Computer time: XSEDE.

  14. Perinatal Risk Factors Altering Regional Brain Structure in the Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Deanne K.; Warfield, Simon K.; Carlin, John B.; Pavlovic, Masa; Wang, Hong X.; Bear, Merilyn; Kean, Michael J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2007-01-01

    Neuroanatomical structure appears to be altered in preterm infants, but there has been little insight into the major perinatal risk factors associated with regional cerebral structural alterations. MR images were taken to quantitatively compare regional brain tissue volumes between term and preterm infants and to investigate associations between…

  15. 18 CFR 1304.211 - Change in ownership of grandfathered structures or alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... grandfathered structures or alterations. (a) When ownership of a permitted structure or other shoreline..., upon application to TVA for a permit, continue to use existing permitted docks and other shoreline... standards existing shoreline alterations constructed and maintained in accordance with the standards...

  16. Perinatal Risk Factors Altering Regional Brain Structure in the Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Deanne K.; Warfield, Simon K.; Carlin, John B.; Pavlovic, Masa; Wang, Hong X.; Bear, Merilyn; Kean, Michael J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2007-01-01

    Neuroanatomical structure appears to be altered in preterm infants, but there has been little insight into the major perinatal risk factors associated with regional cerebral structural alterations. MR images were taken to quantitatively compare regional brain tissue volumes between term and preterm infants and to investigate associations between…

  17. Changes in forest species composition and structure after stand-replacing wildfire in the mountains of southeastern Arizona

    Treesearch

    Ronald D. Quinn; Lin Wu

    2005-01-01

    A wildfire in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona apparently altered the long-term structure of the forest. The pre-fire canopy forest, which had not burned for 100 years, was an even mixture of Arizona pines and Rocky Mountain Douglas-firs. A decade later the new forest was numerically dominated by quaking aspen seedlings in clumps separated by persistent...

  18. Spatial Scales of Genetic Structure in Free-Standing and Strangler Figs (Ficus, Moraceae) Inhabiting Neotropical Forests

    PubMed Central

    Heer, Katrin; Albrecht, Larissa; García-Villacorta, Roosevelt; Staeps, Felix C.; Herre, Edward Allen; Dick, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Wind-borne pollinating wasps (Agaonidae) can transport fig (Ficus sp., Moraceae) pollen over enormous distances (> 100 km). Because of their extensive breeding areas, Neotropical figs are expected to exhibit weak patterns of genetic structure at local and regional scales. We evaluated genetic structure at the regional to continental scale (Panama, Costa Rica, and Peru) for the free-standing fig species Ficus insipida. Genetic differentiation was detected only at distances > 300 km (Jost´s Dest = 0.68 ± 0.07 & FST = 0.30 ± 0.03 between Mesoamerican and Amazonian sites) and evidence for phylogeographic structure (RST>>permuted RST) was only significant in comparisons between Central and South America. Further, we assessed local scale spatial genetic structure (SGS, d ≤ 8 km) in Panama and developed an agent-based model parameterized with data from F. insipida to estimate minimum pollination distances, which determine the contribution of pollen dispersal on SGS. The local scale data for F. insipida was compared to SGS data collected for an additional free-standing fig, F. yoponensis (subgenus Pharmacosycea), and two species of strangler figs, F. citrifolia and F. obtusifolia (subgenus Urostigma) sampled in Panama. All four species displayed significant SGS (mean Sp = 0.014 ± 0.012). Model simulations indicated that most pollination events likely occur at distances > > 1 km, largely ruling out spatially limited pollen dispersal as the determinant of SGS in F. insipida and, by extension, the other fig species. Our results are consistent with the view that Ficus develops fine-scale SGS primarily as a result of localized seed dispersal and/or clumped seedling establishment despite extensive long-distance pollen dispersal. We discuss several ecological and life history factors that could have species- or subgenus-specific impacts on the genetic structure of Neotropical figs. PMID:26226482

  19. Spatial Scales of Genetic Structure in Free-Standing and Strangler Figs (Ficus, Moraceae) Inhabiting Neotropical Forests.

    PubMed

    Heer, Katrin; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Albrecht, Larissa; García-Villacorta, Roosevelt; Staeps, Felix C; Herre, Edward Allen; Dick, Christopher W

    2015-01-01

    Wind-borne pollinating wasps (Agaonidae) can transport fig (Ficus sp., Moraceae) pollen over enormous distances (> 100 km). Because of their extensive breeding areas, Neotropical figs are expected to exhibit weak patterns of genetic structure at local and regional scales. We evaluated genetic structure at the regional to continental scale (Panama, Costa Rica, and Peru) for the free-standing fig species Ficus insipida. Genetic differentiation was detected only at distances > 300 km (Jost´s Dest = 0.68 ± 0.07 & FST = 0.30 ± 0.03 between Mesoamerican and Amazonian sites) and evidence for phylogeographic structure (RST>permuted RST) was only significant in comparisons between Central and South America. Further, we assessed local scale spatial genetic structure (SGS, d ≤ 8 km) in Panama and developed an agent-based model parameterized with data from F. insipida to estimate minimum pollination distances, which determine the contribution of pollen dispersal on SGS. The local scale data for F. insipida was compared to SGS data collected for an additional free-standing fig, F. yoponensis (subgenus Pharmacosycea), and two species of strangler figs, F. citrifolia and F. obtusifolia (subgenus Urostigma) sampled in Panama. All four species displayed significant SGS (mean Sp = 0.014 ± 0.012). Model simulations indicated that most pollination events likely occur at distances > > 1 km, largely ruling out spatially limited pollen dispersal as the determinant of SGS in F. insipida and, by extension, the other fig species. Our results are consistent with the view that Ficus develops fine-scale SGS primarily as a result of localized seed dispersal and/or clumped seedling establishment despite extensive long-distance pollen dispersal. We discuss several ecological and life history factors that could have species- or subgenus-specific impacts on the genetic structure of Neotropical figs.

  20. Polyploidy alters advertisement call structure in gray treefrogs.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, M. J.; Gerhardt, H. C.

    2001-01-01

    Whole-genome duplication is believed to have played a significant role in the early evolution and diversification of vertebrate animals. The establishment of newly arisen polyploid lineages of sexually reproducing animals requires assortative mating between polyploids. Here, we show that genome duplication can directly alter a phenotypic trait mediating mate choice in the absence of genotypic change. Our results suggest that the direct effect of polyploidy on behaviour is a consequence of increased cell size. PMID:11270429

  1. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  2. Vegetation structure in old-growth stands in the Coram Research Natural Area in northwestern Montana. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Elzinga, C.L.; Shearer, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    Forest stand structure, understory composition, and tree seedling composition are described for eight permanent tenth-hectare plots established in Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir, western larch, and interior Douglas-fir forest cover types in northwestern Montana. Sites have been protected as examples of old-growth stands since the establishment of the Coram Research Natural Area in 1937. Plot data clearly illustrate a successional trend toward shade-tolerant conifiers, placing old-growth stands at risk of loss from succession or catastrophic fire. Management issues associated with use of prescribed fire to maintain old-growth characteristics in natural areas are discussed.

  3. Free-standing guided-mode resonance band-pass filters: from 1D to 2D structures.

    PubMed

    Sakat, Emilie; Vincent, Grégory; Ghenuche, Petru; Bardou, Nathalie; Dupuis, Christophe; Collin, Stéphane; Pardo, Fabrice; Haïdar, Riad; Pelouard, Jean-Luc

    2012-06-04

    We study experimentally and theoretically band-pass filters based on guided-mode resonances in free-standing metal-dielectric structures with subwavelength gratings. A variety of filters are obtained: polarizing filters with 1D gratings, and unpolarized or selective filters with 2D gratings, which are shown to behave as two crossed-1D structures. In either case, a high transmission (up to ≈ 79 %) is demonstrated, which represents an eight-fold enhancement compared to the geometrical transmission of the grating. We also show that the angular sensitivity strongly depends on the rotation axis of the sample. This behavior is explained with a detailed description of the guided-mode transmission mechanism.

  4. Hydrothermal alteration in the Bosumtwi impact structure: Evidence from 2M1-muscovite, alteration veins, and fracture fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Michael T.; Newsom, Horton E.; Nelson, Melissa J.; Moore, Duane M.

    Drill-core samples from the Bosumtwi impact structure (1.07 Myr old and 10.5 km in diameter) in Ghana exhibit mineralogical evidence for post-impact hydrothermal alteration. Nine samples of drill core obtained through the 2004 International Continental Scientific Drilling Project (ICDP) were studied, including an uppermost fallback layer overlying impactite breccias, and partly deformed massive meta-graywacke bedrock. The petrographic study revealed alteration veins containing secondary sericitic muscovite (comparable to 2M1-muscovite) crosscutting original bedding in meta-graywacke and forming a matrix between clasts in impactite breccias. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that these impactite samples are rich in 2M1-muscovite, consistent with post-impact fluid deposition and alteration. Optical analysis indicates the presence of a pre-impact stratiform chlorite in meta-graywacke samples and a secondary alteration chlorite occurring in all samples. Secondary illite was detected in upper impactites of drill core LB-08A and samples containing accretionary lapilli. The lower temperature constraint for the hydrothermal event is given by 2M1-muscovite, secondary chlorite, and illite, all of which form at temperatures greater than 280 °C. An absence of recrystallization of quartz and feldspar indicates an upper temperature constraint below 900 °C. The presence of alteration materials associated with fractures and veins in the uppermost impactites of drill cores LB-07A and LB-08A indicates that a post-impact hydrothermal system was present in and adjacent to the central uplift portion of the Bosumtwi impact structure. A sample containing accretionary lapilli obtained from drill core LB-05A exhibits limited evidence that hydrothermal processes were more widespread within the impactites on the crater floor.

  5. Carrier type inversion in quasi-free standing graphene: studies of local electronic and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Melios, Christos; Panchal, Vishal; Giusca, Cristina E.; Strupiński, Włodek; Silva, S. Ravi P.; Kazakova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the local surface potential and Raman characteristics of as-grown and ex-situ hydrogen intercalated quasi-free standing graphene on 4H-SiC(0001) grown by chemical vapor deposition. Upon intercalation, transport measurements reveal a change in the carrier type from n- to p-type, accompanied by a more than three-fold increase in carrier mobility, up to μh ≈ 4540 cm2 V−1 s−1. On a local scale, Kelvin probe force microscopy provides a complete and detailed map of the surface potential distribution of graphene domains of different thicknesses. Rearrangement of graphene layers upon intercalation to (n + 1)LG, where n is the number of graphene layers (LG) before intercalation, is demonstrated. This is accompanied by a significant increase in the work function of the graphene after the H2-intercalation, which confirms the change of majority carriers from electrons to holes. Raman spectroscopy and mapping corroborate surface potential studies. PMID:26030153

  6. [Effects of stand structure regulation on soil labile organic carbon in Pinus elliottii plantation].

    PubMed

    Tan, Gui-Xia; Liu, Yuan-Qiu; Li, Lian-Lian; Liu, Wu; Zan, Yu-Ting; Huo, Bing-Nan; He, Mu-Jiao

    2014-05-01

    Taking 21-year-old Pinus elliottii pure plantation as the control, effects of enrichment planting with broadleaf trees (Liquidambar fornosana) after thinning the conifer trees (P. elliottii) on soil labile organic carbon of different plantations, including 3-year-old, 6-year-old, 9-year-old P. elliottii and 21-year-old P. elliottii-L. fornosana mixed plantations, were investigated. The results showed that the contents of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), readily oxidizable organic carbon (ROC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) significantly increased in the 6-year-old and 9-year-old plantations compared with those in the 21-year-old P. elliottii pure plantation. Soil labile organic carbon contents in the 21-year-old P. elliottii-L. fornosana mixed plantation increased significantly than those in 3-year-old, 6-year-old, 9-year-old stands, and the DOC, ROC and MBC contents increased by 113.1%, 53.3% and 54.6%, respectively, compared with those in the 21-year-old P. elliottii pure plantation. The results suggested that replanting with broadleaf trees are an effective measure to improve the soil ecological function in pure P. elliottii plantation.

  7. FEA modeling of CMUT with membrane stand-off structures to enable selectable frequency-mode operation.

    PubMed

    Eames, Matthew D C; Reck, Theodore J; Kilroy, Joseph P; Hossack, John A

    2011-12-01

    A selectable, dual-frequency, capacitive micro- machined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) designed for both high-frequency imaging and low-frequency therapeutic effect is presented. A validated finite element analysis (FEA) CMUT model was used to examine the performance of the proposed dual-frequency transducer. CMUT device simulations were used to design a hybrid device incorporating stand-off structures that divide a large, low-frequency membrane into smaller, high-frequency sub-membranes when the membrane is partially collapsed so that the stand-offs contact the substrate. In low-frequency operation, simulations indicated that the peak negative pressure achieved by the hybrid device, when biased by 30.0 VDC and excited by a 2-MHz signal with 30.0 V amplitude, exceeded 190 kPa, which is sufficient for microbubble rupture. Low-frequency mode bandwidth was 93% at a center frequency of 2.1 MHz. In the high-frequency mode of operation, the device was excited by 175 Vdc and 87.5 Vac, which generated a peak negative pressure of 247 kPa. Device center frequency was 44.1 MHz with a - 6-dB fractional bandwidth of 42%.

  8. Period ratios for standing kink and sausage modes in magnetized structures with siphon flow on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong

    2016-06-01

    Standing oscillations with multiple periods have been found in a number of atmospheric structures on the Sun. The ratio of the period of the fundamental to twice the one of its first overtone, P 1/2P 2, is important in applications of solar magneto-seismology. We examine how field-aligned flows impact P 1/2P 2 of standing modes in solar magnetic cylinders. For coronal loops, the flow effects are significant for both fast kink and sausage modes. For kink modes, they reduce P 1/2P 2 by up to 17% relative to the static case even when the density contrast between the loop and its surroundings approaches infinity. For sausage modes, the reduction in P 1/2P 2 due to flow is typically ≲ 5.5% compared with the static case. However, the threshold aspect ratio, only above which can trapped sausage modes be supported, may increase dramatically with the flow magnitude. For photospheric tubes, the flow effect on P 1/2P 2 is not as strong. However, when applied to sausage modes, introducing field-aligned flows offers more possibilities in interpreting the multiple periods that have recently been measured. We conclude that field-aligned flows should be taken into account to help better understand what causes the departure of P 1/2P 2 from unity.

  9. Fishing indirectly structures macroalgal assemblages by altering herbivore behavior.

    PubMed

    Madin, Elizabeth M P; Gaines, Steven D; Madin, Joshua S; Warner, Robert R

    2010-12-01

    Fishing has clear direct effects on harvested species, but its cascading, indirect effects are less well understood. Fishing disproportionately removes larger, predatory fishes from marine food webs. Most studies of the consequent indirect effects focus on density-mediated interactions where predator removal alternately drives increases and decreases in abundances of successively lower trophic-level species. While prey may increase in number with fewer predators, they may also alter their behavior. When such behavioral responses impact the food resources of prey species, behaviorally mediated trophic cascades can dramatically shape landscapes. It remains unclear whether this pathway of change is typically triggered by ocean fishing. By coupling a simple foraging model with empirical observations from coral reefs, we provide a mechanistic basis for understanding and predicting how predator harvest can alter the landscape of risk for herbivores and consequently drive dramatic changes in primary producer distributions. These results broaden trophic cascade predictions for fisheries to include behavioral changes. They also provide a framework for detecting the presence and magnitude of behaviorally mediated cascades. This knowledge will help to reconcile the disparity between expected and observed patterns of fishing-induced cascades in the sea.

  10. Forest structure, stand composition, and climate-growth response in montane forests of Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Mark W; Dolanc, Christopher R; Gao, Hui; Strauss, Sharon Y; Schwartz, Ari C; Williams, John N; Tang, Ya

    2013-01-01

    Montane forests of western China provide an opportunity to establish baseline studies for climate change. The region is being impacted by climate change, air pollution, and significant human impacts from tourism. We analyzed forest stand structure and climate-growth relationships from Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve in northwestern Sichuan province, along the eastern edge of the Tibetan plateau. We conducted a survey to characterize forest stand diversity and structure in plots occurring between 2050 and 3350 m in elevation. We also evaluated seedling and sapling recruitment and tree-ring data from four conifer species to assess: 1) whether the forest appears in transition toward increased hardwood composition; 2) if conifers appear stressed by recent climate change relative to hardwoods; and 3) how growth of four dominant species responds to recent climate. Our study is complicated by clear evidence of 20(th) century timber extraction. Focusing on regions lacking evidence of logging, we found a diverse suite of conifers (Pinus, Abies, Juniperus, Picea, and Larix) strongly dominate the forest overstory. We found population size structures for most conifer tree species to be consistent with self-replacement and not providing evidence of shifting composition toward hardwoods. Climate-growth analyses indicate increased growth with cool temperatures in summer and fall. Warmer temperatures during the growing season could negatively impact conifer growth, indicating possible seasonal climate water deficit as a constraint on growth. In contrast, however, we found little relationship to seasonal precipitation. Projected warming does not yet have a discernible signal on trends in tree growth rates, but slower growth with warmer growing season climates suggests reduced potential future forest growth.

  11. Forest Structure, Stand Composition, and Climate-Growth Response in Montane Forests of Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Mark W.; Dolanc, Christopher R.; Gao, Hui; Strauss, Sharon Y.; Schwartz, Ari C.; Williams, John N.; Tang, Ya

    2013-01-01

    Montane forests of western China provide an opportunity to establish baseline studies for climate change. The region is being impacted by climate change, air pollution, and significant human impacts from tourism. We analyzed forest stand structure and climate-growth relationships from Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve in northwestern Sichuan province, along the eastern edge of the Tibetan plateau. We conducted a survey to characterize forest stand diversity and structure in plots occurring between 2050 and 3350 m in elevation. We also evaluated seedling and sapling recruitment and tree-ring data from four conifer species to assess: 1) whether the forest appears in transition toward increased hardwood composition; 2) if conifers appear stressed by recent climate change relative to hardwoods; and 3) how growth of four dominant species responds to recent climate. Our study is complicated by clear evidence of 20th century timber extraction. Focusing on regions lacking evidence of logging, we found a diverse suite of conifers (Pinus, Abies, Juniperus, Picea, and Larix) strongly dominate the forest overstory. We found population size structures for most conifer tree species to be consistent with self-replacement and not providing evidence of shifting composition toward hardwoods. Climate-growth analyses indicate increased growth with cool temperatures in summer and fall. Warmer temperatures during the growing season could negatively impact conifer growth, indicating possible seasonal climate water deficit as a constraint on growth. In contrast, however, we found little relationship to seasonal precipitation. Projected warming does not yet have a discernible signal on trends in tree growth rates, but slower growth with warmer growing season climates suggests reduced potential future forest growth. PMID:23951188

  12. Vegetation response to stand structure and prescribed fire in an interior ponderosa pine ecosystem

    Treesearch

    Jianwei Zhang; Martin W. Ritchie; William W. Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A large-scale interior ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex P. & C. Laws.) study was conducted at the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest in northeastern California. The primary purpose of the study was to determine the influence of structural diversity on the dynamics of interior pine forests at the landscape scale. High structural...

  13. Canopy structure on forest lands in western Oregon: differences among forest types and stand ages

    Treesearch

    Anne C.S. McIntosh; Andrew N. Gray; Steven L. Garman

    2009-01-01

    Canopy structure is an important attribute affecting economic and ecological values of forests in the Pacific Northwest. However, canopy cover and vertical layering are rarely measured directly; they are usually inferred from other forest measurements. In this study, we quantified and compared vertical and horizontal patterns of tree canopy structure and understory...

  14. Stand structure in eastside old-growth ponderosa pine forests of Oregon and northern California.

    Treesearch

    Andrew Youngblood; Timothy Max; Kent. Coe

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative metrics of horizontal and vertical structural attributes in eastside old-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P. and C. Lawson var. ponderosa) forests were measured to guide the design of restoration prescriptions. The age, size structure, and the spatial patterns were investigated in old-growth ponderosa pine forests at three...

  15. A-3 Test Stand work

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-29

    Stennis Space Center employees have installed liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks atop the A-3 Test Stand, raising the structure to its full 300-foot height. The stand is being built to test next-generation rocket engines that could carry humans beyond low-Earth orbit into deep space. The A-3 Test Stand is scheduled for completion and activation in 2013.

  16. Take a Stand for Standing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labandz, Stephenie

    2010-01-01

    As a school-based physical therapist, the author sees children with a wide variety of diagnoses affecting their mobility and motor function. Supported standing is an important part of the routines of those who are unable to stand independently due to issues affecting the neuromuscular system. Being eye-to-eye with their peers and interacting with…

  17. Take a Stand for Standing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labandz, Stephenie

    2010-01-01

    As a school-based physical therapist, the author sees children with a wide variety of diagnoses affecting their mobility and motor function. Supported standing is an important part of the routines of those who are unable to stand independently due to issues affecting the neuromuscular system. Being eye-to-eye with their peers and interacting with…

  18. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Standing Wave Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Yeremian, Anahid; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno; /INFN, Rome

    2012-06-25

    Our experiments are directed toward the understanding of the physics of rf breakdown in systems that can be used to accelerate electron beams at {approx}11.4 GHz. The structure geometries have apertures, stored energy per cell, and rf pulse duration close to that of the NLC or CLIC. The breakdown rate is the main parameter that we use to compare rf breakdown behavior for different structures at a given set of rf pulse parameters (pulse shape and peak power) at 60 Hz repetition rate. In our experiments, the typical range of the breakdown rate is from one per few hours to {approx}100 per hour. To date we have tested 29 structures. We consistently found that after the initial conditioning, the behavior of the breakdown rate is reproducible for structures of the same geometry and material, and the breakdown rate dependence on peak magnetic fields is stronger than on peak surface electric fields for structures of different geometries. Below we report the main results from tests of seven structures made from hard copper, soft copper alloys and hard-copper alloys. Additional details on these and other structures will be discussed in future publications.

  19. Standing spin waves and solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional spiral structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V. V. Raskovalov, A. A.

    2013-02-15

    On the basis of the sine-Gordon model, we calculated the absorption spectrum for the external pump power in a quasi-one-dimensional spiral structure of easy-plane magnets without the inversion center in the presence of a static magnetic field perpendicular to the magnetic spiral axis. It is shown that these data can be used for determining the material constants of the magnet and diagnostics of spin waves and solitons in its spiral structure. The possibility of using magnetooptical methods to observe local translations of the spiral structure during formation and motion of solitons in it is discussed.

  20. Stage structure alters how complexity affects stability of ecological networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudolf, V.H.W.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving how complexity affects stability of natural communities is of key importance for predicting the consequences of biodiversity loss. Central to previous stability analysis has been the assumption that the resources of a consumer are substitutable. However, during their development, most species change diets; for instance, adults often use different resources than larvae or juveniles. Here, we show that such ontogenetic niche shifts are common in real ecological networks and that consideration of these shifts can alter which species are predicted to be at risk of extinction. Furthermore, niche shifts reduce and can even reverse the otherwise stabilizing effect of complexity. This pattern arises because species with several specialized life stages appear to be generalists at the species level but act as sequential specialists that are hypersensitive to resource loss. These results suggest that natural communities are more vulnerable to biodiversity loss than indicated by previous analyses.

  1. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  2. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  3. Crowding-Induced Structural Alterations of Random-Loop Chromosome Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Soo; Backman, Vadim; Szleifer, Igal

    2011-04-01

    We investigate structural alterations of random-loop polymers due to changes in the crowding condition, as a model to study environmental effects on the structure of chromosome subcompartments. The polymer structure is changed in a nonmonotonic fashion with an increasing density of crowders: condensed at small volume fractions; decondensed at high crowding volume fractions. The nonmonotonic behavior is a manifestation of the nontrivial distance dependence of the depletion interactions. We also show that crowding-induced structural alterations affect the access of binding proteins to the surface of polymer segments and are distinguished from structural changes due to the increased number of specific polymer loops.

  4. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  5. Structures, thermal stability, and melting behaviors of free-standing pentagonal multi-shell Pd-Pt nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, D.; Hou, M.

    2010-04-01

    Classical molecular dynamics and Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to investigate the thermal stability and melting behaviors of free-standing Pd-Pt bimetallic nanowires (NWs) with pentagonal multi-shell-type (PMS-type) structure in the whole composition range. Equilibrium configurations at 100 K are predicted in the semi-grand canonical ensemble. Pd-Pt PMS-type NWs are stable with a multishell structure of alternating Pd and Pt compositions and Pd segregating systematically to the surface. On thermal heating, an interesting composition-dependent structural transformation from the PMS-type to face-centred-cubic (FCC) by overcoming a high energy barrier is observed for Pd-Pt bimetallic NWs before the melting. Consequently, the system energy is decreased. The FCC structure is found more stable than PMS-type over the whole range of composition. The melting of Pd-Pt bimetallic NWs is also studied. It is found to start at the edges, then propagate over the whole surface, and next to the interior. It occurs in a composition-dependent range of temperature.

  6. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  7. Structures and Phase Transitions in Thin Free Standing Films of an Antiferroelectric Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradi, M.; Čepič, M.; Čopič, M.; Muševič, I.

    2004-11-01

    The premises of a discrete mean-field model for polar smectic liquid crystals are tested by analyzing the ellipsometric experiments on two, three, and four-layer freestanding films of MHPOBC. The measured temperature dependences of the ellipsometric parameters in a weak dc external field are compared to the predictions of a simple clock model. A very good quantitative agreement is found indicating an odd-even effect: XY structures are stable for odd and Ising-like structures for an even number of layers.

  8. Electronic Structures of Free-Standing Nanowires made from Indirect Bandgap Semiconductor Gallium Phosphide

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from gallium phosphide (GaP)—a III-V semiconductor with an indirect bulk bandgap. We consider [001]-oriented GaP nanowires with square and rectangular cross sections, and [111]-oriented GaP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections. Based on tight binding models, both the band structures and wave functions of the nanowires are calculated. For the [001]-oriented GaP nanowires, the bands show anti-crossing structures, while the bands of the [111]-oriented nanowires display crossing structures. Two minima are observed in the conduction bands, while the maximum of the valence bands is always at the Γ-point. Using double group theory, we analyze the symmetry properties of the lowest conduction band states and highest valence band states of GaP nanowires with different sizes and directions. The band state wave functions of the lowest conduction bands and the highest valence bands of the nanowires are evaluated by spatial probability distributions. For practical use, we fit the confinement energies of the electrons and holes in the nanowires to obtain an empirical formula. PMID:27307081

  9. Genetic subpopulation structuring and its implications in a mature eastern white pine stand

    Treesearch

    Samuel E. Nijensohn; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Donald H. DeHayes; Donald H. DeHayes

    2005-01-01

    We examined patterns of genetic structuring within a mature eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) forest, using geographic information system (GIS)-based data and maps that combined genetic (isozyme analysis of 46 loci) and other tree-specific information (e.g., size, growth, age, and location) for 220 trees in Jericho, Vermont. Interconnections between genotypic...

  10. Stand structure influences nekton community composition and provides protection from natural disturbance in Micronesian mangroves

    Treesearch

    Richard A. MacKenzie; Nicole. Cormier

    2012-01-01

    Structurally complex mangrove roots are thought to provide foraging habitat, predation refugia, and typhoon protection for resident fish, shrimp, and crabs. The spatially compact nature of Micronesian mangroves results in model ecosystems to test these ideas. Tidal creek nekton assemblages were compared among mangrove forests impacted by Typhoon Sudal and differing in...

  11. Does stand density affect mating system and population genetic structure in coast live oak?

    Treesearch

    Kathryn Beals; Richard S. Dodd

    2006-01-01

    Coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) is a major species at risk in the current Phytophthora ramorum epidemic in California’s oak woodlands. To search effectively for resistant genotypes, it is imperative to have an understanding of the existing host population genetic structure in these forests, and how its reproductive capacity may...

  12. Vegetation composition and structure in two hemlock stands threatened by the hemlock woolly adelgid

    Treesearch

    John J. Battles; Natalie Cleavitt; Timothy J. Fahey; Richard A. Evans

    2000-01-01

    We quantified the vegetation composition and structure of two hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) ravines in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area threatened by the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae). Hemlock accounted for more than 50% of the canopy basal area (ravine mean = 52.3 m² ha-1) and...

  13. Estimating survival rates with time series of standing age-structure data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, Mark S.; Gogan, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that age-structure data contain useful information for assessing the status and dynamics of wildlife populations. For example, age-specific survival rates can be estimated with just a single sample from the age distribution of a stable, stationary population. For a population that is not stable, age-specific survival rates can be estimated using techniques such as inverse methods that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data. However, estimation of survival rates using these methods typically requires numerical optimization, a relatively long time series of data, and smoothing or other constraints to provide useful estimates. We developed general models for possibly unstable populations that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data to provide explicit maximum likelihood estimators of age-specific survival rates with as few as two years of data. As an example, we applied these methods to estimate survival rates for female bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. This approach provides a simple tool for monitoring survival rates based on age-structure data.

  14. TEST STAND 4697 CONSTRUCTION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-06

    A CRANE MOVES THE FIRST STEEL TIER TO BE BOLTED INTO PLACE ON JAN. 6, FOR WELDING OF A SECOND NEW STRUCTURAL TEST STAND AT NASA'S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER IN HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA -- CRITICAL TO DEVELOPMENT OF NASA'S SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM. WHEN COMPLETED THIS SUMMER, THE 85-FOOT-TALL TEST STAND 4697 WILL USE HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS TO SUBJECT THE LIQUID OXYGEN TANK AND HARDWARE OF THE MASSIVE SLS CORE STAGE TO THE SAME LOADS AND STRESSES IT WILL ENDURE DURING A LAUNCH. THE STAND IS RISING IN MARSHALL'S WEST TEST AREA, WHERE WORK IS ALSO UNDERWAY ON THE 215-FOOT-TALL TOWERS OF TEST STAND 4693, WHICH WILL CONDUCT SIMILAR STRUCTURAL TESTS ON THE SLS CORE STAGE'S LIQUID HYDROGEN TANK. SLS, THE MOST POWERFUL ROCKET EVER BUILT, WILL CARRY ASTRONAUTS IN NASA'S ORION SPACECRAFT ON DEEP SPACE MISSIONS, INCLUDING THE JOURNEY TO MARS.

  15. NEO Test Stand Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, Cody J.

    2015-01-01

    A project within SwampWorks is building a test stand to hold regolith to study how dust is ejected when exposed to the hot exhaust plume of a rocket engine. The test stand needs to be analyzed, finalized, and fabrication drawings generated to move forward. Modifications of the test stand assembly were made with Creo 2 modeling software. Structural analysis calculations were developed by hand to confirm if the structure will hold the expected loads while optimizing support positions. These calculations when iterated through MatLab demonstrated the optimized position of the vertical support to be 98'' from the far end of the stand. All remaining deflections were shown to be under the 0.6'' requirement and internal stresses to meet NASA Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Safety Standards. Though at the time of writing, fabrication drawings have yet to be generated, but are expected shortly after.

  16. Circulating Microparticles Alter Formation, Structure, and Properties of Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Zubairova, Laily D.; Nabiullina, Roza M.; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Zuev, Yuriy F.; Mustafin, Ilshat G.; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Weisel, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of circulating microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis, there is limited evidence for potential causative effects of naturally produced cell-derived microparticles on fibrin clot formation and its properties. We studied the significance of blood microparticles for fibrin formation, structure, and susceptibility to fibrinolysis by removing them from platelet-free plasma using filtration. Clots made in platelet-free and microparticle-depleted plasma samples from the same healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Microparticles accelerate fibrin polymerisation and support formation of more compact clots that resist internal and external fibrinolysis. These variations correlate with faster thrombin generation, suggesting thrombin-mediated kinetic effects of microparticles on fibrin formation, structure, and properties. In addition, clots formed in the presence of microparticles, unlike clots from the microparticle-depleted plasma, contain 0.1–0.5-μm size granular and CD61-positive material on fibres, suggesting that platelet-derived microparticles attach to fibrin. Therefore, the blood of healthy individuals contains functional microparticles at the levels that have a procoagulant potential. They affect the structure and stability of fibrin clots indirectly through acceleration of thrombin generation and through direct physical incorporation into the fibrin network. Both mechanisms underlie a potential role of microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis as modulators of fibrin formation, structure, and resistance to fibrinolysis. PMID:26635081

  17. A top-down approach for fabricating free-standing bio-carbon supercapacitor electrodes with a hierarchical structure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingzhi; Zhang, Qinghua; Zhang, Junxian; Jin, Lei; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Biomass has delicate hierarchical structures, which inspired us to develop a cost-effective route to prepare electrode materials with rational nanostructures for use in high-performance storage devices. Here, we demonstrate a novel top-down approach for fabricating bio-carbon materials with stable structures and excellent diffusion pathways; this approach is based on carbonization with controlled chemical activation. The developed free-standing bio-carbon electrode exhibits a high specific capacitance of 204 F g−1 at 1 A g−1; good rate capability, as indicated by the residual initial capacitance of 85.5% at 10 A g−1; and a long cycle life. These performance characteristics are attributed to the outstanding hierarchical structures of the electrode material. Appropriate carbonization conditions enable the bio-carbon materials to inherit the inherent hierarchical texture of the original biomass, thereby facilitating effective channels for fast ion transfer. The macropores and mesopores that result from chemical activation significantly increase the specific surface area and also play the role of temporary ion-buffering reservoirs, further shortening the ionic diffusion distance. PMID:26394834

  18. Photoinduced Reversible Structural Transformations in Free-Standing CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Films.

    PubMed

    Gottesman, Ronen; Gouda, Laxman; Kalanoor, Basanth S; Haltzi, Eynav; Tirosh, Shay; Rosh-Hodesh, Eli; Tischler, Yaakov; Zaban, Arie; Quarti, Claudio; Mosconi, Edoardo; De Angelis, Filippo

    2015-06-18

    In the pursuit to better understand the mechanisms of perovskite solar cells we performed Raman and photoluminescence measurements of free-standing CH3NH3PbI3 films, comparing dark with working conditions. The films, grown on a glass substrate and sealed by a thin glass coverslip, were measured subsequent to dark and white-light pretreatments. The extremely slow changes we observe in both the Raman and photoluminescence cannot be regarded as electronic processes, which are much faster. Thus, the most probable explanation is of slow photoinduced structural changes. The CH3NH3PbI3 transformation between the dark and the light structures is reversible, with faster rates for the changes under illumination. The results seem to clarify several common observations associated with solar cell mechanisms, like performance improvement under light soaking. More important is the call for solar-cell-related investigation of CH3NH3PbI3 to take the photoinduced structural changes into consideration when measuring and interpreting the results.

  19. 3-dimensional free standing micro-structures by proton beam writing of Su 8-silver nanoParticle polymeric composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igbenehi, H.; Jiguet, S.

    2012-09-01

    Proton beam lithography a maskless direct-write lithographic technique (well suited for producing 3-Dimensional microstructures in a range of resist and semiconductor materials) is demonstrated as an effective tool in the creation of electrically conductive freestanding micro-structures in an Su 8 + Nano Silver polymer composite. The structures produced show non-ohmic conductivity and fit the percolation theory conduction model of tunneling of separated nanoparticles. Measurements show threshold switching and a change in conductivity of at least 4 orders of magnitude. The predictable range of protons in materials at a given energy is exploited in the creation of high aspect ratio, free standing micro-structures, made from a commercially available SU8 Silver nano-composite (GMC3060 form Gersteltec Inc. a negative tone photo-epoxy with added metallic nano-particles(Silver)) to create films with enhanced electrical properties when exposed and cured. Nano-composite films are directly written on with a finely focused MeV accelerated Proton particle beam. The energy loss of the incident proton beams in the target polymer nano- composite film is concentrated at the end of its range, where damage occurs; changing the chemistry of the nano-composite film via an acid initiated polymerization - creating conduction paths. Changing the energy of the incident beams provide exposed regions with different penetration and damage depth - exploited in the demonstrated cantilever microstructure.

  20. A top-down approach for fabricating free-standing bio-carbon supercapacitor electrodes with a hierarchical structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingzhi; Zhang, Qinghua; Zhang, Junxian; Jin, Lei; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Ting

    2015-09-23

    Biomass has delicate hierarchical structures, which inspired us to develop a cost-effective route to prepare electrode materials with rational nanostructures for use in high-performance storage devices. Here, we demonstrate a novel top-down approach for fabricating bio-carbon materials with stable structures and excellent diffusion pathways; this approach is based on carbonization with controlled chemical activation. The developed free-standing bio-carbon electrode exhibits a high specific capacitance of 204 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1); good rate capability, as indicated by the residual initial capacitance of 85.5% at 10 A g(-1); and a long cycle life. These performance characteristics are attributed to the outstanding hierarchical structures of the electrode material. Appropriate carbonization conditions enable the bio-carbon materials to inherit the inherent hierarchical texture of the original biomass, thereby facilitating effective channels for fast ion transfer. The macropores and mesopores that result from chemical activation significantly increase the specific surface area and also play the role of temporary ion-buffering reservoirs, further shortening the ionic diffusion distance.

  1. Development of a Laser-Powered Dielectric Structure-Based Accelerator as a Stand-Alone Particle Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, R. B.; Travish, G.; Arab, E. R.; Fong, D.; Hoyer, Z.; Lacroix, U. H.; Vartanian, N.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2010-11-01

    An experimental program to develop and build a dielectric-based slab-symmetric structure (the micro-accelerator platform, or MAP) for generating and accelerating low-energy electrons is underway at UCLA and Manhattanville College. This optical acceleration structure is effectively a resonant cavity powered by a side-coupled laser, and has applications as a radiation source for medicine or industry. We present recent experimental and computational results on the accelerator, and progress toward its incorporation into a self-contained particle source. Such a particle source would incorporate a micron-scale electron emitter and a non-relativistic capture region to enable self-injection into the synchronous field within the accelerator. A prototype of the accelerator itself has been constructed from candidate dielectric materials using micromanufacturing techniques; the current status of the testing program is described. A novel electron emitter incorporating pyroelectric crystals with field-enhancing tips has been demonstrated to produce steady currents; the results are dependent on tip geometry, and appear suitable for injection into a microstructure. Extension of the MAP concept to non-relativistic velocities, as in the stand-alone source, requires a tapered structure that gives rise to numerous complications including beam defocusing and manufacturing challenges; approaches for addressing these complications are mentioned.

  2. A Structural Weight Estimation Program (SWEEP) for Aircraft. Volume 11 - Flexible Airloads Stand-Alone Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    1) FS Fuselage station, in. FS_. 0 Fuselage station at intersection of wing elastic with plane of syranetry, in. 11 2 GJ Wing torsional...Spanwise location of wing structural influence coefficient point where deflection is calculated (see Figure 3), measured along elastic axis, in...n.I) Nondimensional span station at center of wing strip, I n Distance along wing elastic axis fron plane of symmetry to influence coefficient

  3. Free-standing carbon nanotube composite sensing skin for distributed strain sensing in structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Minegishi, Kaede; Kurata, Masahiro; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2014-04-01

    The technical challenges of managing the health of critical infrastructure systems necessitate greater structural sensing capabilities. Among these needs is the ability for quantitative, spatial damage detection on critical structural components. Advances in material science have now opened the door for novel and cost-effective spatial sensing solutions specially tailored for damage detection in structures. However, challenges remain before spatial damage detection can be realized. Some of the technical challenges include sensor installations and extensive signal processing requirements. This work addresses these challenges by developing a patterned carbon nanotube composite thin film sensor whose pattern has been optimized for measuring the spatial distribution of strain. The carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposite sensing material is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate using a layer-by-layer deposition process. The thin film sensors are then patterned into sensing elements using optical lithography processes common to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. The sensor array is designed as a series of sensing elements with varying width to provide insight on the limitations of such patterning and implications of pattern geometry on sensing signals. Once fabrication is complete, the substrate and attached sensor are epoxy bonded to a poly vinyl composite (PVC) bar that is then tested with a uniaxial, cyclic load pattern and mechanical response is characterized. The fabrication processes are then utilized on a larger-scale to develop and instrument a component-specific sensing skin in order to observe the strain distribution on the web of a steel beam. The instrumented beam is part of a larger steel beam-column connection with a concrete slab in composite action. The beam-column subassembly is laterally loaded and strain trends in the web are observed using the carbon nanotube composite sensing skin. The results are discussed in the context of

  4. Experimental sulfate amendment alters peatland bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Strickman, R J S; Fulthorpe, R R; Coleman Wasik, J K; Engstrom, D R; Mitchell, C P J

    2016-10-01

    As part of a long-term, peatland-scale sulfate addition experiment, the impact of varying sulfate deposition on bacterial community responses was assessed using 16S tag encoded pyrosequencing. In three separate areas of the peatland, sulfate manipulations included an eight year quadrupling of atmospheric sulfate deposition (experimental), a 3-year recovery to background deposition following 5years of elevated deposition (recovery), and a control area. Peat concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg), a bioaccumulative neurotoxin, were measured, the production of which is attributable to a growing list of microorganisms, including many sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. The total bacterial and Deltaproteobacterial community structures in the experimental treatment differed significantly from those in the control and recovery treatments that were either indistinguishable or very similar to one another. Notably, the relatively rapid return (within three years) of bacterial community structure in the recovery treatment to a state similar to the control, demonstrates significant resilience of the peatland bacterial community to changes in atmospheric sulfate deposition. Changes in MeHg accumulation between sulfate treatments correlated with changes in the Deltaproteobacterial community, suggesting that sulfate may affect MeHg production through changes in the community structure of this group.

  5. Temperature alters food web body-size structure.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Jean P; DeLong, John P

    2014-08-01

    The increased temperature associated with climate change may have important effects on body size and predator-prey interactions. The consequences of these effects for food web structure are unclear because the relationships between temperature and aspects of food web structure such as predator-prey body-size relationships are unknown. Here, we use the largest reported dataset for marine predator-prey interactions to assess how temperature affects predator-prey body-size relationships among different habitats ranging from the tropics to the poles. We found that prey size selection depends on predator body size, temperature and the interaction between the two. Our results indicate that (i) predator-prey body-size ratios decrease with predator size at below-average temperatures and increase with predator size at above-average temperatures, and (ii) that the effect of temperature on predator-prey body-size structure will be stronger at small and large body sizes and relatively weak at intermediate sizes. This systematic interaction may help to simplify forecasting the potentially complex consequences of warming on interaction strengths and food web stability.

  6. Alteration of Large-Scale Chromatin Structure by Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Anne C.; Rajendran, Ramji R.; Stenoien, David L.; Mancini, Michael A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Belmont, Andrew S.

    2002-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily important in human physiology and disease, recruits coactivators which modify local chromatin structure. Here we describe effects of ER on large-scale chromatin structure as visualized in live cells. We targeted ER to gene-amplified chromosome arms containing large numbers of lac operator sites either directly, through a lac repressor-ER fusion protein (lac rep-ER), or indirectly, by fusing lac repressor with the ER interaction domain of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator 1. Significant decondensation of large-scale chromatin structure, comparable to that produced by the ∼150-fold-stronger viral protein 16 (VP16) transcriptional activator, was produced by ER in the absence of estradiol using both approaches. Addition of estradiol induced a partial reversal of this unfolding by green fluorescent protein-lac rep-ER but not by wild-type ER recruited by a lac repressor-SRC570-780 fusion protein. The chromatin decondensation activity did not require transcriptional activation by ER nor did it require ligand-induced coactivator interactions, and unfolding did not correlate with histone hyperacetylation. Ligand-induced coactivator interactions with helix 12 of ER were necessary for the partial refolding of chromatin in response to estradiol using the lac rep-ER tethering system. This work demonstrates that when tethered or recruited to DNA, ER possesses a novel large-scale chromatin unfolding activity. PMID:11971975

  7. Repression and activation by multiprotein complexes that alter chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Kingston, R E; Bunker, C A; Imbalzano, A N

    1996-04-15

    Recent studies have provided strong evidence that macromolecular complexes are used in the cell to remodel chromatin structure during activation and to create an inaccessible structure during repression, Although there is not yet any rigorous demonstration that modification of chromatin structure plays a direct, causal role in either activation or repression, there is sufficient smoke to indicate the presence of a blazing inferno nearby. It is clear that complexes that remodel chromatin are tractable in vitro; hopefully this will allow the establishment of systems that provide a direct analysis of the role that remodeling might play in activation. These studies indicate that establishment of functional systems to corroborate the elegant genetic studies on repression might also be tractable. As the mechanistic effects of these complexes are sorted out, it will become important to understand how the complexes are regulated. In many of the instances discussed above, the genes whose products make up these complexes were identified in genetic screens for effects on developmental processes. This implies a regulation of the activity of these complexes in response to developmental cues and further implies that the work to fully understand these complexes will occupy a generation of scientists.

  8. A last stand in the Po valley: genetic structure and gene flow patterns in Ulmus minor and U. pumila

    PubMed Central

    Bertolasi, B.; Leonarduzzi, C.; Piotti, A.; Leonardi, S.; Zago, L.; Gui, L.; Gorian, F.; Vanetti, I.; Binelli, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Ulmus minor has been severely affected by Dutch elm disease (DED). The introduction into Europe of the exotic Ulmus pumila, highly tolerant to DED, has resulted in it widely replacing native U. minor populations. Morphological and genetic evidence of hybridization has been reported, and thus there is a need for assessment of interspecific gene flow patterns in natural populations. This work therefore aimed at studying pollen gene flow in a remnant U. minor stand surrounded by trees of both species scattered across an agricultural landscape. Methods All trees from a small natural stand (350 in number) and the surrounding agricultural area within a 5-km radius (89) were genotyped at six microsatellite loci. Trees were morphologically characterized as U. minor, U. pumila or intermediate phenotypes, and morphological identification was compared with Bayesian clustering of genotypes. For paternity analysis, seeds were collected in two consecutive years from 20 and 28 mother trees. Maximum likelihood paternity assignment was used to elucidate intra- and interspecific gene flow patterns. Key Results Genetic structure analyses indicated the presence of two genetic clusters only partially matching the morphological identification. The paternity analysis results were consistent between the two consecutive years of sampling and showed high pollen immigration rates (∼0·80) and mean pollination distances (∼3 km), and a skewed distribution of reproductive success. Few intercluster pollinations and putative hybrid individuals were found. Conclusions Pollen gene flow is not impeded in the fragmented agricultural landscape investigated. High pollen immigration and extensive pollen dispersal distances are probably counteracting the potential loss of genetic variation caused by isolation. Some evidence was also found that U. minor and U. pumila can hybridize when in sympatry. Although hybridization might have beneficial effects on both species, remnant U

  9. An unsupervised two-stage clustering approach for forest structure classification based on X-band InSAR data - A case study in complex temperate forest stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Sahra; Schardt, Mathias; Pretzsch, Hans

    2017-05-01

    Forest structure at stand level plays a key role for sustainable forest management, since the biodiversity, productivity, growth and stability of the forest can be positively influenced by managing its structural diversity. In contrast to field-based measurements, remote sensing techniques offer a cost-efficient opportunity to collect area-wide information about forest stand structure with high spatial and temporal resolution. Especially Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), which facilitates worldwide acquisition of 3d information independent from weather conditions and illumination, is convenient to capture forest stand structure. This study purposes an unsupervised two-stage clustering approach for forest structure classification based on height information derived from interferometric X-band SAR data which was performed in complex temperate forest stands of Traunstein forest (South Germany). In particular, a four dimensional input data set composed of first-order height statistics was non-linearly projected on a two-dimensional Self-Organizing Map, spatially ordered according to similarity (based on the Euclidean distance) in the first stage and classified using the k-means algorithm in the second stage. The study demonstrated that X-band InSAR data exhibits considerable capabilities for forest structure classification. Moreover, the unsupervised classification approach achieved meaningful and reasonable results by means of comparison to aerial imagery and LiDAR data.

  10. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L.; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  11. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  12. Structural alterations of fully hydrated human stratum corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambopoulou, G. Ch.; Steriotis, Th. A.; Hauss, Th.; Stubos, A. K.; Kanellopoulos, N. K.

    2004-07-01

    The diffusional barrier function of skin is associated with the superficial epidermal layer, the stratum corneum, a highly complex biomembrane consisting of a staggered corneocyte arrangement in a lipid lamellar continuum. One of the key elements for stratum corneum barrier function is its hydration state. In the present work, the membrane neutron diffraction method is employed to reveal important stratum corneum structural changes that emanate upon water uptake. Increasing stratum corneum water content was observed to lead reversibly to the progressive disruption of the highly ordered lipid configuration and the distortion of the system's barrier function.

  13. Community stand structure of rehabilitated forest at Kenaboi Forest Reserve, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatma, N. A. H.; Wan Juliana, W. A.; Shaharuddin, M. I.; Wickneswari, R.

    2016-11-01

    A descriptive study of species composition, community structure and biomass was conducted in compartment 107, which is a rehabilitated area at Kenaboi Forest Reserve, Jelebu, Negeri Sembilan. The objective is to determine the forest structure and species composition in a rehabilitated area of Kenaboi FR since enrichment planting had done. A sample plot of 1 hectare was censused and a total of 395 trees with diameter ≥ 5 cm DBH were recorded. A total of 285 individual trees were identified belonging to 20 families and the commonest family was Dipterocarpaceae with 193 individuals. The highest tree density per ha was Shorea acuminata at 33% followed by S. parvifolia, 10% and S. leprosula, 6%. The biggest tree was Artocarpus elasticus Reinw. ex Blume with a diameter of 101 cm. The total basal area was 34.48 m2/ha, whereby the highest basal area was between 45 - 54.9 cm DBH class that contributed 10.21 m2/ha (30%). The total biomass estimation (above ground and below ground) was 792.57 t/ha. Dipterocarpaceae contributed the highest total biomass at 545.14 t/ha with S. acuminata contributed the highest total biomass of 330.45 t/ha. This study will contribute to the knowledge of regeneration forest especially on how the ecological process restoring the biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in rehabilitated forest by practicing the enrichment planting of native species.

  14. Capturing suboptical dynamic structures in lipid bilayer patches formed from free-standing giant unilamellar vesicles.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Tripta; Cornelius, Flemming; Ipsen, John H

    2017-08-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the small-scale lateral organization of biological membranes has a crucial role in signaling and trafficking in cells. However, it has been difficult to characterize these features with existing methods for preparing and analyzing freestanding membranes, because the dynamics occurs below the optical resolution possible with these protocols. We have developed a protocol that permits the imaging of lipid nanodomains and lateral protein organization in membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Freestanding GUVs are transferred onto a mica support, and after treatment with magnesium chloride, they collapse to form planar lipid bilayer (PLB) patches. Rapid GUV collapse onto the mica preserves the lateral organization of freestanding membranes and thus makes it possible to image 'snapshots' of GUVs up to nanometer resolution by high-resolution microscopy. The method has been applied to classical lipid raft mixtures in which suboptical domain fluctuations have been imaged in both the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered membrane phases. High-resolution scanning by atomic force microscopy (AFM) of membranes composed of binary and ternary lipid mixtures reconstituted with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) has revealed the spatial distribution and orientations of individual proteins, as well as details of membrane lateral structure. Immunolabeling followed by confocal microscopy can also provide information about the spatial distribution of proteins. The protocol opens up a new avenue for quantitative biophysical studies of suboptical dynamic structures in biomembranes, which are local and short-lived. Preparation of GUVs, PLB patches and their imaging takes <24 h.

  15. White matter structure alterations in HIV-1-infected men with sustained suppression of viraemia on treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Tanja; Caan, Matthan W A; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Schouten, Judith; Geurtsen, Gert J; Cole, James H; Sharp, David J; Vos, Frans M; Prins, Maria; Portegies, Peter; Reiss, Peter; Majoie, Charles B

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in HIV-1-infected (HIV+) patients, despite adequate suppression of viral replication by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Cerebral white matter structure alterations are often associated with cognitive impairment and have commonly been reported in the natural course of HIV infection. However, the existence of these alterations in adequately treated HIV+ patients remains unknown, as well as its possible association with cognitive impairment. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate whether white matter structure alterations exist in HIV+ patients with sustained suppressed viral replication on cART, and if such alterations are related to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. We compared 100 aviraemic HIV+ men on cART with 70 HIV-uninfected, otherwise comparable men. Clinical and neuropsychological assessments were performed. From DTI data, white matter fractional anisotropy and mean diffusion were calculated. Subsequently, tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was performed, with and without masking out white matter lesions. HIV+ patients showed diffuse white matter structure alterations as compared with HIV-uninfected controls, observed as widespread decreased fractional anisotropy and an increased mean diffusion. These white matter structure alterations were associated with the number of years spent with a CD4 cell count below 500 cells/μl, but not with HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Cerebral white matter structure alterations are found in middle-aged HIV+ men with sustained suppression of viraemia on cART, and may result from periods with immune deficiency when viral toxicity and host-inflammatory responses were at their peak. These white matter structure alterations were not associated with the observed subtle HIV-associated cognitive deficits. .

  16. Effect of environmental variables and stand structure on ecosystem respiration components in a Mediterranean beech forest.

    PubMed

    Guidolotti, Gabriele; Rey, Ana; D'Andrea, Ettore; Matteucci, Giorgio; De Angelis, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    The temporal variability of ecosystem respiration (RECO) has been reported to have important effects on the temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange, the net amount of carbon exchanged between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. However, our understanding of ecosystem respiration is rather limited compared with photosynthesis or gross primary productivity, particularly in Mediterranean montane ecosystems. In order to investigate how environmental variables and forest structure (tree classes) affect different respiration components and RECO in a Mediterranean beech forest, we measured soil, stem and leaf CO2 efflux rates with dynamic chambers and RECO by the eddy-covariance technique over 1 year (2007-2008). Ecosystem respiration showed marked seasonal variation, with the highest rates in spring and autumn and the lowest in summer. We found that the soil respiration (SR) was mainly controlled by soil water content below a threshold value of 0.2 m(3) m(-3), above which the soil temperature explained temporal variation in SR. Stem CO2 effluxes were influenced by air temperature and difference between tree classes with higher rates measured in dominant trees than in co-dominant ones. Leaf respiration (LR) varied significantly between the two canopy layers considered. Non-structural carbohydrates were a very good predictor of LR variability. We used these measurements to scale up respiration components to ecosystem respiration for the whole canopy and obtained cumulative amounts of carbon losses over the year. Based on the up-scaled chamber measurements, the relative contributions of soil, stem and leaves to the total annual CO2 efflux were: 56, 8 and 36%, respectively. These results confirm that SR is the main contributor of ecosystem respiration and provided an insight on the driving factors of respiration in Mediterranean montane beech forests.

  17. A TiO2/CNT coaxial structure and standing CNT array laminated photocatalyst to enhance the photolysis efficiency of TiO2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gou-Jen; Lee, Ming-Way; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2008-01-01

    In this study a TiO2/CNT coaxial structure and standing CNT array laminated photocatalyst to enhance the photolysis efficiency of TiO2 is presented. An electrochemical bath that used a nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide membrane as the separation grating to separate two vessels with a transmembrane concentration gradient was constructed. The catalyzed photolysis efficiency was measured in terms of the photolysis-induced ion current. The experimental results demonstrate that the photolysis efficiency of TiO2 could be increased by the high electron conductibility of the standing CNT array. The experimental results also indicate that photolysis efficiency could be enhanced by increasing the height of the standing CNT array substrate; however, it degraded as the thickness of the TiO2/CNT coaxial structure and the TiO2 shell increased.

  18. Identification of nuclear structural protein alterations associated with seminomas.

    PubMed

    Leman, Eddy S; Magheli, Ahmed; Yong, Koh Meng Aw; Netto, George; Hinz, Stefan; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2009-12-15

    Currently, there are no specific markers available for the early detection and for monitoring testicular cancer. Based upon an approach that targets nuclear structure, we have identified a set of proteins that are specific for seminomas, which may then have clinical utility for the disease. Utilizing samples obtained from men with no evidence of testicular cancer (n = 5) as well as those with seminomas (n = 6), nuclear matrix proteins were extracted and separated using a high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis gel system. The proteins were identified by mass spectrometry analysis. These analyses revealed seven nuclear matrix proteins associated with the normal testes, which did not appear in the seminomas. In the seminomas, four nuclear matrix proteins were identified to be associated with the disease that were absent in the normal testes. Mass spectrometric and immunoblot analyses of these proteins revealed that one of the proteins identified in the normal testes appears to be StAR-related lipid transfer protein 7 (StARD7). In the non-seminoma tissues, one of the identified proteins appears to be cell division protein kinase 10 (CDK10). Both StarD7 and CDK10 could potentially be involved in cell differentiation and growth, and thus may serve as potential targets for therapy of prognostication of seminomas. This is the first study to examine the role of nuclear structural proteins as potential biomarkers in testicular cancer. We are currently examining the roles of some of the identified proteins as potential biomarkers for the disease. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Ectomycorrhizal Community Structure and Soil Characteristics of Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus Contorta) and Adjacent Stands of Old Growth Mixed Conifer in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Robert B.; Parker, V. Thomas; Cullings, Kenneth W.; Sun, Sidney (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Forest development patterns following disturbance are known to influence the physical and chemical attributes of soils at different points in time. Changes in soil resources are thought to have a corresponding effect on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) community structure. We used molecular methods to compare below-ground ECM species richness, composition, and abundance between adjacent stands of homogenous lodgepole pine and old growth mixed conifer in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). In each stand-type we collected soil cores to both identify mycorrhizae and assess soil chemistry. Although no statistical difference was observed in the mean number of ECM root tips per core between stand types, the total number of species identified (85 versus 35) and the mean number of species per core (8.8 +/- 0.6 versus 2.5 +/- 0.3) were significantly higher in lodgepole pine. Differences between the actual and estimated species richness levels indicated that these forest types support a high number of ECM species and that undersampling was severe. Species compositions were widely disparate between stands where only four species were shared out of a total of 116. Soil analysis also revealed that mixed conifer was significantly lower in pH, but higher in organic matter, potassium, phosphorus, and ammonium when compared to lodgepole pine stands. Species richness per core was correlated with these chemical data, however, analysis of covariance indicated that stand type was the only statistically significant factor in the observed difference in species richness. Our data suggest that ECM fungal richness increases as homogenous lodgepole pine stands grow and mature, but declines after Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir colonize. Despite difficulties linking species composition with soil chemistry, there are a variety of physical and chemical factors that could be influencing ECM community structure. Future field experiments are necessary to test some of the mechanisms potentially operating

  20. A-3 Test Stand construction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-24

    A 35,000-gallon liquid oxygen tank is placed at the A-3 Test Stand construction site on Sept. 24, 2010. The tank will provide propellant for tests of next-generation rocket engines at the stand. It will be placed upright on top of the stand, helping to increase the overall height to 300 feet. Once completed, the A-3 Test Stand will enable operators to test rocket engines at simulated altitudes of up to 100,000 feet. The A-3 stand is the first large rocket engine test structure to be built at Stennis Space Center since the 1960s.

  1. A-3 Test Stand construction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-01

    An 80,000-gallon liquid hydrogen tank is placed at the A-3 Test Stand construction site on Sept. 24, 2010. The tank will provide propellant for tests of next-generation rocket engines at the stand. It will be placed upright on top of the stand, helping to increase the overall height to 300 feet. Once completed, the A-3 Test Stand will enable operators to test rocket engines at simulated altitudes of up to 100,000 feet. The A-3 stand is the first large rocket engine test structure to be built at Stennis Space Center since the 1960s.

  2. Response of forest soil Acari to prescribed fire following stand structure manipulation in the southern Cascade Range.Can

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Camann; Nancy E. Gillette; Karen L. Lamoncha; Sylvia R. Mori

    2008-01-01

    We studied responses of Acari, especially oribatid mites, to prescribed low-intensity fire in an east side pine site in the southern Cascade Range in California. We compared oribatid population and assemblage responses to prescribed fire in stands that had been selectively logged to enhance old growth characteristics, in logged stands to minimize old growth...

  3. Endophytic fungi alter sucking bug responses to cotton reproductive structures.

    PubMed

    Sword, Gregory A; Tessnow, Ashley; Ek-Ramos, Maria Julissa

    2017-03-22

    All plants including cotton host a wide range of microorganisms as endophytes. There is a growing appreciation of the prevalence, ecological significance and management potential of facultative fungal endophytes in protecting plants from pests, pathogens and environmental stressors. Hemipteran sucking bugs have emerged as major pests across the US cotton belt, reducing yields directly by feeding on developing reproductive structures and indirectly by vectoring plant pathogens. We used no-choice and simultaneous choice assays to examine the host selection behavior of western tarnished plant bugs (Lygus hesperus) and southern green stink bugs (Nezara viridula) in response to developing flower buds and fruits from cotton plants colonized by one of two candidate beneficial fungal endophytes, Phialemonium inflatum or Beauveria bassiana. Both insect species exhibited strong negative responses to flower buds (L. hesperus) and fruits (N. viridula) from plants that had been colonized by candidate endophytic fungi relative to control plants under both no-choice and choice conditions. Behavioral responses of both species indicated that the insects were deterred prior to contact with plant tissues from endophyte-colonized plants, suggesting a putative role for volatile compounds in mediating the negative response. Our results highlight the role of fungal endophytes as plant mutualists that can have positive effects on plant resistance to pests. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Sphingomyelin induces structural alteration in canine parvovirus capsid.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Karttunen, Jenni; Virtanen, Salla; Vuento, Matti

    2008-03-01

    One of the essential steps in canine parvovirus (CPV) infection, the release from endosomal vesicles, is dominated by interactions between the virus capsid and the endosomal membranes. In this study, the effect of sphingomyelin and phosphatidyl serine on canine parvovirus capsid and on the phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activity of CPV VP1 unique N-terminus was analyzed. Accordingly, a significant (P< or =0.05) shift of tryptophan fluorescence emission peak was detected at pH 5.5 in the presence of sphingomyelin, whereas at pH 7.4 a similar but minor shift was observed. This effect may relate to the exposure of VP1 N-terminus in acidic pH as well as to interactions between sphingomyelin and CPV. When the phenomenon was further characterized using circular dichroism spectroscopy, differences in CPV capsid CD spectra with and without sphingomyelin and phosphatidyl serine were detected, corresponding to data obtained with tryptophan fluorescence. However, when the enzymatic activity of CPV PLA(2) was tested in the presence of sphingomyelin, no significant effect in the function of the enzyme was detected. Thus, the structural changes observed with spectroscopic techniques appear not to manipulate the activity of CPV PLA(2), and may therefore implicate alternative interactions between CPV capsid and sphingomyelin.

  5. The Standing Pool of Genomic Structural Variation in a Natural Population of Mimulus guttatus

    PubMed Central

    Flagel, Lex E.; Willis, John H.; Vision, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Major unresolved questions in evolutionary genetics include determining the contributions of different mutational sources to the total pool of genetic variation in a species, and understanding how these different forms of genetic variation interact with natural selection. Recent work has shown that structural variants (SVs) (insertions, deletions, inversions, and transpositions) are a major source of genetic variation, often outnumbering single nucleotide variants in terms of total bases affected. Despite the near ubiquity of SVs, major questions about their interaction with natural selection remain. For example, how does the allele frequency spectrum of SVs differ when compared with single nucleotide variants? How often do SVs affect genes, and what are the consequences? To begin to address these questions, we have systematically identified and characterized a large set of submicroscopic insertion and deletion (indel) variants (between 1 and 200 kb in length) among ten inbred lines from a single natural population of the plant species Mimulus guttatus. After extensive computational filtering, we focused on a set of 4,142 high-confidence indels that showed an experimental validation rate of 73%. All but one of these indels were less than 200 kb. Although the largest were generally at lower frequencies in the population, a surprising number of large indels are at intermediate frequencies. Although indels overlapping with genes were much rarer than expected by chance, approximately 600 genes were affected by an indel. Nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS–LRR) defense response genes were the most enriched among the gene families affected. Most indels associated with genes were rare and appeared to be under purifying selection, though we do find four high-frequency derived insertion alleles that show signatures of recent positive selection. PMID:24336482

  6. The standing pool of genomic structural variation in a natural population of Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed

    Flagel, Lex E; Willis, John H; Vision, Todd J

    2014-01-01

    Major unresolved questions in evolutionary genetics include determining the contributions of different mutational sources to the total pool of genetic variation in a species, and understanding how these different forms of genetic variation interact with natural selection. Recent work has shown that structural variants (SVs) (insertions, deletions, inversions, and transpositions) are a major source of genetic variation, often outnumbering single nucleotide variants in terms of total bases affected. Despite the near ubiquity of SVs, major questions about their interaction with natural selection remain. For example, how does the allele frequency spectrum of SVs differ when compared with single nucleotide variants? How often do SVs affect genes, and what are the consequences? To begin to address these questions, we have systematically identified and characterized a large set of submicroscopic insertion and deletion (indel) variants (between 1 and 200 kb in length) among ten inbred lines from a single natural population of the plant species Mimulus guttatus. After extensive computational filtering, we focused on a set of 4,142 high-confidence indels that showed an experimental validation rate of 73%. All but one of these indels were less than 200 kb. Although the largest were generally at lower frequencies in the population, a surprising number of large indels are at intermediate frequencies. Although indels overlapping with genes were much rarer than expected by chance, approximately 600 genes were affected by an indel. Nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) defense response genes were the most enriched among the gene families affected. Most indels associated with genes were rare and appeared to be under purifying selection, though we do find four high-frequency derived insertion alleles that show signatures of recent positive selection.

  7. 18 CFR 1304.209 - Land-based structures/alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Land-based structures... TVA-Owned Residential Access Shoreland § 1304.209 Land-based structures/alterations. (a) Except for... grading shall be allowed on TVA land. (b) Portable items such as picnic tables and hammocks may be...

  8. 18 CFR 1304.209 - Land-based structures/alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Land-based structures... TVA-Owned Residential Access Shoreland § 1304.209 Land-based structures/alterations. (a) Except for... grading shall be allowed on TVA land. (b) Portable items such as picnic tables and hammocks may be...

  9. Age, composition, and stand structure of old-growth oak sites in the Florida high pine landscape: implications for ecosystem management and restoration

    Treesearch

    Cathryn H. Greenberg; Robert W. Simons

    1999-01-01

    The authors sampled tree age, species composition, and stand structure of four high pine sites composed of old-growth sand post oak (Q. margaretta Ashe), old-growth turkey oak (Quercus laevis Walt.), and young longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) in north and central peninsular Florida. The oldest turkey oak...

  10. Effects of dwarf mistletoe on stand structure of lodgepole pine forests 21-28 years post-mountain pine beetle epidemic in central Oregon

    Treesearch

    Michelle C. Agne; David C. Shaw; Travis J. Woolley; Mónica E. Queijeiro-Bolaños; Mai-He. Li

    2014-01-01

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests are widely distributed throughout North America and are subject to mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemics, which have caused mortality over millions of hectares of mature trees in recent decades. Mountain pine beetle is known to influence stand structure, and has the ability to impact many forest processes....

  11. The Use of Silviculture and Prescribed Fire to Manage Stand Structure and Fuel Profiles in a Multi-aged Lodgepole Pine Forest

    Treesearch

    Colin C. Hardy; Helen Y. Smith; Ward McCaughey

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents several components of a multi-disciplinary project designed to evaluate the ecological and biological effects of two innovative silvicultural treatments coupled with prescribed fire in an attempt to both manage fuel profiles and create two-aged stand structures in lodgepole pine. Two shelterwood silvicultural treatments were designed to replicate as...

  12. Investigating the effect of different asphaltene structures on surface topography and wettability alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, J. Sayyad; E. Nikooee; Ghatee, M. H.; Ayatollahi, Sh.; Alamdari, A.; Sedghamiz, T.

    2011-08-01

    This paper aims at investigation of the effect of asphaltene structure on wettability and topography alteration of a glass surface as a result of asphaltene precipitation. In order to provide a better insight into the topography alteration, a bi-fractal approach was employed. Such an approach is capable of discriminating topography alteration in two different surface types, namely, macro-asperities and micro-asperities. The observed variation of the fractal dimension in the two surface types could be considered as the consequence of different asphaltene sources. Therefore, the structure of different asphaltene sources was carefully examined. The effect of asphaltene structure is more pronounced for asphaltene precipitation at higher pressure. It was revealed that asphaltene particles of high complexity and with larger poly-aromatic rings tend to be detached easier at higher pressure than those with smaller poly-aromatic rings. Another evidence to emphasize the significance of asphaltene structure was given through wettability alteration. It was found that asphaltene particles with larger poly-aromatic rings turn the surface less oil wet at higher pressure. It seems that the difference in wetting condition and surface topography alteration of different asphaltene sources roots in their different structures.

  13. Electronic structures of [1 1 1]-oriented free-standing InAs and InP nanowires.

    PubMed

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H Q

    2016-04-06

    We report on a theoretical study of the electronic structures of the [1 1 1]-oriented, free-standing, zincblende InAs and InP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections by means of an atomistic sp(3)s*, spin-orbit interaction included, nearest-neighbor, tight-binding method. The band structures and the band state wave functions of these nanowires are calculated and the symmetry properties of the bands and band states are analyzed based on the C(3v) double point group. It is shown that all bands of these nanowires are doubly degenerate at the Γ-point and some of these bands will split into non-degenerate bands when the wave vector k moves away from the Γ-point as a manifestation of spin-splitting due to spin-orbit interaction. It is also shown that the lower conduction bands of these nanowires all show simple parabolic dispersion relations, while the top valence bands show complex dispersion relations and band crossings. The band state wave functions are presented by the spatial probability distributions and it is found that all the band states show 2π/3-rotation symmetric probability distributions. The effects of quantum confinement on the band structures of the [1 1 1]-oriented InAs and InP nanowires are also examined and an empirical formula for the description of quantization energies of the lowest conduction band and the highest valence band is presented. The formula can simply be used to estimate the enhancement of the band gaps of the nanowires at different sizes as a result of quantum confinement.

  14. Sensitivity of ERS-1 and JERS-1 radar data to biomass and stand structure in Alaskan boreal forest

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, P.A.; Christensen, N.L. Jr.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L.L.; Kasischke, E.S.; French, N.H.F.

    1995-12-01

    As the boreal system is such an important component of the global carbon budget, it is important that the system and the potential changes be understood, whether from anthropogenic disturbances or global climate change. Thirty-two boreal forest sites were identified and sampled in the central region of Alaska to evaluate the sensitivity of the C-band ERS-1 and the L-band JERS-1 radar platforms to site biophysical properties. The sites selected represent black spruce (Picea mariana) and white spruce (Picea glauca) stands in a post-fire chronosequence. Black spruce biomass ranged from less than 1 kg/m{sup 2} to 5.6 kg/m{sup 2} and white spruce from 8.8 to 21.5 kg/m{sup 2}. Results indicate both ERS-1 and JERS-1 backscatter is responsive to biomass, density, and height, though other factors, principally surface moisture conditions, are often a stronger influence. Sensitivity to forest biomass and structure appears greatest when surface moisture conditions are minimized as a factor. Biomass correlations with the radar backscatter were strongest in the late winter imagery when all sites had a snow cover, and late summer when the surface is most dry. ERS-1 data may be more sensitive to surface moisture conditions than the JERS-1 data due to the shorter wavelength of the C-band sensor, though this is inconclusive because of limited JERS-1 L-band data for comparison.

  15. A structural study of the interaction of methanethiol with Pt (1 1 1) using X-ray standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. J.; Fisher, C. J.; Bittencourt, C.; Woodruff, D. P.; Chan, A. S. Y.; Jones, R. G.

    2002-09-01

    In combination with surface characterisation by synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the normal incidence X-ray standing wave (NIXSW) technique has been applied to a determination of the structure of surface phases formed on Pt(1 1 1) by reaction with methanethiol. On surfaces heated to ⩾ ≈500 K, producing only coadsorbed atomic S and C, the S atoms are found to occupy fcc hollow sites (directly above Pt atoms in the third layer) in a geometry essentially identical to that of simple ordered S overlayer phases on Pt(1 1 1) with a S-Pt layer spacing of 1.67 Å, but with possible fractional co-occupation of a complex S phase. On a surface annealed to ≈223 K only a surface methanethiolate (CH 3S-) species is believed to be present, the favoured model involves a tilted off-atop bonding such that the S atoms are located offset from the fcc hollow sites, with frustrated rotational vibrations of large amplitude, although an alternative model based on co-occupation of atop and fcc hollow sites is also consistent with the NIXSW data.

  16. Ectomycorrhizal diversity and community structure in stands of Quercus oleoides in the seasonally dry tropical forests of Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Nikhilesh S.; Wilson, Andrew W.; Powers, Jennifer S.; Mueller, Gregory M.; Egerton-Warburton, Louise M.

    2016-12-01

    Most conservation efforts in seasonally dry tropical forests have overlooked less obvious targets for conservation, such as mycorrhizal fungi, that are critical to plant growth and ecosystem structure. We documented the diversity of ectomycorrhizal (EMF) and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMF) fungal communities in Quercus oleoides (Fagaceae) in Guanacaste province, Costa Rica. Soil cores and sporocarps were collected from regenerating Q. oleoides plots differing in stand age (early vs late regeneration) during the wet season. Sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal ITS region in EMF root tips and sporocarps identified 37 taxa in the Basidiomycota; EMF Ascomycota were uncommon. The EMF community was dominated by one species (Thelephora sp. 1; 70% of soil cores), more than half of all EMF species were found only once in an individual soil core, and there were few conspecific taxa. Most EMF taxa were also restricted to either Early or Late plots. Levels of EMF species richness and diversity, and AMF root colonization were similar between plots. Our results highlight the need for comprehensive spatiotemporal samplings of EMF communities in Q. oleoides to identify and prioritize rare EMF for conservation, and document their genetic and functional diversity.

  17. Mordenite and montmorillonite alteration of glass structures in a rhyolite pipe, northern Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, J.G. )

    1991-10-01

    Green structures, 0.5 to 1.5 in. across, occur in a Tertiary rhyolite pipe in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota. The structures are of two types: angular to ellipsoidal masses and stretched or smeared structures. Thin section analysis revealed that those of the first type are massive, with no internal structure, and those of the second type are cellular and have classic flame structure characteristics. XRD indicated the composition to be a mixture of secondary mordenite (a zeolite) and montmorillonite. The first type is interpreted to be deuterically altered vitrophyre clasts and the second type to be altered vesicular structures produced by degassing of the magma in the pipe. Chemical analysis of the alteration material indicates a loss of alkalies and silica, with an increase in water, CaO, MgO and ferric iron when compared to the composition of fresh vitrophyre from the same pipe. The changes are in agreement with experimental work on the alteration of rhyolitic glass by a number of researchers. This is the first occurrence of mordenite reported for the Black Hills.

  18. DNA damage response induces structural alterations in histone H3–H4

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yudai; Fujii, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Matsuo, Koichi; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Yokoya, Akinari

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation circular-dichroism spectroscopy was used to reveal that the DNA damage response induces a decrement of α-helix and an increment of β-strand contents of histone H3–H4 extracted from X-ray–irradiated human HeLa cells. The trend of the structural alteration was qualitatively opposite to that of our previously reported results for histone H2A–H2B. These results strongly suggest that histones share roles in DNA damage responses, particularly in DNA repair processes and chromatin remodeling, via a specific structural alteration of each histone. PMID:27672100

  19. In utero and postnatal exposure to arsenic alters pulmonary structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, R. Clark Chau, Binh; Sarihan, Priyanka; Witten, Mark L.; Pivniouk, Vadim I.; Chen, Guan Jie

    2009-02-15

    In addition to cancer endpoints, arsenic exposures can also lead to non-cancerous chronic lung disease. Exposures during sensitive developmental time points can contribute to the adult disease. Using a mouse model, in utero and early postnatal exposures to arsenic (100 ppb or less in drinking water) were found to alter airway reactivity to methacholine challenge in 28 day old pups. Removal of mice from arsenic exposure 28 days after birth did not reverse the alterations in sensitivity to methacholine. In addition, adult mice exposed to similar levels of arsenic in drinking water did not show alterations. Therefore, alterations in airway reactivity were irreversible and specific to exposures during lung development. These functional changes correlated with protein and gene expression changes as well as morphological structural changes around the airways. Arsenic increased the whole lung levels of smooth muscle actin in a dose dependent manner. The level of smooth muscle mass around airways was increased with arsenic exposure, especially around airways smaller than 100 {mu}m in diameter. This increase in smooth muscle was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin) expression. This model system demonstrates that in utero and postnatal exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can irreversibly alter pulmonary structure and function in the adults.

  20. In Utero and Postnatal Exposure to Arsenic Alters Pulmonary Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, R. Clark; Chau, Binh; Sarihan, Priyanka; Witten, Mark L.; Pivniouk, Vadim I.; Chen, Guan Jie

    2009-01-01

    In addition to cancer endpoints, arsenic exposures can also lead to non-cancerous chronic lung disease. Exposures during sensitive developmental time points can contribute to the adult disease. Using a mouse model, in utero and early postnatal exposures to arsenic (100 ppb or less in drinking water) were found to alter airway reactivity to methacholine challenge in 28 day old pups. Removal of mice from arsenic exposure 28 days after birth did not reverse the alterations in sensitivity to methacholine. In addition, adult mice exposed to similar levels of arsenic in drinking water did not show alterations. Therefore, alterations in airway reactivity were irreversible and specific to exposures during lung development. These functional changes correlated with protein and gene expression changes as well as morphological structural changes around the airways. Arsenic increased the whole lung levels of smooth muscle actin in a dose dependent manner. The level of smooth muscle mass around airways was increased with arsenic exposure, especially around airways smaller than 100 μm in diameter. This increase in smooth muscle was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin) expression. This model system demonstrates that in utero and postnatal exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can irreversibly alter pulmonary structure and function in the adults. PMID:19095001

  1. [Influence of mulching management on the relationships between foliar non-structural carbohydrates and N, P concentrations in Phyllostachys violascens stand].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zi-wu; Hu, Jun-jing; Yang, Qing-ping; Li, Ying-chun; Chen, Shuang-lin; Chen, Wei-jun

    2015-04-01

    To understand the physiological adaptive mechanism of Phyllostachys violascens to intensive mulching management, the effect of mulching management (CK, 1, 3 and 6 years) on the concentrations and ratios of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in bamboo foliage, and their stoichiometry was investigated. The results showed the concentrations of NSC and soluble sugar increased, while the starch content and N/P decreased markedly in bamboo stand with 1-year mulching, compared to CK stand, which suggested the N limitation to bamboo growth was strengthened. Foliar soluble sugar content decreased significantly, while the starch content increased dramatically, and the NSC content by per unit mass of N and P reached the maximum in the bamboo stand with 3-year mulching, compared to all other treatments. Foliar NSC and soluble sugar contents decreased significantly, while foliar starch content and N/P increased dramatically in the stand with 6-year mulching, which suggested the P limitation to bamboo growth was strengthened. Foliar NSC content was positively correlated with N and P concentrations in a short-term mulching management stand (≤ 3 years), while showed negative relationship with N/P. The foliar starch content in the stand with 6-year mulching was negatively correlated with N and P contents, while was positively correlated with N/P. The results indicated that short-term mulching management accelerated the accumulation of soluble sugar and decomposition of starch in foliage, thus the growth and activity of Ph. violascens was enhanced greatly. Long-term mulching management promoted the starch accumulation, which led to the transition from N limitation to P limitation for bamboo growth. In summary, long-term (6 years) mulching management caused the decrease of growth and activity of Ph. violascens dramatically, thus enhancing the bamboo stand degradation. The utilization efficiency of N and P reached the highest in the stand with 3-year

  2. Regression of small resistance artery structural alterations in hypertension by appropriate antihypertensive treatment.

    PubMed

    Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2010-04-01

    Regardless of the mechanisms that initiate the rise of blood pressure, the development of structural changes in the systemic vasculature is the end result of established hypertension. Indices of small resistance artery structure, such as the ratio of tunica media to internal lumen, may have a strong prognostic significance in hypertensive patients, over and above all other known cardiovascular risk factors. Hence, the regression of vascular alterations seems to be an appealing goal for antihypertensive treatment. Different antihypertensive drugs may have different effects on vascular structure. Complete normalization of small resistance artery structure was demonstrated in hypertensive patients after long-term and effective antihypertensive therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and calcium antagonists. Little or no improvement was observed with beta-blockers or diuretics. Evidence from several studies suggests that some antihypertensive drugs are more effective than others in reversing microvascular structural alterations in hypertension.

  3. Finite-Element Extrapolation of Myocardial Structure Alterations Across the Cardiac Cycle in Rats

    PubMed Central

    David Gomez, Arnold; Bull, David A.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial microstructures are responsible for key aspects of cardiac mechanical function. Natural myocardial deformation across the cardiac cycle induces measurable structural alteration, which varies across disease states. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) has become the tool of choice for myocardial structural analysis. Yet, obtaining the comprehensive structural information of the whole organ, in 3D and time, for subject-specific examination is fundamentally limited by scan time. Therefore, subject-specific finite-element (FE) analysis of a group of rat hearts was implemented for extrapolating a set of initial DT-MRI to the rest of the cardiac cycle. The effect of material symmetry (isotropy, transverse isotropy, and orthotropy), structural input, and warping approach was observed by comparing simulated predictions against in vivo MRI displacement measurements and DT-MRI of an isolated heart preparation at relaxed, inflated, and contracture states. Overall, the results indicate that, while ventricular volume and circumferential strain are largely independent of the simulation strategy, structural alteration predictions are generally improved with the sophistication of the material model, which also enhances torsion and radial strain predictions. Moreover, whereas subject-specific transversely isotropic models produced the most accurate descriptions of fiber structural alterations, the orthotropic models best captured changes in sheet structure. These findings underscore the need for subject-specific input data, including structure, to extrapolate DT-MRI measurements across the cardiac cycle. PMID:26299478

  4. Altered sphingoid base profiles predict compromised membrane structure and permeability in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Loiseau, Nicolas; Obata, Yasuko; Moradian, Sam; Sano, Hiromu; Yoshino, Saeko; Aburai, Kenichi; Takayama, Kozo; Sakamoto, Kazutami; Holleran, Walter M.; Elias, Peter M.; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Background Ceramide hydrolysis by ceramidase in the stratum corneum (SC) yields both sphingoid bases and free fatty acids (FFA). While FFA are key constituents of the lamellar bilayers that mediate the epidermal permeability barrier, whether sphingoid bases influence permeability barrier homeostasis remains unknown. Pertinently, alterations of lipid profile, including ceramide and ceramidase activities occur in atopic dermatitis (AD). Object We investigated alterations in sphingoid base levels and/or profiles (sphingosine to sphinganine ratio) in the SC of normal vs. AD mice, a model that faithfully replicates human AD, and then whether altered sphingoid base levels and/or profiles influence(s) membrane stability and/or structures. Methods Unilamellar vesicles (LV), incorporating the three major SC lipids (ceramides/FFA/cholesterol) and different ratios of sphingosine/sphinganine, encapsulating carboxyfluorescein, were used as the model of SC lipids. Membrane stability was measured as release of carboxyfluorescein. Thermal analysis of LV was conducted by Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results LV containing AD levels of sphingosine/sphinganine (AD-LV) displayed altered membrane permeability vs. normal-LV. DSC analyses revealed decreases in orthorhombic structures that form tightly-packed lamellar structures in AD-LV. Conclusion Sphingoid base composition influences lamellar membrane architecture in SC, suggesting that altered sphingoid base profiles could contribute to the barrier abnormality in AD. PMID:24070864

  5. Ultra-structural hair alterations of drug abusers: a scanning electron microscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Turkmenoglu, Fatma Pinar; Kasirga, Ugur Baran; Celik, Hakan Hamdi

    2015-01-01

    As drug abuse carries a societal stigma, patients do not often report their history of drug abuse to the healthcare providers. However, drug abuse is highly co-morbid with a host of other health problems such as psychiatric disorders and skin diseases, and majority of individuals with drug use disorders seek treatment in the first place for other problems. Therefore, it is very important for physicians to be aware of clinical signs and symptoms of drug use. Recently diagnostic value of dermatologic tissue alterations associated with drug abuse has become a very particular interest because skin changes were reported to be the earliest noticeable consequence of drug abuse prompting earlier intervention and treatment. Although hair is an annex of skin, alterations on hair structure due to drug use have not been demonstrated. This study represents the first report on ultra-structural hair alterations of drug abusers. We have investigated ultra-structure of the hair samples obtained from 6 cocaine, 6 heroin, 7 cannabis and 4 lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) abusers by scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM analysis of hair samples gave us drug-specific discriminating alterations. We suggest that results of this study will make a noteworthy contribution to cutaneous alterations associated with drug abuse which are regarded as the earliest clinical manifestations, and this SEM approach is a very specific and effective tool in the detection of abuse of respective drugs, leading early treatment. PMID:26309532

  6. Dissociation and Alterations in Brain Function and Structure: Implications for Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Krause-Utz, Annegret; Frost, Rachel; Winter, Dorina; Elzinga, Bernet M

    2017-01-01

    Dissociation involves disruptions of usually integrated functions of consciousness, perception, memory, identity, and affect (e.g., depersonalization, derealization, numbing, amnesia, and analgesia). While the precise neurobiological underpinnings of dissociation remain elusive, neuroimaging studies in disorders, characterized by high dissociation (e.g., depersonalization/derealization disorder (DDD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (D-PTSD)), have provided valuable insight into brain alterations possibly underlying dissociation. Neuroimaging studies in borderline personality disorder (BPD), investigating links between altered brain function/structure and dissociation, are still relatively rare. In this article, we provide an overview of neurobiological models of dissociation, primarily based on research in DDD, DID, and D-PTSD. Based on this background, we review recent neuroimaging studies on associations between dissociation and altered brain function and structure in BPD. These studies are discussed in the context of earlier findings regarding methodological differences and limitations and concerning possible implications for future research and the clinical setting.

  7. Tuneable micro- and nano-periodic structures in a free-standing flexible urethane/urea elastomer film.

    PubMed

    Godinho, M H; Trindade, A C; Figueirinhas, J L; Melo, L V; Brogueira, P; Deus, A M; Teixeira, P I C

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the control and manipulation of tuneable equilibrium structures in a free-standing urethane/urea elastomer film by means of atomic force microscopy, small-angle light scattering and polarising optical microscopy. The urethane/urea elastomer was prepared by reacting a poly(propyleneoxide)-based triisocyanate-terminated prepolymer (PU) with poly(butadienediol) (PBDO), with a weight ratio of 60% PU/40% PBDO. An elastomer film was shear-cast onto a glass plate and allowed to cure, first in an oven, then in air. Latent micro- and nano-periodic patterns are induced by ultra-violet (UV) irradiation of the film and can be "developed" by applying a plane uniaxial stress or by immersing the elastomer in an appropriate solvent and then drying it. For this elastomer we describe six pattern states, how they are related and how they can be manipulated. The morphological features of the UV-exposed film surface can be tuned, reproducibly and reversibly, by switching the direction of the applied mechanical field. Elastomers extracted in toluene exhibit different surface patterns depending upon the state in which they were developed. Stress-strain data collected for the films before and after UV irradiation reveal anisotropy induced by the shear-casting conditions and enhanced by the mechanical field. We have interpreted our results by assuming the film to consist of a thin, stiff surface layer ("skin") lying atop a thicker, softer substrate ("bulk"). The skin's higher stiffness is hypothesised to be due to the more extensive cross-linking of chains located near the surface by the UV radiation. Patterns would thus arise as a competition between the effects of bending the skin and stretching/compressing the bulk, as in the work of Cerda and Mahadevan (Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 074302 (2003)). We present some preliminary results of a simulation of this model using the Finite Element package ABAQUS.

  8. Tuneable micro- and nano-periodic structures in a free-standing flexible urethane/urea elastomer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, M. H.; Trindade, A. C.; Figueirinhas, J. L.; Melo, L. V.; Brogueira, P.; Deus, A. M.; Teixeira, P. I. C.

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the control and manipulation of tuneable equilibrium structures in a free-standing urethane/urea elastomer film by means of atomic force microscopy, small-angle light scattering and polarising optical microscopy. The urethane/urea elastomer was prepared by reacting a poly(propyleneoxide)-based triisocyanate-terminated prepolymer (PU) with poly(butadienediol) (PBDO), with a weight ratio of 60% PU/40% PBDO. An elastomer film was shear-cast onto a glass plate and allowed to cure, first in an oven, then in air. Latent micro- and nano-periodic patterns are induced by ultra-violet (UV) irradiation of the film and can be “developed” by applying a plane uniaxial stress or by immersing the elastomer in an appropriate solvent and then drying it. For this elastomer we describe six pattern states, how they are related and how they can be manipulated. The morphological features of the UV-exposed film surface can be tuned, reproducibly and reversibly, by switching the direction of the applied mechanical field. Elastomers extracted in toluene exhibit different surface patterns depending upon the state in which they were developed. Stress-strain data collected for the films before and after UV irradiation reveal anisotropy induced by the shear-casting conditions and enhanced by the mechanical field. We have interpreted our results by assuming the film to consist of a thin, stiff surface layer (“skin”) lying atop a thicker, softer substrate (“bulk”). The skin's higher stiffness is hypothesised to be due to the more extensive cross-linking of chains located near the surface by the UV radiation. Patterns would thus arise as a competition between the effects of bending the skin and stretching/compressing the bulk, as in the work of Cerda and Mahadevan (Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 074302 (2003)). We present some preliminary results of a simulation of this model using the Finite Element package ABAQUS.

  9. Discovery of structural alterations in solid tumor oligodendroglioma by single molecule analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Solid tumors present a panoply of genomic alterations, from single base changes to the gain or loss of entire chromosomes. Although aberrations at the two extremes of this spectrum are readily defined, comprehensive discernment of the complex and disperse mutational spectrum of cancer genomes remains a significant challenge for current genome analysis platforms. In this context, high throughput, single molecule platforms like Optical Mapping offer a unique perspective. Results Using measurements from large ensembles of individual DNA molecules, we have discovered genomic structural alterations in the solid tumor oligodendroglioma. Over a thousand structural variants were identified in each tumor sample, without any prior hypotheses, and often in genomic regions deemed intractable by other technologies. These findings were then validated by comprehensive comparisons to variants reported in external and internal databases, and by selected experimental corroborations. Alterations range in size from under 5 kb to hundreds of kilobases, and comprise insertions, deletions, inversions and compound events. Candidate mutations were scored at sub-genic resolution and unambiguously reveal structural details at aberrant loci. Conclusions The Optical Mapping system provides a rich description of the complex genomes of solid tumors, including sequence level aberrations, structural alterations and copy number variants that power generation of functional hypotheses for oligodendroglioma genetics. PMID:23885787

  10. 18 CFR 1304.211 - Change in ownership of grandfathered structures or alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Change in ownership of grandfathered structures or alterations. 1304.211 Section 1304.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF...

  11. 18 CFR 1304.211 - Change in ownership of grandfathered structures or alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Change in ownership of grandfathered structures or alterations. 1304.211 Section 1304.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF...

  12. 18 CFR 1304.211 - Change in ownership of grandfathered structures or alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Change in ownership of grandfathered structures or alterations. 1304.211 Section 1304.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF...

  13. Connections of neurons in the lumbar ventral horn of spinal cord are altered after long-standing limb loss in a macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hui-Xin; Stewart Phillips, W; Kaas, Jon H

    2004-01-01

    Explanations for the massive reorganization in primary motor cortex, M1, after limb amputation typically focus on processes that occur in cortex. Few have investigated whether changes in more peripheral parts of the pathway might also play a role in the reorganization. In the present study, we examined the integrity and connectivity of the spinal cord motoneurons in a macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta) that lost a hindlimb as a result of accidental injury more than 3.5 years earlier. To label motoneurons, multiple small injections of a neuroanatomical tracer were placed in the muscles of the hip just adjacent to the stump of the amputated leg, and in matched locations in the opposite side for control purposes. Injections of a second tracer were made in the intact foot. In the ventral horn that related to the intact hindlimb, motoneurons labeled by the hip injections were concentrated rostral and ventromedial to those labeled by the foot injections. Hip injections on the side of the amputation labeled neurons that were located well beyond the normal territory for motoneurons related to the hip and into the zone normally occupied by neurons projecting to the foot. Labeled motoneurons innervating the intact limb were significantly larger than neurons on the side of the amputation (x = 2410 and 2061 microm(2), respectively). The findings suggest that many neurons survived the long-standing amputation, and made new connections with remaining intact muscles. These new patterns of connectivity likely contribute to the reorganization of motor cortex in amputees, and perhaps to abnormal behaviors like those reported by human amputees.

  14. Experimental alteration of artificial and natural impact melt rock from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Declercq, J.; Dypvik, H.; Aagaard, P.; Jahren, J.; Ferrell, R.E.; Horton, J. Wright

    2009-01-01

    The alteration or transformation of impact melt rock to clay minerals, particularly smectite, has been recognized in several impact structures (e.g., Ries, Chicxulub, Mj??lnir). We studied the experimental alteration of two natural impact melt rocks from suevite clasts that were recovered from drill cores into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure and two synthetic glasses. These experiments were conducted at hydrothermal temperature (265 ??C) in order to reproduce conditions found in meltbearing deposits in the first thousand years after deposition. The experimental results were compared to geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) of the same alteration and to original mineral assemblages in the natural melt rock samples. In the alteration experiments, clay minerals formed on the surfaces of the melt particles and as fine-grained suspended material. Authigenic expanding clay minerals (saponite and Ca-smectite) and vermiculite/chlorite (clinochlore) were identified in addition to analcime. Ferripyrophyllite was formed in three of four experiments. Comparable minerals were predicted in the PHREEQC modeling. A comparison between the phases formed in our experiments and those in the cores suggests that the natural alteration occurred under hydrothermal conditions similar to those reproduced in the experiment. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Assessment of gray and white matter structural alterations in migraineurs without aura.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilei; Wu, Yi-Lan; Su, Jingjing; Yao, Qian; Wang, Mengxing; Li, Ge-Fei; Zhao, Rong; Shi, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Qiting; Lu, Haifeng; Xu, Shuai; Qin, Zhaoxia; Cui, Guo-Hong; Li, Jianqi; Liu, Jian-Ren; Du, Xiaoxia

    2017-12-01

    Migraine constitute a disorder characterized by recurrent headaches, and have a high prevalence, a high socio-economic burden and severe effects on quality of life. Our previous fMRI study demonstrated that some brain regions are functional alterations in migraineurs. As the function of the human brain is related to its structure, we further investigated white and gray matter structural alterations in migraineurs. In current study, we used surface-based morphometry, voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging analyses to detect structural alterations of the white matter and gray matter in 32 migraineurs without aura compared with 32 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We found that migraineurs without aura exhibited significantly increased gray matter volume in the bilateral cerebellar culmen, increased cortical thickness in the lateral occipital-temporal cortex, decreased cortical thickness in the right insula, increased gyrification index in left postcentral gyrus, superior parietal lobule and right lateral occipital cortex, and decreased gyrification index in the left rostral middle frontal gyrus compared with controls. No significant change in white matter microstructure was found in DTI analyses. The significantly altered gray matter brain regions were known to be associated with sensory discrimination of pain, multi-sensory integration and nociceptive information processing and were consistent with our previous fMRI study, and may be involved in the pathological mechanism of migraine without aura.

  16. In Situ Structural Studies of the Underpotential Deposition of Copper onto an Iodine Covered Platinum Surface Using X-Ray Standing Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    ABSTRAc C We present initial results of an in situ structural investigation of the underpotential deposition of copper on an iodine covered platinum...compare the result of surface coverage isotherms derived from both electrochemical and x-ray measurements. 1. INTRODUCIION The underpotential deposition ...the underpotential deposition of copper on an iodine covered platinum/carbon layered synthetic microstructure. 2 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND X-ray standing

  17. Exploring Patterns of Alteration in Alzheimer's Disease Brain Networks: A Combined Structural and Functional Connectomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Palesi, Fulvia; Castellazzi, Gloria; Casiraghi, Letizia; Sinforiani, Elena; Vitali, Paolo; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a severe derangement of cognitive functions, primarily memory, in elderly subjects. As far as the functional impairment is concerned, growing evidence supports the “disconnection syndrome” hypothesis. Recent investigations using fMRI have revealed a generalized alteration of resting state networks (RSNs) in patients affected by AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, it was unclear whether the changes in functional connectivity were accompanied by corresponding structural network changes. In this work, we have developed a novel structural/functional connectomic approach: resting state fMRI was used to identify the functional cortical network nodes and diffusion MRI to reconstruct the fiber tracts to give a weight to internodal subcortical connections. Then, local and global efficiency were determined for different networks, exploring specific alterations of integration and segregation patterns in AD and MCI patients compared to healthy controls (HC). In the default mode network (DMN), that was the most affected, axonal loss, and reduced axonal integrity appeared to compromise both local and global efficiency along posterior-anterior connections. In the basal ganglia network (BGN), disruption of white matter integrity implied that main alterations occurred in local microstructure. In the anterior insular network (AIN), neuronal loss probably subtended a compromised communication with the insular cortex. Cognitive performance, evaluated by neuropsychological examinations, revealed a dependency on integration and segregation of brain networks. These findings are indicative of the fact that cognitive deficits in AD could be associated not only with cortical alterations (revealed by fMRI) but also with subcortical alterations (revealed by diffusion MRI) that extend beyond the areas primarily damaged by neurodegeneration, toward the support of an emerging concept of AD as a

  18. Ultra-structural hair alterations in Friedreich's ataxia: A scanning electron microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Turkmenoglu, F Pinar; Kasirga, U Baran; Celik, H Hamdi

    2015-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder involving progressive damage to the central and peripheral nervous systems and cardiomyopathy. FRDA is caused by the silencing of the FXN gene and reduced levels of the encoded protein, frataxin. Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that functions primarily in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis. Skin disorders including hair abnormalities have previously been reported in patients with mitochondrial disorders. However, to our knowledge, ultra-structural hair alterations in FRDA were not demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to determine ultra-structural alterations in the hairs of FRDA patients as well as carriers. Hair specimen from four patients, who are in different stages of the disease, and two carriers were examined by scanning electron microscope. Thin and weak hair follicles with absence of homogeneities on the cuticular surface, local damages of the cuticular layer, cuticular fractures were detected in both carriers and patients, but these alterations were much more prominent in the hair follicles of patients. In addition, erosions on the surface of the cuticle and local deep cavities just under the cuticular level were observed only in patients. Indistinct cuticular pattern, pores on the cuticular surface, and presence of concavities on the hair follicle were also detected in patients in later stages of the disease. According to our results, progression of the disease increased the alterations on hair structure. We suggest that ultra-structural alterations observed in hair samples might be due to oxidative stress caused by deficient frataxin expression in mitochondria. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Estimating growth and yield of mixed stands

    Treesearch

    Stephen R. Shifley; Burnell C. Fischer

    1989-01-01

    A mixed stand is defined as one in which no single species comprises more than 80 percent of the stocking. The growth estimation methods described below can be used not only in mixed stands but in almost any stand, regardless of species composition, age structure, or size structure. The methods described are necessary to accommodate the complex species mixtures and...

  20. Temporal and structural effects of stands on litter production in Melaleuca quinquenervia dominated wetlands of South Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Melaleuca quinquenervia (melaleuca) dominates large areas of the Florida Everglades in the southeastern USA where it has transformed sedge-dominated marshes into melaleuca forests. Despite its prevalence, very little is known about the ecology and stand dynamics of this invasive tree. We delineated...

  1. Species composition and stand structure of a large red spruce planting 67 years after its establishment in western North Carolina

    Treesearch

    W. Henry McNab; James H. Holbrook; Ted M. Oprean

    2010-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Michx.) is a large and long-lived species that dominated high-elevation forests of the southern Appalachians before most stands were heavily logged in the early 1900s. Restoration of spruce forests by artificial methods has been studied since the 1920s, but little information is available on characteristics of older planted...

  2. The Sylview graphical interface to the SYLVAN STAND STRUCTURE model with examples from southern bottomland hardwood forests

    Treesearch

    David R. Larsen; Ian Scott

    2010-01-01

    In the field of forestry, the output of forest growth models provide a wealth of detailed information that can often be difficult to analyze and perceive due to presentation either as plain text summary tables or static stand visualizations. This paper describes the design and implementation of a cross-platform computer application for dynamic and interactive forest...

  3. Red alder-conifer stands in Alaska: An example of mixed species management to enhance structural and biological complexity

    Treesearch

    Robert Deal; Ewa Orlikowska; David D’Amore; Paul Hennon

    2017-01-01

    There is worldwide interest in managing forests to improve biodiversity, enhance ecosystem services and assure long-term sustainability of forest resources. An increasingly important goal of forest management is to increase stand diversity and improve wildlife and aquatic habitat. Well-planned silvicultural systems containing a mixture of broadleaf-conifer species have...

  4. Influence of thinning style on stand structure and growth in upland oaks: a 58-year case study

    Treesearch

    Jeffery S. Ward

    2003-01-01

    In 1937, a study comparing low and high thinning (partial crop tree release) was established in northwestern Connecticut. Oaks accounted for 65 percent of the crop trees that were partially released at stand ages 17, 26, and 42 years. Sawtimber trees had greater diameters, higher volumes, and higher tree grades on thinned than unmanaged plots. The higher oak density on...

  5. Brain structure alterations associated with weight changes in young females with anorexia nervosa: a case series.

    PubMed

    Fuglset, Tone Seim; Endestad, Tor; Landrø, Nils Inge; Rø, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    Structural brain changes associated with starvation and clinical measurements were explored in four females with anorexia nervosa with different clinical course, at baseline and 1-year follow-up, after receiving intensive inpatient treatment at a specialized eating disorder unit. Global volume alterations were associated with weight changes. Regional volume alterations were also associated with weight changes, with the largest changes occurring in the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, pallidum, and putamen. Largest changes in cortical thickness occurred in the frontal and temporal lobes. The results are preliminary; however, they show that fluctuations in weight are associated with brain volume alterations, especially gray matter. We suggest that these parts of the brain are vulnerable to starvation and malnutrition, and could be a part of the pathophysiology of AN.

  6. How the timberline formed: altitudinal changes in stand structure and dynamics around the timberline in central Japan

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Koichi; Hirosawa, Tatsuru; Morishima, Ryohei

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Altitudinal timberlines are thought to move upward by global warming, a crucial topic in ecology. Tall tree species (the conifer Abies mariesii and the deciduous broad-leaved Betula ermanii) dominate the sub-alpine zone between 1600 and 2500 m a.s.l., the timberline, on Mount Norikura in central Japan. Dwarf pine Pinus pumila dominates above the timberline to near the summit (3026 m a.s.l.). This study evaluated how the timberline formed on Mount Norikura by examining altitudinal changes in stand structure and dynamics around the timberline. Methods One hundred and twenty-five plots of 10 m × 10 m were established around the timberline (2350–2600 m a.s.l.). Trunk diameter growth rate during 6 years was examined for A. mariesii, B. ermanii and P. pumila. Mortality during this period and mechanical damage scars on the trunks and branches due to strong wind and snow were examined for A. mariesii only. Key Results The density, maximum trunk height and diameter of A. mariesii in plots decreased with altitude. The maximum trunk height of B. ermanii decreased with altitude, but density and maximum trunk diameter did not decrease. In contrast, the density of P. pumila abruptly increased from around the timberline. A strong negative correlation was found between the densities of P. pumila and tall tree species, indicating their interspecific competition. Trunk diameter growth rates of A. mariesii and B. ermanii did not decrease with altitude, suggesting that these two tall tree species can grow at the timberline. The ratio of trees with mechanical damage scars increased with altitude for A. mariesii, a tendency more conspicuous for larger trees. The mortality of larger A. mariesii was also greater at higher altitude. Tall tree species may not increase their trunk height and survive around the timberline because of mechanical damage. Conclusions This study suggests that the altitudinal location of the timberline is mainly affected by mechanical damage

  7. Multiple watershed alterations influence fish community structure in Great Plains prairie streams

    SciTech Connect

    Perkin, Joshuah S.; Troia, Matthew J.; Shaw, Dustin C. R.; Gerken, Joseph E.; Gido, Keith B.

    2014-10-26

    Stream fish distributions are commonly linked to environmental disturbances affecting terrestrial landscapes. In Great Plains prairie streams, the independent and interactive effects of watershed impoundments and land cover changes remain poorly understood despite their prevalence and assumed contribution to declining stream fish diversity. We used structural equation models and fish community samples from third-order streams in the Kansas River and Arkansas River basins of Kansas, USA to test the simultaneous effects of geographic location, terrestrial landscape alteration, watershed impoundments and local habitat on species richness for stream-associated and impoundment-associated habitat guilds. Watershed impoundment density increased from west to east in both basins, while per cent altered terrestrial landscape (urbanisation + row-crop agriculture) averaged ~50% in the west, declined throughout the Flint Hills ecoregion and increased (Kansas River basin ~80%) or decreased (Arkansas River basin ~30%) to the east. Geographic location had the strongest effect on richness for both guilds across basins, supporting known zoogeography patterns. In addition to location, impoundment species richness was positively correlated with local habitat in both basins; whereas stream-species richness was negatively correlated with landscape alterations (Kansas River basin) or landscape alterations and watershed impoundments (Arkansas River basin). These findings suggest that convergences in the relative proportions of impoundment and stream species (i.e., community structure) in the eastern extent of both basins are related to positive effects of increased habitat opportunities for impoundment species and negative effects caused by landscape alterations (Kansas River basin) or landscape alterations plus watershed impoundments (Arkansas River basin) for stream species.

  8. Structural hippocampal network alterations during healthy aging: a multi-modal MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Amandine; Periot, Olivier; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Hiba, Bassem; Bordessoules, Martine; Pérès, Karine; Amieva, Hélène; Dartigues, Jean-François; Allard, Michèle; Catheline, Gwénaëlle

    2013-01-01

    While hippocampal atrophy has been described during healthy aging, few studies have examined its relationship with the integrity of White Matter (WM) connecting tracts of the limbic system. This investigation examined WM structural damage specifically related to hippocampal atrophy in healthy aging subjects (n = 129), using morphological MRI to assess hippocampal volume and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) to assess WM integrity. Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) or dementia were excluded from the analysis. In our sample, increasing age was significantly associated with reduced hippocampal volume and reduced Fractional Anisotropy (FA) at the level of the fornix and the cingulum bundle. The findings also demonstrate that hippocampal atrophy was specifically associated with reduced FA of the fornix bundle, but it was not related to alteration of the cingulum bundle. Our results indicate that the relationship between hippocampal atrophy and fornix FA values is not due to an independent effect of age on both structures. A recursive regression procedure was applied to evaluate sequential relationships between the alterations of these two brain structures. When both hippocampal atrophy and fornix FA values were included in the same model to predict age, fornix FA values remained significant whereas hippocampal atrophy was no longer significantly associated with age. According to this latter finding, hippocampal atrophy in healthy aging could be mediated by a loss of fornix connections. Structural alterations of this part of the limbic system, which have been associated with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease, result at least in part from the aging process. PMID:24367331

  9. Structural controls, alteration, permeability and thermal regime of Dixie Valley from new-generation MT/galvanic array profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. Wannamaker

    2007-11-30

    State-of-the-art MT array measurements in contiguous bipole deployments across the Dixie Valley thermal area have been integrated with regional MT transect data and other evidence to address several basic geothermal goals. These include 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity; 3), infer ultimate heat and fluid sources for the thermal area; and 4), from a generic technique standpoint, investigate the capability of well-sampled electrical data for resolving subsurface structure. Three dense lines cross the Senator Fumaroles area, the Cottonwood Creek and main producing area, and the low-permeability region through the section 10-15 area, and have stand-alone MT soundings appended at one or both ends for local background control. Regularized 2-D inversion implies that shallow pediment basement rocks extend for a considerable distance (1-2 km) southeastward from the topographic scarp of the Stillwater Range under all three dense profiles, but especially for the Senator Fumaroles line. This result is similar to gravity interpretations in the area, but with the intrinsic depth resolution possible from EM wave propagation. Low resistivity zones flank the interpreted main offsetting fault especially toward the north end of the field which may be due to alteration from geothermal fluid outflow and upflow. The appended MT soundings help to substantiate a deep, subvertical conductor intersecting the base of Dixie Valley from the middle crust, which appears to be a hydrothermal conduit feeding from deep crustal magmatic underplating. This may supply at least part of the high temperature fluids and explain enhanced He-3 levels in those fluids.

  10. Neonatal handling alters the structure of maternal behavior and affects mother-pup bonding.

    PubMed

    Reis, A R; de Azevedo, M S; de Souza, M A; Lutz, M L; Alves, M B; Izquierdo, I; Cammarota, M; Silveira, P P; Lucion, A B

    2014-05-15

    During early life, a mother and her pups establish a very close relationship, and the olfactory learning of the nest odor is very important for the bond formation. The olfactory bulb (OB) is a structure that plays a fundamental role in the olfactory learning (OL) mechanism that also involves maternal behavior (licking and contact). We hypothesized that handling the pups would alter the structure of the maternal behavior, affect OL, and alter mother-pup relationships. Moreover, changes in the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation (CREB) and neurotrophic factors could be a part of the mechanism of these changes. This study aimed to analyze the effects of neonatal handling, 1 min per day from postpartum day 1 to 10 (PPD 1 to PPD 10), on the maternal behavior and pups' preference for the nest odor in a Y maze (PPD 11). We also tested CREB's phosphorylation and BDNF signaling in the OB of the pups (PPD 7) by Western blot analysis. The results showed that handling alters mother-pups interaction by decreasing mother-pups contact and changing the temporal pattern of all components of the maternal behavior especially the daily licking and nest-building. We found sex-dependent changes in the nest odor preference, CREB and BDNF levels in pups OB. Male pups were more affected by alterations in the licking pattern, and female pups were more affected by changes in the mother-pup contact (the time spent outside the nest and nursing).

  11. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-13

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center work to maneuver a structural steam beam into place on the A-1 Test Stand on Jan. 13. The beam was one of several needed to form the thrust takeout structure that will support a new thrust measurement system being installed on the stand for future rocket engine testing. Once lifted onto the stand, the beams had to be hoisted into place through the center of the test stand, with only two inches of clearance on each side. The new thrust measurement system represents a state-of-the-art upgrade from the equipment installed more than 40 years ago when the test stand was first constructed.

  12. Petrology of hydrothermal alteration in the Vargeão basaltic impact structure (South Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, E.; Nédélec, A.; Trindade, R. I.; Baratoux, D.; Berger, G.

    2011-12-01

    Impact cratering process is of primary importance in the evolution of solid bodies of the Solar System. But craters on basaltic rocks, which are the best analog for the surface of other planets and satellites, are rare on Earth. Most studies to date were done in the Lonar crater, a simple crater 1.8 km in diameter, formed on the basaltic flows of the Deccan Province (India). Recently, one medium-size complex crater was identified on volcanic rocks of the Paraná basin (south Brazil) and may provide additional analog to the craters of most rocky planets and satellites. The 12 km wide Vargeão is a very well-preserved impact structure formed on basaltic and subordinately rhyodacites flows of the Serra Geral Formation (about 133-131 Ma), which are locally intertrapped by eolian-sandstones of Botucatu Formation. The impact-related features are represented by shatter cones, breccia-veins and planar deformation features in quartz (few occurrence in the sandstones). This work is focused on the petrogenesis of the centimeter breccia-veins that are found in all lithologies. We conducted a detailed petrological study (petrography, microprobe, SEM, Raman spectroscopy, Spectroscopy of reflectance and XRD) on these veins and their host-rocks. Our results show that the veins were strongly affected by the post-impact hydrothermal fluids. The hydrothermal alteration varies geographically in the structure. On the rim area this alteration consists of total or partial substitution of the melt matrix by quartz, calcite, iron oxides and clay minerals. At the central area, the alteration mineral assembly is composed of quartz, iron oxides, zeolites, clay minerals and rarely calcite. Usually, the alteration shows a zoned setting, which also varies locally. The nature of occurrence of second mineral identified in the context of post-impact hydrothermal alteration of impact craters on basalt represent a critical interpretation to interpret alteration signature of impact craters and the old

  13. Continuous-wave laser annealing of free-standing Si /SiO2 superlattice: Modification of optical, structural, and light-emitting properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Räsänen, Markku; Novikov, Sergei

    2006-09-01

    Raman, optical, and photoluminescence studies of a free-standing Si /SiO2 superlattice (SL) are described with emphasis on laser-induced thermal effects (laser annealing). The Si /SiO2 SL (500 repeats of 2-nm-thick Si and SiO2 layers) on a Si substrate was grown by a molecular beam deposition method and annealed at 1100°C for 1h in an oven, which promoted Si nanocrystals. Then the Si substrate was partially chemically etched producing free-standing areas. Continuous-wave laser annealing (˜104W /cm2) of the as-prepared free-standing SL strongly increases the Raman band of Si nanocrystals at ˜515cm-1, which features laser-induced crystallization and presumably originates from melting of Si nanostructures. The obtained results show that thermal annealing at 1100°C does not finish structural reorganization of the Si /SiO2 SL material and a large proportion of Si excess can be undetectable by Raman spectroscopy in related thermally annealed materials. For the laser-crystallized samples, various material characteristics (Raman spectra, light emission, and absorption) have been measured as a function of laser-induced temperature and period of laser annealing. The light emission is found to be a straightforward function of the temperature whereas the absorption coefficient depends on the laser-annealing period suggesting additional laser-induced structural reorganization.

  14. Epidemiological analysis of structural alterations of the nasal cavity associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA).

    PubMed

    Mekhitarian Neto, Levon; Fava, Antonio Sérgio; Lopes, Hugo Canhete; Stamm, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that structural alterations of the nasal cavity, e.g. septal deviation and conchal hypertrophy have high incidence in patients with sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome and must be addressed with associated specific procedures of the syndrome. Clinical retrospective. A retrospective study of 200 patients was performed, with 196 male and 4 female, attended at the otorhinolaryngology ambulatory of Hospital Prof. Edmundo Vasconcelos and Unidade Paulista de Otorrinolaringologia, all of them subjected to polysomnography, otorhinolaryngological physical exam, endoscopy exam, and surgical treatment with nasal and pharyngeal procedures. All of them were subjected to pharyngeal procedure: uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or uvulopalatoplasty and nose procedure: 176 septoplasty with partial turbinectomy (88%) and 24 isolated turbinectomy, with satisfactory results. We can see that structural alterations of the nasal cavity have high incidence in patients with OSA.

  15. Structure and composition of vegetation of longleaf pine plantations compared to natural stands occurring along an environmental gradient at the Savannah River Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gregory, P.; Shelburne, Victor, B.; Walker, Joan, L.

    2001-12-30

    Study plots in 33-43 year old longleaf pine plantations were compared to remnant longleaf plots on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Within these stands, the structure and composition of primarily the herb layer relative to a presumed soil moisture or soil texture gradient was studied using the North Carolina Vegetation Survey methodology. Data were also collected on soils and landform variables. Based on ordination and cluster analyses, both plantation plots and natural stand plots were separated into three distinct site units (xeric, sub-xeric, and sub-mesic). Lack of a major compositional difference between xeric plantation and natural longleaf sites suggests that restoration of the herbaceous layer may not be as complex as once thought. This provides reasonable encouragement for the restoration of the longleaf pine ecosystem.

  16. Changes in species, grade, and structure over 48 years in a managed New England northern hardwood stand

    Treesearch

    William B. Leak; Paul E. Sendak

    2002-01-01

    Three individual-tree selection harvests over a 48 yr period in a northern hardwood stand in New Hampshire resulted in an increase in the percentage of volume in trees with grade 1 and 2 butt logs from 21% (1952) to 30% (2000) in beech and 40% (1952) to 65% (2000) in sugar maple and other hardwoods. By 2000, 90% of the volume was in tolerant species.

  17. Histone H2AX phosphorylation in response to changes in chromatin structure induced by altered osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Baure, Jennifer; Izadi, Atefeh; Suarez, Vannina; Giedzinski, Erich; Cleaver, James E; Fike, John R; Limoli, Charles L

    2009-03-01

    DNA strand breaks trigger marked phosphorylation of histone H2AX (i.e. gamma-H2AX). While DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) provide a strong stimulus for this event, the accompanying structural alterations in chromatin may represent the actual signal that elicits gamma-H2AX. Our data show that changes in chromatin structure are sufficient to elicit extensive gamma-H2AX formation in the relative absence of DNA strand breaks. Cells subjected to hypotonic (0.05 M) treatment exhibit gamma-H2AX levels that are equivalent to those found after the induction of 80-200 DNA DSBs (i.e. 2-5 Gy). Despite this significant increase in phosphorylation, cell survival remains relatively unaffected (<10% cytotoxicity), and there is no significant increase in apoptosis. Nuclear staining profiles indicate that gamma-H2AX-positive cells induced under altered tonicity exhibit variable levels of staining, ranging from uniform pan staining to discrete punctate foci more characteristic of DNA strand breakage. The capability to induce significant gamma-H2AX formation under altered tonicity in the relative absence of DNA strand breaks suggests that this histone modification evolved in response to changes in chromatin structure.

  18. Altered structure of small cerebral arteries in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano; De Ciuceis, Carolina; Porteri, Enzo; Paiardi, Silvia; Boari, Gianluca E M; Mortini, Pietro; Cornali, Claudio; Cenzato, Marco; Rodella, Luigi F; Borsani, Elisa; Rizzardi, Nicola; Platto, Caterina; Rezzani, Rita; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti

    2009-04-01

    Structural alterations in the microcirculation may be considered an important mechanism of organ damage. An increased media-to-lumen ratio of subcutaneous small resistance arteries has been demonstrated to predict the development of cardiocerebrovascular events in hypertensive patients. Alterations in the structure of small cerebral arteries have been demonstrated in animal models of experimental or genetic hypertension. However, no evaluation with reliable techniques has ever been performed in humans. Twenty-eight participants were included in the present study: they were 13 hypertensive patients and 15 normotensive individuals. All participants underwent a neurosurgical intervention for benign or malign tumors. A small portion of morphologically normal cerebral tissue was excised from surgical samples and examined. Cerebral small resistance arteries (relaxed diameter around 200 mum) were dissected and mounted on an isometric and isobaric myograph, and the tunica media to internal lumen ratio was measured. In addition, cerebral cortical microvessel density (MVD) was also evaluated. The tissue was sectioned and stained for CD31, and MVD was measured with an automated image analyzer (percentage of area stained). Blood pressure values were evaluated, before surgical intervention, by standard sphygmomanometry. M/L was significantly greater and MVD significantly lower in hypertensive patients than that in normotensive individuals. No difference between groups in collagen content or mechanical properties of cerebral small arteries was observed. Our results indicate that structural alterations of small cerebral vessels are present in hypertensive patients compared with normotensive individuals, similar to those previously observed in subcutaneous small arteries.

  19. Effects of weight loss on structural and functional alterations of subcutaneous small arteries in obese patients.

    PubMed

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Porteri, Enzo; Rizzoni, Damiano; Corbellini, Claudia; La Boria, Elisa; Boari, Gianluca E M; Pilu, Annamaria; Mittempergher, Francesco; Di Betta, Ernesto; Casella, Claudio; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Rosei, Claudia Agabiti; Ruggeri, Giuseppina; Caimi, Luigi; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti

    2011-07-01

    Structural alterations of subcutaneous small resistance arteries, as indicated by an increased media:lumen ratio, are frequently present in hypertensive and/or diabetic patients and may represent the earliest alteration observed. In addition, media:lumen ratios of small arteries have a strong prognostic significance. However, no data are available about the structure of small resistance arteries of obese patients, particularly after weight loss. We have investigated 27 patients with severe obesity. Twelve of them were normotensive, and 15 were hypertensive. All of the obese patients underwent bariatric surgery. We compared results obtained with those observed in 13 normotensive lean controls and in 13 hypertensive lean patients. All of the subjects and patients underwent a biopsy of subcutaneous fat during surgical intervention. In 8 obese patients, a second biopsy was obtained after consistent weight loss, during a surgical intervention for abdominoplasty. Subcutaneous small resistance arteries were dissected and mounted on a wire myograph, and structural parameters were measured. A concentration-response curve to acetylcholine was performed to evaluate endothelial function. Obese patients, independent from the presence of hypertension, show the presence of an increased media:lumen ratio and media cross-sectional area, together with an impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation. After surgical correction of obesity and consistent weight loss, a significant improvement of microvascular structure and of some oxidative stress/inflammation markers were observed. In conclusion, our data suggest that the presence of obesity is associated with structural alterations of subcutaneous small resistance arteries, mainly characterized by hypertrophic remodeling. Weight loss may improve microvascular structure.

  20. Solution and crystal structure of BA42, a protein from the Antarctic bacterium Bizionia argentinensis comprised of a stand-alone TPM domain.

    PubMed

    Aran, Martin; Smal, Clara; Pellizza, Leonardo; Gallo, Mariana; Otero, Lisandro H; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Ithurralde, Esteban R; Bercovich, Andrés; Mac Cormack, Walter P; Turjanski, Adrián G; Cicero, Daniel O

    2014-11-01

    The structure of the BA42 protein belonging to the Antarctic flavobacterium Bizionia argentinensis was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. This is the first structure of a member of the PF04536 family comprised of a stand-alone TPM domain. The structure reveals a new topological variant of the four β-strands constituting the central β-sheet of the αβα architecture and a double metal binding site stabilizing a pair of crossing loops, not observed in previous structures of proteins belonging to this family. BA42 shows differences in structure and dynamics in the presence or absence of bound metals. The affinity for divalent metal ions is close to that observed in proteins that modulate their activity as a function of metal concentration, anticipating a possible role for BA42. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Label-free optical quantification of structural alterations in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moosung; Lee, Eeksung; Jung, JaeHwang; Yu, Hyeonseung; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Lee, Shinhwa; Jeong, Yong; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    We present a wide-field quantitative label-free imaging of mouse brain tissue slices with sub-micrometre resolution, employing holographic microscopy and an automated scanning platform. From the measured light field images, scattering coefficients and anisotropies are quantitatively retrieved by using the modified the scattering-phase theorem, which enables access to structural information about brain tissues. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that these scattering parameters enable us to quantitatively address structural alteration in the brain tissues of mice with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27485313

  2. Label-free optical quantification of structural alterations in Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moosung; Lee, Eeksung; Jung, Jaehwang; Yu, Hyeonseung; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Lee, Shinhwa; Jeong, Yong; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-08-01

    We present a wide-field quantitative label-free imaging of mouse brain tissue slices with sub-micrometre resolution, employing holographic microscopy and an automated scanning platform. From the measured light field images, scattering coefficients and anisotropies are quantitatively retrieved by using the modified the scattering-phase theorem, which enables access to structural information about brain tissues. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that these scattering parameters enable us to quantitatively address structural alteration in the brain tissues of mice with Alzheimer’s disease.

  3. Structurally Altered Hard Coal in the Areas of Tectonic Disturbances - An Initial Attempt at Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godyń, Katarzyna

    2016-09-01

    As regards the exploitation of hard coal seams, the near-fault zones and faults themselves are considered to be particularly dangerous areas, which is due to a high probability of the occurrence of gasogeodynamic phenomena. Tectonic dislocations running across a seam have a destructive impact on coal. Degradation of the coal structure, particularly visible in the microscale, is reflected in the coal's strength or gas properties. Such "structurally altered" coal is characterized by the presence of numerous fracturings, crushed areas, or dislocations of some of its fragments, and sometimes even the total destruction of the original structure. The present paper provides a detailed analysis and description of near-fault coal obtained from selected seams of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin, completed due to the application of optical methods. Both the type and the degree of changes in the structure of such coal were identified. On this basis, the author attempted to systematize the nomenclature used in relation to selected Upper Silesian hard coal seams, which, in turn, resulted in a proposed classification of the "altered structures" of the near-fault coal.

  4. Connectomics-based structural network alterations in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reess, T J; Rus, O G; Schmidt, R; de Reus, M A; Zaudig, M; Wagner, G; Zimmer, C; van den Heuvel, M P; Koch, K

    2016-01-01

    Given the strong involvement of affect in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and recent findings, the current cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) model of pathophysiology has repeatedly been questioned regarding the specific role of regions involved in emotion processing such as limbic areas. Employing a connectomics approach enables us to characterize structural connectivity on a whole-brain level, extending beyond the CSTC circuitry. Whole-brain structural networks of 41 patients and 42 matched healthy controls were analyzed based on 83 × 83 connectivity matrices derived from cortical and subcortical parcellation of structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance scans and deterministic fiber tracking based on diffusion tensor imaging data. To assess group differences in structural connectivity, the framework of network-based statistic (NBS) was applied. Graph theoretical measures were calculated to further assess local and global network characteristics. The NBS analysis revealed a single network consistently displaying decreased structural connectivity in patients comprising orbitofrontal, striatal, insula and temporo-limbic areas. In addition, graph theoretical measures indicated local alterations for amygdala and temporal pole while the overall topology of the network was preserved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study combining the NBS with graph theoretical measures in OCD. Along with regions commonly described in the CSTC model of pathophysiology, our results indicate an involvement of mainly temporo-limbic regions typically associated with emotion processing supporting their importance for neurobiological alterations in OCD. PMID:27598966

  5. Quantifying structural alterations in Alzheimer's disease brains using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moosung; Lee, Eeksung; Jung, JaeHwang; Yu, Hyeonseung; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Lee, Shinhwa; Jeong, Yong; Park, YongKeun

    2017-02-01

    Imaging brain tissues is an essential part of neuroscience because understanding brain structure provides relevant information about brain functions and alterations associated with diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography exemplify conventional brain imaging tools, but these techniques suffer from low spatial resolution around 100 μm. As a complementary method, histopathology has been utilized with the development of optical microscopy. The traditional method provides the structural information about biological tissues to cellular scales, but relies on labor-intensive staining procedures. With the advances of illumination sources, label-free imaging techniques based on nonlinear interactions, such as multiphoton excitations and Raman scattering, have been applied to molecule-specific histopathology. Nevertheless, these techniques provide limited qualitative information and require a pulsed laser, which is difficult to use for pathologists with no laser training. Here, we present a label-free optical imaging of mouse brain tissues for addressing structural alteration in Alzheimer's disease. To achieve the mesoscopic, unlabeled tissue images with high contrast and sub-micrometer lateral resolution, we employed holographic microscopy and an automated scanning platform. From the acquired hologram of the brain tissues, we could retrieve scattering coefficients and anisotropies according to the modified scattering-phase theorem. This label-free imaging technique enabled direct access to structural information throughout the tissues with a sub-micrometer lateral resolution and presented a unique means to investigate the structural changes in the optical properties of biological tissues.

  6. Altered Modular Organization of Structural Cortical Networks in Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Li; Peng, Ziwen; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a complex developmental disability that characterized by deficits in social interaction, language skills, repetitive stereotyped behaviors and restricted interests. Although great heterogeneity exists, previous findings suggest that autism has atypical brain connectivity patterns and disrupted small-world network properties. However, the organizational alterations in the autistic brain network are still poorly understood. We explored possible organizational alterations of 49 autistic children and 51 typically developing controls, by investigating their brain network metrics that are constructed upon cortical thickness correlations. Three modules were identified in controls, including cortical regions associated with brain functions of executive strategic, spatial/auditory/visual, and self-reference/episodic memory. There are also three modules found in autistic children with similar patterns. Compared with controls, autism demonstrates significantly reduced gross network modularity, and a larger number of inter-module connections. However, the autistic brain network demonstrates increased intra- and inter-module connectivity in brain regions including middle frontal gyrus, inferior parietal gyrus, and cingulate, suggesting one underlying compensatory mechanism associated with brain functions of self-reference and episodic memory. Results also show that there is increased correlation strength between regions inside frontal lobe, as well as impaired correlation strength between frontotemporal and frontoparietal regions. This alteration of correlation strength may contribute to the organization alteration of network structures in autistic brains. PMID:23675456

  7. Estimating structural alterations in animal models of lung emphysema. Is there a gold standard?

    PubMed

    Ochs, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases. The major component of COPD, which affects the gas-exchanging parenchyma of the lung, emphysema, is characterized by destruction of alveolar septae leading to loss of functional surface, loss of alveoli and enlargement of remaining distal airspaces. These microstructural alterations can be modeled in animals and can be measured using stereological methods applied to imaging datasets. Many animal models of emphysema exist, but most of them are insufficiently characterized with respect to the underlying nature (e.g. destructive or developmental) and the degree of the structural alterations. The most popular parameter for assessment of emphysematous alterations, mean linear intercept length, has severe limitations. It can, therefore, not be recommended. Better design-based stereological alternatives exist but are less often applied, such as total volumes of parenchymal compartments (alveolar airspace, alveolar duct airspace, alveolar septum), total alveolar surface area, total alveolar number and mean alveolar size and its size variation. A prerequisite is the use of appropriate fixation, sampling, and specimen processing protocols. This article reviews the challenges of stereologic assessment of emphysematous alterations in the lung and illustrates possible strategies.

  8. Structural health monitoring (vibration) as a tool for identifying structural alterations of the lumbar spine: a twin control study.

    PubMed

    Kawchuk, Gregory N; Hartvigsen, Jan; Edgecombe, Tiffany; Prasad, Narasimha; van Dieen, Jaap H

    2016-03-11

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an engineering technique used to identify mechanical abnormalities not readily apparent through other means. Recently, SHM has been adapted for use in biological systems, but its invasive nature limits its clinical application. As such, the purpose of this project was to determine if a non-invasive form of SHM could identify structural alterations in the spines of living human subjects. Lumbar spines of 10 twin pairs were visualized by magnetic resonance imaging then assessed by a blinded radiologist to determine whether twin pairs were structurally concordant or discordant. Vibration was then applied to each subject's spine and the resulting response recorded from sensors overlying lumbar spinous processes. The peak frequency, area under the curve and the root mean square were computed from the frequency response function of each sensor. Statistical analysis demonstrated that in twins whose structural appearance was discordant, peak frequency was significantly different between twin pairs while in concordant twins, no outcomes were significantly different. From these results, we conclude that structural changes within the spine can alter its vibration response. As such, further investigation of SHM to identify spinal abnormalities in larger human populations is warranted.

  9. Altered Regional Gray Matter Volume in Obese Men: A Structural MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Tian, Xiao; Tian, Derun; Wang, Jinhong; Wang, Qiming; Yu, Chunshui; Li, Chunbo; Wang, Jijun

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a number of health problems, especial insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Our previous study showed that obese males had decreased neural activity in the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and increased activity in the left putamen (Zhang et al., 2015b), which could indicate altered eating behaviors in obesity related to a hyper-functioning striatum and hypo-functioning inhibitory control. Accordingly, our goal of the current study was to determine whether there are alterations in the brain structures within these two neural systems in obese individuals. Twenty obese men (age: 20–28 years) and 20 age-matched lean male subjects were involved in the current study. Plasma glucose and insulin were tested during hunger state, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was based on the blood samples. In the study, we used structural MRI and a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) method to investigate regional structures in obese subjects and find out whether there are correlations between the insulin and the brain structures. We found that obese men only showed a significantly increased gray matter volume (GMV) in the left putamen and that the GMV of the left putamen was positively correlated with body mass index, plasma insulin and HOMA-IR. The putamen is a core region participating in insulin signal regulation, and our results showed an abnormal GMV of the putamen is a core alternation in aberrant insulin. Furthermore, the GMV of the OFC was negatively correlated with hunger rating, despite there being no significant difference between the two groups in the OFC. In conclusion, the altered structure and function of the putamen could play important roles in obesity and aberrant insulin. PMID:28197123

  10. Irritable Bowel Syndrome in female patients is associated with alterations in structural brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Labus, Jennifer; Dinov, Ivo D.; Jiang, Zhiguo; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Zamanyan, Alen; Shi, Yonggang; Hong, Jui-Yang; Gupta, Arpana; Tillisch, Kirsten; Ebrat, Bahar; Hobel, Sam; Gutman, Boris A.; Joshi, Shantanu; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in gray matter (GM) density/ volume and cortical thickness (CT) have been demonstrated in small and heterogeneous samples of subjects with different chronic pain syndromes, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Aggregating across 7 structural neuroimaging studies conducted at UCLA between August 2006 and April 2011, we examined group differences in regional GM volume in 201 predominantly premenopausal female subjects (82 IBS, mean age: 32 ± 10 SD, 119 Healthy Controls [HCs], 30± 10 SD). Applying graph theoretical methods and controlling for total brain volume, global and regional properties of large-scale structural brain networks were compared between IBS and HC groups. Relative to HCs, the IBS group had lower volumes in bilateral superior frontal gyrus, bilateral insula, bilateral amygdala, bilateral hippocampus, bilateral middle orbital frontal gyrus, left cingulate, left gyrus rectus, brainstem, and left putamen. Higher volume was found for the left postcentral gyrus. Group differences were no longer significant for most regions when controlling for Early Trauma Inventory global score with the exception of the right amygdala and the left post central gyrus. No group differences were found for measures of global and local network organization. Compared to HCs, the right cingulate gyrus and right thalamus were identified as significantly more critical for information flow. Regions involved in endogenous pain modulation and central sensory amplification were identified as network hubs in IBS. Overall, evidence for central alterations in IBS was found in the form of regional GM volume differences and altered global and regional properties of brain volumetric networks. PMID:24076048

  11. Forest to reclaimed mine land use change leads to altered ecosystem structure and function.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jeffrey A; Currie, William S; Eshleman, Keith N; Kuers, Karen; Monteleone, Susan; Negley, Tim L; Pohlad, Bob R; Thomas, Carolyn L

    2008-01-01

    The United States' use of coal results in many environmental alterations. In the Appalachian coal belt region, one widespread alteration is conversion of forest to reclaimed mineland. The goal of this study was to quantify the changes to ecosystem structure and function associated with a conversion from forest to reclaimed mine grassland by comparing a small watershed containing a 15-year-old reclaimed mine with a forested, reference watershed in western Maryland. Major differences were apparent between the two watersheds in terms of biogeochemistry. Total C, N, and P pools were all substantially lower at the mined site, mainly due to the removal of woody biomass but also, in the case of P, to reductions in soil pools. Mineral soil C, N, and P pools were 96%, 79%, and 69% of native soils, respectively. Although annual runoff from the watersheds was similar, the mined watershed exhibited taller, narrower storm peaks as a result of a higher soil bulk density and decreased infiltration rates. Stream export of N was much lower in the mined watershed due to lower net nitrification rates and nitrate concentrations in soil. However, stream export of sediment and P and summer stream temperature were much higher. Stream leaf decomposition was reduced and macroinvertebrate community structure was altered as a result of these changes to the stream environment. This land use change leads to substantial, long-term changes in ecosystem capital and function.

  12. N6-methyladenosine alters RNA structure to regulate binding of a low-complexity protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nian; Zhou, Katherine I; Parisien, Marc; Dai, Qing; Diatchenko, Luda; Pan, Tao

    2017-02-25

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant internal modification in eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA), and affects almost every stage of the mRNA life cycle. The YTH-domain proteins can specifically recognize m6A modification to control mRNA maturation, translation and decay. m6A can also alter RNA structures to affect RNA-protein interactions in cells. Here, we show that m6A increases the accessibility of its surrounding RNA sequence to bind heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein G (HNRNPG). Furthermore, HNRNPG binds m6A-methylated RNAs through its C-terminal low-complexity region, which self-assembles into large particles in vitro. The Arg-Gly-Gly repeats within the low-complexity region are required for binding to the RNA motif exposed by m6A methylation. We identified 13,191 m6A sites in the transcriptome that regulate RNA-HNRNPG interaction and thereby alter the expression and alternative splicing pattern of target mRNAs. Low-complexity regions are pervasive among mRNA binding proteins. Our results show that m6A-dependent RNA structural alterations can promote direct binding of m6A-modified RNAs to low-complexity regions in RNA binding proteins.

  13. Interictal photosensitivity associates with altered brain structure in patients with episodic migraine.

    PubMed

    Chong, Catherine D; Starling, Amaal J; Schwedt, Todd J

    2016-05-01

    Migraine attacks manifest with hypersensitivities to light, sound, touch and odor. Some people with migraine have photosensitivity between migraine attacks, suggesting persistent alterations in the integrity of brain regions that process light. Although functional neuroimaging studies have shown visual stimulus induced "hyperactivation" of visual cortex regions in migraineurs between attacks, whether photosensitivity is associated with alterations in brain structure is unknown. Levels of photosensitivity were evaluated using the Photosensitivity Assessment Questionnaire in 48 interictal migraineurs and 48 healthy controls. Vertex-by-vertex measurements of cortical thickness were assessed in 28 people with episodic migraine who had interictal photosensitivity (mean age = 35.0 years, SD = 12.1) and 20 episodic migraine patients without symptoms of interictal photosensitivity (mean age = 36.0 years, SD = 11.4) using a general linear model design. Migraineurs have greater levels of interictal photosensitivity relative to healthy controls. Relative to migraineurs without interictal photosensitivity, migraineurs with interictal photosensitivity have thicker cortex in several brain areas including the right lingual, isthmus cingulate and pericalcarine regions, and the left precentral, postcentral and supramarginal regions. Episodic migraineurs with interictal photosensitivity have greater cortical thickness in the right parietal-occipital and left fronto-parietal regions, suggesting that persistent light sensitivity is associated with underlying structural alterations. © International Headache Society 2015.

  14. N 6-methyladenosine alters RNA structure to regulate binding of a low-complexity protein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Zhou, Katherine I.; Parisien, Marc; Dai, Qing; Diatchenko, Luda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract N 6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant internal modification in eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA), and affects almost every stage of the mRNA life cycle. The YTH-domain proteins can specifically recognize m6A modification to control mRNA maturation, translation and decay. m6A can also alter RNA structures to affect RNA–protein interactions in cells. Here, we show that m6A increases the accessibility of its surrounding RNA sequence to bind heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein G (HNRNPG). Furthermore, HNRNPG binds m6A-methylated RNAs through its C-terminal low-complexity region, which self-assembles into large particles in vitro. The Arg-Gly-Gly repeats within the low-complexity region are required for binding to the RNA motif exposed by m6A methylation. We identified 13,191 m6A sites in the transcriptome that regulate RNA–HNRNPG interaction and thereby alter the expression and alternative splicing pattern of target mRNAs. Low-complexity regions are pervasive among mRNA binding proteins. Our results show that m6A-dependent RNA structural alterations can promote direct binding of m6A-modified RNAs to low-complexity regions in RNA binding proteins. PMID:28334903

  15. Forest to reclaimed mine land use change leads to altered ecosystem structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Currie, W.S.; Eshleman, K.N.; Kuers, K.; Monteleone, S.; Negley, T.L.; Pohlad, B.R.; Thomas, C.L.

    2008-01-15

    The United States' use of coal results in many environmental alterations. In the Appalachian coal belt region, one widespread alteration is conversion of forest to reclaimed mineland. The goal of this study was to quantify the changes to ecosystem structure and function associated with a conversion from forest to reclaimed mine grassland by comparing a small watershed containing a 15-year-old reclaimed mine with a forested, reference watershed in western Maryland. Major differences were apparent between the two watersheds in terms of biogeochemistry. Total C, N, and P pools were all substantially lower at the mined site, mainly due to the removal of woody biomass but also, in the case of P, to reductions in soil pools. Mineral soil C, N, and P pools were 96%, 79%, and 69% of native soils, respectively. Although annual runoff from the watersheds was similar, the mined watershed exhibited taller, narrower storm peaks as a result of a higher soil bulk density and decreased infiltration rates. Stream export of N was much lower in the mined watershed due to lower net nitrification rates and nitrate concentrations in soil. However, stream export of sediment and P and summer stream temperature were much higher. Stream leaf decomposition was reduced and macroinvertebrate community structure was altered as a result of these changes to the stream environment. This land use change leads to substantial, long-term changes in ecosystem capital and function.

  16. A stand-alone tree demography and landscape structure module for Earth system models: integration with inventory data from temperate and boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverd, V.; Smith, B.; Nieradzik, L. P.; Briggs, P. R.

    2014-08-01

    Poorly constrained rates of biomass turnover are a key limitation of Earth system models (ESMs). In light of this, we recently proposed a new approach encoded in a model called Populations-Order-Physiology (POP), for the simulation of woody ecosystem stand dynamics, demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity. POP is suitable for continental to global applications and designed for coupling to the terrestrial ecosystem component of any ESM. POP bridges the gap between first-generation dynamic vegetation models (DVMs) with simple large-area parameterisations of woody biomass (typically used in current ESMs) and complex second-generation DVMs that explicitly simulate demographic processes and landscape heterogeneity of forests. The key simplification in the POP approach, compared with second-generation DVMs, is to compute physiological processes such as assimilation at grid-scale (with CABLE (Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange) or a similar land surface model), but to partition the grid-scale biomass increment among age classes defined at sub-grid-scale, each subject to its own dynamics. POP was successfully demonstrated along a savanna transect in northern Australia, replicating the effects of strong rainfall and fire disturbance gradients on observed stand productivity and structure. Here, we extend the application of POP to wide-ranging temporal and boreal forests, employing paired observations of stem biomass and density from forest inventory data to calibrate model parameters governing stand demography and biomass evolution. The calibrated POP model is then coupled to the CABLE land surface model, and the combined model (CABLE-POP) is evaluated against leaf-stem allometry observations from forest stands ranging in age from 3 to 200 year. Results indicate that simulated biomass pools conform well with observed allometry. We conclude that POP represents an ecologically plausible and efficient alternative to large-area parameterisations of woody

  17. Structural alterations of brain grey and white matter in early deaf adults.

    PubMed

    Hribar, Manja; Suput, Dušan; Carvalho, Altiere Araujo; Battelino, Saba; Vovk, Andrej

    2014-12-01

    Functional and structural brain alterations in the absence of the auditory input have been described, but the observed structural brain changes in the deaf are not uniform. Some of the previous researchers focused only on the auditory areas, while others investigated the whole brain or other selected regions of interest. Majority of studies revealed decreased white matter (WM) volume or altered WM microstructure and preserved grey matter (GM) structure of the auditory areas in the deaf. However, preserved WM and increased or decreased GM volume of the auditory areas in the deaf have also been reported. Several structural alterations in the deaf were found also outside the auditory areas, but these regions differ between the studies. The observed differences between the studies could be due to the use of different single-analysis techniques, or the diverse population sample and its size, or possibly due to the usage of hearing aids by some participating deaf subjects. To overcome the aforementioned limitations four different image-processing techniques were used to investigate changes in the brain morphology of prelingually deaf adults who have never used hearing aids. GM and WM volume of the Heschl's gyrus (HG) were measured using manual volumetry, while whole brain GM volume, thickness and surface area were assessed by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and surface-based analysis. The microstructural properties of the WM were evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The data were compared between 14 congenitally deaf adults and 14 sex- and age-matched normal hearing controls. Manual volumetry revealed preserved GM volume of the bilateral HG and significantly decreased WM volume of the left HG in the deaf. VBM showed increased cerebellar GM volume in the deaf, while no statistically significant differences were observed in the GM thickness or surface area between the groups. The results of the DTI analysis showed WM microstructural alterations between the groups in

  18. Hemin/G-quadruplex structure and activity alteration induced by magnesium cations.

    PubMed

    Kosman, J; Juskowiak, B

    2016-04-01

    The influence of metal cations on G-quadruplex structure and peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme activity was investigated. Experiments revealed a significant role of magnesium ion, which in the presence of potassium cation influenced DNAzyme activity. This ability has been associated with alteration of G-quadruplex topology and consequently affinity to bind hemin molecule. It has been demonstrated that G-quadruplex based on PS2.M sequence under these conditions formed parallel topology, which exhibited lower activity than that observed in standard potassium-containing solution. On the other hand DNAzyme/magnesium ion system based on telomeric sequence, which did not undergo significant structural changes, exhibited higher peroxidase activity upon magnesium ion addition. In both cases, the stabilization effect of magnesium cations on G-quadruplex structure was observed. The mechanism of DNAzyme activity alteration by magnesium ion can be explained by its influence on the pKa value of DNAzyme. Magnesium ion decreased pKa for PS2.M based system but increased it for telomeric DNAzyme. Magnesium cation effect on G-quadruplex structure as well as DNAzyme activity is particularly important since this ion is one of the most common metal cations in biological samples.

  19. Structural analysis of brain ganglioside acetylation patterns in mice with altered ganglioside biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mlinac, Kristina; Fabris, Dragana; Vukelić, Zeljka; Rožman, Marko; Heffer, Marija; Bognar, Svjetlana Kalanj

    2013-12-15

    Gangliosides are sialylated membrane glycosphingolipids especially abundant in mammalian brain tissue. Sialic acid O-acetylation is one of the most common structural modifications of gangliosides which considerably influences their chemical properties. In this study, gangliosides extracted from brain tissue of mice with altered ganglioside biosynthesis (St8sia1 null and B4galnt1 null mice) were structurally characterized and their acetylation pattern was analyzed. Extracted native and alkali-treated gangliosides were resolved by high performance thin layer chromatography. Ganglioside mixtures as well as separated individual ganglioside fractions were further analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Several O-acetylated brain ganglioside species were found in knockout mice, not present in the wild-type mice. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the presence of O-acetylated GD1a in St8sia1 null mice and O-acetylated GM3 species in B4galnt1 null mice. In addition, much higher diversity of abnormally accumulated brain ganglioside species regarding the structure of ceramide portion was observed in knockout versus wild-type mice. Obtained findings indicate that the diversity of brain ganglioside structures as well as acetylation patterns in mice with altered ganglioside biosynthesis, is even higher than previously reported. Further investigation is needed in order to explore the effects of acetylation on ganglioside interactions with other molecules and consequently the physiological role of acetylated ganglioside species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural alteration of carbon nanoparticle and carbon nanoparticles carrying Pt clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Sato, Takeshi; Tamano, Masayuki; Matsuura, Toyoaki; Hori, Michio; Kaito, Chihiro

    2005-06-01

    Alterations of carbon particles carrying Pt clusters were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Carbon particles of size 20-30 nm produced in a He gas atmosphere by the conventional arc-discharge method changed into carbon tubes or ribbon-like spherules based on an onion-like structure by heating in air at 300 °C. In the case of carbon particles carrying Pt clusters, the alteration of carbon particles took place gradually at 300 °C, and the Pt clusters become partially exposed to the air as they were no longer covered by the carbon layer. The generation of electricity by using Pt clusters in fuel cell is proposed as an application for the Pt clusters.

  1. Use of monoclonal antibodies in the detection of structural alterations occurring in lysozyme on heating.

    PubMed

    Kenett, D; Katchalski-Katzir, E; Fleminger, G

    1990-01-01

    Seven murine anti-hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), which recognize distinct epitopes of the native enzyme, were used as macromolecular probes to detect structural or conformational alterations occurring in HEL on heating at 95 degrees C, pH 5. As the interactions of the heat-treated HEL with its corresponding MAbs were carried out at room temperature, only irreversible structural and/or conformational alterations could be detected. The transformation of the native enzyme into its denatured form was followed electrophoretically and chromatographically. The denatured enzyme was more negatively charged at pH 8.4 and exhibited a longer retention time on reverse-phase HPLC than native HEL. Its specific catalytic activity was considerably lower than that of the native enzyme. Of the seven MAbs tested in competitive ELISA assays with native and heat-treated HEL only one, MAb D74.3, failed to recognize the heat-treated enzyme. This antibody, which is directed toward the active site region of the enzyme, was ineffective in inhibiting the catalytic activity of the heat-treated HEL using M. lysodeikticus as substrate. In contrast, the monoclonal antibody D1.3, which recognizes an epitope remote from the active site of HEL, inhibited the catalytic activity of the native as well as the heat-treated enzyme. The results indicate that the active site of HEL undergoes an irreversible structural alteration on heating for 2 hr at 95 degrees C, pH 5. No irreversible structural changes could be detected in the other regions of HEL recognized by the corresponding MAbs.

  2. Large-scale natural disturbance alters genetic population structure of the sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna.

    PubMed

    Apodaca, Joseph J; Trexler, Joel C; Jue, Nathaniel K; Schrader, Matthew; Travis, Joseph

    2013-02-01

    Many inferences about contemporary rates of gene flow are based on the assumption that the observed genetic structure among populations is stable. Recent studies have uncovered several cases in which this assumption is tenuous. Most of those studies have focused on the effects that regular environmental fluctuations can have on genetic structure and gene flow patterns. Occasional catastrophic disturbances could also alter either the distribution of habitat or the spatial distribution of organisms in a way that affects population structure. However, evidence of such effects is sparse in the literature because it is difficult to obtain. Hurricanes, in particular, have the potential to exert dramatic effects on population structure of organisms found on islands or coral reefs or in near shore and coastal habitats. Here we draw on a historic genetic data set and new data to suggest that the genetic structure of sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna) populations in north Florida was altered dramatically by an unusually large and uncommon type of storm surge associated with Hurricane Dennis in 2005. We compare the spatial pattern of genetic variation in these populations after Hurricane Dennis to the patterns described in an earlier study in this same area. We use comparable genetic data from another region of Florida, collected in the same two periods, to estimate the amount of change expected from typical temporal variation in population structure. The comparative natural history of sailfin mollies in these two regions indicates that the change in population structure produced by the storm surge is not the result of many local extinctions with recolonization from a few refugia but emerged from a pattern of mixing and redistribution.

  3. Disentangling structural brain alterations associated with violent behavior from those associated with substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Boris; Müller, Bernhard W; Scherbaum, Norbert; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Forsting, Michael; Wiltfang, Jens; Gizewski, Elke R; Leygraf, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Studies aimed at identifying structural brain alterations associated with persistent violent behavior or psychopathy have not adequately accounted for a lifetime history of substance misuse. Thus, alterations in gray matter (GM) volume that have been reported to be correlates of violent behavior and/or psychopathy may instead be related to lifelong substance use disorders (SUDs). To identify alterations in GM volume associated with violent behavior and those associated with lifelong SUDs. Cross-sectional study. Participants were recruited from penitentiaries, forensic hospitals, psychiatric outpatient services, and communities in Germany. Structural magnetic resonance imaging was performed at a university hospital. Four groups of men were compared: 12 men with SUDs who exhibited violent behavior (hereafter referred to as violent offenders), 12 violent offenders without SUDs, 13 men with SUDs who did not exhibit violent behavior (hereafter referred to as nonoffenders), and 14 nonoffenders without SUDs. Voxel-based morphometry was used to analyze high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans. Assessments of mental disorders, psychopathy (using the Psychopathy Checklist-Screening Version), aggressive behavior, and impulsivity were conducted by trained clinicians. Compared with nonoffenders, violent offenders presented with a larger GM volume in the amygdala bilaterally, the left nucleus accumbens, and the right caudate head and with less GM volume in the left insula. Men with SUDs exhibited a smaller GM volume in the orbitofrontal cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and premotor cortex than did men without SUDs. Regression analyses indicated that the alterations in GM volume that distinguished the violent offenders from nonoffenders were associated with psychopathy scores and scores for lifelong aggressive behavior. The GM volumes of the orbitofrontal cortex and prefrontal cortex that distinguished the men with SUDs from the men without SUDs were correlated

  4. Multi-parametric structural magnetic resonance imaging in relation to cognitive dysfunction in long-standing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Daams, Marita; Steenwijk, Martijn D; Schoonheim, Menno M; Wattjes, Mike P; Balk, Lisanne J; Tewarie, Prejaas K; Killestein, Joep; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Barkhof, Frederik

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive deficits are common in multiple sclerosis. Most previous studies investigating the imaging substrate of cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis included patients with relatively short disease durations and were limited to one modality/brain region. To identify the strongest neuroimaging predictors for cognitive dysfunction in a large cohort of patients with long-standing multiple sclerosis. Extensive neuropsychological testing and multimodal 3.0T MRI was performed in 202 patients with multiple sclerosis and 52 controls. Cognitive scores were compared between groups using Z-scores. Whole-brain, white matter, grey matter, deep grey matter and lesion volumes; cortical thickness, (juxta)cortical and cerebellar lesions; and extent and severity of diffuse white matter damage were measured. Stepwise linear regression was used to identify the strongest predictors for cognitive dysfunction. All cognitive domains were affected in patients. Patients showed extensive atrophy, focal pathology and damage in up to 75% of the investigated white matter. Associations between imaging markers and average cognition were two times stronger in cognitively impaired patients than in cognitively preserved patients. The final model for average cognition consisted of deep grey matter DGMV volume and fractional anisotropy severity (adjusted R²=0.490; p<0.001). From all imaging markers, deep grey matter atrophy and diffuse white matter damage emerged as the strongest predictors for cognitive dysfunction in long-standing multiple sclerosis. © The Author(s), 2015.

  5. Petrography, geochemistry, and alteration of country rocks from the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karikari, Forson; Ferrière, Ludovic; Koeberl, Christian; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Mader, Dieter

    Samples of the country rocks that likely constituted the target rocks at the 1.07 Myr old Bosumtwi impact structure in Ghana, West Africa, collected outside of the crater rim in the northern and southern parts of the structure, were studied for their petrographic characteristics and analyzed for their major- and trace-element compositions. The country rocks, mainly meta-graywacke, shale, and phyllite of the Early Proterozoic Birimian Supergroup and some granites of similar age, are characterized by two generations of alteration. A pre-impact hydrothermal alteration, often along shear zones, is characterized by new growth of secondary minerals, such as chlorite, sericite, sulfides, and quartz, or replacement of some primary minerals, such as plagioclase and biotite, by secondary sericite and chlorite. A late, argillic alteration, mostly associated with the suevites, is characterized by alteration of the melt/glass clasts in the groundmass of suevites to phyllosilicates. Suevite, which occurs in restricted locations to the north and to the south-southwest of the crater rim, contains melt fragments, diaplectic quartz glass, ballen quartz, and clasts derived from the full variety of target rocks. No planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz were found in the country rock samples, and only a few quartz grains in the suevite samples show PDFs, and in rare cases two sets of PDFs. Based on a total alkali element-silica (TAS) plot, the Bosumtwi granites have tonalitic to quartz-dioritic compositions. The Nb versus Y and Ta versus Yb discrimination plots show that these granites are of volcanic-arc tectonic provenance. Provenance studies of the metasedimentary rocks at the Bosumtwi crater have also indicated that the metasediments are volcanic-arc related. Compared to the average siderophile element contents of the upper continental crust, both country rocks and impact breccias of the Bosumtwi structure show elevated siderophile element contents. This, however, does not

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons alter the structure of oceanic and oligotrophic microbial food webs.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Maria Isabel; Agusti, Susana

    2015-12-30

    One way organic pollutants reach remote oceanic regions is by atmospheric transport. During the Malaspina-2010 expedition, across the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, we analyzed the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) effects on oceanic microbial food webs. We performed perturbation experiments adding PAHs to classic dilution experiments. The phytoplankton growth rates were reduced by more than 5 times, being Prochlorococcus spp. the most affected. 62% of the experiments showed a reduction in the grazing rates due to the presence of PAHs. For the remaining experiments, grazing usually increased likely due to cascading effects. We identified changes in the slope of the relation between the growth rate and the dilution fraction induced by the pollutants, moving from no grazing to V-shape, or to negative slope, indicative of grazing increase by cascade effects and alterations of the grazers' activity structure. Our perturbation experiments indicate that PAHs could influence the structure oceanic food-webs structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Viral RNA Structural Element Alters Host Recognition of Nonself RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, J. L.; Gardner, C. L.; Kimura, T.; White, J. P.; Liu, G.; Trobaugh, D. W.; Huang, C.; Tonelli, M.; Paessler, S.; Takeda, K.; Klimstra, W. B.; Amarasinghe, G. K.; Diamond, M. S.

    2014-01-30

    Although interferon (IFN) signaling induces genes that limit viral infection, many pathogenic viruses overcome this host response. As an example, 2'-O methylation of the 5' cap of viral RNA subverts mammalian antiviral responses by evading restriction of Ifit1, an IFN-stimulated gene that regulates protein synthesis. However, alphaviruses replicate efficiently in cells expressing Ifit1 even though their genomic RNA has a 5' cap lacking 2'-O methylation. We show that pathogenic alphaviruses use secondary structural motifs within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of their RNA to alter Ifit1 binding and function. Mutations within the 5'-UTR affecting RNA structural elements enabled restriction by or antagonism of Ifit1 in vitro and in vivo. These results identify an evasion mechanism by which viruses use RNA structural motifs to avoid immune restriction.

  8. Structural Alterations in the Translational Attenuator of Constitutively Expressed ermC Genes

    PubMed Central

    Werckenthin, Christiane; Schwarz, Stefan; Westh, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Sequence deletions of 16, 59, and 111 bp as well as a tandem duplication of 272 bp with respect to the corresponding sequence of pT48 were identified in the regulatory regions of constitutively expressed ermC genes. Constitutive ermC gene expression as a consequence of these structural alterations is based on either the prevention of the formation of mRNA secondary structures in the translational attenuator or the preferential formation of those mRNA secondary structures which do not interfere with the translation of the ermC transcripts. A model for the development of sequence deletions in the ermC translational attenuator by homologous recombination is presented and experimentally tested by in vitro selection of constitutively expressed mutants in staphylococcal strains deficient and proficient in homologous recombination. PMID:10390222

  9. Structure and function of soil microbial community in artificially planted Sonneratia apetala and S. caseolaris forests at different stand ages in Shenzhen Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Lei, A P; Li, F L; Liu, L N; Zan, Q J; Shin, P K S; Cheung, S G; Tam, N F Y

    2014-08-30

    The present study examined the relationships between soil characteristics, microbial community structure and function in the forests artificially planted with exotic Sonneratia apetala at stand ages of 1-, 2-, 7-, 10- and 14-years and Sonneratia caseolaris of 1-, 4-, 7-, 10- and 14-years in Futian National Nature Reserve, Shenzhen Bay, China. The 7-years old forests of both Sonneratia species reached peak growth and had the highest content of nitrogen and phosphorus, enzymatic activities, including dehydrogenase, cellulase, phosphatase, urease and ß-glucosidase, except arylsulphatase which increased continuously with stand ages. The microbial community structure reflected by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles also reached the maximum value in the 7-years old forests and soil bacterial PLFAs in both forests were significantly higher than fungal PLFAs. The canonical correlation analysis revealed that differences in microbial structural variables were significantly correlated to the differences in their functional variables, and the highest correlation was found between the soil enzymatic activities and the content of carbon and nitrogen.

  10. Subcortical structure alterations impact language processing in individuals with schizophrenia and those at high genetic risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Black, Margaret; Xia, Shugao; Zhan, Chenyang; Bertisch, Hilary C; Branch, Craig A; DeLisi, Lynn E

    2015-12-01

    Cortical structural and functional anomalies have been found to associate with language impairments in both schizophrenia patients and genetic high risk individuals for developing schizophrenia. However, subcortical structures that contribute to language processing haven't been well studied in this population, and thus became the main objective of this study. We examined structural MRI data from 20 patients with schizophrenia, 21 individuals at genetic high risk, and 48 controls. Surface shape and volume differences of 6 subcortical structures that are involved in language processing, including nuclei pallidum, putamen, caudate, amygdala, thalamus, and hippocampus from both hemispheres, were compared between groups. Performance scores of language-associated cognitive tests were obtained to identify relationships of subcortical structures to language-related behaviors. Significantly reduced volumes of both the left and right side caudate nuclei, thalami and right side amygdala were shown in patients when compared with controls. Very interestingly, the high risk group demonstrated significantly increased correlations between volumes of left side pallidum nucleus and bilateral thalami and language-related cognitive test scores when compared to controls. This study furthers our understanding of subcortical structural alterations in schizophrenia and high risk individuals, and suggests the contribution of subcortical structures to the language impairments that may serve as an early sign for impending development of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Altered topology of structural brain networks in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schlemm, E; Cheng, B; Fischer, F; Hilgetag, C; Gerloff, C; Thomalla, G

    2017-09-06

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics. Abnormal neuronal circuits in a wide-spread structural and functional network involved in planning, execution and control of motor functions are thought to represent the underlying pathology. We therefore studied changes of structural brain networks in 13 adult GTS patients reconstructed by diffusion tensor imaging and probabilistic tractography. Structural connectivity and network topology were characterized by graph theoretical measures and compared to 13 age-matched controls. In GTS patients, significantly reduced connectivity was detected in right hemispheric networks. These were furthermore characterized by significantly reduced local graph parameters (local clustering, efficiency and strength) indicating decreased structural segregation of local subnetworks. Contrasting these results, whole brain and right hemispheric networks of GTS patients showed significantly increased normalized global efficiency indicating an overall increase of structural integration among distributed areas. Higher global efficiency was associated with tic severity (R = 0.63, p = 0.022) suggesting the clinical relevance of altered network topology. Our findings reflect an imbalance between structural integration and segregation in right hemispheric structural connectome of patients with GTS. These changes might be related to an underlying pathology of impaired neuronal development, but could also indicate potential adaptive plasticity.

  12. Discrete alterations of brain network structural covariance in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Kareen; Reniers, Renate L E P; Nelson, Barnaby; Yung, Alison R; Lin, Ashleigh; Harrison, Ben J; Pantelis, Christos; Velakoulis, Dennis; McGorry, Patrick D; Wood, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Investigation of aberrant large-scale brain networks offers novel insight into the role these networks play in diverse psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Although studies report altered functional brain connectivity in participants at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis, it is unclear whether these alterations extend to structural brain networks. Whole-brain structural covariance patterns of 133 participants at UHR for psychosis (51 of whom subsequently developed psychosis) and 65 healthy control (HC) subjects were studied. Following data preprocessing (using VBM8 toolbox), the mean signal in seed regions relating to specific networks (visual, auditory, motor, speech, semantic, executive control, salience, and default-mode) were extracted, and voxel-wise analyses of covariance were conducted to compare the association between whole-brain signal and each seed region for UHR and HC individuals. The UHR participants who transitioned to psychosis were compared with the UHR participants who did not. Significantly reduced structural covariance was observed in the UHR sample compared with the HC sample for the default-mode network, and increased covariance was observed for the motor and executive control networks. When the UHR participants who transitioned to psychosis were compared with the UHR participants who did not, aberrant structural covariance was observed in the salience, executive control, auditory, and motor networks. Whole-brain structural covariance analyses revealed subtle changes of connectivity of the default-mode, executive control, salience, motor, and auditory networks in UHR individuals for psychosis. Although we found significant differences, these are small changes and tend to reflect largely intact structural networks. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlations among stand ages and forest strata in mixed-oak forests of southeastern Ohio

    Treesearch

    P. Charles Goebel; David M. Hix

    1997-01-01

    Many models of landscape ecosystem development, as well as of forest stand dynamics, are based upon spatial and temporal changes in the species composition and structure of various forest strata. However, few document the interrelationships among forest strata, or the response of different strata to alterations of natural disturbance regimes. To examine how...

  14. Using the Forest Vegetation Simulator to reconstruct historical stand conditions in the Colorado Front Range

    Treesearch

    Paula J. Fornwalt; Merrill R. Kaufmann; Laurie S. Huckaby; Jason M. Stoker

    2002-01-01

    Presettlement ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forests of the Colorado Front Range were open and heterogeneous. Logging, grazing, and fire suppression over past 100 to150 years have altered stand structure by changing diameter distributions and increasing overstory density. In an effort to guide forest restoration toward presettlement conditions, we are currently using the...

  15. Structural and functional alterations of catalase induced by acriflavine, a compound causing apoptosis and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Attar, Farnoosh; Khavari-Nejad, Sarah; Keyhani, Jacqueline; Keyhani, Ezzatollah

    2009-08-01

    Acriflavine is an antiseptic agent causing both apoptosis and necrosis in yeast. In this work, its effect on the structure and function of catalase, a vital enzyme actively involved in protection against oxidative stress, was investigated. In vitro kinetic studies showed that acriflavine inhibited the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. The residual activity detectable after preincubation of catalase (1.5 nmol/L) with various concentrations of acriflavine went from 50% to 20% of the control value as the acriflavine concentration increased from 30 to 90 micromol/L. Correlatively with the decrease in activity, alterations in the enzyme's conformation were observed as indicated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. The enzyme's intrinsic fluorescence obtained upon excitation at either 297 nm (tryptophan residues) or 280 nm (tyrosine and tryptophan residues) decreased as a function of acriflavine concentration. Circular dichroism studies showed alterations of the protein structure by acriflavine with up to 13% decrease in alpha helix, 16% increase in beta-sheet content, 17% increase in random coil, and 4% increase in beta turns. Spectrophotometric studies showed a blueshift and modifications in the chromicity of catalase at 405 nm, corresponding to an absorbance band due to the enzyme's prosthetic group. Thus, acriflavine induced in vitro a profound change in the structure of catalase so that the enzyme could no longer function. Our results showed that acriflavine, a compound producing apoptosis and necrosis, can have a direct effect on vital functions in cells by disabling key enzymes.

  16. Alterations in structure and mechanics of resistance arteries from ouabain-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Briones, Ana M; Xavier, Fabiano E; Arribas, Silvia M; González, M Carmen; Rossoni, Luciana V; Alonso, María J; Salaices, Mercedes

    2006-07-01

    We have previously described that chronic administration of ouabain induces hypertension and functional alterations in mesenteric resistance arteries. The aim of this study was to analyze whether ouabain treatment also alters the structural and mechanical properties of mesenteric resistance arteries. Wistar rats were treated for 5 wk with ouabain (8.0 microg/day sc). The vascular structure and mechanics of the third-order branches of the mesenteric artery were assessed with pressure myography and confocal microscopy. Total collagen content was determined by picrosirius red staining, collagen I/III was analyzed by Western blot, and elastin was studied by confocal microscopy. Vascular reactivity was analyzed by wire myography. Internal and external diameters and cross-sectional area were diminished, whereas the wall-to-lumen ratio was increased in arteries from ouabain-treated rats compared with controls. In addition, arteries from ouabain-treated rats were stiffer. Ouabain treatment decreased smooth muscle cell number and increased total and I/III collagens in the vascular wall. However, this treatment did not modify adventitia and media thickness, nuclei morphology, elastin structure, and vascular reactivity to norepinephrine and acetylcholine. The present work shows hypotrophic inward remodeling of mesenteric resistance arteries from ouabain-treated rats that seems to be the consequence of a combination of decreased cell number and impaired distension of the artery, possibly due to a higher stiffness associated with collagen deposition. The narrowing of resistance arteries could play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in this model.

  17. A MYLK variant regulates asthmatic inflammation via alterations in mRNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Saadat, Laleh; Garcia, Joe GN

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light-chain kinase (MYLK) is a gene known to be significantly associated with severe asthma in African Americans. Here we further examine the molecular function of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), located in the non-muscle myosin light-chain kinase isoform (nmMLCK), in asthma susceptibility and pathobiology. We identified nmMLCK variant (reference SNP: rs9840993, NM_053025: 721C>T, c.439C>T) with a distinct mRNA secondary structure from the other variants. The nmMLCK variant (721C) secondary structure exhibits increased stability with an elongated half-life in the human endothelial cell, and greater efficiency in protein translation initiation owing to an increased accessibility to translation start site. Finally, nmMLCK expression of 721C- and 721T-containing MYLK transgenes were compared in nmMLCK−/− mice and confirmed deleterious effects of nmMLCK expression on asthmatic indices and implicated the augmented influence of MYLK 721C>T (c.439C>T) SNP on asthma severity. The confirmation of the novel mechanism of the regulation of asthmatic inflammation by a MYLK advances knowledge of the genetic basis for asthma disparities, and further suggests the potential of nmMLCK as a therapeutic target. Our study suggests that in addition to altering protein structure and function, non-synonymous SNPs may also lead to phenotypic disparity by altering protein expression. PMID:25271083

  18. Altered structural and functional connectivity between the bilateral primary motor cortex in unilateral subcortical stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Kuang-Shi; Ning, Yan-Zhe; Fu, Cai-Hong; Liu, Hong-Wei; Han, Xiao; Cui, Fang-Yuan; Ren, Yi; Zou, Yi-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A large number of functional imaging studies have focused on the understanding of motor-related neural activities after ischemic stroke. However, the knowledge is still limited in the structural and functional changes of the interhemispheric connections of the bilateral primary motor cortices (M1s) and their potential influence on motor function recovery following stroke. Twenty-four stroke patients with right hemispheric subcortical infarcts and 25 control subjects were recruited to undergo multimodal magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Structural impairments between the bilateral M1s were measured by fractional anisotropy. Functional changes of the bilateral M1s were assessed via M1-M1 resting-state functional connectivity. Task-evoked activation analysis was applied to identify the roles of the bilateral hemispheres in motor function recovery. Compared with control subjects, unilateral subcortical stroke patients revealed significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and functional connectivity between the bilateral M1s. Stroke patients also revealed higher activations in multiple brain regions in both hemispheres and that more regions were located in the contralesional hemisphere. This study increased our understanding of the structural and functional alterations between the bilateral M1s that occur in unilateral subcortical stroke and provided further evidence for the compensatory role played by the contralesional hemisphere for these alterations during motor function recovery. PMID:27495109

  19. Swimming exercise reverses aging-related contractile abnormalities of female heart by improving structural alterations.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Nihal; Olgar, Yusuf; Er, Hakan; Kucuk, Murathan; Ozdemir, Semir

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of swimming exercise on aging-related Ca2+ handling alterations and structural abnormalities of female rat heart. For this purpose, 4-month and 24-month old female rats were used and divided into three following groups: sedentary young (SY), sedentary old (SO), and exercised old (Ex-O). Swimming exercise was performed for 8 weeks (60 min/day, 5 days/week). Myocyte shortening, L-type Ca2+ currents and associated Ca2+ transients were measured from ventricular myocytes at 36 ± 1°C. NOX-4 levels, aconitase activity, glutathione measurements and ultrastructural examination by electron microscopy were conducted in heart tissue. Swimming exercise reversed the reduced shortening and slowed kinetics of aged cardiomyocytes. Although the current density was similar for all groups, Ca2+ transients were higher in SO and Ex-O myocytes with respect to the SY group. Caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients and the integrated NCX current were lower in cardiomyocytes of SY rats compared with other groups, suggesting an increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in an aged heart. Aging led to upregulated cardiac NOX-4 along with declined aconitase activity. Although it did not reverse these oxidative parameters, swimming exercise achieved a significant increase in glutathione levels and improved structural alterations of old rats' hearts. We conclude that swimming exercise upregulates antioxidant defense capacity and improves structural abnormalities of senescent female rat heart, although it does not change Ca2+ handling alterations further. Thereby, it improves contractile function of aged myocardium by mitigating detrimental effects of oxidative stress.

  20. Rim Structure, Stratigraphy, and Aqueous Alteration Exposures Along Opportunity Rover's Traverse of the Noachian Endeavour Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L.S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Golombek, M.; Grant, J. A.; Jolliff, B. L.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has traversed 10.2 kilometers along segments of the west rim of the 22-kilometer-diameter Noachian Endeavour impact crater as of sol 4608 (01/09/17). The stratigraphy, attitude of units, lithology, and degradation state of bedrock outcrops exposed on the crater rim have been examined in situ and placed in geologic context. Structures within the rim and differences in physical properties of the identified lithologies have played important roles in localizing outcrops bearing evidence of aqueous alteration.

  1. Does methyl isocyante interaction with normal hemoglobin alter its structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevaratnam, K. ); Vaidyanathan, C.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The predominant biological effect of methyl isocyanate (MIC) intoxication in mammals is severe tissue hypoxia leading to acute lactic acidosis. In rabbits administered MIC subcutaneously (s.c.) the hypoxia was shown to be of the stagnant type resulting from hypovolemic hypotension. The occurrence of carbamylation of Hb by MIC in vivo was demonstrated unequivocally. Furthermore, the characteristic observation, dark red colored (cherry red) blood in animals exposed to MIC remained unexplained. This prompted the authors to investigate whether MIC exposure caused an alteration in structure and/or function of normal Hb leading to tissue hypoxia and the change in the color of the blood.

  2. Hyperspectral mapping of alteration assemblages within a hydrothermal vug at the Haughton impact structure, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, Rebecca N.; Mustard, John F.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Tornabene, Livio L.; Pontefract, Alexandra J.; Marion, Cassandra L.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Wilson, Janette H.; Cloutis, Edward A.

    2016-12-01

    Meteorite impacts on Earth and Mars can generate hydrothermal systems that alter the primary mineralogies of rocks and provide suitable environments for microbial colonization. We investigate a calcite-marcasite-bearing vug at the 23 km diameter Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada, using imaging spectroscopy of the outcrop in the field (0.65-1.1 μm) and samples in the laboratory (0.4-2.5 μm), point spectroscopy (0.35-2.5 μm), major element chemistry, and X-ray diffraction analyses. The mineral assemblages mapped at the outcrop include marcasite; marcasite with minor gypsum and jarosite; fibroferrite and copiapite with minor gypsum and melanterite; gypsum, Fe3+ oxides, and jarosite; and calcite, gypsum, clay, microcline, and quartz. Hyperspectral mapping of alteration phases shows spatial patterns that illuminate changes in alteration conditions and formation of specific mineral phases. Marcasite formed from the postimpact hydrothermal system under reducing conditions, while subsequent weathering oxidized the marcasite at low temperatures and water/rock ratios. The acidic fluids resulting from the oxidation collected on flat-lying portions of the outcrop, precipitating fibroferrite + copiapite. That assemblage then likely dissolved, and the changing chemistry and pH resulting from interaction with the calcite-rich host rock formed gypsum-bearing red coatings. These results have implications for understanding water-rock interactions and habitabilities at this site and on Mars.

  3. Characterization of pore structure and hydraulic property alteration in pressurized unsaturated flow tests

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Martin, P F.

    1999-12-01

    The pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) test is a new experimental method for the evaluation of the long-term corrosion behavior of waste forms and other engineered barrier materials. Essentially, the technique provides a means to flow water through a porous bed of test material or materials at elevated temperature and under hydraulically unsaturated conditions. Bulk volumetric content, effluent pH and electrical conductivity are monitored in real time using a computer control and data acquisition system. In previous papers, we have reported on the changes in bulk water content, effluent chemistry, and glass corrosion rates that result from the formation of alteration products during these tests. These measurements are now supplemented through the use of the ultracentrifugation apparatus (UFA) for hydraulic property measurements and high-resolution, x-ray microtomography (XMT) to provide 3-D spatial and temporal imaging of water distribution and pore structure alteration during these tests. Quantitative changes in the water retention characteristic were correlated with the onset of zeolite formation in the tests. Extensive alteration of the glass resulted in cementation of the glass grains near the bottom of the column, which was observed in situ using the XMT.

  4. Characterization of pore structure and hydraulic property alteration in pressurized unsaturated flow tests

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B.P.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Martin, P.F.

    1999-07-01

    The pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) test is a new experimental method for the evaluation of the long-term corrosion behavior of waste forms and other engineered barrier materials. Essentially, the technique provides a means to flow water through a porous bed of test material or materials at elevated temperature and under hydraulically unsaturated conditions. Bulk volumetric content, effluent pH and electrical conductivity are monitored in real time using a computer control and data acquisition system. In previous papers, the authors have reported on the changes in bulk water content, effluent chemistry, and glass corrosion rates that result from the formation of alteration products during these tests. These measurements are now supplemented through the use of the ultracentrifugation apparatus (UFA) for hydraulic property measurements and high-resolution, x-ray microtomography (XMT) to provide 3-D spatial and temporal imaging of water distribution and pore structure alteration during these tests. Quantitative changes in the water retention characteristic were correlated with the onset of zeolite formation in the tests. Extensive alteration of the glass resulted in cementation of the glass grains near the bottom of the column, which was observed in situ using the XMT.

  5. Rapid structural alterations of the active zone lead to sustained changes in neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Matz, Jacob; Gilyan, Andrew; Kolar, Annette; McCarvill, Terrence; Krueger, Stefan R

    2010-05-11

    The likelihood with which an action potential elicits neurotransmitter release, the release probability (p(r)), is an important component of synaptic strength. Regulatory mechanisms controlling several steps of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis may affect p(r), yet their relative importance in determining p(r) and eliciting temporal changes in neurotransmitter release at individual synapses is largely unknown. We have investigated whether the size of the active zone cytomatrix is a major determinant of p(r) and whether changes in its size lead to corresponding alterations in neurotransmitter release. We have used a fluorescent sensor of SV exocytosis, synaptophysin-pHluorin, to measure p(r) at individual synapses with high accuracy and employed a fluorescently labeled cytomatrix protein, Bassoon, to quantify the amount of active zone cytomatrix present at these synapses. We find that, for synapses made by a visually identified presynaptic neuron, p(r) is indeed strongly correlated with the amount of active zone cytomatrix present at the presynaptic specialization. Intriguingly, active zone cytomatrices are frequently subject to synapse-specific changes in size on a time scale of minutes. These spontaneous alterations in active zone size are associated with corresponding changes in neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that the size of the active zone cytomatrix has a large influence on the reliability of synaptic transmission. Furthermore, they implicate mechanisms leading to rapid structural alterations at active zones in synapse-specific forms of plasticity.

  6. Cortical Structure Alterations and Social Behavior Impairment in p50-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Mastinu, Andrea; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Mitola, Stefania; Premoli, Marika; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Memo, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in genes that regulate neurodevelopment can lead to cortical malformations, resulting in malfunction during postnatal life. The NF-κB pathway has a key role during neurodevelopment by regulating the maintenance of the neural progenitor cell pool and inhibiting neuronal differentiation. In this study, we evaluated whether mice lacking the NF-κB p50 subunit (KO) present alterations in cortical structure and associated behavioral impairment. We found that, compared with wild type (WT), KO mice at postnatal day 2 present an increase in radial glial cells, an increase in Reelin protein expression levels, in addition to an increase of specific layer thickness. Moreover, adult KO mice display abnormal columnar organization in the somatosensory cortex, a specific decrease in somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, altered neurite orientation, and a decrease in Synapsin I protein levels. Concerning behavior, KO mice, in addition to an increase in locomotor and exploratory activity, display impairment in social behaviors, with a reduction in social interaction. Finally, we found that risperidone treatment decreased hyperactivity of KO mice, but had no effect on defective social interaction. Altogether, these data add complexity to a growing body of data, suggesting a link between dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway and neurodevelopmental disorders pathogenesis.

  7. Cortical Structure Alterations and Social Behavior Impairment in p50-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Mastinu, Andrea; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Mitola, Stefania; Premoli, Marika; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Memo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in genes that regulate neurodevelopment can lead to cortical malformations, resulting in malfunction during postnatal life. The NF-κB pathway has a key role during neurodevelopment by regulating the maintenance of the neural progenitor cell pool and inhibiting neuronal differentiation. In this study, we evaluated whether mice lacking the NF-κB p50 subunit (KO) present alterations in cortical structure and associated behavioral impairment. We found that, compared with wild type (WT), KO mice at postnatal day 2 present an increase in radial glial cells, an increase in Reelin protein expression levels, in addition to an increase of specific layer thickness. Moreover, adult KO mice display abnormal columnar organization in the somatosensory cortex, a specific decrease in somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, altered neurite orientation, and a decrease in Synapsin I protein levels. Concerning behavior, KO mice, in addition to an increase in locomotor and exploratory activity, display impairment in social behaviors, with a reduction in social interaction. Finally, we found that risperidone treatment decreased hyperactivity of KO mice, but had no effect on defective social interaction. Altogether, these data add complexity to a growing body of data, suggesting a link between dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway and neurodevelopmental disorders pathogenesis. PMID:26946128

  8. Structural brain alterations in patients with lumbar disc herniation: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Luchtmann, Michael; Steinecke, Yvonne; Baecke, Sebastian; Lützkendorf, Ralf; Bernarding, Johannes; Kohl, Jana; Jöllenbeck, Boris; Tempelmann, Claus; Ragert, Patrick; Firsching, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most common health complaints in industrial nations. For example, chronic low back pain (cLBP) disables millions of people across the world and generates a tremendous economic burden. While previous studies provided evidence of widespread functional as well as structural brain alterations in chronic pain, little is known about cortical changes in patients suffering from lumbar disc herniation. We investigated morphometric alterations of the gray and white matter of the brain in patients suffering from LDH. The volumes of the gray and white matter of 12 LDH patients were determined in a prospective study and compared to the volumes of healthy controls to distinguish local differences. High-resolution MRI brain images of all participants were performed using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate local differences in gray and white matter volume between patients suffering from LDH and healthy controls. LDH patients showed significantly reduced gray matter volume in the right anterolateral prefrontal cortex, the right temporal lobe, the left premotor cortex, the right caudate nucleus, and the right cerebellum as compared to healthy controls. Increased gray matter volume, however, was found in the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the left precuneal cortex, the left fusiform gyrus, and the right brainstem. Additionally, small subcortical decreases of the white matter were found adjacent to the left prefrontal cortex, the right premotor cortex and in the anterior limb of the left internal capsule. We conclude that the lumbar disk herniation can lead to specific local alterations of the gray and white matter in the human brain. The investigation of LDH-induced brain alterations could provide further insight into the underlying nature of the chronification processes and could possibly identify prognostic factors that may improve the conservative as well as the operative treatment of the LDH.

  9. Structural alterations in the seminiferous tubules of rats treated with immunosuppressor tacrolimus

    PubMed Central

    Caneguim, Breno H; Cerri, Paulo S; Spolidório, Luís C; Miraglia, Sandra M; Sasso-Cerri, Estela

    2009-01-01

    Background Tacrolimus (FK-506) is an immunosuppressant that binds to a specific immunophilin, resulting in the suppression of the cellular immune response during transplant rejection. Except for some alterations in the spermatozoa, testicular morphological alterations have not been described in rats treated with tacrolimus. In the present study, we purpose to evaluate if the treatment with tacrolimus at long term of follow-up interferes in the integrity of the seminiferous tubules. Methods Rats aging 42-day-old received daily subcutaneous injections of 1 mg/kg/day of tacrolimus during 30 (T-30) and 60 (T-60) days; the rats from control groups (C-30 and C-60) received saline solution. The left testes were fixed in 4% formaldehyde and embedded in glycol methacrylate for morphological and morphometric analyses while right testes were fixed in Bouin's liquid and embedded in paraffin for detection of cell death by the TUNEL method. The epithelial and total tubular areas as well as the stages of the seminiferous epithelium and the number of spermatocytes, spermatids and Sertoli cells (SC) per tubule were obtained. Results In the treated groups, seminiferous tubules irregularly outlined showed disarranged cellular layers and loss of germ cells probably due to cell death, which was revealed by TUNEL method. In addition to germ cells, structural alterations in the SC and folding of the peritubular tissue were usually observed. The morphometric results revealed significant decrease in the number of SC, spermatocytes, spermatids and significant reduction in the epithelial and total tubular areas. Conclusion Tacrolimus induces significant histopathological disorders in the seminiferous tubules, resulting in spermatogenic damage and reduction in the number of Sertoli cells. A careful evaluation of the peritubular components will be necessary to clarify if these alterations are related to the effect of FK-506 on the peritubular tissue. PMID:19243597

  10. Microscopic Shock-Alteration Features in Shatter Cones from the Santa Fe Impact Structure, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, J. R.; Koeberl, C.; Reimold, W. U.

    Microscopic shock-alteration features, including planar microstructures in quartz and probable melt veneers, are documented near the surface of shatter cones from the Santa Fe impact structure, New Mexico, USA.

  11. Soluble Endoglin Level Increase Occurs Prior to Development of Subclinical Structural Vascular Alterations in Diabetic Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Bideci, Aysun; Damar, Çağrı; Derinkuyu, Betül; Çelik, Nurullah; Döğer, Esra; Yüce, Özge; Özmen, Mehmet Cüneyt; Çamurdan, Mahmut Orhun; Cinaz, Peyami

    2016-09-01

    Soluble endoglin (S-endoglin) has been implicated as a potential marker of endothelial dysfunction (ED) and was reported to be elevated in diabetic adults, correlating with the severity of diabetic vasculopathy. However, circulating S-endoglin and its association with other markers of ED have not been formerly analyzed in the first decade of diabetes onset in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Fifty-eight adolescents with moderately/poorly controlled T1DM were included in this study and twenty-nine healthy adolescents served as controls. The diabetic group was divided into two groups based on the presence of microalbuminuria, as the microalbuminuria group (n=15) and the normoalbuminuria group (n=43). Functional vascular alterations were evaluated by measuring serum S-endoglin and plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) was measured for evaluation of structural vascular alterations. The S-endoglin and NO levels of both microalbuminuria and normoalbuminuria groups were higher than those of the control group (for S-endoglin, p=0.047 and p<0.001; for NO, p=0.004 and p=0.006, respectively). The FMD percent was lower in the microalbuminuria group compared to the normoalbuminuria and control groups (p=0.036 and p=0.020, respectively). There were negative correlations between S-endoglin concentration and FMD percent (r=-0.213, p=0.051) and between serum S-endoglin concentration and albumin excretion rate (r=-0.361, p=0.005). No significant differences were found in CIMT among any of the groups (p=0.443). In adolescents with T1DM, S-endoglin concentrations might increase in parallel to the deterioration in endothelial function before subclinical structural vascular alterations become evident.

  12. Soluble Endoglin Level Increase Occurs Prior to Development of Subclinical Structural Vascular Alterations in Diabetic Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Bideci, Aysun; Damar, Çağrı; Derinkuyu, Betül; Çelik, Nurullah; Döğer, Esra; Yüce, Özge; Özmen, Mehmet Cüneyt; Çamurdan, Mahmut Orhun; Cinaz, Peyami

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Soluble endoglin (S-endoglin) has been implicated as a potential marker of endothelial dysfunction (ED) and was reported to be elevated in diabetic adults, correlating with the severity of diabetic vasculopathy. However, circulating S-endoglin and its association with other markers of ED have not been formerly analyzed in the first decade of diabetes onset in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: Fifty-eight adolescents with moderately/poorly controlled T1DM were included in this study and twenty-nine healthy adolescents served as controls. The diabetic group was divided into two groups based on the presence of microalbuminuria, as the microalbuminuria group (n=15) and the normoalbuminuria group (n=43). Functional vascular alterations were evaluated by measuring serum S-endoglin and plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) was measured for evaluation of structural vascular alterations. Results: The S-endoglin and NO levels of both microalbuminuria and normoalbuminuria groups were higher than those of the control group (for S-endoglin, p=0.047 and p<0.001; for NO, p=0.004 and p=0.006, respectively). The FMD percent was lower in the microalbuminuria group compared to the normoalbuminuria and control groups (p=0.036 and p=0.020, respectively). There were negative correlations between S-endoglin concentration and FMD percent (r=-0.213, p=0.051) and between serum S-endoglin concentration and albumin excretion rate (r=-0.361, p=0.005). No significant differences were found in CIMT among any of the groups (p=0.443). Conclusion: In adolescents with T1DM, S-endoglin concentrations might increase in parallel to the deterioration in endothelial function before subclinical structural vascular alterations become evident. PMID:27097763

  13. Running Induces Widespread Structural Alterations in the Hippocampus and Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Khalil, David; Gould, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity enhances hippocampal function but its effects on neuronal structure remain relatively unexplored outside of the dentate gyrus. Using Golgi impregnation and the lipophilic tracer DiI, we show that long-term voluntary running increases the density of dendritic spines in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus of adult rats. Exercise was associated with increased dendritic spine density not only in granule neurons of the dentate gyrus, but also in CA1 pyramidal neurons, and in layer III pyramidal neurons of the entorhinal cortex. In the CA1 region, changes in dendritic spine density are accompanied by changes in dendritic arborization and alterations in the morphology of individual spines. These findings suggest that physical activity exerts pervasive effects on neuronal morphology in the hippocampus and one of its afferent populations. These structural changes may contribute to running-induced changes in cognitive function. PMID:17636549

  14. Chloroplast Structure and Function Is Altered in the NCS2 Maize Mitochondrial Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Roussell, Deborah L.; Thompson, Deborah L.; Pallardy, Steve G.; Miles, Donald; Newton, Kathleen J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonchromosomal stripe 2 (NCS2) mutant of maize (Zea mays L.) has a DNA rearrangement in the mitochondrial genome that segregates with the abnormal growth phenotype. Yet, the NCS2 characteristic phenotype includes striped sectors of pale-green tissue on the leaves. This suggests a chloroplast abnormality. To characterize the chloroplasts present in the mutant sectors, we examined the chloroplast structure by electron microscopy, chloroplast function by radiolabeled carbon dioxide fixation and fluorescence induction kinetics, and thylakoid protein composition by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The data from these analyses suggest abnormal or prematurely arrested chloroplast development. Deleterious effects of the NCS2 mutant mitochondria upon the cells of the leaf include structural and functional alterations in the both the bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668157

  15. [Night sleep structural alteration as a function of individual strategy of adapting to 520-isolation].

    PubMed

    Zavalko, I M; Boritko, Ya S; Kovrov, G V; Vinokhodova, A G; Chekalina, A I; Smoleevsky, A E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the work was to establish a relationship between trends in sleep alteration and individual adaptation to the stress-factors in the 520-day isolation study. Psychological evaluations using a battery of motivation tests and L. Sobchik's modification of the Luscher personality test, and Mirror coordinograph enabled to differentiate groups reacting to the stress on the pattern of "control" (G-1) or "search" (G-2) manifested in individual styles of behavior and operator's activity. The 2 groups showed different dynamics of the night sleep structure. Difficulties with falling asleep in G-1 arose on the eve of "landing onto Mars" and end of the experiment, whereas in G-2 they were evident prior to the end only. Besides, the micro- and segmental sleep structures were more stable in G-1 suggesting the integrity of somnogenic mechanisms despite difficult sleep initiation.

  16. Halothane-induced alterations in cellular structure and proliferation of A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, E; Topouzova-Hristova, T; Hazarosova, R; Moskova, V

    2008-12-01

    Genotoxicity, cytotoxicity or teratogenicity are among the well-known detrimental effects of the volatile anaesthetics. The aim of the present work was to study the structural changes, proliferative activity and the possibility of alveolar A549 cells to recover after in vitro exposure to halothane at 1.5 and 2.1mM concentrations. Our data indicated significant reduction of viability, suppression of mitotic activity more than 60%, and that these alterations were accompanied by disturbances of nuclear and nucleolar structures. The most prominent negative effect was the destruction of the lamellar bodies, the main storage organelles of pulmonary surfactant, substantial for the lung physiology. In conclusion, halothane applied at clinically relevant concentrations exerts genotoxic and cytotoxic effect on the alveolar cells in vitro, most likely as a consequence of stress-induced apoptosis, thus modulating the respiratory function.

  17. Giant axonal neuropathy alters the structure of keratin intermediate filaments in human hair.

    PubMed

    Soomro, Asfia; Alsop, Richard J; Negishi, Atsuko; Kreplak, Laurent; Fudge, Douglas; Kuczmarski, Edward R; Goldman, Robert D; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2017-04-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) follows an autosomal recessive genetic inheritance and impedes the peripheral and central nervous system due to axonal swellings that are packed with neurofilaments. The patients display a number of phenotypes, including hypotonia, muscle weakness, decreased reflexes, ataxia, seizures, intellectual disability, pale skin and often curled hair. We used X-ray diffraction and tensile testing to determine potential changes to the structure of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) in the hair of patients with GAN. A statistically significant decrease in the 47 and the 27 Å diffraction signals were observed. Tensile tests determined that the hair was slightly stiffer, stronger and more extensible in GAN patients. These results suggest that the structure of keratin IFs in hair is altered in GAN, and the findings are compatible with an increased positional disorder of the keratin tetramers within the hair fibres. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Late structural alterations of cerebral white matter in long-term survivors of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dellani, Paulo R; Eder, Stefan; Gawehn, Joachim; Vucurevic, Goran; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Müller, Matthias J; Schmidberger, Heinz; Stoeter, Peter; Gutjahr, Peter

    2008-06-01

    To look for the presence and age-dependence of late structural alterations of otherwise normal-appearing cerebral gray and white matter after radiation and chemotherapy in adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during childhood. In a group of 13 adult survivors 17-37 years old, who had been treated by total brain radiation (18-24 Gy) and chemotherapy 16-28 years ago, prospective MR examinations including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed. Evaluation included volumetry, calculation of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), and comparison of results to an age-matched control group. DTI showed significantly reduced FA values in the temporal lobes (difference of 0.069 units, P < 0.001), hippocampi (difference of 0.033 units, P < 0.001), and thalami (difference of 0.046 units, P = 0.001), which were accompanied by significant white matter volume loss (difference of 92 cm(3), P < 0.001). Significant elevations of MD were limited to the temporal white matter (difference of 42 x 10(-6) mm(2)/s, P = 0.005). Global and frontal white matter MD correlated negatively to increasing age of the survivors (P < 0.01). With regard to structural white matter alterations, adult long-term survivors of childhood ALL, who had received total brain radiation and chemotherapy, apparently show the same overall age dependence as controls. Follow-up studies are needed for confirmation. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  19. Chronic ethanol intake leads to structural and molecular alterations in the rat endometrium.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marcelo; Milton, Flora A; Pinheiro, Patricia Fernanda F; Almeida-Francia, Camila C D; Cagnon-Quitete, Valeria H A; Tirapelli, Luiz F; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    We described the effects of low- and high-dose ethanol intake on the structure and apoptosis signaling of the uterine endometrium of UChA and UChB rats (animals with voluntary ethanol consumption). Thirty adult female rats, 90 days old, were divided into three groups (n = 10/group): UChA rats fed with 10% (v/v) ethanol ad libitum (free choice for water or ethanol) drinking < 1.9 g/kg/day; UChB rats fed with 10% (v/v) ethanol ad libitum (free choice for water or ethanol) drinking from 2 to 5 g/kg/day; control rats without ethanol (only water). After 120 days of treatment, rats displaying estrus were euthanized. Uterine epithelial cells of the UCh rats showed dilated cisterns of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, presence of lipid droplets, altered nuclear chromatin, and disrupted mitochondria. The UCh rats exhibited intense atrophied epithelial cells with smaller areas and perimeters of cytoplasm and nuclei. The endometrium of UChA rats showed higher levels of caspase-3 while Xiap and Bcl2 varied from moderate to weak. Both UChA and UChB rats exhibited a stronger immunoreaction to Ki-67 and IGFR-1 on epithelial and stromal cells. Chronic ethanol intake leads to structural and molecular alterations in the uterine endometrium of UCh rats, regardless of low- or high-dose consumption, promoting reproductive disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural white matter and functional connectivity alterations in patients with shoulder apprehension

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Davide; Cunningham, Gregory; Lädermann, Alexandre; Ozturk, Mehmet; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Haller, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) findings indicate that shoulder apprehension is more complex than a pure mechanical problem of the shoulder, showing a direct modification in functional brain networks associated with motor inhibition and emotional regulation. The current study extends these findings by investigating further structural alterations in patients with shoulder apprehension compared to controls. 14 aged patients with shoulder apprehension (27.3 ± 2.0 years) and 10 matched healthy controls (29.6 ± 1.3 years) underwent clinical and fMRI examination including fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Tract-based spatial statistics procedure was used to analyze white matter (WM) alterations. Functional images were analyzed investigating resting state network connectivity. DTI results were correlated with different shoulder clinical scores and functional connectivity networks. Fractional anisotropy (FA), representing white matter integrity, is increased in the left internal capsule and partially in the thalamus in patients compared to controls. Moreover, FA correlates negatively with simple shoulder test (SST) scores (p < .05) and positively with a functional connectivity network qualitatively replicating previous results (p < .01). This study extends previous findings, showing that in addition to functional changes, structural white matter changes are also present in patients with shoulder apprehension. PMID:28176877

  1. Altered brain structural networks in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children revealed by cortical thickness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Yanni; Li, Chenxi; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue

    2017-01-18

    This study investigated the cortical thickness and topological features of human brain anatomical networks related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Data were collected from 40 attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children and 40 normal control children. Interregional correlation matrices were established by calculating the correlations of cortical thickness between all pairs of cortical regions (68 regions) of the whole brain. Further thresholds were applied to create binary matrices to construct a series of undirected and unweighted graphs, and global, local, and nodal efficiencies were computed as a function of the network cost. These experimental results revealed abnormal cortical thickness and correlations in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and showed that the brain structural networks of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder subjects had inefficient small-world topological features. Furthermore, their topological properties were altered abnormally. In particular, decreased global efficiency combined with increased local efficiency in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children led to a disorder-related shift of the network topological structure toward regular networks. In addition, nodal efficiency, cortical thickness, and correlation analyses revealed that several brain regions were altered in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients. These findings are in accordance with a hypothesis of dysfunctional integration and segregation of the brain in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and provide further evidence of brain dysfunction in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients by observing cortical thickness on magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Kelp forest size alters microbial community structure and function on Vancouver Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Clasen, J L; Shurin, J B

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and important components of marine ecosystems, yet the interaction between bacteria and higher trophic levels remain poorly understood. The trophic cascade involving sea otters, urchins, and kelp in the North Pacific is a classic case of altered ecosystem states; however, its impacts on microbial communities are unknown. We investigated the response of microbial communities to variation in kelp abundance between regions with and without sea otter populations along the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. We compared bacterial community structure and function between regions with large and small kelp forests, including an subset of the bacterial community that produces alginate lyase, which allows direct utilization of kelp carbon. The abundance and activity of alginate-lyase-producing bacteria were 3.2 and 1.4 times higher, respectively, in the region with large kelp forests, and declined rapidly with increasing distance from kelp. Total bacterial abundance was 2.7 times greater, and bacteria grew faster and experienced more zooplankton grazing and viral-mediated mortality in the presence of large kelp forests. These patterns suggest that larger kelp forests produce more detritus and dissolved organic matter, which stimulate microbial activity. Our results indicate that variation in kelp forest size alters the community structure and productivity of microbes and contributes to the growing evidence that top predators interact with microbes and ecosystem processes through a cascade of indirect effects.

  3. Canopy structural alterations to nitrogen functions of the soil microbial community in a Quercus virginiana forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, L. D.; Van Stan, J. T., II; Rosier, C. L.; Gay, T. E.; Wu, T.

    2014-12-01

    Forest canopy structure controls the timing, amount and chemical character of precipitation supply to soils through interception and drainage along crown surfaces. Yet, few studies have examined forest canopy structural connections to soil microbial communities (SMCs), and none have measured how this affects SMC N functions. The maritime Quercus virginiana Mill. (southern live oak) forests of St Catherine's Island, GA, USA provide an ideal opportunity to examine canopy structural alterations to SMCs and their functioning, as their throughfall varies substantially across space due to dense Tillandsia usneoides L. (spanish moss) mats bestrewn throughout. To examine the impact of throughfall variability on SMC N functions, we examined points along the canopy coverage continuum: large canopy gaps (0%), bare canopy (50-60%), and canopy of heavy T. usneoides coverage (>=85%). Five sites beneath each of the canopy cover types were monitored for throughfall water/ions and soil leachates chemistry for one storm each month over the growing period (7 months, Mar-2014 to Sep-2014) to compare with soil chemistry and SMC communities sampled every two months throughout that same period (Mar, May, Jul, Sep). DGGE and QPCR analysis of the N functioning genes (NFGs) to characterize the ammonia oxidizing bacterial (AOB-amoA), archaea (AOA-amoA), and ammonification (chiA) communities were used to determine the nitrification and decomposition potential of these microbial communities. PRS™-probes (Western Ag Innovations Inc., Saskatoon, Canada) were then used to determine the availability of NO3-N and NH4+N in the soils over a 6-week period to evaluate whether the differing NFG abundance and community structures resulted in altered N cycling.

  4. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieqiong; Li, Ting; Sabel, Bernhard A.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Hongwei; Li, Jianhong; Xie, Xiaobin; Yang, Diya; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Ningli; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/2), amygdala and hippocampus. While VBA showed no significant differences in the gray matter volumes of patients, SBA revealed significantly reduced cortical thickness in the right frontal pole and ROI-based analysis volume shrinkage in LGN bilaterally, right V1 and left amygdala. Structural abnormalities were correlated with clinical parameters in a subset of the patients revealing that the left LGN volume was negatively correlated with bilateral cup-to-disk ratio (CDR), the right LGN volume was positively correlated with the mean deviation of the right visual hemifield, and the right V1 cortical thickness was negatively correlated with the right CDR in glaucoma. These results demonstrate that POAG affects both vision-related structures and non-visual cortical regions. Moreover, alterations of the brain visual structures reflect the clinical severity of glaucoma. PMID:26743811

  5. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieqiong; Li, Ting; Sabel, Bernhard A; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Hongwei; Li, Jianhong; Xie, Xiaobin; Yang, Diya; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Ningli; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-08

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/2), amygdala and hippocampus. While VBA showed no significant differences in the gray matter volumes of patients, SBA revealed significantly reduced cortical thickness in the right frontal pole and ROI-based analysis volume shrinkage in LGN bilaterally, right V1 and left amygdala. Structural abnormalities were correlated with clinical parameters in a subset of the patients revealing that the left LGN volume was negatively correlated with bilateral cup-to-disk ratio (CDR), the right LGN volume was positively correlated with the mean deviation of the right visual hemifield, and the right V1 cortical thickness was negatively correlated with the right CDR in glaucoma. These results demonstrate that POAG affects both vision-related structures and non-visual cortical regions. Moreover, alterations of the brain visual structures reflect the clinical severity of glaucoma.

  6. Structural Insight into the Altered Substrate Specificity of Human Cytochrome P450 2A6 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sansen, Stefaan; Hsu, Mei-Hui; Stout, C. David; Johnson, Eric F.

    2009-01-01

    Human P450 2A6 displays a small active site that is well adapted for the oxidation of small planar substrates. Mutagenesis of CYP2A6 resulted in an increased catalytic efficiency for indole biotransformation to pigments and conferred a capacity to oxidize substituted indoles (Wu, Z.-L., Podust, L.M. and Guengerich, F.P. (2005) J.Biol.Chem. 49, 41090-41100). Here, we describe the structural basis that underlies the altered metabolic profile of three mutant enzymes, P450 2A6 N297Q, L240C/N297Q and N297Q/I300V. The Asn297 substitution abolishes a potential hydrogen bonding interaction with substrates in the active site, and replaces a structural water molecule between the helix B′-C region and helix I while maintaining structural hydrogen bonding interactions. The structures of the P450 2A6 N297Q/L240C and N297Q/I300V mutants provide clues as to how the protein can adapt to fit the larger substituted indoles in the active site, and enable a comparison with other P450 family 2 enzymes for which the residue at the equivalent position was seen to function in isozyme specificity, structural integrity and protein flexibility. PMID:17540336

  7. Alterations of Functional and Structural Networks in Schizophrenia Patients with Auditory Verbal Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiajia; Wang, Chunli; Liu, Feng; Qin, Wen; Li, Jie; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: There have been many attempts at explaining the underlying neuropathological mechanisms of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in schizophrenia on the basis of regional brain changes, with the most consistent findings being that AVH are associated with functional and structural impairments in auditory and speech-related regions. However, the human brain is a complex network and the global topological alterations specific to AVH in schizophrenia remain unclear. Methods: Thirty-five schizophrenia patients with AVH, 41 patients without AVH, and 50 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The whole-brain functional and structural networks were constructed and analyzed using graph theoretical approaches. Inter-group differences in global network metrics (including small-world properties and network efficiency) were investigated. Results: We found that three groups had a typical small-world topology in both functional and structural networks. More importantly, schizophrenia patients with and without AVH exhibited common disruptions of functional networks, characterized by decreased clustering coefficient, global efficiency and local efficiency, and increased characteristic path length; structural networks of only schizophrenia patients with AVH showed increased characteristic path length compared with those of healthy controls. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that less “small-worldization” and lower network efficiency of functional networks may be an independent trait characteristic of schizophrenia, and regularization of structural networks may be the underlying pathological process engaged in schizophrenic AVH symptom expression. PMID:27014042

  8. Structural Insight Into the Altered Substrate Specificity of Human Cytochrome P450 2a6 Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Sansen, S.; Hsu, M.-H.; Stout, C.David.; Johnson, E.F.

    2007-07-12

    Human P450 2A6 displays a small active site that is well adapted for the oxidation of small planar substrates. Mutagenesis of CYP2A6 resulted in an increased catalytic efficiency for indole biotransformation to pigments and conferred a capacity to oxidize substituted indoles (Wu, Z.-L., Podust, L.M., Guengerich, F.P. J. Biol. Chem. 49 (2005) 41090-41100.). Here, we describe the structural basis that underlies the altered metabolic profile of three mutant enzymes, P450 2A6 N297Q, L240C/N297Q and N297Q/I300V. The Asn297 substitution abolishes a potential hydrogen bonding interaction with substrates in the active site, and replaces a structural water molecule between the helix B-C region and helix I while maintaining structural hydrogen bonding interactions. The structures of the P450 2A6 N297Q/L240C and N297Q/I300V mutants provide clues as to how the protein can adapt to fit the larger substituted indoles in the active site, and enable a comparison with other P450 family 2 enzymes for which the residue at the equivalent position was seen to function in isozyme specificity, structural integrity and protein flexibility.

  9. Structure-function relationships of brazzein variants with altered interactions with the human sweet taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Singarapu, Kiran K; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2016-03-01

    Brazzein (Brz) is a small (54 amino acid residue) sweet tasting protein with physical and taste properties superior to other non-carbohydrate sweeteners. In an investigation of sequence-dependent functional properties of the protein, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structures and dynamic properties of two Brz variants: one with a single-site substitution (D40K), which is three-fold sweeter than wild-type Brz, and one with a two-residue insertion between residues 18 and 19 (ins18 RI19 ), which is devoid of sweetness. Although the three-dimensional folds of the two variants were very similar to wild-type Brz, they exhibited local conformational and dynamic differences. The D40K substitution abolished the strong inter-stand H-bond between the side chains of residues Gln46 and Asp40 present in wild-type Brz and increased the flexibility of the protein especially at the mutation site. This increased flexibility presumably allows this site to interact more strongly with the G-protein coupled human sweet receptor. On the other hand, the Arg-Ile insertion within Loop9-19 leads to distortion of this loop and stiffening of the adjacent site whose flexibility appears to be required for productive interaction with the sweet receptor. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  10. Packaging and structural phenotype of brome mosaic virus capsid protein with altered N-terminal {beta}-hexamer structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wispelaere, Melissanne de; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Wilkens, Stephan; Rao, A.L.N.

    2011-10-10

    The first 45 amino acid region of brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid protein (CP) contains RNA binding and structural domains that are implicated in the assembly of infectious virions. One such important structural domain encompassing amino acids {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32}, highly conserved between BMV and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), exhibits a {beta}-hexamer structure. In this study we report that alteration of the {beta}-hexamer structure by mutating {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32} to {sup 28}AAAAA{sup 32} had no effect either on symptom phenotype, local and systemic movement in Chenopodium quinoa and RNA profile of in vivo assembled virions. However, sensitivity to RNase and assembly phenotypes distinguished virions assembled with CP subunits having {beta}-hexamer from those of wild type. A comparison of 3-D models obtained by cryo electron microscopy revealed overall similar structural features for wild type and mutant virions, with small but significant differences near the 3-fold axes of symmetry.

  11. 2015 Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence and Status Review For: the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a WebEx/teleconference with members of the Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element, representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP), NASA Headquarters, and NASA Research and Education Support Services (NRESS) on December 17, 2015 (list of participants is in Section VI of this report). The SRP reviewed the new Evidence Report for the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Spaceflight (from here on referred to as the 2015 Sensorimotor Evidence Report), and also received a status review of the Risk. The opening section of the 2015 Sensorimotor Evidence Report provides written descriptions of various incidents that have occurred during space missions. In most of these incidents, the main underlying contributing factors are not easy to identify unambiguously. For example, in section 1.9, a number of falls occurred while astronauts were walking on the moon. It is not clear to the SRP, however, why they fell. It is only possible to extrapolate from likely specific psychophysical or physiological abnormalities, but how these abnormalities were determined, and how they were directly responsible for the falls is unclear to the SRP. Section 2.1.2 on proprioception is very interesting, but the functional significance of the abnormalities detected is not clear. The SRP sees this as a problem throughout the report: a mapping between the component abnormalities identified and the holistic behaviors that are most relevant, for example, controlling the vehicle, and locomotion during egress, is generally lacking. The SRP thinks the cognitive section is too strongly focused on vestibular functioning. The SRP questions the notion that the main cognitive effects are mainly attributable to reversible vestibular changes induced by spaceflight. The SRP thinks that there can also

  12. Quantitative analysis of nanoscale intranuclear structural alterations in hippocampal cells in chronic alcoholism via transmission electron microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Ghimire, Hemendra M.; Almabadi, Huda M.; Tripathi, Vibha; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Rao, Radhakrishna; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2017-04-01

    Chronic alcoholism is known to alter the morphology of the hippocampus, an important region of cognitive function in the brain. Therefore, to understand the effect of chronic alcoholism on hippocampal neural cells, we employed a mouse model of chronic alcoholism and quantified intranuclear nanoscale structural alterations in these cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of hippocampal neurons were obtained, and the degree of structural alteration in terms of mass density fluctuation was determined using the light-localization properties of optical media generated from TEM imaging. The results, which were obtained at length scales ranging from ~30 to 200 nm, show that 10–12 week-old mice fed a Lieber–DeCarli liquid (alcoholic) diet had a higher degree of structural alteration than control mice fed a normal diet without alcohol. The degree of structural alteration became significantly distinguishable at a sample length of ~100 nm, which is the typical length scale of the building blocks of cells, such as DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids. Interestingly, different degrees of structural alteration at such length scales suggest possible structural rearrangement of chromatin inside the nuclei in chronic alcoholism.

  13. Structural and alteration controls on gold mineralization the of the amphibolite facies Detour Lake Deposit, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubosq, Renelle; Schneider, David

    2016-04-01

    The 15M oz Detour Lake deposit is a Neoarchean orogenic gold ore body located in the northern most region of the Abitibi district within the Superior Province. The mine is an open pit design in the high strain zone of the Sunday Lake Deformation Zone (SLDZ). The ductile-brittle SLDZ parallels the broadly E-W Abitibi greenstone belt and the deposit is situated in a dilation zone between volcanoclastic rocks of the Caopatina Assemblage and Lower Detour Lake Formation, consisting of ultramafic talc-chlorite-sericite schist. The Upper Detour Lake Formation consists of pillowed and massive flows and hyloclastic units crosscut by minor felsic to intermediate dykes. All of the formations are sub-vertical, north-dipping units with stretching lineations indicating dip-slip motion. The Detour deposit differs from other classic ore deposits in the dominantly greenschist facies Abitibi Subprovince by possessing an amphibolite facies metamorphic assemblage of actinolite-biotite-plagioclase-almandine. Consequently, the typical indicator minerals used to identify alteration and mineralization, such as secondary biotite, may not be useful. Petrological and geochemical analyses have revealed at least four populations of biotite: 1) large euhedral crystals located within quartz-carbonate veins, 2) small, euhedral zoned crystals present as alteration haloes, 3) very small, anhedral to subhedral indistinct crystal present in mafic volcanic host rock, and 4) large euhedral crystals defining the main metamorphic foliation in the metasediments. Extensive examination of mineral assemblages, alteration products, and vein structure in rock core across barren and mineralized zones has documented over a dozen vein types which can be grouped into two main categories: 1) sulfidized quartz-carbonate veins associated with biotite alteration and 2) late carbonate veins. Gold grades do not prove to be dependent on vein type but rather on the host rock composition: the highest ore grades are present

  14. Fabrication of thickness controllable free-standing sandwich-structured hybrid carbon film for high-rate and high-power supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Helin; Wei, Sihang; Tian, Weifeng; Zhu, Daming; Liu, Yuhao; Yuan, Lili; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid carbon films composed of graphene film and porous carbon film may give full play to the advantages of both carbon materials, and have great potential for application in energy storage and conversion devices. Unfortunately, there are very few reports on fabrication of hybrid carbon films. Here we demonstrate a simple approach to fabricate free-standing sandwich-structured hybrid carbon film composed of porous amorphous carbon film and multilayer graphene film by chemical vapor deposition in a controllable and scalable way. Hybrid carbon films reveal good electrical conductivity, excellent flexibility, and good compatibility with substrate. Supercapacitors assembled by hybrid carbon films exhibit ultrahigh rate capability, wide frequency range, good capacitance performance, and high-power density. Moreover, this approach may provide a general path for fabrication of hybrid carbon materials with different structures by using different metals with high carbon solubility, and greatly expands the application scope of carbon materials. PMID:25394410

  15. Impact of the Mountain Pine Beetle on the net Ecosystem Productivity of Lodgepole Pine Stands and the Role of Secondary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Black, T.; Nesic, Z.; Spilttlehouse, D.; Trofymow, T.; Fredeen, A.; Egginton, V.; Burton, P.; Grant, N.

    2009-05-01

    British Columbia, Canada is experiencing a severe mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic extending over an area of 135,000 km2. The widespread mortality of lodgepole pine caused by the beetle is having severe implications for Canada's carbon (C) budget. This study used the eddy-covariance technique to examine how the beetle is affecting the net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of two attacked lodgepole pine stands in the central interior of BC over 2 years. MPB-KS is an 83-year-old stand that was first attacked in 2006. By the start of 2007, roughly 60% of the canopy had been beetle attacked and by August 2008 only 21% of the canopy remained healthy. MPB-CR, a 110-year-old stand, first attacked by the beetle in 2003, had >95% pine mortality in 2007, and also differed from MPB-KS in that it had a developed secondary structure (seedlings, saplings, sub- canopy and canopy trees that survive a beetle attack) (SS) and deciduous ground layer. In 2007, MPB-KS had an annual and growing season (GS) NEP of -55 and 36 g C m-2, and in 2008, an annual and GS NEP of -42 and 34 g C m-2, respectively. MPB-CR had an annual and GS NEP of -22 and 23 g C m-2 in 2007 and 2 and 75 g C m-2 in 2008. In both years, MPB-KS was a GS C sink due to the productivity of the healthy portion of the canopy, the many seedlings and the mossy surface layer. Between 2007 and 2008, MPB-CR experienced a reduction in LAI (from 0.91 to 0.78), due to needle-fall, which led to an opening up of the canopy and resulted in a high SS C uptake in 2008. These results were confirmed by foliar CO2 exchange measurements which showed a high productivity for the SS and deciduous vegetation.

  16. Structural and functional alterations to rat medial prefrontal cortex following chronic restraint stress and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, Deena S.; Pavlides, Constantine; Hunter, Richard G.; Bloss, Erik B.; Hof, Patrick R.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic stress has been shown in animal models to result in altered dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). It has been hypothesized that the stress-induced dendritic retractions and spine loss lead to disrupted connectivity that results in stress-induced functional impairment of mPFC. While these alterations were initially viewed as a neurodegenerative event, it has recently been established that stress induced dendritic alterations are reversible if animals are given time to recover from chronic stress. However, whether spine growth accompanies dendritic extension remains to be demonstrated. It is also not known if recovery-phase dendritic extension allows for re-establishment of functional capacity. The goal of this study, therefore, was to characterize the structural and functional effects of chronic stress and recovery on the infralimbic (IL) region of the rat mPFC. We compared neuronal morphology of layer V IL pyramidal neurons from animals subjected to 21 days of chronic restraint stress (CRS) to those that experienced CRS followed by a 21 day recovery period. Layer V pyramidal cell functional capacity was assessed by intra-IL long-term potentiation (LTP) both in the absence and presence of SKF38393, a dopamine receptor partial agonist and a known PFC LTP modulator. We found that stress-induced IL apical dendritic retraction and spine loss co-occur with receptor-mediated impairments to catecholaminergic facilitation of synaptic plasticity. We also found that while post-stress recovery did not reverse distal dendritic retraction, it did result in over-extension of proximal dendritic neuroarchitecture and spine growth as well as a full reversal of CRS-induced impairments to catecholaminergic-mediated synaptic plasticity. Our results support the hypothesis that disease-related PFC dysfunction is a consequence of network disruption secondary to altered structural and functional plasticity and that circuitry

  17. Body representations in schizophrenia: an alteration of body structural description is common to people with schizophrenia while alterations of body image worsen with passivity symptoms.

    PubMed

    Graham-Schmidt, Kyran T; Martin-Iverson, Mathew T; Holmes, Nicholas P; Waters, Flavie

    2016-07-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia, particularly those with passivity symptoms, often feel that their actions and thoughts are controlled by an external agent. Recent evidence has elucidated the role of body representations in the aetiology of passivity symptoms, yet one representation - body structural description - has not yet been examined. Additionally, body image has rarely been examined outside of bodily illusions (e.g., rubber hand experiments) and external validation is required. Body structural description was assessed with an in-between task and a matching body parts by location task, and body image with a questionnaire examining body distortion experiences (containing subscales assessing boundary loss, depersonalisation and body size distortions). Individuals with schizophrenia (20 with current, 12 with past and 21 with no history of passivity symptoms) and 48 healthy controls participated in the study. People with schizophrenia (as a group) made more errors on the in-between task, but not on the matching body parts by location task. Individuals with current passivity symptoms reported greater distortions on all subscales relative to the other clinical samples, except for experiences of boundary loss which were common to both passivity symptom groups. The results indicate that body structural description may be altered in schizophrenia generally and body image alterations are worsened in passivity symptoms, and these alterations likely contribute to the emergence of passivity symptoms.

  18. Implications for faunal habitat related to altered macrophyte structure in regulated lakes in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Douglas A.; Meeker, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Water-level regulation has altered the plant species composition and thus the structure of nearshore aquatic macrophyte communities in two regulated lakes in northern Minnesota as compared with a nearby unregulated lake. Results of previous faunal studies in the regulated lakes were used as a basis for assessing the effects of vegetation changes on faunal communities. The unregulated lake with mean annual water-level fluctuations of 1.6 m supported structurally diverse plant communities and varied faunal habitat at all depths studied. Mean annual fluctuations on one regulated lake were reduced to 1.1 m, and dense beds of four erect aquatic macrophytes dominated the 1.75-m depth that was never dewatered. We suggest that this lack of plant diversity and structural complexity resulted in diminished habitat for invertebrates, reduced availability of invertebrates as food for waterbirds and fish, reduced winter food supplies for muskrats, and reduced feeding efficiency for adult northern pike, yellow perch, and muskellunge. Mean annual fluctuations in the other regulated lake were increased to 2.7 m, and rosette and mat-forming species dominated the 1.25-m depth that was affected by winter drawdowns. We suggest that the lack of larger canopy plants resulted in poor habitat for invertebrates, reduced availability of invertebrates as food for waterbirds and fish, and poor nursery and adult feeding habitat for many species of fish. In addition, the timing and extent of winter drawdowns reduced access to macrophytes as food for muskrats and as spawning habitat for northern pike and yellow perch. In regulated lakes throughout the world, indirect effects on aquatic fauna resulting from alteration of wetland and aquatic macrophyte communities should be considered when water-level management plans are developed.

  19. Gray Matter Structural Alterations in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Relationship to Neuropsychological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Christopher J.; Lencz, Todd; Robinson, Delbert G.; Burdick, Katherine E.; Ashtari, Manzar; Malhotra, Anil K.; Betensky, Julia D.; Szeszko, Philip R.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous magnetic resonance (MR) studies have examined gray matter structural alterations in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Few, however, have used automated, highly reliable techniques such as voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to examine the entire brain in contrast to selected regions of interest. Moreover, few studies have examined the functional correlates of gray matter abnormalities in OCD. We used VBM to evaluate regional gray matter differences between 21 OCD patients and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. All patients had comprehensive neuropsychological assessments. MR images were normalized to a customized template and segmented using optimized VBM. OCD patients had significantly (P < 0.001; uncorrected) more gray matter in the left thalamus compared to healthy volunteers. OCD patients without major depression had significantly more gray matter in the thalamus (bilaterally) and left orbitofrontal cortex as well as an unpredicted region of more right dorsolateral prefrontal gray matter, which remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons, compared to healthy volunteers. In the subgroup of patients without depression greater right hemisphere thalamic and dorsolateral prefrontal gray matter correlated significantly with worse motor functioning and processing speed, respectively. In this subgroup there was also a tendency for more gray matter in the left orbitofrontal cortex and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to be associated with greater symptom severity. Our findings provide additional support for involvement of cortical-striatal-thalamic circuits in the pathophysiology of OCD and preliminary evidence that a defect involving the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may also be implicated. Moreover, our data suggest that gray matter structural alterations in OCD have neuropsychological correlates, which may be useful in further characterizing structure-function relations in this disorder. PMID:18938065

  20. Alteration of human serum albumin tertiary structure induced by glycation. Spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, A.; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Chudzik, M.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Sułkowska, A.

    2016-01-01

    The modification of human serum albumin (HSA) structure by non-enzymatic glycation is one of the underlying factors that contribute to the development of complications of diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present work was to estimate how glycation of HSA altered its tertiary structure. Changes of albumin conformation were investigated by comparison of glycated (gHSA) and non-glycated human serum albumin (HSA) absorption spectra, red edge excitation shift (REES) and synchronous spectra. Effect of glycation on human serum albumin tertiary structure was also investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Formation of gHSA Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) caused absorption of UV-VIS light between 310 nm and 400 nm while for non-glycated HSA in this region no absorbance has been registered. Analysis of red edge excitation shift effect allowed for observation of structural changes of gHSA in the hydrophobic pocket containing the tryptophanyl residue. Moreover changes in the microenvironment of tryptophanyl and tyrosyl residues brought about AGEs on the basis of synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy have been confirmed. The influence of glycation process on serum albumin binding to 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (DNSA), 2-(p-toluidino) naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (TNS), has been studied. Fluorescence analysis showed that environment of both binding site I and II is modified by galactose glycation.

  1. A multivariate pattern analysis study of the HIV-related white matter anatomical structural connections alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhenchao; Liu, Zhenyu; Li, Ruili; Cui, Xinwei; Li, Hongjun; Dong, Enqing; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    It's widely known that HIV infection would cause white matter integrity impairments. Nevertheless, it is still unclear that how the white matter anatomical structural connections are affected by HIV infection. In the current study, we employed a multivariate pattern analysis to explore the HIV-related white matter connections alterations. Forty antiretroviraltherapy- naïve HIV patients and thirty healthy controls were enrolled. Firstly, an Automatic Anatomical Label (AAL) atlas based white matter structural network, a 90 × 90 FA-weighted matrix, was constructed for each subject. Then, the white matter connections deprived from the structural network were entered into a lasso-logistic regression model to perform HIV-control group classification. Using leave one out cross validation, a classification accuracy (ACC) of 90% (P=0.002) and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.96 was obtained by the classification model. This result indicated that the white matter anatomical structural connections contributed greatly to HIV-control group classification, providing solid evidence that the white matter connections were affected by HIV infection. Specially, 11 white matter connections were selected in the classification model, mainly crossing the regions of frontal lobe, Cingulum, Hippocampus, and Thalamus, which were reported to be damaged in previous HIV studies. This might suggest that the white matter connections adjacent to the HIV-related impaired regions were prone to be damaged.

  2. Is higher serum cholesterol associated with altered tendon structure or tendon pain? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Benjamin J; Cook, Jill L; Docking, Sean I; Gaida, James E

    2015-12-01

    Tendon pain occurs in individuals with extreme cholesterol levels (familial hypercholesterolaemia). It is unclear whether the association with tendon pain is strong with less extreme elevations of cholesterol. To determine whether lipid levels are associated with abnormal tendon structure or the presence of tendon pain. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant articles were found through an electronic search of 6 medical databases-MEDLINE, Cochrane, AMED, EMBASE, Web of Science and Scopus. We included all case-control or cross-sectional studies with data describing (1) lipid levels or use of lipid-lowering drugs and (2) tendon structure or tendon pain. 17 studies (2612 participants) were eligible for inclusion in the review. People with altered tendon structure or tendon pain had significantly higher total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; with mean difference values of 0.66, 1.00, 0.33, and -0.19 mmol/L, respectively. The results of this review indicate that a relationship exists between an individual's lipid profile and tendon health. However, further longitudinal studies are required to determine whether a cause and effect relationship exists between tendon structure and lipid levels. This could lead to advancement in the understanding of the pathoaetiology and thus treatment of tendinopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. The influence of preterm birth on structural alterations of the vision-deprived brain.

    PubMed

    Wan, Catherine Y; Wood, Amanda G; Chen, Jian; Wilson, Sarah J; Reutens, David C

    2013-04-01

    Differences in brain structures between blind and sighted individuals have not been widely investigated. Furthermore, existing studies have included individuals who were blinded by retinopathy of prematurity, a condition that is associated with premature birth. Recent pediatric research has reported structural differences in individuals who were born prematurely, suggesting that some of the structural abnormalities previously observed in blind individuals may be related to prematurity rather than being specific to blindness. In the present study, we used voxel-based morphometry to investigate gray and white matter differences between 24 blind and 16 sighted individuals. Of the blind individuals, six were born prematurely and 18 at term. Compared to those born at term, blind individuals born preterm showed differences in gray, but not white, matter volumes in various brain regions. When the preterm individuals were excluded from analysis, there were significant differences between blind and sighted individuals. Full-term blind individuals showed regional gray matter decreases in the cuneus, lingual gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, precuneus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, and the thalamus, and gray matter increases in the globus pallidus. They also showed regional white matter decreases in the cuneus, lingual gyrus, and the posterior cingulate. These differences were observed in blind individuals irrespective of blindness onset age, providing evidence for structural alterations in the mature brain. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the potential impact of premature birth on neurodevelopmental outcomes in studies of blind individuals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic fluoxetine treatment alters the structure, connectivity and plasticity of cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Guirado, Ramon; Perez-Rando, Marta; Sanchez-Matarredona, David; Castrén, Eero; Nacher, Juan

    2014-10-01

    Novel hypotheses suggest that antidepressants, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, induce neuronal structural plasticity, resembling that of the juvenile brain, although the underlying mechanisms of this reopening of the critical periods still remain unclear. However, recent studies suggest that inhibitory networks play an important role in this structural plasticity induced by fluoxetine. For this reason we have analysed the effects of a chronic fluoxetine treatment in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of transgenic mice displaying eGFP labelled interneurons. We have found an increase in the expression of molecules related to critical period plasticity, such as the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), GAD67/65 and synaptophysin, as well as a reduction in the number of parvalbumin expressing interneurons surrounded by perineuronal nets. We have also described a trend towards decrease in the perisomatic inhibitory puncta on pyramidal neurons in the mPFC and an increase in the density of inhibitory puncta on eGFP interneurons. Finally, we have found that chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the structure of interneurons in the mPFC, increasing their dendritic spine density. The present study provides evidence indicating that fluoxetine promotes structural changes in the inhibitory neurons of the adult cerebral cortex, probably through alterations in plasticity-related molecules of neurons or the extracellular matrix surrounding them, which are present in interneurons and are known to be crucial for the development of the critical periods of plasticity in the juvenile brain.

  5. Alteration of human serum albumin tertiary structure induced by glycation. Spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, A; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M; Chudzik, M; Równicka-Zubik, J; Sułkowska, A

    2016-01-15

    The modification of human serum albumin (HSA) structure by non-enzymatic glycation is one of the underlying factors that contribute to the development of complications of diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present work was to estimate how glycation of HSA altered its tertiary structure. Changes of albumin conformation were investigated by comparison of glycated (gHSA) and non-glycated human serum albumin (HSA) absorption spectra, red edge excitation shift (REES) and synchronous spectra. Effect of glycation on human serum albumin tertiary structure was also investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Formation of gHSA Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) caused absorption of UV-VIS light between 310 nm and 400 nm while for non-glycated HSA in this region no absorbance has been registered. Analysis of red edge excitation shift effect allowed for observation of structural changes of gHSA in the hydrophobic pocket containing the tryptophanyl residue. Moreover changes in the microenvironment of tryptophanyl and tyrosyl residues brought about AGEs on the basis of synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy have been confirmed. The influence of glycation process on serum albumin binding to 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (DNSA), 2-(p-toluidino) naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (TNS), has been studied. Fluorescence analysis showed that environment of both binding site I and II is modified by galactose glycation.

  6. Secondary structure alterations in insulin and growth hormone water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Lene; Vermehren, Charlotte; Bjerregaard, Simon; Froekjaer, Sven

    2003-03-18

    Water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions have shown a promising release profile of small drug molecules and proteins. However, the major concerns are the structural stability, the retention of the activity and to avoid unwanted immunological reactions caused by the changes in protein structure. In the present study, the secondary structure of insulin and growth hormone is investigated after manufacture of w/o emulsions, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Initial investigations indicate an altered distribution in the secondary structure elements, e.g. alpha-helix and beta-sheet, measured by area overlap calculations. The changes are more pronounced for growth hormone than for insulin. The overlapping area is 0.93 +/- 0.01 for the emulsion containing insulin manufactured at 0 degrees C and homogenised for 3 min, the corresponding value for growth hormone is 0.83 +/- 0.01. The droplet size changes from 0.27 +/- 0.04 microm in the blank w/o emulsion to 0.79 +/- 0.13 and 0.66 +/- 0.21 microm when insulin or growth hormone is incorporated into the w/o emulsions, respectively. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. New insights into structural alteration of enamel apatite induced by citric acid and sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Klocke, Arndt; Mihailova, Boriana; Tosheva, Lubomira; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2008-07-24

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy were applied to analyze the surface structure of enamel apatite exposed to citric acid and to investigate the protective potential of fluorine-containing reagents against citric acid-induced erosion. Enamel and, for comparison, geological hydroxylapatite samples were treated with aqueous solutions of citric acid and sodium fluoride of different concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 mol/L for citric acid solutions and from 0.5 to 2.0% for fluoride solutions. The two solutions were applied either simultaneously or consecutively. The citric acid-induced structural modification of apatite increases with the increase in the citric acid concentration and the number of treatments. The application of sodium fluoride alone does not suppress the atomic level changes in apatite exposed to acidic agents. The addition of sodium fluoride to citric acid solutions leads to formation of surface CaF2 and considerably reduces the changes in the apatite P-O-Ca framework. However, the CaF2 globules deposited on the enamel surface seem to be insufficient to prevent the alteration of the apatite structure upon further exposure to acidic agents. No evidence for fluorine-induced recovery of the apatite structure was found.

  8. Problematic internet use is associated with structural alterations in the brain reward system in females.

    PubMed

    Altbäcker, Anna; Plózer, Enikő; Darnai, Gergely; Perlaki, Gábor; Horváth, Réka; Orsi, Gergely; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Bogner, Péter; Schwarcz, Attila; Kovács, Norbert; Komoly, Sámuel; Clemens, Zsófia; Janszky, József

    2016-12-01

    Neuroimaging findings suggest that excessive Internet use shows functional and structural brain changes similar to substance addiction. Even though it is still under debate whether there are gender differences in case of problematic use, previous studies by-passed this question by focusing on males only or by using gender matched approach without controlling for potential gender effects. We designed our study to find out whether there are structural correlates in the brain reward system of problematic Internet use in habitual Internet user females. T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance (MR) images were collected in 82 healthy habitual Internet user females. Structural brain measures were investigated using both automated MR volumetry and voxel based morphometry (VBM). Self-reported measures of problematic Internet use and hours spent online were also assessed. According to MR volumetry, problematic Internet use was associated with increased grey matter volume of bilateral putamen and right nucleus accumbens while decreased grey matter volume of orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Similarly, VBM analysis revealed a significant negative association between the absolute amount of grey matter OFC and problematic Internet use. Our findings suggest structural brain alterations in the reward system usually related to addictions are present in problematic Internet use.

  9. Is higher serum cholesterol associated with altered tendon structure or tendon pain? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Benjamin J; Cook, Jill L; Docking, Sean I; Gaida, James E

    2015-01-01

    Background Tendon pain occurs in individuals with extreme cholesterol levels (familial hypercholesterolaemia). It is unclear whether the association with tendon pain is strong with less extreme elevations of cholesterol. Objective To determine whether lipid levels are associated with abnormal tendon structure or the presence of tendon pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant articles were found through an electronic search of 6 medical databases—MEDLINE, Cochrane, AMED, EMBASE, Web of Science and Scopus. We included all case–control or cross-sectional studies with data describing (1) lipid levels or use of lipid-lowering drugs and (2) tendon structure or tendon pain. Results 17 studies (2612 participants) were eligible for inclusion in the review. People with altered tendon structure or tendon pain had significantly higher total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; with mean difference values of 0.66, 1.00, 0.33, and −0.19 mmol/L, respectively. Conclusions The results of this review indicate that a relationship exists between an individual’s lipid profile and tendon health. However, further longitudinal studies are required to determine whether a cause and effect relationship exists between tendon structure and lipid levels. This could lead to advancement in the understanding of the pathoaetiology and thus treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:26474596

  10. Standing equine dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Robert A; Easley, Jack

    2014-04-01

    Dental surgeries refer to procedures that affect the dental tissues or their supporting structures. With the development of specific, efficacious, and conservative treatments, morbidity risks have been lowered and chances of benefiting the health of equids improved. Advances in quality of sedation, analgesia, and locoregional anesthesia allow a majority of dental surgeries to be performed in the standing patient. This update focuses on an orthograde endodontic technique, a minimally invasive buccotomy technique, with the potential to combine it with a transbuccal screw extraction technique, and revisits the AO pinless external fixator for fractures of the body of the mandible.

  11. Molecular interactions alter clay and polymer structure in polymer clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Debashis; Katti, Kalpana S; Katti, Dinesh R

    2008-04-01

    OMMTs with three different organic modifiers further confirm the change in structural orientation of silica tetrahedra of OMMTs by organic modifiers. Thus, from our work it is evident that organic modifiers have significant influence on the structure of polymer and clay in PCNs. It appears that in nanocomposites, in addition to strong interactions at interfaces between constituents, the structure of different phases (clay and polymer) of PCN are also altered, which does not occur in conventional composite materials. Thus, the mechanisms governing composite action in nanocomposites are quite different from that of conventional macro composites.

  12. Myocardial Structural Alteration and Systolic Dysfunction in Preclinical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Kai Hang; Atsma, Douwe E.; Delgado, Victoria; Ng, Arnold C. T.; Witkowski, Tomasz G.; Ewe, See Hooi; Auger, Dominique; Holman, Eduard R.; van Mil, Anneke M.; Breuning, Martijn H.; Tse, Hung Fat; Bax, Jeroen J.; Schalij, Martin J.; Marsan, Nina Ajmone

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the presence of myocardial structural alterations and subtle myocardial dysfunction during familial screening in asymptomatic mutation carriers without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype. Methods and Findings Sixteen HCM families with pathogenic mutation were studied and 46 patients with phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen+) and 47 patients without phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen−) were observed. Twenty-five control subjects, matched with the Mut+/Phen− group, were recruited for comparison. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate conventional parameters, myocardial structural alteration by calibrated integrated backscatter (cIBS) and global and segmental longitudinal strain by speckle tracking analysis. All 3 groups had similar left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction. Basal anteroseptal cIBS was the highest in Mut+/Phen+ patients (−14.0±4.6 dB, p<0.01) and was higher in Mut+/Phen− patients as compared to controls (−17.0±2.3 vs. −22.6±2.9 dB, p<0.01) suggesting significant myocardial structural alterations. Global and basal anteroseptal longitudinal strains (−8.4±4.0%, p<0.01) were the most impaired in Mut+/Phen+ patients as compared to the other 2 groups. Although global longitudinal strain was similar between Mut+/Phen− group and controls, basal anteroseptal strain was lower in Mut+/Phen− patients (−14.1±3.8%, p<0.01) as compared to controls (−19.9±2.9%, p<0.01), suggesting a subclinical segmental systolic dysfunction. A combination of >−19.0 dB basal anteroseptal cIBS or >−18.0% basal anteroseptal longitudinal strain had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 72% in differentiating Mut+/Phen− group from controls. Conclusion The use of cIBS and segmental longitudinal strain can differentiate HCM Mut+/Phen− patients from controls with important clinical implications for the family screening and follow-up of these patients. PMID:22574137

  13. A non-contact technique for evaluation of elastic structures at large stand-off distances: applications to classification of fluids in steel vessels.

    PubMed

    Kaduchak, G; Sinha, D N; Lizon, D C; Kelecher, M J

    2000-01-01

    A novel technique for non-contact evaluation of structures in air at large stand-off distances (on the order of several meters) has been developed. It utilizes a recently constructed air-coupled, parametric acoustic array to excite the resonance vibrations of elastic, fluid-filled vessels. The parametric array is advantageous for NDE applications in that it is capable of producing a much narrower beamwidth and broader bandwidth than typical devices that operate under linear acoustic principles. In the present experiments, the array operates at a carrier frequency of 217 kHz, and the sound field several meters from the source is described spectrally by the envelope of the drive voltage. An operating bandwidth of more than 25 kHz at a center frequency of 15 kHz is demonstrated. For the present application, the array is used to excite vibrations of fluid-filled, steel containers at stand-off distances of greater than 3 m. The vibratory response of a container is detected with a laser vibrometer in a monostatic configuration with the acoustic source. By analyzing the change in the response of the lowest order, antisymmetric Lamb wave as the interior fluid loading conditions of the container are changed, the fluid contained within the steel vessel is classified.

  14. Standing footprint diagnostic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y. F.; Fan, Y. B.; Li, Z. Y.; Newman, T.; Lv, C. S.; Fan, Y. Z.

    2013-10-01

    Center of pressure is commonly used to evaluate standing balance. Even though it is incomplete, no better evaluation method has been presented. We designed our experiment with three standing postures: standing with feet together, standing with feet shoulder width apart, and standing with feet slightly wider than shoulder width. Our platform-based pressure system collected the instantaneous plantar pressure (standing footprint). A physical quantity of instantaneous standing footprint principal axis was defined, and it was used to construct an index to evaluate standing balance. Comparison between results from our newly established index and those from the center of pressure index to evaluate the stability of different standing postures revealed that the standing footprint principal axis index could better respond to the standing posture change than the existing one. Analysis indicated that the insensitive response to the relative position between feet and to the standing posture change from the center of pressure could be better detected by the standing footprint principal axis index. This predicts a wide application of standing footprint principal axis index when evaluating standing balance.

  15. The selection system of silviculture in spruce-fir stands - procedures, early results, and comparisons with unmanaged stands

    Treesearch

    Robert M. Frank; Barton M. Blum

    1978-01-01

    Early results after 20 years of record keeping indicate that spruce-fir stands will respond to the selection system of silviculture. Stand quality is improved, species composition can be altered, diameter-class distribution approaches a stated goal, stand density is controlled, and yields are increased. Selection silviculture in spruce-fir can now be compared to early...

  16. Alzheimer's-associated Abeta oligomers show altered structure, immunoreactivity and synaptotoxicity with low doses of oleocanthal.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Jason; Roth, William; Lacor, Pascale; Smith, Amos B; Blankenship, Matthew; Velasco, Pauline; De Felice, Fernanda; Breslin, Paul; Klein, William L

    2009-10-15

    It now appears likely that soluble oligomers of amyloid-beta1-42 peptide, rather than insoluble fibrils, act as the primary neurotoxin in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Consequently, compounds capable of altering the assembly state of these oligomers (referred to as ADDLs) may have potential for AD therapeutics. Phenolic compounds are of particular interest for their ability to disrupt Abeta oligomerization and reduce pathogenicity. This study has focused on oleocanthal (OC), a naturally-occurring phenolic compound found in extra-virgin olive oil. OC increased the immunoreactivity of soluble Abeta species, when assayed with both sequence- and conformation-specific Abeta antibodies, indicating changes in oligomer structure. Analysis of oligomers in the presence of OC showed an upward shift in MW and a ladder-like distribution of SDS-stable ADDL subspecies. In comparison with control ADDLs, oligomers formed in the presence of OC (Abeta-OC) showed equivalent colocalization at synapses but exhibited greater immunofluorescence as a result of increased antibody recognition. The enhanced signal at synapses was not due to increased synaptic binding, as direct detection of fluorescently-labeled ADDLs showed an overall reduction in ADDL signal in the presence of OC. Decreased binding to synapses was accompanied by significantly less synaptic deterioration assayed by drebrin loss. Additionally, treatment with OC improved antibody clearance of ADDLs. These results indicate oleocanthal is capable of altering the oligomerization state of ADDLs while protecting neurons from the synaptopathological effects of ADDLs and suggest OC as a lead compound for development in AD therapeutics.

  17. Vorinostat differentially alters 3D nuclear structure of cancer and non-cancerous esophageal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Hansen, Nanna; Glenn, Honor L.; Han, Jessica H.; Helland, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kathryn; Senechal, Patti; Johnson, Roger H.; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat has received significant attention in recent years as an ‘epigenetic’ drug used to treat solid tumors. However, its mechanisms of action are not entirely understood, particularly with regard to its interaction with the aberrations in 3D nuclear structure that accompany neoplastic progression. We investigated the impact of vorinostat on human esophageal epithelial cell lines derived from normal, metaplastic (pre-cancerous), and malignant tissue. Using a combination of novel optical computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative 3D absorption microscopy and conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that subjecting malignant cells to vorinostat preferentially alters their 3D nuclear architecture relative to non-cancerous cells. Optical CT (cell CT) imaging of fixed single cells showed that drug-treated cancer cells exhibit significant alterations in nuclear morphometry. Confocal microscopy revealed that vorinostat caused changes in the distribution of H3K9ac-marked euchromatin and H3K9me3-marked constitutive heterochromatin. Additionally, 3D immuno-FISH showed that drug-induced expression of the DNA repair gene MGMT was accompanied by spatial relocation toward the center of the nucleus in the nuclei of metaplastic but not in non-neoplastic cells. Our data suggest that vorinostat’s differential modulation of 3D nuclear architecture in normal and abnormal cells could play a functional role in its anti-cancer action. PMID:27503568

  18. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: reasoning training alters structural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Allyson P; Whitaker, Kirstie J; Bunge, Silvia A

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA), have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n = 23) who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n = 22). DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD) in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD) within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination.

  19. Maternal Hyperleptinemia Is Associated with Male Offspring’s Altered Vascular Function and Structure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Kelly E.; Talton, Omonseigho O.; Foote, Christopher A.; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino C.; Wu, Ho-Hsiang; Ji, Tieming; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Schulz, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Children of mothers with gestational diabetes have greater risk of developing hypertension but little is known about the mechanisms by which this occurs. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that high maternal concentrations of leptin during pregnancy, which are present in mothers with gestational diabetes and/or obesity, alter blood pressure, vascular structure and vascular function in offspring. Wildtype (WT) offspring of hyperleptinemic, normoglycemic, Leprdb/+ dams were compared to genotype matched offspring of WT-control dams. Vascular function was assessed in male offspring at 6, and at 31 weeks of age after half the offspring had been fed a high fat, high sucrose diet (HFD) for 6 weeks. Blood pressure was increased by HFD but not affected by maternal hyperleptinemia. On a standard diet, offspring of hyperleptinemic dams had outwardly remodeled mesenteric arteries and an enhanced vasodilatory response to insulin. In offspring of WT but not Leprdb/+ dams, HFD induced vessel hypertrophy and enhanced vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine, while HFD reduced insulin responsiveness in offspring of hyperleptinemic dams. Offspring of hyperleptinemic dams had stiffer arteries regardless of diet. Therefore, while maternal hyperleptinemia was largely beneficial to offspring vascular health under a standard diet, it had detrimental effects in offspring fed HFD. These results suggest that circulating maternal leptin concentrations may interact with other factors in the pre- and post -natal environments to contribute to altered vascular function in offspring of diabetic pregnancies. PMID:27187080

  20. Altered fibrin clot structure/function in patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism and in their relatives.

    PubMed

    Undas, Anetta; Zawilska, Krystyna; Ciesla-Dul, Mariola; Lehmann-Kopydłowska, Agata; Skubiszak, Agnieszka; Ciepłuch, Katarzyna; Tracz, Wiesława

    2009-11-05

    We tested the hypothesis that fibrin structure/function is unfavorably altered in patients after idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE) and their relatives. Ex vivo plasma fibrin clot permeability, turbidimetry, and efficiency of fibrinolysis were investigated in 100 patients with first-ever VTE, including 34 with pulmonary embolism (PE), 100 first-degree relatives, and 100 asymptomatic controls with no history of thrombotic events. Known thrombophilia, cancer, trauma, and surgery were exclusion criteria. VTE patients and their relatives were characterized by lower clot permeability (P < .001), lower compaction (P < .001), higher maximum clot absorbancy (P < .001), and prolonged clot lysis time (P < .001) than controls, with more pronounced abnormalities, except maximum clot absorbance, in the patients versus relatives (all P < .01). Fibrin clots obtained for PE patients were more permeable, less compact, and were lysed more efficiently compared with deep-vein thrombosis patients (all P < .05) with no differences in their relatives. Being VTE relative, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein were independent predictors of clot permeability and fibrinolysis time in combined analysis of controls and relatives. We conclude that altered fibrin clot features are associated with idiopathic VTE with a different profile of fibrin variables in PE. Similar features can be detected in VTE relatives. Fibrin properties might represent novel risk factors for thrombosis.

  1. α-Viniferin-Induced Structural and Functional Alterations in Raillietina echinobothrida, a Poultry Tapeworm.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bishnupada; Giri, Bikash R

    2015-04-01

    α-Viniferin, an active component of the plant Carex baccans L., is known for its anticancer, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory properties. In Northeast India, different tribes traditionally consume C. baccans to control intestinal helminth infections. Therefore, the present study was carried out to assess the extent of tegumental alteration caused by α-viniferin in Raillietina echinobothrida, a widely prevalent poultry helminth in northeast India. Helminths were exposed in vitro to various doses of α-viniferin (50, 100, and 200 µM/mL of physiological buffered saline) and their motility and mortality were recorded. Stereoscan observations on the parasite exposed to the active compound showed extensive distortion and destruction of the surface fine topography of the tegument compared with controls. The compound also caused extensive damage to the tegument by disintegration of microtriches, disorganization of muscle bundles, and loss of cellular organelles combined with distortion and disruption of the plasma membrane, nuclear membrane, nucleolus, mitochondrial membrane, and cristae. Histochemical and biochemical studies carried out parasites exposed to α-viniferin revealed a decline in the activity of vital tegumental enzymes like acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, and adenosine triphosphatase. Extensive structural and functional alterations observed in the treated parasites are indicative of efficient cestocidal activity of the compound.

  2. Altered neurotransmitter release, vesicle recycling and presynaptic structure in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Chirag; Otero, Rafael; Partida, Carlos; Skinner, Frank; Thakker, Ravi; Pacheco, Luis F.; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Maglakelidze, Giorgi; Velíšková, Jana; Velíšek, Libor; Romanovicz, Dwight; Jones, Theresa; Stanton, Patric K.

    2012-01-01

    In searching for persistent seizure-induced alterations in brain function that might be causally related to epilepsy, presynaptic transmitter release has relatively been neglected. To measure directly the long-term effects of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus on vesicular release and recycling in hippocampal mossy fibre presynaptic boutons, we used (i) two-photon imaging of FM1-43 vesicular release in rat hippocampal slices; and (ii) transgenic mice expressing the genetically encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent reporter synaptopHluorin preferentially at glutamatergic synapses. In this study we found that, 1–2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, there were significant increases in mossy fibre bouton size, faster rates of action potential-driven vesicular release and endocytosis. We also analysed the ultrastructure of rat mossy fibre boutons using transmission electron microscopy. Pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus led to a significant increase in the number of release sites, active zone length, postsynaptic density area and number of vesicles in the readily releasable and recycling pools, all correlated with increased release probability. Our data show that presynaptic release machinery is persistently altered in structure and function by status epilepticus, which could contribute to the development of the chronic epileptic state and may represent a potential new target for antiepileptic therapies. PMID:22344585

  3. Fertilization Shapes Bacterial Community Structure by Alteration of Soil pH.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuting; Shen, Hong; He, Xinhua; Thomas, Ben W; Lupwayi, Newton Z; Hao, Xiying; Thomas, Matthew C; Shi, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Application of chemical fertilizer or manure can affect soil microorganisms directly by supplying nutrients and indirectly by altering soil pH. However, it remains uncertain which effect mostly shapes microbial community structure. We determined soil bacterial diversity and community structure by 454 pyrosequencing the V1-V3 regions of 16S rRNA genes after 7-years (2007-2014) of applying chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK) fertilizers, composted manure or their combination to acidic (pH 5.8), near-neutral (pH 6.8) or alkaline (pH 8.4) Eutric Regosol soil in a maize-vegetable rotation in southwest China. In alkaline soil, nutrient sources did not affect bacterial Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) richness or Shannon diversity index, despite higher available N, P, K, and soil organic carbon in fertilized than in unfertilized soil. In contrast, bacterial OTU richness and Shannon diversity index were significantly lower in acidic and near-neutral soils under NPK than under manure or their combination, which corresponded with changes in soil pH. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance showed that bacterial community structure was significantly affected across these three soils, but the PCoA ordination patterns indicated the effect was less distinct among nutrient sources in alkaline than in acidic and near-neural soils. Distance-based redundancy analysis showed that bacterial community structures were significantly altered by soil pH in acidic and near-neutral soils, but not by any soil chemical properties in alkaline soil. The relative abundance (%) of most bacterial phyla was higher in near-neutral than in acidic or alkaline soils. The most dominant phyla were Proteobacteria (24.6%), Actinobacteria (19.7%), Chloroflexi (15.3%) and Acidobacteria (12.6%); the medium dominant phyla were Bacterioidetes (5.3%), Planctomycetes (4.8%), Gemmatimonadetes (4.5%), Firmicutes (3.4%), Cyanobacteria (2.1%), Nitrospirae (1.8%), and candidate division TM7 (1

  4. Old growth ponderosa pine and western larch stand structures: Influences of pre-1900 fires and fire exclusion. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Arno, S.F.; Smith, H.Y.; Krebs, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    We present data from two old growth stands on Lolo National Forest representing habitats that contrast with larch stand. One of the stands is a mixture of pine and larch on a steep upland slope and the other is larch dominated in a frost-prone valley bottom evidently at the cold limits of ponderosa pine. We also synthesize and compare age-class data, basal areas (BA), and Stand Density Indexes (SDI) for the entire range of old growth stands that we have sampled to represent the historical frequent fire types in western Montana.

  5. Structural and functional alterations in Malpighian tubules as biomarkers of environmental pollution: synopsis and prospective.

    PubMed

    Giglio, Anita; Brandmayr, Pietro

    2017-03-06

    Although a number of biomarkers of pollutant exposure have been identified in invertebrate species, little is known about the effect on Malpighian tubules playing an essential role in excretion and osmoregulation. Analyses of structural and functional alterations on this organ can be useful to predict the effects at the organism and population level in monitoring studies of environmental pollution. The aim of the present review is to provide a synthesis of existing knowledge on cellular damages induced by xenobiotics in Malpighian tubules both under laboratory and field conditions. We compared studies of exposure to pesticides and heavy metals as mainly environmental contaminants from anthropogenic activities. This report provided evidence that the exposure to xenobiotics has an effect on this organ and reinforces the need for further research integrating molecular biomarkers with analysis on Malpighian tubules. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Resources alter the structure and increase stochasticity in bromeliad microfauna communities.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Jana S; Kratina, Pavel; Marino, Nicholas A C; MacDonald, A Andrew M; Srivastava, Diane S

    2015-01-01

    Although stochastic and deterministic processes have been found to jointly shape structure of natural communities, the relative importance of both forces may vary across different environmental conditions and across levels of biological organization. We tested the effects of abiotic environmental conditions, altered trophic interactions and dispersal limitation on the structure of aquatic microfauna communities in Costa Rican tank bromeliads. Our approach combined natural gradients in environmental conditions with experimental manipulations of bottom-up interactions (resources), top-down interactions (predators) and dispersal at two spatial scales in the field. We found that resource addition strongly increased the abundance and reduced the richness of microfauna communities. Community composition shifted in a predictable way towards assemblages dominated by flagellates and ciliates but with lower abundance and richness of algae and amoebae. While all functional groups responded strongly and predictably to resource addition, similarity among communities at the species level decreased, suggesting a role of stochasticity in species-level assembly processes. Dispersal limitation did not affect the communities. Since our design excluded potential priority effects we can attribute the differences in community similarity to increased demographic stochasticity of resource-enriched communities related to erratic changes in population sizes of some species. In contrast to resources, predators and environmental conditions had negligible effects on community structure. Our results demonstrate that bromeliad microfauna communities are strongly controlled by bottom-up forces. They further suggest that the relative importance of stochasticity may change with productivity and with the organizational level at which communities are examined.

  7. Alterations in brain structure in adults with anorexia nervosa and the impact of illness duration.

    PubMed

    Fonville, L; Giampietro, V; Williams, S C R; Simmons, A; Tchanturia, K

    2014-07-01

    Brain structure alterations have been reported in anorexia nervosa, but findings have been inconsistent. This may be due to inadequate sample size, sample heterogeneity or differences in methodology. High resolution magnetic resonance images were acquired of 33 adult participants with anorexia nervosa and 33 healthy participants, the largest study sample to date, in order to assess whole-brain volume, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid, white matter and grey matter volume. Voxel-based morphometry was conducted to assess regional grey matter volume. Levels of depression, anxiety, obsessionality and eating disorder-related symptoms were measured and used to explore correlations with brain structure. Participants with anorexia nervosa had smaller brain volumes as well as a global decrease in grey matter volume with ventricular enlargement. Voxel-based morphometry revealed a decrease in grey matter volume spanning across the cerebellum, temporal, frontal and occipital lobes. A correlation was found between grey matter volume loss and duration of illness in the cerebellum and mesencephalon. No correlations were found with clinical measures. Findings are in accordance with several previous studies on brain structure and match functional studies that have assessed the symptomatology of anorexia nervosa, such as body image distortion and cognitive bias to food. The correlation with duration of illness supports the implication of cerebellar atrophy in the maintenance of low weight and disrupted eating behaviour and illustrates its role in the chronic phase of anorexia nervosa. The lack of other correlations suggests that these findings are not related to the presence of co-morbid disorders.

  8. Neuroimaging of sport concussion: persistent alterations in brain structure and function at medical clearance.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Nathan W; Hutchison, Michael G; Richards, Doug; Leung, General; Graham, Simon J; Schweizer, Tom A

    2017-08-24

    The medical decision of return to play (RTP) after a sport concussion is largely based on symptom status following a graded exercise protocol. However, it is currently unknown how objective markers of brain structure and function relate to clinical recovery. The goal of this study was to determine whether differences in brain structure and function at acute injury remain present at RTP. In this longitudinal study, 54 active varsity athletes were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including 27 with recent concussion, imaged at both acute injury and medical clearance, along with 27 matched controls. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to measure fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of white matter and resting-state functional MRI was used to measure global functional connectivity (Gconn). At acute injury, concussed athletes had reduced FA and increased MD, along with elevated Gconn; these effects remained present at RTP. Athletes who took longer to reach RTP also showed elevated Gconn in dorsal brain regions, but no significant white matter effects. This study presents the first evidence of altered brain structure and function at the time of medical clearance to RTP, with greater changes in brain function for athletes with a longer recovery time.

  9. Resources Alter the Structure and Increase Stochasticity in Bromeliad Microfauna Communities

    PubMed Central

    Petermann, Jana S.; Kratina, Pavel; Marino, Nicholas A. C.; MacDonald, A. Andrew M.; Srivastava, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Although stochastic and deterministic processes have been found to jointly shape structure of natural communities, the relative importance of both forces may vary across different environmental conditions and across levels of biological organization. We tested the effects of abiotic environmental conditions, altered trophic interactions and dispersal limitation on the structure of aquatic microfauna communities in Costa Rican tank bromeliads. Our approach combined natural gradients in environmental conditions with experimental manipulations of bottom-up interactions (resources), top-down interactions (predators) and dispersal at two spatial scales in the field. We found that resource addition strongly increased the abundance and reduced the richness of microfauna communities. Community composition shifted in a predictable way towards assemblages dominated by flagellates and ciliates but with lower abundance and richness of algae and amoebae. While all functional groups responded strongly and predictably to resource addition, similarity among communities at the species level decreased, suggesting a role of stochasticity in species-level assembly processes. Dispersal limitation did not affect the communities. Since our design excluded potential priority effects we can attribute the differences in community similarity to increased demographic stochasticity of resource-enriched communities related to erratic changes in population sizes of some species. In contrast to resources, predators and environmental conditions had negligible effects on community structure. Our results demonstrate that bromeliad microfauna communities are strongly controlled by bottom-up forces. They further suggest that the relative importance of stochasticity may change with productivity and with the organizational level at which communities are examined. PMID:25775464

  10. Histone H3 phosphorylation near the nucleosome dyad alters chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    North, Justin A; Šimon, Marek; Ferdinand, Michelle B; Shoffner, Matthew A; Picking, Jonathan W; Howard, Cecil J; Mooney, Alex M; van Noort, John; Poirier, Michael G; Ottesen, Jennifer J

    2014-04-01

    Nucleosomes contain ∼146 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone protein octamer that controls DNA accessibility to transcription and repair complexes. Posttranslational modification (PTM) of histone proteins regulates nucleosome function. To date, only modest changes in nucleosome structure have been directly attributed to histone PTMs. Histone residue H3(T118) is located near the nucleosome dyad and can be phosphorylated. This PTM destabilizes nucleosomes and is implicated in the regulation of transcription and repair. Here, we report gel electrophoretic mobility, sucrose gradient sedimentation, thermal disassembly, micrococcal nuclease digestion and atomic force microscopy measurements of two DNA-histone complexes that are structurally distinct from nucleosomes. We find that H3(T118ph) facilitates the formation of a nucleosome duplex with two DNA molecules wrapped around two histone octamers, and an altosome complex that contains one DNA molecule wrapped around two histone octamers. The nucleosome duplex complex forms within short ∼150 bp DNA molecules, whereas altosomes require at least ∼250 bp of DNA and form repeatedly along 3000 bp DNA molecules. These results are the first report of a histone PTM significantly altering the nucleosome structure.

  11. Structural basis for the alteration of coenzyme specificity in a malate dehydrogenase mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Takeo; Fushinobu, Shinya; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto . E-mail: umanis@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-08-25

    To elucidate the structural basis for the alteration of coenzyme specificity from NADH toward NADPH in a malate dehydrogenase mutant EX7 from Thermus flavus, we determined the crystal structures at 2.0 A resolution of EX7 complexed with NADPH and NADH, respectively. In the EX7-NADPH complex, Ser42 and Ser45 form hydrogen bonds with the 2'-phosphate group of the adenine ribose of NADPH, although the adenine moiety is not seen in the electron density map. In contrast, although Ser42 and Ser45 occupy a similar position in the EX7-NADH complex structure, both the adenine and adenine ribose moieties of NADH are missing in the map. These results and kinetic analysis of site-directed mutant enzymes indicate (1) that the preference of EX7 for NADPH over NADH is ascribed to the recognition of the 2'-phosphate group by two Ser and Arg44, and (2) that the adenine moiety of NADPH is not recognized in this mutant.

  12. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  13. Alterations in Brain Structure and Functional Connectivity in Alcohol Dependent Patients and Possible Association with Impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junkai; Fan, Yunli; Dong, Yue; Ma, Mengying; Ma, Yi; Dong, Yuru; Niu, Yajuan; Jiang, Yin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhiyan; Wu, Liuzhen; Sun, Hongqiang; Cui, Cailian

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that heightened impulsivity likely contributes to the development and maintenance of alcohol use disorders. However, there is still a lack of studies that comprehensively detected the brain changes associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol addicts. This study was designed to investigate the alterations in brain structure and functional connectivity associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol dependent patients. Brain structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging data as well as impulsive behavior data were collected from 20 alcohol dependent patients and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls respectively. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the differences of grey matter volume, and tract-based spatial statistics was used to detect abnormal white matter regions between alcohol dependent patients and healthy controls. The alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in alcohol dependent patients were examined using selected brain areas with gray matter deficits as seed regions. Compared with healthy controls, alcohol dependent patients had significantly reduced gray matter volume in the mesocorticolimbic system including the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the medial prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex and the putamen, decreased fractional anisotropy in the regions connecting the damaged grey matter areas driven by higher radial diffusivity value in the same areas and decreased resting-state functional connectivity within the reward network. Moreover, the gray matter volume of the left medial prefrontal cortex exhibited negative correlations with various impulse indices. These findings suggest that chronic alcohol dependence could cause a complex neural changes linked to abnormal impulsivity.

  14. Evasion of Innate Immune Responses by the Highly Virulent Cryptococcus gattii by Altering Capsule Glucuronoxylomannan Structure

    PubMed Central

    Urai, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Ueno, Keigo; Okubo, Yoichiro; Aizawa, Tomoko; Fukazawa, Hidesuke; Sugita, Takashi; Ohno, Hideaki; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Kinjo, Yuki; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening diseases mainly in immunosuppressed hosts such as AIDS patients; C. gattii causes disseminated infections even in healthy hosts. To identify the possible molecular mechanisms underlying this difference in virulence, we investigated the survival and histopathology of lung tissue in wild-type and CD4-depleted mice infected with C. neoformans H99 and C. gattii JP02 (the highly virulent strain isolated in Japan); we then compared dendritic cell (DC) cytokine release responses to different cell fractions from these two strains. JP02-infected mice exhibited shorter survival and fewer inflammatory cells in the lung than H99-infected control mice. Depletion of CD4-related cellular immunity reduced survival of H99-infected mice but had no effect on the survival or inflammatory cell infiltration in JP02-infected mice, suggesting that JP02 evades immune detection. To identify the molecule(s) conferring this difference, we measured cytokine production from murine DCs co-cultured with H99 and JP02 in vitro. The levels of inflammatory cytokines from DCs treated with intact JP02 cells, the extracted capsule, secreted extracellular polysaccharides, and purified glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) were markedly lower than those induced by intact H99 cells and corresponding H99 fractions. Structural analysis of GXM indicated that JP02 altered one of two O-acetyl groups detected in the H99 GXM. Deacetylated GXM lost the ability to induce inflammatory cytokine release from DCs, implicating these O-acetyl groups in immune recognition. We conclude that the highly virulent C. gattii processes a structural alteration in GXM that allows this pathogen to evade the immune response and therefore elimination. PMID:26779451

  15. Evasion of Innate Immune Responses by the Highly Virulent Cryptococcus gattii by Altering Capsule Glucuronoxylomannan Structure.

    PubMed

    Urai, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Ueno, Keigo; Okubo, Yoichiro; Aizawa, Tomoko; Fukazawa, Hidesuke; Sugita, Takashi; Ohno, Hideaki; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Kinjo, Yuki; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening diseases mainly in immunosuppressed hosts such as AIDS patients; C. gattii causes disseminated infections even in healthy hosts. To identify the possible molecular mechanisms underlying this difference in virulence, we investigated the survival and histopathology of lung tissue in wild-type and CD4-depleted mice infected with C. neoformans H99 and C. gattii JP02 (the highly virulent strain isolated in Japan); we then compared dendritic cell (DC) cytokine release responses to different cell fractions from these two strains. JP02-infected mice exhibited shorter survival and fewer inflammatory cells in the lung than H99-infected control mice. Depletion of CD4-related cellular immunity reduced survival of H99-infected mice but had no effect on the survival or inflammatory cell infiltration in JP02-infected mice, suggesting that JP02 evades immune detection. To identify the molecule(s) conferring this difference, we measured cytokine production from murine DCs co-cultured with H99 and JP02 in vitro. The levels of inflammatory cytokines from DCs treated with intact JP02 cells, the extracted capsule, secreted extracellular polysaccharides, and purified glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) were markedly lower than those induced by intact H99 cells and corresponding H99 fractions. Structural analysis of GXM indicated that JP02 altered one of two O-acetyl groups detected in the H99 GXM. Deacetylated GXM lost the ability to induce inflammatory cytokine release from DCs, implicating these O-acetyl groups in immune recognition. We conclude that the highly virulent C. gattii processes a structural alteration in GXM that allows this pathogen to evade the immune response and therefore elimination.

  16. Alterations in Brain Structure and Functional Connectivity in Alcohol Dependent Patients and Possible Association with Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yue; Ma, Mengying; Ma, Yi; Dong, Yuru; Niu, Yajuan; Jiang, Yin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhiyan; Wu, Liuzhen; Sun, Hongqiang; Cui, Cailian

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have documented that heightened impulsivity likely contributes to the development and maintenance of alcohol use disorders. However, there is still a lack of studies that comprehensively detected the brain changes associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol addicts. This study was designed to investigate the alterations in brain structure and functional connectivity associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol dependent patients. Methods Brain structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging data as well as impulsive behavior data were collected from 20 alcohol dependent patients and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls respectively. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the differences of grey matter volume, and tract-based spatial statistics was used to detect abnormal white matter regions between alcohol dependent patients and healthy controls. The alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in alcohol dependent patients were examined using selected brain areas with gray matter deficits as seed regions. Results Compared with healthy controls, alcohol dependent patients had significantly reduced gray matter volume in the mesocorticolimbic system including the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the medial prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex and the putamen, decreased fractional anisotropy in the regions connecting the damaged grey matter areas driven by higher radial diffusivity value in the same areas and decreased resting-state functional connectivity within the reward network. Moreover, the gray matter volume of the left medial prefrontal cortex exhibited negative correlations with various impulse indices. Conclusions These findings suggest that chronic alcohol dependence could cause a complex neural changes linked to abnormal impulsivity. PMID:27575491

  17. Structural alterations of the pyramidal pathway in schizoid and schizotypal cluster A personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Via, Esther; Orfila, Carles; Pedreño, Carla; Rovira, Antoni; Menchón, José M; Cardoner, Narcís; Palao, Diego J; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Obiols, Jordi E

    2016-12-01

    Schizoid (ScPD) and Schizotypal (SPD) personality disorders are rare and severe disorders. They are associated with high liability to schizophrenia and present an attenuated form of its negative symptoms, which are considered a putative endophenotype for schizophrenia. The trans-diagnostic study of negative symptoms in non-psychotic populations such as ScPD/SPD might provide useful markers of a negative-symptom domain; however, little is known about their neurobiological substrates. The aim of the study was to investigate differences in gray and white matter volumes in subjects with ScPD/SPD compared to a group of healthy controls. Structural magnetic resonance images were obtained from 20 never-psychotic subjects with ScPD/SPD and 28 healthy controls. Resulting values from clusters of differences were correlated in patients with relevant clinical variables (O-LIFE scale). ScPD/SPD presented greater bilateral white matter volume compared to healthy controls in the superior part of the corona radiata, close to motor/premotor regions, which correlated with the O-LIFE subtest of cognitive disorganization. No differences were found in regional gray matter or global gray/white matter volumes. Greater volumes in motor pathways might relate to cognitive symptoms and motor alterations commonly present in schizophrenia-related disorders. Given the established link between motor signs and psychosis, structural alterations in motor pathways are suggested as a putative biomarker of a negative-symptom domain in psychosis subject to further testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Structurally similar estradiol analogs uniquely alter the regulation of intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yarger, James G; Babine, Robert E; Bittner, Michael; Shanle, Erin; Xu, Wei; Hershberger, Pamela; Nye, Steven H

    2013-02-01

    Ligand structure can affect the activation of nuclear receptors, such as estrogen receptors (ERs), and their control of signaling pathways for cellular responses including death and differentiation. We hypothesized that distinct biological functions of similar estradiol (E(2)) analogs could be identified by integrating gene expression patterns obtained from human tumor cell lines with receptor binding and functional data for the purpose of developing compounds for treatment of a variety of diseases. We compared the estrogen receptor subtype selectivity and impact on signaling pathways for three distinct, but structurally similar, analogs of E(2). Modifications in the core structure of E(2) led to pronounced changes in subtype selectivity for estrogen receptors, ER-α or ER-β, along with varying degrees of ER dimerization and activation. While all three E(2) analogs are predominantly ER-β agonists, the cell growth inhibitory activity commonly associated with this class of compounds was detected for only two of the analogs and might be explained by a ligand-specific pattern of gene transcription. Microarray studies using three different human tumor cell lines demonstrated that the analogs distinctly affect the transcription of genes in signaling pathways for chromosome replication, cell death, and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation. That the E(2) analogs could lower tumor cell viability and stimulate neuronal differentiation confirmed that gene expression data could accurately distinguish biological activity of the E(2) analogs. The findings reported here confirm that cellular responses can be regulated by making key structural alterations to the core structure of endogenous ER ligands.

  19. Tree stand falls: a persistent cause of sports injury.

    PubMed

    Metz, Matthew; Kross, Marc; Abt, Peter; Bankey, Paul; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2004-08-01

    Tree stand falls are a well-known cause of hunting-related injury. Spine and brain injuries associated with these falls result in a significant incidence of permanent disability. Prior studies indicate that hunting tree stand injuries are largely preventable with the proper use of safety belts; however, compliance with safety belt use is variable. The purposes of this study were to determine 1) current compliance with safety belt use, 2) alterations in the spectrum of injury, and 3) causes of the falls. From January 1996 to October 2001, 51 tree stand-related injuries referred to either of two regional trauma centers or their region's medical examiner's office were reviewed. Data had been recorded in each hospital's trauma registry, and the registries were searched for falls. Medical records were reviewed for additional data retrospectively, with an emphasis on determining the use of safety belts, and mechanisms contributing to the fall. Fifty-one cases of tree stand-associated injuries were identified. These injuries all occurred in men, with a mean age of 42.6 years (range, 22-69 years). Alcohol use was present in 10% of patients and in two of the three deaths. The mean Injury Severity Score was 18.1 (range, 2-75). The most common injuries were spinal fractures (51% of series) and extremity fractures (41% of series). Closed head injuries were identified in 24% and lung injuries were identified in 22% of patients. Abdominal visceral injuries were present in 8% and genitourinary injuries were present in 4%. Three patients died. In addition to injury from the fall, a significant number (six patients [12%]) had additional morbidity from exposure. Only two patients reported the use of a safety belt (4% of series). There were no cases of gunshot wounds in this review, either self-inflicted or hunter-related. The chief reasons reported for these falls were errors in placement that resulted in structural failure of the stand, or errors made while climbing into or out of

  20. The Neutron Structure of Urate Oxidase Resolves a Long-Standing Mechanistic Conundrum and Reveals Unexpected Changes in Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Oksanen, Esko; Blakeley, Matthew P.; El-Hajji, Mohamed; Ryde, Ulf; Budayova-Spano, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Urate oxidase transforms uric acid to 5-hydroxyisourate without the help of cofactors, but the catalytic mechanism has remained enigmatic, as the protonation state of the substrate could not be reliably deduced. We have determined the neutron structure of urate oxidase, providing unique information on the proton positions. A neutron crystal structure inhibited by a chloride anion at 2.3 Å resolution shows that the substrate is in fact 8-hydroxyxanthine, the enol tautomer of urate. We have also determined the neutron structure of the complex with the inhibitor 8-azaxanthine at 1.9 Å resolution, showing the protonation states of the K10–T57–H256 catalytic triad. Together with X-ray data and quantum chemical calculations, these structures allow us to identify the site of the initial substrate protonation and elucidate why the enzyme is inhibited by a chloride anion. PMID:24466188

  1. Standing Tall: The Benefits of Standing Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    In the author's opinion as a pediatric physical therapist, with the exception of a wheelchair, there is no other piece of assistive technology that is more beneficial to children and adults with special needs than a standing device. Postural symmetry during standing and walking activities is extremely important for everyone. Very few children…

  2. Standing Tall: The Benefits of Standing Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    In the author's opinion as a pediatric physical therapist, with the exception of a wheelchair, there is no other piece of assistive technology that is more beneficial to children and adults with special needs than a standing device. Postural symmetry during standing and walking activities is extremely important for everyone. Very few children…

  3. Field-based experimental acidification alters fouling community structure and reduces diversity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Norah E M; Therriault, Thomas W; Harley, Christopher D G

    2016-09-01

    Increasing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere are affecting ocean chemistry, leading to increased acidification (i.e. decreased pH) and reductions in calcium carbonate saturation state. Many species are likely to respond to acidification, but the direction and magnitude of these responses will be based on interspecific and ontogenetic variation in physiology and the relative importance of calcification. Differential responses to ocean acidification (OA) among species will likely result in important changes in community structure and diversity. To characterize the potential impacts of OA on community composition and structure, we examined the response of a marine fouling community to experimental CO2 enrichment in field-deployed flow-through mesocosm systems. Acidification significantly altered the community structure by altering the relative abundance of species and reduced community variability, resulting in more homogenous biofouling communities from one experimental tile to the next both among and within the acidified mesocosms. Mussel (Mytilus trossulus) recruitment was reduced by over 30% in the elevated CO2 treatment compared to the ambient treatment by the end of the experiment. Strong differences in mussel cover (up to 40% lower in acidified conditions) developed over the second half of the 10-week experiment. Acidification did not appear to affect the mussel growth, as average mussel sizes were similar between treatments at the end of the experiment. Hydroid (Obelia dichotoma) cover was significantly reduced in the elevated CO2 treatment after 8 weeks. Conversely, the percentage cover of bryozoan colonies (Mebranipora membranacea) was higher under acidified conditions with differences becoming apparent after 6 weeks. Neither recruitment nor final size of barnacles (Balanus crenatus) was affected by acidification. By the end of the experiment, diversity was 41% lower in the acidified treatment relative to ambient conditions. Overall, our findings support the

  4. [The altered topology of brain structural network in patients with acute stress response after traffic accident].

    PubMed

    Weng, Y F; Qi, R F; Zhang, X D; Zhang, L; Ke, J; Zhong, Y; Chen, F; Xu, Q; Lu, G M

    2017-09-19

    Objective: To explore the changes of brain activities in traffic accident survivors with acute stress response (ASR) within a week by using complex networks analysis method based on graph-theory, and to find out the alteration of topological properties in structural brain network. Method: From January, 2013 to February, 2016, twenty traffic accidents survivors with acute stress disorders (Acute Stress Disorder Interview, ASDI>3)and twenty healthy controls underwent the 3T diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) magnetic resonance imaging scan in Nanjing General Hospital.The graph-theory analysis method was used to compare the structural brain network properties and nodal features between ASR survivors and controls.Statistical analyses were also performed by including anxiety and depression as covariates to evaluate their effect.In additional, Pearson correlation was performed between abnormal parametric values and clinical indices. Results: (1) The brain structural networks had small-world properties in both groups; (2) while compared with healthy controls, patients with ASR showed increased weighted connectivity strength (Si, 1.36±0.47 vs 0.92±0.38, P=0.008) and nodal betweenness centrality (BCi, 20±15 vs 7±6, P=0.002) in left triangular part of inferior frontal (IFG triang_L), increased Si in orbital part of inferior frontal gyrus (1.10±0.31 vs 0.77±0.30, P=0.004) and obviously decreased Si in left caudate (0.75±0.24 vs 1.04±0.35, P=0.004); (3) furthermore, the inclusion of anxiety and depression as covariates abolished nodal parameters differences in IFG triang_L, left caudate, thalamus and inferior temporal gyrus. Conclusions: The brain structure network in ASR patients has small world properties.But nodal parameters change obviously in some nodes compared with healthy controls and mainly locate in prefrontal lobe and striatum. High levels of anxiety and depression in ASR patients may partly account for these alterations.

  5. Multi-scale patterns of subalpine fir mortality are driven by complex interactions among broad-scale climate, local topography, stand structure, and tree characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, B. J.; Andrus, R. A.; Orrego, A.; Battaglia, M.; Negrón, J. F.; Veblen, T. T.

    2016-12-01

    Recent tree mortality events across much of western North America have been associated with warming temperatures and elevated drought stress, which can interact with forest stand-structure and tree vigor to drive outbreaks of native insect species. Although cross-scale interactions among drivers of tree-mortality events have been described for some beetle species (e.g., mountain pine beetle or spruce beetle) and their hosts (lodgepole pine and Engelmann spruce), less is known about how drivers at different scales interact to kill subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) in a phenomenon simply dubbed "subalpine fir mortality" or "subalpine fir decline." Understanding the fate of subalpine fir is important, however, because this is commonly the tree species expected to establish and exhibit growth releases following outbreaks of mountain pine beetle or spruce beetle. In this study, we use three decades of field and remote data that span spatial scales from individual trees to sub-continental ecoregions to explore factors associated with subalpine fir mortality and how drivers interact across scales. Between 1991 and 2015, >5 million hectares (ha) of subalpine forest in the US Rocky Mountains have been affected by subalpine fir mortality. At the eco-region scale (1,000s of km), mortality was temporally associated with increases in regional drought stress, suggesting that climate is an important broad-scale driver. However, at the eco-region, landscape, and stand scales (several km to sub ha), mortality was greatest in cooler/wetter topographic locations and in areas with greater pre-mortality subalpine fir dominance. Conversely, mortality was lowest for fir trees in warmer/drier topographic locations and in areas of lesser pre-mortality subalpine fir dominance. This suggests that topographically driven differences in stand structure drive mortality dynamics at meso-scales and moderate the broad-scale influence of climate. Finally, at the tree and tree-neighborhood scale

  6. Stand dynamics in 60-year-old Allegheny hardwoods after thinning

    Treesearch

    Gary W. Miller

    1997-01-01

    Stand dynamics and tree growth in even-aged hardwood stands can be influenced by manipulating relative stand density, species composition, and stand structure. Land managers need quantitative information on the effect of vegetation manipulation to prescribe stand treatments that are appropriate for specific management objectives. Sixty-year-old stands composed of black...

  7. [The value of double contrast arthrotomography combined with cinematography in the diagnosis of functional and structural TMJ alterations].

    PubMed

    Engelke, W; Grossniklaus, B; Sailer, H F

    1991-01-01

    Double contrast arthrotomography combined with cinematography as a diagnostic instrument establishing functional and structural TMJ alterations is evaluated for its diagnostic value and reliability within the chain of diagnostic measures applied. In 131 patients double-contrast arthrotomography was followed by a comprehensive history of joint problems, and verification of the clinical findings as well as the arthrographic diagnosis and the post-arthrographic TMJ alterations. Our interest was focussed, among others, on the question whether arthrography alone would have any therapeutic effect or produce an alteration in TMJ function.

  8. Is pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in celiac disease related to structural alterations in pancreatic parenchyma?

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Dambalkar, Arvind; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Nada, Ritambhra; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Satyavati; Bhasin, Deepak K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) has been reported in a number of patients with celiac disease (CD), it is not clear if this is primarily a functional or a structural defect. We studied pancreatic structural abnormalities by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in adult CD patients with EPI. Methods Pancreatic exocrine function was prospectively assessed in 36 recently diagnosed CD patients (mean age: 29.8 years) by measuring fecal elastase. Pancreatic structural changes were assessed in CD patients with EPI by EUS and elastography. Exocrine functions were reassessed after 3 months of gluten-free diet. Results Of the 36 CD patients included, 30 (83%) had anemia, 21 (58%) diarrhea, and 7 (19%) hypothyroidism. Ten (28%) patients had EPI with mean elastase levels of 141.6 μg/g of stool, of whom only one had a history of recurrent acute pancreatitis while the rest 9 patients had no history of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Of these 10 patients, 8 (80%) had diarrhea, 8 (80%) anemia, and 2 (20%) hypothyroidism. EUS was done in 8 patients which showed: normal pancreas in 5 (50%), hyperechoic strands in 3 (30%), and hyperechoic foci without shadowing in 2 (20%) patients. None had lobularity or parenchymal calcification. All patients except the patient with recurrent pancreatitis had normal strain ratio. Follow-up fecal elastase was within normal range in 6 of 7 (86%) patients. Conclusion EPI, assessed by fecal elastase levels in adult CD patients, possibly does not relate to structural alterations in the pancreatic parenchyma and may be reversible by following a gluten-free diet. PMID:27366039

  9. Assessing river regime alteration due to flood detention structures in dry and semi-dry regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaraghi, Navid; Torabihaghighi, Ali; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Fazel, Nasim; Rossi, Pekka. M.; Klöve, Björn

    2017-04-01

    In dry and semi-dry climate, flood detention structures are used for flood control and managed aquifer recharge. These damps basin runoff response decreasing the maximum flows and increasing the runoff duration through wet seasons. In this study, a framework to quantify the role of flood detention dams in headwater tributaries on total water balance of major basin and alteration of flow pattern in the main river has been presented. The study contains four main subroutines: rainfall-runoff model, reservoir flood routing, river analysis system and seepage analysis. The flood hydrographs with different return periods are estimated based on the climatic data and geomorphology of headwater basin. River flow analysis below the flood detention structure is carried out for two unsteady flow scenarios, first with the hydrographs of natural system (as pre-impact: quick flood with significant peak flow) and second the routed hydrographs due to detention process in the reservoir (as post-impact: damped flood lower peak with longer duration time). Two sets of dynamic water surface along the river (from the location of detention structure (x=0) to the confluence point with main river (x=L) are developed based on two hydrologic conditions as results of river analysis system. The results of framework define the impact of flood detention structure by comparing the timing, magnitude and variability of flow. The Kamal Abad artificial groundwater recharge in Mahrloo Lake basin in Southern Iran was selected as case study to demonstrate the application of the created framework. Through the probability analysis, the return period for hydrological drought would be compared in pre and post impact condition. The results clearly showed how embankments influence floods in tributaries and in some cases the flow reduced significantly and disappears in tributaries.

  10. Altered topological organization of brain structural network in Chinese children with developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Shi, Lin; Chen, Feiyan; Waye, Mary M Y; Lim, Cadmon K P; Cheng, Pui-Wan; Luk, Sarah S H; Mok, Vincent C T; Chu, Winnie C W; Wang, Defeng

    2015-03-04

    Increasing evidence indicates that developmental dyslexia (DD) is a "disconnection syndrome", and new probes of connectome were applied to investigate the "disconnection" in DD. However, there is a lack of brain connectome studies of Chinese dyslexics, who may have a different neural impairment pattern due to the logographic nature of Chinese. The aim of this study was to investigate the topological organization characteristics of the DD brain using a structural network based analysis on the volumetric covariance, which is a method with the advantage of reflecting brain developmental changes. Twenty-five children diagnosed with DD and twenty-five typically developing controls were included. The structural networks based on the pair-wise correlation of gray matter volume from 90 brain regions were constructed for the two groups and compared. Compared to controls, the structural network of dyslexic children exhibited significantly increased local efficiency combined with a tendency of decreased global efficiency and prolonged characteristic path length, thus reflecting a more locally specialized topological organization. Two brain areas showed significantly altered local regional network properties: the left precentral gyrus with increased bi, and the right Heschl's gyrus with decreased bi and ki. Moreover, a series of hub regions (especially the right fronto-temporal regions) identified in the network of typically developing children were not presented in the brain of DD. To our knowledge, this is the first whole-brain structural network study on Chinese dyslexics. This study provides evidence of brain topological organization changes in Chinese children with DD, and thus may help shed light on its neurobiological basis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Is pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in celiac disease related to structural alterations in pancreatic parenchyma?

    PubMed

    Rana, Surinder S; Dambalkar, Arvind; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Nada, Ritambhra; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Satyavati; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2016-01-01

    Although exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) has been reported in a number of patients with celiac disease (CD), it is not clear if this is primarily a functional or a structural defect. We studied pancreatic structural abnormalities by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in adult CD patients with EPI. Pancreatic exocrine function was prospectively assessed in 36 recently diagnosed CD patients (mean age: 29.8 years) by measuring fecal elastase. Pancreatic structural changes were assessed in CD patients with EPI by EUS and elastography. Exocrine functions were reassessed after 3 months of gluten-free diet. Of the 36 CD patients included, 30 (83%) had anemia, 21 (58%) diarrhea, and 7 (19%) hypothyroidism. Ten (28%) patients had EPI with mean elastase levels of 141.6 μg/g of stool, of whom only one had a history of recurrent acute pancreatitis while the rest 9 patients had no history of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Of these 10 patients, 8 (80%) had diarrhea, 8 (80%) anemia, and 2 (20%) hypothyroidism. EUS was done in 8 patients which showed: normal pancreas in 5 (50%), hyperechoic strands in 3 (30%), and hyperechoic foci without shadowing in 2 (20%) patients. None had lobularity or parenchymal calcification. All patients except the patient with recurrent pancreatitis had normal strain ratio. Follow-up fecal elastase was within normal range in 6 of 7 (86%) patients. EPI, assessed by fecal elastase levels in adult CD patients, possibly does not relate to structural alterations in the pancreatic parenchyma and may be reversible by following a gluten-free diet.

  12. Different methods to alter surface morphology of high aspect ratio structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leber, M.; Shandhi, M. M. H.; Hogan, A.; Solzbacher, F.; Bhandari, R.; Negi, S.

    2016-03-01

    In various applications such as neural prostheses or solar cells, there is a need to alter the surface morphology of high aspect ratio structures so that the real surface area is greater than geometrical area. The change in surface morphology enhances the devices functionality. One of the applications of altering the surface morphology is of neural implants such as the Utah electrode array (UEA) that communicate with single neurons by charge injection induced stimulation or by recording electrical neural signals. For high selectivity between single cells of the nervous system, the electrode surface area is required to be as small as possible, while the impedance is required to be as low as possible for good signal to noise ratios (SNR) during neural recording. For stimulation, high charge injection and charge transfer capacities of the electrodes are required, which increase with the electrode surface. Traditionally, researchers have worked with either increasing the roughness of the existing metallization (platinum grey, black) or other materials such as Iridium Oxide and PEDOT. All of these previously investigated methods lead to more complicated metal deposition processes that are difficult to control and often have a critical impact on the mechanical properties of the metal films. Therefore, a modification of the surface underneath the electrode's coating will increase its surface area while maintaining the standard and well controlled metal deposition process. In this work, the surfaces of the silicon micro-needles were engineered by creating a defined microstructure on the electrodes surface using several methods such as laser ablation, focused ion beam, sputter etching, reactive ion etching (RIE) and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The surface modification processes were optimized for the high aspect ratio silicon structures of the UEA. The increase in real surface area while maintaining the geometrical surface area was verified using scanning electron

  13. Different methods to alter surface morphology of high aspect ratio structures.

    PubMed

    Leber, M; Shandhi, M M H; Hogan, A; Solzbacher, F; Bhandari, R; Negi, S

    2016-03-01

    In various applications such as neural prostheses or solar cells, there is a need to alter the surface morphology of high aspect ratio structures so that the real surface area is greater than geometrical area. The change in surface morphology enhances the devices functionality. One of the applications of altering the surface morphology is of neural implants such as the Utah electrode array (UEA) that communicate with single neurons by charge injection induced stimulation or by recording electrical neural signals. For high selectivity between single cells of the nervous system, the electrode surface area is required to be as small as possible, while the impedance is required to be as low as possible for good signal to noise ratios (SNR) during neural recording. For stimulation, high charge injection and charge transfer capacities of the electrodes are required, which increase with the electrode surface. Traditionally, researchers have worked with either increasing the roughness of the existing metallization (Platinum grey, black) or other materials such as Iridium Oxide and PEDOT. All of these previously investigated methods lead to more complicated metal deposition processes that are difficult to control and often have a critical impact on the mechanical properties of the metal films. Therefore, a modification of the surface underneath the electrode's coating will increase its surface area while maintaining the standard and well controlled metal deposition process. In this work, the surfaces of the Silicon micro-needles were engineered by creating a defined microstructure on the electrodes surface using several methods such as Laser ablation, focused ion beam, sputter etching, reactive ion etching (RIE) and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The surface modification processes were optimized for the high aspect ratio Silicon structures of the UEA. The increase in real surface area while maintaining the geometrical surface area was verified using scanning electron

  14. Different methods to alter surface morphology of high aspect ratio structures

    PubMed Central

    Leber, M.; Shandhi, M. M. H.; Hogan, A.; Solzbacher, F.; Bhandari, R.; Negi, S.

    2016-01-01

    In various applications such as neural prostheses or solar cells, there is a need to alter the surface morphology of high aspect ratio structures so that the real surface area is greater than geometrical area. The change in surface morphology enhances the devices functionality. One of the applications of altering the surface morphology is of neural implants such as the Utah electrode array (UEA) that communicate with single neurons by charge injection induced stimulation or by recording electrical neural signals. For high selectivity between single cells of the nervous system, the electrode surface area is required to be as small as possible, while the impedance is required to be as low as possible for good signal to noise ratios (SNR) during neural recording. For stimulation, high charge injection and charge transfer capacities of the electrodes are required, which increase with the electrode surface. Traditionally, researchers have worked with either increasing the roughness of the existing metallization (Platinum grey, black) or other materials such as Iridium Oxide and PEDOT. All of these previously investigated methods lead to more complicated metal deposition processes that are difficult to control and often have a critical impact on the mechanical properties of the metal films. Therefore, a modification of the surface underneath the electrode’s coating will increase its surface area while maintaining the standard and well controlled metal deposition process. In this work, the surfaces of the Silicon micro-needles were engineered by creating a defined microstructure on the electrodes surface using several methods such as Laser ablation, focused ion beam, sputter etching, reactive ion etching (RIE) and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The surface modification processes were optimized for the high aspect ratio Silicon structures of the UEA. The increase in real surface area while maintaining the geometrical surface area was verified using scanning electron

  15. Alterations of CNS structure & function by charged particle radiation & resultant oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Komarova, Natalia; Limoli, Charles; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Raber, Jacob; Spigelman, Igor; Soltesz, Ivan; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Stampanoni, Marco; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Wodarz, Dominik

    The NSCOR program project is transitioning from establishing the existence of CNS responses to low doses of charged particles, to an investigation of mechanisms underlying these changes and extending the irradiation paradigm to more space-like exposures. In earlier experiments we examined radiation responses of the mouse brain (hippocampus) following exposure to 250 MeV protons and 600 MeV/n iron ions. Our key findings on structural changes were: 1) Significant dose and time dependent loss of en-dothelial cells and microvessel network remodeling occurs suggesting that vascular insufficiency is produced. 2) Significant dose dependent losses of neural precursor cells were observed in a lineage specific pattern which may be associated with cognitive impairment. 3) Evaluation of DNA damage showed dose and time dependent accumulation of mutations with region-specific mutation structures and gene expression profiling demonstrated activation of neurotrophic and adhesion factors as well as chemokine receptors associated with inflammation. Our key find-ings on functional changes were: 1) Time and dose dependent modifications to neural output expressed as enhanced excitability but reduced synaptic efficacy and plasticity (including long term potentiation). 2) Intrinsic membrane properties of neurons were not significantly modi-fied by radiation exposure but pharmacological treatments demonstrated changes in inhibitory synapses. 3) MRI imaging visualized brain structural changes based on altered water diffu-sion properties and patterns were consistent with demyelination or gliosis. Our key findings on neurodegeneration and fidelity of homeostasis were: 1) APP23 transgenic mice exhibited accelerated APP-type electrophysiological pathology over several months. 2) Microvessel net-work changes following irradiation were suggestive of poor tissue oxygenation. 3) The ability of the brain to respond a controlled septic shock was altered by irradiation; the septic shock reactions

  16. Analyzing canopy structure in Pacific Northwest old-growth forests with a stand-scale crown model

    Treesearch

    Robert Van Pelt; Malcolm P. North

    1996-01-01

    I n forests, the canopy is the locale of critical ecosystem processes such as photosynthesis and evapotranspiration. and it provides essential habitat for a highly diverse array of animals, plants, and other organisms. Despite its importance, the structure of the canopy as a whole has had little quantitative study because limited access makes quantification difficult...

  17. Predicted long-term effects of group selection on species composition and stand structure in northern hardwood forests

    Treesearch

    Corey R. Halpin; Craig G. Lorimer; Jacob J. Hanson; Brian J. Palik

    2017-01-01

    The group selection method can potentially increase the proportion of shade-intolerant and midtolerant tree species in forests dominated by shade-tolerant species, but previous results have been variable, and concerns have been raised about possible effects on forest fragmentation and forest structure. Limited evidence is available on these issues for forests managed...

  18. Seeing the forest for the homogeneous trees: stand-scale resource distributions emerge from tree-scale structure

    Treesearch

    Suzanne Boyden; Rebecca Montgomery; Peter B. Reich; Brian J. Palik

    2012-01-01

    Forest ecosystem processes depend on local interactions that are modified by the spatial pattern of trees and resources. Effects of resource supplies on processes such as regeneration are increasingly well understood, yet we have few tools to compare resource heterogeneity among forests that differ in structural complexity. We used a neighborhood approach to examine...

  19. Associations between breeding bird abundance and stand structure in the White Mountains, New Hampshire and Maine, USA

    Treesearch

    Richard M. DeGraaf; Jay B. Hestbeck; Mariko Yamasaki

    1998-01-01

    Assessment of faunal distribution in relation to landscape features is becoming increasingly popular. Technological advances in remote sensing have encouraged regional analyses of the distributions of terrestrial vertebrates. Comparisons of the strength of association of habitat characteristics at various scales of measurement of habitat structure are rare. We compared...

  20. Long-term impacts of prescribed fire on stand structure, growth, mortality, and individual tree vigor in Pinus resinosa forests

    Treesearch

    Sawyer S. Scherer; Anthony W. D' Amato; Christel C. Kern; Brian J. Palik; Matthew B. Russell

    2016-01-01

    Prescribed fire is increasingly being viewed as a valuable tool for mitigating the ecological consequences of long-term fire suppression within fire-adapted forest ecosystems. While the use of burning treatments in northern temperate conifer forests has at times received considerable attention, the long-term (>10 years) effects on forest structure and...