Sample records for standard exercise protocol

  1. Evaluation of Dogs with Border Collie Collapse, Including Response to Two Standardized Strenuous Exercise Protocols.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Shmon, Cindy; Su, Lillian; Epp, Tasha; Minor, Katie; Mickelson, James; Patterson, Edward; Shelton, G Diane

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and metabolic variables were evaluated in 13 dogs with border collie collapse (BCC) before, during, and following completion of standardized strenuous exercise protocols. Six dogs participated in a ball-retrieving protocol, and seven dogs participated in a sheep-herding protocol. Findings were compared with 16 normal border collies participating in the same exercise protocols (11 retrieving, five herding). Twelve dogs with BCC developed abnormal mentation and/or an abnormal gait during evaluation. All dogs had post-exercise elevations in rectal temperature, pulse rate, arterial blood pH, PaO2, and lactate, and decreased PaCO2 and bicarbonate, as expected with strenuous exercise, but there were no significant differences between BCC dogs and normal dogs. Electrocardiography demonstrated sinus tachycardia in all dogs following exercise. Needle electromyography was normal, and evaluation of muscle biopsy cryosections using a standard panel of histochemical stains and reactions did not reveal a reason for collapse in 10 dogs with BCC in which these tests were performed. Genetic testing excluded the dynamin-1 related exercise-induced collapse mutation and the V547A malignant hyperthermia mutation as the cause of BCC. Common reasons for exercise intolerance were eliminated. Although a genetic basis is suspected, the cause of collapse in BCC was not determined.

  2. Titrating Oxygen Requirements During Exercise: Evaluation of a Standardized Single Walk Test Protocol.

    PubMed

    Giovacchini, Coral X; Mathews, Anne M; Lawlor, Brian R; MacIntyre, Neil R

    2018-04-01

    Oxygen supplementation for exercise-induced hypoxemia is a common clinical practice that improves exercise tolerance. However, we know of no standardized exercise oxygen titration protocol using a single walk test. We report our experience with a protocol developed in our laboratory. Our protocol is based on the 6-min walk test (6MWT). Pulse oximetry readings (oxygen saturation [Spo 2 ]) are monitored, and supplemental oxygen is added in 2 L/min increments to keep Spo 2 > 88%. This continues for at least 6 min of walking with the Spo 2 remaining > 88% for at least 3 min. The records of consecutive patients over 4 months undergoing this procedure were reviewed for test performance, oxygen titration results, and adverse events. Two hundred twenty-two patients were tested; only two prematurely terminated the protocol because of intractable dyspnea. One hundred fifty-six patients (38%) required oxygen supplementation, with the first titration most commonly occurring between 1 and 2 min of walking. Nine of the patients had the first titration after 5 min of walking. The average test duration was 7 min (maximum, 15 min). The average number of titrations was 2.2 (maximum six). Sixteen patients could not maintain Spo 2 > 88% for 3 min despite administration of 15 L/min of supplemental oxygen (maximal dose). Our protocol was easily performed as a modification of a standard 6MWT with no serious adverse events. Because it is based on a widely accepted measurement of functional capabilities, and because it determined a stable final oxygen dose for ≥ 3 min of walking in most patients, we believe this protocol can be easily adapted for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Design of the multicenter standardized supervised exercise training intervention for the claudication: exercise vs endoluminal revascularization (CLEVER) study.

    PubMed

    Bronas, Ulf G; Hirsch, Alan T; Murphy, Timothy; Badenhop, Dalynn; Collins, Tracie C; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Ershow, Abby G; Lewis, Beth; Treat-Jacobson, Diane J; Walsh, M Eileen; Oldenburg, Niki; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2009-11-01

    The CLaudication: Exercise Vs Endoluminal Revascularization (CLEVER) study is the first randomized, controlled, clinical, multicenter trial that is evaluating a supervised exercise program compared with revascularization procedures to treat claudication. In this report, the methods and dissemination techniques of the supervised exercise training intervention are described. A total of 217 participants are being recruited and randomized to one of three arms: (1) optimal medical care; (2) aortoiliac revascularization with stent; or (3) supervised exercise training. Of the enrolled patients, 84 will receive supervised exercise therapy. Supervised exercise will be administered according to a protocol designed by a central CLEVER exercise training committee based on validated methods previously used in single center randomized control trials. The protocol will be implemented at each site by an exercise committee member using training methods developed and standardized by the exercise training committee. The exercise training committee reviews progress and compliance with the protocol of each participant weekly. In conclusion, a multicenter approach to disseminate the supervised exercise training technique and to evaluate its efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness for patients with claudication due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is being evaluated for the first time in CLEVER. The CLEVER study will further establish the role of supervised exercise training in the treatment of claudication resulting from PAD and provide standardized methods for use of supervised exercise training in future PAD clinical trials as well as in clinical practice.

  4. Effects of Adding an Internet-Based Pain Coping Skills Training Protocol to a Standardized Education and Exercise Program for People With Persistent Hip Pain (HOPE Trial): Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Rini, Christine; Keefe, Francis; French, Simon; Nelligan, Rachel; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Dobson, Fiona; Haxby Abbott, J.; Dalwood, Andrew; Vicenzino, Bill; Harris, Anthony; Hinman, Rana S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent hip pain in older people is usually due to hip osteoarthritis (OA), a major cause of pain, disability, and psychological dysfunction. Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether adding an Internet-based pain coping skills training (PCST) protocol to a standardized intervention of education followed by physical therapist–instructed home exercise leads to greater reductions in pain and improvements in function. Design An assessor-, therapist-, and participant-blinded randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Setting The study will be conducted in a community setting. Participants The participants will be 142 people over 50 years of age with self-reported hip pain consistent with hip OA. Intervention Participants will be randomly allocated to: (1) a control group receiving a 24-week standardized intervention comprising an 8-week Internet-based education package followed by 5 individual physical therapy exercise sessions plus home exercises (3 times weekly) or (2) a PCST group receiving an 8-week Internet-based PCST protocol in addition to the control intervention. Measurements Outcomes will be measured at baseline and 8, 24, and 52 weeks, with the primary time point at 24 weeks. Primary outcomes are hip pain on walking and self-reported physical function. Secondary outcomes include health-related quality-of-life, participant-perceived treatment response, self-efficacy for pain management and function, pain coping attempts, pain catastrophizing, and physical activity. Measurements of adherence, adverse events, use of health services, and process measures will be collected at 24 and 52 weeks. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed at 52 weeks. Limitations A self-reported diagnosis of persistent hip pain will be used. Conclusions The findings will help determine whether adding an Internet-based PCST protocol to standardized education and physical therapist–instructed home exercise is more effective than education and exercise

  5. Effects of Adding an Internet-Based Pain Coping Skills Training Protocol to a Standardized Education and Exercise Program for People With Persistent Hip Pain (HOPE Trial): Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim L; Rini, Christine; Keefe, Francis; French, Simon; Nelligan, Rachel; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Dobson, Fiona; Abbott, J Haxby; Dalwood, Andrew; Vicenzino, Bill; Harris, Anthony; Hinman, Rana S

    2015-10-01

    Persistent hip pain in older people is usually due to hip osteoarthritis (OA), a major cause of pain, disability, and psychological dysfunction. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether adding an Internet-based pain coping skills training (PCST) protocol to a standardized intervention of education followed by physical therapist-instructed home exercise leads to greater reductions in pain and improvements in function. An assessor-, therapist-, and participant-blinded randomized controlled trial will be conducted. The study will be conducted in a community setting. The participants will be 142 people over 50 years of age with self-reported hip pain consistent with hip OA. Participants will be randomly allocated to: (1) a control group receiving a 24-week standardized intervention comprising an 8-week Internet-based education package followed by 5 individual physical therapy exercise sessions plus home exercises (3 times weekly) or (2) a PCST group receiving an 8-week Internet-based PCST protocol in addition to the control intervention. Outcomes will be measured at baseline and 8, 24, and 52 weeks, with the primary time point at 24 weeks. Primary outcomes are hip pain on walking and self-reported physical function. Secondary outcomes include health-related quality-of-life, participant-perceived treatment response, self-efficacy for pain management and function, pain coping attempts, pain catastrophizing, and physical activity. Measurements of adherence, adverse events, use of health services, and process measures will be collected at 24 and 52 weeks. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed at 52 weeks. A self-reported diagnosis of persistent hip pain will be used. The findings will help determine whether adding an Internet-based PCST protocol to standardized education and physical therapist-instructed home exercise is more effective than education and exercise alone for persistent hip pain. This study has the potential to guide clinical practice toward innovative

  6. Measurement properties of maximal cardiopulmonary exercise tests protocols in persons after stroke: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wittink, Harriet; Verschuren, Olaf; Terwee, Caroline; de Groot, Janke; Kwakkel, Gert; van de Port, Ingrid

    2017-11-21

    To systematically review and critically appraise the literature on measurement properties of cardiopulmonary exercise test protocols for measuring aerobic capacity, VO2max, in persons after stroke. PubMed, Embase and Cinahl were searched from inception up to 15 June 2016. A total of 9 studies were identified reporting on 9 different cardiopulmonary exercise test protocols. VO2max measured with cardiopulmonary exercise test and open spirometry was the construct of interest. The target population was adult persons after stroke. We included all studies that evaluated reliability, measurement error, criterion validity, content validity, hypothesis testing and/or responsiveness of cardiopulmonary exercise test protocols. Two researchers independently screened the literature, assessed methodological quality using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments checklist and extracted data on measurement properties of cardiopulmonary exercise test protocols. Most studies reported on only one measurement property. Best-evidence synthesis was derived taking into account the methodological quality of the studies, the results and the consistency of the results. No judgement could be made on which protocol is "best" for measuring VO2max in persons after stroke due to lack of high-quality studies on the measurement properties of the cardiopulmonary exercise test.

  7. Return of postural control to baseline after anaerobic and aerobic exercise protocols.

    PubMed

    Fox, Zachary G; Mihalik, Jason P; Blackburn, J Troy; Battaglini, Claudio L; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2008-01-01

    With regard to sideline concussion testing, the effect of fatigue associated with different types of exercise on postural control is unknown. To evaluate the effects of fatigue on postural control in healthy college-aged athletes performing anaerobic and aerobic exercise protocols and to establish an immediate recovery time course from each exercise protocol for postural control measures to return to baseline status. Counterbalanced, repeated measures. Research laboratory. Thirty-six collegiate athletes (18 males, 18 females; age = 19.00 +/- 1.01 years, height = 172.44 +/- 10.47 cm, mass = 69.72 +/- 12.84 kg). Participants completed 2 counterbalanced sessions within 7 days. Each session consisted of 1 exercise protocol followed by postexercise measures of postural control taken at 3-, 8-, 13-, and 18-minute time intervals. Baseline measures were established during the first session, before the specified exertion protocol was performed. Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) results, sway velocity, and elliptical sway area. We found a decrease in postural control after each exercise protocol for all dependent measures. An interaction was noted between exercise protocol and time for total BESS score (P = .002). For both exercise protocols, all measures of postural control returned to baseline within 13 minutes. Postural control was negatively affected after anaerobic and aerobic exercise protocols as measured by total BESS score, elliptical sway area, and sway velocity. The effect of exertion lasted up to 13 minutes after each exercise was completed. Certified athletic trainers and clinicians should be aware of these effects and their recovery time course when determining an appropriate time to administer sideline assessments of postural control after a suspected mild traumatic brain injury.

  8. Return of Postural Control to Baseline After Anaerobic and Aerobic Exercise Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Zachary G; Mihalik, Jason P; Blackburn, J Troy; Battaglini, Claudio L; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2008-01-01

    Context: With regard to sideline concussion testing, the effect of fatigue associated with different types of exercise on postural control is unknown. Objective: To evaluate the effects of fatigue on postural control in healthy college-aged athletes performing anaerobic and aerobic exercise protocols and to establish an immediate recovery time course from each exercise protocol for postural control measures to return to baseline status. Design: Counterbalanced, repeated measures. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients Or Other Participants: Thirty-six collegiate athletes (18 males, 18 females; age  =  19.00 ± 1.01 years, height  =  172.44 ± 10.47 cm, mass  =  69.72 ± 12.84 kg). Intervention(s): Participants completed 2 counterbalanced sessions within 7 days. Each session consisted of 1 exercise protocol followed by postexercise measures of postural control taken at 3-, 8-, 13-, and 18-minute time intervals. Baseline measures were established during the first session, before the specified exertion protocol was performed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) results, sway velocity, and elliptical sway area. Results: We found a decrease in postural control after each exercise protocol for all dependent measures. An interaction was noted between exercise protocol and time for total BESS score (P  =  .002). For both exercise protocols, all measures of postural control returned to baseline within 13 minutes. Conclusions: Postural control was negatively affected after anaerobic and aerobic exercise protocols as measured by total BESS score, elliptical sway area, and sway velocity. The effect of exertion lasted up to 13 minutes after each exercise was completed. Certified athletic trainers and clinicians should be aware of these effects and their recovery time course when determining an appropriate time to administer sideline assessments of postural control after a suspected mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:18833307

  9. Exercise-training protocols for astronauts in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bulbulian, R.; Bernauer, E. M.; Haskell, W. L.; Moore, T.

    1989-01-01

    Based on physical working requirements for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activity and on the findings from bed-rest studies that utilized exercise training as a countermeasure for the reduction of aerobic power, deterioration of muscular strength and endurance, decrements in mood and cognitive performance, and possibly for bone loss, two exercise protocols are proposed. One assumes that, during microgravity, astronaut exercise physiological functions should be maintained at 100 percent of ground-based levels. The other assumes that maximal aerobic power in flight can be reduced by 10 percent of the ground-based level.

  10. Work, exercise, and space flight. 3: Exercise devices and protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William

    1989-01-01

    Preservation of locomotor capacity by earth equivalent, exercise in space is the crucial component of inflight exercise. At this time the treadmill appears to be the only way possible to do this. Work is underway on appropriate hardware but this and a proposed protocol to reduce exercise time must be tested. Such exercise will preserve muscle, bone Ca(++) and cardiovascular-respiratory capacity. In addition, reasonable upper body exercise can be supplied by a new force generator/measurement system-optional exercise might include a rowing machine and bicycle ergometer. A subject centered monitoring-evaluation program will allow real time adjustments as required. Absolute protection for any astronaut will not be possible and those with hypertrophied capacities such as marathoners or weight lifters will suffer significant loss. However, the program described should return the crew to earth with adequate capacity of typical activity on earth including immediate ambulation and minimal recovery time and without permanent change. An understanding of the practical mechanics and biomechanics involved is essential to a solution of the problem.

  11. Exercise countermeasure protocol management expert system.

    PubMed

    Webster, L; Chen, J G; Flores, L; Tan, S

    1993-04-01

    Exercise will be used primarily to countermeasure against deconditioning on extended space flight. In this paper we describe the development and evaluation of an expert system for exercise countermeasure protocol management. Currently, the system includes two major subsystems: baseline prescription and prescription adjustment. The baseline prescription subsystem is designed to provide initial exercise prescriptions while prescription adjustment subsystem is designed to modify the initial prescription based on the exercised progress. The system runs under three different environments: PC, SUN workstation, and Symbolic machine. The inference engine, baseline prescription module, prescription adjustment module and explanation module are developed under the Symbolic environment by using the ART (Automated Reasoning Tool) software. The Sun environment handles database management features and interfaces with PC environment to obtain physical and physiological data from exercise units on-board during the flight. Eight subjects' data have been used to evaluate the system performance by comparing the prescription of nine experienced exercise physiologists and the one prescribed by the expert system. The results of the validation test indicated that the performance of the expert system was acceptable.

  12. Exercise countermeasure protocol management expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, L.; Chen, J. G.; Flores, L.; Tan, S.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise will be used primarily to countermeasure against deconditioning on extended space flight. In this paper we describe the development and evaluation of an expert system for exercise countermeasure protocol management. Currently, the system includes two major subsystems: baseline prescription and prescription adjustment. The baseline prescription subsystem is designed to provide initial exercise prescriptions while prescription adjustment subsystem is designed to modify the initial prescription based on the exercised progress. The system runs under three different environments: PC, SUN workstation, and Symbolic machine. The inference engine, baseline prescription module, prescription adjustment module and explanation module are developed under the Symbolic environment by using the ART (Automated Reasoning Tool) software. The Sun environment handles database management features and interfaces with PC environment to obtain physical and physiological data from exercise units on-board during the flight. Eight subjects' data have been used to evaluate the system performance by comparing the prescription of nine experienced exercise physiologists and the one prescribed by the expert system. The results of the validation test indicated that the performance of the expert system was acceptable.

  13. Short- and long-term clinical outcomes following a standardized protocol of orthopedic manual physical therapy and exercise in individuals with osteoarthritis of the hip: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hando, Ben R; Gill, Norman W; Walker, Michael J; Garber, Mathew

    2012-11-01

    Describe short- and long-term outcomes observed in individuals with hip osteoarthritis (OA) treated with a pre-selected, standardized set of best-evidence manual therapy and therapeutic exercise interventions. Fifteen consecutive subjects (9 males, 6 females; mean age: 52±7.5 years) with unilateral hip OA received an identical protocol of manual therapy and therapeutic exercise interventions. Subjects attended 10 treatment sessions over an 8-week period for manual therapy interventions and performed the therapeutic exercise as a home program. Baseline to 8-week follow-up outcomes were as follows: Harris Hip Scale (HHS) scores improved from 60.3(±10.4) to 80.7(±10.5), Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) scores improved from 4.3(±1.9) to 2.0(±1.9), hip flexion range of motion (ROM) improved from 99 degrees (±10.6) to 127 degrees (±6.3) and hip internal rotation ROM improved from 19 degrees (±9.1) to 31 degrees (±11.5). Improvements in HHS, NPRS, and hip ROM measures reached statistical significance (P<0.05) at 8-weeks and remained significant at the 29-week follow-up. Mean changes in NPRS and HHS scores exceeded the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) at 8-weeks and for the HHS scores alone at 29 weeks. The 8 and 29 week mean Global Rating of Change scores were 5.1(±1.4) and 2.1(±4.2), respectively. Improved outcomes observed following a pre-selected, standardized treatment protocol were similar to those observed in previous studies involving impairment-based manual therapy and therapeutic exercise for hip OA. Future studies might directly compare the two approaches.

  14. Neuromuscular Fatigue and Physiological Responses After Five Dynamic Squat Exercise Protocols.

    PubMed

    Raeder, Christian; Wiewelhove, Thimo; Westphal-Martinez, Marc P; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; de Paula Simola, Rauno A; Kellmann, Michael; Meyer, Tim; Pfeiffer, Mark; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    This aimed to analyze neuromuscular, physiological and perceptual responses to a single bout of 5 different dynamic squat exercise protocols. In a randomized and counterbalanced order, 15 male resistance-trained athletes (mean ± SD; age: 23.1 ± 1.9 years, body mass: 77.4 ± 8.0 kg) completed traditional multiple sets (MS: 4 × 6, 85% 1 repetition maximum [RM]), drop sets (DS: 1 × 6, 85% 1RM + 3 drop sets), eccentric overload (EO: 4 × 6, 70% 1RM concentric, 100% 1RM eccentric), flywheel YoYo squat (FW: 4 × 6, all-out), and a plyometric jump protocol (PJ: 4 × 15, all-out). Blood lactate (La), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), counter movement jump height (CMJ), multiple rebound jump (MRJ) performance, maximal voluntary isometric contraction force, serum creatine kinase (CK) and delayed onset muscle soreness were measured. Immediately post exercise, La was significantly (p < 0.001) higher in FW (mean ± 95% confidence limit; 12.2 ± 0.9 mmol·L) and lower in PJ (3.0 ± 0.8 mmol·L) compared with MS (7.7 ± 1.5 mmol·L), DS (8.5 ± 0.6 mmol·L), and EO (8.2 ± 1.6 mmol·L), accompanied by similar RPE responses. Neuromuscular performance (CMJ, MRJ) significantly remained decreased (p < 0.001) from 0.5 to 48 hours post exercise in all protocols. There was a significant time × protocol interaction (p ≤ 0.05) in MRJ with a significant lower performance in DS, EO, and FW compared with PJ (0.5 hours post exercise), and in EO compared with all other protocols (24 hours post exercise). A significant main time effect with peak values 24 hours post exercise was observed in CK serum concentrations (p < 0.001), but there was no time × protocol interaction. In conclusion, (a) metabolic and perceptual demands were higher in FW and EO compared with MS, DS and PJ, (b) neuromuscular fatigue was consistent up to 48 hours post exercise in all protocols, and (c) EO induced the greatest neuromuscular fatigue.

  15. A neuromuscular exercise programme versus standard care for patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (the SINEX study).

    PubMed

    Eshoj, Henrik; Rasmussen, Sten; Frich, Lars Henrik; Hvass, Inge; Christensen, Robin; Jensen, Steen Lund; Søndergaard, Jens; Søgaard, Karen; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2017-02-28

    Anterior shoulder dislocation is a common injury and may have considerable impact on shoulder-related quality of life (QoL). If not warranted for initial stabilising surgery, patients are mostly left with little to no post-traumatic rehabilitation. This may be due to lack of evidence-based exercise programmes. In similar, high-impact injuries (e.g. anterior cruciate ligament tears in the knee) neuromuscular exercise has shown large success in improving physical function and QoL. Thus, the objective of this trial is to compare a nonoperative neuromuscular exercise shoulder programme with standard care in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations (TASD). Randomised, assessor-blinded, controlled, multicentre trial. Eighty patients with a TASD will be recruited from three orthopaedic departments in Denmark. Patients with primary or recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations due to at least one traumatic event will be randomised to 12 weeks of either a standardised, individualised or physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular shoulder exercise programme or standard care (self-managed shoulder exercise programme). Patients will be stratified according to injury status (primary or recurrent). Primary outcome will be change from baseline to 12 weeks in the patient-reported QoL outcome questionnaire, the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI). This trial will be the first study to compare the efficacy and safety of two different nonoperative exercise treatment strategies for patients with TASD. Moreover, this is also the first study to investigate nonoperative treatment effects in patients with recurrent shoulder dislocations. Lastly, this study will add knowledge to the shared decision-making process of treatment strategies for clinical practice. ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT02371928 . Registered on 9 February 2015 at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Protocol Registration System.

  16. Short- and long-term clinical outcomes following a standardized protocol of orthopedic manual physical therapy and exercise in individuals with osteoarthritis of the hip: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Hando, Ben R; Gill, Norman W; Walker, Michael J; Garber, Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Describe short- and long-term outcomes observed in individuals with hip osteoarthritis (OA) treated with a pre-selected, standardized set of best-evidence manual therapy and therapeutic exercise interventions. Methods: Fifteen consecutive subjects (9 males, 6 females; mean age: 52±7.5 years) with unilateral hip OA received an identical protocol of manual therapy and therapeutic exercise interventions. Subjects attended 10 treatment sessions over an 8-week period for manual therapy interventions and performed the therapeutic exercise as a home program. Results: Baseline to 8-week follow-up outcomes were as follows: Harris Hip Scale (HHS) scores improved from 60.3(±10.4) to 80.7(±10.5), Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) scores improved from 4.3(±1.9) to 2.0(±1.9), hip flexion range of motion (ROM) improved from 99 degrees (±10.6) to 127 degrees (±6.3) and hip internal rotation ROM improved from 19 degrees (±9.1) to 31 degrees (±11.5). Improvements in HHS, NPRS, and hip ROM measures reached statistical significance (P<0.05) at 8-weeks and remained significant at the 29-week follow-up. Mean changes in NPRS and HHS scores exceeded the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) at 8-weeks and for the HHS scores alone at 29 weeks. The 8 and 29 week mean Global Rating of Change scores were 5.1(±1.4) and 2.1(±4.2), respectively. Improved outcomes observed following a pre-selected, standardized treatment protocol were similar to those observed in previous studies involving impairment-based manual therapy and therapeutic exercise for hip OA. Future studies might directly compare the two approaches. Discussion: PMID:24179327

  17. Comparison of V-4 and V-5 Exercise/Oxygen Prebreathe Protocols to Support Extravehicular Activity in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Vann, R. D.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Conkin, Johnny

    2007-01-01

    The Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) used exercise during oxygen prebreathe to reduce necessary prebreathe time prior to depressurizing to work in a 4.3 psi suit during extravehicular activity (EVA). Initial testing produced a two-hour protocol incorporating ergometry exercise and a 30 min cycle of depress/repress to 10.2 psi where subjects breathed 26.5% oxygen/balance nitrogen (Phase II - 10 min at 75% peak oxygen consumption [VO2 peak] followed by 40 min intermittent light exercise [ILE] [approx. 5.8 mL-per kilogram- per minute], then 50 min of rest). The Phase II protocol (0/45 DCS) was approved for operations and has been used on 40 EVAs, providing significant time savings compared to the standard 4 h resting oxygen prebreathe. The Phase V effort focused on performing all light in-suit exercise. Two oxygen prebreathe protocols were tested sequentially: V-4) 160 min prebreathe with 150 min of continuous ILE. The entire protocol was completed at 14.7 psi. All exercise involved upper body effort. Exercise continued until decompression. V-5) 160 min prebreathe with 140 min of ILE - first 40 min at 14.7 psi, then 30 min at 10.2 psi (breathing 26.5% oxygen) after a 20 min depress, simulating a suit donning period. Subjects were then repressed to 14.7 psi and performed another 50 min of lower body ILE, followed by 50 min rest before decompression. The V-4 protocol was rejected with 3 DCS/6 person-exposures. Initial V-5 testing has produced 0 DCS/11 person-exposures (ongoing trials). The difference in DCS rate was significant (Fisher Exact p=0.029). The observations of DCS were significantly lower in early V-5 trials than in V-4 trials. Additional studies are required to evaluate the relative contribution of the variables in exercise distribution, the 10.2 psi depress/repress component, pre-decompression rest, or possible variation in total oxygen consumption.

  18. Goal-setting protocol in adherence to exercise by Italian adults.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J

    2002-04-01

    A goal-setting protocol, based on research in goal setting and performance and personal construct theory, was tested for its effect on adherence to a new exercise program. The Goal-setting group (n = 50) had significantly less dropout (30%) than the control group (n = 50) (74%). The Goal-setting group also had significantly better attendance (p<.0001). Suggestions for increasing confidence in findings through further research and practical implications of using the protocol to improve exercise maintenance across settings were discussed.

  19. Prospective evaluation of a new protocol for the provisional use of perfusion imaging with exercise stress testing.

    PubMed

    Duvall, W Lane; Savino, John A; Levine, Elliot J; Hermann, Luke K; Croft, Lori B; Henzlova, Milena J

    2015-02-01

    Previous literature suggests that myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) adds little to the prognosis of patients who exercise >10 metabolic equivalents (METs) during stress testing. With this in mind, we prospectively tested a provisional injection protocol in emergency department (ED) patients presenting for the evaluation of chest pain in which a patient would not receive an injection of radioisotope if adequate exercise was achieved without symptoms and a negative ECG response. All patients who presented to the ED over a 5-year period who were referred for stress testing as part of their ED evaluation were included. Patients considered for a provisional protocol were: exercise stress, age <65 years, no known coronary artery disease, and an interpretable rest ECG. Criteria for not injecting included a maximal predicted heart rate ≥85%, ≥10 METs of exercise, no anginal symptoms during stress, and no ECG changes. Groups were compared based on stress test results, all-cause and cardiac mortality, follow-up cardiac testing, subsequent revascularization, and cost. A total of 965 patients were eligible with 192 undergoing exercise-only and 773 having perfusion imaging. After 41.6 ± 19.6 months of follow-up, all-cause mortality was similar in the exercise-only versus the exercise plus imaging group (2.6% vs. 2.1%, p = 0.59). There were no cardiac deaths in the exercise-only group. At 1 year there was no difference in the number of repeat functional stress tests (1.6% vs. 2.1%, p = 0.43), fewer angiograms (0% vs. 4.0%, p = 0.002), and a significantly lower cost ($65 ± $332 vs $506 ± $1,991, p = 0.002; values are in US dollars) in the exercise-only group. The radiation exposure in the exercise plus imaging group was 8.4 ± 2.1 mSv. A provisional injection protocol has a very low mortality, few follow-up diagnostic tests, and lower cost compared to standard imaging protocols. If adopted it would decrease radiation exposure, save time and

  20. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial: tongue strengthening exercises in head and neck cancer patients, does exercise load matter?

    PubMed

    Van Nuffelen, Gwen; Van den Steen, Leen; Vanderveken, Olivier; Specenier, Pol; Van Laer, Carl; Van Rompaey, Diane; Guns, Cindy; Mariën, Steven; Peeters, Marc; Van de Heyning, Paul; Vanderwegen, Jan; De Bodt, Marc

    2015-09-04

    Reduced tongue strength is an important factor contributing to early and late dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients previously treated with chemoradiotherapy. The evidence is growing that tongue strengthening exercises can improve tongue strength and swallowing function in both healthy and dysphagic subjects. However, little is known about the impact of specific features of an exercise protocol for tongue strength on the actual outcome (strength or swallowing function). Previous research originating in the fields of sports medicine and physical rehabilitation shows that the degree of exercise load is an influential factor for increasing muscle strength in the limb skeletal muscles. Since the tongue is considered a muscular hydrostat, it remains to be proven whether the same concepts will apply. This ongoing randomized controlled trial in chemoradiotherapy-treated patients with head and neck cancer investigates the effect of three tongue strengthening exercise protocols, with different degrees of exercise load, on tongue strength and swallowing. At enrollment, 51 patients whose dysphagia is primarily related to reduced tongue strength are randomly assigned to a training schedule of 60, 80, or 100% of their maximal tongue strength. Patients are treated three times a week for 8 weeks, executing 120 repetitions of the assigned exercise once per training day. Exercise load is progressively adjusted every 2 weeks. Patients are evaluated before, during and after treatment by means of tongue strength measurements, fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and quality-of-life questionnaires. This randomized controlled trial is the first to systematically investigate the effect of different exercise loads in tongue strengthening exercise protocols. The results will allow the development of more efficacious protocols. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN14447678.

  1. Physical exercise-induced changes in the core body temperature of mice depend more on ambient temperature than on exercise protocol or intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Costa, Kátia Anunciação; Soares, Anne Danieli Nascimento; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying physical exercise-induced hyperthermia may be species specific. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise intensity and ambient temperature on the core body temperature ( T core) of running mice, which provide an important experimental model for advancing the understanding of thermal physiology. We evaluated the influence of different protocols (constant- or incremental-speed exercises), treadmill speeds and ambient temperatures ( T a) on the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. To measure T core, a telemetric sensor was implanted in the abdominal cavity of male adult Swiss mice under anesthesia. After recovering from the surgery, the animals were familiarized to running on a treadmill and then subjected to the different running protocols and speeds at two T a: 24 °C or 34 °C. All of the experimental trials resulted in marked increases in T core. As expected, the higher-temperature environment increased the magnitude of running-induced hyperthermia. For example, during incremental exercise at 34 °C, the maximal T core achieved was increased by 1.2 °C relative to the value reached at 24 °C. However, at the same T a, neither treadmill speed nor exercise protocol altered the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. We conclude that T core of running mice is influenced greatly by T a, but not by the exercise protocols or intensities examined in the present report. These findings suggest that the magnitude of hyperthermia in running mice may be regulated centrally, independently of exercise intensity.

  2. Physical exercise-induced changes in the core body temperature of mice depend more on ambient temperature than on exercise protocol or intensity.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Costa, Kátia Anunciação; Soares, Anne Danieli Nascimento; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying physical exercise-induced hyperthermia may be species specific. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise intensity and ambient temperature on the core body temperature (T core) of running mice, which provide an important experimental model for advancing the understanding of thermal physiology. We evaluated the influence of different protocols (constant- or incremental-speed exercises), treadmill speeds and ambient temperatures (T a) on the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. To measure T core, a telemetric sensor was implanted in the abdominal cavity of male adult Swiss mice under anesthesia. After recovering from the surgery, the animals were familiarized to running on a treadmill and then subjected to the different running protocols and speeds at two T a: 24 °C or 34 °C. All of the experimental trials resulted in marked increases in T core. As expected, the higher-temperature environment increased the magnitude of running-induced hyperthermia. For example, during incremental exercise at 34 °C, the maximal T core achieved was increased by 1.2 °C relative to the value reached at 24 °C. However, at the same T a, neither treadmill speed nor exercise protocol altered the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. We conclude that T core of running mice is influenced greatly by T a, but not by the exercise protocols or intensities examined in the present report. These findings suggest that the magnitude of hyperthermia in running mice may be regulated centrally, independently of exercise intensity.

  3. Dry needling in a manual physiotherapy and therapeutic exercise protocol for patients with chronic mechanical shoulder pain of unspecific origin: a protocol for a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Tejera-Falcón, Emma; Toledo-Martel, Nuria Del Carmen; Sosa-Medina, Francisco Manuel; Santana-González, Fátima; Quintana-de la Fe, Miriam Del Pino; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Pecos-Martín, Daniel

    2017-09-18

    Shoulder pain of musculoskeletal origin is the main cause of upper limb pain of non-traumatic origin. Despite being one of the most common reasons for consultation, there is no established protocol for treatment due to the complexity of its etiology. However, it has been shown that the presence of myofascial trigger points on the shoulder muscles is a common condition associated with patients suffering from shoulder pain. This protocol has been created which describes the design of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the inclusion of dry needling (DN) within a protocol of manual physiotherapy and therapeutic exercise in the treatment of chronic shoulder pain of unspecific origin. Thirty-six participants aged 18-65 years will be recruited having mechanical chronic shoulder pain on unspecific origin and meeting the inclusion criteria. These will be randomized to one of two interventions, (i) DN, manual physiotherapy and therapeutic exercise or (ii) sham DN, manual physiotherapy and therapeutic exercise. The protocol will cover 6 weeks of treatment, with a 6-month follow-up. Our main outcome measure will be the Visual Analogue Scale for pain. This is the first study to combine the use of DN, manual physiotherapy and an exercise program with a 6-month follow-up, thus becoming a new contribution to the treatment of chronic shoulder pain, while new lines of research may be established to help determine the effects of DN on chronic shoulder pain and the frequency and proper dosage. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN30604244 ( http://www.controlled-trials.com ) 29 June 2016.

  4. An exercise protocol designed to control energy expenditure for long-term space missions.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomoaki; Ohkawara, Kazunori; Seino, Satoshi; Shimojo, Nobutake; Yamada, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Mukai, Chiaki

    2012-08-01

    Astronauts experience weight loss during spaceflight. Future space missions require a more efficient exercise program not only to maintain work efficiency, but also to control increased energy expenditure (EE). When discussing issues concerning EE incurred through exercise, excess post-exercise energy expenditure (EPEE) must also be considered. The aim of this study was to compare the total EE, including EPEE, induced by two types of interval cycling protocols with the total EE of a traditional, continuous cycling protocol. There were 10 healthy men, ages 20 to 31 yr, who completed 3 exercise sessions: sprint interval training (SIT) consisting of 7 sets of 30-s cycling at 120% VO2max with a 15-s rest between each bout; high-intensity interval aerobic training (HIAT) consisting of 3 sets of 3-min cycling at 80-90% VO2max with a 2-min active rest at 50% VO2max; and continuous aerobic training (CAT) consisting of 40 min of cycling at 60-65% VO2max. During each session, resting metabolic rate, exercise EE, and a 180-min post-exercise EE were measured. The EPEEs during the SIT, HIAT, and CAT averaged 32 +/- 19, 21 +/- 16, and 13 +/- 13 kcal, and the total EE for an entire exercise/ rest session averaged 109 +/- 20, 182 +/- 17, and 363 +/- 45 kcal, respectively. While the EPEE after the CAT was significantly less than after the SIT, the total EE with the CAT was the greatest of the three. The SIT and HIAT would be potential protocols to control energy expenditure for long space missions.

  5. Individual Optimal Frequency in Whole-Body Vibration: Effect of Protocol, Joint Angle, and Fatiguing Exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, Flaminia; Felici, Francesco; Piccinini, Alberto; Haxhi, Jonida; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Carlucci, F, Felici, F, Piccinini, A, Haxhi, J, and Sacchetti, M. Individual optimal frequency in whole-body vibration: effect of protocol, joint angle, and fatiguing exercise. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3503-3511, 2016-Recent studies have shown the importance of individualizing the vibration intervention to produce greater effects on the neuromuscular system in less time. The purpose of this study was to assess the individual optimal vibration frequency (OVF) corresponding to the highest muscle activation (RMSmax) during vibration at different frequencies, comparing different protocols. Twenty-nine university students underwent 3 continuous (C) and 2 random (R) different vibrating protocols, maintaining a squat position on a vibration platform. The C protocol lasted 50 seconds and involved the succession of ascending frequencies from 20 to 55 Hz, every 5 seconds. The same protocol was performed twice, having the knee angle at 120° (C) and 90° (C90), to assess the effect of joint angle and after a fatiguing squatting exercise (CF) to evaluate the influence of fatigue on OVF assessment. In the random protocols, vibration time was 20 seconds with a 2-minute (R2) and a 4-minute (R4) pauses between tested frequencies. Muscle activation and OVF values did not differ significantly in the C, R2, and R4 protocols. RMSmax was higher in C90 (p < 0.001) and in CF (p = 0.04) compared with the C protocol. Joint angle and fatiguing exercise had no effect on OVF. In conclusion, the shorter C protocol produced similar myoelectrical activity in the R2 and the R4 protocols, and therefore, it could be equally valid in identifying the OVF with considerable time efficiency. Knee joint angle and fatiguing exercise had an effect on surface electromyography response during vibration but did not affect OVF identification significantly.

  6. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation: A Standardized Protocol for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Rodrigo; Nieto, Javier; Ibarra, Sergio; Haas, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes present with voiding, sexual, and anorectal disturbances, which may be associated with one another, resulting in complex presentation. Thus, an integrated diagnosis and management approach may be required. Pelvic muscle rehabilitation (PMR) is a noninvasive modality involving cognitive reeducation, modification, and retraining of the pelvic floor and associated musculature. We describe our standardized PMR protocol for the management of pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation Program. The diagnostic assessment includes electromyography and manometry analyzed in 4 phases: (1) initial baseline phase; (2) rapid contraction phase; (3) tonic contraction and endurance phase; and (4) late baseline phase. This evaluation is performed at the onset of every session. PMR management consists of 6 possible therapeutic modalities, employed depending on the diagnostic evaluation: (1) down-training; (2) accessory muscle isolation; (3) discrimination training; (4) muscle strengthening; (5) endurance training; and (6) electrical stimulation. Eight to ten sessions are performed at one-week intervals with integration of home exercises and lifestyle modifications. Conclusions. The PMR protocol offers a standardized approach to diagnose and manage pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes with potential advantages over traditional biofeedback, involving additional interventions and a continuous pelvic floor assessment with management modifications over the clinical course. PMID:25006337

  7. Firefighter exercise protocols conducted in an environmental chamber: developing a laboratory-based simulated firefighting protocol.

    PubMed

    Ensari, Ipek; Motl, Robert W; Klaren, Rachel E; Fernhall, Bo; Smith, Denise L; Horn, Gavin P

    2017-05-01

    A standard exercise protocol that allows comparisons across various ergonomic studies would be of great value for researchers investigating the physical and physiological strains of firefighting and possible interventions for reducing the demands. We compared the pattern of cardiorespiratory changes from 21 firefighters during simulated firefighting activities using a newly developed firefighting activity station (FAS) and treadmill walking both performed within an identical laboratory setting. Data on cardiorespiratory parameters and core temperature were collected continuously using a portable metabolic unit and a wireless ingestible temperature probe. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated distinct patterns of change in cardiorespiratory parameters and heart rate between conditions. The pattern consisted of alternating periods of peaks and nadirs in the FAS that were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to live fire activities, whereas the same parameters increased logarithmically in the treadmill condition. Core temperature increased in a similarly for both conditions, although more rapidly in the FAS. Practitioner Summary: The firefighting activity station (FAS) yields a pattern of cardiorespiratory responses qualitatively and quantitatively similar to live fire activities, significantly different than treadmill walking. The FAS can be performed in a laboratory/clinic, providing a potentially standardised protocol for testing interventions to improve health and safety and conducting return to duty decisions.

  8. VO2max Testing in Trail Runners: Is There a Specific Exercise Test Protocol?

    PubMed

    Scheer, Volker; Ramme, Katharina; Reinsberger, Claus; Heitkamp, Hans-Christian

    2018-06-01

    Trail running places specific physiological demands on the human body due to its uphill and downhill running sections. We developed and investigated a more sport-specific trail exercise test protocol (inclination and speed incremental protocol), and compared it to two standard exercise test protocols (horizontal step and ramp protocol) in thirteen highly trained trail runners (age 31±6 years, height 179±6.4 cm, weight 69.2±7.9 kg, BMI 21.6±2.1 kg/m 2 ). The maximum oxygen uptake (VO 2 max) measured during the trail test (62.5±5.9 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 , [95% CI: 59.0-66.1]) was significantly higher compared to both the step test (60.1±5.3 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 , [95% CI: 56.8-63.3], p=0.024) and the ramp test (59.7±5.5 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 , [95% CI: 56.4-63.0], p=0.028). Time to task failure was significantly shorter in the trail test (557±73 s, [95% CI: 512-601]) compared to both the step test (1378±152 s, [95% CI: 1286-1470], p<0.001) and the ramp test (605±95, [95% CI: 547-662], p<0.001). Other physiological measurements obtained were similar. The trail test was the preferred choice in our group of trail runners. This study supports the implementation of the trail test in practice, and recommends that its validity be evaluated further. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The effect of various cold-water immersion protocols on exercise-induced inflammatory response and functional recovery from high-intensity sprint exercise.

    PubMed

    White, Gillian E; Rhind, Shawn G; Wells, Greg D

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different cold-water immersion (CWI) protocols on the inflammatory response to and functional recovery from high-intensity exercise. Eight healthy recreationally active males completed five trials of a high-intensity intermittent sprint protocol followed by a randomly assigned recovery condition: 1 of 4 CWI protocols (CWI-10 min × 20 °C, CWI-30 min × 20 °C, CWI-10 min × 10 °C, or CWI-30 min × 10 °C) versus passive rest. Circulating mediators of the inflammatory response were measured from EDTA plasma taken pre-exercise (baseline), immediately post-exercise, and at 2, 24, and 48 h post-exercise. Ratings of perceived soreness and impairment were noted on a 10-pt Likert scale, and squat jump and drop jump were performed at these time points. IL-6, IL-8, and MPO increased significantly from baseline immediately post-exercise in all conditions. IL-6 remained elevated from baseline at 2 h in the CWI-30 min × 20 °C, CWI-10 min × 10 °C, and CWI-30 min × 10 °C conditions, while further increases were observed for IL-8 and MPO in the CWI-30 min × 20 °C and CWI-30 min × 10 °C conditions. Squat jump and drop jump height were significantly lower in all conditions immediately post-exercise and at 2 h. Drop jump remained below baseline at 24 and 48 h in the CON and CWI-10 min × 20 °C conditions only, while squat jump height returned to baseline in all conditions. Cold-water immersion appears to facilitate restoration of muscle performance in a stretch-shortening cycle, but not concentric power. These changes do not appear to be related to inflammatory modulation. CWI protocols of excessive duration may actually exacerbate the concentration of cytokines in circulation post-exercise; however, the origin of the circulating cytokines is not necessarily skeletal muscle.

  10. A comparative study of two protocols for treadmill walking exercise testing in ambulating subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lundgaard, E; Wouda, M F; Strøm, V

    2017-10-01

    This is a comparative study of two exercise testing protocols. The objective of this study was to compare maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2 max) and achieved criteria for maximal exercise testing between the Sunnaas Protocol-a newly designed treadmill exercise test protocol-and the Modified Bruce Protocol in persons with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). This study was conducted in Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital, Norway. Twenty persons (19 men) with incomplete SCI (AIS D) capable of ambulating without assistive devices performed two treadmill walking exercise tests (Sunnaas Protocol and Modified Bruce Protocol) until exhaustion 1-3 days apart. The key differences between the protocols are the smaller increments in speed and shorter duration on each workload in the Sunnaas Protocol. Cardiovascular responses were measured continuously throughout both tests. The subjects exhibited statistically significantly higher VO 2 max when using the Sunnaas Protocol (37.1±9.9 vs 35.4±9.8 ml kg -1  min -1 , P=0.01), with a mean between-test difference of 1.8 ml kg -1  min -1 (95% confidence interval: 0.49-3.16). There was no significant difference in mean maximal heart rate (HR max). Nineteen (95%) subjects achieved at least three of the four criteria for maximal oxygen uptake using the Sunnaas Protocol. Thirteen (65%) subjects achieved at least three of the criteria using a Modified Bruce protocol. The small differences in both VO 2 max and achieved criteria in favor of the Sunnaas Protocol suggest that it could be a useful alternative treadmill exercise test protocol for ambulating persons with incomplete SCI.

  11. Norandrosterone and noretiocholanolone concentration before and after submaximal standardized exercise.

    PubMed

    de Geus, B; Delbeke, F; Meeusen, R; Van Eenoo, P; De Meirleir, K; Busschaert, B

    2004-10-01

    19-Norandrosterone (19-NA) and 19-noretiocholanolone (19-NE) are the two main urinary indicators used to detect illegal use of nandrolone. Recent studies showed that 19-NA and 19-NE can be endogenously produced in non-treated humans. The concentrations were close to the threshold of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), i.e. 2 ng/ml for men and seem to increase after prolonged intense effort. Androgens are involved in the biosynthesis of estrogens and estrogen has a protective effect against skeletal muscle damage following eccentric exercise. Furthermore, the testicular tissue can synthesize 19-norandrogens from androgens, we hypothetisize that the 19-norandrogen production might be influenced by muscle damage following eccentric exercise. Therefore the purpose of this study is to examine if three different exercise methods will influence the urinary concentration of 19-NA and 19-NE in healthy young subjects. Fifteen amateur hockey players undertook a 30 min submaximal standardized exercise protocol. They were randomised for three different types of exercise, namely a cycle ergometer test (cyclic muscle activity), a treadmill test (concentric muscle activity), or a bench-steptest (eccentric muscle activity) at a target heart rate corresponding to 65 % (+/- 5 %) of Karvonen heart rate. Urine samples were obtained before the test and 60 min and 120 min after the end of exercise. Subjects completed a Likert scale of muscle soreness before and 12 h after exercise. 19-NA and 19-NE were determined by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). Baseline urinary 19-NA and 19-NE concentrations were under limit of detection of 0.05 ng/ml, except for one sample (0.13 ng/ml). No 19-NA or 19-NE could be detected post exercise. In our experimental conditions, the exercise mode (eccentric or concentric) had no impact on 19-NA or 19-NE excretion. Our findings confirm that the current International Olympic Committee threshold level for nandrolone metabolites is

  12. Protocol: the effect of 12 weeks of Tai Chi practice on anxiety in healthy but stressed people compared to exercise and wait-list comparison groups: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuai; Lal, Sara; Meier, Peter; Sibbritt, David; Zaslawski, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Stress is a major problem in today's fast-paced society and can lead to serious psychosomatic complications. The ancient Chinese mind-body exercise of Tai Chi may provide an alternative and self-sustaining option to pharmaceutical medication for stressed individuals to improve their coping mechanisms. The protocol of this study is designed to evaluate whether Tai Chi practice is equivalent to standard exercise and whether the Tai Chi group is superior to a wait-list control group in improving stress coping levels. This study is a 6-week, three-arm, parallel, randomized, clinical trial designed to evaluate Tai Chi practice against standard exercise and a Tai Chi group against a nonactive control group over a period of 6 weeks with a 6-week follow-up. A total of 72 healthy adult participants (aged 18-60 years) who are either Tai Chi naïve or have not practiced Tai Chi in the past 12 months will be randomized into a Tai Chi group (n = 24), an exercise group (n = 24) or a wait-list group (n = 24). The primary outcome measure will be the State Trait Anxiety Inventory with secondary outcome measures being the Perceived Stress Scale 14, heart rate variability, blood pressure, Short Form 36 and a visual analog scale. The protocol is reported using the appropriate Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) items. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The incidence of training responsiveness to cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiometabolic measurements following individualized and standardized exercise prescription: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Weatherwax, Ryan M; Harris, Nigel K; Kilding, Andrew E; Dalleck, Lance C

    2016-12-19

    There is individual variability to cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) training, but the underlying cause is not well understood. Traditionally, a standardized approach to exercise prescription has utilized relative percentages of maximal heart rate, heart rate reserve (HRR), maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2 max), or VO 2 reserve to establish exercise intensity. However, this model fails to take into consideration individual metabolic responses to exercise and may attribute to the variability in training responses. It has been proposed that an individualized approach would take into consideration metabolic responses to exercises to increase responsiveness to training. In this randomized control trial, participants will undergo a 12-week exercise intervention using individualized (ventilatory thresholds) and standardized (HRR) methods to prescribe CRF training intensity. Following the intervention, participants will be categorized as responders or non-responders based on changes in maximal aerobic abilities. Participants who are non-responders will complete a second 12-week intervention in a crossover design to determine whether they can become responders with a differing exercise prescription. There are four main research outcomes: (1) determine the cohort-specific technical error to use in the categorization of response rate; (2) determine if an individualized intensity prescription is superior to a standard approach in regards to VO 2 max and cardiometabolic risk factors; (3) investigate the time course changes throughout 12 weeks of CRF training between the two intervention groups; and (4) determine if non-responders can become responders if the exercise prescription is modified. The findings from this research will provide evidence on the effectiveness of individualized exercise prescription related to training responsiveness of VO 2 max and cardiometabolic risk factors compared to a standardized approach and further our understanding of individual exercise responses

  14. DDN (Defense Data Network) Protocol Handbook. Volume 1. DoD Military Standard Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    official Military Standard communication protocols in use on the DDN are included, as are several ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network... research protocols which are currently in use, and some protocols currently undergoing review. Tutorial information and auxiliary documents are also...compatible with DoD needs, by researchers wishing to improve the protocols, and by impleroentors of local area networks (LANs) wishing their

  15. The Space Communications Protocol Standards Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, Alan; Hooke, Adrian J.

    1994-01-01

    In the fall of 1992 NASA and the Department of Defense chartered a technical team to explore the possibility of developing a common set of space data communications standards for potential dual-use across the U.S. national space mission support infrastructure. The team focused on the data communications needs of those activities associated with on-lined control of civil and military aircraft. A two-pronged approach was adopted: a top-down survey of representative civil and military space data communications requirements was conducted; and a bottom-up analysis of available standard data communications protocols was performed. A striking intersection of civil and military space mission requirements emerged, and an equally striking consensus on the approach towards joint civil and military space protocol development was reached. The team concluded that wide segments of the U.S. civil and military space communities have common needs for: (1) an efficient file transfer protocol; (2) various flavors of underlying data transport service; (3) an optional data protection mechanism to assure end-to-end security of message exchange; and (4) an efficient internetworking protocol. These recommendations led to initiating a program to develop a suite of protocols based on these findings. This paper describes the current status of this program.

  16. Satellite-Friendly Protocols and Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, O.; Schmidt, M.; Ebert, J.; Schlemmer, H.; Kastner, S.; Riedler, W.

    2002-01-01

    We are currently observing a development unprecedented with other services, the enormous growth of the Internet. Video, voice and data applications can be supported via this network in high quality. Multi-media applications require high bandwidth which may not be available in many areas. When making proper use of the broadcast feature of a communications satellite, the performance of the satellite-based system can compare favourably to terrestrial solutions. Internet applications are in many cases highly asymmetric, making them very well suited to applications using small and inexpensive terminals. Data from one source may be used simultaneously by a large number of users. The Internet protocol suite has become the de-facto standard. But this protocol family in its original form has not been designed to support guaranteed quality of service, a prerequisite for real-time, high quality traffic. The Internet Protocol has to be adapted for the satellite environment, because long roundtrip delays and the error behaviour of the channel could make it inefficient over a GEO satellite. Another requirement is to utilise the satellite bandwidth as efficiently as possible. This can be achieved by adapting the access system to the nature of IP frames, which are variable in length. In the framework of ESA's ARTES project a novel satellite multimedia system was developed which utilises Multi-Frequency TDMA in a meshed network topology. The system supports Quality of Service (QoS) by reserving capacity with different QoS requirements. The system is centrally controlled by a master station with the implementation of a demand assignment (DAMA) system. A lean internal signalling system has been adopted. Network management is based on the SNMP protocol and industry-standard network management platforms, making interfaces to standard accounting and billing systems easy. Modern communication systems will have to be compliant to different standards in a very flexible manner. The

  17. ECOC comparison exercise with identical thermal protocols after temperature offset correction - instrument diagnostics by in-depth evaluation of operational parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panteliadis, P.; Hafkenscheid, T.; Cary, B.; Diapouli, E.; Fischer, A.; Favez, O.; Quincey, P.; Viana, M.; Hitzenberger, R.; Vecchi, R.; Saraga, D.; Sciare, J.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; John, A.; Schwarz, J.; Giannoni, M.; Novak, J.; Karanasiou, A.; Fermo, P.; Maenhaut, W.

    2015-02-01

    A comparison exercise on thermal-optical elemental carbon/organic carbon (ECOC) analysers was carried out among 17 European laboratories. Contrary to previous comparison exercises, the 17 participants made use of an identical instrument set-up, after correcting for temperature offsets with the application of a recently developed temperature calibration kit (Sunset Laboratory Inc, OR, US). Temperature offsets reported by participants ranged from -93 to +100 °C per temperature step. Five filter samples and two sucrose solutions were analysed with both the EUSAAR2 and NIOSH870 thermal protocols. z scores were calculated for total carbon (TC); nine outliers and three stragglers were identified. Three outliers and eight stragglers were found for EC. Overall, the participants provided results between the warning levels with the exception of two laboratories that showed poor performance, the causes of which were identified and corrected through the course of the comparison exercise. The TC repeatability and reproducibility (expressed as relative standard deviations) were 11 and 15% for EUSAAR2 and 9.2 and 12% for NIOSH870; the standard deviations for EC were 15 and 20% for EUSAAR2 and 20 and 26% for NIOSH870. TC was in good agreement between the two protocols, TCNIOSH870 = 0.98 × TCEUSAAR2 (R2 = 1.00, robust means). Transmittance (TOT) calculated EC for NIOSH870 was found to be 20% lower than for EUSAAR2, ECNIOSH870 = 0.80 × ECEUSAAR2 (R2 = 0.96, robust means). The thermograms and laser signal values were compared and similar peak patterns were observed per sample and protocol for most participants. Notable deviations from the typical patterns indicated either the absence or inaccurate application of the temperature calibration procedure and/or pre-oxidation during the inert phase of the analysis. Low or zero pyrolytic organic carbon (POC), as reported by a few participants, is suggested as an indicator of an instrument-specific pre-oxidation. A sample-specific pre

  18. STANDARD MEASUREMENT PROTOCOLS - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual, in support of the Florida Radon Research Program, contains standard protocols for key measurements where data quality is vital to the program. t contains two sections. he first section, soil measurements, contains field sampling protocols for soil gas permeability and...

  19. Effectiveness of Artificial Gravity and Ergometric Exercise as a Countermeasure-Comparison between Everyday and Every Other Day Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Satoshi; Sugenoya, Junichi; Sato, Maki; Shimizu, Yuuki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Nishimura, Nooki; Takada, Hiroki; Takada, Masumi; Mano, Tadaki; Ishida, Koji; Akima, Hiroshi; Katayama, Keisho; Hirayanagi, Kaname; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Yajima, Katzuyoshi; Watanabe, Yoriko; Suzuki, Satomi; Fukunnaga, Tetsuo; Masuo, Yoshihisa

    2008-06-01

    Effectiveness of centrifuge-induced artificial gravity and ergometric exercise as a countermeasure to space deconditioning, including cardiovascular deconditioning, myatrophy, and osteoporosis, induced by 20 days of head-down bedrest., was examined in 12 healthy men in 2006, and 8 healthy men in 2007. Bedrest was performed with 2300 kcal of diet. Water intake was recommended more than the urine volume in a previous day. A new protocol for artificial gravity with ergometric exercise was adopted, with 1.6 G of artificial gravity at heart level and 60 W of exercise every day in 2006, and every other day in 2007. The load was suspended when subjects complained all-out, and was continued until 30 min cumulative total load time. Gravity was stepped up by 0.2 G or exercise load was stepped up by 15 W alternately when the subject endured the load for 5 min. Gravity tolerance was examined by using centrifuge, and anti-G score was determined before and after the bedrest. Not all result has been analyzed, however, effectiveness of artificial gravity with ergometric exercise was evidenced in orthostatic tolerance, physical fitness, cardiac function, myatrophy, and bone metabolism in everyday protocol, but not in every other day protocol. We concluded this everyday protocol was effective in cardiovascular deconditioning myatrophy, and bone metabolism.

  20. Inflight Exercise Regimen for the 2-Hour Prebreathe Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Philip P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Woodruff, Kristin K.; Schneider, Susan M.; Homick, Jerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A 10 min aerobic prebreathe exercise up to 75% V-O2(sub max) on a dual-cycle ergometer, included in the 2-hour prebreathe protocol, has been shown to dramatically reduce the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) at altitude. In-flight only leg ergometry will be available. A balanced exercise was developed using surgical tubing with the ergometer on-orbit. We hypothesize that a 75% V02max workload, individually prescribed, would be achieved using a target heart rate to regulate the intensity of the arm exercise. VO2, heart rate (HR) / ECG, V-CO2 /V-O2, V(sub E), and V(sub T), and rate of perceived exertion (Borg scale) were measured in eleven healthy subjects who passed a US Air Force Class III Physical examination. A V-O2 peak test was performed to assess the sub-maximal exercise prescription. Two series of sub-maximal tests were performed: (1) leg ergometer/hand ergometer and (2) leg ergometer/surgical tubes. We found no significant differences (P > 0.05) in comparing the means for V-O2 and HR between the predicted and measured values during the final 4 minute-stage at "75% V-O2 workload" or between the two types of sub-maximal tests. The prescribed prebreathe sub-maximal exercise performed with flight certified surgical tubes was achieved using the target HR.

  1. NASA Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loerch, Linda; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Efficient exercise countermeasures are necessary to offset or minimize spaceflight-induced deconditioning and to maximize crew performance of mission tasks. These countermeasure protocols should use the fewest crew and vehicle resources. NASA s Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures (ExPC) Project works to identify, collect, interpret, and summarize evidence that results in effective exercise countermeasure protocols which protect crew health and performance during International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions. The ExPC and NASA s Human Research Program are sponsoring multiple studies to evaluate and improve the efficacy of spaceflight exercise countermeasures. First, the Project will measure maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) during cycle ergometry before, during, and after ISS missions. Second, the Project is sponsoring an evaluation of a new prototype harness that offers improved comfort and increased loading during treadmill operations. Third, the Functional Tasks Test protocol will map performance of anticipated lunar mission tasks with physiologic systems before and after short and long-duration spaceflight, to target system contributions and the tailoring of exercise protocols to maximize performance. In addition to these studies that are actively enrolling crewmember participants, the ExPC is planning new studies that include an evaluation of a higher-intensity/lower-volume exercise countermeasure protocol aboard the ISS using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device and second-generation treadmill, studies that evaluate bone loading during spaceflight exercise, and ground-based studies that focus on fitness for duty standards required to complete lunar mission tasks and for which exercise protocols need to protect. Summaries of these current and future studies and strategies will be provided to international colleagues for knowledge sharing and possible collaboration.

  2. High-Intensity Interval Exercises' Acute Impact on Heart Rate Variability: Comparison Between Whole-Body and Cycle Ergometer Protocols.

    PubMed

    Schaun, Gustavo Z; Del Vecchio, Fabrício B

    2018-01-01

    Schaun, GZ and Del Vecchio, FB. High-intensity interval exercises' acute impact on heart rate variability: comparison between whole-body and cycle ergometer protocols. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 223-229, 2018-Study aimed to compare the effects of 2 high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocols on heart rate variability. Twelve young adult males (23.3 ± 3.9 years, 177.8 ± 7.4 cm, 76.9 ± 12.9 kg) volunteered to participate. In a randomized cross-over design, subjects performed 2 HIIT protocols, 1 on a cycle ergometer (Tabata protocol [TBT]; eight 20-second bouts at 170% Pmax interspersed by 10-second rest) and another with whole-body calisthenic exercises (McRae protocol; eight 20-second all-out intervals interspersed by 10-second rest). Heart rate variability outcomes in the time, frequency, and nonlinear domains were assessed on 3 moments: (a) presession; (b) immediately postsession; and (c) 24 hours postsession. Results revealed that RRmean, Ln rMSSD, Ln high frequency (HF), and Ln low frequency (LF) were significantly reduced immediately postsession (p ≤ 0.001) and returned to baseline 24 h after both protocols. In addition, LF/HF ratio was reduced 24 h postsession (p ≤ 0.01) and SD2 was significantly lower immediately postsession only in TBT. Our main finding was that responses from heart rate autonomic control were similar in both protocols, despite different modes of exercise performed. Specifically, exercises resulted in a high parasympathetic inhibition immediately after session with subsequent recovery within 1 day. These results suggest that subjects were already recovered the day after and can help coaches to better program training sessions with such protocols.

  3. EXERCISE in pediatric autologous stem cell transplant patients: a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an intensive therapy used to improve survivorship and cure various oncologic diseases. However, this therapy is associated with high mortality rates and numerous negative side-effects. The recovery of the immune system is a special concern and plays a key role in the success of this treatment. In healthy populations it is known that exercise plays an important role in immune system regulation, but little is known about the role of exercise in the hematological and immunological recovery of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The primary objective of this randomized-controlled trial (RCT) is to study the effect of an exercise program (in- and outpatient) on immune cell recovery in patients undergoing an autologous stem cell transplantation. The secondary objective is to determine if an exercise intervention diminishes the usual deterioration in quality of life, physical fitness, and the acquisition of a sedentary lifestyle. Methods This RCT has received approval from The Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board (CHREB) of the University of Calgary (Ethics ID # E-24476). Twenty-four participants treated for a malignancy with autologous stem cell transplant (5 to 18 years) in the Alberta Children’s Hospital will be randomly assigned to an exercise or control group. The exercise group will participate in a two-phase exercise intervention (in- and outpatient) from hospitalization until 10 weeks after discharge. The exercise program includes strength, flexibility and aerobic exercise. During the inpatient phase this program will be performed 5 times/week and will be supervised. The outpatient phase will combine a supervised session with two home-based exercise sessions with the use of the Wii device. The control group will follow the standard protocol without any specific exercise program. A range of outcomes, including quantitative and functional recovery of immune system, cytokine levels in

  4. U.S. Additional Protocol Outreach Program-Tabletop Exercises to Implement the AP.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Langner, D. C.; Thomas, K. E.; Smith, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    The Office of International Regimes and Agreement (NA-243) is the lead office in the Department of Energy (DOE) to assist DOE and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) sites in the preparation of providing declarations on relevant civilian, nuclear fuel cycle-related research and development activities to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This is in accordance to the implementation of the ''Protocol Additional to the AGreement between the United STates and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Applications of Safeguards in the United States. In preparation for entry-into-force, NA-243 conducted two tabletop exercises under the Additional Protocol Outreach Program. Themore » first one, held in May 2004 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, focused on the factors important to protect national security assets and intellectual property. The other, held in August 2004 at the Idaho National Laboratory explored the level of detail or granularity for reporting declarable activities. Both tabletops invited participants from the national laboratories and DOE/NNSA organizations. Discussions were based around the process to identify potential declarable activities relating to the nuclear fuel cycle-related R and D projects from the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program. The two tabletop exercises provided recommendations and conclusions that would be helpful to other DOE/NNSA locations for preparing for and reporting relevant and concise information to the IAEA under the Additional Protocol. This paper provides details on the events, discussions, observations, and lessons learned from both the LANL and INL tabletop exercises.« less

  5. 49 CFR 89.11 - Standards for exercise of delegated authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for exercise of delegated authority. 89.11 Section 89.11 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.11 Standards for exercise of delegated authority. The authority...

  6. 49 CFR 89.11 - Standards for exercise of delegated authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for exercise of delegated authority. 89.11 Section 89.11 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.11 Standards for exercise of delegated authority. The authority...

  7. 49 CFR 89.11 - Standards for exercise of delegated authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for exercise of delegated authority. 89.11 Section 89.11 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.11 Standards for exercise of delegated authority. The authority...

  8. 49 CFR 89.11 - Standards for exercise of delegated authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for exercise of delegated authority. 89.11 Section 89.11 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.11 Standards for exercise of delegated authority. The authority...

  9. 49 CFR 89.11 - Standards for exercise of delegated authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for exercise of delegated authority. 89.11 Section 89.11 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.11 Standards for exercise of delegated authority. The authority...

  10. An Exercise Protocol Designed to control Energy Expenditure and to have a Positive Impact on Maximal Oxygen Consumption for Long-Term Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Tomoaki; Ohkawara, Kazunori; Seino, Satoshi; Shimojo, Nobutake; Yamada, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Mukai, Chiaki

    2013-02-01

    Maximal oxygen consumption decreases during spaceflight, and astronauts also experience controversial weight loss. Future space missions require a more efficient exercise program to maintain work efficiency and to control increased energy expenditure (EE). We have been developing two types of original exercise training protocols which are better suited to astronauts’ daily routine exercise during long-term spaceflight: sprint interval training (SIT) and high-intensity interval aerobic training (HIAT). In this study, we compared the total EE, including excess post-exercise energy expenditure (EPEE), induced by our interval cycling protocols with the total EE of a traditional, continuous aerobic training (CAT). In the results, while the EPEEs after the SIT and HIAT were greater than after the CAT, the total EE for an entire exercise/rest session with the CAT was the greatest of our three exercise protocols. The SIT and HIAT would be potential protocols to control energy expenditure for long space missions.

  11. A "mini-fast with exercise" protocol for fat loss.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Babak; McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Gustin, John C; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-10-01

    From the standpoint of promoting leanness, exercise is of most value if oxidation of stored fat is maximized during and following the exercise sessions. Bahadori has proposed that this can best be achieved if prolonged exercise of moderate intensity is performed during a 12-14 h "mini-fast" that entails skipping a meal; if subsequent food consumption features low-fat foods, the fat stores expended during and after the exercise will not be fully repleted by dietary fat. Thus, prolonged compliance with such a regimen should lead to steady loss of body fat until a much leaner equilibrium body composition is attained. The feasibility and efficacy of this strategy has been examined in an open pilot study. Participants were asked to perform prolonged, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise at least 3-5 times weekly, nesting each exercise session within a 12-14 h mini-fast. No restrictions were placed on daily calorie consumption, but low-fat, low-glycemic-index food choices were recommended. Of the 34 subjects originally enrolled, 27 returned for follow-up evaluations at 6 and 12 weeks. During the 12 week study, the average fat loss in these 27 subjects - 7.4 kg - corresponded to one-quarter of their baseline fat mass. Fasting insulin levels likewise fell by 25%. The rate of fat loss was at least as great in the second 6 weeks as in the first, suggesting that fat loss might have persisted for some time if the study had been prolonged. This protocol, combining elements of exercise training, fasting, and low-fat eating, is both sustainable and healthful, and in reasonably compliant subjects may have considerable potential for promoting and maintaining leanness and insulin sensitivity.

  12. Use of the HR index to predict maximal oxygen uptake during different exercise protocols.

    PubMed

    Haller, Jeannie M; Fehling, Patricia C; Barr, David A; Storer, Thomas W; Cooper, Christopher B; Smith, Denise L

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the ability of the HRindex model to accurately predict maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2max) across a variety of incremental exercise protocols. Ten men completed five incremental protocols to volitional exhaustion. Protocols included three treadmill (Bruce, UCLA running, Wellness Fitness Initiative [WFI]), one cycle, and one field (shuttle) test. The HRindex prediction equation (METs = 6 × HRindex - 5, where HRindex = HRmax/HRrest) was used to generate estimates of energy expenditure, which were converted to body mass-specific estimates of [Formula: see text]O2max. Estimated [Formula: see text]O2max was compared with measured [Formula: see text]O2max. Across all protocols, the HRindex model significantly underestimated [Formula: see text]O2max by 5.1 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) (95% CI: -7.4, -2.7) and the standard error of the estimate (SEE) was 6.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1). Accuracy of the model was protocol-dependent, with [Formula: see text]O2max significantly underestimated for the Bruce and WFI protocols but not the UCLA, Cycle, or Shuttle protocols. Although no significant differences in [Formula: see text]O2max estimates were identified for these three protocols, predictive accuracy among them was not high, with root mean squared errors and SEEs ranging from 7.6 to 10.3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) and from 4.5 to 8.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), respectively. Correlations between measured and predicted [Formula: see text]O2max were between 0.27 and 0.53. Individual prediction errors indicated that prediction accuracy varied considerably within protocols and among participants. In conclusion, across various protocols the HRindex model significantly underestimated [Formula: see text]O2max in a group of aerobically fit young men. Estimates generated using the model did not differ from measured [Formula: see text]O2max for three of the five protocols studied; nevertheless, some individual prediction errors were large. The lack of precision among estimates

  13. Lower Extremity Landing Biomechanics in Both Sexes After a Functional Exercise Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Wesley, Caroline A.; Aronson, Patricia A.; Docherty, Carrie L.

    2015-01-01

    Context Sex differences in landing biomechanics play a role in increased rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in female athletes. Exercising to various states of fatigue may negatively affect landing mechanics, resulting in a higher injury risk, but research is inconclusive regarding sex differences in response to fatigue. Objective To use the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS), a valid clinical movement-analysis tool, to determine the effects of exercise on the landing biomechanics of males and females. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Thirty-six (18 men, 18 women) healthy college-aged athletes (members of varsity, club, or intramural teams) with no history of ACL injury or prior participation in an ACL injury-prevention program. Intervention(s) Participants were videotaped performing 3 jump-landing trials before and after performance of a functional, sportlike exercise protocol consisting of repetitive sprinting, jumping, and cutting tasks. Main Outcome Measure(s) Landing technique was evaluated using the LESS. A higher LESS score indicates more errors. The mean of the 3 LESS scores in each condition (pre-exercise and postexercise) was used for statistical analysis. Results Women scored higher on the LESS (6.3 ± 1.9) than men (5.0 ± 2.3) regardless of time (P = .04). Postexercise scores (6.3 ± 2.1) were higher than preexercise scores (5.0 ± 2.1) for both sexes (P = .01), but women were not affected to a greater degree than men (P = .62). Conclusions As evidenced by their higher LESS scores, females demonstrated more errors in landing technique than males, which may contribute to their increased rate of ACL injury. Both sexes displayed poor technique after the exercise protocol, which may indicate that participants experience a higher risk of ACL injury in the presence of fatigue. PMID:26285090

  14. Effects of an Exercise Protocol for Improving Handgrip Strength and Walking Speed on Cognitive Function in Patients with Chronic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeeun; Yim, Jongeun

    2017-11-13

    BACKGROUND Handgrip strength and walking speed predict and influence cognitive function. We aimed to investigate an exercise protocol for improving handgrip strength and walking speed, applied to patients with chronic stroke who had cognitive function disorder. MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-nine patients with cognitive function disorder participated in this study, and were randomly divided into one of two groups: exercise group (n=14) and control group (n=15). Both groups underwent conventional physical therapy for 60 minutes per day. Additionally, the exercise group followed an exercise protocol for handgrip using the hand exerciser, power web exerciser, Digi-Flex (15 minutes); and treadmill-based weight loading training on their less-affected leg (15 minutes) using a sandbag for 30 minutes, three times per day, for six weeks. Outcomes, including cognitive function and gait ability, were measured before and after the training. RESULTS The Korean version of Montreal Cognitive Assessment (K-MoCA), Stroop test (both simple and interference), Trail Making-B, Timed Up and Go, and 10-Meter Walk tests (p<0.05) yielded improved results for the exercise group compared with the control group. Importantly, the K-MoCA, Timed Up and Go, and 10-Meter Walk test results were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS The exercise protocol for improving handgrip strength and walking speed had positive effects on cognitive function in patients with chronic stroke.

  15. Effect of test exercises and mask donning on measured respirator fit.

    PubMed

    Crutchfield, C D; Fairbank, E O; Greenstein, S L

    1999-12-01

    Quantitative respirator fit test protocols are typically defined by a series of fit test exercises. A rationale for the protocols that have been developed is generally not available. There also is little information available that describes the effect or effectiveness of the fit test exercises currently specified in respiratory protection standards. This study was designed to assess the relative impact of fit test exercises and mask donning on respirator fit as measured by a controlled negative pressure and an ambient aerosol fit test system. Multiple donnings of two different sizes of identical respirator models by each of 14 test subjects showed that donning affects respirator fit to a greater degree than fit test exercises. Currently specified fit test protocols emphasize test exercises, and the determination of fit is based on a single mask donning. A rationale for a modified fit test protocol based on fewer, more targeted test exercises and multiple mask donnings is presented. The modified protocol identified inadequately fitting respirators as effectively as the currently specified Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) quantitative fit test protocol. The controlled negative pressure system measured significantly (p < 0.0001) more respirator leakage than the ambient aerosol fit test system. The bend over fit test exercise was found to be predictive of poor respirator fit by both fit test systems. For the better fitting respirators, only the talking exercise generated aerosol fit factors that were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) than corresponding donning fit factors.

  16. Sub-Symptomatic Aerobic Exercise for Patients with Post-Concussion Syndrome: A Critically Appraised Topic.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Katrina G; Hussey, Matthew J; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2017-09-27

    Clinical Scenario: Patients who experience prolonged concussion symptoms can be diagnosed with Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS) when those symptoms persist past 4 weeks. Aerobic exercise protocols have been shown to be effective in improving physical and mental aspects of health. Emerging research suggests that aerobic exercise maybe useful as a treatment for PCS, where exercise allows patients to feel less isolated and more active during the recovery process. Is aerobic exercise more beneficial in reducing symptoms than current standard care in patients with prolonged symptoms or PCS lasting longer than 4 weeks? Summary of Key Findings: After a thorough literature search, 4 studies were selected relevant to the clinical question. Of the 4 studies, 1 was a randomized control trial and 3 were case series. All 4 studies investigate aerobic exercise protocol as treatment for PCS. 1-4 Three articles demonstrated a greater rate of symptom improvement from baseline assessment to follow-up after a controlled sub-symptomatic aerobic exercise program. 2-4 One study showed a decrease in symptoms in the aerobic exercise group compared to the full body stretching group. 1 Clinical Bottom Line: There is moderate evidence to support sub-symptomatic aerobic exercise as a treatment of PCS, therefore it should be considered as a clinical option for reducing PCS and prolonged concussion symptoms. A previously validated protocol, such as the Buffalo Concussion Treadmill Test, Balke Protocol, or Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) as mentioned in this critically appraised topic should be used to measure baseline values and treatment progression. Strength of Recommendation: Level C evidence exists that aerobic exercise protocol is more effective than the current standard of care in treating PCS.

  17. Whole body vibration exercise for chronic low back pain: study protocol for a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Qiang; Pi, Yan-Lin; Chen, Pei-Jie; Chen, Bin-Lin; Liang, Lei-Chao; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Juan

    2014-04-02

    Low back pain affects approximately 80% of people at some stage in their lives. Exercise therapy is the most widely used nonsurgical intervention for low back pain in practice guidelines. Whole body vibration exercise is becoming increasingly popular for relieving musculoskeletal pain and improving health-related quality of life. However, the efficacy of whole body vibration exercise for low back pain is not without dispute. This study aims to estimate the effect of whole body vibration exercise for chronic low back pain. We will conduct a prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled trial of 120 patients with chronic low back pain. Patients will be randomly assigned into an intervention group and a control group. The intervention group will participate in whole body vibration exercise twice a week for 3 months. The control group will receive general exercise twice a week for 3 months. Primary outcome measures will be the visual analog scale for pain, the Oswestry Disability Index and adverse events. The secondary outcome measures will include muscle strength and endurance of spine, trunk proprioception, transversus abdominis activation capacity, and quality of life. We will conduct intention-to-treat analysis if any participants withdraw from the trial. Important features of this study include the randomization procedures, single-blind, large sample size, and a standardized protocol for whole body vibration in chronic low back pain. This study aims to determine whether whole body vibration exercise produces more beneficial effects than general exercise for chronic low back pain. Therefore, our results will be useful for patients with chronic low back pain as well as for medical staff and health-care decision makers. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-13003708.

  18. Identification of anaerobic threshold by analysis of heart rate variability during discontinuous dynamic and resistance exercise protocols in healthy older men.

    PubMed

    Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Castello-Simões, Viviane; Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Archiza, Bruno; Dos Santos, Daniel Augusto; Bonjorno, José Carlos; de Oliveira, Claudio Ricardo; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2014-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine anaerobic threshold (AT) during discontinuous dynamic and resistive exercise protocols by analysing of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood lactate (BL) in healthy elderly subjects and compare the cardiovascular, metabolic and autonomic variables obtained from these two forms of exercise. Fourteen elderly (70 ± 4 years) apparently healthy males underwent the following tests: (i) incremental ramp test on cycle ergometer, (ii) one repetition maximum (1RM) leg press at 45°, (iii) a discontinuous exercise test on a cycle ergometer (DET-C) protocol and (iv) a resistance exercise leg press (DET-L) protocol. Heart rate, blood pressure and BL were obtained during each increment of exercise intensity. No significant differences (P>0·05) were found between methods of AT determination (BL and HRV) nor the relative intensity corresponding to AT (30% of maximum intensity) between the types of exercise (DET-C and DET-L). Furthermore, no significant differences (P>0·05) were found between the DET-C and DET-L in relation to HRV, however, the DET-L provided higher values of systolic blood pressure and BL (P<0·05) from the intensity corresponding to AT. We conclude that HRV was effective in determination of AT, and the parasympathetic modulation responses obtained during dynamic and resistive exercise protocols were similar when compared at the same relative intensity. However, DET-L resulted in higher values of blood pressure and BL at workloads beyond AT. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Short-term supervised inpatient physiotherapy exercise protocol improves cardiac autonomic function after coronary artery bypass graft surgery--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; De Souza Melo Costa, Fernando; Pantoni, Camila Bianca Falasco; Di Thommazo, Luciana; Luzzi, Sérgio; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is accompanied by severe impairment of cardiac autonomous regulation (CAR). This study aimed to determine whether a short-term physiotherapy exercise protocol post-CABG, during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR), might improve CAR. Seventy-four patients eligible for CABG were recruited and randomised into physiotherapy exercise group (EG) or physiotherapy usual care group (UCG). EG patients underwent a short-term supervised inpatient physiotherapy exercise protocol consisting of an early mobilisation with progressive exercises plus usual care (respiratory exercises). UCG only received respiratory exercises. Forty-seven patients (24 EG and 23 UGC) completed the study. Outcome measures of CAR included linear and non-linear measures of heart rate variability (HRV) assessed before discharge. By hospital discharge, EG presented significantly higher parasympathetic HRV values [rMSSD, high frequency (HF), SD1)], global power (STD RR, SD2), non-linear HRV indexes [detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)alpha1, DFAalpha2, approximate entropy (ApEn)] and mean RR compared to UCG (p<0.05). Conversely, higher values of mean HR, low frequency (LF) (sympathetic activity) and the LF/HF (global sympatho-vagal balance) were found in the UCG. A short-term supervised physiotherapy exercise protocol during inpatient CR improves CAR at the time of discharge. Thus, exercise-based inpatient CR might be an effective non-pharmacological tool to improve autonomic cardiac tone in patient's post-CABG.

  20. Stress biomarker responses to different protocols of forced exercise in chronically stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    Stress is one of the most significant causes of major health problems on a global scale. The beneficial effects of exercise on combating stress, however, are well-established. The present study investigated the stress biomarker responses, such as serum corticosterone, interlukin-1β, and glucose levels, to different (preventive, therapeutic, protective, and continuous) protocols of forced exercise under stress. Male rats were randomly allocated to the following five groups: stressed, preventive, therapeutic, protective, and continuous (and/or pre-stress, post-stress, stress-accompanied, and both pre-stress and stress-accompanied exercise respectively) exercise groups. Stress was applied 6 h/day for 21 days and the treadmill running was employed at a speed of 20-21 m/min for 21 and 42 days. The findings showed that the therapeutic, protective, and continuous exercises led to reduced corticosterone and glucose levels. Whereas, the preventive exercise did not reverse the stress responses, and that the therapeutic exercise led to a significant decline in serum interlukin-1β. It is concluded that protective, therapeutic, and, particularly, continuous exercises lead to significant reductions in serum corticosterone and the associated stress-induced hyperglycemia. Moreover, it appears that the timing and duration of exercise are the two factors contributing to changes in stress biomarker responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Post-Exercise Protein Trial: Interactions between Diet and Exercise (PEPTIDE): study protocol for randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Alghannam, Abdullah F; Tsintzas, Kostas; Thompson, Dylan; Bilzon, James; Betts, James A

    2014-11-24

    Performing regular exercise is known to manifest a number of health benefits that mainly relate to cardiovascular and muscular adaptations to allow for greater oxygen extraction and utilization. There is increasing evidence that nutrient intake can affect the adaptive response to a single exercise bout, and that protein feeding is important to facilitate this process. Thus, the exercise-nutrient interaction may potentially lead to a greater response to training. The role of post-exercise protein ingestion in enhancing the effects of running-based endurance exercise training relative to energy-matched carbohydrate intervention remains to be established. Additionally, the influence of immediate versus overnight protein ingestion in mediating these training effects is currently unknown. The current protocol aims to establish whether post-exercise nutrient intake and timing would influence the magnitude of improvements during a prescribed endurance training program. The project involves two phases with each involving two treatment arms applied in a randomized investigator-participant double-blind parallel group design. For each treatment, participants will be required to undergo six weeks of running-based endurance training. Immediately post-exercise, participants will be prescribed solutions providing 0.4 grams per kilogram of body mass (g · kg(-1)) of whey protein hydrolysate plus 0.4 g · kg(-1) sucrose, relative to an isocaloric sucrose control (0.8 g · kg(-1); Phase I). In Phase II, identical protein supplements will be provided (0.4 + 0.4 g · kg(-1) · h(-1) of whey protein hydrolysate and sucrose, respectively), with the timing of ingestion manipulated to compare immediate versus overnight recovery feedings. Anthropometric, expired gas, venous blood and muscle biopsy samples will be obtained at baseline and following the six-week training period. By investigating the role of nutrition in enhancing the effects of endurance exercise training, we will provide

  2. ACR/NEMA Digital Image Interface Standard (An Illustrated Protocol Overview)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. Robert

    1985-09-01

    The American College of Radiologists (ACR) and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) have sponsored a joint standards committee mandated to develop a universal interface standard for the transfer of radiology images among a variety of PACS imaging devicesl. The resulting standard interface conforms to the ISO/OSI standard reference model for network protocol layering. The standard interface specifies the lower layers of the reference model (Physical, Data Link, Transport and Session) and implies a requirement of the Network Layer should a requirement for a network exist. The message content has been considered and a flexible message and image format specified. The following Imaging Equipment modalities are supported by the standard interface... CT Computed Tomograpy DS Digital Subtraction NM Nuclear Medicine US Ultrasound MR Magnetic Resonance DR Digital Radiology The following data types are standardized over the transmission interface media.... IMAGE DATA DIGITIZED VOICE HEADER DATA RAW DATA TEXT REPORTS GRAPHICS OTHERS This paper consists of text supporting the illustrated protocol data flow. Each layer will be individually treated. Particular emphasis will be given to the Data Link layer (Frames) and the Transport layer (Packets). The discussion utilizes a finite state sequential machine model for the protocol layers.

  3. A Pilot Study for Applying an Extravehicular Activity Exercise Prebreathe Protocol to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Kristin K.; Johnson, Anyika N.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Gernhardt, Michael; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Foster, Philip P.

    2000-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a serious risk to astronauts performing extravehicular activity (EVA). To reduce this risk, the addition of ten minutes of moderate exercise (75% VO2pk) during prebreathe has been shown to decrease the total prebreathe time from 4 to 2 hours and to decrease the incidence of DCS. The overall purpose of this pilot study was to develop an exercise protocol using flight hardware and an in-flight physical fitness cycle test to perform prebreathe exercise before an EVA. Eleven subjects volunteered to participate in this study. The first objective of this study was to compare the steady-state heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) from a submaximal arm and leg exercise (ALE) session with those predicted from a maximal ALE test. The second objective was to compare the steady-state HR and V02 from a submaximal elastic tube and leg exercise (TLE) session with those predicted from the maximal ALE test. The third objective involved a comparison of the maximal ALE test with a maximal leg-only (LE) test to conform to the in- flight fitness assessment test. The 75% VO2pk target HR from the LE test was significantly less than the target HR from the ALE test. Prescribing exercise using data from the maximal ALE test resulted in the measured submaximal values being higher than predicted VO2 and HR. The results of this pilot study suggest that elastic tubing is valid during EVA prebreathe as a method of arm exercise with the flight leg ergometer and it is recommended that prebreathe countermeasure exercise protocol incorporate this method.

  4. Eletromyography of abdominal muscles in different physical exercises: An update protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fidale, Thiago Montes; Borges, Felipe Farnesi Ribeiro; Roever, Leonardo; Souza, Gilmar da Cunha; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Chacur, Eduardo Paul; Pimenta, Cristhyano; Haddad, Eduardo Gasparetto; Agostini, Guilherme Gularte de; Gregório, Fábio Clemente; Guimarães, Fabrício Cardoso Ribeiro; Arantes, Franciel José; Santos, Lázaro Antônio Dos; Pereira, Adriano Alves; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Puga, Guilherme Morais; Lizardo, Frederico Balbino

    2018-04-01

    The abdominal muscles are extremely important because they are directly involved in the functions of support, containment of viscera, and help in the process of expiration, defecation, urination, vomiting, and also at the time of childbirth. Many exercises and equipment are used to strengthen the abdominal muscles, and the workouts are proposed for a variety of purposes, such as preventing and rehabilitating low back pain, improving sports performance, achieving aesthetic standards, among others. Exercises that potentiate the electromyographic activity promote a greater recruitment of muscle fibers and are more effective to improve or maintain of the force. The electromyographic activity analysis allows us to reflect on the quality of the exercises proposed, consequently, to choose and order the exercises properly in a training session. Our systematic review protocol will developed following the reporting items for the systematic review. To identify relevant studies, we sought articles on the following bases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Europubmed, SciELO, Physiotherapy Evidences Data Base (PEDro), Cochrane, and Google Scholar. The methodological quality of the studies included in the review will evaluated using a checklist and quality assessment. For intervention studies, risk of bias will estimated using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. The results of this study will show the electromyographic activation of the abdomen in the different types of exercises. Ethics approval was not required for this study because it was based on published studies. The results and findings of this study will be submitted and published in a scientific peer-reviewed journal. PROSPERO CRD42018086172.

  5. Reliability of a Novel High Intensity One Leg Dynamic Exercise Protocol to Measure Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Lepers, Romuald; Marcora, Samuele M.

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion. PMID:27706196

  6. Simplified dispatch-assisted CPR instructions outperform standard protocol.

    PubMed

    Dias, J A; Brown, T B; Saini, D; Shah, R C; Cofield, S S; Waterbor, J W; Funkhouser, E; Terndrup, T E

    2007-01-01

    Dispatch-assisted chest compressions only CPR (CC-CPR) has gained widespread acceptance, and recent research suggests that increasing the proportion of compression time during CPR may increase survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We created a simplified CC-CPR protocol to reduce time to start chest compressions and to increase the proportion of time spent delivering chest compressions. This simplified protocol was compared to a published protocol, Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS) Version 11.2, recommended by the National Academies of Emergency Dispatch. Subjects were randomized to the MPDS v11.2 protocol or a simplified protocol. Data was recorded from a Laerdal Resusci Anne Skillreporter manikin. A simulated emergency medical dispatcher, contacted by cell phone, delivered standardized instructions for both protocols. Outcomes included chest compression rate, depth, hand position, full release, overall proportion of compressions without error, time to start of CPR and total hands-off chest time. Proportions were analyzed by Wilcoxon's Rank Sum tests and time variables with Welch ANOVA and Wilcoxon's Rank Sum test. All tests used a two-sided alpha-level of 0.05. One hundred and seventeen subjects were randomized prospectively, 58 to the standard protocol and 59 to the simplified protocol. The average age of subjects in both groups was 25 years old. For both groups, the compression rate was equivalent (104 simplified versus 94 MPDS, p = 0.13), as was the proportion with total release (1.0 simplified versus 1.0 MPDS, p = 0.09). The proportion to the correct depth was greater in the simplified protocol (0.31 versus 0.03, p < 0.01), as was the proportion of compressions done without error (0.05 versus 0.0, p = 0.16). Time to start of chest compressions and total hands-off chest time were better in the simplified protocol (start time 60.9s versus 78.6s, p < 0.0001; hands-off chest time 69 s versus 95 s, p < 0.0001). The proportion with correct hand

  7. An Exercise in Modelling Using the US Standard Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Jacobs, Diane A.

    2007-01-01

    In this exercise the US Standard Atmosphere is used as "data" that a student is asked to model by deriving equations to reproduce it with the help of spreadsheet and graphing software. The exercise can be used as a laboratory or an independent study for a student of introductory physics to provide an introduction to scientific research…

  8. Standards for Environmental Measurement Using GIS: Toward a Protocol for Protocols.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Ann; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Oakes, Michael; Zimmerman, Jason; Koepp, Joel

    2006-02-01

    Interdisciplinary research regarding how the built environment influences physical activity has recently increased. Many research projects conducted jointly by public health and environmental design professionals are using geographic information systems (GIS) to objectively measure the built environment. Numerous methodological issues remain, however, and environmental measurements have not been well documented with accepted, common definitions of valid, reliable variables. This paper proposes how to create and document standardized definitions for measures of environmental variables using GIS with the ultimate goal of developing reliable, valid measures. Inherent problems with software and data that hamper environmental measurement can be offset by protocols combining clear conceptual bases with detailed measurement instructions. Examples demonstrate how protocols can more clearly translate concepts into specific measurement. This paper provides a model for developing protocols to allow high quality comparative research on relationships between the environment and physical activity and other outcomes of public health interest.

  9. Influences of two high intensity interval exercise protocols on the main determinants of blood fluidity in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Ahmadizad, Sajad; Bassami, Minoo; Hadian, Mohsen; Eslami, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Acute effects of continuous exercise on the markers of blood fluidity have been addressed in different populations and the changes are intensity related. However, the effect of different high intensity interval exercise (HIIE) on these variables is unclear. This study is designed to determine the effects of two different HIIE with different work/rest ratios but the same energy expenditure on the main determinants of blood fluidity. Ten overweight men (age, 26.3±1.7 yrs) completed two HIIE protocols on two separate occasions with one week intervening. The two HIIE encompassed performing: 1) 6 intervals of 2 min activity at 85% of VO2max interspersed by 2 min active recovery at 30% of VO2max (ratio 1 to 1, HIIE1/1), and 2) 6 intervals of 30 s activity at 110% of VO2max interspersed by 4 min active recovery at 40% of VO2max (ratio 1 to 8, HIIE1/8). Each exercise trial was followed by 30 min rest. Venous blood samples were obtained before exercise, immediately after exercise and after recovery and analyzed for blood and plasma viscosity, fibrinogen and red blood cell indices. The HIIE1/1 protocol led to higher reduction (P < 0.01) in plasma volume changes compared to HIIE1/8 (9.9% vs 5.7%). Moreover, increases in blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, RBC count and mean arterial blood pressure observed following HIIE1/1 were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than HIIE1/8 ; whereas, the changes in fibrinogen concentration neither were significant in response to both trials nor were significantly different between two protocols (P > 0.05). However, the changes in all variables during exercise were transient and returned to the baseline levels after 30 min recovery. It is concluded that the HIIE protocol with lower intensity and shorter rest intervals (higher work to rest ratio) clearly results in more physiological strain than HIIE with higher intensity but longer rest intervals (lower work to rest ratio) in overweight individuals, and

  10. The Virtual Insect Brain protocol: creating and comparing standardized neuroanatomy

    PubMed Central

    Jenett, Arnim; Schindelin, Johannes E; Heisenberg, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, new genetic, physiological, molecular and behavioral techniques for the functional analysis of the brain are rapidly accumulating. These diverse investigations on the function of the insect brain use gene expression patterns that can be visualized and provide the means for manipulating groups of neurons as a common ground. To take advantage of these patterns one needs to know their typical anatomy. Results This paper describes the Virtual Insect Brain (VIB) protocol, a script suite for the quantitative assessment, comparison, and presentation of neuroanatomical data. It is based on the 3D-reconstruction and visualization software Amira, version 3.x (Mercury Inc.) [1]. Besides its backbone, a standardization procedure which aligns individual 3D images (series of virtual sections obtained by confocal microscopy) to a common coordinate system and computes average intensities for each voxel (volume pixel) the VIB protocol provides an elaborate data management system for data administration. The VIB protocol facilitates direct comparison of gene expression patterns and describes their interindividual variability. It provides volumetry of brain regions and helps to characterize the phenotypes of brain structure mutants. Using the VIB protocol does not require any programming skills since all operations are carried out at an intuitively usable graphical user interface. Although the VIB protocol has been developed for the standardization of Drosophila neuroanatomy, the program structure can be used for the standardization of other 3D structures as well. Conclusion Standardizing brains and gene expression patterns is a new approach to biological shape and its variability. The VIB protocol provides a first set of tools supporting this endeavor in Drosophila. The script suite is freely available at [2] PMID:17196102

  11. Physiological responses to simulated firefighter exercise protocols in varying environments.

    PubMed

    Horn, Gavin P; Kesler, Richard M; Motl, Robert W; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T; Klaren, Rachel E; Ensari, Ipek; Petrucci, Matthew N; Fernhall, Bo; Rosengren, Karl S

    2015-01-01

    For decades, research to quantify the effects of firefighting activities and personal protective equipment on physiology and biomechanics has been conducted in a variety of testing environments. It is unknown if these different environments provide similar information and comparable responses. A novel Firefighting Activities Station, which simulates four common fireground tasks, is presented for use with an environmental chamber in a controlled laboratory setting. Nineteen firefighters completed three different exercise protocols following common research practices. Simulated firefighting activities conducted in an environmental chamber or live-fire structures elicited similar physiological responses (max heart rate: 190.1 vs 188.0 bpm, core temperature response: 0.047°C/min vs 0.043°C/min) and accelerometry counts. However, the response to a treadmill protocol commonly used in laboratory settings resulted in significantly lower heart rate (178.4 vs 188.0 bpm), core temperature response (0.037°C/min vs 0.043°C/min) and physical activity counts compared with firefighting activities in the burn building. Practitioner Summary: We introduce a new approach for simulating realistic firefighting activities in a controlled laboratory environment for ergonomics assessment of fire service equipment and personnel. Physiological responses to this proposed protocol more closely replicate those from live-fire activities than a traditional treadmill protocol and are simple to replicate and standardise.

  12. PUREAIR protocol: randomized controlled trial of intensive pulmonary rehabilitation versus standard care in patients undergoing surgical resection for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fugazzaro, Stefania; Costi, Stefania; Mainini, Carlotta; Kopliku, Besa; Rapicetta, Cristian; Piro, Roberto; Bardelli, Roberta; Rebelo, Patricia Filipa Sobral; Galeone, Carla; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Lococo, Filippo; Paci, Massimiliano; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Cavuto, Silvio; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Tenconi, Sara

    2017-07-31

    Non-small cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer. Surgery is proven to be the most effective treatment in early stages, despite its potential impact on quality of life. Pulmonary rehabilitation, either before or after surgery, is associated with reduced morbidity related symptoms and improved exercise capacity, lung function and quality of life. We describe the study protocol for the open-label randomized controlled trial we are conducting on patients affected by primary lung cancer (stages I-II) eligible for surgical treatment. The control group receives standard care consisting in one educational session before surgery and early inpatient postoperative physiotherapy. The treatment group receives, in addition to standard care, intensive rehabilitation involving 14 preoperative sessions (6 outpatient and 8 home-based) and 39 postoperative sessions (15 outpatient and 24 home-based) with aerobic, resistance and respiratory training, as well as scar massage and group bodyweight exercise training. Assessments are performed at baseline, the day before surgery and one month and six months after surgery. The main outcome is the long-term exercise capacity measured with the Six-Minute Walk Test; short-term exercise capacity, lung function, postoperative morbidity, length of hospital stay, quality of life (Short Form 12), mood disturbances (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and pain (Numeric Rating Scale) are also recorded and analysed. Patient compliance and treatment-related side effects are also collected. Statistical analyses will be performed according to the intention-to-treat approach. T-test for independent samples will be used for continuous variables after assessment of normality of distribution. Chi-square test will be used for categorical variables. Expecting a 10% dropout rate, assuming α of 5% and power of 80%, we planned to enrol 140 patients to demonstrate a statistically significant difference of 25 m at Six-Minute Walk Test

  13. Comparison of test protocols for standard room/corner tests

    Treesearch

    R. H. White; M. A. Dietenberger; H. Tran; O. Grexa; L. Richardson; K. Sumathipala; M. Janssens

    1998-01-01

    As part of international efforts to evaluate alternative reaction-to-fire tests, several series of room/comer tests have been conducted. This paper reviews the overall results of related projects in which different test protocols for standard room/corner tests were used. Differences in the test protocols involved two options for the ignition burner scenario and whether...

  14. Getting to compliance in forced exercise in rodents: a critical standard to evaluate exercise impact in aging-related disorders and disease.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Jennifer C; Salvatore, Michael F

    2014-08-22

    There is a major increase in the awareness of the positive impact of exercise on improving several disease states with neurobiological basis; these include improving cognitive function and physical performance. As a result, there is an increase in the number of animal studies employing exercise. It is argued that one intrinsic value of forced exercise is that the investigator has control over the factors that can influence the impact of exercise on behavioral outcomes, notably exercise frequency, duration, and intensity of the exercise regimen. However, compliance in forced exercise regimens may be an issue, particularly if potential confounds of employing foot-shock are to be avoided. It is also important to consider that since most cognitive and locomotor impairments strike in the aged individual, determining impact of exercise on these impairments should consider using aged rodents with a highest possible level of compliance to ensure minimal need for test subjects. Here, the pertinent steps and considerations necessary to achieve nearly 100% compliance to treadmill exercise in an aged rodent model will be presented and discussed. Notwithstanding the particular exercise regimen being employed by the investigator, our protocol should be of use to investigators that are particularly interested in the potential impact of forced exercise on aging-related impairments, including aging-related Parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease.

  15. A protocol of rope skipping exercise for primary school children: A pilot test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzi, A. N. M.; Rambely, A. S.; Chellapan, K.

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims to investigate the methods and sample used in rope skipping as an exercise approach. A systematic literature review was approached in identifying skipping performance in the related researches. The methods were compared to determine the best methodological approach for the targeted skipping based research measure. A pilot test was performed among seven students below 12 years old. As the outcome of the review, a skipping protocol design has been proposed for 10 years old primary school students. The proposed protocol design is to be submitted to PPUKM Ethical Committee for approval prior to its implementation in investigation memory enhancement in relation to designed skipping activities.

  16. Effects of myofascial release after high-intensity exercise: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Olea, Nicolas; Martinez, Manuel; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Hidalgo-Lozano, Amparo

    2008-03-01

    The usefulness of massage as a recovery method after high-intensity exercise has yet to be established. We aimed to investigate the effects of whole-body massage on heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure (BP) after repeated high-intensity cycling exercise under controlled and standardized pretest conditions. The study included 62 healthy active individuals. After baseline measurements, the subjects performed standardized warm-up exercises followed by three 30-second Wingate tests. After completing the exercise protocol, the subjects were randomly assigned to a massage (myofascial release) or placebo (sham treatment with disconnected ultrasound and magnetotherapy equipment) group for a 40-minute recovery period. Holter recording and BP measurements were taken after exercise protocol and after the intervention. After the exercise protocol, both groups showed a significant decrease in normal-to-normal interval, HRV index, diastolic BP (P > .001), and low-frequency domain values (P = .006). After the recovery period, HRV index (P = .42) and high-frequency (HF) (P = .94) values were similar to baseline levels in the massage group, whereas the HRV index tended (P = .05) to be lower and the HF was significantly (P < .01) lower vs baseline values in the placebo group, which also showed a tendency (P = .06) for HF to be lower than after the exercise. Likewise, diastolic BP returned to baseline levels in the massage group (P = .45) but remained lower in the placebo group (P = .02). Myofascial release massage favors the recovery of HRV and diastolic BP after high-intensity exercise (3 Wingate tests) to preexercise levels.

  17. ASRM standard embryo transfer protocol template: a committee opinion.

    PubMed

    Penzias, Alan; Bendikson, Kristin; Butts, Samantha; Coutifaris, Christos; Falcone, Tommaso; Fossum, Gregory; Gitlin, Susan; Gracia, Clarisa; Hansen, Karl; Mersereau, Jennifer; Odem, Randall; Rebar, Robert; Reindollar, Richard; Rosen, Mitchell; Sandlow, Jay; Vernon, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Standardization improves performance and safety. A template for standardizing the embryo transfer procedure is presented here with 12 basic steps supported by published scientific literature and a survey of common practice of SART programs; it can be used by ART practices to model their own standard protocol. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of baseline heart rate recovery normality and exercise training protocol on heart rate recovery in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Yaylalı, Yalın Tolga; Fındıkoğlu, Gülin; Yurtdaş, Mustafa; Konukçu, Sibel; Şenol, Hande

    2015-09-01

    It is unclear which exercise training protocol yields superior heart rate recovery (HRR) improvement in heart failure (HF) patients. Whether baseline HRR normality plays a role in the improvement is unknown. We hypothesized that an exercise training protocol and baseline HRR normality would be factors in altering HRR in HF patients. In this prospective, randomized, controlled and 3 group parallel study, 41 stable HF patients were randomly assigned to 3-times-weekly training sessions for 12 weeks, consisting of i) 30 minutes of interval training (IT) (n=17, 63.7±8.8 years old) versus ii) 30 minutes of continuous training (CT) (n=13, 59.6±6.8 years old) versus iii) no training (CON) (n=11, 60.6±9.9 years old). Each patient had cardiopulmonary exercise testing before and after the training program. Maximum heart rates attained during the test and heart rates at 1 and 2 min (HRR1 and HRR2) during the recovery phase were recorded. Paired samples t-test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for comparisons before and after training. One-way ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis variance analysis was used for comparisons among groups. HRR1 was unchanged after training. HRR2 improved in the IT group after training, and post-training HRR2 values were significantly faster in the IT group than in controls. Both HRR1 and HRR2 was significantly faster, irrespective of exercise protocol in patients with abnormal baseline values after training. HRR1 did not improve after training. HRR2 improved only in the IT group. Both HRRs in patients with abnormal baseline values improved after both exercise protocols. IT might be superior to CT in improving HRR2. Baseline HRR might play a role in its response to exercise.

  19. Does a fall prevention educational programme improve knowledge and change exercise prescribing behaviour in health and exercise professionals? A study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, A; Sturnieks, D L; Hill, A-M; Lovitt, L; Clemson, L; Lord, S R; Harvey, L; Sherrington, C

    2014-11-19

    Falling in older age is a serious and costly problem. At least one in three older people fall annually. Although exercise is recognised as an effective fall prevention intervention, low numbers of older people engage in suitable programmes. Health and exercise professionals play a crucial role in addressing fall risk in older adults. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of participation in a fall prevention educational programme, compared with a wait-list control group, on health and exercise professionals' knowledge about fall prevention and the effect on fall prevention exercise prescription behaviour and confidence to prescribe the exercises to older people. A randomised controlled trial involving 220 consenting health and exercise professionals will be conducted. Participants will be individually randomised to an intervention group (n=110) to receive an educational workshop plus access to internet-based support resources, or a wait-list control group (n=110). The two primary outcomes, measured 3 months after randomisation, are: (1) knowledge about fall prevention and (2) self-perceived change in fall prevention exercise prescription behaviour. Secondary outcomes include: (1) participants' confidence to prescribe fall prevention exercises; (2) the proportion of people aged 60+ years seen by trial participants in the past month who were prescribed fall prevention exercise; and (3) the proportion of fall prevention exercises prescribed by participants to older people in the past month that comply with evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes will be measured with a self-report questionnaire designed specifically for the trial. The trial protocol was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee, The University of Sydney, Australia. Trial results will be disseminated via peer reviewed journals, presentations at international conferences and participants' newsletters. Trial protocol was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (Number

  20. The Effect of Therapeutic Exercise on Long-Standing Adductor-Related Groin Pain in Athletes: Modified Hölmich Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Yousefzadeh, Abbas; Olyaei, Gholam Reza; Naseri, Nasrin; Khazaeipour, Zahra

    2018-01-01

    Objective The Hölmich protocol in therapeutic exercise is the most appropriate method for the treatment of long-standing adductor-related groin pain (LSAGP). Herein, we evaluated a modified Hölmich protocol to resolve the possible limitations intrinsic to the Hölmich protocol in terms of the rate of return to sport and the recovery period for athletes with LSAGP. Design The study followed a single-blind, before/after study design, where 15 athletes with LSAGP (mean age = 26.13 years; SD = 4.48) performed a 10-week modified Hölmich therapeutic exercise protocol. Results Outcome scores related to pain, hip adductor and abductor muscle strengths, and the ratio of maximum isometric and eccentric hip adduction to abduction strength increased significantly. Likewise, hip abduction and internal rotation ROM improved significantly compared to that at baseline. Furthermore, functional records (t-test, Edgren Side Step Test, and Triple Hop Test) showed significant improvement after treatment. Finally, 13 athletes (86.6% of the participants) successfully returned to sports activity in a mean time of 12.06 weeks (SD = 3.41). Conclusion The findings of this study objectively show that the modified Hölmich protocol may be safer and more effective than the Hölmich protocol in athletes with LSAGP in promoting their return to sports activity. This trial is registered with  IRCT2016080829269N1. PMID:29721339

  1. Effectiveness of aerobic exercise for adults living with HIV: systematic review and meta-analysis using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Tynan, Anne-Marie; Nixon, Stephanie A; Glazier, Richard H

    2016-04-26

    People with HIV are living longer with the health-related consequences of HIV, multi-morbidity, and aging. Exercise is a key strategy that may improve or sustain health for people living with HIV. Our aim was to examine the safety and effectiveness of aerobic exercise interventions on immunological, virological, cardiorespiratory, strength, weight, body composition, and psychological outcomes in adults living with HIV. We conducted a systematic review using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol. We searched databases up to April 2013. We included randomized controlled trials comparing aerobic exercise with no exercise or another intervention performed at least three times per week for at least four weeks among adults living with HIV. Two reviewers independently determined study eligibility. Data were extracted from studies that met inclusion criteria using standardized forms. We assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Outcomes were analyzed as continuous and meta-analyses conducted using random effects models with Review Manager (RevMan) computer software. Twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria (n = 936 participants at study completion); the majority of participants were men (73 %) and the majority were taking antiretroviral therapy (19/24 included studies). The exercise intervention included aerobic exercise alone (11 studies) or a combination of aerobic and resistive exercise (13 studies) ranging from 5 to 52 weeks. Fifty-eight meta-analyses were performed. Main results indicated statistically significant improvements in selected outcomes of cardiorespiratory status (maximum oxygen consumption, exercise time), strength (chest press, knee flexion), body composition (lean body mass, percent body fat, leg muscle area), depression symptoms, and quality of life (SF-36 questionnaire) among exercisers compared with non-exercisers. No significant differences in change in CD4 count and viral load were found

  2. A Novel Process Audit for Standardized Perioperative Handoff Protocols.

    PubMed

    Pallekonda, Vinay; Scholl, Adam T; McKelvey, George M; Amhaz, Hassan; Essa, Deanna; Narreddy, Spurthy; Tan, Jens; Templonuevo, Mark; Ramirez, Sasha; Petrovic, Michelle A

    2017-11-01

    A perioperative handoff protocol provides a standardized delivery of communication during a handoff that occurs from the operating room to the postanestheisa care unit or ICU. The protocol's success is dependent, in part, on its continued proper use over time. A novel process audit was developed to help ensure that a perioperative handoff protocol is used accurately and appropriately over time. The Audit Observation Form is used for the Audit Phase of the process audit, while the Audit Averages Form is used for the Data Analysis Phase. Employing minimal resources and using quantitative methods, the process audit provides the necessary means to evaluate the proper execution of any perioperative handoff protocol. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. In-Suit Light Exercise (ISLE) Prebreathe Protocol Peer Review Assessment. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Timothy K.; Polk, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of extravehicular activity (EVA) by National Aeronautics and Space Administration astronauts involves the risk of decompression sickness. This risk has been mitigated by the use of oxygen "prebreathe" to effectively wash out tissue nitrogen prior to each EVA. Now that the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) is being retired, high-pressure oxygen will become a limited resource. The In-Suit Light Exercise (ISLE) Prebreathe Protocol offers several potential benefits including its potential to save 6 pounds of oxygen per EVA. At the request of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center, the peer review convened on October 14, 2010. The major recommendation of the Review Committee was that the ISLE protocol was acceptable for operational use as a prebreathe option prior to EVA. The results from the peer review are contained in this document.

  4. SPIRIT 2013 Statement: defining standard protocol items for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chan, An-Wen; Tetzlaff, Jennifer M; Altman, Douglas G; Laupacis, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Krle A-Jerić, Karmela; Hrobjartsson, Asbjørn; Mann, Howard; Dickersin, Kay; Berlin, Jesse A; Dore, Caroline J; Parulekar, Wendy R; Summerskill, William S M; Groves, Trish; Schulz, Kenneth F; Sox, Harold C; Rockhold, Frank W; Rennie, Drummond; Moher, David

    2015-12-01

    The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol. The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders.

  5. SPIRIT 2013 Statement: Defining Standard Protocol Items for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chan, An-Wen; Tetzlaff, Jennifer M.; Altman, Douglas G.; Laupacis, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Krleža-Jerić, Karmela; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Mann, Howard; Dickersin, Kay; Berlin, Jesse A.; Doré, Caroline J.; Parulekar, Wendy R.; Summerskill, William S.M.; Groves, Trish; Schulz, Kenneth F.; Sox, Harold C.; Rockhold, Frank W.; Rennie, Drummond; Moher, David

    2016-01-01

    The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol. The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders. PMID:23295957

  6. SPIRIT 2013 statement: defining standard protocol items for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chan, An-Wen; Tetzlaff, Jennifer M; Altman, Douglas G; Laupacis, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Krleža-Jerić, Karmela; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Mann, Howard; Dickersin, Kay; Berlin, Jesse A; Doré, Caroline J; Parulekar, Wendy R; Summerskill, William S M; Groves, Trish; Schulz, Kenneth F; Sox, Harold C; Rockhold, Frank W; Rennie, Drummond; Moher, David

    2013-02-05

    The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol.The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders.

  7. Effect of different exercise protocols on metabolic profiles and fatty acid metabolism in skeletal muscle in high-fat diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Youqing; Xu, Xiangfeng; Yue, Kai; Xu, Guodong

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of mild-intensity endurance, high-intensity interval, and concurrent exercise on preventing high-fat diet-induced obesity. Male rats were divided into five groups, control diet/sedentary group, high-fat diet/sedentary, high-fat diet/endurance exercise, high-fat diet/interval exercise (HI), and high-fat diet/concurrent exercise. All exercise groups were made to exercise for 10 weeks, with matched running distances. Body weight, fat content, blood metabolites, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and adipocyte and liver lipid droplet size were assessed, and the expression of fatty acid metabolism-related genes was quantified. All exercise protocols reduced body weight, adiposity, serum triglycerides, and fasting glucose and also improved QUICKI to some extent. However, only HI prevented obesity and its associated pathologies completely. The expression of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase-1 was elevated in all rats fed a high-fat diet whereas carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) expression was increased with exercise. Rev-erbα expression was elevated only in the HI group, which also had the highest level of CPT1 expression. The HI-induced increase in Rev-erbα and CPT1 expression was associated with the complete prevention of diet-induced obesity. Moreover, the increased caloric expenditure achieved with this protocol was preferential over other exercise regimens, and might be used to improve lipid metabolism. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  8. A Standard Mutual Authentication Protocol for Cloud Computing Based Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Prerna; Amin, Ruhul; Karati, Arijit; Biswas, G P; Khan, Muhammad Khurram

    2017-04-01

    Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) supports a standard platform to the patient for getting necessary medical treatment from the doctor(s) via Internet communication. Security protection is important for medical records (data) of the patients because of very sensitive information. Besides, patient anonymity is another most important property, which must be protected. Most recently, Chiou et al. suggested an authentication protocol for TMIS by utilizing the concept of cloud environment. They claimed that their protocol is patient anonymous and well security protected. We reviewed their protocol and found that it is completely insecure against patient anonymity. Further, the same protocol is not protected against mobile device stolen attack. In order to improve security level and complexity, we design a light weight authentication protocol for the same environment. Our security analysis ensures resilience of all possible security attacks. The performance of our protocol is relatively standard in comparison with the related previous research.

  9. EPA Traceability Protocol for Assay and Certification of Gaseous Calibration Standards

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, revised its 1993 version of its traceability protocol for the assay and certification of compressed gas and permeation-device calibration standards. The protocol allows producers o...

  10. Accelerated rehabilitation compared with a standard protocol after distal radial fractures treated with volar open reduction and internal fixation: a prospective, randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Brehmer, Jess L; Husband, Jeffrey B

    2014-10-01

    There are relatively few studies in the literature that specifically evaluate accelerated rehabilitation protocols for distal radial fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). The purpose of this study was to compare the early postoperative outcomes (at zero to twelve weeks postoperatively) of patients enrolled in an accelerated rehabilitation protocol with those of patients enrolled in a standard rehabilitation protocol following ORIF for a distal radial fracture. We hypothesized that patients with accelerated rehabilitation after volar ORIF for a distal radial fracture would have an earlier return to function compared with patients who followed a standard protocol. From November 2007 to November 2010, eighty-one patients with an unstable distal radial fracture were prospectively randomized to follow either an accelerated or a standard rehabilitation protocol after undergoing ORIF with a volar plate for a distal radial fracture. Both groups began with gentle active range of motion at three to five days postoperatively. At two weeks, the accelerated group initiated wrist/forearm passive range of motion and strengthening exercises, whereas the standard group initiated passive range of motion and strengthening at six weeks postoperatively. Patients were assessed at three to five days, two weeks, three weeks, four weeks, six weeks, eight weeks, twelve weeks, and six months postoperatively. Outcomes included Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) scores (primary outcome) and measurements of wrist flexion/extension, supination, pronation, grip strength, and palmar pinch. The patients in the accelerated group had better mobility, strength, and DASH scores at the early postoperative time points (zero to eight weeks postoperatively) compared with the patients in the standard rehabilitation group. The difference between the groups was both clinically relevant and statistically significant. Patients who follow an accelerated rehabilitation

  11. Interleukin-6 and associated cytokine responses to an acute bout of high-intensity interval exercise: the effect of exercise intensity and volume.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Tom; Thomas, Andrew W; Webb, Richard; Hughes, Michael G

    2016-08-01

    Acute increases in interleukin (IL)-6 following prolonged exercise are associated with the induction of a transient anti-inflammatory state (e.g., increases in IL-10) that is partly responsible for the health benefits of regular exercise. The purposes of this study were to investigate the IL-6-related inflammatory response to high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and to determine the impact of exercise intensity and volume on this response. Ten participants (5 males and 5 females) completed 3 exercise bouts of contrasting intensity and volume (LOW, MOD, and HIGH). The HIGH protocol was based upon standard HIIE protocols, while the MOD and LOW protocols were designed to enable a comparison of exercise intensity and volume with a fixed duration. Inflammatory cytokine concentrations were measured in plasma (IL-6, IL-10) and also determined the level of gene expression (IL-6, IL-10, and IL-4R) in peripheral blood. The plasma IL-6 response to exercise (reported as fold changes) was significantly greater in HIGH (2.70 ± 1.51) than LOW (1.40 ± 0.32) (P = 0.04) and was also positively correlated to the mean exercise oxygen uptake (r = 0.54, P < 0.01). However, there was no change in anti-inflammatory IL-10 or IL-4R responses in plasma or at the level of gene expression. HIIE caused a significant increase in IL-6 and was greater than that seen in low-intensity exercise of the same duration. The increases in IL-6 were relatively small in magnitude, and appear to have been insufficient to induce the acute systemic anti-inflammatory effects, which are evident following longer duration exercise.

  12. Greater impact of acute high-intensity interval exercise on post-exercise executive function compared to moderate-intensity continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hayato; Suga, Tadashi; Takenaka, Saki; Tanaka, Daichi; Takeuchi, Tatsuya; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Isaka, Tadao; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MCE) can improve executive function (EF) acutely, potentially through the activation of both physiological and psychological factors. Recently, high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) has been reported to be more beneficial for physical adaptation than MCE. Factors for EF improvement can potentially be more enhanced by HIIE than by MCE; but the effects of HIIE on EF remain unknown. Therefore, we aimed to examine to what extent HIIE impacts post-exercise EF immediately after exercise and during post-exercise recovery, compared with traditional MCE. Twelve healthy male subjects performed cycle ergometer exercise based on either HIIE or MCE protocols in a randomized and counterbalanced order. The HIIE protocol consisted of four 4-min bouts at 90% of peak VO2 with 3-min active recovery at 60% of peak VO2. A volume-matched MCE protocol was applied at 60% of peak VO2. To evaluate EF, a color-words Stroop task was performed pre- and post-exercise. Improvement in EF immediately after exercise was the same for the HIIE and MCE protocols. However, the improvement of EF by HIIE was sustained during 30 min of post-exercise recovery, during which MCE returned to the pre-exercise level. The EF response in the post-exercise recovery was associated with changes in physiological and psychological responses. The present findings showed that HIIE and MCE were capable of improving EF. Moreover, HIIE could prolong improvement in EF during post-exercise recovery. For the first time, we suggest that HIIE may be more effective strategy than MCE for improving EF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Security analysis of standards-driven communication protocols for healthcare scenarios.

    PubMed

    Masi, Massimiliano; Pugliese, Rosario; Tiezzi, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    The importance of the Electronic Health Record (EHR), that stores all healthcare-related data belonging to a patient, has been recognised in recent years by governments, institutions and industry. Initiatives like the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) have been developed for the definition of standard methodologies for secure and interoperable EHR exchanges among clinics and hospitals. Using the requisites specified by these initiatives, many large scale projects have been set up for enabling healthcare professionals to handle patients' EHRs. The success of applications developed in these contexts crucially depends on ensuring such security properties as confidentiality, authentication, and authorization. In this paper, we first propose a communication protocol, based on the IHE specifications, for authenticating healthcare professionals and assuring patients' safety. By means of a formal analysis carried out by using the specification language COWS and the model checker CMC, we reveal a security flaw in the protocol thus demonstrating that to simply adopt the international standards does not guarantee the absence of such type of flaws. We then propose how to emend the IHE specifications and modify the protocol accordingly. Finally, we show how to tailor our protocol for application to more critical scenarios with no assumptions on the communication channels. To demonstrate feasibility and effectiveness of our protocols we have fully implemented them.

  14. Comparing the effects of whole-body vibration to standard exercise in ambulatory people with Multiple Sclerosis: a randomised controlled feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Uszynski, Marcin Kacper; Purtill, Helen; Donnelly, Alan; Coote, Susan

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed firstly to investigate the feasibility of the study protocol and outcome measures, secondly to obtain data in order to inform the power calculations for a larger randomised controlled trial, and finally to investigate if whole-body vibration (WBV) is more effective than the same duration and intensity of standard exercises (EXE) in people with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS). Randomised controlled feasibility study. Outpatient MS centre. Twenty seven PwMS (age mean (SD) 48.1 (11.2)) with minimal gait impairments. Twelve weeks of WBV or standard EXE, three times weekly. Participants were measured with isokinetic muscle strength, vibration threshold, Timed Up and Go test (TUG), Mini-BESTest (MBT), 6 Minute Walk test (6MWT), Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale 29 (MSIS 29), Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) and Verbal Analogue scale for sensation (VAS) pre and post 12 week intervention. WBV intervention was found feasible with low drop-out rate (11.1%) and high compliance (90%). Data suggest that a sample of 52 in each group would be sufficient to detect a moderate effect size, with 80% power and 5% significance for 6 minute walk test. Large effect sizes in favour of standard exercise were found for vibration threshold at 5th metatarsophalangeal joint and heel (P=0.014, r= 0.5 and P=0.005, r=0.56 respectively). No between group differences were found for muscle strength, balance or gait (P>0.05). Data suggest that the protocol is feasible, there were no adverse effects. A trial including 120 people would be needed to detect an effect on walking endurance. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Hormonal and metabolic responses to a resistance exercise protocol in lean children, obese children and lean adults.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniela A; Castner, Diobel M; Pham, Hoang; Ng, Jason; Adams, Eric; Judelson, Daniel A

    2014-11-01

    During childhood, varying exercise modalities are recommended to stimulate normal growth, development, and health. This project investigated hormonal and metabolic responses triggered by a resistance exercise protocol in lean children (age: 9.3 ± 1.4 y, body fat: 18.3 ± 4.9%), obese children (age: 9.6 ± 1.3 y, body fat: 40.3 ± 5.2%) and lean adults (age: 23.3 ± 2.4 y, body fat: 12.7 ± 2.9%). The protocol consisted of stepping onto a raised platform (height = 20% of stature) while wearing a weighted vest (resistance = 50% of lean body mass). Participants completed 6 sets of 10 repetitions per leg with a 1-min rest period between sets. Blood samples were obtained at rest preexercise, immediately postexercise and 2 times throughout the 1-hr recovery to analyze possible changes in hormones and metabolites. Children-adult differences included a larger exercise-induced norepinephrine increase in adults vs. children and a decrease in glucagon in children but not adults. Similarities between adults and children were observed for GH-IGF-1 axis responses. Metabolically, children presented with lower glycolytic and increased fat metabolism after exercise than adults did. Obesity in childhood negatively influenced GH, insulin, and glucose concentrations. While adults occasionally differed from children, amount of activated lean mass, not maturation, likely drove these dissimilarities.

  16. Developing strategies to be added to the protocol for antenatal care: an exercise and birth preparation program.

    PubMed

    Miquelutti, Maria Amélia; Cecatti, José Guilherme; Makuch, Maria Yolanda

    2015-04-01

    To describe the implementation process of a birth preparation program, the activities in the protocol for physical and birth preparation exercises, and the educational activities that have been evaluated regarding effectiveness and women's satisfaction. The birth preparation program described was developed with the following objectives: to prevent lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence and anxiety; to encourage the practice of physical activity during pregnancy and of positions and exercises for non-pharmacological pain relief during labor; and to discuss information that would help women to have autonomy during labor. The program comprised the following activities: supervised physical exercise, relaxation exercises, and educational activities (explanations of lumbopelvic pain prevention, pelvic floor function, labor and delivery, and which non-pharmacological pain relief to use during labor) provided regularly after prenatal consultations. These activities were held monthly, starting when the women joined the program at 18-24 weeks of pregnancy and continuing until 30 weeks of pregnancy, fortnightly thereafter from 31 to 36 weeks of pregnancy, and then weekly from the 37th week until delivery. Information and printed materials regarding the physical exercises to be performed at home were provided. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01155804. The program was an innovative type of intervention that systematized birth preparation activities that were organized to encompass aspects related both to pregnancy and to labor and that included physical, educational and home-based activities. The detailed description of the protocol used may serve as a basis for further studies and also for the implementation of birth preparation programs within the healthcare system in different settings.

  17. Effectiveness of a lifestyle exercise program for older people receiving a restorative home care service: study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Burton, Elissa; Lewin, Gill; Clemson, Lindy; Boldy, Duncan

    2013-10-18

    Restorative home care services help older people maximise their independence using a multi-dimensional approach. They usually include an exercise program designed to improve the older person's strength, balance and function. The types of programs currently offered require allocation of time during the day to complete specific exercises. This is not how the majority of home care clients prefer to be active and may be one of the reasons that few older people do the exercises regularly and continue the exercises post discharge.This paper describes the study protocol to test whether a Lifestyle Functional Exercise (LiFE) program: 1) is undertaken more often; 2) is more likely to be continued over the longer term; and, 3) will result in greater functional gains compared to a standard exercise program for older people receiving a restorative home care service. A pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT) design was employed with two study arms: LiFE program (intervention) and the current exercise program (control). Silver Chain, a health and community care organisation in Perth, Western Australia. One hundred and fifty restorative home care clients, aged 65 years and older. The primary outcome is a composite measure incorporating balance, strength and mobility. Other outcome measures include: physical functioning, falls efficacy, and levels of disability and functioning. If LiFE is more effective than the current exercise program, the evidence will be presented to the service management accompanied by the recommendation that it be adopted as the generic exercise program to be used within the restorative home care service. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000788976.

  18. A scoping review of the psychological responses to interval exercise: is interval exercise a viable alternative to traditional exercise?

    PubMed

    Stork, Matthew J; Banfield, Laura E; Gibala, Martin J; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A

    2017-12-01

    While considerable evidence suggests that interval exercise confers numerous physiological adaptations linked to improved health, its psychological consequences and behavioural implications are less clear and the subject of intense debate. The purpose of this scoping review was to catalogue studies investigating the psychological responses to interval exercise in order to identify what psychological outcomes have been assessed, the research methods used, and the results. A secondary objective was to identify research issues and gaps. Forty-two published articles met the review inclusion/exclusion criteria. These studies involved 1258 participants drawn from various active/inactive and healthy/unhealthy populations, and 55 interval exercise protocols (69% high-intensity interval training [HIIT], 27% sprint interval training [SIT], and 4% body-weight interval training [BWIT]). Affect and enjoyment were the most frequently studied psychological outcomes. Post-exercise assessments indicate that overall, enjoyment of, and preferences for interval exercise are equal or greater than for continuous exercise, and participants can hold relatively positive social cognitions regarding interval exercise. Although several methodological issues (e.g., inconsistent use of terminology, measures and protocols) and gaps (e.g., data on adherence and real-world protocols) require attention, from a psychological perspective, the emerging data support the viability of interval exercise as an alternative to continuous exercise.

  19. A standard protocol for describing individual-based and agent-based models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimm, Volker; Berger, Uta; Bastiansen, Finn; Eliassen, Sigrunn; Ginot, Vincent; Giske, Jarl; Goss-Custard, John; Grand, Tamara; Heinz, Simone K.; Huse, Geir; Huth, Andreas; Jepsen, Jane U.; Jorgensen, Christian; Mooij, Wolf M.; Muller, Birgit; Pe'er, Guy; Piou, Cyril; Railsback, Steven F.; Robbins, Andrew M.; Robbins, Martha M.; Rossmanith, Eva; Ruger, Nadja; Strand, Espen; Souissi, Sami; Stillman, Richard A.; Vabo, Rune; Visser, Ute; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Simulation models that describe autonomous individual organisms (individual based models, IBM) or agents (agent-based models, ABM) have become a widely used tool, not only in ecology, but also in many other disciplines dealing with complex systems made up of autonomous entities. However, there is no standard protocol for describing such simulation models, which can make them difficult to understand and to duplicate. This paper presents a proposed standard protocol, ODD, for describing IBMs and ABMs, developed and tested by 28 modellers who cover a wide range of fields within ecology. This protocol consists of three blocks (Overview, Design concepts, and Details), which are subdivided into seven elements: Purpose, State variables and scales, Process overview and scheduling, Design concepts, Initialization, Input, and Submodels. We explain which aspects of a model should be described in each element, and we present an example to illustrate the protocol in use. In addition, 19 examples are available in an Online Appendix. We consider ODD as a first step for establishing a more detailed common format of the description of IBMs and ABMs. Once initiated, the protocol will hopefully evolve as it becomes used by a sufficiently large proportion of modellers.

  20. The Effects of a Yoga Exercise and Nutritional Guidance Program on Pregnancy Outcomes Among Healthy Pregnant Japanese Women: A Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Masayo; Kusaka, Momoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Shiraishi, Mie; Kobayashi, Risa; Watanabe, Sachi; Haruna, Megumi

    2018-02-14

    This report provides an experimental protocol for a study designed to verify the effects of yoga exercise and a nutritional guidance program during pregnancy on several key pregnancy and birth outcomes among Japanese women. This is a study protocol of a randomized controlled trial. This intervention will be carried out in a university hospital in Tokyo. Healthy primiparous women will be recruited at 18-23 gestational weeks in the hospital. A total of 400 participants will be randomly assigned to one of four groups in this trial, with 100 participants in each group-group with yoga exercise, with nutritional guidance, with both yoga and nutritional guidance, and with standard care alone, as the control group. Yoga exercise consists of yoga classes held at the hospital 3 or 5 days a month, duration 60 min, and home practice using a digital video disk, duration 30 or 60 min per session. We recommend participants do yoga at least 3 days a week for a total of 60 min per day. Nutritional guidance is based on individual dietary intake assessed using a brief-type diet history questionnaire. The primary outcome is rate of pregnant women with adequate gestational weight gain. Secondary outcomes include physiologic and psychologic status assessed via biomarkers and health-related scales, dietary nutrition intake, and birth outcomes. This study shows the effects of a yoga exercise and nutritional intervention. If the intervention is found to be effective, our results will be useful for healthcare providers and pregnant women.

  1. Evaluating attentional and affective changes following an acute exercise bout using a modified dot-probe protocol

    PubMed Central

    BARNES, ROBERT T.; COOMBES, STEPHEN A.; ARMSTRONG, NICOLE B.; HIGGINS, TORRANCE J.; JANELLE, CHRISTOPHER M.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of literature advocates exercise as a successful intervention for increasing positive affect while also reducing negative affect and anxiety. Questions concerning the mechanisms driving these effects remain unanswered, particularly considering theorized attentional adaptations that may be elicited by acute exercise bouts. We investigated pre- and post-exercise attentional bias to examine possible attentional explanations that may account for these reported changes in affect. On separate visits to the laboratory, 30 high trait anxious participants completed 30 min of exercise on a cycle ergometer at 70% of their heart rate reserve, or completed a 30-min quiet rest protocol. During each intervention, pre-test and post-test modified dot-probe assessments of attentional bias were completed, as were a series of self-report anxiety and affect questionnaires. Attentional bias scores and reaction times were calculated. Post-exercise dot probe performance did not vary significantly as a function of the affective valence of presented stimuli. As hypothesized, however, positive affect and reaction time improved significantly following exercise compared with the pre- and post-rest conditions and the pre-exercise condition, suggesting that exercise facilitates a broadening of attentional scope. Implications of these findings and future directions are discussed within the context of traditional and contemporary theories of dispositional affect and state-specific emotional responses. PMID:20686994

  2. Muscle recruitment variations during wrist flexion exercise: MR evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleckenstein, J. L.; Watumull, D.; Bertocci, L. A.; Nurenberg, P.; Peshock, R. M.; Payne, J. A.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many exercise protocols used in physiological studies assume homogeneous and diffuse muscle recruitment. To test this assumption during a "standard" wrist flexion protocol, variations in muscle recruitment were assessed using MRI in eight healthy subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Variations were assessed by comparing the right to the left forearms and the effect of slight (15 degrees) pronation or supination at the wrist. RESULTS: Postexercise imaging showed focal regions of increased signal intensity (SI), indicating relatively strong recruitment, most often in entire muscles, although occasionally only in subvolumes of muscles. In 15 of 26 studies, flexor carpi radialis (FCR) showed more SI than flexor carpi ulnaris, while in 11 studies SI in these muscles increased equivalently. Relatively greater FCR recruitment was seen during pronation and/or use of the nondominant side. Palmaris longus, a wrist flexor, did not appear recruited in 4 of 11 forearms in which it was present. A portion of the superficial finger flexor became hyperintense in 89% of studies, while recruitment of the deep finger flexor was seen only in 43%. CONCLUSION: Inter- and intraindividual variations in forearm muscle recruitment should be anticipated in physiological studies of standard wrist flexion exercise protocols.

  3. Melanins and melanogenesis: methods, standards, protocols.

    PubMed

    d'Ischia, Marco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Napolitano, Alessandra; Briganti, Stefania; Garcia-Borron, José-Carlos; Kovacs, Daniela; Meredith, Paul; Pezzella, Alessandro; Picardo, Mauro; Sarna, Tadeusz; Simon, John D; Ito, Shosuke

    2013-09-01

    Despite considerable advances in the past decade, melanin research still suffers from the lack of universally accepted and shared nomenclature, methodologies, and structural models. This paper stems from the joint efforts of chemists, biochemists, physicists, biologists, and physicians with recognized and consolidated expertise in the field of melanins and melanogenesis, who critically reviewed and experimentally revisited methods, standards, and protocols to provide for the first time a consensus set of recommended procedures to be adopted and shared by researchers involved in pigment cell research. The aim of the paper was to define an unprecedented frame of reference built on cutting-edge knowledge and state-of-the-art methodology, to enable reliable comparison of results among laboratories and new progress in the field based on standardized methods and shared information. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. An approach to standardization of urine sediment analysis via suggestion of a common manual protocol.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dae-Hyun; Ji, Misuk; Kim, Sollip; Cho, Eun-Jung; Lee, Woochang; Yun, Yeo-Min; Chun, Sail; Min, Won-Ki

    2016-01-01

    The results of urine sediment analysis have been reported semiquantitatively. However, as recent guidelines recommend quantitative reporting of urine sediment, and with the development of automated urine sediment analyzers, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of urine sediment. Here, we developed a protocol for urine sediment analysis and quantified the results. Based on questionnaires, various reports, guidelines, and experimental results, we developed a protocol for urine sediment analysis. The results of this new protocol were compared with those obtained with a standardized chamber and an automated sediment analyzer. Reference intervals were also estimated using new protocol. We developed a protocol with centrifugation at 400 g for 5 min, with the average concentration factor of 30. The correlation between quantitative results of urine sediment analysis, the standardized chamber, and the automated sediment analyzer were generally good. The conversion factor derived from the new protocol showed a better fit with the results of manual count than the default conversion factor in the automated sediment analyzer. We developed a protocol for manual urine sediment analysis to quantitatively report the results. This protocol may provide a mean for standardization of urine sediment analysis.

  5. Normalization of cortical thickness measurements across different T1 magnetic resonance imaging protocols by novel W-Score standardization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jinyong; Yoo, Kwangsun; Lee, Peter; Kim, Chan Mi; Roh, Jee Hoon; Park, Ji Eun; Kim, Sang Joon; Seo, Sang Won; Shin, Jeong-Hyeon; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Jeong, Yong

    2017-10-01

    The use of different 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance (T1 MR) imaging protocols induces image incompatibility across multicenter studies, negating the many advantages of multicenter studies. A few methods have been developed to address this problem, but significant image incompatibility still remains. Thus, we developed a novel and convenient method to improve image compatibility. W-score standardization creates quality reference values by using a healthy group to obtain normalized disease values. We developed a protocol-specific w-score standardization to control the protocol effect, which is applied to each protocol separately. We used three data sets. In dataset 1, brain T1 MR images of normal controls (NC) and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from two centers, acquired with different T1 MR protocols, were used (Protocol 1 and 2, n = 45/group). In dataset 2, data from six subjects, who underwent MRI with two different protocols (Protocol 1 and 2), were used with different repetition times, echo times, and slice thicknesses. In dataset 3, T1 MR images from a large number of healthy normal controls (Protocol 1: n = 148, Protocol 2: n = 343) were collected for w-score standardization. The protocol effect and disease effect on subjects' cortical thickness were analyzed before and after the application of protocol-specific w-score standardization. As expected, different protocols resulted in differing cortical thickness measurements in both NC and AD subjects. Different measurements were obtained for the same subject when imaged with different protocols. Multivariate pattern difference between measurements was observed between the protocols. Classification accuracy between two protocols was nearly 90%. After applying protocol-specific w-score standardization, the differences between the protocols substantially decreased. Most importantly, protocol-specific w-score standardization reduced both univariate and multivariate differences in the images while

  6. SUPPLEMENT TO: STANDARD MEASUREMENT PROTOCOLS - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report supplements earlier published standard protocols for key measurements where data quality is vital to the Florida Radon Research Program. The report adds measurements of small canister radon flux and soil water potential to the section on soil measurements. It adds indo...

  7. Assessment of the ability of wheelchair subjects with spinal cord injury to perform a specific protocol of shoulder training: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Dellabiancia, Fabio; Filippi, Maria Vittoria; De Santis, Elisa; Alpi, Daniele; Magrini, Paola; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    a regular program of exercises in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) can contribute to reduce the risk of upper extremities injuries. in this prospective laboratory study we tested the hypothesis that a training machine developed for able-body users is suitable for a shoulder training protocol in 11 paraplegic subjects with SCI. Overall subjects were assessed with the SCIM III, CS, DASH and standard shoulder examination. We set a protocol of shoulder exercises performed with a training machine. Overall subjects were able to perform the protocol but 2 did not complete the exercises n° 6 and 7. The position of the wheelchair during each exercise was recorded. Wheelchair position/loading level were significantly correlated with the protocol n° 2, 3 and 5 as well as BMI/loading level for the exercises n° 5 and 9 and age/loading level for the exercise n° 7. Clinical scores were neither correlated with loading nor with anthropometric data. FROM THE ANALYSIS OF DATA COLLECTED IN THIS STUDY ARISED THAT: 1) the training machine needs some adjustments for paraplegic subjects, 2) the training protocol was appropriate except for the exercises needing a torso-rotation and 3) the template for wheelchair position may be a valid guide for an optimal paraplegic shoulder training.

  8. In-Suit Light Exercise (ISLE) Prebreathe Protocol Peer Review Assessment. Part 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Timothy K.; Polk, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of extravehicular activity (EVA) by National Aeronautics and Space Administration astronauts involves the risk of decompression sickness. This risk has been mitigated by the use of oxygen "prebreathe" to effectively wash out tissue nitrogen prior to each EVA. Now that the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) is being retired, high-pressure oxygen will become a limited resource. The In-Suit Light Exercise (ISLE) Prebreathe Protocol offers several potential benefits including its potential to save 6 pounds of oxygen per EVA. At the request of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center, the peer review convened on October 14, 2010. The major recommendation of the Review Committee was that the ISLE protocol was acceptable for operational use as a prebreathe option prior to EVA. The appendices to Volume I of the report are contained in this document.

  9. Pre-cooling for endurance exercise performance in the heat: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endurance exercise capacity diminishes under hot environmental conditions. Time to exhaustion can be increased by lowering body temperature prior to exercise (pre-cooling). This systematic literature review synthesizes the current findings of the effects of pre-cooling on endurance exercise performance, providing guidance for clinical practice and further research. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science and SPORTDiscus databases were searched in May 2012 for studies evaluating the effectiveness of pre-cooling to enhance endurance exercise performance in hot environmental conditions (≥ 28°C). Studies involving participants with increased susceptibility to heat strain, cooling during or between bouts of exercise, and protocols where aerobic endurance was not the principle performance outcome were excluded. Potential publications were assessed by two independent reviewers for inclusion and quality. Means and standard deviations of exercise performance variables were extracted or sought from original authors to enable effect size calculations. Results In all, 13 studies were identified. The majority of studies contained low participant numbers and/or absence of sample size calculations. Six studies used cold water immersion, four crushed ice ingestion and three cooling garments. The remaining study utilized mixed methods. Large heterogeneity in methodological design and exercise protocols was identified. Effect size calculations indicated moderate evidence that cold water immersion effectively improved endurance performance, and limited evidence that ice slurry ingestion improved performance. Cooling garments were ineffective. Most studies failed to document or report adverse events. Low participant numbers in each study limited the statistical power of certain reported trends and lack of blinding could potentially have introduced either participant or researcher bias in some studies. Conclusions Current evidence indicates cold water

  10. Effect of a lateral step-up exercise protocol on quadriceps and lower extremity performance.

    PubMed

    Worrell, T W; Borchert, B; Erner, K; Fritz, J; Leerar, P

    1993-12-01

    Closed kinetic chain exercises have been promoted as more functional and more appropriate than open kinetic chain exercises. Limited research exists demonstrating the effect of closed kinetic chain exercise on quadriceps and lower extremity performance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a lateral step-up exercise protocol on isokinetic quadriceps peak torque and the following lower extremity activities: 1) leg press, 2) maximal step-up repetitions with body weight plus 25%, 3) hop for distance, and 4) 6-m timed hop. Twenty subjects participated in a 4-week training period, and 18 subjects served as controls. For the experimental group, a repeated measure ANOVA comparing pretest and posttest values revealed significant improvements in the leg press (p < or = .05), step-ups (p < or = .05), hop for distance (p < or = .05), and hop for time (p < or = .05) and no significant increase in isokinetic quadriceps peak torque (p > or = .05). Over the course of the training period, weight used for the step-up exercise increased (p < or = .05), repetitions decreased (p < or = .05), and step-up work did not change (p > or = .05). For the control group, no significant change (p > or = .05) occurred in any variable. The inability of the isokinetic dynamometer to detect increases in quadriceps performance is important because the isokinetic values are frequently used as criteria for return to functional activities. We conclude that closed kinetic chain testing and exercise provide additional means to assess and rehabilitate the lower extremity.

  11. Evaluating the effectiveness of home exercise programmes using an online exercise prescription tool in children with cerebral palsy: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sian A; Gucciardi, Daniel F; Bear, Natasha; Gibson, Noula

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Children with cerebral palsy (CP) and other neurodevelopmental disabilities often receive a home programme of exercises to assist in reaching their therapy goals. Adherence to exercise programmes is necessary to attain the level of practice required to achieve goals; however, adherence can be difficult to accomplish. In this paper, we describe the protocol for a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of delivering a home exercise programme to school-age children with disabilities using Physitrack, an online exercise prescription tool with a website or app interface. Methods and analysis Participants aged 6–17 years, with CP or other neurodevelopmental disabilities, receiving community physiotherapy services in Western Australia, will be recruited. Participants will be stratified by age and functional mobility and randomised to either the intervention group, who will complete an 8-week home exercise programme using Physitrack, or the control group, who will complete an 8-week exercise programme without Physitrack. Researcher blinding to group allocation, and participant blinding to outcome, will be maintained. The primary outcome measures are adherence to the home exercise programme with weekly collection of home exercise logs; achievement of individualised goals by phone interview before and after intervention; and correctness of exercise performance by collection and analysis of videos of participants performing home exercises. Secondary outcome measures include enjoyment of physical activity, confidence to complete exercise programme, preferred method of delivery of programme and usability of Physitrack. A sample size of 58 participants will be necessary to see an effect on home programme adherence. Data will be analysed using the intention-to-treat principle. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from Curtin University Human Research Ethics Committee in July 2016 (10391). Outcomes will be disseminated through

  12. From Expert Protocols to Standardized Management of Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Aubry, Camille; Delord, Marion; Michelet, Pierre; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Million, Matthieu; Brouqui, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2017-08-15

    We report here 4 examples of management of infectious diseases (IDs) at the University Hospital Institute Méditerranée Infection in Marseille, France, to illustrate the value of expert protocols feeding standardized management of IDs. First, we describe our experience on Q fever and Tropheryma whipplei infection management based on in vitro data and clinical outcome. Second, we describe our management-based approach for the treatment of infective endocarditis, leading to a strong reduction of mortality rate. Third, we report our use of fecal microbiota transplantation to face severe Clostridium difficile infections and to perform decolonization of patients colonized by emerging highly resistant bacteria. Finally, we present the standardized management of the main acute infections in patients admitted in the emergency department, promoting antibiotics by oral route, checking compliance with the protocol, and avoiding the unnecessary use of intravenous and urinary tract catheters. Overall, the standardization of the management is the keystone to reduce both mortality and morbidity related to IDs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Standardization of a Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Protocol to Investigate Dysphagia in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Harris, R A; Grobman, M E; Allen, M J; Schachtel, J; Rawson, N E; Bennett, B; Ledyayev, J; Hopewell, B; Coates, J R; Reinero, C R; Lever, T E

    2017-03-01

    Videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) is the gold standard for diagnosis of dysphagia in veterinary medicine but lacks standardized protocols that emulate physiologic feeding practices. Age impacts swallow function in humans but has not been evaluated by VFSS in dogs. To develop a protocol with custom kennels designed to allow free-feeding of 3 optimized formulations of contrast media and diets that address limitations of current VFSS protocols. We hypothesized that dogs evaluated by a free-feeding VFSS protocol would show differences in objective swallow metrics based on age. Healthy juvenile, adult, and geriatric dogs (n = 24). Prospective, experimental study. Custom kennels were developed to maintain natural feeding behaviors during VFSS. Three food consistencies (thin liquid, pureed food, and dry kibble) were formulated with either iohexol or barium to maximize palatability and voluntary prehension. Dogs were evaluated by 16 swallow metrics and compared across age groups. Development of a standardized VFSS protocol resulted in successful collection of swallow data in healthy dogs. No significant differences in swallow metrics were observed among age groups. Substantial variability was observed in healthy dogs when evaluated under these physiologic conditions. Features typically attributed to pathologic states, such as gastric reflux, were seen in healthy dogs. Development of a VFSS protocol that reflects natural feeding practices may allow emulation of physiology resulting in clinical signs of dysphagia. Age did not result in significant changes in swallow metrics, but additional studies are needed, particularly in light of substantial normal variation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Amplitude-oriented exercise in Parkinson's disease: a randomized study comparing LSVT-BIG and a short training protocol.

    PubMed

    Ebersbach, Georg; Grust, Ute; Ebersbach, Almut; Wegner, Brigitte; Gandor, Florin; Kühn, Andrea A

    2015-02-01

    LSVT-BIG is an exercise for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) comprising of 16 1-h sessions within 4 weeks. LSVT-BIG was compared with a 2-week short protocol (AOT-SP) consisting of 10 sessions with identical exercises in 42 patients with PD. UPDRS-III-score was reduced by -6.6 in LSVT-BIG and -5.7 in AOT-SP at follow-up after 16 weeks (p < 0.001). Measures of motor performance were equally improved by LSVT-BIG and AOT-SP but high-intensity LSVT-BIG was more effective to obtain patient-perceived benefit.

  15. Exercise Self-Efficacy Moderates the Relation between Anxiety Sensitivity and Body Mass Index and Exercise Tolerance in Treatment-Seeking Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Samantha G.; Davis, Michelle L.; Rosenfield, David; Kauffman, Brooke Y.; Baird, Scarlett O.; Powers, Mark B.; Otto, Michael W.; Marcus, Bess H.; Church, Timothy S.; Smits, Jasper A. J.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    There is little known about factors that contribute to the comorbidity of cigarette smoking and obesity. The current study sought to test whether exercise self-efficacy moderated the relation between anxiety sensitivity (fear of internal sensations) and BMI and exercise tolerance among cigarette smokers. Smokers (n = 72; 50% female; Mcpd = 19.3, SD = 10.65) were recruited to participate in a smoking cessation treatment trial. During medical screen, we measured weight, height, and exercise tolerance (functional capacity) employing a standardized maximal exercise testing protocol. After adjusting for participant sex and cigarettes per day, exercise self-efficacy moderated the association between anxiety sensitivity and BMI, such that the positive association between anxiety sensitivity and BMI was significantly stronger when exercise self-efficacy was low. The same pattern of results emerged for exercise tolerance. Exercise self-efficacy moderated the association between anxiety sensitivity and exercise tolerance, such that the negative association between anxiety sensitivity and exercise tolerance was significantly stronger when exercise self-efficacy was low. Among smokers, anxiety sensitivity may be a risk variable that, directly and indirectly in the context of low self-efficacy for exercise, causes or maintains higher body weight and lower exercise tolerance. PMID:27725844

  16. Exercise Self-Efficacy Moderates the Relation between Anxiety Sensitivity and Body Mass Index and Exercise Tolerance in Treatment-Seeking Smokers.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Davis, Michelle L; Rosenfield, David; Kauffman, Brooke Y; Baird, Scarlett O; Powers, Mark B; Otto, Michael W; Marcus, Bess H; Church, Timothy S; Smits, Jasper A J; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    There is little known about factors that contribute to the comorbidity of cigarette smoking and obesity. The current study sought to test whether exercise self-efficacy moderated the relation between anxiety sensitivity (fear of internal sensations) and BMI and exercise tolerance among cigarette smokers. Smokers ( n = 72; 50% female; M cpd = 19.3, SD = 10.65) were recruited to participate in a smoking cessation treatment trial. During medical screen, we measured weight, height, and exercise tolerance (functional capacity) employing a standardized maximal exercise testing protocol. After adjusting for participant sex and cigarettes per day, exercise self-efficacy moderated the association between anxiety sensitivity and BMI, such that the positive association between anxiety sensitivity and BMI was significantly stronger when exercise self-efficacy was low. The same pattern of results emerged for exercise tolerance. Exercise self-efficacy moderated the association between anxiety sensitivity and exercise tolerance, such that the negative association between anxiety sensitivity and exercise tolerance was significantly stronger when exercise self-efficacy was low. Among smokers, anxiety sensitivity may be a risk variable that, directly and indirectly in the context of low self-efficacy for exercise, causes or maintains higher body weight and lower exercise tolerance.

  17. Acute effect of oral water intake during exercise on post-exercise hypotension.

    PubMed

    Endo, M Y; Kajimoto, C; Yamada, M; Miura, A; Hayashi, N; Koga, S; Fukuba, Y

    2012-11-01

    Post-exercise hypotension (PEH) is a sustained reduction in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) after prolonged exercise. As water drinking is known to elicit a large acute pressor response, we aimed to explore the effect of drinking water during exercise on PEH. Ten normotensive male volunteers performed the control protocol: 30 min supine rest, 60 min cycling exercise in moderate intensity, and 60 min supine rest recovery. In the water drinking protocol, the same procedure was followed but with water intake during exercise to compensate for exercise-induced body weight lost. Heart rate, MAP, cardiac output and blood flow in the brachial artery were measured pre- and post-exercise. The total vascular conductance (TVC) and the vascular conductance (VC) in the brachial artery were calculated pre- and post-exercise, and the relative change in plasma volume (ΔPV) was also measured. Body weight loss during exercise was 0.65 ± 0.24 kg in the control. ΔPV was not different during recovery in either protocol. MAP in the control was significantly reduced during the latter half of the recovery compared with baseline. In contrast, MAP in the water drinking showed no reduction during recovery, and was significantly higher than in the control. TVC and VC in the brachial artery were lower in the water drinking, in which vasoconstriction was relatively exaggerated. Prevention of dehydration after exercise by oral water intake, or oral water intake per se has a role in maintaining post-exercise MAP and it may be related to reduction in TVC.

  18. Heart Rate Recovery after Submaximal Exercise in Four Different Recovery Protocols in Male Athletes and Non-Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Otto F.; Ovcin, Zoran B.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.; Lozanov-Crvenkovic, Zagorka; Brodie, David A.; Grujic, Nikola G.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different recovery protocols on heart rate recovery (HRR) trend through fitted heart rate (HR) decay curves were assessed. Twenty one trained male athletes and 19 sedentary male students performed a submaximal cycle exercise test on four occasions followed by 5 min: 1) inactive recovery in the upright seated position, 2) active (cycling) recovery in the upright seated position, 3) supine position, and 4) supine position with elevated legs. The HRR was assessed as the difference between the peak exercise HR and the HR recorded following 60 seconds of recovery (HRR60). Additionally the time constant decay was obtained by fitting the 5 minute post-exercise HRR into a first-order exponential curve. Within- subject differences of HRR60 for all recovery protocols in both groups were significant (p < 0. 001) except for the two supine positions (p > 0.05). Values of HRR60 were larger in the group of athletes for all conditions (p < 0.001). The time constant of HR decay showed within-subject differences for all recovery conditions in both groups (p < 0.01) except for the two supine positions (p > 0.05). Between group difference was found for active recovery in the seated position and the supine position with elevated legs (p < 0.05). We conclude that the supine position with or without elevated legs accelerated HRR compared with the two seated positions. Active recovery in the seated upright position was associated with slower HRR compared with inactive recovery in the same position. The HRR in athletes was accelerated in the supine position with elevated legs and with active recovery in the seated position compared with non-athletes. Key points In order to return to a pre-exercise value following exercise, heart rate (HR) is mediated by changes in the autonomic nervous system but the underlying mechanisms governing these changes are not well understood. Even though HRR is slower with active recovery, lactate elimination after high intensity exercise might be

  19. Task-oriented aerobic exercise in chronic hemiparetic stroke: training protocols and treatment effects.

    PubMed

    Macko, R F; Ivey, F M; Forrester, L W

    2005-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in older Americans. Each year 750,000 Americans suffer a stroke, two thirds of whom are left with neurological deficits that persistently impair function. Principal among them is hemiparetic gait that limits mobility and increases fall risk, promoting a sedentary lifestyle. These events propagate disability by physical deconditioning and "learned non-use," with further functional declines accelerated by the sarcopenia and fitness decrements of advancing age. Conventional rehabilitation care typically provides little or no structured therapeutic exercise beyond the subacute stroke recovery period, based on natural history studies showing little or no further functional motor recovery beyond 6 months after stroke. Emerging evidence suggests that new models of task-oriented exercise have the potential to improve motor function even years after stroke. This article presents treadmill as a task-oriented training paradigm to optimize locomotor relearning while eliciting cardiovascular conditioning in chronic stroke patients. Protocols for exercise testing and longitudinal aerobic training progression are presented that provide fundamental formulas that safely approach the complex task of customizing aerobic training to gait deficit severity in the high CVD risk stroke population. The beneficial effects of 6 months task-oriented treadmill exercise on cardiovascular-metabolic fitness, energy cost of hemiparetic gait, ADL mobility task performance, and leg strength are discussed with respect to the central and peripheral neuromuscular adaptations targeted by the training. Collectively, these findings constitute one initial experience in a much broader neuroscience and exercise rehabilitation development of task-oriented training paradigms that offer a multisystems approach to improving both neurological and cardiovascular health outcomes in the chronic stroke population.

  20. A Standardized Protocol for the Prospective Follow-Up of Cleft Lip and Palate Patients.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Negar; Jolanta, Aleksejūnienė; Edwin, Yen; Angelina, Loo

    2018-01-01

    To develop a standardized all-encompassing protocol for the assessment of cleft lip and palate patients with clinical and research implications. Electronic database searches were conducted and 13 major cleft centers worldwide were contacted in order to prepare for the development of the protocol. In preparation, the available evidence was reviewed and potential fistula-related risk determinants from 4 different domains were identified. No standardized protocol for the assessment of cleft patients could be found in any of the electronic database searches that were conducted. Interviews with representatives from several major centers revealed that the majority of centers do not have a standardized comprehensive strategy for the reporting and follow-up of cleft lip and palate patients. The protocol was developed and consisted of the following domains of determinants: (1) the sociodemographic domain, (2) the cleft defect domain, (3) the surgery domain, and (4) the fistula domain. The proposed protocol has the potential to enhance the quality of patient care by ensuring that multiple patient-related aspects are consistently reported. It may also facilitate future multicenter research, which could contribute to the reduction of fistula occurrence in cleft lip and palate patients.

  1. The effect of personalized versus standard patient protocols for radiostereometric analysis (RSA).

    PubMed

    Muharemovic, O; Troelsen, A; Thomsen, M G; Kallemose, T; Gosvig, K K

    2018-05-01

    Increasing pressure in the clinic requires a more standardized approach to radiostereometric analysis (RSA) imaging. The aim of this study was to investigate whether implementation of personalized RSA patient protocols could increase image quality and decrease examination time and the number of exposure repetitions. Forty patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty were equally randomized to either a case or a control group. Radiographers in the case group were assisted by personalized patient protocols containing information about each patient's post-operative RSA imaging. Radiographers in the control group used a standard RSA protocol. At three months, radiographers in the case group significantly reduced (p < 0.001) the number of exposures by 1.6, examination time with 19.2 min, and distance between centrum of prosthesis and centrum of calibration field with 34.1 mm when compared to post-operative (baseline) results. At twelve months, the case group significantly reduced (p < 0.001) number of exposures by two, examination time with 22.5 min, and centrum of prosthesis to centrum of calibration field distance with 43.1 mm when compared to baseline results. No significant improvements were found in the control group at any time point. There is strong evidence that personalized RSA patient protocols have a positive effect on image quality and radiation dose savings. Implementation of personal patient protocols as a RSA standard will contribute to the reduction of examination time, thus ensuring a cost benefit for department and patient safety. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Bright Light, Exercise, and Bright Light + Exercise.

    PubMed

    Youngstedt, Shawn D; Kline, Christopher E; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Zielinski, Mark R; Devlin, Tina M; Moore, Teresa A

    2016-02-26

    Limited research has compared the circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light and exercise and additive effects of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the phase-delaying effects of late night bright light, late night exercise, and late evening bright light followed by early morning exercise. In a within-subjects, counterbalanced design, 6 young adults completed each of three 2.5-day protocols. Participants followed a 3-h ultra-short sleep-wake cycle, involving wakefulness in dim light for 2h, followed by attempted sleep in darkness for 1 h, repeated throughout each protocol. On night 2 of each protocol, participants received either (1) bright light alone (5,000 lux) from 2210-2340 h, (2) treadmill exercise alone from 2210-2340 h, or (3) bright light (2210-2340 h) followed by exercise from 0410-0540 h. Urine was collected every 90 min. Shifts in the 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) cosine acrophase from baseline to post-treatment were compared between treatments. Analyses revealed a significant additive phase-delaying effect of bright light + exercise (80.8 ± 11.6 [SD] min) compared with exercise alone (47.3 ± 21.6 min), and a similar phase delay following bright light alone (56.6 ± 15.2 min) and exercise alone administered for the same duration and at the same time of night. Thus, the data suggest that late night bright light followed by early morning exercise can have an additive circadian phase-shifting effect.

  3. Structural and biomechanical changes in shoulders of junior javelin throwers: a comprehensive evaluation as a proof of concept for a preventive exercise protocol.

    PubMed

    Beitzel, Knut; Zandt, Julia F; Buchmann, Stefan; Beitzel, Kirsten I; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Imhoff, Andreas B; Brucker, Peter U

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a preventive exercise protocol based on structural and functional changes present in shoulder joints of young throwing athletes. As a proof of concept, these changes were previously evaluated in a cross-section of high-performance junior javelin throwers. Thirteen members of the German and Bavarian junior javelin squad (mean age 17.5 ± 0.8 years) completed a systematic clinical examination, shoulder range of motion (ROM) measurement, and were scored with standardized clinical tools. 3.0 tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted on both shoulders. Bilateral three-dimensional analysis of the scapulothoracic motion during multiplanar humeral elevation and isokinetic strength testing of the shoulder internal and external rotators was accomplished. Based on the findings, a preventive exercise protocol was confirmed. Dominant internal ROM was significantly decreased (dominant 48° ± 20° vs. non-dominant 57° ± 19°; P = 0.006) and dominant external ROM increased (dominant 117° ± 15° vs. non-dominant 107° ± 10°; P = 0.008). MRI revealed posterosuperior intraosseous cysts of the humeral head with a size larger than >3 mm in 69 % of the dominant shoulders and only in 15 % in the non-dominant shoulders. Motion analysis of the static scapular resting position was significantly different between dominant and non-dominant sides regarding anterior tilt (dominant > non-dominant, mean difference 4.2°, P = 0.010) and retraction (dominant > non-dominant, mean difference 2.4°, P = 0.038). Dominant scapular anterior tilt during flexion and abduction was significantly increased (-4.3°, P = 0.006; -3.4°, P = 0.046). Dominant retraction was significantly increased during abduction (-2.3°, P = 0.040). Isokinetic outcome parameters presented nonsignificant bilateral differences. Elite junior javelin throwers already present structural (humeral intraosseous cysts) and biomechanical changes

  4. Importance of Standardized DXA Protocol for Assessing Physique Changes in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Nana, Alisa; Slater, Gary J; Hopkins, Will G; Halson, Shona L; Martin, David T; West, Nicholas P; Burke, Louise M

    2016-06-01

    The implications of undertaking DXA scans using best practice protocols (subjects fasted and rested) or a less precise but more practical protocol in assessing chronic changes in body composition following training and a specialized recovery technique were investigated. Twenty-one male cyclists completed an overload training program, in which they were randomized to four sessions per week of either cold water immersion therapy or control groups. Whole-body DXA scans were undertaken with best practice protocol (Best) or random activity protocol (Random) at baseline, after 3 weeks of overload training, and after a 2-week taper. Magnitudes of changes in total, lean and fat mass from baseline-overload, overload-taper and baseline-taper were assessed by standardization (Δmean/SD). The standard deviations of change scores for total and fat-free soft tissue mass (FFST) from Random scans (2-3%) were approximately double those observed in the Best (1-2%), owing to extra random errors associated with Random scans at baseline. There was little difference in change scores for fat mass. The effect of cold water immersion therapy on baseline-taper changes in FFST was possibly harmful (-0.7%; 90% confidence limits ±1.2%) with Best scans but unclear with Random scans (0.9%; ±2.0%). Both protocols gave similar possibly harmful effects of cold water immersion therapy on changes in fat mass (6.9%; ±13.5% and 5.5%; ±14.3%, respectively). An interesting effect of cold water immersion therapy on training-induced changes in body composition might have been missed with a less precise scanning protocol. DXA scans should be undertaken with Best.

  5. Standardized food images: A photographing protocol and image database.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier, Lisette; van Meer, Floor; van der Laan, Laura N; Viergever, Max A; Smeets, Paul A M

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of food intake has gained much research interest because of the current obesity epidemic. For research purposes, food images are a good and convenient alternative for real food because many dietary decisions are made based on the sight of foods. Food pictures are assumed to elicit anticipatory responses similar to real foods because of learned associations between visual food characteristics and post-ingestive consequences. In contemporary food science, a wide variety of images are used which introduces between-study variability and hampers comparison and meta-analysis of results. Therefore, we created an easy-to-use photographing protocol which enables researchers to generate high resolution food images appropriate for their study objective and population. In addition, we provide a high quality standardized picture set which was characterized in seven European countries. With the use of this photographing protocol a large number of food images were created. Of these images, 80 were selected based on their recognizability in Scotland, Greece and The Netherlands. We collected image characteristics such as liking, perceived calories and/or perceived healthiness ratings from 449 adults and 191 children. The majority of the foods were recognized and liked at all sites. The differences in liking ratings, perceived calories and perceived healthiness between sites were minimal. Furthermore, perceived caloric content and healthiness ratings correlated strongly (r ≥ 0.8) with actual caloric content in both adults and children. The photographing protocol as well as the images and the data are freely available for research use on http://nutritionalneuroscience.eu/. By providing the research community with standardized images and the tools to create their own, comparability between studies will be improved and a head-start is made for a world-wide standardized food image database. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. HEART: heart exercise and remote technologies: a randomized controlled trial study protocol.

    PubMed

    Maddison, Ralph; Whittaker, Robyn; Stewart, Ralph; Kerr, Andrew; Jiang, Yannan; Kira, Geoffrey; Carter, Karen H; Pfaeffli, Leila

    2011-05-31

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is aimed at improving health behaviors to slow or reverse the progression of CVD disease. Exercise is a central element of CR. Technologies such as mobile phones and the Internet (mHealth) offer potential to overcome many of the psychological, physical, and geographical barriers that have been associated with lack of participation in exercise-based CR. We aim to trial the effectiveness of a mobile phone delivered exercise-based CR program to increase exercise capacity and functional outcomes compared with usual CR care in adults with CVD. This paper outlines the rationale and methods of the trial. A single-blinded parallel two-arm randomized controlled trial is being conducted. A total of 170 people will be randomized at 1:1 ratio either to receive a mHealth CR program or usual care. Participants are identified by CR nurses from two metropolitan hospitals in Auckland, New Zealand through outpatient clinics and existing databases. Consenting participants are contacted to attend a baseline assessment. The intervention consists of a theory-based, personalized, automated package of text and video message components via participants' mobile phones and the Internet to increase exercise behavior, delivered over six months. The control group will continue with usual CR. Data collection occurs at baseline and 24 weeks (post-intervention). The primary outcome is change in maximal oxygen uptake from baseline to 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes include post-intervention measures on self-reported physical activity (IPAQ), cardiovascular risk factors (systolic blood pressure, weight, and waist to hip ratio), health related quality of life (SF-36), and cost-effectiveness. This manuscript presents the protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a mHealth exercise-based CR program. Results of this trial will provide much needed information about physical and psychological well-being, and

  7. Graded Exercise Testing in a Pediatric Weight Management Center: The DeVos Protocol.

    PubMed

    Eisenmann, Joey C; Guseman, Emily Hill; Morrison, Kyle; Tucker, Jared; Smith, Lucie; Stratbucker, William

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we describe a protocol used to test the functional capacity of the obese pediatric patient and describe the peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) of patients seeking treatment at a pediatric weight management center. One hundred eleven (mean age, 12.5 ± 3.0 years) patients performed a multistage exercise test on a treadmill, of which 90 (81%) met end-test criteria and provided valid VO2peak data. Peak VO2 was expressed: (1) in absolute terms (L·min(-1)); (2) as the ratio of the volume of oxygen consumed per minute relative to total body mass (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)); and (3) as the ratio of the volume of oxygen consumed per minute relative to fat-free mass (mL·FFM·kg(-1)·min(-1)). Mean BMI z-score was 2.4 ± 0.3 and the mean percent body fat was 36.5 ± 9.7%. Absolute VO2peak (L·min(-1)) was significantly different between sexes; however, relative values were similar between sexes. Mean VO2peak was 25.7 ± 4.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) with a range of 13.5-36.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1). Obese youth seeking treatment at a stage 3 pediatric weight management center exhibit low VO2peak. The protocol outlined here should serve as a model for similar programs interested in the submaximal and peak responses to exercise in obese pediatric patients.

  8. Comparison of low back mobility and stability exercises from Pilates in non-specific low back pain: A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Iã Ferreira; Souza, Catiane; Schneider, Alexandre Tavares; Chagas, Leandro Campos; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes

    2018-05-01

    There is some evidence in the literature about the effectiveness of the Pilates methods in the low back pain. Moreover, Pilates focus on exercises that empathizes the stability and/or mobility of the spine. Therefore, it is discussed in the literature whether higher levels of stability or mobility of the lumbar spine generates better results, both in performance and rehabilitation for low back pain. Compare the effects of the low back mobility and stability exercises from Pilates Method on low back pain, disability and movement functionality in individuals with non-specific chronic low back pain. 28 participants will be randomized into two exercise protocol from Pilates methods, one focusing on low back stability and other on low back mobility. Low back pain (visual analogic scale), low back disability (Oswestry) and movement functionality (7 functional movement tasks) will be evaluated before and after 10 sessions of Pilates exercise by the same trained assessor. A mixed designed ANOVA with two factors will be used. This study is the first to compare these outcomes for chronic low back pain participants with two exercises protocol focusing on low back mobility and stability and the results will evaluate what to prioritize with Pilates exercises to give better results for that population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Bright Light, Exercise, and Bright Light + Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Christopher E.; Elliott, Jeffrey A.; Zielinski, Mark R.; Devlin, Tina M.; Moore, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has compared the circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light and exercise and additive effects of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the phase-delaying effects of late night bright light, late night exercise, and late evening bright light followed by early morning exercise. In a within-subjects, counterbalanced design, 6 young adults completed each of three 2.5-day protocols. Participants followed a 3-h ultra-short sleep-wake cycle, involving wakefulness in dim light for 2h, followed by attempted sleep in darkness for 1 h, repeated throughout each protocol. On night 2 of each protocol, participants received either (1) bright light alone (5,000 lux) from 2210–2340 h, (2) treadmill exercise alone from 2210–2340 h, or (3) bright light (2210–2340 h) followed by exercise from 0410–0540 h. Urine was collected every 90 min. Shifts in the 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) cosine acrophase from baseline to post-treatment were compared between treatments. Analyses revealed a significant additive phase-delaying effect of bright light + exercise (80.8 ± 11.6 [SD] min) compared with exercise alone (47.3 ± 21.6 min), and a similar phase delay following bright light alone (56.6 ± 15.2 min) and exercise alone administered for the same duration and at the same time of night. Thus, the data suggest that late night bright light followed by early morning exercise can have an additive circadian phase-shifting effect. PMID:27103935

  10. Comparison of responses to two high-intensity intermittent exercise protocols.

    PubMed

    Gist, Nicholas H; Freese, Eric C; Cureton, Kirk J

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare peak cardiorespiratory, metabolic, and perceptual responses to acute bouts of sprint interval cycling (SIC) and a high-intensity intermittent calisthenics (HIC) protocol consisting of modified "burpees." Eleven (8 men and 3 women) moderately trained, college-aged participants (age = 21.9 ± 2.1, body mass index = 24.8 ± 1.9, V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak = 54.1 ± 5.4 ml·kg·min) completed 4 testing sessions across 9 days with each session separated by 48-72 hours. Using a protocol of 4 repeated bouts of 30-second "all-out" efforts interspersed with 4-minute active recovery periods, responses to SIC and HIC were classified relative to peak values. Mean values for %V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak and %HRpeak for SIC (80.4 ± 5.3% and 86.8 ± 3.9%) and HIC (77.6 ± 6.9% and 84.6 ± 5.3%) were not significantly different (p > 0.05). Effect sizes (95% confidence interval) calculated for mean differences were: %V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak Cohen's d = 0.51 (0.48-0.53) and %HRpeak Cohen's d = 0.57 (0.55-0.59). A low-volume, high-intensity bout of repeated whole-body calisthenic exercise induced cardiovascular responses that were not significantly different but were ∼1/2SD lower than "all-out" SIC. These results suggest that in addition to the benefit of reduced time commitment, a high-intensity interval protocol of calisthenics elicits vigorous cardiorespiratory and perceptual responses and may confer physiological adaptations and performance improvements similar to those reported for SIC. The potential efficacy of this alternative interval training method provides support for its application by athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals.

  11. Hormonal responses in athletes: the use of a two bout exercise protocol to detect subtle differences in (over)training status.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, R; Piacentini, M F; Busschaert, B; Buyse, L; De Schutter, G; Stray-Gundersen, J

    2004-03-01

    In overtrained athletes, several signs and symptoms have been associated with the imbalance between training and recovery. However, reliable diagnostic markers for distinguishing between well-trained, overreached (OR) and overtrained (OT) athletes are lacking. A hallmark feature of overtraining syndrome (OTS) is the inability to sustain intense exercise and recover for the next training or competition session. We therefore devised a test protocol utilizing two bouts of maximal work. With this test protocol we tried to establish a difference in hormonal responses between the training status of T and OR athletes. Seven well-trained cyclists participated in this study and were tested before and after a training camp. We also present the data of one OT motocross athlete who was clinically diagnosed as overtrained. All athletes performed two maximal exercise tests separated by 4 h. Blood was analyzed for cortisol, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), growth hormone and prolactin (PRL). Performance decreased by 6% between the first and the second exercise test in the OR group and by 11% in the OT subject. Moreover, during the second exercise test there were more marked differences between the T and OR athletes; in particular, the OT subject did not show an increase in some of the hormonal responses. PRL increased only by 14% in the OT subject's second test and there was a 7% decrease in ACTH. The two exercise approach enables us to detect subtle performance decrements that will not be identified by one exercise trigger. The hormonal responses to the second exercise test were different between the T and OR athletes (the increase in the T group was higher than in the OR that was higher than in the OT). The results of the case presentation of an overtrained athlete provide evidence of an altered and dysfunctional hypothalamic-pituitary axis response to two bouts of maximal exercise. These findings can be used to develop markers for diagnosis of OTS and to begin to address

  12. F47. COGNITIVE REMEDIATION AND PHYSICAL EXERCISE IN MULTI-EPISODE SCHIZOPHRENIA: STUDY PROTOCOL FOR A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Nuria; Pérez-Solà, Víctor; Cortizo, Romina; Ayllon, Lourdes; Salvador, Teresa; Moreno, Daniel; Català, Ferran; Chamorro, Jacobo; Oller, Silvia; Polo-Velasco, Javier; Abellanas, Adelina; Diez-Aja, Cristobal; Mane, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Cognitive remediation (CR) and physical exercise have separately shown promising results in schizophrenia cognitive improvement, despite this, the impact on daily functionality is still limited. Physical exercise increases Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels, promoting neuronal and cognitive plasticity, which can maximize the impact of CR. We are conducting a randomised controlled trial to determine the efficacy of an intensive program that combines CR and physical exercise on cognition and related outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. In addition, we investigate functional and structural brain effects of this intervention and its association to BDNF. Methods This study protocol describes a randomized controlled trial in which 74 patients are randomly assigned to either CR and physical exercise or CR and health promotion. The interventions are 12-week long and consist of three weekly sessions (90min of CR and 40min of either aerobic exercise or health promotion). To be included in the study, patients must be diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, aged 28–60 years, and do low physical activity, as measured by International Physical Activity Questionnaire, IPAQ. Exclusion Criteria for participation in the study are the presence of neurological or substance use disorders, IQ < 70 and somatic illnesses that contraindicate physical exercise. Healthy control participants (n=18) are screened for the presence of lifetime Axis I psychotic disorders and for the presence of a first-degree relative with schizophrenia. Primary outcome measures are cognitive performance, functional outcome, negative symptoms, BDNF levels and neuroimaging measures. Secondary outcome measures are quality of life and metabolic parameters. All measures are blindly assessed at baseline, at 3 months follow up and at 15 months follow up. This trial was approved by the Comité Ètic d’Investigació Clínica de l’Hospital del Mar (CEIC) 2015

  13. CT and MR Protocol Standardization Across a Large Health System: Providing a Consistent Radiologist, Patient, and Referring Provider Experience.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Peter B; Hunt, Kelly; Mansoubi, Fabien; Borgstede, James

    2017-02-01

    Building and maintaining a comprehensive yet simple set of standardized protocols for a cross-sectional image can be a daunting task. A single department may have difficulty preventing "protocol creep," which almost inevitably occurs when an organized "playbook" of protocols does not exist and individual radiologists and technologists alter protocols at will and on a case-by-case basis. When multiple departments or groups function in a large health system, the lack of uniformity of protocols can increase exponentially. In 2012, the University of Colorado Hospital formed a large health system (UCHealth) and became a 5-hospital provider network. CT and MR imaging studies are conducted at multiple locations by different radiology groups. To facilitate consistency in ordering, acquisition, and appearance of a given study, regardless of location, we minimized the number of protocols across all scanners and sites of practice with a clinical indication-driven protocol selection and standardization process. Here we review the steps utilized to perform this process improvement task and insure its stability over time. Actions included creation of a standardized protocol template, which allowed for changes in electronic storage and management of protocols, designing a change request form, and formation of a governance structure. We utilized rapid improvement events (1 day for CT, 2 days for MR) and reduced 248 CT protocols into 97 standardized protocols and 168 MR protocols to 66. Additional steps are underway to further standardize output and reporting of imaging interpretation. This will result in an improved, consistent radiologist, patient, and provider experience across the system.

  14. Effect of a Standardized Protocol of Antibiotic Therapy on Surgical Site Infection after Laparoscopic Surgery for Complicated Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung-Chul; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Bong Hwa

    Although it is accepted that complicated appendicitis requires antibiotic therapy to prevent post-operative surgical infections, consensus protocols on the duration and regimens of treatment are not well established. This study aimed to compare the outcome of post-operative infectious complications in patients receiving old non-standardized and new standard antibiotic protocols, involving either 5 or 10 days of treatment, respectively. We enrolled 1,343 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis between January 2009 and December 2014. At the beginning of the new protocol, the patients were divided into two groups; 10 days of various antibiotic regimens (between January 2009 and June 2012, called the non-standardized protocol; n = 730) and five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole regimen (between July 2012 and December 2014; standardized protocol; n = 613). We compared the clinical outcomes, including surgical site infection (SSI) (superficial and deep organ/space infections) in the two groups. The standardized protocol group had a slightly shorter operative time (67 vs. 69 min), a shorter hospital stay (5 vs. 5.4 d), and lower medical cost (US$1,564 vs. US$1,654). Otherwise, there was no difference between the groups. No differences were found in the non-standardized and standard protocol groups with regard to the rate of superficial infection (10.3% vs. 12.7%; p = 0.488) or deep organ/space infection (2.3% vs. 2.1%; p = 0.797). In patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis, five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole did not lead to more SSIs, and it decreased the medical costs compared with non-standardized antibiotic regimens.

  15. Effects of two aerobic exercise training protocols on parameters of oxidative stress in the blood and liver of obese rats.

    PubMed

    Delwing-de Lima, Daniela; Ulbricht, Ariene Sampaio Souza Farias; Werlang-Coelho, Carla; Delwing-Dal Magro, Débora; Joaquim, Victor Hugo Antonio; Salamaia, Eloise Mariani; de Quevedo, Silvana Rodrigues; Desordi, Larissa

    2017-12-08

    We evaluated the effects of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocols on the alterations in oxidative stress parameters caused by a high-fat diet (HFD), in the blood and liver of rats. The HFD enhanced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBA-RS) and protein carbonyl content, while reducing total sulfhydryl content and catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in the blood. Both training protocols prevented an increase in TBA-RS and protein carbonyl content, and prevented a reduction in CAT. HIIT protocol enhanced SOD activity. In the liver, HFD didn't alter TBA-RS, total sulfhydryl content or SOD, but increased protein carbonyl content and CAT and decreased GSH-Px. The exercise protocols prevented the increase in protein carbonyl content and the MICT protocol prevented an alteration in CAT. In conclusion, HFD elicits oxidative stress in the blood and liver and both protocols prevented most of the alterations in the oxidative stress parameters.

  16. Biocoder: A programming language for standardizing and automating biology protocols

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Published descriptions of biology protocols are often ambiguous and incomplete, making them difficult to replicate in other laboratories. However, there is increasing benefit to formalizing the descriptions of protocols, as laboratory automation systems (such as microfluidic chips) are becoming increasingly capable of executing them. Our goal in this paper is to improve both the reproducibility and automation of biology experiments by using a programming language to express the precise series of steps taken. Results We have developed BioCoder, a C++ library that enables biologists to express the exact steps needed to execute a protocol. In addition to being suitable for automation, BioCoder converts the code into a readable, English-language description for use by biologists. We have implemented over 65 protocols in BioCoder; the most complex of these was successfully executed by a biologist in the laboratory using BioCoder as the only reference. We argue that BioCoder exposes and resolves ambiguities in existing protocols, and could provide the software foundations for future automation platforms. BioCoder is freely available for download at http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/india/projects/biocoder/. Conclusions BioCoder represents the first practical programming system for standardizing and automating biology protocols. Our vision is to change the way that experimental methods are communicated: rather than publishing a written account of the protocols used, researchers will simply publish the code. Our experience suggests that this practice is tractable and offers many benefits. We invite other researchers to leverage BioCoder to improve the precision and completeness of their protocols, and also to adapt and extend BioCoder to new domains. PMID:21059251

  17. Post-Plyometric Exercise Hypotension and Heart Rate in Normotensive Individuals: Influence of Exercise Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Arazi, Hamid; Asadi, Abbas; Rahimzadeh, Mehdi; Moradkhani, Amir-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of high, moderate and low intensity plyometric exercise on the post-exercise systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate responses. Methods Ten healthy normotensive men (age, 21.1±0.9 years; height, 175.8±6 cm; and body mass, 69.1±13.6 kg) volunteered to participate in this study and were evaluated for three non-consecutive days in depth jump exercise from 20-cm box (low intensity [LI]), 40-cm box (moderate intensity [MI]) and 60-cm box (high intensity [HI]) for 5 sets of 20 repetitions. After each exercise session, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured every 10 min for a period of 90 min. Results No significant differences were observed among post-exercise SBP, DBP and HR when the protocols (LI, MI and HI) were compared. The LI and HI protocols showed greater reduction in SBP at 40th-70th min of post-exercise (~9%), whereas the LI and MI protocols indicated greater reduction in DBP at 10th-50th min of post exercise (~10%). In addition, the change in the DBP for HI was not significant and the increases in the HR were similar for all intensities. Conclusion It can be concluded that a plyometric exercise (PE) can reduce SBP and DBP post-exercise and therefore we can say that PE has significant effects for reducing BP and HR or post-exercise hypotension. PMID:24799997

  18. Post-plyometric exercise hypotension and heart rate in normotensive individuals: influence of exercise intensity.

    PubMed

    Arazi, Hamid; Asadi, Abbas; Rahimzadeh, Mehdi; Moradkhani, Amir-Hossein

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of high, moderate and low intensity plyometric exercise on the post-exercise systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate responses. Ten healthy normotensive men (age, 21.1±0.9 years; height, 175.8±6 cm; and body mass, 69.1±13.6 kg) volunteered to participate in this study and were evaluated for three non-consecutive days in depth jump exercise from 20-cm box (low intensity [LI]), 40-cm box (moderate intensity [MI]) and 60-cm box (high intensity [HI]) for 5 sets of 20 repetitions. After each exercise session, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured every 10 min for a period of 90 min. No significant differences were observed among post-exercise SBP, DBP and HR when the protocols (LI, MI and HI) were compared. The LI and HI protocols showed greater reduction in SBP at 40(th)-70(th) min of post-exercise (~9%), whereas the LI and MI protocols indicated greater reduction in DBP at 10(th)-50(th) min of post exercise (~10%). In addition, the change in the DBP for HI was not significant and the increases in the HR were similar for all intensities. It can be concluded that a plyometric exercise (PE) can reduce SBP and DBP post-exercise and therefore we can say that PE has significant effects for reducing BP and HR or post-exercise hypotension.

  19. Acute Hematological and Inflammatory Responses to High-intensity Exercise Tests: Impact of Duration and Mode of Exercise.

    PubMed

    Minuzzi, Luciele G; Carvalho, Humberto M; Brunelli, Diego T; Rosado, Fatima; Cavaglieri, Cláudia R; Gonçalves, Carlos E; Gaspar, Joana M; Rama, Luís M; Teixeira, Ana M

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hematological and inflammatory responses to 4 maximal high-intensity protocols, considering energy expenditure in each test. 9 healthy volunteers performed 4 high-intensity exercise tests of short [Wingate (WANT); Repeated-sprints (RSA)] and long durations [Continuous VO 2 test (VCONT); intermittent VO 2 test (VINT)] in a cycle-ergometer, until exhaustion. Hematological parameters and IL-6, IL-10 and creatine kinase (CK) levels were determined before (PRE), POST, 30 min, 1, 2, 12 and 24 h after the end of the protocols. Additionally, energy expenditure was determined. Leucocytes, erythrocytes and lymphocytes increased at POST and returned to PRE values at 30 min for all protocols. Lymphocytes had a second decreased at 2 h and granulocytes increased at 2 h when compared to PRE. Both variables returned to PRE values between 12-24 h into recovery. The magnitude of response for IL-6 was greater in VINT and for IL-10 in VCONT. There was no association of energy expenditure within each exercise protocol with the pattern of IL-6, IL-10 and CK responses to the exercise protocols. The present finding support that similar responses after continuous or intermittent acute protocols are observed when exercises are performed to volitional failure, regardless of the duration and mode of exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Candidate Exercise Technologies and Prescriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loerch, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews potential exercise technologies to counter the effects of space flight. It includes a overview of the exercise countermeasures project, a review of some of the candidate exercise technologies being considered and a few of the analog exercise hardware devices, and a review of new studies that are designed to optimize the current and future exercise protocols.

  1. Outcomes of Optimized over Standard Protocol of Rabbit Antithymocyte Globulin for Severe Aplastic Anemia: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Meili; Shao, Yingqi; Huang, Jinbo; Huang, Zhendong; Zhang, Jing; Nie, Neng; Zheng, Yizhou

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous reports showed that outcome of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) was not satisfactory as the first-line therapy for severe aplastic anemia (SAA). We explored a modifying schedule of administration of rATG. Design and Methods Outcomes of a cohort of 175 SAA patients, including 51 patients administered with standard protocol (3.55 mg/kg/d for 5 days) and 124 cases with optimized protocol (1.97 mg/kg/d for 9 days) of rATG plus cyclosporine (CSA), were analyzed retrospectively. Results Of all 175 patients, response rates at 3 and 6 months were 36.6% and 56.0%, respectively. 51 cases received standard protocol had poor responses at 3 (25.5%) and 6 months (41.2%). However, 124 patients received optimized protocol had better responses at 3 (41.1%, P = 0.14) and 6 (62.1%, P = 0.01). Higher incidences of infection (57.1% versus 37.9%, P = 0.02) and early mortality (17.9% versus 0.8%, P<0.001) occurred in patients received standard protocol compared with optimized protocol. The 5-year overall survival in favor of the optimized over standard rATG protocol (76.0% versus. 50.3%, P<0.001) was observed. By multivariate analysis, optimized protocol (RR = 2.21, P = 0.04), response at 3 months (RR = 10.31, P = 0.03) and shorter interval (<23 days) between diagnosis and initial dose of rATG (RR = 5.35, P = 0.002) were independent favorable predictors of overall survival. Conclusions Optimized instead of standard rATG protocol in combination with CSA remained efficacious as a first-line immunosuppressive regimen for SAA. PMID:23554855

  2. Why standard brain-computer interface (BCI) training protocols should be changed: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeunet, Camille; Jahanpour, Emilie; Lotte, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Objective. While promising, electroencephaloraphy based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are barely used due to their lack of reliability: 15% to 30% of users are unable to control a BCI. Standard training protocols may be partly responsible as they do not satisfy recommendations from psychology. Our main objective was to determine in practice to what extent standard training protocols impact users’ motor imagery based BCI (MI-BCI) control performance. Approach. We performed two experiments. The first consisted in evaluating the efficiency of a standard BCI training protocol for the acquisition of non-BCI related skills in a BCI-free context, which enabled us to rule out the possible impact of BCIs on the training outcome. Thus, participants (N = 54) were asked to perform simple motor tasks. The second experiment was aimed at measuring the correlations between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. The ten best and ten worst performers of the first study were recruited for an MI-BCI experiment during which they had to learn to perform two MI tasks. We also assessed users’ spatial ability and pre-training μ rhythm amplitude, as both have been related to MI-BCI performance in the literature. Main results. Around 17% of the participants were unable to learn to perform the motor tasks, which is close to the BCI illiteracy rate. This suggests that standard training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching. No correlation was found between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. However, spatial ability played an important role in MI-BCI performance. In addition, once the spatial ability covariable had been controlled for, using an ANCOVA, it appeared that participants who faced difficulty during the first experiment improved during the second while the others did not. Significance. These studies suggest that (1) standard MI-BCI training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching, (2) spatial ability is confirmed as impacting on MI-BCI performance, and (3) when faced

  3. Why standard brain-computer interface (BCI) training protocols should be changed: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Jeunet, Camille; Jahanpour, Emilie; Lotte, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    While promising, electroencephaloraphy based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are barely used due to their lack of reliability: 15% to 30% of users are unable to control a BCI. Standard training protocols may be partly responsible as they do not satisfy recommendations from psychology. Our main objective was to determine in practice to what extent standard training protocols impact users' motor imagery based BCI (MI-BCI) control performance. We performed two experiments. The first consisted in evaluating the efficiency of a standard BCI training protocol for the acquisition of non-BCI related skills in a BCI-free context, which enabled us to rule out the possible impact of BCIs on the training outcome. Thus, participants (N = 54) were asked to perform simple motor tasks. The second experiment was aimed at measuring the correlations between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. The ten best and ten worst performers of the first study were recruited for an MI-BCI experiment during which they had to learn to perform two MI tasks. We also assessed users' spatial ability and pre-training μ rhythm amplitude, as both have been related to MI-BCI performance in the literature. Around 17% of the participants were unable to learn to perform the motor tasks, which is close to the BCI illiteracy rate. This suggests that standard training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching. No correlation was found between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. However, spatial ability played an important role in MI-BCI performance. In addition, once the spatial ability covariable had been controlled for, using an ANCOVA, it appeared that participants who faced difficulty during the first experiment improved during the second while the others did not. These studies suggest that (1) standard MI-BCI training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching, (2) spatial ability is confirmed as impacting on MI-BCI performance, and (3) when faced with difficult pre-training, subjects seemed to

  4. Schroth Physiotherapeutic Scoliosis-Specific Exercises Added to the Standard of Care Lead to Better Cobb Angle Outcomes in Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis - an Assessor and Statistician Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Sanja; Parent, Eric C; Khodayari Moez, Elham; Hedden, Douglas M; Hill, Douglas L; Moreau, Marc; Lou, Edmond; Watkins, Elise M; Southon, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    The North American non-surgical standard of care for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) includes observation and bracing, but not exercises. Schroth physiotherapeutic scoliosis-specific exercises (PSSE) showed promise in several studies of suboptimal methodology. The Scoliosis Research Society calls for rigorous studies supporting the role of exercises before including it as a treatment recommendation for scoliosis. To determine the effect of a six-month Schroth PSSE intervention added to standard of care (Experimental group) on the Cobb angle compared to standard of care alone (Control group) in patients with AIS. Fifty patients with AIS aged 10-18 years, with curves of 10°-45° and Risser grade 0-5 were recruited from a single pediatric scoliosis clinic and randomized to the Experimental or Control group. Outcomes included the change in the Cobb angles of the Largest Curve and Sum of Curves from baseline to six months. The intervention consisted of a 30-45 minute daily home program and weekly supervised sessions. Intention-to-treat and per protocol linear mixed effects model analyses are reported. In the intention-to-treat analysis, after six months, the Schroth group had significantly smaller Largest Curve than controls (-3.5°, 95% CI -1.1° to -5.9°, p = 0.006). Likewise, the between-group difference in the square root of the Sum of Curves was -0.40°, (95% CI -0.03° to -0.8°, p = 0.046), suggesting that an average patient with 51.2° at baseline, will have a 49.3° Sum of Curves at six months in the Schroth group, and 55.1° in the control group with the difference between groups increasing with severity. Per protocol analyses produced similar, but larger differences: Largest Curve = -4.1° (95% CI -1.7° to -6.5°, p = 0.002) and [Formula: see text] (95% CI -0.8 to 0.2, p = 0.006). Schroth PSSE added to the standard of care were superior compared to standard of care alone for reducing the curve severity in patients with AIS. NCT01610908.

  5. Standardized patient walkthroughs in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network: common challenges to protocol implementation.

    PubMed

    Fussell, Holly E; Kunkel, Lynn E; McCarty, Dennis; Lewy, Colleen S

    2011-09-01

    Training research staff to implement clinical trials occurring in community-based addiction treatment programs presents unique challenges. Standardized patient walkthroughs of study procedures may enhance training and protocol implementation. Examine and discuss cross-site and cross-study challenges of participant screening and data collection procedures identified during standardized patient walkthroughs of multi-site clinical trials. Actors portrayed clients and "walked through" study procedures with protocol research staff. The study completed 57 walkthroughs during implementation of 4 clinical trials. Observers and walkthrough participants identified three areas of concern (consent procedures, screening and assessment processes, and protocol implementation) and made suggestions for resolving the concerns. Standardized patient walkthroughs capture issues with study procedures previously unidentified with didactic training or unscripted rehearsals. Clinical trials within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network are conducted in addiction treatment centers that vary on multiple dimensions. Based on walkthrough observations, the national protocol team and local site leadership modify standardized operating procedures and resolve cross-site problems prior to recruiting study participants. The standardized patient walkthrough improves consistency across study sites and reduces potential site variation in study outcomes.

  6. Standardized protocols for quality control of MRM-based plasma proteomic workflows.

    PubMed

    Percy, Andrew J; Chambers, Andrew G; Smith, Derek S; Borchers, Christoph H

    2013-01-04

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is rapidly emerging as a viable technology for the identification and quantitation of biological samples, such as human plasma--the most complex yet commonly employed biofluid in clinical analyses. The transition from a qualitative to quantitative science is required if proteomics is going to successfully make the transition to a clinically useful technique. MS, however, has been criticized for a lack of reproducibility and interlaboratory transferability. Currently, the MS and plasma proteomics communities lack standardized protocols and reagents to ensure that high-quality quantitative data can be accurately and precisely reproduced by laboratories across the world using different MS technologies. Toward addressing this issue, we have developed standard protocols for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based assays with customized isotopically labeled internal standards for quality control of the sample preparation workflow and the MS platform in quantitative plasma proteomic analyses. The development of reference standards and their application to a single MS platform is discussed herein, along with the results from intralaboratory tests. The tests highlighted the importance of the reference standards in assessing the efficiency and reproducibility of the entire bottom-up proteomic workflow and revealed errors related to the sample preparation and performance quality and deficits of the MS and LC systems. Such evaluations are necessary if MRM-based quantitative plasma proteomics is to be used in verifying and validating putative disease biomarkers across different research laboratories and eventually in clinical laboratories.

  7. Validity of an Exercise Test Based on Habitual Gait Speed in Mobility-Limited Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Forman, Daniel E.; Kiely, Dan K.; LaRose, Sharon; Hirschberg, Ronald; Frontera, Walter R.; Bean, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a customized exercise tolerance testing (ETT) protocol based on an individual’s habitual gait speed (HGS) on level ground would be a valid mode of exercise testing older adults. Although ETT provides a useful means to risk-stratify adults, age-related declines in gait speed paradoxically limit the utility of standard ETT protocols for evaluating older adults. A customized ETT protocol may be a useful alternative to these standard methods, and this study hypothesized that this alternative approach would be valid. Design We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a randomized controlled trial of older adults with observed mobility problems. Screening was performed using a treadmill-based ETT protocol customized for each individual’s HGS. We determined the content validity by assessing the results of the ETTs, and we evaluated the construct validity of treadmill time in relation to the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI). Setting Outpatient rehabilitation center. Participants Community-dwelling, mobility-limited older adults (N = 141). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Cardiac instability, ETT duration, peak heart rate, peak systolic blood pressure, PASE, and LLFDI. Results Acute cardiac instability was identified in 4 of the participants who underwent ETT. The remaining participants (n = 137, 68% female; mean age, 75.3y) were included in the subsequent analyses. Mean exercise duration was 9.39 minutes, with no significant differences in durations being observed after evaluating among tertiles by HGS status. Mean peak heart rate and mean peak systolic blood pressure were 126.6 beats/ min and 175.0mmHg, respectively. Within separate multivariate models, ETT duration in each of the 3 gait speed groups was significantly associated (P<.05) with PASE and LLFDI. Conclusions Mobility-limited older adults can complete this customized

  8. Quality and Variability of Online Physical Therapy Protocols for Isolated Meniscal Repairs.

    PubMed

    Trofa, David P; Parisien, Robert L; Noticewala, Manish S; Noback, Peter C; Ahmad, Christopher S; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Makhni, Eric C

    2018-05-31

    The ideal meniscal repair postoperative rehabilitation protocol has yet to be determined. Further, patients are attempting to access health care content online at a precipitously increasing rate given the efficiency of modern search engines. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the quality and variability of meniscal repair rehabilitation protocols published online with the hypothesis that there would be a high degree of variability found across available protocols. To this end, Web-based meniscal repair physical therapy protocols from U.S. academic orthopaedic programs as well as the first 10 protocols identified by the Google search engine for the term "meniscal repair physical therapy protocol" were reviewed and assessed via a custom scoring rubric. Twenty protocols were identified from 155 U.S. academic orthopaedic programs for a total of 30 protocols. Twenty-six protocols (86.6%) recommended immediate postoperative bracing. Twelve (40.0%) protocols permitted immediate weight-bearing as tolerated (WBAT) postoperatively, while the remaining protocols permitted WBAT at an average of 4.0 (range, 1-7) weeks. There was considerable variation in range of motion (ROM) goals, with most protocols (73.3%) initiating immediate passive ROM to 90°. The types and timing of strength, proprioception, agility, and pivoting exercises advised were extremely diverse. Only five protocols (16.7%) employed functional testing as a marker for return to athletics. The results of this study indicate that only a minority of academic orthopaedic programs publish meniscal repair physical therapy protocols online and that within the most readily available online protocols there are significant disparities in regards to brace use, ROM, weight-bearing, and strengthening and proprioception exercises. These discrepancies reflect the fact that the best rehabilitation practices after a meniscal repair have yet to be elucidated. This represents a significant area for improved patient

  9. Protocol standards and implementation within the digital engineering laboratory computer network (DELNET) using the universal network interface device (UNID). Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phister, P. W., Jr.

    1983-12-01

    Development of the Air Force Institute of Technology's Digital Engineering Laboratory Network (DELNET) was continued with the development of an initial draft of a protocol standard for all seven layers as specified by the International Standards Organization's (ISO) Reference Model for Open Systems Interconnections. This effort centered on the restructuring of the Network Layer to perform Datagram routing and to conform to the developed protocol standards and actual software module development of the upper four protocol layers residing within the DELNET Monitor (Zilog MCZ 1/25 Computer System). Within the guidelines of the ISO Reference Model the Transport Layer was developed utilizing the Internet Header Format (IHF) combined with the Transport Control Protocol (TCP) to create a 128-byte Datagram. Also a limited Application Layer was created to pass the Gettysburg Address through the DELNET. This study formulated a first draft for the DELNET Protocol Standard and designed, implemented, and tested the Network, Transport, and Application Layers to conform to these protocol standards.

  10. Resistance training program for fatigue management in the workplace: exercise protocol in a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hélio Gustavo; Chiavegato, Luciana Dias; Valentim, Daniela Pereira; da Silva, Patricia Rodrigues; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini

    2016-12-22

    Fatigue is a multifactorial condition that leads to disease and loss in production, and it affects a large number of workers worldwide. This study aims to demonstrate a resistance exercise protocol that individuals will perform during the work schedule, and to evaluate the effectiveness of this exercises program for fatigue control. This is a cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms and is assessor blinded. A total of 352 workers of both sexes, aged 18-65 years, from a medium-sized dairy plant were enrolled in this study. Participants will be recruited from 13 production sectors according to the eligibility criteria and will be randomized by clusters to either the Progressive Resistance Exercise (PRE) intervention group or the Compensatory Workplace Exercise (CWE) comparative group. A resistance exercise program will be implemented for both groups. The groups will receive instructions on self-management, breaks, adjustments to workstations, and the benefits of physical exercise. The PRE group will perform resistance exercises with gradual loads in an exercise room, and the CWE group will perform exercise at their workstations using elastic bands. The exercise sessions will be held 3 times a week for 20 min. The primary outcome measures will be symptoms of physical and mental fatigue, and muscular fatigue based on a one-repetition maximum (1RM). The secondary outcome measures will be level of physical activity, musculoskeletal symptoms, physical condition, perceived exposure, and productivity. The workers will be assessed at baseline and after a 4-month program. A linear mixed model will be applied on an intention-to-treat basis. This intervention is expected to reduce symptoms of fatigue in the workers. The exercise program is indicating in the workplace, although there are few studies describing the effects of exercise on the control of fatigue in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on adherence to the program, which may result in significant and

  11. Schroth Physiotherapeutic Scoliosis-Specific Exercises Added to the Standard of Care Lead to Better Cobb Angle Outcomes in Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis – an Assessor and Statistician Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Eric C.; Khodayari Moez, Elham; Hedden, Douglas M.; Hill, Douglas L.; Moreau, Marc; Lou, Edmond; Watkins, Elise M.; Southon, Sarah C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The North American non-surgical standard of care for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) includes observation and bracing, but not exercises. Schroth physiotherapeutic scoliosis-specific exercises (PSSE) showed promise in several studies of suboptimal methodology. The Scoliosis Research Society calls for rigorous studies supporting the role of exercises before including it as a treatment recommendation for scoliosis. Objectives To determine the effect of a six-month Schroth PSSE intervention added to standard of care (Experimental group) on the Cobb angle compared to standard of care alone (Control group) in patients with AIS. Methods Fifty patients with AIS aged 10–18 years, with curves of 10°-45° and Risser grade 0–5 were recruited from a single pediatric scoliosis clinic and randomized to the Experimental or Control group. Outcomes included the change in the Cobb angles of the Largest Curve and Sum of Curves from baseline to six months. The intervention consisted of a 30–45 minute daily home program and weekly supervised sessions. Intention-to-treat and per protocol linear mixed effects model analyses are reported. Results In the intention-to-treat analysis, after six months, the Schroth group had significantly smaller Largest Curve than controls (-3.5°, 95% CI -1.1° to -5.9°, p = 0.006). Likewise, the between-group difference in the square root of the Sum of Curves was -0.40°, (95% CI -0.03° to -0.8°, p = 0.046), suggesting that an average patient with 51.2° at baseline, will have a 49.3° Sum of Curves at six months in the Schroth group, and 55.1° in the control group with the difference between groups increasing with severity. Per protocol analyses produced similar, but larger differences: Largest Curve = -4.1° (95% CI -1.7° to -6.5°, p = 0.002) and Sum of Curves=−0.5° (95% CI -0.8 to 0.2, p = 0.006). Conclusion Schroth PSSE added to the standard of care were superior compared to standard of care alone for reducing the

  12. Electrical alternans during rest and exercise as predictors of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, N. A. 3rd; Michaud, G.; Zipes, D. P.; El-Sherif, N.; Venditti, F. J.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Albrecht, P.; Wang, P. J.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    This investigation was performed to evaluate the feasibility of detecting repolarization alternans with the heart rate elevated with a bicycle exercise protocol. Sensitive spectral signal-processing techniques are able to detect beat-to-beat alternation of the amplitude of the T wave, which is not visible on standard electrocardiogram. Previous animal and human investigations using atrial or ventricular pacing have demonstrated that T-wave alternans is a marker of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. Using a spectral analysis technique incorporating noise reduction signal-processing software, we evaluated electrical alternans at rest and with the heart rate elevated during a bicycle exercise protocol. In this study we defined optimal criteria for electrical alternans to separate patients from those without inducible arrhythmias. Alternans and signal-averaged electrocardiographic results were compared with the results of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias as defined by induction of sustained ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation at electrophysiologic evaluation. In 27 patients alternans recorded at rest and with exercise had a sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 75%, and overall clinical accuracy of 80% (p <0.003). In this patient population the signal-averaged electrocardiogram was not a significant predictor of arrhythmia vulnerability. This is the first study to report that repolarization alternans can be detected with heart rate elevated with a bicycle exercise protocol. Alternans measured using this technique is an accurate predictor of arrhythmia inducibility.

  13. Improving post-stroke dysphagia outcomes through a standardized and multidisciplinary protocol: an exploratory cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Smania, Nicola; Bisoffi, Giulia; Squaquara, Teresa; Zuccher, Paola; Mazzucco, Sara

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is a major cause of dysphagia. Few studies to date have reported on standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approaches to the management of post-stroke dysphagia. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized multidisciplinary protocol on clinical outcomes in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. We performed retrospective chart reviews of patients with post-stroke dysphagia admitted to the neurological ward of Verona University Hospital from 2004 to 2008. Outcomes after usual treatment for dysphagia (T- group) were compared versus outcomes after treatment under a standardized diagnostic and rehabilitative multidisciplinary protocol (T+ group). Outcome measures were death, pneumonia on X-ray, need for respiratory support, and proportion of patients on tube feeding at discharge. Of the 378 patients admitted with stroke, 84 had dysphagia and were enrolled in the study. A significantly lower risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio [OR] 0.20 [0.53-0.78]), pneumonia (OR 0.33 [0.10-1.03]), need for respiratory support (OR 0.48 [0.14-1.66]), and tube feeding at discharge (OR 0.30 [0.09-0.91]) was recorded for the T+ group (N = 39) as compared to the T- group (N = 45). The adjusted OR showed no difference between the two groups for in-hospital death and tube feeding at discharge. Use of a standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approach to the management of post-stroke dysphagia may significantly reduce rates of aspiration pneumonia, in-hospital mortality, and tube feeding in dysphagic stroke survivors. Consistent with the study's exploratory purposes, our findings suggest that the multidisciplinary protocol applied in this study offers an effective model of management of post-stroke dysphagia.

  14. Writing standard operating procedures (SOPs) for cryostorage protocols: using shoot meristem cryopreservation as an example.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith; Benson, Erica E

    2015-01-01

    Standard operating procedures are a systematic way of making sure that biopreservation processes, tasks, protocols, and operations are correctly and consistently performed. They are the basic documents of biorepository quality management systems and are used in quality assurance, control, and improvement. Methodologies for constructing workflows and writing standard operating procedures and work instructions are described using a plant cryopreservation protocol as an example. This chapter is pertinent to other biopreservation sectors because how methods are written, interpreted, and implemented can affect the quality of storage outcomes.

  15. Effect of Exercise Intensity and Duration on Postexercise Executive Function.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hayato; Takenaka, Saki; Suga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Daichi; Takeuchi, Tatsuya; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Isaka, Tadao; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    The effect of exercise volume represented by exercise intensity and duration on postexercise executive function (EF) improvement remains unclear. In the present study, involving two volume-controlled evaluations, we aimed to compare acute exercise protocols with differing intensities and durations to establish an effective exercise protocol for improving EF. In study 1, 12 healthy male subjects performed cycle ergometer exercise, based on a low-intensity (LI) protocol for 20 min (LI20), moderate-intensity (MI) protocol for 20 min (MI20), and MI20 volume-matched LI protocol for 40 min (LI40). The exercise intensities for the LI and MI were set at 30% and 60% of peak oxygen consumption, respectively. In study 2, 15 healthy male subjects performed MI exercise for 10 min (MI10), MI20, and 40 min (MI40). To evaluate the EF, the color-word Stroop task was administrated before exercise, immediately after exercise, and during the 30-min postexercise recovery. In study 1, postexercise EF improvement was sustained for a longer duration after MI20 than after LI40 and was sustained for a longer duration after LI40 than after LI20. In study 2, although there was no significant difference in post-MI exercise EF improvement, the magnitude of difference in the EF between preexercise and 30-min postexercise recovery period was moderately larger in MI40, but not in MI10 and MI20, indicating that the EF improvement during postexercise recovery could be sustained after MI40. The present findings showed that postexercise EF improvement could be prolonged after MI exercise with a moderate duration compared with volume-matched LI exercise with a longer duration. In addition, MI exercise with a relatively long duration may slightly prolong the postexercise EF improvement.

  16. Physical exercise reduces pyruvate carboxylase (PCB) and contributes to hyperglycemia reduction in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Vitor Rosetto; Gaspar, Rafael Calais; Crisol, Barbara Moreira; Formigari, Guilherme Pedron; Sant'Ana, Marcella Ramos; Botezelli, José Diego; Gaspar, Rodrigo Stellzer; da Silva, Adelino S R; Cintra, Dennys Esper; de Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2018-07-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of exercise training on pyruvate carboxylase protein (PCB) levels in hepatic tissue and glucose homeostasis control in obese mice. Swiss mice were distributed into three groups: control mice (CTL), fed a standard rodent chow; diet-induced obesity (DIO), fed an obesity-inducing diet; and a third group, which also received an obesity-inducing diet, but was subjected to an exercise training protocol (DIO + EXE). Protocol training was carried out for 1 h/d, 5 d/wk, for 8 weeks, performed at an intensity of 60% of exhaustion velocity. An insulin tolerance test (ITT) was performed in the last experimental week. Twenty-four hours after the last physical exercise session, the animals were euthanized and the liver was harvested for molecular analysis. Firstly, DIO mice showed increased epididymal fat and serum glucose and these results were accompanied by increased PCB and decreased p-Akt in hepatic tissue. On the other hand, physical exercise was able to increase the performance of the mice and attenuate PCB levels and hyperglycemia in DIO + EXE mice. The above findings show that physical exercise seems to be able to regulate hyperglycemia in obese mice, suggesting the participation of PCB, which was enhanced in the obese condition and attenuated after a treadmill running protocol. This is the first study to be aimed at the role of exercise training in hepatic PCB levels, which may be a novel mechanism that can collaborate to reduce the development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes in DIO mice.

  17. An inter- laboratory proficiency testing exercise for rabies diagnosis in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo, Alfonso; Freire de Carvalho, Mary H.; Orciari, Lillian A.; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Ellison, James A.; Greenberg, Lauren; Yager, Pamela A.; Green, Douglas B.; Vigilato, Marco A.; Cosivi, Ottorino; Del Rio-Vilas, Victor J.

    2017-01-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody test (DFA), is performed in all rabies reference laboratories across Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Despite DFA being a critical capacity in the control of rabies, there is not a standardized protocol in the region. We describe the results of the first inter-laboratory proficiency exercise of national rabies laboratories in LAC countries as part of the regional efforts towards dog-maintained rabies elimination in the American region. Twenty three laboratories affiliated to the Ministries of Health and Ministries of Agriculture participated in this exercise. In addition, the laboratories completed an online questionnaire to assess laboratory practices. Answers to the online questionnaire indicated large variability in the laboratories throughput, equipment used, protocols availability, quality control standards and biosafety requirements. Our results will inform actions to improve and harmonize laboratory rabies capacities across LAC in support for the regional efforts towards elimination of dog-maintained rabies. PMID:28369139

  18. Home exercise programmes supported by video and automated reminders compared with standard paper-based home exercise programmes in patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Emmerson, Kellie B; Harding, Katherine E; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether patients with stroke receiving rehabilitation for upper limb deficits using smart technology (video and reminder functions) demonstrate greater adherence to prescribed home exercise programmes and better functional outcomes when compared with traditional paper-based exercise prescription. Randomized controlled trial comparing upper limb home exercise programmes supported by video and automated reminders on smart technology, with standard paper-based home exercise programmes. A community rehabilitation programme within a large metropolitan health service. Patients with stroke with upper limb deficits, referred for outpatient rehabilitation. Participants were randomly assigned to the control (paper-based home exercise programme) or intervention group (home exercise programme filmed on an electronic tablet, with an automated reminder). Both groups completed their prescribed home exercise programme for four weeks. The primary outcome was adherence using a self-reported log book. Secondary outcomes were change in upper limb function and patient satisfaction. A total of 62 participants were allocated to the intervention ( n = 30) and control groups ( n = 32). There were no differences between the groups for measures of adherence (mean difference 2%, 95% CI -12 to 17) or change in the Wolf Motor Function Test log transformed time (mean difference 0.02 seconds, 95% CI -0.1 to 0.1). There were no between-group differences in how participants found instructions ( p = 0.452), whether they remembered to do their exercises ( p = 0.485), or whether they enjoyed doing their exercises ( p = 0.864). The use of smart technology was not superior to standard paper-based home exercise programmes for patients recovering from stroke. This trial design was registered prospectively with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register, ID: ACTRN 12613000786796. http://www.anzctr.org.au/trialSearch.aspx.

  19. Supine Lower Body Negative Pressure Exercise Maintains Upright Exercise Capacity in Male Twins during 30 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Boda, Wanda L.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Macias, Brandon R.; Meyer, R. Scott; Hargens, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    Exercise capacity is reduced following both short and long duration exposures to microgravity. We have shown previously that supine lower body negative pressure with exercise (LBNP(sub ex) maintains upright exercise capacity in men after 5d and 15d bed rest, as a simulation of microgravity. We hypothesized that LBNP(sub ex) would protect upright exercise capacity (VO2pk) and sprint performance in eight sets of identical male twins during a 30-d bed rest. Twins within each set were randomly assigned to either a control group (CON) who performed no exercise or to an exercise group (EX) who performed a 40-min interval (40-80% pre-BR VO2pk) LBNP(sub ex) (55+/-4 mmHg) exercise protocol, plus 5 min of resting LBNP, 6 d/wk. LBNP produced footward force equivalent to 1.0- 1.2 times body weight. Pre- and post-bed rest, subjects completed an upright graded exercise test to volitional fatigue and sprint test of 30.5 m. After bed rest, VO2pk was maintained in the EX subjects (-3+/-3%), but was significantly decreased in the CON subjects (-24+/-4%). Sprint time also was increased in the CON subjects (24+/-8%), but maintained in the EX group (8+/-2%). The performance of a supine, interval exercise protocol with LBNP maintains upright exercise capacity and sprint performance during 30 d of bed rest. This exercise countermeasure protocol may help prevent microgravity-induced deconditioning during long duration space flight.

  20. High-intensity interval training evokes larger serum BDNF levels compared with intense continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Saucedo Marquez, Cinthia Maria; Vanaudenaerde, Bart; Troosters, Thierry; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-15

    Exercise can have a positive effect on the brain by activating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-related processes. In healthy humans there appears to be a linear relationship between exercise intensity and the positive short-term effect of acute exercise on BDNF levels (i.e., the highest BDNF levels are reported after high-intensity exercise protocols). Here we performed two experiments to test the effectiveness of two high-intensity exercise protocols, both known to improve cardiovascular health, to determine whether they have a similar efficacy in affecting BDNF levels. Participants performed a continuous exercise (CON) protocol at 70% of maximal work rate and a high-intensity interval-training (HIT) protocol at 90% of maximal work rate for periods of 1 min alternating with 1 min of rest (both protocols lasted 20 min). We observed similar BDNF kinetics in both protocols, with maximal BDNF concentrations being reached toward the end of training (experiment 1). We then showed that both exercise protocols significantly increase BDNF levels compared with a rest condition (CON P = 0.04; HIT P < 0.001), with HIT reaching higher BDNF levels than CON (P = 0.035) (experiment 2). These results suggest that shorter bouts of high intensity exercise are slightly more effective than continuous high-intensity exercise for elevating serum BDNF. Additionally, 73% of the participants preferred the HIT protocol (P = 0.02). Therefore, we suggest that the HIT protocol might represent an effective and preferred intervention for elevating BDNF levels and potentially promoting brain health. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation in individuals with obesity.

    PubMed

    Dandanell, Sune; Præst, Charlotte Boslev; Søndergård, Stine Dam; Skovborg, Camilla; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2017-04-01

    Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and the exercise intensity that elicits MFO (Fat Max ) are commonly determined by indirect calorimetry during graded exercise tests in both obese and normal-weight individuals. However, no protocol has been validated in individuals with obesity. Thus, the aims were to develop a graded exercise protocol for determination of Fat Max in individuals with obesity, and to test validity and inter-method reliability. Fat oxidation was assessed over a range of exercise intensities in 16 individuals (age: 28 (26-29) years; body mass index: 36 (35-38) kg·m -2 ; 95% confidence interval) on a cycle ergometer. The graded exercise protocol was validated against a short continuous exercise (SCE) protocol, in which Fat Max was determined from fat oxidation at rest and during 10 min of continuous exercise at 35%, 50%, and 65% of maximal oxygen uptake. Intraclass and Pearson correlation coefficients between the protocols were 0.75 and 0.72 and within-subject coefficient of variation (CV) was 5 (3-7)%. A Bland-Altman plot revealed a bias of -3% points of maximal oxygen uptake (limits of agreement: -12 to 7). A tendency towards a systematic difference (p = 0.06) was observed, where Fat Max occurred at 42 (40-44)% and 45 (43-47)% of maximal oxygen uptake with the graded and the SCE protocol, respectively. In conclusion, there was a high-excellent correlation and a low CV between the 2 protocols, suggesting that the graded exercise protocol has a high inter-method reliability. However, considerable intra-individual variation and a trend towards systematic difference between the protocols reveal that further optimization of the graded exercise protocol is needed to improve validity.

  2. The effects of rest interval length manipulation of the first upper-body resistance exercise in sequence on acute performance of subsequent exercises in men and women.

    PubMed

    Ratamess, Nicholas A; Chiarello, Christina M; Sacco, Anthony J; Hoffman, Jay R; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Ross, Ryan E; Kang, Jie

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of manipulating rest interval (RI) length of the first upper-body exercise in sequence on subsequent resistance exercise performance. Twenty-two men and women with at least 1 year of resistance training experience performed resistance exercise protocols on 3 occasions in random order. Each protocol consisted of performing 4 barbell upper-body exercises in the same sequence (bench press, incline bench press, shoulder press, and bent-over row) for 3 sets of up to 10 repetitions with 75% of 1 repetition maximum. Bench press RIs were 1, 2, or 3 minutes, whereas other exercises were performed with a standard 2-minute rest interval. The number of repetitions completed, average power, and velocity for each set of each exercise were recorded. Gender differences were observed during the bench press and incline press as women performed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) more repetitions than men during all RIs. The magnitude of decline in velocity and power over 3 sets of the bench press and incline press was significantly higher in men than women. Manipulation of RI length during the bench press did not affect performance of the remaining exercises in men. However, significantly more repetitions were performed by women during the first set of the incline press using 3-minute rest interval than 1-minute rest interval. In men and women, performance of the incline press and shoulder press was compromised compared with baseline performances. Manipulation of RI length of the first exercise affected performance of only the first set of 1 subsequent exercise in women. All RIs led to comparable levels of fatigue in men, indicating that reductions in load are necessary for subsequent exercises performed in sequence that stress similar agonist muscle groups when 10 repetitions are desired.

  3. Study protocol: EXERcise and cognition in sedentary adults with early-ONset dementia (EXERCISE-ON).

    PubMed

    Hooghiemstra, Astrid M; Eggermont, Laura H P; Scheltens, Philip; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Bakker, Jet; de Greef, Mathieu H G; Koppe, Peter A; Scherder, Erik J A

    2012-08-16

    Although the development of early-onset dementia is a radical and invalidating experience for both patient and family there are hardly any non-pharmacological studies that focus on this group of patients. One type of a non-pharmacological intervention that appears to have a beneficial effect on cognition in older persons without dementia and older persons at risk for dementia is exercise. In view of their younger age early-onset dementia patients may be well able to participate in an exercise program. The main aim of the EXERCISE-ON study is to assess whether exercise slows down the progressive course of the symptoms of dementia. One hundred and fifty patients with early-onset dementia are recruited. After completion of the baseline measurements, participants living within a 50 kilometre radius to one of the rehabilitation centres are randomly assigned to either an aerobic exercise program in a rehabilitation centre or a flexibility and relaxation program in a rehabilitation centre. Both programs are applied three times a week during 3 months. Participants living outside the 50 kilometre radius are included in a feasibility study where participants join in a daily physical activity program set at home making use of pedometers. Measurements take place at baseline (entry of the study), after three months (end of the exercise program) and after six months (follow-up). Primary outcomes are cognitive functioning; psychomotor speed and executive functioning; (instrumental) activities of daily living, and quality of life. Secondary outcomes include physical, neuropsychological, and rest-activity rhythm measures. The EXERCISE-ON study is the first study to offer exercise programs to patients with early-onset dementia. We expect this study to supply evidence regarding the effects of exercise on the symptoms of early-onset dementia, influencing quality of life. The present study is registered within The Netherlands National Trial Register (ref: NTR2124).

  4. Exercise with vibration dumb-bell enhances neuromuscular excitability measured using TMS.

    PubMed

    Fowler, D E; Tok, M I; Colakoğlu, M; Bademkiran, F; Colakoğlu, Z

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of exercise without vibration and exercise with vibration (27 Hz) on the cortical silent period (CSP) and cortical motor threshold (CMT) measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In 22 university athletes, a circular coil attached to a TMS stimulator was applied over the contralateral motor cortex of the target forearm. Resting cortical motor thresholds for dominant and non-dominant extremities were measured for each participant. Then, 15 biceps curls (15 flexion and 15 extension movements) were performed with the dominant arm using a single vibration dumbbell with the vibration turned off. On a different day, the same biceps curl protocol was performed with the dumbbell vibrating at 27 Hz (2 mm amplitude). A supra-threshold TMS stimulus (1.5x CMT) was delivered while participants were voluntarily contracting the flexor digitorum sublimus muscle (30% MVC grip strength) to determine cortical silent periods before and after each upper extremity exercise protocol. Cortical motor thresholds were measured at rest and after the vibration exercise protocol. All subjects completed the study protocol as designed. After TMS, the CSP in the dominant (exercised) extremities increased after exercise without vibration from a resting (pre-exercise) mean of 57.3 ms to 70.4 ms (P<0.05) and after exercise with vibration, the CSP decreased to a mean of 49.4 ms (P<0.02). The CSP in the non-dominant (unexercised) extremities decreased from resting values of 75.6 ms to 69.3 ms (P=0.935) after the exercise-only protocol and decreased to 49.4 ms (P<0.01) after the vibration exercise protocol. The cortical motor threshold in exercised extremities decreased from a resting mean of 41.4 μV to a postvibration exercise mean of 38.6 μV (P<0.01). In non-exercised extremities, the CMT also decreased, from mean of 43.5 μV to 39.9 μV after the vibration-exercise (P<0.01). Vibration exercise enhances bilateral corticospinal

  5. Evaluation of a standard provision versus an autonomy promotive exercise referral programme: rationale and study design.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Kate; Duda, Joan L; Daley, Amanda; Eves, Frank F; Mutrie, Nanette; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Rouse, Peter C; Lodhia, Rekha; Williams, Geoffrey C

    2009-06-08

    The National Institute of Clinical Excellence in the UK has recommended that the effectiveness of ongoing exercise referral schemes to promote physical activity should be examined in research trials. Recent empirical evidence in health care and physical activity promotion contexts provides a foundation for testing the utility of a Self Determination Theory (SDT)-based exercise referral consultation. An exploratory cluster randomised controlled trial comparing standard provision exercise on prescription with a Self Determination Theory-based (SDT) exercise on prescription intervention. 347 people referred to the Birmingham Exercise on Prescription scheme between November 2007 and July 2008. The 13 exercise on prescription sites in Birmingham were randomised to current practice (n = 7) or to the SDT-based intervention (n = 6).Outcomes measured at 3 and 6-months: Minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity per week assessed using the 7-day Physical Activity Recall; physical health: blood pressure and weight; health status measured using the Dartmouth CO-OP charts; anxiety and depression measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and vitality measured by the subjective vitality score; motivation and processes of change: perceptions of autonomy support from the advisor, satisfaction of the needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness via physical activity, and motivational regulations for exercise. This trial will determine whether an exercise referral programme based on Self Determination Theory increases physical activity and other health outcomes compared to a standard programme and will test the underlying SDT-based process model (perceived autonomy support, need satisfaction, motivation regulations, outcomes) via structural equation modelling. The trial is registered as Current Controlled trials ISRCTN07682833.

  6. Experimental protocol of a randomized controlled clinical trial investigating the effects of personalized exercise rehabilitation on kidney transplant recipients' outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kastelz, Alexandra; Tzvetanov, Ivo G; Fernhall, Bo; Shetty, Aneesha; Gallon, Lorenzo; West-Thielke, Patricia; Hachaj, Greg; Grazman, Mark; Benedetti, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    This randomized controlled trial (RCT) will investigate the effects of a personalized exercise rehabilitation regimen on return to work and find work rate, vascular health, functional capacity, quality of life, kidney function, and body composition in kidney transplant (KT) recipients. This RCT will recruit 120 men and/or women who have had a KT to participate in a 12 month exercise intervention or control (standard clinical care only) group. The 12 month exercise intervention will consist of one-on-one, progressive exercise rehabilitation sessions twice a week, for 60 min each session. The control group will continue standard clinical care as recommended by their post-transplant medical team without any intervention. The primary outcomes will be assessments of vascular structure and function, walking and strength measures to assess functional capacity, blood markers to assess kidney function, questionnaires to assess quality of life, DXA body scan to assess body composition, and a 1-week free living physical activity assessment. Additionally, employment status will be assessed. These assessments will be performed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. This investigation will increase the understanding of the role exercise rehabilitation has on managing the physiological and psychological health of the individual as well as on the individual's personal economic impact (via employment status). This study design has the potential to assist in constructing an effective exercise rehabilitation program that can be incorporated into part of standard post-transplant care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Exercise and reproductive function in polycystic ovary syndrome: protocol of a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Isis Kelly; de Lima Nunes, Romilson; Soares, Gustavo Mafaldo; de Oliveira Maranhão, Tecia Maria; Dantas, Paulo Moreira Silva

    2017-12-22

    Although many post-participation outcomes in different types of physical training (e.g., aerobic and strength) have been previously investigated for the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome, there is no recent systematic review of the relationship between various types of intervention and the reproductive function of women with PCOS. The current paper describes a systematic review protocol on the benefits of physical exercise and dietary or drug interventions on endocrinological outcomes in women with PCOS. PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Direct, Bireme, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest, Cochrane Library (Cochrane Systematic Reviews Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Studies (CENTRAL) databases will be searched. Studies randomized controlled trials reporting on intervening changes in exercise interventions with or without interventions compared such as diet, medication and acupuncture on the menstrual cycle, and fertility in women with PCOS will be included. Results will be on the decrease of the characteristics of hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance, and obesity. Studies published since 2010 and in the English language will be included. This systematic review will identify improvement strategies and types of interventions that are geared toward improving endocrine and consequently metabolic parameters. Thus, the use of such strategies may increase the types of low-cost non-drug therapies that aid in the treatment of PCOS. PROSPERO CRD42017058869.

  8. The effects of exercise during pregnancy on the newborn’s brain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that an active lifestyle is beneficial for cognition in children, adults and the elderly. Recently, studies using the rat animal model found that the pups of mothers who exercised during pregnancy had increased hippocampal neurogenesis and better memory and learning abilities. The aim of this report is to present the experimental protocol of a study that is designed to verify if an active lifestyle during pregnancy in humans has an impact on the newborn's brain. Methods 60 pregnant women will be included in a randomized controlled study. The experimental group will be asked to exercise a minimum of 20 minutes three times per week, at a minimal intensity of 55% of their maximal aerobic capacity. The control group will not be exercising. The effect of exercise during pregnancy on the newborn's brain will be investigated 8 to 12 days postpartum by means of the mismatch negativity, a neurophysiological brain potential that is associated to auditory sensory memory. We hypothesize that children born to mothers who exercised during their pregnancy will present shorter latencies and larger mismatch negativity amplitudes, indicating more efficient auditory memory processes. Discussion As of September 2011, 17 women have joined the study. Preliminary results show that the experimental group are active 3.1 ± 0.9 days per week while the control group only exercise 0.8 ± 0.6 days per week. The results of this study will present insight on fetal neuroplasticity and will be a valuable tool for health professionals who wish to encourage pregnant women to exercise. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov registration: NTC01220778 PMID:22643160

  9. Swimming exercise enhances the hippocampal antioxidant status of female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Stone, Vinícius; Kudo, Karen Yurika; Marcelino, Thiago Beltram; August, Pauline Maciel; Matté, Cristiane

    2015-05-01

    Moderate exercise is known to have health benefits, while both sedentarism and strenuous exercise have pro-oxidant effects. In this study, we assessed the effect of moderate exercise on the antioxidant homeostasis of rats' hippocampi. Female Wistar rats were submitted to a 30-minute swimming protocol on 5 days a week, for 4 weeks. Control rats were immersed in water and carefully dried. Production of hippocampal reactive species, activity of antioxidant enzymes, and glutathione levels in these animals were determined up to 30 days after completion of the 4-week protocol. Production of reactive species and hippocampal glutathione levels were increased 1 day after completion of the 4-week protocol, and returned to control levels after 7 days. Antioxidant enzyme activities were increased both 1 day (catalase) and 7 days (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) after completion of the protocol. Thirty days after completion of the protocol, none of the antioxidant parameters evaluated differed from those of controls. Our results reinforce the benefits of aerobic exercise, which include positive modulation of antioxidant homeostasis in the hippocampi. The effects of exercise are not permanent; rather, an exercise regimen must be continued in order to maintain the neurometabolic adaptations.

  10. Study protocol: EXERcise and Cognition In Sedentary adults with Early-ONset dementia (EXERCISE-ON)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the development of early-onset dementia is a radical and invalidating experience for both patient and family there are hardly any non-pharmacological studies that focus on this group of patients. One type of a non-pharmacological intervention that appears to have a beneficial effect on cognition in older persons without dementia and older persons at risk for dementia is exercise. In view of their younger age early-onset dementia patients may be well able to participate in an exercise program. The main aim of the EXERCISE-ON study is to assess whether exercise slows down the progressive course of the symptoms of dementia. Methods/Design One hundred and fifty patients with early-onset dementia are recruited. After completion of the baseline measurements, participants living within a 50 kilometre radius to one of the rehabilitation centres are randomly assigned to either an aerobic exercise program in a rehabilitation centre or a flexibility and relaxation program in a rehabilitation centre. Both programs are applied three times a week during 3 months. Participants living outside the 50 kilometre radius are included in a feasibility study where participants join in a daily physical activity program set at home making use of pedometers. Measurements take place at baseline (entry of the study), after three months (end of the exercise program) and after six months (follow-up). Primary outcomes are cognitive functioning; psychomotor speed and executive functioning; (instrumental) activities of daily living, and quality of life. Secondary outcomes include physical, neuropsychological, and rest-activity rhythm measures. Discussion The EXERCISE-ON study is the first study to offer exercise programs to patients with early-onset dementia. We expect this study to supply evidence regarding the effects of exercise on the symptoms of early-onset dementia, influencing quality of life. Trial registration The present study is registered within The Netherlands

  11. Acute effects of high-intensity interval, resistance or combined exercise protocols on testosterone - cortisol responses in inactive overweight individuals.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Orjuela, Gina P; Domínguez-Sanchéz, María A; Hernández, Enrique; Correa-Bautista, Jorge E; Triana-Reina, Héctor R; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Peña-Ibagon, Jhonatan C; Izquierdo, Mikel; Cadore, Eduardo L; Hackney, Anthony C; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2018-06-22

    The purpose of this study was to compare the hormonal responses to one session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 4 × 4 min intervals at 85-95% maximum heart rate [HRmax], interspersed with 4 min of recovery at 75-85% HRmax), resistance training (RT at 50-70% of one repetition maximum 12-15 repetitions per set with 60s of recovery) or both (HIIT+RT) exercise protocol in a cohort of physical inactivity, overweight adults (age 18-30 years old). Randomized, parallel-group clinical trial among fifty-one men (23.6 ± 3.5 yr; 83.5 ± 7.8 kg; 28.0 ± 1.9 kg/m2), physical inactivity (i.e., <150 min of moderate-intensity exercise per week for >6 months), with abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥90 cm) or body mass index ≥25 and ≤30 kg/m 2 were randomized to the following 4 groups: high-intensity interval training (HIIT, n = 14), resistance training (RT, n = 12), combined high-intensity interval and resistance training (HIIT+RT, n = 13), or non-exercising control (CON, n = 12). Cortisol, total- and free-testosterone and total-testosterone/cortisol-ratio (T/C) assessments (all in serum) were determined before (pre) and 1-min post-exercise for each protocol session. Decreases in cortisol levels were -57.08 (95%CI, -75.58 to -38.58; P = 0.001; ɳ 2  = 0.61) and - 37.65 (95%CI, -54.36 to -20.93; P = 0.001; ɳ 2  = 0.51) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. Increases in T/C ratio were 0.022 (95%CI, 0.012 to 0.031; P = 0.001; ɳ 2  = 0.49) and 0.015 (95%CI, 0.004 to 0.025; P = 0.007; ɳ 2  = 0.29) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. In per-protocol analyses revealed a significant change in cortisol levels [interaction effect F( 7.777 ), ɳ 2  = 0.33] and T/C ratio [interaction effect F( 5.298 ), ɳ 2  = 0.25] between groups over time. Additionally, we showed that in both the intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol analyses, HIIT+RT did not change

  12. Acute effects of various weighted bat warm-up protocols on bat velocity.

    PubMed

    Reyes, G Francis; Dolny, Dennis

    2009-10-01

    Although research has provided evidence of increased muscular performance following a facilitation set of resistance exercise, this has not been established for use prior to measuring baseball bat velocity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of selected weighted bat warm-up protocols to enhance bat velocity in collegiate baseball players. Nineteen collegiate baseball players (age = 20.15 +/- 1.46 years) were tested for upper-body strength by a 3-repetition maximum (RM) bench press (mean = 97.98 +/- 14.54 kg) and mean bat velocity. Nine weighted bat warm-up protocols, utilizing 3 weighted bats (light = 794 g; standard = 850 g; heavy = 1,531 g) were swung in 3 sets of 6 repetitions in different orders. A control trial involved the warm-up protocol utilizing only the standard bat. Pearson product correlation revealed a significant relationship between 3RM strength and pretest bat velocity (r = 0.51, p = 0.01). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed no significant treatment effects of warm-up protocol on bat velocity. However, the order of standard, light, heavy bat sequence resulted in the greatest increase in bat velocity (+6.03%). These results suggest that upper-body muscle strength influences bat velocity. It appears that the standard, light, heavy warm-up order may provide the greatest benefit to increase subsequent bat velocity and may warrant use in game situations.

  13. Aerobic vs. resistance exercise in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hashida, Ryuki; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Bekki, Masafumi; Omoto, Masayuki; Matsuse, Hiroo; Nago, Takeshi; Takano, Yoshio; Ueno, Takato; Koga, Hironori; George, Jacob; Shiba, Naoto; Torimura, Takuji

    2017-01-01

    Exercise is a first-line therapy for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We sought to: 1) summarize effective aerobic and resistance exercise protocols for NAFLD; and 2) compare the effects and energy consumption of aerobic and resistance exercises. A literature search was performed using PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopas to January 28, 2016. From a total of 95 articles, 23 studies including 24 aerobic and 7 resistance exercise protocols were selected for the summary of exercise protocols. Twelve articles including 13 aerobic and 4 resistance exercise protocols were selected for the comparative analysis. For aerobic exercise, the median effective protocol was 4.8 metabolic equivalents (METs) for 40min/session, 3times/week for 12weeks. For resistance exercise, the median effective protocol was 3.5 METs for 45min/session, 3times/week for 12weeks. Aerobic and resistance exercise improved hepatic steatosis. No significant difference was seen in the duration, frequency, or period of exercise between the two exercise groups; however, %VO 2 max and energy consumption were significantly lower in the resistance than in the aerobic group (50% [45-98] vs. 28% [28-28], p=0.0034; 11,064 [6394-21,087] vs. 6470 [4104-12,310] kcal/total period, p=0.0475). Resistance exercise improves NAFLD with less energy consumption. Thus, resistance exercise may be more feasible than aerobic exercise for NAFLD patients with poor cardiorespiratory fitness or for those who cannot tolerate or participate in aerobic exercise. These data may indicate a possible link between resistance exercise and lipid metabolism in the liver. Both aerobic and resistance exercise reduce hepatic steatosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with similar frequency, duration, and period of exercise (40-45min/session 3times/week for 12weeks); however, the two forms of exercise have different characteristics. Intensity and energy consumption were significantly lower for resistance than for

  14. Running exercise strengthens the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Quittner, Matthew J.; Ridgers, Nicola; Ling, Yuan; Connell, David; Rantalainen, Timo

    2017-01-01

    There is currently no evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) can respond positively to exercise in humans. Some authors have argued that IVD metabolism in humans is too slow to respond anabolically to exercise within the human lifespan. Here we show that chronic running exercise in men and women is associated with better IVD composition (hydration and proteoglycan content) and with IVD hypertrophy. Via quantitative assessment of physical activity we further find that accelerations at fast walking and slow running (2 m/s), but not high-impact tasks, lower intensity walking or static positions, correlated to positive IVD characteristics. These findings represent the first evidence in humans that exercise can be beneficial for the IVD and provide support for the notion that specific exercise protocols may improve IVD material properties in the spine. We anticipate that our findings will be a starting point to better define exercise protocols and physical activity profiles for IVD anabolism in humans. PMID:28422125

  15. Nitric oxide contributes to the augmented vasodilatation during hypoxic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Darren P; Madery, Brandon D; Curry, Timothy B; Eisenach, John H; Wilkins, Brad W; Joyner, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that (1) nitric oxide (NO) contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilatation during hypoxic exercise and (2) the combined inhibition of NO production and adenosine receptor activation would attenuate the augmented vasodilatation during hypoxic exercise more than NO inhibition alone. In separate protocols subjects performed forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n= 12), subjects received intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and the NO synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). In protocol 2 (n= 10), subjects received intra-arterial saline (control) and combined l-NMMA–aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist) administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; ml min−1 (100 mmHg)−1) was calculated from forearm blood flow (ml min−1) and blood pressure (mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (Δ from normoxic baseline) due to hypoxia under resting conditions and during hypoxic exercise was substantially lower with l-NMMA administration compared to saline (control; P < 0.01). In protocol 2, administration of combined l-NMMA–aminophylline reduced the ΔFVC due to hypoxic exercise compared to saline (control; P < 0.01). However, the relative reduction in ΔFVC compared to the respective control (saline) conditions was similar between l-NMMA only (protocol 1) and combined l-NMMA–aminophylline (protocol 2) at 10% (−17.5 ± 3.7 vs.−21.4 ± 5.2%; P= 0.28) and 20% (−13.4 ± 3.5 vs.−18.8 ± 4.5%; P= 0.18) hypoxic exercise. These findings suggest that NO contributes to the augmented vasodilatation observed during hypoxic exercise independent of adenosine. PMID:19948661

  16. Evaluation of a standard provision versus an autonomy promotive exercise referral programme: rationale and study design

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Kate; Duda, Joan L; Daley, Amanda; Eves, Frank F; Mutrie, Nanette; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Rouse, Peter C; Lodhia, Rekha; Williams, Geoffrey C

    2009-01-01

    Background The National Institute of Clinical Excellence in the UK has recommended that the effectiveness of ongoing exercise referral schemes to promote physical activity should be examined in research trials. Recent empirical evidence in health care and physical activity promotion contexts provides a foundation for testing the utility of a Self Determination Theory (SDT)-based exercise referral consultation. Methods/Design Design: An exploratory cluster randomised controlled trial comparing standard provision exercise on prescription with a Self Determination Theory-based (SDT) exercise on prescription intervention. Participants: 347 people referred to the Birmingham Exercise on Prescription scheme between November 2007 and July 2008. The 13 exercise on prescription sites in Birmingham were randomised to current practice (n = 7) or to the SDT-based intervention (n = 6). Outcomes measured at 3 and 6-months: Minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity per week assessed using the 7-day Physical Activity Recall; physical health: blood pressure and weight; health status measured using the Dartmouth CO-OP charts; anxiety and depression measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and vitality measured by the subjective vitality score; motivation and processes of change: perceptions of autonomy support from the advisor, satisfaction of the needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness via physical activity, and motivational regulations for exercise. Discussion This trial will determine whether an exercise referral programme based on Self Determination Theory increases physical activity and other health outcomes compared to a standard programme and will test the underlying SDT-based process model (perceived autonomy support, need satisfaction, motivation regulations, outcomes) via structural equation modelling. Trial registration The trial is registered as Current Controlled trials ISRCTN07682833. PMID:19505293

  17. Cardiorespiratory effects of water ingestion during and after exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In prolonged exercise, the state of hypohydration due to sweating raises physiological stress and induces a drop in sports performance. However, the impact of water intake in cardiorespiratory parameters when administered during and after physical activity has not been well studied. This study aimed to analyze the effects of water intake in heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), partial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and respiratory rate during and after prolonged exercise. Methods Thirty-one young males (21.55 ± 1.89 yr) performed three different protocols (48 h interval between each stage): I) maximal exercise test to determine the load for the protocols; II) Control protocol (CP) and; III) Experimental protocol (EP). The protocols consisted of 10 min at rest with the subject in the supine position, 90 min of treadmill exercise (60% of VO2 peak) and 60 min of rest placed in the dorsal decubitus position. No rehydration beverage consumption was allowed during CP. During EP, however, the subjects were given water (Vittalev, Spaipa, Brazil). The parameters HR, SBP, DBP, SpO2 and respiratory rate were measured at the end of the rest, in 30, 60 and 90 minutes of the activity, except the respiratory rate parameter, and at 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minute post- exercise. Results The hydration protocol provided minimal changes in SBP and DBP and a smaller increase in HR and did not significantly affect SpO2 during exercise and better HR recovery, faster return of SBP and DBP and a better performance for SpO2 and respiratory rate post-exercise. Conclusion Hydration with water influenced the behavior of cardiorespiratory parameters in healthy young subjects. PMID:24059759

  18. Adenosine receptor antagonist and augmented vasodilation during hypoxic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Madery, Brandon D.; Pike, Tasha L.; Eisenach, John H.; Dietz, Niki M.; Joyner, Michael J.; Wilkins, Brad W.

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adenosine contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilation during hypoxic exercise. In separate protocols, subjects performed incremental rhythmic forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n = 8), subjects received an intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist). In protocol 2 (n = 10), subjects received intra-arterial phentolamine (α-adrenoceptor antagonist) and combined phentolamine and aminophylline administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml·min−1·100 mmHg−1) was calculated from forearm blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (ΔFVC; change from normoxic baseline) during hypoxic exercise with saline was 172 ± 29 and 314 ± 34 ml·min−1·100 mmHg−1 (10% and 20%, respectively). Aminophylline administration did not affect ΔFVC during hypoxic exercise at 10% (190 ± 29 ml·min−1·100 mmHg−1, P = 0.4) or 20% (287 ± 48 ml·min−1·100 mmHg−1, P = 0.3). In protocol 2, ΔFVC due to hypoxic exercise with phentolamine infusion was 313 ± 30 and 453 ± 41 ml·min−1·100 mmHg−1 (10% and 20% respectively). ΔFVC was similar at 10% (352 ± 39 ml·min−1·100 mmHg−1, P = 0.8) and 20% (528 ± 45 ml·min−1·100 mmHg−1, P = 0.2) hypoxic exercise with combined phentolamine and aminophylline. In contrast, ΔFVC to exogenous adenosine was reduced by aminophylline administration in both protocols (P < 0.05 for both). These observations suggest that adenosine receptor activation is not obligatory for the augmented hyperemia during hypoxic exercise in humans. PMID:19661449

  19. Behavior Intervention for Students with Externalizing Behavior Problems: Primary-Level Standard Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Gregory J.; Nelson, J. Ron; Sanders, Elizabeth A.; Ralston, Nicole C.

    2012-01-01

    This article examined the efficacy of a primary-level, standard-protocol behavior intervention for students with externalizing behavioral disorders. Elementary schools were randomly assigned to treatment (behavior intervention) or control (business as usual) conditions, and K-3 students were screened for externalizing behavior risk status. The…

  20. One-minute heart rate recovery after cycloergometer exercise testing as a predictor of mortality in a large cohort of exercise test candidates: substantial differences with the treadmill-derived parameter.

    PubMed

    Gaibazzi, Nicola; Petrucci, Nicola; Ziacchi, Vigilio

    2004-03-01

    Previous work showed a strong inverse association between 1-min heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercising on a treadmill and all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to determine whether the results could be replicated in a wide population of real-world exercise ECG candidates in our center, using a standard bicycle exercise test. Between 1991 and 1997, 1420 consecutive patients underwent ECG exercise testing performed according to our standard cycloergometer protocol. Three pre-specified cut-point values of 1-min HRR, derived from previous studies in the medical literature, were tested to see whether they could identify a higher-risk group for all-cause mortality; furthermore, we tested the possible association between 1-min HRR as a continuous variable and mortality using logistic regression. Both methods showed a lack of a statistically significant association between 1-min HRR and all-cause mortality. A weak trend toward an inverse association, although not statistically significant, could not be excluded. We could not validate the clear-cut results from some previous studies performed using the treadmill exercise test. The results in our study may only "not exclude" a mild inverse association between 1-min HRR measured after cycloergometer exercise testing and all-cause mortality. The 1-min HRR measured after cycloergometer exercise testing was not clinically useful as a prognostic marker.

  1. Evaluation of Vitamin D Standardization Program protocols for standardizing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D data: a case study of the program's potential for national nutrition and health surveys12345

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, Kevin D; Kiely, Mairead; Kinsella, Michael; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramón A; Tian, Lu; Zhang, Yue; Lucey, Alice; Flynn, Albert; Gibney, Michael J; Vesper, Hubert W; Phinney, Karen W; Coates, Paul M; Picciano, Mary F; Sempos, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing procedures of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] measurement in National Health/Nutrition Surveys to promote 25(OH)D measurements that are accurate and comparable over time, location, and laboratory procedure to improve public health practice. Objective: We applied VDSP protocols to existing ELISA-derived serum 25(OH)D data from the Irish National Adult Nutrition Survey (NANS) as a case-study survey and evaluated their effectiveness by comparison of the protocol-projected estimates with those from a reanalysis of survey serums by using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–tandem MS). Design: The VDSP reference system and protocols were applied to ELISA-based serum 25(OH)D data from the representative NANS sample (n = 1118). A reanalysis of 99 stored serums by using standardized LC–tandem MS and resulting regression equations yielded predicted standardized serum 25(OH)D values, which were then compared with LC–tandem MS reanalyzed values for all serums. Results: Year-round prevalence rates for serum 25(OH)D concentrations <30, <40, and <50 nmol/L were 6.5%, 21.9%, and 40.0%, respectively, via original ELISA measurements and 11.4%, 25.3%, and 43.7%, respectively, when VDSP protocols were applied. Differences in estimates at <30- and <40-nmol/L thresholds, but not at the <50-nmol/L threshold, were significant (P < 0.05). A reanalysis of all serums by using LC–tandem MS confirmed prevalence estimates as 11.2%, 27.2%, and 45.0%, respectively. Prevalences of serum 25(OH)D concentrations >125 nmol/L were 1.2%, 0.3%, and 0.6% by means of ELISA, VDSP protocols, and LC–tandem MS, respectively. Conclusion: VDSP protocols hold a major potential for national nutrition and health surveys in terms of the standardization of serum 25(OH)D data. PMID:23615829

  2. Anthropometric protocols for the construction of new international fetal and newborn growth standards: the INTERGROWTH-21st Project.

    PubMed

    Cheikh Ismail, L; Knight, H E; Bhutta, Z; Chumlea, W C

    2013-09-01

    The primary aim of the INTERGROWTH-21(st) Project is to construct new, prescriptive standards describing optimal fetal and preterm postnatal growth. The anthropometric measurements include the head circumference, recumbent length and weight of the infants, and the stature and weight of the parents. In such a large, international, multicentre project, it is critical that all study sites follow standardised protocols to ensure maximal validity of the growth and nutrition indicators used. This paper describes, in detail, the selection of anthropometric personnel, equipment, and measurement and calibration protocols used to construct the new standards. Implementing these protocols at each study site ensures that the anthropometric data are of the highest quality to construct the international standards. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  3. Protocol for Usability Testing and Validation of the ISO Draft International Standard 19223 for Lung Ventilators

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinicians, such as respiratory therapists and physicians, are often required to set up pieces of medical equipment that use inconsistent terminology. Current lung ventilator terminology that is used by different manufacturers contributes to the risk of usage errors, and in turn the risk of ventilator-associated lung injuries and other conditions. Human factors and communication issues are often associated with ventilator-related sentinel events, and inconsistent ventilator terminology compounds these issues. This paper describes our proposed protocol, which will be implemented at the University of Waterloo, Canada when this project is externally funded. Objective We propose to determine whether a standardized vocabulary improves the ease of use, safety, and utility as it relates to the usability of medical devices, compared to legacy medical devices from multiple manufacturers, which use different terms. Methods We hypothesize that usage errors by clinicians will be lower when standardization is consistently applied by all manufacturers. The proposed study will experimentally examine the impact of standardized nomenclature on performance declines in the use of an unfamiliar ventilator product in clinically relevant scenarios. Participants will be respiratory therapy practitioners and trainees, and we propose studying approximately 60 participants. Results The work reported here is in the proposal phase. Once the protocol is implemented, we will report the results in a follow-up paper. Conclusions The proposed study will help us better understand the effects of standardization on medical device usability. The study will also help identify any terms in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Draft International Standard (DIS) 19223 that may be associated with recurrent errors. Amendments to the standard will be proposed if recurrent errors are identified. This report contributes a protocol that can be used to assess the effect of

  4. Combining performance and outcome indicators can be used in a standardized way: a pilot study of two multidisciplinary, full-scale major aircraft exercises.

    PubMed

    Rådestad, Monica; Nilsson, Heléne; Castrén, Maaret; Svensson, Leif; Rüter, Anders; Gryth, Dan

    2012-08-28

    Disaster medicine is a fairly young scientific discipline and there is a need for the development of new methods for evaluation and research. This includes full-scale disaster exercisers. A standardized concept on how to evaluate these exercises, could lead to easier identification of pitfalls caused by system-errors in the organization. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a combination of performance and outcome indicators so that results can be compared in standardized full-scale exercises. Two multidisciplinary, full-scale exercises were studied in 2008 and 2010. The panorama had the same setup. Sets of performance indicators combined with indicators for unfavorable patient outcome were recorded in predesigned templates. Evaluators, all trained in a standardized way at a national disaster medicine centre, scored the results on predetermined locations; at the scene, at hospital and at the regional command and control. All data regarding the performance indicators of the participants during the exercises were obtained as well as all data regarding indicators for patient outcome. Both exercises could therefore be compared regarding performance (processes) as well as outcome indicators. The data from the performance indicators during the exercises showed higher scores for the prehospital command in the second exercise 15 points and 3 points respectively. Results from the outcome indicators, patient survival and patient complications, demonstrated a higher number of preventable deaths and a lower number of preventable complications in the exercise 2010. In the exercise 2008 the number of preventable deaths was lower and the number of preventable complications was higher. Standardized multidisciplinary, full-scale exercises in different settings can be conducted and evaluated with performance indicators combined with outcome indicators enabling results from exercises to be compared. If exercises are performed in a standardized way

  5. Exercise ASKARI SERPENT: enabling clinical data collection during exercises and operations to support future contingency planning and assurance of category-based reporting systems.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Iain T; Wheatley, R J; Carter, P

    2016-02-01

    Exercise ASKARI SERPENT (Ex AS) is a British Army exercise that provides primary healthcare (PHC) to Kenyan civilians in support of local health authorities. It is conducted in partnership with the Kenya Defence Force Medical Services (KDFMS). Accurate epidemiological data is critical in planning the exercise and for any future short-notice contingency operations in similar environments. This paper reports epidemiological data for Ex AS using a novel data collection system. PHC on Ex AS was delivered by trained and validated combat medical technicians (CMTs) using a set of Read-coded protocols. The CMTs were also directly supported and supervised by medical officers and nurses. A total of 3093 consultations were conducted over a 16-day period. Of these, 2707 (87.5%) consultations fell within the remit of the CMT protocols, with only 386 consultations (12.5%) being conducted exclusively by the medical officers or nurses. A Read-coded matrix built on CMT protocols is a simple and useful tool, particularly in civilian populations, for collecting morbidity data with the vast majority of conditions accounted for in the protocols. It is anticipated that such a system can better inform training, manning, medical material and pharmaceutical procurement than current category-based morbidity surveillance systems such as EPINATO (NATO epidemiological data). There is clear advantage to directly linking data capture to treatment algorithms. Accuracy, both in terms of numbers and condition, is likely improved. Data is also captured contemporaneously rather than after indeterminate time. Read coding has the added benefit of being an established electronic standard. In addition, the system would support traditional reporting methods such as EPINATO by providing increased assurance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Blood Flow After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Selkow, Noelle M.; Herman, Daniel C.; Liu, Zhenqi; Hertel, Jay; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The most common modality used to address acute inflammation is cryotherapy. Whereas pain decreases with cryotherapy, evidence that changes occur in perfusion of skeletal muscle is limited. We do not know whether ice attenuates the increases in perfusion associated with acute inflammation. Objective: To examine the effects of repeated applications of ice bags on perfusion of the gastrocnemius muscle after an eccentric exercise protocol. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eighteen healthy participants (3 men, 15 women; age = 22.2 ± 2.2 years, height = 166.0 ± 11.9 cm, mass = 69.4 ± 25.0 kg). Intervention(s): To induce eccentric muscle damage, participants performed 100 unilateral heel-lowering exercises off a step to the beat of a metronome. A randomized intervention (cryotherapy, sham, control) was applied to the exercised lower extremity immediately after the protocol and again at 10, 24, and 34 hours after the protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): Baseline perfusion measurements (blood volume, blood flow, and blood flow velocity) were taken using contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the exercised leg. Perfusion was reassessed after the first intervention and 48 hours after the protocol as percentage change scores. Pain was measured with a visual analog scale at baseline and at 10, 24, 34, and 48 hours after the protocol. Separate repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to assess each dependent variable. Results: We found no interactions among interventions for microvascular perfusion. Blood volume and blood flow, however, increased in all conditions at 48 hours after exercise (P < .001), and blood flow velocity decreased postintervention from baseline (P = .041). We found a time-by-intervention interaction for pain (P = .009). Visual analog scale scores were lower for the cryotherapy group than for the control group at 34 and 48 hours after exercise. Conclusions: Whereas eccentric muscle damage

  7. The French press: a repeatable and high-throughput approach to exercising zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Usui, Takuji; Noble, Daniel W A; O'Dea, Rose E; Fangmeier, Melissa L; Lagisz, Malgorzata; Hesselson, Daniel; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2018-01-01

    Zebrafish are increasingly used as a vertebrate model organism for various traits including swimming performance, obesity and metabolism, necessitating high-throughput protocols to generate standardized phenotypic information. Here, we propose a novel and cost-effective method for exercising zebrafish, using a coffee plunger and magnetic stirrer. To demonstrate the use of this method, we conducted a pilot experiment to show that this simple system provides repeatable estimates of maximal swim performance (intra-class correlation [ICC] = 0.34-0.41) and observe that exercise training of zebrafish on this system significantly increases their maximum swimming speed. We propose this high-throughput and reproducible system as an alternative to traditional linear chamber systems for exercising zebrafish and similarly sized fishes.

  8. Cardiovascular responses to plyometric exercise are affected by workload in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Arazi, Hamid; Mahdavi, Seyed Amir; Nasiri, Seyed Omid Mirfalah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction With regard to blood pressure responses to plyometric exercise and decreasing blood pressure after exercise (post-exercise hypotension), the influence of different workloads of plyometric exercise on blood pressure is not clear. Aim The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of a low, moderate and high workload of plyometric exercise on the post-exercise systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and rate-pressure product (RPP) responses in athletes. Material and methods Ten male athletes (age: 22.6 ±0.5 years; height: 178.2 ±3.3 cm; and body mass: 75.2 ±2.8 kg) underwent PE protocols involving 5 × 10 reps (Low Workload – LW), 10 × 10 reps (Moderate Workload – MW), and 15 × 10 reps (High Workload – HW) depth jump exercise from a 50-cm box in 3 non-consecutive days. After each exercise session, SBP, DBP and HR were measured every 10 min for a period of 70 min. Results No significant differences were observed among post-exercise SBP and DBP when the protocols (LW, MW and HW) were compared. The MW and HW protocols showed greater increases in HR compared with LW. Also the HW indicated greater increases than LW in RPP at post-exercise (p < 0.05). Conclusions All protocols increased SBP, HR and RPP responses at the 10th and 20th min of post-exercise. With regard to different workloads of plyometric exercise, HW condition indicated greater increases in HR and RPP and strength and conditioning professionals and athletes must keep in their mind that HW of plyometric exercise induces greater cardiovascular responses. PMID:24799919

  9. Cardiovascular responses to plyometric exercise are affected by workload in athletes.

    PubMed

    Arazi, Hamid; Asadi, Abbas; Mahdavi, Seyed Amir; Nasiri, Seyed Omid Mirfalah

    2014-01-01

    With regard to blood pressure responses to plyometric exercise and decreasing blood pressure after exercise (post-exercise hypotension), the influence of different workloads of plyometric exercise on blood pressure is not clear. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of a low, moderate and high workload of plyometric exercise on the post-exercise systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and rate-pressure product (RPP) responses in athletes. TEN MALE ATHLETES (AGE: 22.6 ±0.5 years; height: 178.2 ±3.3 cm; and body mass: 75.2 ±2.8 kg) underwent PE protocols involving 5 × 10 reps (Low Workload - LW), 10 × 10 reps (Moderate Workload - MW), and 15 × 10 reps (High Workload - HW) depth jump exercise from a 50-cm box in 3 non-consecutive days. After each exercise session, SBP, DBP and HR were measured every 10 min for a period of 70 min. No significant differences were observed among post-exercise SBP and DBP when the protocols (LW, MW and HW) were compared. The MW and HW protocols showed greater increases in HR compared with LW. Also the HW indicated greater increases than LW in RPP at post-exercise (p < 0.05). All protocols increased SBP, HR and RPP responses at the 10(th) and 20(th) min of post-exercise. With regard to different workloads of plyometric exercise, HW condition indicated greater increases in HR and RPP and strength and conditioning professionals and athletes must keep in their mind that HW of plyometric exercise induces greater cardiovascular responses.

  10. A randomized controlled crossover trial of the effect of ginseng consumption on the immune response to moderate exercise in healthy sedentary men.

    PubMed

    Biondo, Patricia D; Robbins, Sarah J; Walsh, Jennifer D; McCargar, Linda J; Harber, Vicki J; Field, Catherine J

    2008-10-01

    Ginseng is a popular herbal remedy that is reputed to increase resistance to stress and improve immune function. Regular exercise results in acute physiologic stress that affects the immune response. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of daily consumption of a standardized ginsenoside-containing North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) extract on immune function before, during, and after a moderate-exercise protocol in healthy sedentary men. Ten healthy males were randomized to receive either ginseng (1125 mg.d-1) or placebo for 35 days. After a 3 month washout period, subjects received the opposite treatment for another 35 days. An exercise test and blood collection were performed at the end of each treatment period. Immune parameters and blood hormone levels were measured before, during, and after the exercise stress protocol. Ginseng treatment reduced the peripheral blood concentration of CD8+ T cells and increased mitogen-stimulated T cell production of interleukin-2 ex vivo. Ginseng had no effect on total white blood cell counts; on concentrations of neutrophils, monocytes, or lymphocytes (CD3+, CD4+, CD16+, CD20+); on lymphocyte proliferation; or on neutrophil oxidative burst. Ginseng did not significantly affect exercise-induced changes in plasma concentrations of lactate, insulin, cortisol, or growth hormone. The consumption of ginseng for 5 weeks had a limited effect on the immune response to an acute exercise protocol.

  11. A framework for the definition of standardized protocols for measuring upper-extremity kinematics.

    PubMed

    Kontaxis, A; Cutti, A G; Johnson, G R; Veeger, H E J

    2009-03-01

    Increasing interest in upper extremity biomechanics has led to closer investigations of both segment movements and detailed joint motion. Unfortunately, conceptual and practical differences in the motion analysis protocols used up to date reduce compatibility for post data and cross validation analysis and so weaken the body of knowledge. This difficulty highlights a need for standardised protocols, each addressing a set of questions of comparable content. The aim of this work is therefore to open a discussion and propose a flexible framework to support: (1) the definition of standardised protocols, (2) a standardised description of these protocols, and (3) the formulation of general recommendations. Proposal of a framework for the definition of standardized protocols. The framework is composed by two nested flowcharts. The first defines what a motion analysis protocol is by pointing out its role in a motion analysis study. The second flowchart describes the steps to build a protocol, which requires decisions on the joints or segments to be investigated and the description of their mechanical equivalent model, the definition of the anatomical or functional coordinate frames, the choice of marker or sensor configuration and the validity of their use, the definition of the activities to be measured and the refinements that can be applied to the final measurements. Finally, general recommendations are proposed for each of the steps based on the current literature, and open issues are highlighted for future investigation and standardisation. Standardisation of motion analysis protocols is urgent. The proposed framework can guide this process through the rationalisation of the approach.

  12. Protocols for hyperlactatemia induction in the lactate minimum test adapted to swimming rats.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Gustavo Gomes; Papoti, Marcelo; Manchado, Fúlvia de Barros; de Mello, Maria Alice Rostom; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2007-12-01

    The lactate minimum test (LACmin) has been considered an important indicator of endurance exercise capacity and a single session protocol can predict the maximal steady state lactate (MLSS). The objective of this study was to determine the best swimming protocol to induce hyperlactatemia in order to assure the LACmin in rats (Rattus norvegicus), standardized to four different protocols (P) of lactate elevation. The protocols were P1: 6 min of intermittent jumping exercise in water (load of 50% of the body weight - bw); P2: two 13% bw load swimming bouts until exhaustion (tlim); P3: one tlim 13% bw load swimming bout; and P4: two 13% bw load swimming bouts (1st 30 s, 2nd to tlim), separated by a 30 s interval. The incremental phase of LACmin beginning with initial loads of 4% bw, increased in 0.5% at each 5 min. Peak lactate concentration was collected after 5, 7 and 9 min (mmol L(-1)) and differed among the protocols P1 (15.2+/-0.4, 14.9+/-0.7, 14.8+/-0.6) and P2 (14.0+/-0.4, 14.9+/-0.4, 15.5+/-0.5) compared to P3 (5.1+/-0.1, 5.6+/-0.3, 5.6+/-0.3) and P4 (4.7+/-0.2, 6.8+/-0.2, 7.1+/-0.2). The LACmin determination success rates were 58%, 55%, 80% and 91% in P1, P2, P3 and P4 protocols, respectively. The MLSS did not differ from LACmin in any protocol. The LACmin obtained from P4 protocol showed better assurance for the MLSS identification in most of the tested rats.

  13. Standardization of infrared breast thermogram acquisition protocols and abnormality analysis of breast thermograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Gogoi, Usha Rani; Das, Kakali; Ghosh, Anjan Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Majumdar, Gautam

    2016-05-01

    The non-invasive, painless, radiation-free and cost-effective infrared breast thermography (IBT) makes a significant contribution to improving the survival rate of breast cancer patients by early detecting the disease. This paper presents a set of standard breast thermogram acquisition protocols to improve the potentiality and accuracy of infrared breast thermograms in early breast cancer detection. By maintaining all these protocols, an infrared breast thermogram acquisition setup has been established at the Regional Cancer Centre (RCC) of Government Medical College (AGMC), Tripura, India. The acquisition of breast thermogram is followed by the breast thermogram interpretation, for identifying the presence of any abnormality. However, due to the presence of complex vascular patterns, accurate interpretation of breast thermogram is a very challenging task. The bilateral symmetry of the thermal patterns in each breast thermogram is quantitatively computed by statistical feature analysis. A series of statistical features are extracted from a set of 20 thermograms of both healthy and unhealthy subjects. Finally, the extracted features are analyzed for breast abnormality detection. The key contributions made by this paper can be highlighted as -- a) the designing of a standard protocol suite for accurate acquisition of breast thermograms, b) creation of a new breast thermogram dataset by maintaining the protocol suite, and c) statistical analysis of the thermograms for abnormality detection. By doing so, this proposed work can minimize the rate of false findings in breast thermograms and thus, it will increase the utilization potentiality of breast thermograms in early breast cancer detection.

  14. Protocol and standard operating procedures for common use in a worldwide multicenter study on reference values.

    PubMed

    Ozarda, Yesim; Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Barth, Julian H; Klee, George

    2013-05-01

    The reference intervals (RIs) given in laboratory reports have an important role in aiding clinicians in interpreting test results in reference to values of healthy populations. In this report, we present a proposed protocol and standard operating procedures (SOPs) for common use in conducting multicenter RI studies on a national or international scale. The protocols and consensus on their contents were refined through discussions in recent C-RIDL meetings. The protocol describes in detail (1) the scheme and organization of the study, (2) the target population, inclusion/exclusion criteria, ethnicity, and sample size, (3) health status questionnaire, (4) target analytes, (5) blood collection, (6) sample processing and storage, (7) assays, (8) cross-check testing, (9) ethics, (10) data analyses, and (11) reporting of results. In addition, the protocol proposes the common measurement of a panel of sera when no standard materials exist for harmonization of test results. It also describes the requirements of the central laboratory, including the method of cross-check testing between the central laboratory of each country and local laboratories. This protocol and the SOPs remain largely exploratory and may require a reevaluation from the practical point of view after their implementation in the ongoing worldwide study. The paper is mainly intended to be a basis for discussion in the scientific community.

  15. Exercise counteracts fatty liver disease in rats fed on fructose-rich diet

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study aimed to analyze the effects of exercise at the aerobic/anaerobic transition on the markers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin sensitivity and the blood chemistry of rats kept on a fructose-rich diet. Methods We separated 48 Wistar rats into two groups according to diet: a control group (balanced diet AIN-93 G) and a fructose-rich diet group (60% fructose). The animals were tested for maximal lactate-steady state (MLSS) in order to identify the aerobic/anaerobic metabolic transition during swimming exercises at 28 and 90 days of age. One third of the animals of each group were submitted to swimming training at an intensity equivalent to the individual MLSS for 1 hours/day, 5 days/week from 28 to 120 days (early protocol). Another third were submitted to the training from 90 to 120 days (late protocol), and the others remained sedentary. The main assays performed included an insulin tolerance test (ITT) and tests of serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] and aspartate aminotransferase [AST] activities, serum triglyceride concentrations [TG] and liver total lipid concentrations. Results The fructose-fed rats showed decreased insulin sensitivity, and the late-exercise training protocol counteracted this alteration. There was no difference between the groups in levels of serum ALT, whereas AST and liver lipids increased in the fructose-fed sedentary group when compared with the other groups. Serum triglycerides concentrations were higher in the fructose-fed trained groups when compared with the corresponding control group. Conclusions The late-training protocol was effective in restoring insulin sensitivity to acceptable standards. Considering the markers here evaluated, both training protocols were successful in preventing the emergence of non-alcoholic fatty liver status disease. PMID:20946638

  16. Combining performance and outcome indicators can be used in a standardized way: a pilot study of two multidisciplinary, full-scale major aircraft exercises

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disaster medicine is a fairly young scientific discipline and there is a need for the development of new methods for evaluation and research. This includes full-scale disaster exercisers. A standardized concept on how to evaluate these exercises, could lead to easier identification of pitfalls caused by system-errors in the organization. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a combination of performance and outcome indicators so that results can be compared in standardized full-scale exercises. Methods Two multidisciplinary, full-scale exercises were studied in 2008 and 2010. The panorama had the same setup. Sets of performance indicators combined with indicators for unfavorable patient outcome were recorded in predesigned templates. Evaluators, all trained in a standardized way at a national disaster medicine centre, scored the results on predetermined locations; at the scene, at hospital and at the regional command and control. Results All data regarding the performance indicators of the participants during the exercises were obtained as well as all data regarding indicators for patient outcome. Both exercises could therefore be compared regarding performance (processes) as well as outcome indicators. The data from the performance indicators during the exercises showed higher scores for the prehospital command in the second exercise 15 points and 3 points respectively. Results from the outcome indicators, patient survival and patient complications, demonstrated a higher number of preventable deaths and a lower number of preventable complications in the exercise 2010. In the exercise 2008 the number of preventable deaths was lower and the number of preventable complications was higher. Conclusions Standardized multidisciplinary, full-scale exercises in different settings can be conducted and evaluated with performance indicators combined with outcome indicators enabling results from exercises to be compared. If exercises are

  17. Land-based versus aquatic resistance therapeutic exercises for older women with sarcopenic obesity: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sarcopenic obesity is a health condition that combines excess adipose tissue and loss of muscle mass and strength. Sarcopenic obesity predisposes to more functional disabilities than obesity or sarcopenia alone. Progressive resistance exercises are recommended for older people as a potential treatment for sarcopenia and also for obesity. However, there is a lack of evidence indicating which programmes are best applied to older people, and no studies have investigated their effects on sarcopenic obese people. The aims of this protocol study are to investigate and compare the efficacy of land-based and aquatic resistance exercise programmes on improving muscle performance, functional capacity and quality of life of older women with sarcopenic obesity. Methods/Design This is a protocol study for a parallel randomised controlled clinical trial. Eligible participants are older women (≥65 years) with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 and hand grip strength ≤21 kg force. A total sample of 36 participants will be randomly allocated to one of the intervention groups in blocks of three: land-based, aquatic or control. Each intervention group will undergo 2-week sessions of a 10-week therapeutic exercise programme for strength, power and endurance training of the lower-limb muscles. Participants in the control group will not participate in any strengthening activity for lower limbs and will receive telephone calls once a week. Baseline and final evaluation of outcomes will encompass muscle performance of the lower limbs assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer; functional tests of usual walking speed, maximal walking speed (shuttle walking test), stair speed and the Short Physical Performance Battery; and health-related quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Questionnaire – SF-36). Data collectors will be blinded to randomisation and will not be in touch with participants during the interventions. Discussion This study is the first randomised controlled

  18. Comparison of Bruce treadmill exercise test protocols: is ramped Bruce equal or superior to standard bruce in producing clinically valid studies for patients presenting for evaluation of cardiac ischemia or arrhythmia with body mass index equal to or greater than 30?

    PubMed

    Bires, Angela Macci; Lawson, Dori; Wasser, Thomas E; Raber-Baer, Donna

    2013-12-01

    Clinically valid cardiac evaluation via treadmill stress testing requires patients to achieve specific target heart rates and to successfully complete the cardiac examination. A comparison of the standard Bruce protocol and the ramped Bruce protocol was performed using data collected over a 1-y period from a targeted patient population with a body mass index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30 to determine which treadmill protocol provided more successful examination results. The functional capacity, metabolic equivalent units achieved, pressure rate product, and total time on the treadmill as measured for the obese patients were clinically valid and comparable to normal-weight and overweight patients (P < 0.001). Data gathered from each protocol demonstrated that the usage of the ramped Bruce protocol achieved more consistent results in comparison across all BMI groups in achieving 80%-85% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate. This study did not adequately establish that the ramped Bruce protocol was superior to the standard Bruce protocol for the examination of patients with a BMI equal to or greater than 30.

  19. The Effects of Acute Exercise on Mood, Cognition, Neurophysiology, and Neurochemical Pathways: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Julia C.; Suzuki, Wendy A.

    2017-01-01

    A significant body of work has investigated the effects of acute exercise, defined as a single bout of physical activity, on mood and cognitive functions in humans. Several excellent recent reviews have summarized these findings; however, the neurobiological basis of these results has received less attention. In this review, we will first briefly summarize the cognitive and behavioral changes that occur with acute exercise in humans. We will then review the results from both human and animal model studies documenting the wide range of neurophysiological and neurochemical alterations that occur after a single bout of exercise. Finally, we will discuss the strengths, weaknesses, and missing elements in the current literature, as well as offer an acute exercise standardization protocol and provide possible goals for future research. PMID:29765853

  20. Perfusion dynamics assessment with Power Doppler ultrasound in skeletal muscle during maximal and submaximal cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Heres, H M; Schoots, T; Tchang, B C Y; Rutten, M C M; Kemps, H M C; van de Vosse, F N; Lopata, R G P

    2018-06-01

    Assessment of limitations in the perfusion dynamics of skeletal muscle may provide insight in the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in, e.g., heart failure patients. Power doppler ultrasound (PDUS) has been recognized as a sensitive tool for the detection of muscle blood flow. In this volunteer study (N = 30), a method is demonstrated for perfusion measurements in the vastus lateralis muscle, with PDUS, during standardized cycling exercise protocols, and the test-retest reliability has been investigated. Fixation of the ultrasound probe on the upper leg allowed for continuous PDUS measurements. Cycling exercise protocols included a submaximal and an incremental exercise to maximal power. The relative perfused area (RPA) was determined as a measure of perfusion. Absolute and relative reliability of RPA amplitude and kinetic parameters during exercise (onset, slope, maximum value) and recovery (overshoot, decay time constants) were investigated. A RPA increase during exercise followed by a signal recovery was measured in all volunteers. Amplitudes and kinetic parameters during exercise and recovery showed poor to good relative reliability (ICC ranging from 0.2-0.8), and poor to moderate absolute reliability (coefficient of variation (CV) range 18-60%). A method has been demonstrated which allows for continuous (Power Doppler) ultrasonography and assessment of perfusion dynamics in skeletal muscle during exercise. The reliability of the RPA amplitudes and kinetics ranges from poor to good, while the reliability of the RPA increase in submaximal cycling (ICC = 0.8, CV = 18%) is promising for non-invasive clinical assessment of the muscle perfusion response to daily exercise.

  1. The Interface of Clinical Decision-Making With Study Protocols for Knowledge Translation From a Walking Recovery Trial.

    PubMed

    Hershberg, Julie A; Rose, Dorian K; Tilson, Julie K; Brutsch, Bettina; Correa, Anita; Gallichio, Joann; McLeod, Molly; Moore, Craig; Wu, Sam; Duncan, Pamela W; Behrman, Andrea L

    2017-01-01

    Despite efforts to translate knowledge into clinical practice, barriers often arise in adapting the strict protocols of a randomized, controlled trial (RCT) to the individual patient. The Locomotor Experience Applied Post-Stroke (LEAPS) RCT demonstrated equal effectiveness of 2 intervention protocols for walking recovery poststroke; both protocols were more effective than usual care physical therapy. The purpose of this article was to provide knowledge-translation tools to facilitate implementation of the LEAPS RCT protocols into clinical practice. Participants from 2 of the trial's intervention arms: (1) early Locomotor Training Program (LTP) and (2) Home Exercise Program (HEP) were chosen for case presentation. The two cases illustrate how the protocols are used in synergy with individual patient presentations and clinical expertise. Decision algorithms and guidelines for progression represent the interface between implementation of an RCT standardized intervention protocol and clinical decision-making. In each case, the participant presents with a distinct clinical challenge that the therapist addresses by integrating the participant's unique presentation with the therapist's expertise while maintaining fidelity to the LEAPS protocol. Both participants progressed through an increasingly challenging intervention despite their own unique presentation. Decision algorithms and exercise progression for the LTP and HEP protocols facilitate translation of the RCT protocol to the real world of clinical practice. The two case examples to facilitate translation of the LEAPS RCT into clinical practice by enhancing understanding of the protocols, their progression, and their application to individual participants.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A147).

  2. EPA Traceability Protocol for Assay and Certification of Gaseous Calibration Standards (EPA/600/R-12/531, May 2012)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, revised its 1993 version of its traceability protocol for the assay and certification of compressed gas and permeation-device calibration standards. The protocol allows producers of...

  3. Exercise Countermeasures Demonstration Project During the Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project Phase 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Guilliams, Mark E.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Williams, W. Jon; Greenisen, M. C.; Fortney, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    This demonstration project assessed the crew members' compliance to a portion of the exercise countermeasures planned for use onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and the outcomes of their performing these countermeasures. Although these countermeasures have been used separately in other projects and investigations, this was the first time they'd been used together for an extended period (60 days) in an investigation of this nature. Crew members exercised every day for six days, alternating every other day between aerobic and resistive exercise, and rested on the seventh day. On the aerobic exercise days, subjects exercised on an electronically braked cycle ergometer using a protocol that has been previously shown to maintain aerobic capacity in subjects exposed to a space flight analogue. On the resistive exercise days, crew members performed five major multijoint resistive exercises in a concentric mode, targeting those muscle groups and bones we believe are most severely affected by space flight. The subjects favorably tolerated both exercise protocols, with a 98% compliance to aerobic exercise prescription and a 91% adherence to the resistive exercise protocol. After 60 days, the crew members improved their peak aerobic capacity by an average 7%, and strength gains were noted in all subjects. These results suggest that these exercise protocols can be performed during ISS, lunar, and Mars missions, although we anticipate more frequent bouts with both protocols for long-duration spaceflight. Future projects should investigate the impact of increased exercise duration and frequency on subject compliance, and the efficacy of such exercise prescriptions.

  4. Cannabis: Exercise performance and sport. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Michael C

    2017-09-01

    To review the evidence relating to the effect of cannabis on exercise performance. A systematic review of published literature METHODS: Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the principal psychoactive component of cannabis. A search was conducted using PUB med, Medline and Embase searching for cannabis, marijuana, cannabinoids and THC, in sport and exercise; the contents of sports medicine journals for the last 10 years; as well as cross references from journals and a personal collection of reprints. Only English language literature was reviewed and only articles that specified the details of a formal exercise program or protocol. Individuals in rehabilitation or health screening programs involving exercise were included as the study may have identified adverse reactions in the marijuana group. Review articles, opinion pieces, policy statements by sporting bodies and regulatory agencies were excluded. Only 15 published studies have investigated the effects of THC in association with exercise protocols. Of these studies, none showed any improvement in aerobic performance. Exercise induced asthma was shown to be inhibited. In terms of detrimental effects, two studies found that marijuana precipitated angina at a lower work-load (100% of subjects) and strength is probably reduced. Some subjects could not complete an exercise protocol because adverse reactions caused by cannabis. An important finding relevant to drug testing was that aerobic exercise was shown to cause only very small rises (<1ng/mL) in THC concentrations. THC does not enhance aerobic exercise or strength. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparing the effects of two in-flight aerobic exercise protocols on standing heart rates and VO(2peak) before and after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siconolfi, S. F.; Charles, J. B.; Moore, A. D. Jr; Barrows, L. H.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of regular aerobic exercise on orthostatic tolerance have been the subject of a long-standing controversy that will influence the use of exercise during space flight. To examine these effects, astronauts performed continuous (CE) aerobic exercise (n = 8), interval (IE) aerobic exercise (n = 4), or no (NE) exercise (n = 5) during flights of 7 to 11 days. Heart rate (HR) responses to an orthostatic challenge (stand test) were measured 10 days before flight and on landing day. VO(2peak) (graded treadmill exercise) was measured 7 to 21 days before and 2 days after flight. No significant differences across the groups were observed in standing HRs before or after flight. However, the within-group mean HRs significantly increased in the NE (71-89 beats/min) and CE (60-85 beats/min) groups after space flight. The HRs for the IE group did not significantly increase (75-86 beats/min) after space flight. VO(2peak) decreased (P < .05) in the NE (-9.5%) group, but did not change in the CE (-2.4%) and IE (1%) groups. The relationship (r = 0.237) between the delta HR and delta VO(2peak) was not significant. These preliminary results indicate that: (1) continuous exercise does not affect the orthostatic HR response after space flight; (2) interval exercise may minimize an increase in the postflight orthostatic HR; and (3) both exercise protocols can maintain VO(2peak).

  6. Two RFID standard-based security protocols for healthcare environments.

    PubMed

    Picazo-Sanchez, Pablo; Bagheri, Nasour; Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Tapiador, Juan E

    2013-10-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems are widely used in access control, transportation, real-time inventory and asset management, automated payment systems, etc. Nevertheless, the use of this technology is almost unexplored in healthcare environments, where potential applications include patient monitoring, asset traceability and drug administration systems, to mention just a few. RFID technology can offer more intelligent systems and applications, but privacy and security issues have to be addressed before its adoption. This is even more dramatical in healthcare applications where very sensitive information is at stake and patient safety is paramount. In Wu et al. (J. Med. Syst. 37:19, 43) recently proposed a new RFID authentication protocol for healthcare environments. In this paper we show that this protocol puts location privacy of tag holders at risk, which is a matter of gravest concern and ruins the security of this proposal. To facilitate the implementation of secure RFID-based solutions in the medical sector, we suggest two new applications (authentication and secure messaging) and propose solutions that, in contrast to previous proposals in this field, are fully based on ISO Standards and NIST Security Recommendations.

  7. Is ACOG guideline helpful for encouraging pregnant women to do exercise during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Davari Tanha, Fatemeh; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohseni, Mona; Shariat, Mamak; Ranjbar, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate physical activity of pregnant women before and after ACOG guideline study. Four hundred and eighty-five pregnant women enrolled in this before-after study. They were asked to study ACOG guideline. A structured questionnaire filled by women at first visit and the last visit in the prenatal clinic.Type, frequency, duration and anxiety about doing exercises during pregnancy period. Before education, 411 did exercises before pregnancy onset, among them, 346 were walking out and 65 did light exercises such as aerobics. After studying the protocol, 434 (89.4%) did walking during pregnancy period in comparison to 71% who did walking before pregnancy (P<0.001). Forty two (56.7%) out of 74 who had not done sport before, went for walking after the protocol reading, and nine continued not doing exercise. Among 74 participants who had not done exercise before the protocol reading, 16 (21%) were doing exercise three times a week and 11 (14%) changed their habit to daily exercise practice (P<0.001). Forty percent (195 women) were anxious about doing exercise during pregnancy before guideline study, while 116 reported that after the protocol reading, they had no anxiety about doing exercises during pregnancy (P<0.001). Guidelines providing information about physical activity during pregnancy will help pregnant women to do exercise during pregnancy with convenience and less anxiety.

  8. Standards-Based Wireless Sensor Networking Protocols for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Raymond S.

    2010-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have the capacity to revolutionize data gathering in both spaceflight and terrestrial applications. WSNs provide a huge advantage over traditional, wired instrumentation since they do not require wiring trunks to connect sensors to a central hub. This allows for easy sensor installation in hard to reach locations, easy expansion of the number of sensors or sensing modalities, and reduction in both system cost and weight. While this technology offers unprecedented flexibility and adaptability, implementing it in practice is not without its difficulties. Recent advances in standards-based WSN protocols for industrial control applications have come a long way to solving many of the challenges facing practical WSN deployments. In this paper, we will overview two of the more promising candidates - WirelessHART from the HART Communication Foundation and ISA100.11a from the International Society of Automation - and present the architecture for a new standards-based sensor node for networking and applications research.

  9. Management of persistent postconcussion symptoms in youth: a randomised control trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Nick; Greenspoon, Dayna; Iverson, Grant L; DeMatteo, Carol; Fait, Philippe; Gauvin-Lepage, Jérôme; Hunt, Anne; Gagnon, Isabelle J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current management of concussion consists of early education, rest until symptom free, with gradual return to school and physical activity protocols. Although this management strategy is effective for most youth who sustain a concussion, it is not an appropriate strategy for youth with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Prolonged rest and periods of restricted activity may place youth at risk for secondary issues and contribute to the chronicity of postconcussion symptoms. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of an active rehabilitation protocol for youth who are slow to recover from concussion. It is hypothesised that an active rehabilitation intervention can reduce persistent postconcussion symptoms, improve function and facilitate return to activity. This article describes the research protocol. Methods and analysis This is a randomised clinical trial with blinded outcome measurement. Participants will be recruited and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups, an active rehabilitation intervention or a standard care education group. Both groups will receive standard care education. However, the active rehabilitation group will participate in an additional low-intensity exercise programme consisting of aerobic, coordination and visualisation exercises. Both the active rehabilitation and the standard care education interventions will be 6 weeks in duration. The primary outcome measure is postconcussion symptoms. Secondary outcome measures include functional recovery (cognitive, motor, psychosocial and emotional functioning) and return to activity. Outcome measures will be administered preintervention and postintervention. The primary outcome measure will also be repeated 2 weeks into the intervention period. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital research ethics board (REB # 13-459). The findings from this study will be shared with the general public, sport

  10. Modulation of mitochondrial biomarkers by intermittent hypobaric hypoxia and aerobic exercise after eccentric exercise in trained rats.

    PubMed

    Rizo-Roca, David; Ríos-Kristjánsson, Juan Gabriel; Núñez-Espinosa, Cristian; Santos-Alves, Estela; Magalhães, José; Ascensão, António; Pagès, Teresa; Viscor, Ginés; Torrella, Joan Ramon

    2017-07-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric contractions induce muscle damage, calcium homeostasis disruption, and mitochondrial alterations. Since exercise and hypoxia are known to modulate mitochondrial function, we aimed to analyze the effects on eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EEIMD) in trained rats using 2 recovery protocols based on: (i) intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH) and (ii) IHH followed by exercise. The expression of biomarkers related to mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, oxidative stress, and bioenergetics was evaluated. Soleus muscles were excised before (CTRL) and 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after an EEIMD protocol. The following treatments were applied 1 day after the EEIMD: passive normobaric recovery (PNR), 4 h daily exposure to passive IHH at 4000 m (PHR) or IHH exposure followed by aerobic exercise (AHR). Citrate synthase activity was reduced at 7 and 14 days after application of the EEIMD protocol. However, this reduction was attenuated in AHR rats at day 14. PGC-1α and Sirt3 and TOM20 levels had decreased after 1 and 3 days, but the AHR group exhibited increased expression of these proteins, as well as of Tfam, by the end of the protocol. Mfn2 greatly reduced during the first 72 h, but returned to basal levels passively. At day 14, AHR rats had higher levels of Mfn2, OPA1, and Drp1 than PNR animals. Both groups exposed to IHH showed a lower p66shc(ser 36 )/p66shc ratio than PNR animals, as well as higher complex IV subunit I and ANT levels. These results suggest that IHH positively modulates key mitochondrial aspects after EEIMD, especially when combined with aerobic exercise.

  11. Effective components of exercise and physical activity-related behaviour-change interventions for chronic non-communicable diseases in Africa: protocol for a systematic mixed studies review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Igwesi-Chidobe, Chinonso N; Godfrey, Emma L; Kengne, Andre P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) account for a high burden of mortality and morbidity in Africa. Evidence-based clinical guidelines recommend exercise training and promotion of physical activity behaviour changes to control NCDs. Developing such interventions in Africa requires an understanding of the essential components that make them effective in this context. This is a protocol for a systematic mixed studies review that aims to determine the effective components of exercise and physical activity-related behaviour-change interventions for chronic diseases in Africa, by combining quantitative and qualitative research evidence from studies published until July 2015. Methods and analysis We will conduct a detailed search to identify all published and unpublished studies that assessed the effects of exercise and physical activity-related interventions or the experiences/perspectives of patients to these interventions for NCDs from bibliographic databases and the grey literature. Bibliographic databases include MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), PsycINFO, CINAHL and Web of Science. We will include the following African regional databases: African Index Medicus (AIM) and AFROLIB, which is the WHO's regional office database for Africa. The databases will be searched from inception until 18 July 2015. Appraisal of study quality will be performed after results synthesis. Data synthesis will be performed independently for quantitative and qualitative data using a mixed methods sequential explanatory synthesis for systematic mixed studies reviews. Meta-analysis will be conducted for the quantitative studies, and thematic synthesis for qualitative studies and qualitative results from the non-controlled observational studies. The primary outcome will include exercise adherence and physical activity behaviour changes. This review protocol is reported according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and

  12. Nodule Classification on Low-Dose Unenhanced CT and Standard-Dose Enhanced CT: Inter-Protocol Agreement and Analysis of Interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Lee, Kyung Won; Park, Ji Hoon; Han, Kyunghwa; Kim, Jihang; Lee, Sang Min; Park, Chang Min

    2018-01-01

    To measure inter-protocol agreement and analyze interchangeability on nodule classification between low-dose unenhanced CT and standard-dose enhanced CT. From nodule libraries containing both low-dose unenhanced and standard-dose enhanced CT, 80 solid and 80 subsolid (40 part-solid, 40 non-solid) nodules of 135 patients were selected. Five thoracic radiologists categorized each nodule into solid, part-solid or non-solid. Inter-protocol agreement between low-dose unenhanced and standard-dose enhanced images was measured by pooling κ values for classification into two (solid, subsolid) and three (solid, part-solid, non-solid) categories. Interchangeability between low-dose unenhanced and standard-dose enhanced CT for the classification into two categories was assessed using a pre-defined equivalence limit of 8 percent. Inter-protocol agreement for the classification into two categories {κ, 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-0.98)} and that into three categories (κ, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.85-0.92]) was considerably high. The probability of agreement between readers with standard-dose enhanced CT was 95.6% (95% CI, 94.5-96.6%), and that between low-dose unenhanced and standard-dose enhanced CT was 95.4% (95% CI, 94.7-96.0%). The difference between the two proportions was 0.25% (95% CI, -0.85-1.5%), wherein the upper bound CI was markedly below 8 percent. Inter-protocol agreement for nodule classification was considerably high. Low-dose unenhanced CT can be used interchangeably with standard-dose enhanced CT for nodule classification.

  13. The French press: a repeatable and high-throughput approach to exercising zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Takuji; Noble, Daniel W.A.; O’Dea, Rose E.; Fangmeier, Melissa L.; Lagisz, Malgorzata; Hesselson, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Zebrafish are increasingly used as a vertebrate model organism for various traits including swimming performance, obesity and metabolism, necessitating high-throughput protocols to generate standardized phenotypic information. Here, we propose a novel and cost-effective method for exercising zebrafish, using a coffee plunger and magnetic stirrer. To demonstrate the use of this method, we conducted a pilot experiment to show that this simple system provides repeatable estimates of maximal swim performance (intra-class correlation [ICC] = 0.34–0.41) and observe that exercise training of zebrafish on this system significantly increases their maximum swimming speed. We propose this high-throughput and reproducible system as an alternative to traditional linear chamber systems for exercising zebrafish and similarly sized fishes. PMID:29372124

  14. Analysis of physical exercises and exercise protocols for space transportation system operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative evaluation of the Thornton-Whitmore treadmill was made so that informed management decisions regarding the role of this treadmill in operational flight crew exercise programs could be made. Specific tasks to be completed were: The Thornton-Whitmore passive treadmill as an exercise device at one-g was evaluated. Hardware, harness and restraint systems for use with the Thornton-Whitmore treadmill in the laboratory and in Shuttle flights were established. The quantitative and qualitative performance of human subjects on the Thorton-Whitmore treadmill with forces in excess of one-g, was evaluated. The performance of human subjects on the Thornton-Whitmore treadmill in weightlessness (onboard Shuttle flights) was also determined.

  15. Use of a Standardized Patient Exercise to Assess Core Competencies During Fellowship Training

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Curtis T.; Avissar, Uri; Asebrook, Maureen; Sostok, Michael A.; Sherman, Kenneth E.; Zucker, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires fellows in many specialties to demonstrate attainment of 6 core competencies, yet relatively few validated assessment tools currently exist. We present our initial experience with the design and implementation of a standardized patient (SP) exercise during gastroenterology fellowship that facilitates appraisal of all core clinical competencies. Methods Fellows evaluated an SP trained to portray an individual referred for evaluation of abnormal liver tests. The encounters were independently graded by the SP and a faculty preceptor for patient care, professionalism, and interpersonal and communication skills using quantitative checklist tools. Trainees' consultation notes were scored using predefined key elements (medical knowledge) and subjected to a coding audit (systems-based practice). Practice-based learning and improvement was addressed via verbal feedback from the SP and self-assessment of the videotaped encounter. Results Six trainees completed the exercise. Second-year fellows received significantly higher scores in medical knowledge (55.0 ± 4.2 [standard deviation], P  =  .05) and patient care skills (19.5 ± 0.7, P  =  .04) by a faculty evaluator as compared with first-year trainees (46.2 ± 2.3 and 14.7 ± 1.5, respectively). Scores correlated by Spearman rank (0.82, P  =  .03) with the results of the Gastroenterology Training Examination. Ratings of the fellows by the SP did not differ by level of training, nor did they correlate with faculty scores. Fellows viewed the exercise favorably, with most indicating they would alter their practice based on the experience. Conclusions An SP exercise is an efficient and effective tool for assessing core clinical competencies during fellowship training. PMID:21975896

  16. Does Stroke Volume Increase During an Incremental Exercise? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Stella S.; Lemes, Brunno; de T. C. de Carvalho, Paulo; N. de Lima, Rafael; S. Bocalini, Danilo; A. S. Junior, José; Arsa, Gisela; A. Casarin, Cezar; L. Andrade, Erinaldo; J. Serra, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac output increases during incremental-load exercise to meet metabolic skeletal muscle demand. This response requires a fast adjustment in heart rate and stroke volume. The heart rate is well known to increase linearly with exercise load; however, data for stroke volume during incremental-load exercise are unclear. Our objectives were to (a) review studies that have investigated stroke volume on incremental load exercise and (b) summarize the findings for stroke volume, primarily at maximal-exercise load. Methods: A comprehensive review of the Cochrane Library’s, Embase, Medline, SportDiscus, PubMed, and Web of Sci-ence databases was carried out for the years 1985 to the present. The search was performed between February and June 2014 to find studies evaluating changes in stroke volume during incremental-load exercise. Controlled and uncontrolled trials were evaluated for a quality score. Results: The stroke volume data in maximal-exercise load are inconsistent. There is evidence to hypothesis that stroke volume increases during maximal-exercise load, but other lines of evidence indicate that stroke volume reaches a plateau under these circumstances, or even decreases. Conclusion: The stroke volume are unclear, include contradictory evidence. Additional studies with standardized reporting for subjects (e.g., age, gender, physical fitness, and body position), exercise test protocols, and left ventricular function are required to clarify the characteristics of stroke volume during incremental maximal-exercise load. PMID:27347221

  17. Effect of Acu-TENS on recovery heart rate after treadmill running exercise in subjects with normal health.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Leo Chin-Ting; Jones, Alice Yee-Men

    2007-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, applied at bilateral acupuncture points PC6 (Acu-TENS), on recovery heart rate (HR) in healthy subjects after treadmill running exercise. A single blinded, randomized controlled trial. Laboratory with healthy male subjects (n=28). Each subject participated in three separate protocols in random order. PROTOCOL A: The subject followed the Bruce protocol and ran on a treadmill until their HR reached 70% of their maximum (220-age). At this 'target' HR, the subject adopted the supine position and Acu-TENS to bilateral PC6 was commenced. PROTOCOL B: Identical to protocol A except that Acu-TENS was applied in the supine position for 45min prior to, but not after exercise. PROTOCOL C: Identical to protocol A except that placebo Acu-TENS was applied. Heart rate was recorded before and at 30s intervals after exercise until it returned to the pre-exercise baseline. The time for HR to return to baseline was compared for each protocol. Acu-TENS applied to bilateral PC6 resulted in a faster return to pre-exercise HR compared to placebo. Time required for HR to return to pre-exercise level in protocols A-C was 5.5+/-3.0; 4.8+/-3.3; 9.4+/-3.7 min, respectively (p<0.001). There was no statistical difference in HR recovery time between protocols A and B. Subjects expressed the lowest rate of perceived exertion score (RPE) at 70% maximum HR with protocol B. This study suggests that Acu-TENS applied to PC6 may facilitate HR recovery after high intensity treadmill exercise.

  18. Combined Dietary Nitrate and Exercise Intervention in Peripheral Artery Disease: Protocol Rationale and Design

    PubMed Central

    Woessner, Mary N; VanBruggen, Mitch D; Pieper, Carl F; O'Reilly, Erin K; Kraus, William E

    2017-01-01

    week for 12 weeks (ie, 36 sessions). They will be randomized to either the EX+BR or EX+PL group where participants will consume a beverage high in inorganic nitrate (4.2 mmol) or a low-nitrate placebo, respectively, 3 hours prior to each training session. Results Data collection from this study has been completed and is in the process of analysis and write-up. While the study is too underpowered—EX+BR, n=11; EX+PL, n=13—to determine between-group differences in the primary outcomes of COT, PWT, and 6MW, preliminary observations are promising with Cohen d effect sizes of medium to large. Conclusions Exercise training is currently the most effective therapy to increase functional capacity in PAD+IC. If the addition of inorganic nitrate to an exercise regimen elicits greater benefits, it may redefine the current standard of care for PAD+IC. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684930; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684930 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6raXFyEcP) PMID:28974486

  19. How should COPD patients exercise during respiratory rehabilitation? Comparison of exercise modalities and intensities to treat skeletal muscle dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Puhan, M; Schunemann, H; Frey, M; Scharplatz, M; Bachmann, L

    2005-01-01

    Background: Physical exercise is an important component of respiratory rehabilitation because it reverses skeletal muscle dysfunction, a clinically important manifestation of COPD associated with reduced health-related quality of life (HRQL) and survival. However, there is controversy regarding the components of the optimal exercise protocol. A study was undertaken to systematically evaluate and summarise randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing different exercise protocols for COPD patients. Methods: Six electronic databases, congress proceedings and bibliographies of included studies were searched without imposing language restrictions. Two reviewers independently screened all records and extracted data on study samples, interventions and methodological characteristics of included studies. Results: The methodological quality of the 15 included RCTs was low to moderate. Strength exercise led to larger improvements of HRQL than endurance exercise (weighted mean difference for Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire 0.27, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.52). Interval exercise seems to be of similar effectiveness as continuous exercise, but there are few data on clinically relevant outcomes. One small RCT which included patients with mild COPD compared the effect of high and low intensity exercise (at 80% and 40% of the maximum exercise capacity, respectively) and found larger physiological training effects from high intensity exercise. Conclusions: Strength exercise should be routinely incorporated in respiratory rehabilitation. There is insufficient evidence to recommend high intensity exercise for COPD patients and investigators should conduct larger high quality trials to evaluate exercise intensities in patients with moderate to severe COPD. PMID:15860711

  20. Effects of quadriceps strength after static and dynamic whole-body vibration exercise.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jill A; Blog, Gabriel L; Kang, Jie; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Ratamess, Nicholas A

    2015-05-01

    Numerous studies have shown performance benefits including whole-body vibration (WBV) as a training modality or an acute exercise protocol when used as a component of the resistance training program. Some studies have indicated that performing dynamic exercises as compared with static position exercises while exposed to WBV might be beneficial; however, evidence is lacking. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if an acute bout of dynamic versus static squats performed during WBV results in increase in quadriceps force production by means of dynamic isokinetic knee extension and flexion exercise. Nonresistance-trained healthy young men and women (N = 21) of 18-25 years participated in 4 protocols with 2-week rest in-between. Protocol 1 consisted of 5 sets of 10 dynamic squats without vibration; Protocol 2: 5 sets of 30-second static squats without vibration; Protocol 3: 5 sets of 10 dynamic squats with 30-Hz WBV for a total of 2.5 minutes; and Protocol 4: 5 sets of 30-second static squats with 30-Hz WBV for a total of 2.5 minutes. Prestrength tests (1 set of 4 repetitions at 100° · s(-1) for the knee extension exercise) was performed within 5 minutes of starting each protocol, and poststrength testing was performed within 1 minute of completing each protocol. Strength outcomes were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance with a significance level set at p ≤ 0.05. A significant decrease in strength was observed after dynamic and static squats without WBV (p = 0.002); an increase in strength after dynamic squats with WBV (p = 0.003); and a decrease in strength after static squats with WBV (p = 0.003). The inclusion of WBV to dynamic resistance exercise can be an added modality to increase strength. Whole-body vibration can have varied effects in altering muscle strength in untrained individuals according to the type of resistance training performed. As a dynamic squat with WBV seems to immediately potentiate neuromuscular functioning, the

  1. The impact of post-exercise hydration with deep-ocean mineral water on rehydration and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Keen, Douglas A; Constantopoulos, Eleni; Konhilas, John P

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration caused by prolonged exercise impairs thermoregulation, endurance and exercise performance. Evidence from animal and human studies validates the potential of desalinated deep-ocean mineral water to positively impact physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we hypothesize that deep-ocean mineral water drawn from a depth of 915 m off the Kona, HI coast enhances recovery of hydration and exercise performance following a dehydrating exercise protocol compared to mountain spring water and a carbohydrate-based sports drink. Subjects (n = 8) were exposed to an exercise-dehydration protocol (stationary biking) under warm conditions (30 °C) to achieve a body mass loss of 3 % (93.4 ± 21.7 total exercise time). During the post-exercise recovery period, subjects received deep-ocean mineral water (Kona), mountain spring water (Spring) or a carbohydrate-based sports drink (Sports) at a volume (in L) equivalent to body mass loss (in Kg). Salivary samples were collected at regular intervals during exercise and post-exercise rehydration. Additionally, each participant performed peak torque knee extension as a measure of lower body muscle performance. Subjects who received Kona during the rehydrating period showed a significantly more rapid return to pre-exercise (baseline) hydration state, measured as the rate of decline in peak to baseline salivary osmolality, compared to Sports and Spring groups. In addition, subjects demonstrated significantly improved recovery of lower body muscle performance following rehydration with Kona versus Sports or Spring groups. Deep-ocean mineral water shows promise as an optimal rehydrating source over spring water and/or sports drink.

  2. Proposal for the Development of a Standardized Protocol for Assessing the Economic Costs of HIV Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, Steven D.; Pearson, Cynthia R.; Eachus, Susan R.; Berg, Karina M.; Grimes, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Maximizing our economic investment in HIV prevention requires balancing the costs of candidate interventions against their effects and selecting the most cost-effective interventions for implementation. However, many HIV prevention intervention trials do not collect cost information, and those that do use a variety of cost data collection methods and analysis techniques. Standardized cost data collection procedures, instrumentation, and analysis techniques are needed to facilitate the task of assessing intervention costs and to ensure comparability across intervention trials. This article describes the basic elements of a standardized cost data collection and analysis protocol and outlines a computer-based approach to implementing this protocol. Ultimately, the development of such a protocol would require contributions and “buy-in” from a diverse range of stakeholders, including HIV prevention researchers, cost-effectiveness analysts, community collaborators, public health decision makers, and funding agencies. PMID:18301128

  3. Cervical Spine Clearance in Pediatric Trauma Centers: The Need for Standardization and an Evidence-based Protocol.

    PubMed

    Pannu, Gurpal S; Shah, Mitesh P; Herman, Marty J

    Cervical spine clearance in the pediatric trauma patient represents a particularly challenging task. Unfortunately, standardized clearance protocols for pediatric cervical clearance are poorly reported in the literature and imaging recommendations demonstrate considerable variability. With the use of a web-based survey, this study aims to define the methods utilized by pediatric trauma centers throughout North America. Specific attention was given to the identification of personnel responsible for cervical spine care, diagnostic imaging modalities used, and the presence or absence of a written pediatric cervical spine clearance protocol. A 10-question electronic survey was given to members of the newly formed Pediatric Cervical Spine Study Group, all of whom are active POSNA members. The survey was submitted via the online service SurveyMonkey (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/7NVVQZR). The survey assessed the respondent's institution demographics, such as trauma level and services primarily responsible for consultation and operative management of cervical spine injuries. In addition, respondents were asked to identify the protocols and primary imaging modality used for cervical spine clearance. Finally, respondents were asked if their institution had a documented cervical spine clearance protocol. Of the 25 separate institutions evaluated, 21 were designated as level 1 trauma centers. Considerable variation was reported with regards to the primary service responsible for cervical spine clearance. General Surgery/Trauma (44%) is most commonly the primary service, followed by a rotating schedule (33%), Neurosugery (11%), and Orthopaedic Surgery (8%). Spine consults tend to be seen most commonly by a rotating schedule of Orthopaedic Surgery and Neurosurgery. The majority of responding institutions utilize computed tomographic imaging (46%) as the primary imaging modality, whereas 42% of hospitals used x-ray primarily. The remaining institutions reported using a

  4. [Lumbar stabilization exercises].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Ríos, Jorge Rodrigo; Nava-Bringas, Tania Inés

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is the intervention with the highest level of evidence on efficacy for treatment of chronic low back pain, with a higher benefit in terms of pain and function compared to any other intervention. A wide variety of exercises programs have been designed; however, "lumbar stabilization exercises" have become increasingly popular among clinicians who are in contact with spine diseases. However, there is controversy regarding the adequate prescription and there are multiple protocols. The aim of this literature review is to analyze the information about these exercises to promote better decision-making among clinicians and design the best program for each patient. We found the program an essential tool in the treatment of low back pain in both therapeutic and preventive phases.

  5. Randomised controlled trial of exercise to prevent shoulder problems in women undergoing breast cancer treatment: study protocol for the prevention of shoulder problems trial (UK PROSPER)

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Esther; Lait, Clare; Richmond, Helen; Betteley, Lauren; Lall, Ranjit; Petrou, Stavros; Rees, Sophie; Withers, Emma J; Lamb, Sarah E; Thompson, Alastair M

    2018-01-01

    Musculoskeletal shoulder problems are common after breast cancer treatment. Early postoperative exercises targeting the upper limb may improve shoulder function. This protocol describes a National Institute for Health Research-funded randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of an early supervised structured exercise programme compared with usual care, for women at high risk of developing shoulder problems after breast cancer surgery. Methods This pragmatic two-armed, multicentre RCT is underway within secondary care in the UK. PRevention Of Shoulder ProblEms tRial (PROSPER) aims to recruit 350 women from approximately 15 UK centres with follow-up at 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months after randomisation. Recruitment processes and intervention development were optimised through qualitative research during a 6-month internal pilot phase. Participants are randomised to the PROSPER intervention or best practice usual care only. The PROSPER intervention is delivered by physiotherapists and incorporates three main components: shoulder-specific exercises targeting range of movement and strength; general physical activity and behavioural strategies to encourage adherence and support exercise behaviour. The primary outcome is upper arm function assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire at 12 months postrandomisation. Secondary outcomes include DASH subscales, acute and chronic pain, complications, health-related quality of life and healthcare resource use. We will interview a subsample of 20 participants to explore their experiences of the trial interventions. Discussion The PROSPER study is the first multicentre UK clinical trial to investigate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of supported exercise in the prevention of shoulder problems in high-risk women undergoing breast cancer surgery. The findings will inform future clinical practice and provide valuable insight into the role of physiotherapy

  6. Analog Exercise Hardware to Implement a High Intensity Exercise Program During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loerch, Linda; Newby, Nate; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Background: In order to evaluate novel countermeasure protocols in a space flight analog prior to validation on the International Space Station (ISS), NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is sponsoring a multi-investigator bedrest campaign that utilizes a combination of commercial and custom-made exercise training hardware to conduct daily resistive and aerobic exercise protocols. This paper will describe these pieces of hardware and how they are used to support current bedrest studies at NASA's Flight Analog Research Unit in Galveston, TX. Discussion: To implement candidate exercise countermeasure studies during extended bed rest studies the following analog hardware are being utilized: Stand alone Zero-Gravity Locomotion Simulator (sZLS) -- a custom built device by NASA, the sZLS allows bedrest subjects to remain supine as they run on a vertically-oriented treadmill (0-15 miles/hour). The treadmill includes a pneumatic subject loading device to provide variable body loading (0-100%) and a harness to keep the subject in contact with the motorized treadmill to provide a ground reaction force at their feet that is quantified by a Kistler Force Plate. Supine Cycle Ergometer -- a commercially available supine cycle ergometer (Lode, Groningen, Netherlands) is used for all cycle ergometer sessions. The ergometer has adjustable shoulder supports and handgrips to help stabilize the subject during exercise. Horizontal Squat Device (HSD) -- a custom built device by Quantum Fitness Corp (Stafford, TX), the HSD allows for squat exercises to be performed while lying in a supine position. The HSD can provide 0 to 600 pounds of force in selectable 5 lb increments, and allows hip translation in both the vertical and horizontal planes. Prone Leg Curl -- a commercially available prone leg curl machine (Cybex International Inc., Medway, MA) is used to complete leg curl exercises. Horizontal Leg Press -- a commercially available horizontal leg press (Quantum Fitness Corporation) is

  7. Exercise Increases the Cardiovascular Stimulus Provided by Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, M. S.; Moore, F. B.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Jezova, D.; Diedrich, A.; Ferris, M. B.; Schlegel, T. T.; Pathwardhan, A. R.; Knapp, C. F.; Evans, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated fluid shifts and regulatory responses to variations of posture, exercise, Gz level and radius of rotation in subjects riding NASA Ames 20G centrifuge. Results are from 4 protocols that address radius and exercise effects only. Protocol A: After 10 min supine control, 12 healthy men (35 plus or minus 9 yr, 82.8 plus or minus 7.9 kg) were exposed to rotational 1 Gz (2.5 m radius) for 2 min followed by 20 min alternating between 1 and 1.25 Gz. Blood samples were taken pre and post spin. Protocol B: Same as A, but lower limb exercise (70% V02max) preceded ramps to 1.25 Gz. Protocol C: Same as A but radius of rotation 8.3 m. Protocol D: Same as B but at 8.3 m. The 8 subjects who completed all protocols, increased heart rate (HR) from control, on average, by: A: 5, B: 39, C: 11, D: 44 bpm. For thoracic fluid volume, (bioimpedance), the 8 subjects changed from control, on average: A: -394, B: -548, C: -537, D: -708 mL. For thigh fluid volume, changes from control, on average, were: A: -137, B: 129, C: -75, D: 159 mL. Hematocrit changes from control were: A: 2.3, B: 3.5, C: 2.3, D: 4.3 %. Radius effects were mild and included greater loss of fluid from the thorax, less fluid loss from the thigh and increased heart rate at the longer radius. Pre-acceleration exercise effects were more dramatic and included additional loss of fluid from the chest, increased fluid volume of the thigh, increased hematocrit and greater heart rate increases. We propose that short bouts of intense exercise can be used to magnify the cardiovascular stress delivered by artificial gravity (AG) training and the combination of AG with exercise training can be fine-tuned to preserve orthostatic tolerance of astronauts during spaceflight.

  8. Physical Exercise As Stabilizer For Alzheimer'S Disease Cognitive Decline: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Machado, Sergio; Filho, Alberto Souza de Sá; Wilbert, Matheus; Barbieri, Gabriela; Almeida, Victor; Gurgel, Alexandre; Rosa, Charles V; Lins, Victor; Paixão, Alexandre; Santana, Kamila; Ramos, Gabriel; Neto, Geraldo Maranhão; Paes, Flá; Rocha, Nuno; Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Mental health decline is one of the main responsible factors for augments in health care costs, and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some studies stated physical exercise is useful for reduction in cognitive decline and AD. Moreover, a recent review argued that evidence are scarce due to few studies published and lack of configuration information of exercise protocol, such as intensity and duration of exercise, number of sessions and other relevant data, to allow appropriate assessment. Here, we discussed the possible confounders or factors responsible for these differences and possible neurophysiological mechanisms. Most studies revealed a possible positive association between physical exercise and cognitive assessments. There are inconsistencies in studies design responsible for varying use of cognitive assessments and different assessments of fitness. However, these studies do not fail to provide evidence about the benefits of exercise, but fail to make it possible because of the lack of dose-response information in AD patients. Physical exercise of moderate intensity should be considered as standard recommendation to reduce cognitive decline, probably due to the improvement in neurodegenerative mechanisms, and the increase in neuroplastic and neuroprotective neurotrophic factors. Therefore, it is suggested that physical exercise is an important neuroprotective modulator, bringing significant control of the disease and amplifying brain functions.

  9. Motor Learning Versus StandardWalking Exercise in Older Adults with Subclinical Gait Dysfunction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brach, Jennifer S.; Van Swearingen, Jessie M.; Perera, Subashan; Wert, David M.; Studenski, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Background Current exercise recommendationsfocus on endurance and strength, but rarely incorporate principles of motor learning. Motor learning exerciseis designed to address neurological aspects of movement. Motor learning exercise has not been evaluated in older adults with subclinical gait dysfunction. Objectives Tocompare motor learning versus standard exercise on measures of mobility and perceived function and disability. Design Single-blind randomized trial. Setting University research center. Participants Olderadults (n=40), mean age 77.1±6.0 years), who had normal walking speed (≥1.0 m/s) and impaired motor skill (Figure of 8 walk time > 8 s). Interventions The motor learning program (ML) incorporated goal-oriented stepping and walking to promote timing and coordination within the phases of the gait cycle. The standard program (S) employed endurance training by treadmill walking.Both included strength training and were offered twice weekly for one hour for 12 weeks. Measurements Primary outcomes included mobility performance (gait efficiency, motor skill in walking, gait speed, and walking endurance)and secondary outcomes included perceived function and disability (Late Life Function and Disability Instrument). Results 38 of 40 participants completed the trial (ML, n=18; S, n=20). ML improved more than Sin gait speed (0.13 vs. 0.05 m/s, p=0.008) and motor skill (−2.2 vs. −0.89 s, p<0.0001). Both groups improved in walking endurance (28.3 and 22.9m, but did not differ significantly p=0.14). Changes in gait efficiency and perceived function and disability were not different between the groups (p>0.10). Conclusion In older adults with subclinical gait dysfunction, motor learning exercise improved some parameters of mobility performance more than standard exercise. PMID:24219189

  10. Effectiveness of Progressive Resistive Exercise (PRE) in the context of HIV: systematic review and meta-analysis using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Tynan, Anne-Marie; Nixon, Stephanie A; Glazier, Richard H

    2017-04-12

    HIV is increasingly considered a chronic illness. More individuals are living longer and aging with the health-related consequences associated with HIV and multi-morbidity. Exercise is a self-management approach that can promote health for people aging with HIV. We examined the safety and effectiveness of progressive resistive exercise (PRE) interventions on immunological, virological, cardiorespiratory, strength, weight, body composition, and psychological outcomes in adults living with HIV. We conducted a systematic review using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol. Searching databases up to April 2013, we included randomized controlled trials that compared PRE with no exercise or another intervention performed at least three times per week for at least four weeks with adults living with HIV. Two reviewers independently determined study eligibility. We extracted data from included studies and assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were conducted using random effects models with Review Manager (RevMan) computer software. Twenty studies met inclusion criteria (n = 764 participants at study completion); the majority of participants were men (77%) taking antiretroviral therapy (14/20 included studies). Exercise interventions included PRE alone (8 studies) or a combination of resistive and aerobic exercise (12 studies) ranging from 6 to 52 weeks in duration. Thirty-four meta-analyses were performed. Results demonstrated statistically significant improvements in cardiorespiratory status (maximum oxygen consumption, exercise time), strength (chest press, knee flexion), weight, and body composition (arm and thigh girth, leg muscle area) among exercisers versus non-exercisers. We found no significant differences in change in CD4 count and viral load. We were unable to perform meta-analyses for psychological outcomes however results from individual studies demonstrated improvements in health-related quality of life with

  11. Pilot Testing a Cognitive-Behavioral Protocol on Psychosocial Predictors of Exercise, Nutrition, Weight, and Body Satisfaction Changes in a College-Level Health-Related Fitness Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annesi, James J.; Howton, Amy; Johnson, Ping H.; Porter, Kandice J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Small-scale pilot testing of supplementing a required college health-related fitness course with a cognitive-behavioral exercise-support protocol (The Coach Approach). Participants: Three classes were randomly assigned to Usual processes (n = 32), Coach Approach-supplemented: Mid-size Groups (n = 32), and Coach Approach-supplemented:…

  12. A Standardized Shift Handover Protocol: Improving Nurses’ Safe Practice in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Malekzadeh, Javad; Mazluom, Seyed Reza; Etezadi, Toktam; Tasseri, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For maintaining the continuity of care and improving the quality of care, effective inter-shift information communication is necessary. Any handover error can endanger patient safety. Despite the importance of shift handover, there is no standard handover protocol in our healthcare settings. Methods: In this one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study conducted in spring and summer of 2011, we recruited a convenience sample of 56 ICU nurses. The Nurses’ Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist was used for data collection. The Content Validity Index and the inter-rater correlation coefficient of the checklist was 0.92 and 89, respectively. We employed the SPSS 11.5 software and the Mc Nemar and paired-samples t test for data analysis. Results: Study findings revealed that nurses’ mean score on the Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist increased significantly from 11.6 (2.7) to 17.0 (1.8) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: using a standard handover protocol for communicating patient’s needs and information improves nurses’ safe practice in the area of basic nursing care. PMID:25276725

  13. Exercise Training and Weight Gain in Obese Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial (ETIP Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Garnæs, Kirsti Krohn; Mørkved, Siv; Salvesen, Øyvind; Moholdt, Trine

    2016-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of exercise training for preventing excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is still uncertain. As maternal obesity is associated with both GWG and GDM, there is a special need to assess whether prenatal exercise training programs provided to obese women reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Our primary aim was to assess whether regular supervised exercise training in pregnancy could reduce GWG in women with prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Secondary aims were to examine the effects of exercise in pregnancy on 30 outcomes including GDM incidence, blood pressure, blood measurements, skinfold thickness, and body composition. Methods and Findings This was a single-center study where we randomized (1:1) 91 pregnant women with a prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) ≥ 28 kg/m2 to exercise training (n = 46) or control (standard maternity care) (n = 45). Assessments were done at baseline (pregnancy week 12–18) and in late pregnancy (week 34–37), as well as at delivery. The exercise group was offered thrice weekly supervised sessions of 35 min of moderate intensity endurance exercise and 25 min of strength training. Seventeen women were lost to follow-up (eight in the exercise group and nine in the control group). Our primary endpoint was GWG from baseline testing to delivery. The principal analyses were done as intention-to-treat analyses, with supplementary per protocol analyses where we assessed outcomes in the women who adhered to the exercise program (n = 19) compared to the control group. Mean GWG from baseline to delivery was 10.5 kg in the exercise group and 9.2 kg in the control group, with a mean difference of 0.92 kg (95% CI −1.35, 3.18; p = 0.43). Among the 30 secondary outcomes in late pregnancy, an apparent reduction was recorded in the incidence of GDM (2009 WHO definition) in the exercise group (2 cases; 6.1%) compared to the control group (9 cases; 27.3%), with an odds ratio

  14. Aquatic Exercise Training is Effective in Maintaining Exercise Performance in Trained Heart Failure Patients: A Randomised Crossover Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Adsett, Julie; Morris, Norman; Kuys, Suzanne; Hwang, Rita; Mullins, Robert; Khatun, Mohsina; Paratz, Jennifer; Mudge, Alison

    2017-06-01

    Providing flexible models and a variety of exercise options are fundamental to supporting long-term exercise participation for patients with heart failure (HF). The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of aquatic exercise training during a maintenance phase for a clinical heart failure population. In this 2 x 2 crossover design trial, individuals who had previously completed HF rehabilitation were randomised into either a land-based or aquatic training program once per week for six weeks, after which time they changed to the alternate exercise training protocol for an additional six weeks. Six-minute walk test (6MWT), grip strength, walk speed, and measures of balance were compared for the two training protocols. Fifty-one participants (43 males, mean age 69.2 yrs) contributed data for the analysis. Both groups maintained function during the follow-up period, however improvements in 6MWT were greater in the land-based training group (95% CI: 0.7, 22.5; p=0.038), by a mean difference of 10.8 metres. No significant difference was observed for other parameters when the two training protocols were compared. Attending an aquatic exercise program once per week is feasible for patients with stable HF and may provide a suitable option to maintain functional performance in select patients. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Renin-Angiotensin System, Not the Kinin-Kallikrein System, Affects Post-Exercise Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Koçer, Günnur; Basralı, Filiz; Kuru, Oktay; Şentürk, Ümit Kemal

    2018-05-17

    Temporary proteinuria post-exercise is common and is caused predominantly by renal haemodynamic alterations. One reason is up-regulation of angiotensin II (Ang II) due to the reducing effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. However, another, ignored, reason could be the kininase effect of ACE inhibition. This study investigated how ACE inhibition reduces post-exercise proteinuria: by either Ang II up-regulation inhibition or bradykinin elevation due to kininase activity inhibition. Our study included 10 volunteers, who completed 3 high-intensity exercise protocols involving cycling at 1-week intervals. The first protocol was a control arm, the second evaluated the effect of ACE inhibition and the third examined the effect of angiotensin type 1 receptor blockade. Upon application, both agents reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure; however, there were no statistically significant -differences. In addition, total protein, microalbumin and -β2-microglobulin excretion levels in urine specimens were analysed before, 30 min after and 120 min after the exercise protocols. Total protein levels in urine samples were elevated in all 3 protocols after 30 min of high-intensity exercise, compared to baseline levels. However, both ACE inhibition and angiotensin type 1 receptor blockade suppressed total protein in the 30th min. In each protocol, total protein levels returned to the baseline after 120 min. Urinary microalbumin and β2-microglobulin levels during the control protocol were significantly higher 30 min post-exercise; however, only angiotensin type 1 receptor blockade suppressed microalbumin levels. The results indicated Ang II up-regulation, not bradykinin elevation, plays a role in post-exercise proteinuria. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Protocol for evaluating the effects of a therapeutic foot exercise program on injury incidence, foot functionality and biomechanics in long-distance runners: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Matias, Alessandra B; Taddei, Ulisses T; Duarte, Marcos; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2016-04-14

    Overall performance, particularly in a very popular sports activity such as running, is typically influenced by the status of the musculoskeletal system and the level of training and conditioning of the biological structures. Any change in the musculoskeletal system's biomechanics, especially in the feet and ankles, will strongly influence the biomechanics of runners, possibly predisposing them to injuries. A thorough understanding of the effects of a therapeutic approach focused on feet biomechanics, on strength and functionality of lower limb muscles will contribute to the adoption of more effective therapeutic and preventive strategies for runners. A randomized, prospective controlled and parallel trial with blind assessment is designed to study the effects of a "ground-up" therapeutic approach focused on the foot-ankle complex as it relates to the incidence of running-related injuries in the lower limbs. One hundred and eleven (111) healthy long-distance runners will be randomly assigned to either a control (CG) or intervention (IG) group. IG runners will participate in a therapeutic exercise protocol for the foot-ankle for 8 weeks, with 1 directly supervised session and 3 remotely supervised sessions per week. After the 8-week period, IG runners will keep exercising for the remaining 10 months of the study, supervised only by web-enabled software three times a week. At baseline, 2 months, 4 months and 12 months, all runners will be assessed for running-related injuries (primary outcome), time for the occurrence of the first injury, foot health and functionality, muscle trophism, intrinsic foot muscle strength, dynamic foot arch strain and lower-limb biomechanics during walking and running (secondary outcomes). This is the first randomized clinical trial protocol to assess the effect of an exercise protocol that was designed specifically for the foot-and-ankle complex on running-related injuries to the lower limbs of long-distance runners. We intend to show

  17. Plasma volume shifts with immersion at rest and two exercise intensities.

    PubMed

    Ertl, A C; Bernauer, E M; Hom, C A

    1991-04-01

    Eight men were studied to determine the effect of cycling exercise on plasma volume (PV) during water immersion to the xiphoid process (WIX). In all protocols the subjects were seated upright. After 30 min of rest, subjects were immersed in 34.5 degrees C water and seated on a cycling ergometer. During three 1 h WIX protocols, subjects either remained at rest (No Ex) or pedaled from minutes 20 to 30 at 38% (Ex1) or 62% (Ex2) of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin concentration [( Hb]) from venous blood samples were compared pre-WIX and at minutes 20, 30, 40, and 60. Percent change in PV (delta PV) was calculated from pre-WIX Hct and [Hb] within each protocol. Hct and [Hb] decreased after 20 min of resting WIX (P less than 0.017). In the No Ex protocol, there were no further significant changes in these variables, with delta PV values of +10.4% at minute 20 and at a peak of +13.5% at minute 40. In Ex1 and Ex2, cycling increased Hct and [Hb] (P less than 0.01, minute 30 vs No Ex), with delta PV values at minute 30 of +3.7% and -0.9%, respectively, vs +12.8% in No Ex. Minute 60 values between protocols were not significantly different (mean delta PV of +10.8 +/- 0.6% SD). The hemodilution associated with WIX was either partially or completely attenuated by cycling exercise; the degree of hemoconcentration was related to exercise intensity. The exercise-induced hemoconcentration was reversed by 30 min of resting WIX. Exercise during WIX appears to cause similar decreases in PV, as does exercise in air provided that postural hemoconcentration prior to exercise is not already maximal.

  18. Protocol and the post-human performativity of security techniques.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Nathaniel

    2016-07-01

    This article explores the deployment of exercises by the United Kingdom Fire and Rescue Service. Exercises stage, simulate and act out potential future emergencies and in so doing help the Fire and Rescue Service prepare for future emergencies. Specifically, exercises operate to assess and develop protocol; sets of guidelines which plan out the actions undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service in responding to a fire. In the article I outline and assess the forms of knowledge and technologies, what I call the 'aesthetic forces', by which the exercise makes present and imagines future emergencies. By critically engaging with Karen Barad's notion of post-human performativity, I argue that exercises provide a site where such forces can entangle with one another; creating a bricolage through which future emergencies are evoked sensually and representatively, ultimately making it possible to experience emergencies in the present. This understanding of exercises allows also for critical appraisal of protocol both as phenomena that are produced through the enmeshing of different aesthetic forces and as devices which premise the operation of the security apparatus on contingency.

  19. Phototherapy on Management of Creatine Kinase Activity in General Versus Localized Exercise: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Aryane Flauzino; Micheletti, Jéssica Kirsch; Lopes, Jaqueline Santos Silva; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Netto Junior, Jayme; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo

    2018-06-21

    The main focus of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of phototherapy in the management of creatine kinase (CK) activity after exercise and furthermore to identify for which exercise model protocol phototherapy provides the best results. Meta-analysis comparing phototherapy with a control condition. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus, PEDro, and CENTRAL databases were searched from their earliest records to October 03, 2016. Data were pooled in a meta-analysis and described as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random effects model. Healthy subjects (no restrictions were applied, eg, age, sex, and exercise level). Phototherapy (low-level laser therapy and/or light-emitting diode therapy) before or after exercise and a placebo or control condition. Creatine kinase activity (no restriction to any analysis, eg, serum, plasma, or capillary blood). Fourteen studies were included for review. The results revealed that phototherapy has a more positive effect than control condition in management of CK activity [SMD = 0.77, 95% CI (0.32 to 1.22); P = 0.0007; I = 72%]. In exploratory analysis, the results showed that phototherapy was effective only in the exercise protocol with localized exercise with large effect size [localized exercise: SMD = 0.89, 95% CI (0.26 to 1.51); P = 0.0002; I = 76%; general exercise: SMD = 0.61, 95% CI (-0.05 to 1.26); P = 0.07; I = 67%]. The available evidence suggest that phototherapy has beneficial effects on the management of CK activity and demonstrate a possible relationship based on damage caused by exercise, providing a greater effect in studies that used localized exercise.

  20. Comparing interventions and exploring neural mechanisms of exercise in Parkinson disease: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Earhart, Gammon M; Duncan, Ryan P; Huang, John L; Perlmutter, Joel S; Pickett, Kristen A

    2015-02-05

    important insights regarding the effects of different modes of exercise on locomotor function in PD. The protocol is innovative because it: 1) uses group exercise approaches for all conditions including treadmill training, 2) directly compares tango to treadmill training and stretching, 3) tests participants OFF medication, and 4) utilizes two distinct neuroimaging approaches to explore mechanisms of the effects of exercise on the brain. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01768832 .

  1. Acute and chronic effects of aerobic exercise on blood pressure in resistant hypertension: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, L S; Santos, A C; Lucena, Jms; Silva, Lgo; Almeida, Aem; Brasileiro-Santos, M S

    2017-06-02

    Resistant hypertension is a specific condition that affects approximately 10% of subjects with hypertension, and is characterized by persistently high blood pressure levels even using therapy of three or more antihypertensive agents or with blood pressure control using therapy with four or more antihypertensive agents. Changes in lifestyle, such as physical exercise, are indicated for controlling blood pressure. However, investigating studies about this therapy in individuals with resistant hypertension are few. This is a randomized controlled clinical trial. Forty-eight patients with resistant hypertension will be submitted to perform four short-term interventions: aerobic exercise sessions (mild-, moderate- and high-intensity) and control session, in random order and on separate days. After the short-term sessions, the patients will be randomly allocated into four groups for 8 weeks of follow-up: mild-, moderate- and high-intensity aerobic exercise, and a control group. The primary outcome is the occurrence of blood pressure reduction (office and ambulatory analysis, and acute and chronic effects). Secondary outcomes are autonomic and hemodynamic mechanisms: cardiac and vasomotor autonomic modulation, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity, forearm blood flow and vascular resistance. The importance of exercise for hypertension has been known for decades, but little is known about the effects on patients with resistant hypertension. This study will help to understand whether different aerobic exercise intensities can induce different responses, as well as by what mechanisms adjustments in blood pressure levels may occur. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02670681 . Registered on 28 January 2016 (first version); Brazilian Registry Platform Clinical Trials: protocol RBR-5q24zh . Registered on 24 June 2015.

  2. Reliability and Accuracy of a Standardized Shallow Water Running Test to Determine Cardiorespiratory Fitness.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Elizabeth F; Sanders, Mary E; Gibbs, Bethany B; Franklin, Barry A; Nagle, Jacquelyn A; Prins, Philip J; Johnson, Caleb D; Robertson, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    A standardized fitness assessment is critical for the development of an individualized exercise prescription. Although the benefits of aquatic exercise have been well established, there remains the need for a standardized nonswimming protocol to accurately assess cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in shallow water. The present investigation was designed to assess (a) the reliability of a standardized shallow water run (SWR) test of CRF and (b) the accuracy of a standardized SWR compared with a land-based treadmill (LTM) test. Twenty-three healthy women (20 ± 3 years), with body mass index (23.5 ± 3 kg·m), performed 2 shallow water peak oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak) running tests (SWRa and SWRb), and 1 V[Combining Dot Above]O2max LTM. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated moderately strong reliability for V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak (ml·kg·min) (r = 0.73, p < 0.01), HRpeak (b·min) (r = 0.82; p < 0.01), and O2pulse (V[Combining Dot Above]O2 [ml·kg·min]·HR [b·min]) (r = 0.77, p < 0.01). Using paired t-tests and Pearson's correlations, SWR V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak and HRpeak were significantly lower than during LTM (p ≤ 0.05) and showed moderate correlations of 0.60 and 0.58 (p < 0.001) to LTM. O2pulse was similar (p > 0.05) for the SWR and LTM tests with a moderate correlation of 0.63. A standardized SWR test as a measure of CRF is a reliable, and to some degree, valid alternative to conventional protocols and may be used by strength and conditioning professionals to measure program outcomes and monitor training progress. Furthermore, this protocol provides a water-based option for CRF assessment among healthy women and offers insight toward the development of an effective protocol that can accommodate individuals with limited mobility, or those seeking less musculoskeletal impact from traditional land-based types of training.

  3. Comparison of ventilation threshold and heart rate deflection point in fast and standard treadmill test protocols.

    PubMed

    Vucetić, Vlatko; Sentija, Davor; Sporis, Goran; Trajković, Nebojsa; Milanović, Zoran

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two methods for determination of anaerobic threshold from two different treadmill protocols. Forty-eight Croatian runners of national rank (ten sprinters, fifteen 400-m runners, ten middle distance runners and thirteen long distance runners), mean age 21.7 +/- 5.1 years, participated in the study. They performed two graded maximal exercise tests on a treadmill, a standard ramp treadmill test (T(SR), speed increments of 1 km x h(-1) every 60 seconds) and a fast ramp treadmill test (T(FR), speed increments of 1 km x h(-1) every 30 seconds) to determine and compare the parameters at peak values and at heart rate at the deflection point (HR(DP)) and ventilation threshold (VT). There were no significant differences between protocols (p > 0.05) for peak values of oxygen uptake (VO(2max), 4.48 +/- 0.43 and 4.44 +/- 0.45 L x min(-1)), weight related VO(2max) (62.5 +/- 6.2 and 62.0 +/- 6.0 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)), pulmonary ventilation (VE(max), 163.1 +/- 18.7 and 161.3 +/- 19.9 L x min(-1)) and heart rate (HR(max), 192.3 +/- 8.5 and 194.4 +/- 8.7 bpm) (T(FR) and T(SR), respectively). Moreover, no significant differences between T(FR) and T(SR) where found for VT and HR(DP) when expressed as VO2 and HR. However, there was a significant effect of ramp slope on running speed at VO(2max) and at the anaerobic threshold (AnT), independent of the method used (VT: 16.0 +/- 2.2 vs 14.9 +/- 2.2 km x h(-1);HR(DP): 16.5 +/- 1.9 vs 14.9 +/- 2.0 km x h(-1) for T(FR) and T(SR) respectively). Linear regression analysis revealed high between-test and between-method correlations for VO2, HR and running speed parameters (r = 0.78-0.89, p < 0.01). The present study has indicated that the VT and HR(DP) for running (VO2, ventilation, and heart rate at VT/HR(DP)) are independent of test protocol, while there is a significant effect of ramp slope on VT and HR(DP) when expressed as running speed. Moreover, this study demonstrates that the point of deflection

  4. Post-exercise hypotension and heart rate variability response after water- and land-ergometry exercise in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Bergamin, Marco; Evangelista, Alexandre Lopes; Rica, Roberta Luksevicius; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Figueira, Aylton; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Rossi, Emilly Martinelli; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Dos Santos, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    systemic arterial hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease; physical activity for hypertensive patients is related to several beneficial cardiovascular adaptations. This paper evaluated the effect of water- and land-ergometry exercise sessions on post-exercise hypotension (PEH) of healthy normotensive subjects versus treated or untreated hypertensive patients. Forty-five older women composed three experimental groups: normotensive (N, n = 10), treated hypertensive (TH, n = 15) and untreated hypertensive (UH, n = 20). The physical exercise acute session protocol was performed at 75% of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) for 45 minutes; systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MBP) blood pressure were evaluated at rest, peak and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes after exercise cessation. Additionally, the heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed by R-R intervals in the frequency domain for the assessment of cardiac autonomic function. In both exercise modalities, equivalent increases in SBP were observed from rest to peak exercise for all groups, and during recovery, significant PEH was noted. At 90 minutes after the exercise session, the prevalence of hypotension was significantly higher in water- than in the land-based protocol. Moreover, more pronounced reductions in SBP and DBP were observed in the UH patients compared to TH and N subjects. Finally, exercise in the water was more effective in restoring HRV during recovery, with greater effects in the untreated hypertensive group. Our data demonstrated that water-ergometry exercise was able to induce expressive PEH and improve cardiac autonomic modulation in older normotensive, hypertensive treated or hypertensive untreated subjects when compared to conventional land-ergometry.

  5. A Cycle Ergometer Exercise Program Improves Exercise Capacity and Inspiratory Muscle Function in Hospitalized Patients Awaiting Heart Transplantation: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Forestieri, Patrícia; Guizilini, Solange; Peres, Monique; Bublitz, Caroline; Bolzan, Douglas W.; Rocco, Isadora S.; Santos, Vinícius B.; Moreira, Rita Simone L.; Breda, João R.; de Almeida, Dirceu R.; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos de C.; Arena, Ross; Gomes, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a cycle ergometer exercise program on exercise capacity and inspiratory muscle function in hospitalized patients with heart failure awaiting heart transplantation with intravenous inotropic support. Methods Patients awaiting heart transplantation were randomized and allocated prospectively into two groups: 1) Control Group (n=11) - conventional protocol; and 2) Intervention Group (n=7) - stationary cycle ergometer exercise training. Functional capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test and inspiratory muscle strength assessed by manovacuometry before and after the exercise protocols. Results Both groups demonstrated an increase in six-minute walk test distance after the experimental procedure compared to baseline; however, only the intervention group had a significant increase (P=0.08 and P=0.001 for the control and intervention groups, respectively). Intergroup comparison revealed a greater increase in the intervention group compared to the control (P<0.001). Regarding the inspiratory muscle strength evaluation, the intragroup analysis demonstrated increased strength after the protocols compared to baseline for both groups; statistical significance was only demonstrated for the intervention group, though (P=0.22 and P<0.01, respectively). Intergroup comparison showed a significant increase in the intervention group compared to the control (P<0.01). Conclusion Stationary cycle ergometer exercise training shows positive results on exercise capacity and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure awaiting cardiac transplantation while on intravenous inotropic support. PMID:27982348

  6. Documentation of operational protocol for the use of MAMA software

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Schwartz, Daniel S.

    2016-01-21

    Image analysis of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs is a complex process that can vary significantly between analysts. The factors causing the variation are numerous, and the purpose of Task 2b is to develop and test a set of protocols designed to minimize variation in image analysis between different analysts and laboratories, specifically using the MAMA software package, Version 2.1. The protocols were designed to be “minimally invasive”, so that expert SEM operators will not be overly constrained in the way they analyze particle samples. The protocols will be tested using a round-robin approach where results from expert SEM usersmore » at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, and the National Institute of Standards and Testing will be compared. The variation of the results will be used to quantify uncertainty in the particle image analysis process. The round-robin exercise will proceed with 3 levels of rigor, each with their own set of protocols, as described below in Tasks 2b.1, 2b.2, and 2b.3. The uncertainty will be developed using NIST standard reference material SRM 1984 “Thermal Spray Powder – Particle Size Distribution, Tungsten Carbide/Cobalt (Acicular)” [Reference 1]. Full details are available in the Certificate of Analysis, posted on the NIST website (http://www.nist.gov/srm/).« less

  7. Use of a Microprocessor to Implement an ADCCP Protocol (Federal Standard 1003).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    results of other studies, to evaluate the operational and economic impact of incorporating various options in Federal Standard 1003. The effort...the LSI interface and the microprocessor; the LSI chip deposits bytes in its buffer as the producer, and the MPU reads this data as the consumer...on the interface between the MPU and the LSI protocol chip. This requires two main processes to be running at the same time--transmit and receive. The

  8. Does the addition of hip strengthening exercises improve outcomes following total knee arthroplasty? A study protocol for a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Schache, Margaret B; McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E

    2016-06-13

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is effective in reducing pain and improving function for end-stage knee osteoarthritis. However, muscle weakness and functional limitations persist despite assistance from post-operative rehabilitation programs that traditionally focus on quadriceps strengthening and range of movement exercises. Hip abductor muscle weakness is evident in knee osteoarthritis and hip muscle strengthening reduces knee pain in this group. Following TKA, people with weak hip abductor strength perform more poorly on measures of physical function. However, very little is known of the effectiveness of including hip abductor strengthening exercises in post-operative rehabilitation. The aim of this trial is to compare the effects of targeted hip abductor strengthening to those of traditional care in a TKA rehabilitation program on muscle strength, patient reported outcomes and functional performance measures. This protocol describes a single-blinded randomized controlled trial, where 104 participants referred for inpatient rehabilitation following TKA will be recruited. Participants will be randomized using computer-generated numbers to one of two groups: usual care or usual care with additional hip strengthening exercises. Participants will attend physiotherapy daily during their inpatient length of stay, and will then attend between six and eight physiotherapy sessions as an outpatient. Primary outcomes are isometric hip abductor strength and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Secondary outcomes are stair climb test, 6 min walk test, timed up and go, 40 m fast-paced walk test, 30 second chair stand test, isometric quadriceps strength, Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) and SF-12. Outcome measures will be recorded at baseline (admission to inpatient rehabilitation), and then 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 6 months post admission to rehabilitation. The findings of this study will determine whether the addition of targeted hip strengthening

  9. Aerobic exercise effects upon cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Cammisuli, D M; Innocenti, A; Franzoni, F; Pruneti, C

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have shown that physical activity has positive effects on cognition in healthy older adults without cognitive complains but lesser is known about the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in patients suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The aim of the present study was to systematically review the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about the effects of aerobic exercise upon cognition in MCI patients. To this end, PubMed, Cochrane and Web of Science databases were analytically searched for RCTs including aerobic exercise interventions for MCI patients. There is evidence that aerobic exercise improves cognition in MCI patients. Overall research reported moderate effects for global cognition, logical memory, inhibitory control and divided attention. Due to methodological limitations of the investigated studies, findings should be interpreted with caution. Standardized training protocols, larger scale interventions and follow-ups may also provide better insight into the preventive effects of aerobic exercise on cognitive deterioration in MCI and its conversion into dementia.

  10. The influence of exercise intensity on heat acclimation in trained subjects.

    PubMed

    Houmard, J A; Costill, D L; Davis, J A; Mitchell, J B; Pascoe, D D; Robergs, R A

    1990-10-01

    Low-intensity exercise (less than or equal to 50% VO2max) has been demonstrated to produce heat acclimation (HA) in trained subjects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether shorter-duration, moderate-intensity exercise would also result in HA. Nine trained runners performed two 9-d exercise heat-stress protocols. Each protocol consisted of a 90-min heat tolerance test on days 1 (HTT1) and 9 (HTT2). On days 2-8 the subjects exercised at 50% VO2max for 60 min.d-1 (T50) or at 75% VO2max for 30-35 min.d-1 (T75). Final HTT2 heart rate and rectal temperature (Tr) were significantly (P less than 0.001) reduced, as compared to HTT1, with no differences between T50 and T75. Both protocols resulted in significant (P less than 0.05) reductions in HTT2 pre-exercise Tr and total exercising caloric expenditure, both of which are known to contribute to HA. No changes in resting plasma volume, osmolality, protein, post-HTT aldosterone, and exercising sweat rate were observed. These results demonstrate that equal levels of HA were obtained with T50 and T75, which suggests that moderate-intensity, short-duration exercise in the heat can produce HA in trained subjects.

  11. EuroFlow standardization of flow cytometer instrument settings and immunophenotyping protocols

    PubMed Central

    Kalina, T; Flores-Montero, J; van der Velden, V H J; Martin-Ayuso, M; Böttcher, S; Ritgen, M; Almeida, J; Lhermitte, L; Asnafi, V; Mendonça, A; de Tute, R; Cullen, M; Sedek, L; Vidriales, M B; Pérez, J J; te Marvelde, J G; Mejstrikova, E; Hrusak, O; Szczepański, T; van Dongen, J J M; Orfao, A

    2012-01-01

    The EU-supported EuroFlow Consortium aimed at innovation and standardization of immunophenotyping for diagnosis and classification of hematological malignancies by introducing 8-color flow cytometry with fully standardized laboratory procedures and antibody panels in order to achieve maximally comparable results among different laboratories. This required the selection of optimal combinations of compatible fluorochromes and the design and evaluation of adequate standard operating procedures (SOPs) for instrument setup, fluorescence compensation and sample preparation. Additionally, we developed software tools for the evaluation of individual antibody reagents and antibody panels. Each section describes what has been evaluated experimentally versus adopted based on existing data and experience. Multicentric evaluation demonstrated high levels of reproducibility based on strict implementation of the EuroFlow SOPs and antibody panels. Overall, the 6 years of extensive collaborative experiments and the analysis of hundreds of cell samples of patients and healthy controls in the EuroFlow centers have provided for the first time laboratory protocols and software tools for fully standardized 8-color flow cytometric immunophenotyping of normal and malignant leukocytes in bone marrow and blood; this has yielded highly comparable data sets, which can be integrated in a single database. PMID:22948490

  12. Development of a neuromuscular electrical stimulation protocol for sprint training.

    PubMed

    Russ, David W; Clark, Brian C; Krause, Jodi; Hagerman, Fredrick C

    2012-09-01

    Sprint training is associated with several beneficial adaptations in skeletal muscle, including an enhancement of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release. Unfortunately, several patient populations (e.g., the elderly, those with cardiac dysfunction) that might derive great benefit from sprint exercise are unlikely to tolerate it. The purpose of this report was to describe the development of a tolerable neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) protocol that induces skeletal muscle adaptations similar to those observed with sprint training. Our NMES protocol was modeled after a published sprint exercise protocol and used a novel electrode configuration and stimulation sequence to provide adequate training stimulus while maintaining subject tolerance. Nine young, healthy subjects (four men) began and completed the training protocol of the knee extensor muscles. All subjects completed the protocol, with ratings of discomfort far less than those reported in studies of traditional NMES. Training induced significant increases in SR Ca(2+) release and citrate synthase activity (~16% and 32%, respectively), but SR Ca(2+) uptake did not change. The percentage of myosin heavy chain IIx isoform was decreased significantly after training. At the whole muscle level, neither central activation nor maximum voluntary isometric contraction force were significantly altered, although isometric force did exhibit a trend toward an increase (~3%, P = 0.055). Surprisingly, the NMES training produced a significant increase in muscle cross-sectional area (~3%, P = 0.04). It seems that an appropriately designed NMES protocol can mimic many of the benefits of sprint exercise training, with a low overall time commitment and training volume. These findings suggest that NMES has the potential to bring the benefits of sprint exercise to individuals who are unable to tolerate traditional sprint training.

  13. Operational Implementation of a 2-Hour Prebreathe Protocol for International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, James M.; Conkin, J.; Foster, P. P.; Schneider, S.; Loftin, Karin C.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Vann, R.

    2000-01-01

    Procedures, equipment, and analytical techniques were developed to implement the ground tested 2-hour protocol in-flight operations. The methods are: 1) The flight protocol incorporates additional safety margin over the ground tested protocol. This includes up to 20 min of additional time on enriched O2 during suit purge and pressure check, increased duration of extravehicular activity (EVA) preparation exercise during O2 prebreathing (up to 90 min vs; the tested 24 min), and reduced rates of depressurization. The ground test observations were combined with model projections of the conservative measures (using statistical models from Duke University and NASA JSQ to bound the risk of Type I and Type II decompression sickness (DCS). 2) An inflight exercise device using the in-flight ergometer and elastic tubes for upper body exercise was developed to replicate the dual cycle exercise in the ground trials. 3) A new in-flight breathing system was developed and man-tested. 4) A process to monitor inflight experience with the protocol, including the use of an in-suit Doppler bubble monitor when available, was developed. The results are: 1) The model projections of the conservative factors of the operational protocol were shown to reduce the risk of DCS to levels consistent with the observations of no DCS to date in the shuttle program. 2) Cross over trials of the dual cycle ergometer used in ground tests and the in-flight exercise system verified that02consumption and the % division of work between upper and lower body was not significantly different at the p= 0.05 level. 3) The in-flight breathing system was demonstrated to support work rates generating 75% O2(max) in 95 percentile subjects. 4) An in-flight monitoring plan with acceptance criteria was put in place for the 2-hour prebreathe protocol. And the conclusions are: The 2-hour protocol has been approved for flight, and all implementation efforts are in place to allow use of the protocol as early as flight ISS 7A

  14. Interaction between cytokine gene polymorphisms and the effect of physical exercise on clinical and inflammatory parameters in older women: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Daniele S; Queiroz, Bárbara Z; Mateo, Elvis C C; Assumpção, Alexandra M; Felício, Diogo C; Miranda, Aline S; Anjos, Daniela M C; Jesus-Moraleida, Fabianna; Dias, Rosângela C; Pereira, Danielle A G; Teixeira, Antônio L; Pereira, Leani S M

    2012-08-08

    Aging is associated with chronic low-grade inflammatory activity with an elevation of cytokine levels. An association between regular physical activity and reduction of blood levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines is demonstrated in the literature pointing to an anti-inflammatory effect related to exercise. However, there is no consensus regarding which type of exercise and which parameters are the most appropriate to influence inflammatory markers. Evidence indicates that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) can influence the synthesis of those cytokines affecting their production. The design of this study is a randomized controlled trial. The aim of this study is to investigate the interaction between the cytokine genes SNP and the effect of physical activity on older women. The main outcomes are: serum levels of sTNFR-1, sTNFR-2, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, measured by the ELISA method; genotyping of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF)-alpha (rs1800629), IL6 (rs1800795), IL10 (rs1800896) by the TaqMan Method (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA); and physical performance assessed by Timed Up and Go and 10-Meter Walk Tests. Secondary outcomes include: Geriatric Depression Scale, Perceived Stress Scaleand aerobic capacity, assessed by the six-minute walk; and lower limb muscle strength, using an isokinetic dinamometer (Biodex Medical Systems, Inc., Shirley, NY,USA). Both exercise protocols will be performed three times a week for 10 weeks, 30 sessions in total. Investigating the interaction between genetic factors and exercise effects of both protocols of exercise on the levels of inflammatory cytokine levels can contribute to guide clinical practice related to treatment and prevention of functional changes due to chronic inflammatory activity in older adults. This approach could develop new perspectives on preventive and treatment proposals in physical therapy and in the management of the older patient. (ReBEC) RBR9v9cwf.

  15. Well-being, health and fitness of children who use wheelchairs: feasibility study protocol to develop child-centred 'keep-fit' exercise interventions.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Thomas D; Noyes, Jane; Spencer, Llinos Haf; Kubis, Hans-Peter; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Bray, Nathan; Whitaker, Rhiannon

    2015-02-01

    To undertake the pre-clinical and modelling phases of the Medical Research Council complex intervention framework to underpin development of child-centred 'keep-fit', exercise and physical activity interventions for children and young people who use wheelchairs. Children who use wheelchairs face many barriers to participation in physical activity, which compromises fitness, obesity, well-being and health. 'Keep-fit' programmes that are child-centred and engaging are urgently required to enhance participation of disabled children and their families as part of a healthy lifestyle. Nurses will likely be important in promoting and monitoring 'keep-fit' intervention(s) when implemented in the community. Mixed-method (including economic analysis) feasibility study to capture child and family preferences and keep-fit needs and to determine outcome measures for a 'keep-fit' intervention. The study comprises three stages. Stage 1 includes a mixed-method systematic review of effectiveness, cost effectiveness and key stakeholder views and experiences of keep-fit interventions, followed by qualitative interviews with children, young people and their parents to explore preferences and motivations for physical activity. Stage 2 will identify standardized outcome measures and test their application with children who use wheelchairs to obtain baseline fitness data. Options for an exercise-based keep-fit intervention will then be designed based on Stage 1 and 2 findings. In stage 3, we will present intervention options for feedback and further refinement to children and parents/carers in focus groups. (Project funded October 2012). At completion, this study will lead to the design of the intervention and a protocol to test its efficacy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Blood lactate clearance after maximal exercise depends on active recovery intensity.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J; Paton, B; Poole, L; Sun, W; Ferguson, C; Wilson, J; Kemi, O J

    2014-06-01

    High-intensity exercise is time-limited by onset of fatigue, marked by accumulation of blood lactate. This is accentuated at maximal, all-out exercise that rapidly accumulates high blood lactate. The optimal active recovery intensity for clearing lactate after such maximal, all-out exercise remains unknown. Thus, we studied the intensity-dependence of lactate clearance during active recovery after maximal exercise. We constructed a standardized maximal, all-out treadmill exercise protocol that predictably lead to voluntary exhaustion and blood lactate concentration>10 mM. Next, subjects ran series of all-out bouts that increased blood lactate concentration to 11.5±0.2 mM, followed by recovery exercises ranging 0% (passive)-100% of the lactate threshold. Repeated measurements showed faster lactate clearance during active versus passive recovery (P<0.01), and that active recovery at 60-100% of lactate threshold was more efficient for lactate clearance than lower intensity recovery (P<0.05). Active recovery at 80% of lactate threshold had the highest rate of and shortest time constant for lactate clearance (P<0.05), whereas the response during the other intensities was graded (100%=60%>40%>passive recovery, P<0.05). Active recovery after maximal all-out exercise clears accumulated blood lactate faster than passive recovery in an intensity-dependent manner, with maximum clearance occurring at active recovery of 80% of lactate threshold.

  17. Effects of exercise continued until anaerobic threshold on balance performance in male basketball players.

    PubMed

    Erkmen, Nurtekin; Suveren, Sibel; Göktepe, Ahmet Salim

    2012-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of exercise continued until the anaerobic threshold on balance performance in basketball players. Twelve male basketball players (age = 20.92 ± 2.81 years, body height = 192.72 ± 7.61 cm, body mass = 88.09 ± 8.41 kg, training experience = 7.17 ± 3.10 years) volunteered to participate in this study. A Kinesthetic Ability Trainer (KAT 2000 stabilometer) was used to measure the balance performance. Balance tests consisted of static tests on dominant, nondominant and double leg stance. The Bruce Protocol was performed by means of a treadmill. The exercise protocol was terminated when the subject passed the anaerobic threshold. After the exercise protocol, balance measurements were immediately repeated. Statistical differences between pre and post-exercise for dominant, nondominant and double leg stance were determined by the paired samples t-test according to the results of the test of normality. The post-exercise balance score on the dominant leg was significantly higher than pre-exercise (t = -2.758, p < 0.05). No differences existed between pre- and post-exercise in the balance scores of the nondominant leg after the exercise protocol (t = 0.428, p > 0.05). A significant difference was found between pre and post-exercise balance scores in the double leg stance (t = -2.354, p < 0.05). The main finding of this study was that an incremental exercise continued until the anaerobic threshold decreased balance performance on the dominant leg in basketball players, but did not alter it in the nondominant leg.

  18. Improving the Sandia Test Protocols with Advanced Inverter Functionality Testing of INV3, VV11, FW21, and L/HVRT

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Johnson, Jay Dean

    2013-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has created a test protocol for IEC TR 61850-90-7 advanced distributed energy resource (DER) functions, titled "Test Protocols for Advanced Inverter Interoperability Functions," often referred to as the Sandia Test Protocols. This document is currently in draft form, but has been shared with stakeholders around the world with the ultimate goal of collaborating to create a consensus set of test protocols which can be then incorporated into an International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and/or Underwriters Laboratories (UL) certification standard. The protocols are designed to ensure functional interoperability of DER (primarily photovoltaic (PV) inverters and energy storage systems) asmore » specified by the IEC technical report through communication and electrical tests. In this report, Sandia exercises the electrical characterization portion of the test protocols for four functions: constant power factor (INV3), volt-var (VV11), frequency-watt (FW21), and Low and High Voltage Ride Through (L/HVRT). The goal of the tests reported here was not to characterize the performance of the equipment under test (EUT), but rather to (a) exercise the draft Sandia Test Protocols in order to identify any revisions needed in test procedures, conditions, or equipment and (b) gain experience with state-of-the-art DER equipment to determine if the tests put unrealistic or overly aggressive requirements on EUT operation. In performing the work according to the current versions of the protocols, Sandia was able to identify weaknesses in the current versions and suggest improvements to the test protocols.« less

  19. Physical Therapy Protocols for Arthroscopic Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    DeFroda, Steven F; Mehta, Nabil; Owens, Brett D

    Outcomes after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be highly dependent on compliance and participation in physical therapy. Additionally, there are many variations in physician-recommended physical therapy protocols. The rehabilitation protocols of academic orthopaedic surgery departments vary widely despite the presence of consensus protocols. Descriptive epidemiology study. Level 3. Web-based arthroscopic Bankart rehabilitation protocols available online from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited orthopaedic surgery programs were included for review. Individual protocols were reviewed to evaluate for the presence or absence of recommended therapies, goals for completion of ranges of motion, functional milestones, exercise start times, and recommended time to return to sport. Thirty protocols from 27 (16.4%) total institutions were identified out of 164 eligible for review. Overall, 9 (30%) protocols recommended an initial period of strict immobilization. Variability existed between the recommended time periods for sling immobilization (mean, 4.8 ± 1.8 weeks). The types of exercises and their start dates were also inconsistent. Goals to full passive range of motion (mean, 9.2 ± 2.8 weeks) and full active range of motion (mean, 12.2 ± 2.8 weeks) were consistent with other published protocols; however, wide ranges existed within the reviewed protocols as a whole. Only 10 protocols (33.3%) included a timeline for return to sport, and only 3 (10%) gave an estimate for return to game competition. Variation also existed when compared with the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' (ASSET) consensus protocol. Rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic Bankart repair were found to be highly variable. They also varied with regard to published consensus protocols. This discrepancy may lead to confusion among therapists and patients. This study highlights the importance of attending surgeons being very clear and specific with

  20. Pre-exercise β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free-acid supplementation improves work capacity recovery: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Correia, Ana Luiza Matias; de Lima, Filipe Dinato; Bottaro, Martim; Vieira, Amilton; da Fonseca, Andrew Correa; Lima, Ricardo M

    2018-02-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a single-dose of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid (HMB-FA) supplementation on muscle recovery after a high-intensity exercise bout. Twenty-three trained young males were randomly assigned to receive either a single-dose supplementation of 3g of HMB-FA (n = 12; age 22.8 ± 3.0 years) or placebo (PLA; n = 11; age 22.9 ± 3.1 years). A muscle damage protocol was applied 60 minutes after supplementation, and consisted of seven sets of 20 drop jumps from a 60-cm box with 2-min rest intervals between sets. Muscle swelling, countermovement jump (CMJ), maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVIT) and work capacity (WC) were measured before, immediately after, 24, 48 and 72 hours after the exercise protocol. Muscle swelling, CMJ and MVIT changed similarly in both groups after the exercise protocol (p < 0.001), but returned to pre-exercise levels after 24 hours in both groups. WC decreased similarly in both groups after the exercise protocol (p < 0.01). For HMB-FA, WC returned to pre-exercise level 24 hours after exercise protocol. However, on PLA, WC did not return to pre-exercise level even 72 hours after the exercise protocol. In summary, a single-dose of HMB-FA supplementation improved WC recovery after a high-intensity exercise bout. However, HMB-FA did not affect the time-course of muscle swelling, MVIT and CMJ recovery.

  1. Development of a standardized sequential extraction protocol for simultaneous extraction of multiple actinide elements

    DOE PAGES

    Faye, Sherry A.; Richards, Jason M.; Gallardo, Athena M.; ...

    2017-02-07

    Sequential extraction is a useful technique for assessing the potential to leach actinides from soils; however, current literature lacks uniformity in experimental details, making direct comparison of results impossible. This work continued development toward a standardized five-step sequential extraction protocol by analyzing extraction behaviors of 232Th, 238U, 239,240Pu and 241Am from lake and ocean sediment reference materials. Results produced a standardized procedure after creating more defined reaction conditions to improve method repeatability. A NaOH fusion procedure is recommended following sequential leaching for the complete dissolution of insoluble species.

  2. Effects of exercise with or without light exposure on sleep quality and hormone reponses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hayan; Kim, Sunho; Kim, Donghee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The objectives of the present study were to determine the effect of sun exposure and aerobic exercise on quality of sleep and investigate sleep-related hormonal responses in college-aged males. [Methods] In this study, the cross-over design was utilized. The subjects (N = 10) without any physical problems or sleep disorders participated in the experimental performed 4 protocols in only sun exposure (for 30 minutes, EG1) protocol, only aerobic exercise (walking and jogging for 30 minutes, EG2) protocol, aerobic exercise with sun exposure (EG3) protocol, and control (no exercise and no sun exposure, EG4) protocol. Each protocol was 5 times per week with one-week break (wash-out period) between protocols to prevent the effects of the previous protocol. Total test period was should be 7 weeks (one week of protocol and one week of break). Before and after each aerobic exercise session, the subjects completed stretching to warm up for 5 to 10 minutes. Surveys consisting of (bedtime, wake-up time, sleep onset latency, and (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were obtained before the test and after each protocol. After each protocol, the following sleep-related hormonal responses were measured: blood concentrations of melatonin, cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. One-way ANOVA was used to determine differences between protocols. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. [Results] Bedtime of EG4 was significantly later than that of the EG1 or EG3. Wake-up time in the EG4 was significantly later than that of the EG1 or the EG3. Sleep onset latency in the EG4 was longer than that of the EG3. The quality of sleep in the EG4 was lower than that of the EG3. Sleep cycle in the EG4 was significantly shorter than that of the EG1. Blood melatonin concentrations of the EG3 was significantly higher than that of the EG4. There were no significant differences in blood concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, or norepinephrine among protocols, with the order from

  3. Effects of administration of the standardized Panax ginseng extract G115 on hepatic antioxidant function after exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Voces, J; Alvarez, A I; Vila, L; Ferrando, A; Cabral de Oliveira, C; Prieto, J G

    1999-06-01

    The effect of prolonged treatment with the standardized Panax ginseng extract G115 on the antioxidant capacity of the liver was investigated. For this purpose, rats that had received G115 orally at different doses for 3 months and untreated control rats were subjected to exhaustive exercise on a treadmill. A bell-shaped dose response on running time was obtained. The results showed that the administration of G115 significantly increases the hepatic glutathione peroxidase activity (GPX) and the reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in the liver, with a dose-dependent reduction of the thiobarbituric acid reactant substances (TBARS). After the exercise, there is reduced hepatic lipid peroxidation, as evidenced by the TBARS levels in both the controls and the treated animals. The GPX (glutathione peroxidase) and SOD (superoxide dismutase) activity are also significantly increased in the groups receiving G115, compared with the controls. The hepatic transaminase levels, ALT (Alanine-amino-transferase) and AST (Aspartate-amino-transferase), in the recuperation phase 48 h after the exercise, indicate a clear hepatoprotective effect related to the administration of the standardized Panax ginseng extract G115. At hepatic level, G115 increases the antioxidant capacity, with a marked reduction of the effects of the oxidative stress induced by the exhaustive exercise.

  4. Impact of dehydration on a full body resistance exercise protocol.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Justin A; Green, James M; Bishop, Phillip A; Richardson, Mark T; Neggers, Yasmin H; Leeper, James D

    2010-05-01

    This study examined effects of dehydration on a full body resistance exercise workout. Ten males completed two trials: heat exposed (with 100% fluid replacement) (HE) and dehydration (approximately 3% body mass loss with no fluid replacement) (DEHY) achieved via hot water bath (approximately 39 degrees C). Following HE and DEHY, participants performed three sets to failure (using predetermined 12 repetition maximum) of bench press, lat pull down, overhead press, barbell curl, triceps press, and leg press with a 2-min recovery between each set and 2 min between exercises. A paired t test showed total repetitions (all sets combined) were significantly lower for DEHY: (144.1 +/- 26.6 repetitions) versus HE: (169.4 +/- 29.1 repetitions). ANOVAs showed significantly lower repetitions (approximately 1-2 repetitions on average) per exercise for DEHY versus HE (all exercises). Pre-set rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and pre-set heart rate (HR) were significantly higher [approximately 0.6-1.1 units on average in triceps press, leg press, and approached significance in lat pull down (P = 0.14) and approximately 6-13 b min(-1) on average in bench press, lat pull down, triceps press, and approached significance for overhead press (P = 0.10)] in DEHY versus HE. Session RPE difference approached significance (DEHY: 8.6 +/- 1.9, HE: 7.4 +/- 2.3) (P = 0.12). Recovery HR was significantly higher for DEHY (116 +/- 15 b min(-1)) versus HE (105 +/- 13 b min(-1)). Dehydration (approximately 3%) impaired resistance exercise performance, decreased repetitions, increased perceived exertion, and hindered HR recovery. Results highlight the importance of adequate hydration during full body resistance exercise sessions.

  5. Does exercise deprivation increase the tendency towards morphine dependence in rats?

    PubMed

    Nakhaee, Mohammad Reza; Sheibani, Vahid; Ghahraman Tabrizi, Kourosh; Marefati, Hamid; Bahreinifar, Sareh; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2010-01-01

    Exercise deprivation has been concluded to have some negative effectson psychological well-being. This study was conducted to find outwhether exercise deprivation may lead to morphine dependence in rats. Forty male Wistar rats weighing 162 ± 9 g were housed in clear plasticcages in groups of two under standard laboratory conditions. The studyhad two phases. In phase I, the animals were randomly divided intoexercised (E) and unexercised (UE) groups (n = 20 each) and treadmillrunning was performed based on a standard protocol for three weeks. Atthe end of the training period, plasma β-endorphin levels weredetermined in four rats from each group. In phase II, the animals wereprovided with two bottles, one containing tap water and the other 25mg/l morphine sulfate in tap water for a total of 12 weeks. At the end ofthis phase naloxone was injected intraperitoneally to precipitatemorphine withdrawal. THERE WAS NO SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UE AND E GROUPS INMORPHINE CONSUMPTION (MG/KG/WK) [ F(1,14) = 0.2, P = 0.690; time:F(11,154) =18.72, P < 0.001; interaction: F(11,154) = 1.27 , P = 0.245]. Nostatistically significant difference between the two groups of animals wasseen regarding withdrawal signs. The study showed that discontinuation of exercise does not increasethe tendency of morphine dependence in rats.

  6. Post-exercise hypotension and heart rate variability response after water- and land-ergometry exercise in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Bergamin, Marco; Evangelista, Alexandre Lopes; Rica, Roberta Luksevicius; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Figueira, Aylton; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Rossi, Emilly Martinelli; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Background systemic arterial hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease; physical activity for hypertensive patients is related to several beneficial cardiovascular adaptations. This paper evaluated the effect of water- and land-ergometry exercise sessions on post-exercise hypotension (PEH) of healthy normotensive subjects versus treated or untreated hypertensive patients. Methods Forty-five older women composed three experimental groups: normotensive (N, n = 10), treated hypertensive (TH, n = 15) and untreated hypertensive (UH, n = 20). The physical exercise acute session protocol was performed at 75% of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) for 45 minutes; systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MBP) blood pressure were evaluated at rest, peak and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes after exercise cessation. Additionally, the heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed by R-R intervals in the frequency domain for the assessment of cardiac autonomic function. Results In both exercise modalities, equivalent increases in SBP were observed from rest to peak exercise for all groups, and during recovery, significant PEH was noted. At 90 minutes after the exercise session, the prevalence of hypotension was significantly higher in water- than in the land-based protocol. Moreover, more pronounced reductions in SBP and DBP were observed in the UH patients compared to TH and N subjects. Finally, exercise in the water was more effective in restoring HRV during recovery, with greater effects in the untreated hypertensive group. Conclusion Our data demonstrated that water-ergometry exercise was able to induce expressive PEH and improve cardiac autonomic modulation in older normotensive, hypertensive treated or hypertensive untreated subjects when compared to conventional land-ergometry. PMID:28658266

  7. Exercise-Induced Neuroprotection of the Nigrostriatal Dopamine System in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lijuan; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiaoli; Qiao, Decai; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that physical activity and exercise may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD), and clinical observations suggest that physical exercise can reduce the motor symptoms in PD patients. In experimental animals, a profound observation is that exercise of appropriate timing, duration, and intensity can reduce toxin-induced lesion of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system in animal PD models, although negative results have also been reported, potentially due to inappropriate timing and intensity of the exercise regimen. Exercise may also minimize DA denervation-induced medium spiny neuron (MSN) dendritic atrophy and other abnormalities such as enlarged corticostriatal synapse and abnormal MSN excitability and spiking activity. Taken together, epidemiological studies, clinical observations, and animal research indicate that appropriately dosed physical activity and exercise may not only reduce the risk of developing PD in vulnerable populations but also benefit PD patients by potentially protecting the residual DA neurons or directly restoring the dysfunctional cortico-basal ganglia motor control circuit, and these benefits may be mediated by exercise-triggered production of endogenous neuroprotective molecules such as neurotrophic factors. Thus, exercise is a universally available, side effect-free medicine that should be prescribed to vulnerable populations as a preventive measure and to PD patients as a component of treatment. Future research needs to establish standardized exercise protocols that can reliably induce DA neuron protection, enabling the delineation of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that in turn can maximize exercise-induced neuroprotection and neurorestoration in animal PD models and eventually in PD patients. PMID:29163139

  8. Protocol and the post-human performativity of security techniques

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the deployment of exercises by the United Kingdom Fire and Rescue Service. Exercises stage, simulate and act out potential future emergencies and in so doing help the Fire and Rescue Service prepare for future emergencies. Specifically, exercises operate to assess and develop protocol; sets of guidelines which plan out the actions undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service in responding to a fire. In the article I outline and assess the forms of knowledge and technologies, what I call the ‘aesthetic forces’, by which the exercise makes present and imagines future emergencies. By critically engaging with Karen Barad’s notion of post-human performativity, I argue that exercises provide a site where such forces can entangle with one another; creating a bricolage through which future emergencies are evoked sensually and representatively, ultimately making it possible to experience emergencies in the present. This understanding of exercises allows also for critical appraisal of protocol both as phenomena that are produced through the enmeshing of different aesthetic forces and as devices which premise the operation of the security apparatus on contingency. PMID:29708110

  9. VALIDATION OF STANDARD ANALYTICAL PROTOCOL FOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is a growing concern with the potential for terrorist use of chemical weapons to cause civilian harm. In the event of an actual or suspected outdoor release of chemically hazardous material in a large area, the extent of contamination must be determined. This requires a system with the ability to prepare and quickly analyze a large number of contaminated samples for the traditional chemical agents, as well as numerous toxic industrial chemicals. Liquid samples (both aqueous and organic), solid samples (e.g., soil), vapor samples (e.g., air) and mixed state samples, all ranging from household items to deceased animals, may require some level of analyses. To meet this challenge, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center, in collaboration with experts from across U.S. EPA and other Federal Agencies, initiated an effort to identify analytical methods for the chemical and biological agents that could be used to respond to a terrorist attack or a homeland security incident. U.S. EPA began development of standard analytical protocols (SAPs) for laboratory identification and measurement of target agents in case of a contamination threat. These methods will be used to help assist in the identification of existing contamination, the effectiveness of decontamination, as well as clearance for the affected population to reoccupy previously contaminated areas. One of the first SAPs developed was for the determin

  10. Mental Fatigue and Physical and Cognitive Performance During a 2-Bout Exercise Test.

    PubMed

    Vrijkotte, Susan; Meeusen, Romain; Vandervaeren, Cloe; Buyse, Luk; Cutsem, Jeroen van; Pattyn, Nathalie; Roelands, Bart

    2018-04-01

    The 2-bout exercise protocol has been developed to diagnose nonfunctional overreaching and the "overtraining syndrome." It consists of 2 maximal exercise bouts separated by 4 hours. Mental fatigue negatively influences performance, but the effects of its occurrence during the 2-bout exercise protocol have never been investigated. The aim of this study was to examine whether mental fatigue (induced during the rest period) influences physical and cognitive performance during/after the second exercise bout of the 2-bout exercise protocol. Nine healthy, well-trained male cyclists participated in a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. The intervention consisted of either 1.5-hour rest (control) or performing a computer-based Stroop task to induce mental fatigue. Cognitive (Eriksen Flanker task), physiological (lactate, maximum heart rate, and maximum wattage), and subjective data (mental fatigue-visual analog scale, Profile of Mood States, and rating of perceived exertion) were gathered. Ratings of fatigue, tension, and mental fatigue were affected in the mental fatigue condition (P < .05). Neither physiological nor cognitive differences were found between conditions. Ratings of mental fatigue were already affected after the first maximum exercise test (P < .05). Neither physical nor cognitive performance was affected by mental fatigue, but subjective ratings did reveal significant differences. It is recommended to exclude mentally challenging tasks during the 2-bout exercise protocol rest period to ascertain unaffected subjective test results. This study should be repeated in athletes diagnosed with nonfunctional overreaching/overtraining syndrome.

  11. Eccentric exercises; why do they work, what are the problems and how can we improve them?

    PubMed

    Rees, J D; Wolman, R L; Wilson, A

    2009-04-01

    Eccentric exercises (EE) have proved successful in the management of chronic tendinopathy, particularly of the Achilles and patellar tendons, where they have been shown to be effective in controlled trials. However, numerous questions regarding EE remain. The standard protocols are time-consuming and require very motivated patients. EE are effective in some tendinopathies but not others. Furthermore, the location of the lesion can have a profound effect on efficacy; for example, standard EE in insertional lesions of the Achilles are ineffective. Until recently little was known of the effect of EE on tendinopathic tendons, although a greater understanding of this process is emerging. Additionally, recent in vivo evidence directly comparing eccentric and concentric exercises provides a possible explanation for the therapeutic benefit of EE. The challenge now is to make EE more effective. Suggestions on areas of future research are made.

  12. Exacerbated in vivo metabolic changes suggestive of a spontaneous muscular vaso-occlusive crisis in exercising muscle of a sickle cell mouse.

    PubMed

    Chatel, Benjamin; Messonnier, Laurent A; Bendahan, David

    2017-06-01

    While sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by frequent vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC), no direct observation of such an event in skeletal muscle has been performed in vivo. The present study reported exacerbated in vivo metabolic changes suggestive of a spontaneous muscular VOC in exercising muscle of a sickle cell mouse. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of phosphorus 31, phosphocreatine and inorganic phosphate concentrations and intramuscular pH were measured throughout two standardized protocols of rest - exercise - recovery at two different intensities in ten SCD mice. Among these mice, one single mouse presented divergent responses. A statistical analysis (based on confidence intervals) revealed that this single mouse presented slower phosphocreatine resynthesis and inorganic phosphate disappearance during the post-stimulation recovery of one of the protocols, what could suggest an ischemia. This study described, for the first time in a sickle cell mouse in vivo, exacerbated metabolic changes triggered by an exercise session that would be suggestive of a live observation of a muscular VOC. However, no evidence of a direct cause-effect relationship between exercise and VOC has been put forth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects Of Exercise During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, Edmund M.

    1993-01-01

    Pair of reports adds to growing body of knowledge of physical deconditioning caused by prolonged bed rest and effectiveness of various exercise regimens in preserving or restoring fitness. Major objective to determine what regimens to prescribe to astronauts before flight, during prolonged weightlessness, and immediately before returning to Earth. Knowledge also benefits patients confined by illness or injury. First report discusses experiment on effects of two types of periodic, intense, short-duration exercise during bed rest. Experiment also discussed in documents "Effects Of Exercise During Prolonged Bed Rest" (ARC-12190), and "Isotonic And Isokinetic Exercise During Bed Rest" (ARC-12180). Second report reviews knowledge acquired with view toward development of protocols for exercise regimens.

  14. Study protocol: a mixed methods feasibility study for a loaded self-managed exercise programme for patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin E; Hendrick, Paul; Bateman, Marcus; Moffatt, Fiona; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Selfe, James; Smith, Toby O; Logan, Pip

    2018-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is one of the most common forms of knee pain in adults under the age of 40, with a prevalence of 23% in the general population. The long-term prognosis is poor, with only one third of people pain-free 1 year after diagnosis. The biomedical model of pain in relation to persistent PFP has recently been called into question. It has been suggested that interventions for chronic musculoskeletal conditions should consider alternative mechanisms of action, beyond muscles and joints. Modern treatment therapies should consider desensitising strategies, with exercises that target movements and activities patients find fearful and painful. High-quality research on exercise prescription in relation to pain mechanisms, not directed at specific tissue pathology, and dose response clearly warrants further investigation. Our primary aim is to establish the feasibility and acceptability of conducting a definitive RCT which will evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a loaded self-managed exercise programme for people with patellofemoral pain. This is a single-centred, multiphase, sequential, mixed-methods trial that will evaluate the feasibility of running a definitive large-scale randomised controlled trial of a loaded self-managed exercise programme versus usual physiotherapy. Initially, 8-10 participants with a minimum 3-month history of PFP will be recruited from an NHS physiotherapy waiting list and interviewed. Participants will be invited to discuss perceived barriers and facilitators to exercise engagement, and the meaning and impact of PFP. Then, 60 participants will be recruited in the same manner for the main phase of the feasibility trial. A web-based service will randomise patients to a loaded self-managed exercise programme or usual physiotherapy. The loaded self-managed exercise programme is aimed at addressing lower limb knee and hip weakness and is positioned within a framework of reducing fear/avoidance with an emphasis on self

  15. Improving physical functional and quality of life in older adults with multiple sclerosis via a DVD-delivered exercise intervention: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Wójcicki, Thomas R; Roberts, Sarah A; Learmonth, Yvonne C; Hubbard, Elizabeth A; Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominque; Motl, Robert W; McAuley, Edward

    2014-12-01

    There is a need to identify innovative, low-cost and broad-reaching strategies for promoting exercise and improving physical function in older adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This randomised controlled pilot trial will test the efficacy of a 6-month, DVD-delivered exercise intervention to improve functional performance and quality of life in older adults with MS. Participants will be randomised either into a DVD-delivered exercise condition or an attentional control condition. This novel approach to programme delivery provides participants with detailed exercise instructions which are presented in a progressive manner and includes a variety of modifications to better meet varying levels of physical abilities. The targeted exercises focus on three critical elements of functional fitness: flexibility, strength and balance. It is hypothesised that participants who are randomised to the exercise DVD condition will demonstrate improvements in physical function compared with participants assigned to the attentional control condition. Data analysis will include a 2 (condition)×2 (time) mixed factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) that follows intent-to-treat principles, as well as an examination of effect sizes. Participants will take part in qualitative interviews about perspectives on physical activity and programme participation. The study protocol was approved by a university institutional review board and registered with a federal database. Participants will be asked to read and sign a detailed informed consent document and will be required to provide a physician's approval to participate in the study. The exercise DVDs include an overview of safety-related concerns and recommendations relative to exercise participation, as well as detailed instructions highlighting the proper execution of each exercise presented on screen. Following completion of this trial, data will be immediately analysed and results will be presented at scientific meetings and published in

  16. Global Metabolic Stress of Isoeffort Continuous and High Intensity Interval Aerobic Exercise: A Comparative 1H NMR Metabonomic Study.

    PubMed

    Zafeiridis, Andreas; Chatziioannou, Anastasia Chrysovalantou; Sarivasiliou, Haralambos; Kyparos, Antonios; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Pechlivanis, Alexandros; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis; Baskakis, Constantinos; Dipla, Konstantina; Theodoridis, Georgios A

    2016-12-02

    The overall metabolic/energetic stress that occurs during an acute bout of exercise is proposed to be the main driving force for long-term training adaptations. Continuous and high-intensity interval exercise protocols (HIIE) are currently prescribed to acquire the muscular and metabolic benefits of aerobic training. We applied 1 H NMR-based metabonomics to compare the overall metabolic perturbation and activation of individual bioenergetic pathways of three popular aerobic exercises matched for effort/strain. Nine men performed continuous, long-interval (3 min), and short-interval (30 s) bouts of exercise under isoeffort conditions. Blood was collected before and after exercise. The multivariate PCA and OPLS-DA models showed a distinct separation of pre- and postexercise samples in three protocols. The two models did not discriminate the postexercise overall metabolic profiles of the three exercise types. Analysis focused on muscle bioenergetic pathways revealed an extensive upregulation of carbohydrate-lipid metabolism and the TCA cycle in all three protocols; there were only a few differences among protocols in the postexercise abundance of molecules when long-interval bouts were performed. In conclusion, continuous and HIIE exercise protocols, when performed with similar effort/strain, induce comparable global metabolic response/stress despite their marked differences in work-bout intensities. This study highlights the importance of NMR metabonomics in comprehensive monitoring of metabolic consequences of exercise training in the blood of athletes and exercising individuals.

  17. Evaluating a community-based exercise intervention with adults living with HIV: protocol for an interrupted time series study.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Solomon, Patricia; Tang, Ada; Murzin, Kate; Chan Carusone, Soo; Zobeiry, Mehdi; Nayar, Ayesha; Davis, Aileen M

    2016-10-20

    Our aim was to evaluate a community-based exercise (CBE) intervention with the goal of reducing disability and enhancing health for community-dwelling people living with HIV (PLWH). We will use a mixed-methods implementation science study design, including a prospective longitudinal interrupted time series study, to evaluate a CBE intervention with PLWH in Toronto, Canada. We will recruit PLWH who consider themselves medically stable and safe to participate in exercise. In the baseline phase (0-8 months), participants will be monitored bimonthly. In the intervention phase (8-14 months), participants will take part in a 24-week CBE intervention that includes aerobic, resistance, balance and flexibility exercise at the YMCA 3 times per week, with weekly supervision by a fitness instructor, and monthly educational sessions. In the follow-up phase (14-22 months), participants will be encouraged to continue to engage in unsupervised exercise 3 times per week. Quantitative assessment: We will assess cardiopulmonary fitness, strength, weight, body composition and flexibility outcomes followed by the administration of self-reported questionnaires to assess disability and contextual factor outcomes (coping, mastery, stigma, social support) bimonthly. We will use time series regression analysis to determine the level and trend of outcomes across each phase in relation to the intervention. Qualitative assessment: We will conduct a series of face-to-face interviews with a subsample of participants and recreation providers at initiation, midpoint and completion of the 24-week CBE intervention. We will explore experiences and anticipated benefits with exercise, perceived impact of CBE for PLWH and the strengths and challenges of implementing a CBE intervention. Interviews will be audio recorded and analysed thematically. Protocol approved by the University of Toronto HIV/AIDS Research Ethics Board. Knowledge translation will occur with stakeholders in the form of

  18. Evaluating a community-based exercise intervention with adults living with HIV: protocol for an interrupted time series study

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Solomon, Patricia; Tang, Ada; Murzin, Kate; Chan Carusone, Soo; Zobeiry, Mehdi; Nayar, Ayesha; Davis, Aileen M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to evaluate a community-based exercise (CBE) intervention with the goal of reducing disability and enhancing health for community-dwelling people living with HIV (PLWH). Methods and analysis We will use a mixed-methods implementation science study design, including a prospective longitudinal interrupted time series study, to evaluate a CBE intervention with PLWH in Toronto, Canada. We will recruit PLWH who consider themselves medically stable and safe to participate in exercise. In the baseline phase (0–8 months), participants will be monitored bimonthly. In the intervention phase (8–14 months), participants will take part in a 24-week CBE intervention that includes aerobic, resistance, balance and flexibility exercise at the YMCA 3 times per week, with weekly supervision by a fitness instructor, and monthly educational sessions. In the follow-up phase (14–22 months), participants will be encouraged to continue to engage in unsupervised exercise 3 times per week. Quantitative assessment: We will assess cardiopulmonary fitness, strength, weight, body composition and flexibility outcomes followed by the administration of self-reported questionnaires to assess disability and contextual factor outcomes (coping, mastery, stigma, social support) bimonthly. We will use time series regression analysis to determine the level and trend of outcomes across each phase in relation to the intervention. Qualitative assessment: We will conduct a series of face-to-face interviews with a subsample of participants and recreation providers at initiation, midpoint and completion of the 24-week CBE intervention. We will explore experiences and anticipated benefits with exercise, perceived impact of CBE for PLWH and the strengths and challenges of implementing a CBE intervention. Interviews will be audio recorded and analysed thematically. Ethics and dissemination Protocol approved by the University of Toronto HIV/AIDS Research Ethics Board. Knowledge

  19. Effects of water drinking on cardiovascular responses to supine exercise and on orthostatic hypotension after exercise in pure autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Humm, A M; Mason, L M; Mathias, C J

    2008-10-01

    Patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF) have an abnormal fall in blood pressure (BP) with supine exercise and exacerbation of orthostatic hypotension (OH) after exercise. This study assessed the pressor effect of water on the cardiovascular responses to supine exercise and on OH after exercise. 8 patients with PAF underwent a test protocol consisting of standing for 5 min, supine rest for 10 min, supine exercise by pedalling a cycle ergometer at workloads of 25, 50 and 75 W (each for 3 min), supine rest for 10 min and standing for 5 min. The test protocol was performed without water ingestion and on a separate occasion after 480 ml of distilled water immediately after pre-exercise standing. Beat to beat cardiovascular indices were measured with the Portapres II device with subsequent Modelflow analysis. All patients had severe OH pre-exercise (BP fall systolic 65.0 (26.1) mm Hg, diastolic 22.7 (13.5) mm Hg), with prompt recovery of BP in the supine position. 5 min after water drinking, there was a significant rise in BP in the supine position. With exercise, there was a clear fall in BP (systolic 42.1 (24.4) mm Hg, diastolic 25.9 (10.0) mm Hg) with a modest rise in heart rate; this occurred even after water ingestion (BP fall systolic 49.8 (18.9) mm Hg, diastolic 26.0 (9.1) mm Hg). BP remained low after exercise but was significantly higher after water intake, resulting in better tolerance of post-exercise standing. Water drinking did not change the abnormal cardiovascular responses to supine exercise. However, water drinking improved orthostatic tolerance post-exercise.

  20. Validity of Wearable Activity Monitors during Cycling and Resistance Exercise.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, Benjamin D; Hebert, Edward P; Hollander, Daniel B; Williams, Brian M; Cormier, Corinne L; Naquin, Mildred R; Gillan, Wynn W; Gusew, Emily E; Kraemer, Robert R

    2018-03-01

    The use of wearable activity monitors has seen rapid growth; however, the mode and intensity of exercise could affect the validity of heart rate (HR) and caloric (energy) expenditure (EE) readings. There is a lack of data regarding the validity of wearable activity monitors during graded cycling regimen and a standard resistance exercise. The present study determined the validity of eight monitors for HR compared with an ECG and seven monitors for EE compared with a metabolic analyzer during graded cycling and resistance exercise. Fifty subjects (28 women, 22 men) completed separate trials of graded cycling and three sets of four resistance exercises at a 10-repetition-maximum load. Monitors included the following: Apple Watch Series 2, Fitbit Blaze, Fitbit Charge 2, Polar H7, Polar A360, Garmin Vivosmart HR, TomTom Touch, and Bose SoundSport Pulse (BSP) headphones. HR was recorded after each cycling intensity and after each resistance exercise set. EE was recorded after both protocols. Validity was established as having a mean absolute percent error (MAPE) value of ≤10%. The Polar H7 and BSP were valid during both exercise modes (cycling: MAPE = 6.87%, R = 0.79; resistance exercise: MAPE = 6.31%, R = 0.83). During cycling, the Apple Watch Series 2 revealed the greatest HR validity (MAPE = 4.14%, R = 0.80). The BSP revealed the greatest HR accuracy during resistance exercise (MAPE = 6.24%, R = 0.86). Across all devices, as exercise intensity increased, there was greater underestimation of HR. No device was valid for EE during cycling or resistance exercise. HR from wearable devices differed at different exercise intensities; EE estimates from wearable devices were inaccurate. Wearable devices are not medical devices, and users should be cautious when using these devices for monitoring physiological responses to exercise.

  1. A Descriptive Analysis of Exercise Tolerance Test at Seremban Hospital : An Audit for the Year 2001

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Abdul Latiff; Nee, Chan Chee; Azzad, Ahmed

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose is to report on the epidemiological variables and their association with the results of the exercise tolerance test (ETT) in the series of patients referred for standard diagnostic ETT at Seremban Hospital during the year 2001. ETT is widely performed, but, in Malaysia, an analysis of the associations between the epidemiological data and the results of the ETT has not been presented. All patients referred for ETT at Seremban Hospital who underwent exercise treadmill tests for the year 2001 were taken as the study population. Demographic details and patients with established heart disease (i.e. prior coronary bypass surgery, myocardial infarction, or congestive heart failure) were noted. Clinical and ETT variables were collected retrospectively from the hospital records. Testing and data management were performed in a standardized fashion with a computer-assisted protocol. This study showed that there was no significant predictive epidemiological variable on the results of the ETT. However, it was found that there was statistically significant difference between the peak exercise time of males and females undergoing the ETT. PMID:22973128

  2. Overview of the Exploration Exercise Device Validation Study Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, J. K.; Swan, B. G.

    2018-01-01

    The NASA has determined that a multi-functional exercise device will be developed for use as an exercise device during exploration missions. The device will allow for full body resistance and metabolic exercise necessary to minimize physiological losses during space flight and to maintain fitness necessary to perform critical mission tasks. Prior to implementation as an exercise device on an Exploration vehicle, there will be verification and validation testing completed to determine device efficacy at providing the necessary training stimuli to achieve desired goals. Because the exploration device will be new device that has yet be specified, specific Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols have yet to be developed. Upon delivery of an exploration exercise device training unit, stakeholders throughout NASA will develop V&V plans that include ground-based testing and testing on the International Space Station (ISS). Stakeholders will develop test protocols that include success criterion for the device. Ground tests will occur at NASA Johnson Space Station prior to flight testing. The intents of the ground tests are to allow crew, spaceflight medicine, science, engineering, Astronaut Strength, Conditioning, and Reconditioning staff, and others to gain experience in the best utilization of the device. The goal is to obtain an evidence base for recommending use of the device on the ISS. The developed protocol will be created to achieve multiple objectives, including determining if the device provides an adequate training stimulus for 5th - 95th percentile males and females, allows for exercise modalities that protect functional capability, and is robust and can withstand extensive human use. Although protocols are yet to be determined, current expectations include use of the device by test subjects and current crew in order to obtain quantitative and qualitative feedback. Information obtained during the ground tests may be used to influence device modifications

  3. Fructose Consumption in the Development of Obesity and the Effects of Different Protocols of Physical Exercise on the Hepatic Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rodrigo Martins; Botezelli, José Diego; da Cruz Rodrigues, Kellen Cristina; Mekary, Rania A; Cintra, Dennys Esper; Pauli, José Rodrigo; da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; de Moura, Leandro Pereira

    2017-04-20

    Fructose consumption has been growing exponentially and, concomitant with this, the increase in the incidence of obesity and associated complications has followed the same behavior. Studies indicate that fructose may be a carbohydrate with greater obesogenic potential than other sugars. In this context, the liver seems to be a key organ for understanding the deleterious health effects promoted by fructose consumption. Fructose promotes complications in glucose metabolism, accumulation of triacylglycerol in the hepatocytes, and alterations in the lipid profile, which, associated with an inflammatory response and alterations in the redox state, will imply a systemic picture of insulin resistance. However, physical exercise has been indicated for the treatment of several chronic diseases. In this review, we show how each exercise protocol (aerobic, strength, or a combination of both) promote improvements in the obesogenic state created by fructose consumption as an improvement in the serum and liver lipid profile (high-density lipoprotein (HDL) increase and decrease triglyceride (TG) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels) and a reduction of markers of inflammation caused by an excess of fructose. Therefore, it is concluded that the practice of aerobic physical exercise, strength training, or a combination of both is essential for attenuating the complications developed by the consumption of fructose.

  4. Fructose Consumption in the Development of Obesity and the Effects of Different Protocols of Physical Exercise on the Hepatic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rodrigo Martins; Botezelli, José Diego; da Cruz Rodrigues, Kellen Cristina; Mekary, Rania A.; Cintra, Dennys Esper; Pauli, José Rodrigo; da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; de Moura, Leandro Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Fructose consumption has been growing exponentially and, concomitant with this, the increase in the incidence of obesity and associated complications has followed the same behavior. Studies indicate that fructose may be a carbohydrate with greater obesogenic potential than other sugars. In this context, the liver seems to be a key organ for understanding the deleterious health effects promoted by fructose consumption. Fructose promotes complications in glucose metabolism, accumulation of triacylglycerol in the hepatocytes, and alterations in the lipid profile, which, associated with an inflammatory response and alterations in the redox state, will imply a systemic picture of insulin resistance. However, physical exercise has been indicated for the treatment of several chronic diseases. In this review, we show how each exercise protocol (aerobic, strength, or a combination of both) promote improvements in the obesogenic state created by fructose consumption as an improvement in the serum and liver lipid profile (high-density lipoprotein (HDL) increase and decrease triglyceride (TG) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels) and a reduction of markers of inflammation caused by an excess of fructose. Therefore, it is concluded that the practice of aerobic physical exercise, strength training, or a combination of both is essential for attenuating the complications developed by the consumption of fructose. PMID:28425939

  5. The need for LWR metrology standardization: the imec roughness protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, Gian Francesco; Sutani, Takumichi; Rutigliani, Vito; van Roey, Frieda; Moussa, Alain; Charley, Anne-Laure; Mack, Chris; Naulleau, Patrick; Constantoudis, Vassilios; Ikota, Masami; Ishimoto, Toru; Koshihara, Shunsuke

    2018-03-01

    As semiconductor technology keeps moving forward, undeterred by the many challenges ahead, one specific deliverable is capturing the attention of many experts in the field: Line Width Roughness (LWR) specifications are expected to be less than 2nm in the near term, and to drop below 1nm in just a few years. This is a daunting challenge and engineers throughout the industry are trying to meet these targets using every means at their disposal. However, although current efforts are surely admirable, we believe they are not enough. The fact is that a specification has a meaning only if there is an agreed methodology to verify if the criterion is met or not. Such a standardization is critical in any field of science and technology and the question that we need to ask ourselves today is whether we have a standardized LWR metrology or not. In other words, if a single reference sample were provided, would everyone measuring it get reasonably comparable results? We came to realize that this is not the case and that the observed spread in the results throughout the industry is quite large. In our opinion, this makes the comparison of LWR data among institutions, or to a specification, very difficult. In this paper, we report the spread of measured LWR data across the semiconductor industry. We investigate the impact of image acquisition, measurement algorithm, and frequency analysis parameters on LWR metrology. We review critically some of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) metrology guidelines (such as measurement box length larger than 2μm and the need to correct for SEM noise). We compare the SEM roughness results to AFM measurements. Finally, we propose a standardized LWR measurement protocol - the imec Roughness Protocol (iRP) - intended to ensure that every time LWR measurements are compared (from various sources or to specifications), the comparison is sensible and sound. We deeply believe that the industry is at a point where it is

  6. Effects of exercise and enrichment on behaviour in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Aujnarain, Amiirah B; Luo, Owen D; Taylor, Natalie; Lai, Jonathan K Y; Foster, Jane A

    2018-04-16

    A host of scholarly work has characterized the positive effects of exercise and environmental enrichment on behaviour and cognition in animal studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the uptake and longitudinal impact of exercise and enrichment on the behavioural phenotype of male and female CD-1 mice. CD-1 mice housed in standard (STD) or exercise and enrichment (EE) conditions post-weaning were tested in the 3-chamber sociability test, open field, and elevated plus maze and exercise activity was monitored throughout the enrichment protocol. Male and female EE mice both showed reduced anxiety and activity in the open field and elevated plus maze relative to sex-matched STD mice. EE altered social behaviours in a sex-specific fashion, with only female EE mice showing increased social preference relative to female STD mice and a preference for social novelty only present in male EE mice. This sexual dimorphism was not observed to be a product of exercise uptake, as CD-1 mice of both sexes demonstrated a consistent trend of wheel rotation frequencies. These findings suggest the importance of considering variables such as sex and strain on experimental design variables in future work on environmental enrichment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Standard Operational Protocols in professional nursing practice: use, weaknesses and potentialities.

    PubMed

    Sales, Camila Balsero; Bernardes, Andrea; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Brito, Maria de Fátima Paiva; Moura, André Almeida de; Zanetti, Ariane Cristina Barboza

    2018-01-01

    to evaluate the use of Standard Operational Protocols (SOPs) in the professional practice of the nursing team based on the theoretical framework of Donabedian, as well as to identify the weaknesses and potentialities from its implementation. Evaluative research, with quantitative approach performed with nursing professionals working in the Health Units of a city of São Paulo, composed of two stages: document analysis and subsequent application of a questionnaire to nursing professionals. A total of 247 nursing professionals participated and reported changes in the way the interventions were performed. The main weaknesses were the small number of professionals, inadequate physical structure and lack of materials. Among the potentialities were: the standardization of materials and concern of the manager and professional related to patient safety. The reassessment of SOPs is necessary, as well as the adoption of a strategy of permanent education of professionals aiming at improving the quality of care provided.

  8. Defining standardized protocols for determining the efficacy of a postmilking teat disinfectant following experimental exposure of teats to mastitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schukken, Y H; Rauch, B J; Morelli, J

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this paper was to define standardized protocols for determining the efficacy of a postmilking teat disinfectant following experimental exposure of teats to both Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae. The standardized protocols describe the selection of cows and herds and define the critical points in performing experimental exposure, performing bacterial culture, evaluating the culture results, and finally performing statistical analyses and reporting of the results. The protocols define both negative control and positive control trials. For negative control trials, the protocol states that an efficacy of reducing new intramammary infections (IMI) of at least 40% is required for a teat disinfectant to be considered effective. For positive control trials, noninferiority to a control disinfectant with a published efficacy of reducing new IMI of at least 70% is required. Sample sizes for both negative and positive control trials are calculated. Positive control trials are expected to require a large trial size. Statistical analysis methods are defined and, in the proposed methods, the rate of IMI may be analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. The efficacy of the test product can be evaluated while controlling for important covariates and confounders in the trial. Finally, standards for reporting are defined and reporting considerations are discussed. The use of the defined protocol is shown through presentation of the results of a recent trial of a test product against a negative control. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness of a Nintendo Wii balance board exercise programme on standing balance of children with cerebral palsy: A randomised clinical trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Cartes-Velásquez, Ricardo; Guzmán-Muñoz, Eduardo; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo; Soto-Poblete, Alex; Pacheco-Espinoza, Ana Carolina; Amigo-Mendoza, Carlos; Albornoz-Verdugo, M Eliana; Elgueta-Cancino, Edith

    2017-06-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy (CP) typically receive limited physical therapy services. However, the Nintendo Wii system offers a simple and affordable mode of virtual reality therapy. There are no clinical trials assessing the Nintendo Wii balance board for improving standing balance in CP. This randomised clinical trial will evaluate the effectiveness of an 18-session/six-week protocol using Wii therapy (W-t) compared with conventional therapy (C-t) in Chilean CP patients. The C-t group will perform the typical exercises prescribed by physical therapists for 40 min each session. W-t will consist of a virtual reality training session using the Nintendo Wii balance board console for 30 min each session. The primary outcome variable is the area of centre-of-pressure (CoP) sway (CoP Sway ). The secondary outcomes are the standard deviation (SD ML ; SD AP ) and velocity (V ML ; V AP ) of CoP in the ML and AP directions. For a mean difference of 21.5 cm 2 (CoP Sway ) between the groups, we required a minimum of 16 participants in each group. Data will be collected at baseline (week 0), during the study (weeks 2 and 4), at the end of the study (week 6), and during the follow-up (weeks 8 and 10). Measurements of postural control during quiet standing for both groups will be assessed on a force platform AMTI OR67. This is the first trial that measures and compares the effects of a Nintendo Wii Balance Board exercise programme on standing balance in children with cerebral palsy compared to conventional therapy.

  10. Increased active hamstring stiffness after exercise in women with a history of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Bedard, Rebecca J; Kim, Kyung-Min; Grindstaff, Terry L; Hart, Joseph M

    2013-02-01

    To compare active hamstring stiffness in female subjects with and without a history of low back pain (LBP) after a standardized 20-min aerobic-exercise session. Case control. Laboratory. 12 women with a history of recurrent episodes of LBP (age = 22.4 ± 2.1 y, mass = 67.1 ± 11.8 kg, height = 167.9 ± 8 cm) and 12 matched healthy women (age = 21.7 ± 1.7 y, mass = 61.4 ± 8.8 kg, height = 165.6 ± 7.3 cm). LBP subjects reported an average 6.5 ± 4.7 on the Oswestry Disability Index. Participants walked at a self-selected speed (minimum 3.0 miles/h) for 20 min. The treadmill incline was raised 1% grade per minute for the first 15 min. During the last 5 min, participants adjusted the incline of the treadmill so they would maintain a moderate level of perceived exertion through the end of the exercise protocol. During session 1, active hamstring stiffness, hamstring and quadriceps isometric strength, and concurrently collected electromyographic activity were recorded before and immediately after the exercise protocol. For session 2, subjects returned 48-72 h after exercise for repeat measure of active hamstring stiffness. Hamstring active stiffness (Nm/rad) taken immediately postexercise was not significantly different between groups. However, individuals with a history of recurrent LBP episodes presented significantly increased hamstring stiffness 48-72 h postexercise compared with controls. For other outcomes, there was no group difference. Women with a history of recurrent LBP episodes presented greater active hamstring stiffness 48-72 h after aerobic exercise.

  11. Does Sport-Drink Use During Exercise Promote an Acute Positive Energy Balance?

    PubMed

    Dragusin, Iulian B; Horswill, Craig A

    2016-10-01

    Sports drinks have been implicated in contributing to obesity and chronic diseases by providing surplus calories and excess sugars. Using existing literature we compared energy intake from sports drinks consumed during exercise with the exercise-induced calorie expenditure to determine whether sports drink use might eliminate the energy deficit and jeopardize conditions for improved metabolic fitness. We identified 11 published studies that compared sport drink consumption to placebo during exercise with a primary focused on the effect of sport drinks or total carbohydrate content on enhancing physical performance. Energy expenditure (EE) was calculated using VO 2 , RER, and exercise duration for the exercise protocol. Energy ingestion (EI) was determined using the carbohydrate dosing regimen administered before and during the exercise protocol. A two-tailed t test was used to test whether the energy balance (EI-EE) was different from zero (alpha level = 0.05). Sport drink consumption during aerobic exercise of sufficient duration (≥ 60 min) did not abolish the energy deficit (p < .001). Mean ± SD were EE, 1600 ± 639 Cal; EI, 394 ± 289 Cal; and EI-EE,-1206+594 Cal; VO 2 , 3.05 ± 0.55 L/min; RER, 0.91 ± 0.04; exercise duration 110 ± 42 min. Ingesting sports drinks to enhance performance did not abolish the caloric deficit of aerobic exercise. Sports drinks can be used in accordance with research protocols that typically provide 30-60 g of carbohydrate per hour when exercising at adequate durations for moderate to high intensity and still maintain a substantive caloric deficit.

  12. The preventive effect of the Nordic hamstring exercise on hamstring injuries in amateur soccer players: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Nick; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Petersen, Jesper; Goedhart, Edwin A; Backx, Frank J G

    2014-08-01

    Hamstring injuries are the most common muscle injury in male amateur soccer players and have a high rate of recurrence, often despite extensive treatment and long rehabilitation periods. Eccentric strength and flexibility are recognised as important modifiable risk factors, which have led to the development of eccentric hamstring exercises, such as the Nordic hamstring exercise. As the effectiveness of the Nordic hamstring exercise in reducing hamstring injuries has never been investigated in amateur soccer players, the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of this exercise on the incidence and severity of hamstring injuries in male amateur soccer players. An additional aim is to determine whether flexibility is associated with hamstring injuries. Cluster-randomised controlled trial with soccer teams as the unit of cluster. Dutch male amateur soccer players, aged 18-40 years, were allocated to an intervention or control group. Both study groups continued regular soccer training during 2013, but the intervention group additionally performed the Nordic hamstring exercise (25 sessions over 13 weeks). Primary outcomes are the incidence of initial and recurrent hamstring injury and injury severity. Secondary outcomes are hamstring-and-lower-back flexibility and compliance. Compliance to the intervention protocol was also monitored. Eccentric hamstring strength exercises are hypothesised to reduce the incidence of hamstring injury among male amateur soccer players by 70%. The prevention of such injuries will be beneficial to soccer players, clubs, football associations, health insurance companies and society. NTR3664. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Effect of physical exercise training in patients with Chagas heart disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (PEACH study).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fernanda de Souza Nogueira Sardinha; Sousa, Andréa Silvestre; Souza, Fernando Cesar de Castro Cesar; Pinto, Vivian Liane Mattos; Silva, Paula Simplicio; Saraiva, Roberto Magalhães; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Veloso, Henrique Horta; Holanda, Marcelo Teixeira; Costa, Andréa Rodrigues; Carneiro, Fernanda Martins; Silva, Gilberto Marcelo Sperandio; Borges, Juliana Pereira; Tibirica, Eduardo; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Lara, Flávio Alves; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Brasil, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix

    2016-09-02

    The effects of exercise training on Chagas heart disease are still unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of exercise training over functional capacity, cardiac function, quality of life, and biomarkers in Chagas heart disease. The PEACH study is a superiority randomized clinical trial which will include subjects who meet the following criteria: Chagas heart disease with a left ventricular ejection fraction below 45 % with or without heart failure symptoms; clinical stability in the last 3 months; adherence to clinical treatment; and age above 18 years. The exclusion criteria are: pregnancy; neuromuscular limitations; smoking; evidence of non-chagasic heart disease; systemic conditions that limit exercise practice or cardiopulmonary exercise test; unavailability to attend the center three times a week during the intervention period; and practitioners of regular exercise. The intervention group will perform an exercise training intervention three times per week during 6 months and will be compared to the control group without exercise. Both groups will undergo the same monthly pharmaceutical and nutritional counseling as well as standard medical treatment according to the Brazilian consensus on Chagas disease. The primary outcome is functional capacity based on peak exercise oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Secondary outcomes are: cardiac function; body composition; muscle respiratory strength; microvascular reactivity; cardiac rhythm abnormalities; autonomic function; biochemical; oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers; and quality of life. Subjects will be evaluated at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months after randomization. Thirty patients will be randomly assigned into exercise or control groups at a ratio of 1:1. Findings of the present study will be useful to determine if physical exercise programs should be included as an important additional therapy in the treatment of patients with Chagas heart disease. Clinical

  14. Simulated Partners and Collaborative Exercise (SPACE) to boost motivation for astronauts: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Feltz, Deborah L; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Winn, Brian; Kerr, Norbert L; Pivarnik, James M; Ede, Alison; Hill, Christopher; Samendinger, Stephen; Jeffery, William

    2016-11-14

    Astronauts may have difficulty adhering to exercise regimens at vigorous intensity levels during long space missions. Vigorous exercise is important for aerobic and musculoskeletal health during space missions and afterwards. A key impediment to maintaining vigorous exercise is motivation. Finding ways to motivate astronauts to exercise at levels necessary to mitigate reductions in musculoskeletal health and aerobic capacity have not been explored. The focus of Simulated Partners and Collaborative Exercise (SPACE) is to use recently documented motivation gains in task groups to heighten the exercise experience for participants, similar in age and fitness to astronauts, for vigorous exercise over a 6-month exercise regimen. A secondary focus is to determine the most effective features in simulated exercise partners for enhancing enjoyment, self-efficacy, and social connectedness. The aims of the project are to (1) Create software-generated (SG) exercise partners and interface software with a cycle ergometer; (2) Pilot test design features of SG partners within a video exercise game (exergame), and (3) Test whether exercising with an SG partner over 24-week time period, compared to exercising alone, leads to greater work effort, aerobic capacity, muscle strength, exercise adherence, and enhanced psychological parameters. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Chronic exercisers, between the ages 30 and 62, were asked to exercise on a cycle ergometer 6 days per week for 24 weeks using a routine consisting of alternating between moderate-intensity continuous and high-intensity interval sessions. Participants were assigned to one of three conditions: no partner (control), always faster SG partner, or SG partner who was not always faster. Participants were told they could vary cycle ergometer output to increase or decrease intensity during the sessions. Mean change in cycle ergometer power (watts) from the initial continuous and 4

  15. Comparison of cardiorespiratory responses during aquatic and land treadmill exercise in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun Hwan; Kim, Bo Ryun; Joo, Seung Jae; Han, Eun Young; Kim, Song Yi; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, So Young; Yoon, Ho Min

    2015-01-01

    To investigate cardiorespiratory responses during exercise stress tests using an aquatic treadmill and a land-based treadmill in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-one stable CAD patients were enrolled. All patients participated in 2 symptom-limited incremental exercise tests, using both an aquatic and a land treadmill. For the aquatic treadmill protocol, patients were submerged to the upper waist in 28°C water. The treadmill speed started at 2.0 km/h and increased 0.5 km/h every minute thereafter. For the land treadmill protocol, the speed and gradient were started at 2.4 km/h and 1.5%, respectively. The speed was increased by 0.3 km/h and grade by 1% every minute thereafter. Oxygen consumption ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2), heart rate (HR), and respiratory exchange ratio were measured continuously and peak values recorded. Rating of perceived exertion, percentage of age-predicted maximal HR, and total exercise duration were also recorded. Peak cardiorespiratory responses during both protocols were compared. The peak (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 and peak HR did not show any significant differences. The peak respiratory exchange ratio was significantly greater using the land treadmill than the aquatic treadmill protocol. Rating of perceived exertion, age-predicted maximal HR percentage, and total exercise duration were similar for both protocols. There was a significant linear relationship between HR and (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 with both protocols. This study demonstrated that aquatic treadmill exercise elicits similar peak cardiorespiratory responses compared with land treadmill exercise, suggesting that aquatic treadmill exercise may be effective for CAD patients in cardiac rehabilitation.

  16. Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia combined with aerobic exercise improves muscle morphofunctional recovery after eccentric exercise to exhaustion in trained rats.

    PubMed

    Rizo-Roca, D; Ríos-Kristjánsson, J G; Núñez-Espinosa, C; Santos-Alves, E; Gonçalves, I O; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A; Pagès, T; Viscor, G; Torrella, J R

    2017-03-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise leads to muscle morphological and functional alterations, including microvasculature damage, the repair of which is modulated by hypoxia. We present the effects of intermittent hypobaric hypoxia and exercise on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EEIMD). Soleus muscles from trained rats were excised before (CTRL) and 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after a double session of EEIMD protocol. A recovery treatment consisting of one of the following protocols was applied 1 day after the EEIMD: passive normobaric recovery (PNR), a 4-h daily exposure to passive hypobaric hypoxia at 4,000 m (PHR), or hypobaric hypoxia exposure followed by aerobic exercise (AHR). EEIMD produced an increase in the percentage of abnormal fibers compared with CTRL, and it affected the microvasculature by decreasing capillary density (CD, capillaries per mm 2 ) and the capillary-to-fiber ratio (CF). After 14 days, AHR exhibited CD and CF values similar to those of CTRL animals (789 and 3.30 vs. 746 and 3.06) and significantly higher than PNR (575 and 2.62) and PHR (630 and 2.92). Furthermore, VEGF expression showed a significant 43% increase in AHR when compared with PNR. Moreover, after 14 days, the muscle fibers in AHR had a more oxidative phenotype than the other groups, with significantly smaller cross-sectional areas (AHR, 3,745; PNR, 4,502; and PHR, 4,790 µm 2 ), higher citrate synthase activity (AHR, 14.8; PNR, 13.1; and PHR, 12 µmol·min -1 ·mg -1 ) and a significant 27% increment in PGC-1α levels compared with PNR. Our data show that hypoxia combined with exercise attenuates or reverses the morphofunctional alterations induced by EEIMD. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our study provides new insights into the use of intermittent hypobaric hypoxia combined with exercise as a strategy to recover muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise. We analyzed the effects of hypobaric exposure combined with aerobic exercise on histopathological features of muscle

  17. Effect of Submaximal Warm-up Exercise on Exercise-induced Asthma in African School Children.

    PubMed

    Mtshali, B F; Mokwena, K; Oguntibeju, O O

    2015-03-01

    Regular physical activity has long been regarded as an important component of a healthy lifestyle. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is one of the major problems interfering with the performance of exercise. A warm-up exercise programme has been cited as a non-pharmacologic means of reducing EIA, but its effect has not been fully elucidated. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of unrecognized EIA in Pretoria primary school children, determine the effect of a warm-up exercise programme on EIA and to establish the relationship between history of allergy, family history of asthma and EIA. A random sample of 640 school children was selected. The study was divided into three phases. In phase one, a descriptive cross-sectional study was done using the standardized European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) questionnaire. In phase two, non-asthmatic participants that returned a completed questionnaire were included in the field study. Pre-test and post-test experimental designs were used, where peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured at baseline and within ten minutes after exercise. A total of 340 subjects completed the Free Running Asthma Screening Test (FRAST); EIA was defined as a decrease in baseline PEFR ≥ 10% after exercise and 75 children (22%) had EIA. In phase three, 29 of the 75 subjects participated in the warm-up programme which was performed in the laboratory and subjects acted as their own controls. Predefined protocols for the study were followed. Seventy-five (22%) of the 340 participants had EIA. The mean age, height and weight were 10.51 years, 139.26 cm and 33.45 kg, respectively. Exercise-induced asthma symptoms were cough (25%), chest pain (16%), wheeze (12%) and chest tightness (12%). The history of allergy was 75%, family history of allergy 40% and positive history of allergy when near animals, feathers or in dusty areas 38%. Wheezing during or after exercise, wheezing when near animals, feathers or in dusty areas

  18. Medium-/Long-Term Effects of a Specific Exercise Protocol Combined with Patient Education on Spine Mobility, Chronic Fatigue, Pain, Aerobic Fitness and Level of Disability in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Erika; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Pigatto, Maurizia; Rampudda, Maria Elisa; Doria, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To propose a rehabilitation protocol able to produce immediate and long-term beneficial effects on level of disability and overall performance in ADLs. Materials and Methods. Forty-one FM patients were randomized to an exercise and educational-behavioral programme group (experimental group, EG = 21) or to a control group (CG = 20). Each subject was evaluated before, at the end (T1), and after 6 months (T6) from the conclusion of the rehabilitation treatment using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), tender points count (TPC), and spinal active range of motion. The exercise protocol included 20 sessions consisting in self-awareness, stretching, strengthening, spine flexibility, and aerobic exercises, which patients were subsequently educated to perform at home. Results. The two groups were comparable at baseline. At T1, the EG showed a positive trend in FIQ, VAS, HAQ, and FSS scales and significant improvement in 6MWT and in most spinal active range of motion measurements (P between 0.001 and 0.04). The positive results were maintained at the follow-up. Conclusion. The proposed programme was well tolerated and produced immediate and medium-term beneficial effects improving function and strain endurance. This trial is registered with DRKS00005071 on DRKS. PMID:24616894

  19. Medium-/long-term effects of a specific exercise protocol combined with patient education on spine mobility, chronic fatigue, pain, aerobic fitness and level of disability in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Erika; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Pigatto, Maurizia; Rampudda, Maria Elisa; Doria, Andrea; Masiero, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    To propose a rehabilitation protocol able to produce immediate and long-term beneficial effects on level of disability and overall performance in ADLs. Forty-one FM patients were randomized to an exercise and educational-behavioral programme group (experimental group, EG = 21) or to a control group (CG = 20). Each subject was evaluated before, at the end (T1), and after 6 months (T6) from the conclusion of the rehabilitation treatment using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), tender points count (TPC), and spinal active range of motion. The exercise protocol included 20 sessions consisting in self-awareness, stretching, strengthening, spine flexibility, and aerobic exercises, which patients were subsequently educated to perform at home. The two groups were comparable at baseline. At T1, the EG showed a positive trend in FIQ, VAS, HAQ, and FSS scales and significant improvement in 6MWT and in most spinal active range of motion measurements (P between 0.001 and 0.04). The positive results were maintained at the follow-up. The proposed programme was well tolerated and produced immediate and medium-term beneficial effects improving function and strain endurance. This trial is registered with DRKS00005071 on DRKS.

  20. Fatigue Analysis Before and After Shaker Exercise: Physiologic Tool for Exercise Design

    PubMed Central

    White, Kevin T.; Easterling, Caryn; Roberts, Niles; Shaker, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the Shaker exercise induces fatigue in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening muscles and sternocleidomastoid (SCM), with the SCMs fatiguing earliest. The aim of this study was to measure fatigue induced by the isometric portion of the Shaker exercise by measuring the rate of change in the median frequency (MF rate) of the power spectral density (PSD) function, which is interpreted as proportional to the rate of fatigue, from surface electromyography (EMG) of suprahyoid (SHM), infrahyoid (IHM), and SCM. EMG data compared fatigue-related changes from 20-, 40-, and 60-s isometric hold durations of the Shaker exercise. We found that fatigue-related changes were manifested during the 20-s hold. The findings confirm that the SCM fatigues initially and as fast as or faster than the SHM and IHM. In addition, upon completion of the exercise protocol, the SCM had a decreased MF rate, implying improved fatigue resistance, while the SHM and IHM showed increased MF rates, implying that these muscles increased their fatiguing effort. We conclude that the Shaker exercise initially leads to increased fatigue resistance of the SCM, after which the exercise loads the less fatigue-resistant SHM and IHM, potentiating the therapeutic effect of the Shaker exercise regimen with continued exercise performance. PMID:18369673

  1. Acute Postexercise Time Course Responses of Hypertrophic vs. Power-Endurance Squat Exercise Protocols on Maximal and Rapid Torque of the Knee Extensors.

    PubMed

    Conchola, Eric C; Thiele, Ryan M; Palmer, Ty B; Smith, Doug B; Thompson, Brennan J

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a medium-intensity high-volume vs. explosive squat protocol on the postexercise time course responses of maximal and rapid strength of the knee extensors. Seventeen resistance-trained men (mean ± SD: age = 22.0 ± 2.6 years) performed maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the knee extensors before and after performing a squat workout using either a low-intensity fast velocity (LIFV) (5 × 16 at 40% 1 repetition maximum) or a traditional high-intensity slow velocity (TISV) (5 × 8 at 80% 1RM) exercise protocol. For each MVC, peak torque (PT), peak rate of torque development (RTDpeak), absolute (RTDabs), and relative RTD (RTDnorm) at early (0-50 milliseconds) and late (100-200 milliseconds) phases of muscle contraction were examined at pre- (Pre) and post-exercise at 0, 7, 15, and 30 (Post0...30) minutes. There were no intensity × time interactions for any variables (p = 0.098-0.832). Peak torque was greater at Pre than Post0 and Post7 (p = 0.001-0.016) but was not greater than Post15 and Post30 (p = 0.010-0.189). RTDpeak and early absolute RTD (RTD50abs) were greater at Pre than all postexercise time phases (p = 0.001-0.050); however, later absolute RTD (RTD100-200abs) was only greater at Pre than Post0 and Post30 (p = 0.013-0.048). Early relative RTD (RTD50norm) was only higher at Pre compared with Post0 (p = 0.023), whereas no differences were observed for later relative RTD (RTD100-200norm) (p = 0.920-0.990). Low-intensity fast velocity and TISV squat protocols both yielded acute decreases in maximal and rapid strength capacities following free-weight squats, with rapid strength showing slower recovery characteristics than maximal strength.

  2. Difficulties in controlling mobilization pain using a standardized patient-controlled analgesia protocol in burns.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Andreas; Kalman, Sigga; Sonesson, Lena Karin; Arvidsson, Anders; Sjöberg, Folke

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain relief for patients with burns during rest and mobilization with morphine according to a standard protocol for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Eighteen patients with a mean (SD) burned TBSA% of 26 (20) were studied for 10 days. Using a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0 = no pain and 10 = unbearable pain), patients were asked to estimate their acceptable and worst experienced pain by specifying a number on a scale and at what point they would like additional analgesics. Patients were allowed free access to morphine with a PCA pump device. Bolus doses were set according to age, (100 - age)/24 = bolus dose (mg), and 6 minutes lockout time. Degrees of pain, morphine requirements, doses delivered and demanded, oral intake of food, and antiemetics given were used as endpoints. Acceptable pain (mean [SD]) was estimated to be 3.8 (1.3) on the NRS, and additional treatment was considered necessary at scores of 4.3 (1.6) or more. NRS at rest was 2.7 (2.2) and during mobilization 4.7 (2.6). Required mean morphine per day was 81 (15) mg, and the number of doses requested increased during the first 6 days after the burn. The authors found no correlation between dose of morphine required and any other variables. Background pain can be controlled adequately with a standard PCA protocol. During mobilization, the pain experienced was too intense, despite having the already high doses of morphine increased. The present protocol must be refined further to provide analgesia adequate to cover mobilization as well.

  3. Salivary cortisol and testosterone responses to resistance and plyometric exercise in 12- to 14-year-old boys.

    PubMed

    Klentrou, Panagiota; Giannopoulou, Angeliki; McKinlay, Brandon J; Wallace, Phillip; Muir, Cameron; Falk, Bareket; Mack, Diane

    2016-07-01

    This study examined changes in salivary testosterone and cortisol following resistance and plyometric exercise protocols in active boys. In a crossover experimental design, 26 peri-pubertal (12- to 14-year-old) soccer players performed 2 exercise trials in random order, on separate evenings, 1 week apart. Each trial included a 30 min control session followed by 30 min of either resistance or plyometric exercise. Saliva was collected at baseline, post-control (i.e., pre-exercise), and 5 and 30 min post-exercise. There were no significant differences in the baseline hormone concentrations between trials or between weeks (p > 0.05). A significant effect for time was found for testosterone (p = 0.02, [Formula: see text] = 0.14), which increased from pre-exercise to 5 min post-exercise in both the resistance (27% ± 5%) and plyometric (12% ± 6%) protocols. Cortisol decreased to a similar extent in both trials (p = 0.009, [Formula: see text] = 0.19) from baseline to post-control and then to 5 min post-exercise, following its typical circadian decrease in the evening hours. However, a significant protocol-by-time interaction was observed for cortisol, which increased 30 min after the plyometrics (+31% ± 12%) but continued to decrease following the resistance protocol (-21% ± 5%). Our results suggest that in young male athletes, multiple modes of exercise can lead to a transient anabolic state, thus maximizing the beneficial effects on growth and development, when exercise is performed in the evening hours.

  4. [Silent myocardial ischemia and exercise-induced arrhythmia detected by the exercise test in the total health promotion plan (THP)].

    PubMed

    Iwane, M; Shibe, Y; Itoh, K; Kinoshita, F; Kanagawa, Y; Kobayashi, M; Mugitani, K; Ohta, M; Ohata, H; Yoshikawa, A; Ikuta, Z; Nakamura, Y; Mohara, O

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence and characteristics of ischemic heart disease especially silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) and arrhythmia in need of careful observation in the exercise stress tests in the Total Health Promotion Plan (THP), which was conducted between 1994-96 for the purpose of measuring cardiopulmonary function. All workers (n = 4,918, 4,426 males) aged 18-60 yr old in an occupational field were studied. Exercise tests with an ergometer were performed by the LOPS protocol, in which the maximal workload was set up as a presumed 70-80% maximal oxygen intake, or STEP (original multistage protocol). ECG changes were evaluated with a CC5 lead. Two hundred and fifteen people refused the study because of a common cold, lumbago and so on. Of 4,703 subjects, 17 with abnormal rest ECG and 19 with probable anginal pain were excluded from the exercise tests. Of 4,667 who underwent the exercise test, 37 (0.79%) had ischemic ECG change, and 155 (3.32%) had striking arrhythmia. These 228 subjects then did a treadmill exercise test with Bruce protocol. Twenty-two (0.47% of 4,703) showed positive ECG change, 9 (0.19%) of 22 had abnormal findings on a 201Tl scan. 8 (0.17%) were diagnosed as SMI (Cohn I), in which the prevalence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoker and positive familial history of ischemic heart disease was greater than that of all subjects. In a 15-30 month follow up, none has developed cardiac accidents. Exercise-induced arrhythmia was detected in 11 (0.23%) subjects. Four were non-sustained ventricular tachycardia without any organic disease, 4 were ventricular arrhythmia based on cardiomyopathy detected by echocardiography, 2 were atrial fibrillation and another was WPW syndrome. It is therefore likely that the ergometer exercise test in THP was effective in preventing sudden death caused by ischemic heart disease or striking arrhythmia.

  5. A Telerehabilitation Approach to Enhance Quality of Life Through Exercise Among Adults With Paraplegia: Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Shane Norman; Rocchi, Meredith; Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly; Kairy, Dahlia; Fillion, Brigitte

    2017-10-19

    assessment, participants will be randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Participants in the intervention group will participate in 8 weekly, 1-hour video-based telerehabilitation sessions with a trained physical activity counselor, while participants in the control group will be asked to continue with their regular routine. We expect higher ratings of the basic psychological needs and autonomous motivation and lower scores for controlled motivation for the intervention group compared to the control group (Objective 1). We also expect that our video-based intervention will have moderate effects on exercise participation, as well as small-to-moderate positive effects on the quality of life‒related variables (Objective 2). Finally, we expect the intervention to have a small positive effect on psychosocial predictors of physical activity and well-being (Objective 3). We anticipate that the results will show that the intervention is appropriate for adults with paraplegia and feasible to test in a full-scale RCT. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02833935; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02833935 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6u8U9x2yt). ©Shane Norman Sweet, Meredith Rocchi, Kelly Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Dahlia Kairy, Brigitte Fillion. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 19.10.2017.

  6. Circulating cell-free DNA: an up-coming molecular marker in exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Breitbach, Sarah; Tug, Suzan; Simon, Perikles

    2012-07-01

    or apoptosis of cells in acute exercise settings. Recently, rapid DNA release mechanisms of activated immune-competent cells like NETosis (pathogen-induced cell death including the release of neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) have been discovered. cfDNA accumulations might comprise a similar kind of cell death including trap formation or an active release of cfDNA. Just like chronic diseases, chronic high-intensity resistance training protocols induced persistent increases of cfDNA levels. Chronic, strenuous exercise protocols, either long-duration endurance exercise or regular high-intensity workouts, induce chronic inflammation that might lead to a slow, constant release of DNA. This could be due to mechanisms of cell death like apoptosis or necrosis. Yet, it has neither been implicated nor proven sufficiently whether cfDNA can serve as a marker for overtraining. The relevance of cfDNA with regard to overtraining status, performance level, and the degree of physical exhaustion still remains unclear. Longitudinal studies are required that take into account standardized and controlled exercise, serial blood sampling, and large and homogeneous cohorts of different athletic achievement. Furthermore, it is important to establish standardized laboratory procedures for the measurement of genomic cfDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We introduce a new hypothesis based on acute exercise and chronic exposure to stress, and rapid active and passive chronic release of cfDNA fragments into the circulation.

  7. Non-invasive haemodynamic assessments using Innocor during standard graded exercise tests.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Piero; Boutellier, Urs; Toigo, Marco

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac output (Q) and stroke volume (V(S)) represent primary determinants of cardiovascular performance and should therefore be determined for performance diagnostics purposes. Since it is unknown, whether measurements of Q and V(S) can be performed by means of Innocor during standard graded exercise tests (GXTs), and whether current GXT stages are sufficiently long for the measurements to take place, we determined Q and V(S) at an early and late point in time on submaximal 2 min GXT stages. 16 male cyclists (age 25.4 +/- 2.9 years, body mass 71.2 +/- 5.0 kg) performed three GXTs and we determined Q and V(S) after 46 and 103 s at 69, 77, and 85% peak power. We found that the rebreathings could easily be incorporated into the GXTs and that Q and V(S) remained unchanged between the two points in time on the same GXT stage (69% peak power, Q: 18.1 +/- 2.1 vs. 18.2 +/- 2.3 l min(-1), V(S): 126 +/- 18 vs. 123 +/- 21 ml; 77% peak power, Q: 20.7 +/- 2.6 vs. 21.0 +/- 2.3 l min(-1), V(S): 132 +/- 18 vs. 131 +/- 18 ml; 85% peak power, Q: 21.6 +/- 2.4 vs. 21.8 +/- 2.7 l min(-1), V(S): 131 +/- 17 vs. 131 +/- 22 ml). We conclude that Innocor may be a useful device for assessing Q and V(S) during GXTs, and that the adaptation of Q and V(S) to exercise-to-exercise transitions at moderate to high submaximal power outputs is fast enough for 1 and 2 min GXT stage durations.

  8. Inflammatory Cytokines and BDNF Response to High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise: Effect the Exercise Volume.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Santos, Carolina; Castrillón, Carlos I M; Miranda, Rodolfo A T; Monteiro, Paula A; Inoue, Daniela S; Campos, Eduardo Z; Hofmann, Peter; Lira, Fábio S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two similar high-intensity intermittent exercises (HIIE) but different volume 1.25 km (HIIE1.25) and 2.5 km (HIIE2.5) on inflammatory and BDNF responses. Ten physically active male subjects (age 25.22 ± 1.74 years, body mass 78.98 ± 7.31 kg, height 1.78 ± 0.06 m, VO 2peak 59.94 ± 9.38 ml·kg·min -1 ) performed an incremental treadmill exercise test and randomly completed two sessions of HIIE on a treadmill (1:1 min at vVO 2max with passive recovery). Blood samples were collected at rest, immediately and 60-min after the exercise sessions. Serum was analyzed for glucose, lactate, IL-6, IL-10, and BDNF levels. Blood lactate concentrations was higher immediately post-exercise compared to rest (HIIE1.25: 1.69 ± 0.26-7.78 ± 2.09 mmol·L -1 , and HIIE2.5: 1.89 ± 0.26-7.38 ± 2.57 mmol·L -1 , p < 0.0001). Glucose concentrations did not present changes under the different conditions, however, levels were higher 60-min post-exercise than at rest only in the HIIE1.25 condition (rest: 76.80 ± 11.14-97.84 ± 24.87 mg·dL -1 , p < 0.05). BDNF level increased immediately after exercise in both protocols (HIIE1.25: 9.71 ± 306-17.86 ± 8.59 ng.mL -1 , and HIIE2.5: 11.83 ± 5.82-22.84 ± 10.30 ng.mL -1 ). Although both exercises increased IL-6, level percent between rest and immediately after exercise was higher in the HIIE2.5 than HIIE1.25 (30 and 10%; p = 0.014, respectively). Moreover, IL-10 levels percent increase between immediately and 60-min post-exercise was higher in HIIE2.5 than HIIE1.25 (37 and 10%; p = 0.012, respectively). In conclusion, both HIIE protocols with the same intensity were effective to increase BDNF and IL-6 levels immediately after exercise while only IL-10 response was related to the durantion of exercise indicanting the importance of this exercise prescription variable.

  9. Best Protocol for the Sit-to-Stand Test in Subjects With COPD.

    PubMed

    Morita, Andrea A; Bisca, Gianna W; Machado, Felipe V C; Hernandes, Nidia A; Pitta, Fabio; Probst, Vanessa S

    2018-05-22

    Different protocols for the sit-to-stand test (STS) are available for assessing functional capacity in COPD. We sought to correlate each protocol of the STS (ie, the 5-repetition [5-rep STS], the 30-s STS, and the 1-min STS) with clinical outcomes in subjects with COPD. We also aimed to compare the 3 protocols of the STS, to verify their association and agreement, and to verify whether the 3 protocols are able to predict functional exercise capacity and physical activity in daily life (PADL). 23 subjects with COPD (11 men; FEV 1 53 ± 15% predicted) performed 3 protocols of the STS. Subjects also underwent the following assessments: incremental shuttle walking test, 6-min walk test (6MWT), 4-m gait speed test (4MGS), 1-repetition maximum of quadriceps muscle, assessment of PADL, and questionnaires on health-related quality of life and functional status. The 1-min STS showed significant correlations with the 6MWT (r = 0.40), 4MGS (r = 0.64), and PADL (0.40 ≤ r ≤ 0.52), and the 5-rep STS and 30-s STS were associated with the 4MGS (r = 0.54 and r = 0.52, respectively). The speed differed for each protocol (5-rep STS 0.53 ± 0.16 rep/s, 30-s STS 0.48 ± 0.13 rep/s, 1-min STS 0.45 ± 0.11 rep/s, P = .01). However, they presented good agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.73 for all) and correlated well with each other (r ≥ 0.68 for all). More marked changes in peripheral oxygen saturation ( P = .004), heart rate ( P < .001), blood pressure ( P < .001), dyspnea ( P < .001), and leg fatigue ( P < .001) were found after the 1-min STS protocol. Furthermore, the 3 protocols were equally able to identify subjects with low exercise capacity or preserved exercise capacity. The 1-min STS generated higher hemodynamic demands and correlated better with clinical outcomes in subjects with COPD. Despite the difference in speed performance and physiological demands between the 5-rep STS and 1-min STS, there was a good level of agreement among the 3 protocols. In

  10. Feasibility of a Facebook Intervention for Exercise Motivation and Cardiac Rehabilitation Adherence: Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Lee Anne; Ahmed, Haitham M; Crawford, Michael Todd; Bena, James Frank

    2017-08-18

    recruitment goal is 60 cardiac rehabilitation patients. Data collection is anticipated to be complete by July 2018. This pilot study will be the first to examine the effect of a Facebook intervention on patient adherence and motivation for exercise in a cardiac rehabilitation setting. Engagement in the Facebook group and participation in the study will help to determine the feasibility of using Facebook to affect adherence and motivation in cardiac rehabilitation patients, potentially improving outcomes through the use of a unique intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02971813; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02971813 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6sRsz8Zpa). ©Lee Anne Siegmund, Haitham M Ahmed, Michael Todd Crawford, James Frank Bena. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 18.08.2017.

  11. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Qualified Fitness and Exercise as Professionals and Exercise Prescription: Evolution of the PAR-Q and Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Roy J

    2015-04-01

    Traditional approaches to exercise prescription have included a preliminary medical screening followed by exercise tests of varying sophistication. To maximize population involvement, qualified fitness and exercise professionals (QFEPs) have used a self-administered screening questionnaire (the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire, PAR-Q) and a simple measure of aerobic performance (the Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test, CAFT). However, problems have arisen in applying the original protocol to those with chronic disease. Recent developments have addressed these issues. Evolution of the PAR-Q and CAFT protocol is reviewed from their origins in 1974 to the current electronic decision tree model of exercise screening and prescription. About a fifth of apparently healthy adults responded positively to the original PAR-Q instrument, thus requiring an often unwarranted referral to a physician. Minor changes of wording did not overcome this problem. However, a consensus process has now developed an electronic decision tree for stratification of exercise risk not only for healthy individuals, but also for those with various types of chronic disease. The new approach to clearance greatly reduces physician referrals and extends the role of QFEPs. The availability of effective screening and simple fitness testing should contribute to the goal of maximizing physical activity in the entire population.

  13. Effectiveness of a programme of exercise on physical function in survivors of critical illness following discharge from the ICU: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (REVIVE)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Following discharge home from the ICU, patients often suffer from reduced physical function, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life and social functioning. There is usually no support to address these longer term problems, and there has been limited research carried out into interventions which could improve patient outcomes. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a 6-week programme of exercise on physical function in patients discharged from hospital following critical illness compared to standard care. Methods/Design The study design is a multicentre prospective phase II, allocation-concealed, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled clinical trial. Participants randomised to the intervention group will complete three exercise sessions per week (two sessions of supervised exercise and one unsupervised session) for 6 weeks. Supervised sessions will take place in a hospital gymnasium or, if this is not possible, in the participants home and the unsupervised session will take place at home. Blinded outcome assessment will be conducted at baseline after hospital discharge, following the exercise intervention, and at 6 months following baseline assessment (or equivalent time points for the standard care group). The primary outcome measure is physical function as measured by the physical functioning subscale of the Short-Form-36 health survey following the exercise programme. Secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life, exercise capacity, anxiety and depression, self efficacy to exercise and healthcare resource use. In addition, semi-structured interviews will be conducted to explore participants’ perceptions of the exercise programme, and the feasibility (safety, practicality and acceptability) of providing the exercise programme will be assessed. A within-trial cost-utility analysis to assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention compared to standard care will also be conducted

  14. Effectiveness of a programme of exercise on physical function in survivors of critical illness following discharge from the ICU: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (REVIVE).

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Brenda; McDowell, Kathryn; Bradley, Judy; Blackwood, Bronagh; Mullan, Brian; Lavery, Gavin; Agus, Ashley; Murphy, Sally; Gardner, Evie; McAuley, Daniel F

    2014-04-27

    Following discharge home from the ICU, patients often suffer from reduced physical function, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life and social functioning. There is usually no support to address these longer term problems, and there has been limited research carried out into interventions which could improve patient outcomes. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a 6-week programme of exercise on physical function in patients discharged from hospital following critical illness compared to standard care. The study design is a multicentre prospective phase II, allocation-concealed, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled clinical trial. Participants randomised to the intervention group will complete three exercise sessions per week (two sessions of supervised exercise and one unsupervised session) for 6 weeks. Supervised sessions will take place in a hospital gymnasium or, if this is not possible, in the participants home and the unsupervised session will take place at home. Blinded outcome assessment will be conducted at baseline after hospital discharge, following the exercise intervention, and at 6 months following baseline assessment (or equivalent time points for the standard care group). The primary outcome measure is physical function as measured by the physical functioning subscale of the Short-Form-36 health survey following the exercise programme. Secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life, exercise capacity, anxiety and depression, self efficacy to exercise and healthcare resource use. In addition, semi-structured interviews will be conducted to explore participants' perceptions of the exercise programme, and the feasibility (safety, practicality and acceptability) of providing the exercise programme will be assessed. A within-trial cost-utility analysis to assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention compared to standard care will also be conducted. If the exercise programme is

  15. Efficacy of blood flow restriction exercise during dialysis for end stage kidney disease patients: protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Matthew J; Fraser, Steve F; Bennett, Paul N; McMahon, Lawrence P; Brumby, Catherine; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-09-11

    Exercise during haemodialysis improves strength and physical function. However, both patients and clinicians are time poor, and current exercise recommendations add an excessive time burden making exercise a rare addition to standard care. Hypothetically, blood flow restriction exercise performed during haemodialysis can provide greater value for time spent exercising, reducing this time burden while producing similar or greater outcomes. This study will explore the efficacy of blood flow restriction exercise for enhancing strength and physical function among haemodialysis patients. This is a randomised controlled trial design. A total of 75 participants will be recruited from haemodialysis clinics. Participants will be allocated to a blood flow restriction cycling group, traditional cycling group or usual care control group. Both exercising groups will complete 3 months of cycling exercise, performed intradialytically, three times per week. The blood flow restriction cycling group will complete two 10-min cycling bouts separated by a 20-min rest at a subjective effort of 15 on a 6 to 20 rating scale. This will be done with pressurised cuffs fitted proximally on the active limbs during exercise at 50% of a pre-determined limb occlusion pressure. The traditional cycling group will perform a continuous 20-min bout of exercise at a subjective effort of 12 on the same subjective effort scale. These workloads and volumes are equivalent and allow for comparison of a common blood flow restriction aerobic exercise prescription and a traditional aerobic exercise prescription. The primary outcome measures are lower limb strength, assessed by a three repetition maximum leg extension test, as well as objective measures of physical function: six-minute walk test, 30-s sit to stand, and timed up and go. Secondary outcome measures include thigh muscle cross sectional area, body composition, routine pathology, quality of life, and physical activity engagement. This study will

  16. Effect of supervised exercise in groups on psychological well-being among pregnant women at risk of depression (the EWE Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Broberg, Lotte; Backhausen, Mette; Damm, Peter; Bech, Per; Tabor, Ann; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine

    2017-05-05

    Pregnant women with depression and/or anxiety prior to pregnancy are at higher risk of preterm birth, breastfeeding problems, postpartum depression, and disruption of the mother-infant attachment. It is well documented that exercise improves psychological well-being in nonpregnant subjects with symptoms of depression. However, in only a few small studies have researchers examined the effect of exercise on symptoms of depression among pregnant women. We hypothesize that physiotherapist-supervised group exercise for pregnant women at risk of antenatal depression increases their psychological well-being. This paper describes the study protocol of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on a supervised group exercise intervention for pregnant women with a current or previous history of depression and/or anxiety. The RCT is being carried out at the Department of Obstetrics, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, in the period 2016-2019. The inclusion criteria are pregnant women ≥18 years of age with depression and/or anxiety requiring treatment by a psychiatrist or a psychologist within the last 10 years and/or intake of antidepressants in the 3 months prior to conception and/or during pregnancy. The women must have appropriate Danish language skills, be pregnant with a single fetus, give written informed consent, and be at 17-22 gestational weeks when the intervention begins. The primary outcome is psychological well-being (the five-item World Health Organization Well-being Index). Secondary outcomes are symptoms of depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale), functional ability (General Health Questionnaire), clinical symptoms of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), sleep quality and sleep disturbances (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and pregnancy and delivery outcomes. The intervention is supervised group exercise twice weekly for 12 weeks. The control group will receive standard antenatal care. On the basis of sample size calculation, a total

  17. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    PubMed

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Heat Production During Countermeasure Exercises Planned for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapley, Michael G.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Guilliams, Mark E.; Greenisen, Michael C.; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation's purpose was to determine the amount of heat produced when performing aerobic and resistance exercises planned as part of the exercise countermeasures prescription for the ISS. These data will be used to determine thermal control requirements of the Node 1 and other modules where exercise hardware might reside. To determine heat production during resistive exercise, 6 subjects using the iRED performed 5 resistance exercises which form the core exercises of the current ISS resistive exercise countermeasures. Each exerciser performed a warm-up set at 50% effort, then 3 sets of increasing resistance. We measured oxygen consumption and work during each exercise. Heat loss was calculated as the difference between the gross energy expenditure (minus resting metabolism) and the work performed. To determine heat production during aerobic exercise, 14 subjects performed an interval, cycle exercise protocol and 7 subjects performed a continuous, treadmill protocol. Each 30-min. exercise is similar to exercises planned for ISS. Oxygen consumption monitored continuously during the exercises was used to calculate the gross energy expenditure. For cycle exercise, work performed was calculated based on the ergometer's resistance setting and pedaling frequency. For treadmill, total work was estimated by assuming 25% work efficiency and subtracting the calculated heat production and resting metabolic rate from the gross energy expenditure. This heat production needs to be considered when determining the location of exercise hardware on ISS and designing environmental control systems. These values reflect only the human subject s produced heat; heat produced by the exercise hardware also will contribute to the heat load.

  19. Evaluating the efficacy of an integrated motivational interviewing and multi-modal exercise intervention for youth with major depression: Healthy Body, Healthy Mind randomised controlled trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Nasstasia, Yasmina; Baker, Amanda L; Halpin, Sean A; Hides, Leanne; Lewin, Terry J; Kelly, Brian J; Callister, Robin

    2018-03-01

    Recent meta-analytic reviews suggest exercise can reduce depression severity among adults with major depressive disorder (MDD); however, efficacy studies with depressed youth are limited. Few studies have investigated the efficacy of multi-modal exercise interventions in this population, addressed treatment engagement, or explored the differential effects of exercise on depressive symptom profiles. This paper describes the study protocol and recruitment pattern for an assessor blinded, two-arm randomised controlled trial investigating the efficacy of an integrated motivational interviewing (MI) and multi-modal exercise intervention in youth diagnosed with MDD. Associations between depressive symptom profiles (cognitive, somatic and affective) and psychological, physiological (fitness), and biological (blood biomarker) outcomes will also be examined. Participants aged 15-25 years with current MDD were recruited. Eligible participants were randomised and stratified according to gender and depression severity to either an immediate or delayed (control) group. The immediate group received a brief MI intervention followed by a 12-week small group exercise intervention (3 times per week for 1 h), all delivered by personal trainers. The delayed control group received the same intervention 12-weeks later. Both groups were reassessed at mid-treatment or mid-control, post-treatment or post-control, and follow-up (12 weeks post-treatment). 68 participants were recruited and randomly allocated to an intervention group. This trial will increase our understanding of the efficacy of multi-modal exercise interventions for depression and the specific effects of exercise on depressive symptom profiles. It also offers a novel contribution by addressing treatment engagement in exercise efficacy trials in youth with MDD.

  20. Effect of a High-Intensity, Intermittent-Exercise Protocol on Neurocognitive Function in Healthy Adults: Implications for Return-to-Play Management After Sport-Related Concussion.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Enda F; Gibbons, Nicola; Kerr, Grainne; Moran, Kieran A

    2015-12-03

    Determination of return to play (RTP) after sport-related concussion (SRC) is critical given the potential consequences of premature RTP. Current RTP guidelines may not identify persistent exercise-induced neurocognitive deficits in asymptomatic athletes after SRC. Therefore, postexercise neurocognitive testing has been recommended to further inform RTP determination. To implement this recommendation, the effect of exercise on neurocognitive function in healthy athletes should be understood. To examine the acute effects of a high-intensity intermittent-exercise protocol (HIIP) on neurocognitive function assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (SDMT) and Stroop Interference Test. Cohort study. University laboratory. 40 healthy male athletes (age 21.25 ± 1.29 y, education 16.95 ± 1.37 y). Each participant completed the SDMT and Stroop Interference Test at baseline and after random allocation to a condition (HIIP vs control). A mixed between-within-subjects ANOVA assessed time- (pre- vs postcondition) -by-condition interaction effects. SDMT and Stroop Interference Test scores. There was a significant time-by-condition interaction effect (P < .001, η2 = .364) for the Stroop Interference Test scores, indicating that the HIIP group scored significantly lower (56.05 ± 9.34) postcondition than the control group (66.39 ± 19.6). There was no significant time-by-condition effect (P = .997, η2 < .001) for the SDMT, indicating that there was no difference between SDMT scores for the HIIP and control groups (59.95 ± 10.7 vs 58.56 ± 14.02). In healthy athletes, the HIIP results in a reduction in neurocognitive function as assessed by the Stroop Interference Test, with no effect on function as assessed by the SDMT. Testing should also be considered after high-intensity exercise in determining RTP decisions for athletes after SRC in conjunction with the existing recommended RTP protocol. These results may provide an initial reference point for future research

  1. Physical therapy vs. internet-based exercise training (PATH-IN) for patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Williams, Quinn I; Gunn, Alexander H; Beaulieu, John E; Benas, Bernadette C; Buley, Bruce; Callahan, Leigh F; Cantrell, John; Genova, Andrew P; Golightly, Yvonne M; Goode, Adam P; Gridley, Christopher I; Gross, Michael T; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Hill, Carla H; Huffman, Kim M; Kline, Aaron; Schwartz, Todd A; Allen, Kelli D

    2015-09-28

    Physical activity improves pain and function among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA), but most people with this condition are inactive. Physical therapists play a key role in helping people with knee OA to increase appropriate physical activity. However, health care access issues, financial constraints, and other factors impede some patients from receiving physical therapy (PT) for knee OA. A need exists to develop and evaluate other methods to provide physical activity instruction and support to people with knee OA. This study is examining the effectiveness of an internet-based exercise training (IBET) program designed for knee OA, designed by physical therapists and other clinicians. This is a randomized controlled trial of 350 participants with symptomatic knee OA, allocated to three groups: IBET, standard PT, and a wait list (WL) control group (in a 2:2:1 ratio, respectively). The study was funded by the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, which conducted a peer review of the proposal. The IBET program provides patients with a tailored exercise program (based on functional level, symptoms, and current activity), video demonstrations of exercises, and guidance for appropriate exercise progression. The PT group receives up to 8 individual visits with a physical therapist, mirroring standard practice for knee OA and with an emphasis on a home exercise program. Outcomes are assessed at baseline, 4 months (primary time point) and 12 months (to assess maintenance of treatment effects). The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and secondary outcomes include objective physical function, satisfaction with physical function, physical activity, depressive symptoms and global assessment of change. Linear mixed models will be used to compare both the IBET and standard PT groups to the WL control group, examine whether IBET is non-inferior to PT (a treatment that has an established evidence base for knee

  2. Evaluation of Tai Chi Yunshou exercises on community-based stroke patients with balance dysfunction: a study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jing; Rao, Ting; Lin, Lili; Liu, Wei; Wu, Zhenkai; Zheng, Guohua; Su, Yusheng; Huang, Jia; Lin, Zhengkun; Wu, Jinsong; Fang, Yunhua; Chen, Lidian

    2015-02-25

    Balance dysfunction after stroke limits patients' general function and participation in daily life. Previous researches have suggested that Tai Chi exercise could offer a positive improvement in older individuals' balance function and reduce the risk of falls. But convincing evidence for the effectiveness of enhancing balance function after stroke with Tai Chi exercise is still inadequate. Considering the difficulties for stroke patients to complete the whole exercise, the current trial evaluates the benefit of Tai Chi Yunshou exercise for patients with balance dysfunction after stroke through a cluster randomization, parallel-controlled design. A single-blind, cluster-randomized, parallel-controlled trial will be conducted. A total of 10 community health centers (5 per arm) will be selected and randomly allocated into Tai Chi Yunshou exercise group or balance rehabilitation training group. Each community health centers will be asked to enroll 25 eligible patients into the trial. 60 minutes per each session, 1 session per day, 5 times per week and the total training round is 12 weeks. Primary and secondary outcomes will be measured at baseline and 4-weeks, 8-weeks, 12-weeks, 6-week follow-up, 12-week follow-up after randomization. Safety and economic evaluation will also be assessed. This protocol aims to evaluate the effectiveness of Tai Chi Yunshou exercise for the balance function of patients after stroke. If the outcome is positive, this project will provide an appropriate and economic balance rehabilitation technology for community-based stroke patients. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-13003641. Registration date: 22 August, 2013 http://www.chictr.org/usercenter/project/listbycreater.aspx .

  3. Standardised method for reporting exercise programmes: protocol for a modified Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Slade, Susan C; Dionne, Clermont E; Underwood, Martin; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2014-12-30

    Exercise is integral to health across the lifespan and important for people with chronic health conditions. A systematic review of exercise trials for chronic conditions reported suboptimal descriptions of the evaluated interventions and concluded that this hinders interpretation and replication. The aim of this project is to develop a standardised method for reporting essential exercise programme details being evaluated in clinical trials. A modified Delphi technique will be used to gain consensus among international exercise experts. We will use three sequential rounds of anonymous online questionnaires to refine a standardised checklist. A draft checklist of potentially relevant items was developed based on the results of a systematic review of exercise systematic reviews. An international panel of experts was identified by exercise systematic review authorship, established international profile in exercise research and practice and by peer referral. In round 1, the international panel of experts will be asked to rate the importance of each draft item and provide additional suggestions for revisions or new items. Consensus will be considered reached if at least 70% of the panel strongly agree/disagree that an item should be included or excluded. Where agreement is not reached or there are suggestions for altered or new items, these will be taken to round 2 together with an aggregated summary of round 1 responses. Following the second round, a ranking of item importance will be made to rationalise the number of items. The final template will be distributed to panel members for approval. Ethics approval was received from The Cabrini Institute Ethics Committee, Melbourne, Australia (HREC 02-07-04-14). We plan to use a stepwise process to develop and refine a standardised and internationally agreed template for explicit reporting of exercise programmes. The template will be generalisable across all types of exercise interventions. The findings will be disseminated

  4. Knee osteoarthritis, dyslipidemia syndrome and exercise.

    PubMed

    Păstrăiguş, Carmen; Ancuţa, Codrina; Miu, Smaranda; Ancuţa, E; Chirieac, Rodica

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of aerobic training on the dyslipedemia in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Prospective observational six-month study performed on 40 patients with KOA, fulfilling the inclusion criteria, classified according to their participation in specific aerobic training program (30 minutes/day, 5 days/ week) in two subgroups. A standard evaluation protocol was followed assessing lipid parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol levels) at baseline, three and six months. Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS 16.0, p < 0.05. Subgroup analysis has demonstrated a statistical significant improvement in plasma lipids levels in all patients performing regular aerobic training (cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol) (p < 0.05). Although the difference reported for total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol after six months between subgroups was not significant (p > 0.05), the mean level of HDL-cholesterol was significantly higher in patients performing aerobic training, reaching the cardio-vascular protective levels. Regular aerobic exercise has a positive effect on plasma lipoprotein concentrations; further research is needed for the assessment of long-term effects of physical exercises for both KOA and lipid pattern.

  5. Effective components of exercise and physical activity-related behaviour-change interventions for chronic non-communicable diseases in Africa: protocol for a systematic mixed studies review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Igwesi-Chidobe, Chinonso N; Godfrey, Emma L; Kengne, Andre P

    2015-08-12

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) account for a high burden of mortality and morbidity in Africa. Evidence-based clinical guidelines recommend exercise training and promotion of physical activity behaviour changes to control NCDs. Developing such interventions in Africa requires an understanding of the essential components that make them effective in this context. This is a protocol for a systematic mixed studies review that aims to determine the effective components of exercise and physical activity-related behaviour-change interventions for chronic diseases in Africa, by combining quantitative and qualitative research evidence from studies published until July 2015. We will conduct a detailed search to identify all published and unpublished studies that assessed the effects of exercise and physical activity-related interventions or the experiences/perspectives of patients to these interventions for NCDs from bibliographic databases and the grey literature. Bibliographic databases include MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), PsycINFO, CINAHL and Web of Science. We will include the following African regional databases: African Index Medicus (AIM) and AFROLIB, which is the WHO's regional office database for Africa. The databases will be searched from inception until 18 July 2015. Appraisal of study quality will be performed after results synthesis. Data synthesis will be performed independently for quantitative and qualitative data using a mixed methods sequential explanatory synthesis for systematic mixed studies reviews. Meta-analysis will be conducted for the quantitative studies, and thematic synthesis for qualitative studies and qualitative results from the non-controlled observational studies. The primary outcome will include exercise adherence and physical activity behaviour changes. This review protocol is reported according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis protocols (PRISMA

  6. The Feasibility of Standardised Geriatric Assessment Tools and Physical Exercises in Frail Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Jadczak, A D; Mahajan, N; Visvanathan, R

    2017-01-01

    Geriatric assessment tools are applicable to the general geriatric population; however, their feasibility in frail older adults is yet to be determined. The study aimed to determine the feasibility of standardised geriatric assessment tools and physical exercises in hospitalised frail older adults. Various assessment tools including the FRAIL Screen, the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the SF-36, the Trail Making Test (TMT), the Rapid Cognitive Screen, the Self Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA-SF) and the Lawton iADL as well as standard physical exercises were assessed using observational protocols. The FRAIL Screen, MNA-SF, Rapid Cognitive Screen, Lawton iADL and the physical exercises were deemed to be feasible with only minor comprehension, execution and safety issues. The TMT was not considered to be feasible and the SF-36 should be replaced by its shorter form, the SF-12. In order to ensure the validity of these findings a study with a larger sample size should be undertaken.

  7. The influence of evaluation protocol on time spent exercising at a high level of oxygen uptake during continuous cycling.

    PubMed

    Merry, K L; Glaister, M; Howatson, G; Van Someren, K

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the effects of protocol variation on the time spent exercising at ≥95% V̇O2max during cycle ergometer trials performed at the exercise intensity associated with V̇O2max (iV̇O2max). Nine male triathletes (age: 32±10 years; body mass: 73.3±6.1 kg; stature: 1.79±0.07 m; V̇O2max: 3.58±0.45 L.min(-1)) performed four exercise tests. During tests 1 and 2, participants performed a maximal incremental cycle ergometer test using different stage durations (1 min and 3 min) for the determination of iV̇O2max (1 min) and iV̇O2max (3 min). During tests 3 and 4, participants performed a continuous bout of exhaustive cycling at iV̇O2max (1 min) (CONT1) and iV̇O2max (3 min) (CONT3). iV̇O2max (1 min) was significantly greater (P<0.001) than iV̇O2max (3 min) (340±31 W vs. 299±44 W). Time to exhaustion (TTE) measured during CONT3 was significantly longer (P<0.001) than CONT1 (529±140 s vs. 214±65 s). Time spent at V̇O2max was significantly longer (P=0.036) during CONT3 than CONT1 (146±158 s vs. 11±20 s), and time spent at ≥95% V̇O2max was significantly longer (P=0.005) during CONT3 than CONT1 (326±211 s vs. 57±51 s). These results show that when exercising continuously at iV̇O2max, time spent at ≥95% V̇O2max is influenced by the initial measurement of iV̇O2max.

  8. A protocol using coho salmon to monitor Tongass National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan standards and guidelines for fish habitat.

    Treesearch

    M.D. Bryant; Trent McDonald; R. Aho; B.E. Wright; Michelle Bourassa Stahl

    2008-01-01

    We describe a protocol to monitor the effectiveness of the Tongass Land Management Plan (TLMP) management standards for maintaining fish habitat. The protocol uses juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in small tributary streams in forested watersheds. We used a 3-year pilot study to develop detailed methods to estimate juvenile salmonid...

  9. Fatigue and muscle-tendon stiffness after stretch-shortening cycle and isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Hechmi; Poumarat, Georges; Best, Thomas M; Martin, Alain; Fairclough, John; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare vertical jump performance after 2 different fatigue protocols. In the first protocol, subjects performed consecutive sets of 10 repetitions of stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) contractions. In the second protocol, successive sets of 10 repetitions of isometric contractions were performed for 10 s with the knee at 90 degrees of flexion. The exercises were stopped when the subjects failed to reach 50% of their maximum voluntary isometric contractions. Maximal isometric force and maximal concentric power were assessed by performing supine leg presses, squat jumps, and drop jumps. Surface EMG was used to determine changes in muscle activation before and after fatigue. In both groups, the fatigue exercises reduced voluntary isometric force, maximal concentric power, and drop jump performance. Kinematic data showed a decrease in knee muscle-tendon stiffness accompanied by a lengthened ground contact time. EMG analysis showed that the squat and drop jumps were performed similarly before and after the fatigue exercise for both groups. Although it was expected that the stiffness would decrease more after SSC than after isometric fatigue (as a result of a greater alteration of the reflex sensitivity SSC), our results showed that both protocols had a similar effect on knee muscle stiffness during jumping exercises. Both fatigue protocols induced muscle fatigue, and the decrease in jump performance was linked to a decrease in the strength and stiffness of the knee extensor muscles.

  10. Study protocol and overview of the literature on long-term health and quality of life outcomes in patients treated in adolescence for scoliosis with therapeutic exercises.

    PubMed

    Plaszewski, Maciej; Kotwicki, Tomasz; Chwala, Wieslaw; Terech, Jacek; Cieśliński, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Scoliosis, the most prevalent orthopaedic condition affecting children and adolescents, may have lasting physical, psychological and social consequences. With limited evidence-base, scoliosis-specific exercise therapies are an option. An overview of the subject and description of a long-term follow-up study including adults who in adolescence were treated with a scoliosis-specific exercise programme investigating the association of the exercise regime with present physical activity, physical functioning and subjective wellbeing. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first long-term outcome study on scoliosis-specific exercises, in opposition to a number of studies in adults who were braced or treated surgically in adolescence. Observational, registry-based case-control study. Adult subjects who in adolescence were treated with an exercise programme or were under observation are invited. Spine and trunk deformity, respiratory function, physical capacity and trunk muscles' function are measured. Health-related quality of life with generic and condition-specific instruments, general mental health, depression and anxiety symptoms, disability due to low back problems and physical activity are assessed. The report is believed to provide the readers with an overview of this controversial aspect of rehabilitation, and that the proposed protocol will assist researchers designing their studies.

  11. Effects of GI meals on intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Hulton, A T; Gregson, W; Maclaren, D; Doran, D A

    2012-09-01

    Pre-exercise meals or single foods containing low glycaemic index (LGI) carbohydrates (CHO) have been shown to enhance performance prior to prolonged steady state exercise compared to high glycaemic index (HGI) CHO. This study investigated the impact of HGI and LGI pre-exercise meals on intermittent high intensity exercise. Nine male recreational football players performed a football specific protocol followed by a 1 km time trial 3.5 h after ingesting 1 of 2 isoenergetic test meals (HGI: 870.3 kcal, LGI: 889.5 kcal), which were either HGI (GI: 80) or LGI (GI: 44). Blood glucose, fatty acids (FA), glycerol, β-hydroxybutyrate, lactate and insulin were assessed before, during, and after the exercise bout, whilst rates of CHO and fat oxidation were determined at 4 time points during the protocol. No significant differences were found for the 1 km time trial (LGI: 210.2 ± 19.1 s: HGI: 215.8 ± 22.6 s) (mean ± SD), nor for any of the other variables measured (P>0.05) apart from a significant condition effect with FA and significant interaction effects observed for glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate (P<0.05). These findings suggest that the type of CHO ingested in a pre-match meal has no significant impact on performance or metabolic responses during 90 min of intermittent high intensity exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Do changes in energy intake and non-exercise physical activity affect exercise-induced weight loss? Midwest Exercise Trial-2

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Stephen D.; Willis, Erik A.; Honas, Jeffery J.; Lee, Jaehoon; Washburn, Richard A.; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare energy intake, total daily energy expenditure (TDEE), non-exercise energy expenditure (NEEx), resting metabolic rate (RMR), non-exercise physical activity (NEPA), and sedentary time between participants with weight loss <5% (non-responders) vs. ≥5% (responders) in response to exercise. Methods Overweight/obese (BMI 25–40 kg/m2), adults (18–30 yrs.) were randomized to exercise: 5 day/week, 400 or 600 kcal/session, 10 months. Results Forty participants responded and 34 did not respond to the exercise protocol. Non-responder energy intake was higher vs. responders, significant only in men (p=0.034). TDEE increased only in responders (p=0.001). NEEx increased in responders and decreased in non-responders, significant only in men (p=0.045). There were no within or between-group differences for change in RMR. NEPA increased in responders and decreased in non-responders (group-by-time interactions: total sample, p=0.049; men, p=0.016). Sedentary time decreased in both groups, significant only in men. Conclusion Men who did not lose weight in response to exercise (<5%) had higher energy intake and lower NEEx compared to men losing ≥5%. No significant differences in any parameters assessed were observed between women who lost <5% vs. those losing ≥5. Factors associated with the weight loss response to exercise in women warrant additional investigation. PMID:26193059

  13. Introduction of a standardized multimodality image protocol for navigation-guided surgery of suspected low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Mert, Aygül; Kiesel, Barbara; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Martínez-Moreno, Mauricio; Minchev, Georgi; Furtner, Julia; Knosp, Engelbert; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Widhalm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT Surgery of suspected low-grade gliomas (LGGs) poses a special challenge for neurosurgeons due to their diffusely infiltrative growth and histopathological heterogeneity. Consequently, neuronavigation with multimodality imaging data, such as structural and metabolic data, fiber tracking, and 3D brain visualization, has been proposed to optimize surgery. However, currently no standardized protocol has been established for multimodality imaging data in modern glioma surgery. The aim of this study was therefore to define a specific protocol for multimodality imaging and navigation for suspected LGG. METHODS Fifty-one patients who underwent surgery for a diffusely infiltrating glioma with nonsignificant contrast enhancement on MRI and available multimodality imaging data were included. In the first 40 patients with glioma, the authors retrospectively reviewed the imaging data, including structural MRI (contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and FLAIR sequences), metabolic images derived from PET, or MR spectroscopy chemical shift imaging, fiber tracking, and 3D brain surface/vessel visualization, to define standardized image settings and specific indications for each imaging modality. The feasibility and surgical relevance of this new protocol was subsequently prospectively investigated during surgery with the assistance of an advanced electromagnetic navigation system in the remaining 11 patients. Furthermore, specific surgical outcome parameters, including the extent of resection, histological analysis of the metabolic hotspot, presence of a new postoperative neurological deficit, and intraoperative accuracy of 3D brain visualization models, were assessed in each of these patients. RESULTS After reviewing these first 40 cases of glioma, the authors defined a specific protocol with standardized image settings and specific indications that allows for optimal and simultaneous visualization of structural and metabolic data, fiber tracking, and 3D brain

  14. Satellite Communications Using Commercial Protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Griner, James H.; Dimond, Robert; Frantz, Brian D.; Kachmar, Brian; Shell, Dan

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been working with industry, academia, and other government agencies in assessing commercial communications protocols for satellite and space-based applications. In addition, NASA Glenn has been developing and advocating new satellite-friendly modifications to existing communications protocol standards. This paper summarizes recent research into the applicability of various commercial standard protocols for use over satellite and space- based communications networks as well as expectations for future protocol development. It serves as a reference point from which the detailed work can be readily accessed. Areas that will be addressed include asynchronous-transfer-mode quality of service; completed and ongoing work of the Internet Engineering Task Force; data-link-layer protocol development for unidirectional link routing; and protocols for aeronautical applications, including mobile Internet protocol routing for wireless/mobile hosts and the aeronautical telecommunications network protocol.

  15. The effects of high-intensity resistance exercise on the blood lipid profile and liver function in hypercholesterolemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Frajacomo, Fernando Tadeu Trevisan; Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos Piva; Fernandes, Cleverson Rodrigues; Martinello, Flávia; Bachur, José Alexandre; Uyemura, Sérgio Akira; Perez, Sérgio Eduardo de Andrade; Garcia, Sérgio Britto

    2012-06-01

    It is well established that atherogenic dyslipidemia, characterized by high levels of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, constitutes important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Regular exercise has been associated with a reduced risk for metabolic diseases. However, studies supporting the concept that resistance exercise is a modifier of blood lipid parameters are often contradictory. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of high-intensity resistance exercise on the serum levels of TG, TC, HDL and non-HDL cholesterol, glucose, and the liver function enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT, EC 2.6.1.2) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST, EC 2.6.1.1) in golden Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus (Waterhouse, 1839)) fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. Sedentary groups (S) and exercise groups (E) were fed a standard diet (SS and ES) or a cholesterol-enriched diet (standard plus 1% cholesterol, SC and EC). Resistance exercise was performed by jumps in the water, carrying a load strapped to the chest, representing 10 maximum repetitions (10 RM, 30 s rest, five days per week for five weeks). Mean blood sample comparisons were made by ANOVA + Tukey or ANOVA + Kruskal-Wallis tests (p < 0.05) to compare parametric and nonparametric samples, respectively. There were no differences in blood lipids between the standard diet groups (SS and ES) (p > 0.05). However, the EC group increased the glucose, non-HDL, and TC levels in comparison with the ES group. Moreover, the EC group increased the TG levels versus the SC group (p < 0.05). In addition, the ALT levels were increased only by diet treatment. These findings indicated that high-intensity resistance exercise contributed to dyslipidemia in hamsters fed a hypercholesterolemic diet, whereas liver function enzymes did not differ in regards to the exercise protocol.

  16. Physiological and perceptual responses to incremental exercise testing in healthy men: effect of exercise test modality.

    PubMed

    Muscat, Kristina M; Kotrach, Houssam G; Wilkinson-Maitland, Courtney A; Schaeffer, Michele R; Mendonca, Cassandra T; Jensen, Dennis

    2015-11-01

    In a randomized cross-over study of 15 healthy men aged 20-30 years, we compared physiological and perceptual responses during treadmill and cycle exercise test protocols matched for increments in work rate - the source of increased locomotor muscle metabolic and contractile demands. The rates of O2 consumption and CO2 production were higher at the peak of treadmill versus cycle testing (p ≤ 0.05). Nevertheless, work rate, minute ventilation, tidal volume (VT), breathing frequency (fR), inspiratory capacity (IC), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), tidal esophageal (Pes,tidal) and transdiaphragmatic pressure swings (Pdi,tidal), peak expiratory gastric pressures (Pga,peak), the root mean square of the diaphragm electromyogram (EMGdi,rms) expressed as a percentage of maximum EMGdi,rms (EMGdi,rms%max), and dyspnea ratings were similar at the peak of treadmill versus cycle testing (p > 0.05). Ratings of leg discomfort were higher at the peak of cycle versus treadmill exercise (p ≤ 0.05), even though peak O2 consumption was lower during cycling. Oxygen consumption, CO2 production, minute ventilation, fR, Pes,tidal, Pdi,tidal and Pga,peak were higher (p ≤ 0.05), while VT, IC, IRV, EMGdi,rms%max, and ratings of dyspnea and leg discomfort were similar (p > 0.05) at all or most submaximal work rates during treadmill versus cycle exercise. Our findings highlight important differences (and similarities) in physiological and perceptual responses at maximal and submaximal work rates during incremental treadmill and cycle exercise testing protocols. The lack of effect of exercise test modality on peak work rate advocates for the use of this readily available parameter to optimize training intensity determination, regardless of exercise training mode.

  17. Standardized terminology for clinical trial protocols based on top-level ontological categories.

    PubMed

    Heller, B; Herre, H; Lippoldt, K; Loeffler, M

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for the ontologically based standardization of concepts with regard to the quality assurance of clinical trial protocols. We developed a data dictionary for medical and trial-specific terms in which concepts and relations are defined context-dependently. The data dictionary is provided to different medical research networks by means of the software tool Onto-Builder via the internet. The data dictionary is based on domain-specific ontologies and the top-level ontology of GOL. The concepts and relations described in the data dictionary are represented in natural language, semi-formally or formally according to their use.

  18. Early Versus Delayed Passive Range of Motion Exercise for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Hung, Chen-Yu; Han, Der-Sheng; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative shoulder stiffness complicates functional recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. To compare early passive range of motion (ROM) exercise with a delayed rehabilitation protocol with regard to the effectiveness of stiffness reduction and functional improvements and rates of improper healing in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair for torn rotator cuffs. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing both rehabilitation approaches were identified in PubMed and Scopus. Between-group differences in shoulder function were transformed to effect sizes for comparisons, whereas the effectiveness against stiffness and the risk of tendon failure were reported using standardized mean differences of ROM degrees and odds ratios (ORs) of recurrent tears, respectively. Six RCTs were included, consisting of 482 patients. No significant difference in shoulder function existed across both protocols. The early ROM group demonstrated more improvement in shoulder forward flexion than the delayed rehabilitation group, with a standardized mean difference of 7.45° (95% CI, 3.20°-11.70°) at 6 months and 3.51° (95% CI, 0.31°-6.71°) at 12 months. Early ROM exercise tended to cause a higher rate of recurrent tendon tears (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.90-2.28), and the effect became statistically significant (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.04-3.60) after excluding 2 RCTs that recruited only those patients with small to medium-sized tears. Early ROM exercise accelerated recovery from postoperative stiffness for patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair but was likely to result in improper tendon healing in shoulders with large-sized tears. The choice of either protocol should be based on an accommodation of the risks of recurrent tears and postoperative shoulder stiffness. © 2014 The Author(s).

  19. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a blended exercise intervention for patients with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kloek, Corelien J J; Bossen, Daniël; Veenhof, Cindy; van Dongen, Johanna M; Dekker, Joost; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2014-08-08

    Exercise therapy in patients with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis is effective in reducing pain, increasing physical activity and physical functioning, but costly and a burden for the health care budget. A web-based intervention is cheap in comparison to face-to-face exercise therapy and has the advantage of supporting in home exercises because of the 24/7 accessibility. However, the lack of face-to-face contact with a professional is a disadvantage of web-based interventions and is probably one of the reasons for low adherence rates. In order to combine the best of two worlds, we have developed the intervention e-Exercise. In this blended intervention face-to-face contacts with a physical therapist are partially replaced by a web-based exercise intervention. The aim of this study is to investigate the short- (3 months) and long-term (12 months) (cost)-effectiveness of e-Exercise compared to usual care physical therapy. Our hypothesis is that e-Exercise is more effective and cost-effective in increasing physical functioning and physical activity compared to usual care. This paper presents the protocol of a prospective, single-blinded, multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial. In total, 200 patients with OA of the hip and/or knee will be randomly allocated into either e-Exercise or usual care (physical therapy). E-Exercise is a 12-week intervention, consisting of maximum five face-to-face physical therapy contacts supplemented with a web-based program. The web-based program contains assignments to gradually increase patients' physical activity, strength and stability exercises and information about OA related topics. Primary outcomes are physical activity and physical functioning. Secondary outcomes are health related quality of life, self-perceived effect, pain, tiredness and self-efficacy. All measurements will be performed at baseline, 3 and 12 months after inclusion. Retrospective cost questionnaires will be sent at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months and used for the

  20. Evaluation of respiratory dynamics by volumetric capnography during submaximal exercise protocol of six minutes on treadmill in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Parazzi, Paloma L F; Marson, Fernando A L; Ribeiro, Maria A G O; Schivinski, Camila I S; Ribeiro, José D

    2017-11-29

    Volumetric capnography provides the standard CO 2 elimination by the volume expired per respiratory cycle and is a measure to assess pulmonary involvement. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory dynamics of healthy control subjects and those with cystic fibrosis in a submaximal exercise protocol for six minutes on the treadmill, using volumetric capnography parameters (slope 3 [Slp3], Slp3/tidal volume [Slp3/TV], and slope 2 [Slp2]). This was a cross-sectional study with 128 subjects (cystic fibrosis, 64 subjects; controls, 64 subjects]. Participants underwent volumetric capnography before, during, and after six minutes on the treadmill. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman, Mann-Whitney, and Kruskal-Wallis tests, considering age and sex. An alpha=0.05 was considered. Six minutes on the treadmill evaluation: in cystic fibrosis, volumetric capnography parameters were different before, during, and after six minutes on the treadmill; the same was observed for the controls, except for Slp2. Regarding age, an Slp3 difference was observed in cystic fibrosis patients regardless of age, at all moments, and in controls for age≥12 years; a difference in Slp3/TV was observed in cystic fibrosis and controls, regardless of age; and an Slp2 difference in the cystic fibrosis, regardless of age. Regarding sex, Slp3 and Slp3/TV differences were observed in cystic fibrosis regardless of sex, and in controls in male participants; an Slp2 difference was observed in the cystic fibrosis and female participants. The analysis between groups (cystic fibrosis and controls) indicated that Slp3 and Slp3/TV has identified the CF, regardless of age and sex, while the Slp2 showed the CF considering age. Cystic fibrosis showed greater values of the parameters before, during, and after exercise, even when stratified by age and sex, which may indicate ventilation inhomogeneity in the peripheral pathways in the cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2017

  1. Exercise deprivation increases negative mood in exercise-addicted subjects and modifies their biochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Leite, Geovana Silva Fogaça; Lee, Kil Sun; Barreto, Amaury Tavares; Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli Dos; Souza, Helton de Sá; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to identify the possible association between biochemical markers of exercise addiction and affective parameters in a sample of athletes during 2weeks of withdrawal exercise. Eighteen male runners were distributed into a control group (n=10) composed of runners without exercise addiction symptoms and an exercise addiction group (n=8) composed of runners with exercise addiction symptoms. The volunteers performed a baseline evaluation that included affective questionnaires, blood samples, body composition and an aerobic test performed at ventilatory threshold I. After the baseline evaluation, the groups started an exercise withdrawal period that was sustained for 2weeks. During exercise withdrawal, an actigraph accelerometer was used to monitor the movement index, and CK and LDH were measured in blood samples to validate the non-exercise practice. At the end of the exercise withdrawal period, a blood collection, aerobic test and mood scale was performed in the re-test. The results showed that at the end of the experimental protocol, when compared with the control group, the exercise addiction group showed an increase in depression, confusion, anger, fatigue and decreased vigor mood that improved post-exercise, along with low levels of anandamide at all time-points evaluated and a modest increase in β-endorphin post-exercise. Moreover, the exercise addiction group showed a decrease in oxygen consumption and respiratory exchange ratio after the exercise withdrawal period, which characterized a detraining phenomenon. Our data suggest that a 2-week withdrawal exercise period resulted in an increase of negative mood in exercise addiction; additionally, exercise addiction showed low levels of anandamide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Different Heavy-Resistance Exercise Protocols on Plasma Beta-Endorphin Concentrations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    of O-EP and cortisol. forms of high-intensity exercise, which is performed well above the level that produces V02 .. but uses multi- anaerobic ; opioid...utilizing the Borg CR- ing the rest period length (i.e., from I to 3 min; or in- 10 scale designed to accommodate primarily anaerobic creasing the resistance...O-EP in response to though short-term anaerobic exercise to exhaustion has high-intensity exercise remain unknown, it has been sug- been shown to

  3. Standardization and Optimization of Computed Tomography Protocols to Achieve Low-Dose

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Cynthia; Cody, Dianna D.; Gupta, Rajiv; Hess, Christopher P.; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Kofler, James M.; Krishnam, Mayil S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The increase in radiation exposure due to CT scans has been of growing concern in recent years. CT scanners differ in their capabilities and various indications require unique protocols, but there remains room for standardization and optimization. In this paper we summarize approaches to reduce dose, as discussed in lectures comprising the first session of the 2013 UCSF Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety in Computed Tomography. The experience of scanning at low dose in different body regions, for both diagnostic and interventional CT procedures, is addressed. An essential primary step is justifying the medical need for each scan. General guiding principles for reducing dose include tailoring a scan to a patient, minimizing scan length, use of tube current modulation and minimizing tube current, minimizing-tube potential, iterative reconstruction, and periodic review of CT studies. Organized efforts for standardization have been spearheaded by professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Finally, all team members should demonstrate an awareness of the importance of minimizing dose. PMID:24589403

  4. Acute and Chronic Exercise in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Thu, Vu Thi; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Numerous animal cardiac exercise models using animal subjects have been established to uncover the cardiovascular physiological mechanism of exercise or to determine the effects of exercise on cardiovascular health and disease. In most cases, animal-based cardiovascular exercise modalities include treadmill running, swimming, and voluntary wheel running with a series of intensities, times, and durations. Those used animals include small rodents (e.g., mice and rats) and large animals (e.g., rabbits, dogs, goats, sheep, pigs, and horses). Depending on the research goal, each experimental protocol should also describe whether its respective exercise treatment can produce the anticipated acute or chronic cardiovascular adaptive response. In this chapter, we will briefly describe the most common kinds of animal models of acute and chronic cardiovascular exercises that are currently being conducted and are likely to be chosen in the near future. Strengths and weakness of animal-based cardiac exercise modalities are also discussed.

  5. Exercise response in Parkinson’s disease: insights from a cross-sectional comparison with sedentary controls and a per-protocol analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Collett, Johnny; Franssen, Marloes; Meaney, Andy; Sexton, Claire; Dennis-West, Andrea; Betts, Jill F; Izadi, Hooshang; Bogdanovic, Marko; Tims, Martin; Farmer, Andrew; Dawes, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the acute and adaptation cardiovascular and metabolic training responses in people with Parkinson’s disease (pwP). Design (1) A cross-sectional study of exercise response of pwP compared with sedentary controls and (2) an interventional study of exercise training in pwP. Setting Community leisure facilities. Participants pwP (n=83) and sedentary controls (n=55). Interventions Study 1 included participants from a two-arm-parallel single-blind phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT), that undertook a baseline maximal incremental exercise test and study 2 included those randomised to the exercise group in the RCT, who completed a 6-month weekly exercise programme (n=37). The intervention study 2 was a prescribed exercise program consisting of sessions lasting 60 min, two times a week over a 6-month period. The control group followed the same protocol which derived the same cardiorespiratory parameters, except that they were instructed to aim for a cadence of ~60 revolutions per minute and the unloaded phase lasted 3 min with an initial step of 25 W. Primary and secondary outcome measures Stepwise incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion was the primary outcome measure. Results Study 1 showed higher maximum values for heart rate (HR), VO2 L/min, VCO2 L/min and ventilation L/min for the control group; respiratory exchange ratio (RER), perceived exertion and O2 pulse (VO2 L/min/HR) did not differ between groups. In study 2, for pwP who adhered to training (n=37), RER increased significantly and although there was no significant change in aerobic capacity or HR response, reduced blood pressure was found. Conclusions An abnormal cardiovascular response to exercise was observed in pwP compared to controls. After the exercise programme, metabolic deficiencies remained for pwP. These observations add to the pathogenic understanding of PD, acknowledge an underling metabolic contribution and support that certain cardiovascular symptoms

  6. High-intensity interval running is perceived to be more enjoyable than moderate-intensity continuous exercise: implications for exercise adherence.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Close, Graeme L; MacLaren, Don P M; Gregson, Warren; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively quantify ratings of perceived enjoyment using the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale following high-intensity interval running versus moderate-intensity continuous running. Eight recreationally active men performed two running protocols consisting of high-intensity interval running (6 × 3 min at 90% VO(2max) interspersed with 6 × 3 min active recovery at 50% VO(2max) with a 7-min warm-up and cool down at 70% VO(2max)) or 50 min moderate-intensity continuous running at 70% VO(2max). Ratings of perceived enjoyment after exercise were higher (P < 0.05) following interval running compared with continuous running (88 ± 6 vs. 61 ± 12) despite higher (P < 0.05) ratings of perceived exertion (14 ± 1 vs. 13 ± 1). There was no difference (P < 0.05) in average heart rate (88 ± 3 vs. 87 ± 3% maximum heart rate), average VO(2) (71 ± 6 vs. 73 ± 4%VO(2max)), total VO(2) (162 ± 16 vs. 166 ± 27 L) or energy expenditure (811 ± 83 vs. 832 ± 136 kcal) between protocols. The greater enjoyment associated with high-intensity interval running may be relevant for improving exercise adherence, since running is a low-cost exercise intervention requiring no exercise equipment and similar relative exercise intensities have previously induced health benefits in patient populations.

  7. The magnitude of muscle strain does not influence serial sarcomere number adaptations following eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-02-01

    It is generally accepted that eccentric exercise, when performed by a muscle that is unaccustomed to that type of contraction, results in a delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS). A prolonged exposure to eccentric exercise leads to the disappearance of the signs and symptoms associated with DOMS, which has been referred to as the repeated bout effect (RBE). Although the mechanisms underlying the RBE remain unclear, several mechanisms have been proposed, including the serial sarcomere number addition following exercise induced muscle damage. In the traditional DOMS and RBE protocols, muscle injury has been treated as a global parameter, with muscle force and strain assumed to be uniform throughout the muscle. To assess the effects of muscle-tendon unit strain, fiber strain, torque and injury on serial sarcomere number adaptations, three groups of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to chronic repetitive eccentric exercise bouts of the ankle dorsiflexors for 6 weeks. These eccentric exercise protocols consisted of identical muscle tendon unit (MTU) strain, but other mechanical factors were systematically altered. Following chronic eccentric exercise, serial sarcomere number adaptations were not identical between the three eccentric exercise protocols, and serial sarcomere number adaptations were not uniform across all regions of the muscle. Peak torque and relaxation fiber strain were the best predictors of serial sarcomere number across all three protocols. Therefore, MTU strain does not appear to be the primary cause for sarcomerogenesis, and differential adaptations within the muscle may be explained by the nonuniform architecture of the muscle, resulting in differential local fiber strains.

  8. Strength and Aerobic Exercises Improve Spatial Memory in Aging Rats Through Stimulating Distinct Neuroplasticity Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Macan, Tamires Pavei; da Silva, Sabrina; Canteiro, Paula Bortoluzzi; de Sena Casagrande, Alisson; Pedroso, Giulia Dos Santos; Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes; de Pinho, Ricardo Aurino

    2017-12-01

    Aging is associated with impaired cognition and memory and increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders. Physical exercise is neuroprotective; however, the major evidence of this effect involves studies of only aerobic training in young animals. The benefits of other exercise protocols such as strength training in aged animals remains unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of aerobic and strength training on spatial memory and hippocampal plasticity in aging rats. Aging Wistar rats performed aerobic or strength training for 50 min 3 to 4 days/week for 8 weeks. Spatial memory and neurotrophic and glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus of aged rats were evaluated after aerobic or strength training. Both aerobic and strength training improved cognition during the performance of a spatial memory task. Remarkably, the improvement in spatial memory was accompanied by an increase in synaptic plasticity proteins within the hippocampus after exercise training, with some differences in the intracellular functions of those proteins between the two exercise protocols. Moreover, neurotrophic signaling (CREB, BDNF, and the P75 NTR receptor) increased after training for both exercise protocols, and aerobic exercise specifically increased glutamatergic proteins (NMDA receptor and PSD-95). We also observed a decrease in DNA damage after aerobic training. In contrast, strength training increased levels of PKCα and the proinflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-1β. Overall, our results show that both aerobic and strength training improved spatial memory in aging rats through inducing distinct molecular mechanisms of neuroplasticity. Our findings extend the idea that exercise protocols can be used to improve cognition during aging.

  9. P-31 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of limb muscles during bedrest with exercise countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, P.; Berry, I.; Arnaud, S.; Moseley, M.

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen volunteers in bed with head down tilt (-6 deg) for 1 month and doing or not exercise training while in bed (lido or ergometer) had their limb muscle studied by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A protocol of repetitive exercise in the magnet was set and a wooden probe designed to support the limb and to allow exercise. Spectra were recorded continuously during the protocol. In each spectrum, inorganic phosphate, phosphocreatin, adenosin triphosphate, and pH were measured. All the subjects were studied before, after bedrest, and 6 weeks later. After 1 month, the lido group show no changes in the spectra of their leg muscles while the group doing no exercise or ergometer do. For the arms, a loss of muscle function is only seen in the group doing no exercise.

  10. A community-based approach to trials of aerobic exercise in aging and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Vidoni, Eric D.; Van Sciver, Angela; Johnson, David K.; He, Jinghua; Honea, Robyn; Haines, Brian; Goodwin, Jami; Laubinger, M. Pat; Anderson, Heather S.; Kluding, Patricia M.; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Billinger, Sandra A.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of exercise for aging have received considerable attention in both the popular and academic press. The putative benefits of exercise for maximizing cognitive function and supporting brain health have great potential for combating Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Aerobic exercise offers a low-cost, low-risk intervention that is widely available and may have disease modifying effects. Demonstrating aerobic exercise alters the AD process would have enormous public health implications. The purpose of this paper is to a report the protocol of a current, community-based pilot study of aerobic exercise for AD to guide future investigation. This manuscript provides 1) an overview of possible benefits of exercise in those with dementia, 2) a rationale and recommendations for implementation of a community-based approach, 3) recommendation for implementation of similar study protocols, 4) unique challenges in conducting an exercise trial in AD. PMID:22903151

  11. Development of a new clot formation protocol for standardized in vitro investigations of sonothrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Florian C; Teichert, Andrea; Ohlrich, Marcus; Marxsen, Jan H; Stellmacher, Florian; Tanislav, Christian; Seidel, Günter

    2014-11-30

    Agreement about the most suitable clot formation protocol for sonothrombolysis investigations is lacking. Lysis rates vary strongly owing to different test conditions and, thus, cannot be compared. We aim to establish a simple but physiologically grounded protocol for in vitro coagulation to enable standardized sonothrombolysis investigations. Clots were generated from platelet-rich plasma (PRP) obtained by centrifugation (10 min, 180 × g) of human venous blood (VB). PRP was mixed with the boundary layer formed between the supernatant and the erythrocyte layer. To achieve clots with different platelet counts, PRP was gradually substituted with platelet-free plasma (PFP), harvested from the supernatant of VB after centrifugation (10 min, 2570 × g). Clot types were examined for histological appearance, hydrodynamic resistance under physiological flows, and lysis rate measured by weight loss after a 2-h treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) (60 kU/ml). Lysis rates of the most suitable clot were measured after a 1-h treatment with rt-PA (60 kU/ml), and combined treatment with rt-PA and 2-MHz transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCS) (0.179 W/cm(2)) or 2-MHz transcranial Doppler (TCD) (0.457 W/cm(2)). With increased platelet count, the hydrodynamic resistance of the artificial clots increased, their histological appearance became more physiological, and lysis rates decreased. The most suitable clots consisted of 1.5-ml PRP, 2.0-ml PFP, and 0.5-ml boundary layer. Their lysis rates were 36.7 ± 7.8% (rt-PA), 40.8 ± 8.6% (rt-PA+TCCS), and 40.4 ± 8.3% (rt-PA+TCD). These systemic investigations were conducted for the first time. This protocol should be used for standardized sonothrombolysis investigations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The TreadWheel: Interval Training Protocol for Gently Induced Exercise in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lowman, Kelsey E; Wyatt, Brélahn J; Cunneely, Owen P; Reed, Laura K

    2018-06-08

    The incidence of complex metabolic diseases has increased as a result of a widespread transition towards lifestyles of increased caloric intake and lowered activity levels. These multifactorial diseases arise from a combination of genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. One such complex disease is Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), which is a cluster of metabolic disorders, including hypertension, hyperglycemia, and abdominal obesity. Exercise and dietary intervention are the primary treatments recommended by doctors to mitigate obesity and its subsequent metabolic diseases. Exercise intervention, in particular aerobic interval training, stimulates favorable changes in the common risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), Cardiovascular Disease (CVD), and other conditions. With the influx of evidence describing the therapeutic effect exercise has on metabolic health, establishing a system that models exercise in a controlled setting provides a valuable tool for assessing the effects of exercise in an experimental context. Drosophila melanogaster is a great tool for investigating the physiological and molecular changes that result from exercise intervention. The flies have short lifespans and similar mechanisms of metabolizing nutrients when compared to humans. To induce exercise in Drosophila, we developed a machine called the TreadWheel, which utilizes the fly's innate, negative geotaxis tendency to gently induce climbing. This enables researchers to perform experiments on large cohorts of genetically diverse flies to better understand the genotype-by-environment interactions underlying the effects of exercise on metabolic health.

  13. Abdominal symptoms during physical exercise and the role of gastrointestinal ischaemia: a study in 12 symptomatic athletes.

    PubMed

    ter Steege, Rinze W F; Geelkerken, Robert H; Huisman, Ad B; Kolkman, Jeroen J

    2012-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during exercise may be caused by GI ischaemia. The authors report their experience with the diagnostic protocol and management of athletes with symptomatic exercise-induced GI ischaemia. The value of prolonged exercise tonometry in the diagnostic protocol of these patients was evaluated. Patients referred for GI symptoms during physical exercise underwent a standardised diagnostic protocol, including prolonged exercise tonometry. Indicators of GI ischaemia, as measured by tonometry, were related to the presence of symptoms during the exercise test (S+ and S- tests) and exercise intensity. 12 athletes were specifically referred for GI symptoms during exercise (five males and seven females; median age 29 years (range 15-46 years)). Type of sport was cycling, long-distance running and triathlon. Median duration of symptoms was 32 months (range 7-240 months). Splanchnic artery stenosis was found in one athlete. GI ischaemia was found in six athletes during submaximal exercise. All athletes had gastric and jejunal ischaemia during maximum intensity exercise. No significant difference was found in gastric and jejunal Pco(2) or gradients between S+ and S- tests during any phase of the exercise protocol. In S+ tests, but not in S- tests, a significant correlation between lactate and gastric gradient was found. In S+ tests, the regression coefficients of gradients were higher than those in S- tests. Treatment advice aimed at limiting GI ischaemia were successful in reducing complaints in the majority of the athletes. GI ischaemia was present in all athletes during maximum intensity exercise and in 50% during submaximal exercise. Athletes with GI symptoms had higher gastric gradients per mmol/l increase in lactate, suggesting an increased susceptibility for the development of ischaemia during exercise. Treatment advice aimed at limiting GI ischaemia helped the majority of the referred athletes to reduce their complaints. Our results suggest an

  14. Increased cardiac output elicits higher V̇O2max in response to self-paced exercise.

    PubMed

    Astorino, Todd Anthony; McMillan, David William; Edmunds, Ross Montgomery; Sanchez, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a self-paced protocol demonstrated higher maximal oxygen uptake versus the traditional ramp protocol. The primary aim of the current study was to further explore potential differences in maximal oxygen uptake between the ramp and self-paced protocols using simultaneous measurement of cardiac output. Active men and women of various fitness levels (N = 30, mean age = 26.0 ± 5.0 years) completed 3 graded exercise tests separated by a minimum of 48 h. Participants initially completed progressive ramp exercise to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake followed by a verification test to confirm maximal oxygen uptake attainment. Over the next 2 sessions, they performed a self-paced and an additional ramp protocol. During exercise, gas exchange data were obtained using indirect calorimetry, and thoracic impedance was utilized to estimate hemodynamic function (stroke volume and cardiac output). One-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to determine differences in maximal oxygen uptake and cardiac output between ramp and self-paced testing. Results demonstrated lower (p < 0.001) maximal oxygen uptake via the ramp (47.2 ± 10.2 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) versus the self-paced (50.2 ± 9.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) protocol, with no interaction (p = 0.06) seen for fitness level. Maximal heart rate and cardiac output (p = 0.02) were higher in the self-paced protocol versus ramp exercise. In conclusion, data show that the traditional ramp protocol may underestimate maximal oxygen uptake compared with a newly developed self-paced protocol, with a greater cardiac output potentially responsible for this outcome.

  15. End-exercise ΔHHb/ΔVO2 and post-exercise local oxygen availability in relation to exercise intensity.

    PubMed

    Stöcker, F; Von Oldershausen, C; Paternoster, F K; Schulz, T; Oberhoffer, R

    2017-07-01

    Increased local blood supply is thought to be one of the mechanisms underlying oxidative adaptations to interval training regimes. The relationship of exercise intensity with local blood supply and oxygen availability has not been sufficiently evaluated yet. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of six different intensities (40-90% peak oxygen uptake, VO 2peak ) on relative changes in oxygenated, deoxygenated and total haemoglobin (ΔO 2 Hb, ΔHHb, ΔTHb) concentration after exercise as well as end-exercise ΔHHb/ΔVO 2 as a marker for microvascular O 2 distribution. Seventeen male subjects performed an experimental protocol consisting of 3 min cycling bouts at each exercise intensity in randomized order, separated by 5 min rests. ΔO 2 Hb and ΔHHb were monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy of the vastus lateralis muscle, and VO 2 was assessed. ΔHHb/ΔVO 2 increased significantly from 40% to 60% VO 2 peak and decreased from 60% to 90% VO 2 peak. Post-exercise ΔTHb and ΔO 2 Hb showed an overshoot in relation to pre-exercise values, which was equal after 40-60% VO 2peak and rose significantly thereafter. A plateau was reached following exercise at ≥80% VO 2peak . The results suggest that there is an increasing mismatch of local O 2 delivery and utilization during exercise up to 60% VO 2peak . This insufficient local O 2 distribution is progressively improved above that intensity. Further, exercise intensities of ≥80% VO 2peak induce highest local post-exercise O 2 availability. These effects are likely due to improved microvascular perfusion by enhanced vasodilation, which could be mediated by higher lactate production and the accompanying acidosis. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of a virtual reality-enhanced exercise protocol after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tien-Yow; Sung, Wen-Hsu; Chang, Hwa-Ann; Wang, Ray-Yau

    2006-10-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology has gained importance in many areas of medicine. Knowledge concerning the application and the influence of VR-enhanced exercise programs is limited for patients receiving coronary artery bypass grafting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a virtual "country walk" on the number of sessions necessary to reach cardiac rehabilitation goals in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Twenty subjects who were seen for cardiac rehabilitation between January and June 2004 comprised the study sample. The protocol for this study included an initial maximum graded exercise tolerance test, given to determine the subsequent training goals for the subject, followed by biweekly submaximal endurance training sessions. All subjects were assigned by lot to 1 of 2 submaximal endurance training programs, one (group 2) with and the other (group 1) without the added VR environment. In all other respects, the 2 programs were identical. Each training session lasted for 30 minutes and was carried out twice per week for about 3 months. The primary outcome measures were maximum load during the work sessions, target oxygen consumption, target heart rate (beats per minute), and number of training sessions required to reach rehabilitation goals. By the end of 20 training sessions, only 4 of the 10 control subjects had reached the heart rate target goal of 85% their maximum heart rate. In contrast, 9 of the 10 subjects in the VR program had attained this goal by 9 or fewer training sessions. When target metabolic cost (75% peak oxygen consumption) was used as the training goal, all 10 subjects in the VR program had reached this target after 2 training sessions (or, in some cases, 1 training session), but not until training session 15 did a cumulative number of 9 control subjects reach this goal. These study outcomes clearly support the notion that incorporating a VR environment into cardiac rehabilitation programs will accelerate

  17. Effects of exercise training on systo-diastolic ventricular dysfunction in patients with hypertension: an echocardiographic study with tissue velocity and strain imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Leggio, Massimo; Mazza, Andrea; Cruciani, Giancarlo; Sgorbini, Luca; Pugliese, Marco; Bendini, Maria Grazia; Severi, Paolo; Jesi, Anna Patrizia

    2014-07-01

    There is a lack of detailed data regarding the effect of exercise training in pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exercise training on left and right ventricular morphologic and functional parameters by means of conventional echocardiography and sensitive new echocardiographic techniques including tissue Doppler velocity and strain imaging, that were performed in pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients at baseline and at the end of a specific exercise training protocol for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. We selected 116 pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients who completed the exercise training protocol. All patients underwent a clinical history and examination; transthoracic echocardiography and exercise testing were performed at baseline and at the end of the exercise training protocol. Conventional echocardiography revealed a mild degree of diastolic dysfunction without significant differences or variations from baseline to the end of the exercise training protocol. In contrast, tissue Doppler velocity and strain imaging measurements demonstrated and highlighted the positive influence of exercise training: for both left and right ventricle myocardial early peak diastolic velocities (Em), the ratio of myocardial early-late peak diastolic velocity (Em/Am), myocardial peak systolic velocities (Sm) and peak strain and strain rate values significantly increased at the end of the exercise training protocol, suggesting a relationship between exercise capacity and both left and right ventricular systo-diastolic function. Our study, by means of newer more sensitive echocardiographic techniques, clearly demonstrated the positive impact of exercise training on both left and right ventricular systo-diastolic function, in terms of adjunctive subclinical improvement, in pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients.

  18. Effectiveness of Standardized Physical Therapy Exercises for Patients With Difficulty Returning to Usual Activities After Decompression Surgery for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Falla, Deborah; Haahr, Jens Peder; Frich, Lars Henrik; Andrea, Linda Christie; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of exercise programs after decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. For patients with difficulty returning to usual activities, special efforts may be needed to improve shoulder function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness at 3 and 12 months of a standardized physical therapy exercise intervention compared with usual care in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after subacromial decompression surgery. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted. The study was conducted in 6 public departments of orthopedic surgery, 2 departments of occupational medicine, and 2 physical therapy training centers in Central Denmark Region. One hundred twenty-six patients reporting difficulty returning to usual activities at the postoperative clinical follow-up 8 to 12 weeks after subacromial decompression surgery participated. A standardized exercise program consisting of physical therapist-supervised individual training sessions and home training was used. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Shoulder Score. Secondary outcome measures were the Constant Score and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. At 3 and 12 months, follow-up data were obtained for 92% and 83% of the patients, respectively. Intention-to-treat analyses suggested a between-group difference on the Oxford Shoulder Score favoring the exercise group at 3 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 2.0 (95% confidence interval=-0.5, 4.6), and at 12 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 5.8 (95% confidence interval=2.8, 8.9). Significantly larger improvements for the exercise group were observed for most secondary and supplementary outcome measures. The nature of the exercise intervention did not allow blinding of patients and care providers. The standardized physical therapy exercise intervention resulted in statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement in shoulder pain and

  19. Assessing exercise cardiac reserve using real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Le, Thu-Thao; Bryant, Jennifer Ann; Ting, Alicia Er; Ho, Pei Yi; Su, Boyang; Teo, Raymond Choon Chye; Gan, Julian Siong-Jin; Chung, Yiu-Cho; O'Regan, Declan P; Cook, Stuart A; Chin, Calvin Woon-Loong

    2017-01-23

    Exercise cardiovascular magnetic resonance (ExCMR) has great potential for clinical use but its development has been limited by a lack of compatible equipment and robust real-time imaging techniques. We developed an exCMR protocol using an in-scanner cycle ergometer and assessed its performance in differentiating athletes from non-athletes. Free-breathing real-time CMR (1.5T Aera, Siemens) was performed in 11 athletes (5 males; median age 29 [IQR: 28-39] years) and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (7 males; median age 26 [interquartile range (IQR): 25-33] years). All participants underwent an in-scanner exercise protocol on a CMR compatible cycle ergometer (Lode BV, the Netherlands), with an initial workload of 25W followed by 25W-increment every minute. In 20 individuals, exercise capacity was also evaluated by cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET). Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed in 10 individuals, at least 7 days apart. The exCMR protocol demonstrated excellent scan-rescan (cardiac index (CI): 0.2 ± 0.5L/min/m 2 ) and inter-observer (ventricular volumes: 1.2 ± 5.3mL) reproducibility. CI derived from exCMR and CPET had excellent correlation (r = 0.83, p < 0.001) and agreement (1.7 ± 1.8L/min/m 2 ). Despite similar values at rest (P = 0.87), athletes had increased exercise CI compared to healthy individuals (at peak exercise: 12.2 [IQR: 10.2-13.5] L/min/m 2 versus 8.9 [IQR: 7.5-10.1] L/min/m 2 , respectively; P < 0.001). Peak exercise CI, where image acquisition lasted 13-17 s, outperformed that at rest (c-statistics = 0.95 [95% confidence interval: 0.87-1.00] versus 0.48 [95% confidence interval: 0.23-0.72], respectively; P < 0.0001 for comparison) in differentiating athletes from healthy volunteers; and had similar performance as VO 2max (c-statistics = 0.84 [95% confidence interval = 0.62-1.00]; P = 0.29 for comparison). We have developed a novel in-scanner exCMR protocol using real-time CMR that is highly reproducible. It may now be

  20. A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial of a Behavioral Exercise Intervention for Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Erika Litvin; Strong, David R.; Riebe, Deborah; Marcus, Bess H.; Desaulniers, Julie; Fokas, Kathryn; Brown, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Previous exercise intervention studies for smoking cessation have been challenged by a number of methodological limitations that confound the potential efficacy of aerobic exercise for smoking cessation. Methods: The preliminary efficacy of a behavioral exercise intervention that incorporated features designed to address prior limitations was tested in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Sixty-one smokers (65.6% female, mean age = 47.3 years, smoked a mean of 19.7 cigarettes/day) were randomized to receive either a 12-week exercise intervention or a 12-week health education contact control. Participants in both conditions received an 8-week telephone-delivered, standard smoking cessation protocol (with the transdermal nicotine patch). Follow-ups were conducted at the end of treatment (EOT), 6- and 12-month timepoints. Results: There were no differences between conditions with respect to the number of weekly exercise or health education sessions attended (9.3±2.8 vs. 9.3±3.0, respectively). While not statistically significant, participants in the exercise condition demonstrated higher verified abstinence rates (EOT: 40% vs. 22.6%, odds ratio [OR] = 2.28; 6- and 12-month follow-ups: 26.7% vs. 12.9%, OR = 2.46). Irrespective of treatment condition, higher levels of moderate-to-vigorous exercise were associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms during the intervention. Conclusions: The results of this small RCT point toward the benefit of a behavioral exercise intervention designed to address previous methodological limitations for smoking cessation. Given the potential public health impact of the demonstrated efficacy of exercise for smoking cessation, the continued development and optimization of exercise interventions for smokers through larger RCTs merits pursuit. PMID:24812023

  1. Restoration of plasma volume after 16 days of head-down tilt induced by a single bout of maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Engelke, K. A.; Ludwig, D. A.; Doerr, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    Seven healthy men performed maximal exercise 24 h before the end of 16 days exposure to 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) to test the hypothesis that such an exercise technique could restore plasma volume (PV) at the end of a simulated space mission. Exercise consisted of supine cycling with graded work rates increasing by 16 W/min to volitional fatigue and required an average of 16 min. The experimental protocol was a standard cross-over design in which the order of treatment (exercise or control) was counterbalanced across all seven subjects. PV, fluid intake (ad libitum), urine output, renal function, and hormones associated with fluid homeostasis were measured before HDT, 24 h before the end of HDT just prior to exercise, and at the end of HDT 24 h after exercise. HDT reduced PV by 16% in both control and exercise conditions. Maximal exercise completely restored plasma volume within 24 h to 3.9 +/- 3.2% of pre-HDT levels despite continued HDT. Compared with control, exercise induced a 660-ml larger positive fluid balance because of greater fluid intake and reduced urine volume during the 24 h after exercise. These results suggest that one bout of maximal leg exercise before return from 16 days of spaceflight may be completely effective in stimulating thirst and restoring plasma volume to preflight levels.

  2. Exercise for methamphetamine dependence: rationale, design, and methodology.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Larissa J; Cooper, Christopher; London, Edythe D; Chudzynski, Joy; Dolezal, Brett; Dickerson, Daniel; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Peñate, Jose; Rawson, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Effective pharmacotherapies to treat methamphetamine (MA) dependence have not been identified, and behavioral therapies are marginally effective. Based on behavioral studies demonstrating the potential efficacy of aerobic exercise for improving depressive symptoms, anxiety, cognitive deficits, and substance use outcomes, the study described here is examining exercise as a potential treatment for MA-dependent individuals. This study is randomizing 150 participants with MA dependence at a residential treatment facility for addictive disorders to receive either a thrice-weekly structured aerobic and resistance exercise intervention or a health education condition. Recruitment commenced in March, 2010. Enrollment and follow-up phases are ongoing, and recruitment is exceeding targeted enrollment rates. Seeking evidence for a possibly effective adjunct to traditional behavioral approaches for treatment of MA dependence, this study is assessing the ability of an 8-week aerobic and resistance exercise protocol to reduce relapse to MA use during a 12-week follow-up period after discharge from residential-based treatment. The study also is evaluating improvements in health and functional outcomes during and after the protocol. This paper describes the design and methods of the study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Photographing Injuries in the Acute Care Setting: Development and Evaluation of a Standardized Protocol for Research, Forensics, and Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bloemen, Elizabeth M.; Rosen, Tony; Schiroo, Justina A. Cline; Clark, Sunday; Mulcare, Mary R.; Stern, Michael E.; Mysliwiec, Regina; Flomenbaum, Neal E.; Lachs, Mark S.; Hargarten, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Photographing injuries in the acute setting allows for improved documentation as well as assessment by clinicians and others who have not personally examined a patient. This tool is important, particularly for telemedicine, tracking of wound healing, the evaluation of potential abuse, and injury research. Despite this, protocols to ensure standardization of photography in clinical practice, forensics, or research have not been published. In preparation for a study of injury patterns in elder abuse and geriatric falls, our goal was to develop and evaluate a protocol for standardized photography of injuries that may be broadly applied. Methods We conducted a literature review for techniques and standards in medical, forensic, and legal photography. We developed a novel protocol describing types of photographs and body positioning for eight body regions, including instructional diagrams. We revised it iteratively in consultation with experts in medical photography; forensics; and elder, child, and domestic abuse. The resulting protocol requires a minimum of four photos of each injury at multiple distances with and without a ruler/color guide. To evaluate the protocol’s efficacy, multiple research assistants without previous photography experience photographed injuries from a convenience sample of elderly patients presenting to a single large, urban, academic emergency department. A selection of these patients’ images were then evaluated in a blinded fashion by four nontreating emergency medicine physicians and the inter-rater reliability between these physicians was calculated. Results Among the 131 injuries, from 53 patients, photographed by 18 photographers using this protocol, photographs of 25 injuries (10 bruises, seven lacerations, and eight abrasions) were used to assess characterization of the injury. Physicians’ characterizations of the injuries were reliable for the size of the injury (κ = 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77 to 1

  4. Near-infrared spectroscopic monitoring during cardiopulmonary exercise testing detects anaerobic threshold.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rohit P; Danduran, Michael J; Loomba, Rohit S; Dixon, Jennifer E; Hoffman, George M

    2012-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) provides assessment of the integrative responses involving the pulmonary, cardiovascular, and skeletal muscle systems. Application of exercise testing remains limited to children who are able to understand and cooperate with the exercise protocol. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a noninvasive, continuous method to monitor regional tissue oxygenation (rSO2). Our specific aim was to predict anaerobic threshold (AT) during CPET noninvasively using two-site NIRS monitoring. Achievement of a practical noninvasive technology for estimating AT will increase the compatibility of CPET. Patients without structural or acquired heart disease were eligible for inclusion if they were ordered to undergo CPET by a cardiologist. Data from 51 subjects was analyzed. The ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) was computed on [Formula: see text] and respiratory quotient post hoc using the standard V-slope method. The inflection points of the regional rSO2 time-series were identified as the noninvasive regional NIRS AT for each of the two monitored regions (cerebral and kidney). AT calculation made using an average of kidney and brain NIRS matched the calculation made by VAT for the same patient. Two-site NIRS monitoring of visceral organs is a predictor of AT.

  5. Cytokine Responses to Acute Exercise in Healthy Older Adults: The Effect of Cardiorespiratory Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Mark T.; Bailey, Tom G.; Perissiou, Maria; Meital, Lara; Golledge, Jonathan; Russell, Fraser D.; Askew, Christopher D.

    2018-01-01

    Markers of chronic inflammation increase with aging, and are associated with cardiovascular disease prevalence and mortality. Increases in fitness with exercise training have been associated with lower circulating concentrations of cytokines known to have pro-inflammatory actions (such as interleukin-6 [IL-6]) and higher circulating concentrations of anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-10 [IL-10]). However, the effect of cardiorespiratory fitness on acute cytokine responses to a single bout of exercise in healthy older individuals is unknown. We compared the response of plasma cytokines IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and IL-10 to a bout of moderate-intensity continuous and higher-intensity interval exercise between older individuals with higher and lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. Sixteen lower-fit (VO2peak: 22.6±2.8 mL.kg−1.min−1) and fourteen higher-fit participants (VO2peak: 37.4±5.9 mL.kg−1.min−1) completed three 24 min experimental protocols in a randomized order: (1) moderate-intensity continuous exercise (40% of peak power output [PPO]); (2) higher-intensity interval exercise (12 × 1 min intervals at 70% PPO separated by 1 min periods at 10% PPO); or (3) non-exercise control. Plasma cytokines were measured at rest, immediately after, and during 90 min of recovery following exercise or control. Plasma IL-6 concentrations at baseline were greater in the higher-fit compared to the lower-fit group (P = 0.02), with no difference in plasma IL-10 or TNF-α concentrations at baseline between groups. Plasma IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations in both groups increased immediately after all protocols (IL-6: P = 0.02, IL-10: P < 0.01). However, there was no difference in the IL-6 and IL-10 response between the exercise and non-exercise (control) protocols. After all protocols, no changes in plasma TNF-α concentrations were observed in either the higher- or lower-fit groups. In this study, basal concentrations of circulating IL-6 were

  6. Acute regulation of IGF-I by alterations in post-exercise macronutrients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This investigation sought to examine the contributions of exercise and nutrient replenishment on in vivo regulation of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis components. Eight college-aged males completed three high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocols followed by three post-exercise ...

  7. Effects of contraction duration on low-frequency fatigue in voluntary and electrically induced exercise of quadriceps muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Ratkevicius, A; Skurvydas, A; Povilonis, E; Quistorff, B; Lexell, J

    1998-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate if low-frequency fatigue (LFF) dependent on the duration of repeated muscle contractions and to compare LFF in voluntary and electrically induced exercise. Male subjects performed three 9-min periods of repeated isometric knee extensions at 40% maximal voluntary contraction with contraction plus relaxation periods of 30 plus 60 s, 15 plus 30 s and 5 plus 10 s in protocols 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The same exercise protocols were repeated using feedback-controlled electrical stimulation at 40% maximal tetanic torque. Before and 15 min after each exercise period, knee extension torque at 1, 7, 10, 15, 20, 50 and 100 Hz was assessed. During voluntary exercise, electromyogram root mean square (EMGrms) of the vastus lateralis muscle was evaluated. The 20-Hz torque:100-Hz torque (20:100 Hz torque) ratio was reduced more after electrically induced than after voluntary exercise (P < 0.05). During electrically induced exercise, the decrease in 20:100 Hz torque ratio was gradually (P < 0.05) reduced as the individual contractions shortened. During voluntary exercise, the decrease in 20:100 Hz torque ratio and the increase in EMGrms were greater in protocol 1 (P < 0.01) than in protocols 2 and 3, which did not differ from each other. In conclusion, our results showed that LFF is dependent on the duration of individual muscle contractions during repetitive isometric exercise and that the electrically induced exercise produced a more pronounced LFF compared to voluntary exercise of submaximal intensity. It is suggested that compensatory recruitment of faster-contracting motor units is an additional factor affecting the severity of LFF during voluntary exercise.

  8. A cluster randomised controlled trial of advice, exercise or multifactorial assessment to prevent falls and fractures in community-dwelling older adults: protocol for the prevention of falls injury trial (PreFIT)

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Ranjit; Withers, Emma J; Finnegan, Susanne; Underwood, Martin; Hulme, Claire; Sheridan, Ray; Skelton, Dawn A; Martin, Finbarr; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Falls are the leading cause of accident-related mortality in older adults. Injurious falls are associated with functional decline, disability, healthcare utilisation and significant National Health Service (NHS)-related costs. The evidence base for multifactorial or exercise interventions reducing fractures in the general population is weak. This protocol describes a large-scale UK trial investigating the clinical and cost-effectiveness of alternative falls prevention interventions targeted at community dwelling older adults. Methods and analysis A three-arm, pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial, conducted within primary care in England, UK. Sixty-three general practices will be randomised to deliver one of three falls prevention interventions: (1) advice only; (2) advice with exercise; or (3) advice with multifactorial falls prevention (MFFP). We aim to recruit over 9000 community-dwelling adults aged 70 and above. Practices randomised to deliver advice will mail out advice booklets. Practices randomised to deliver ‘active’ interventions, either exercise or MFFP, send all trial participants the advice booklet and a screening survey to identify participants with a history of falling or balance problems. Onward referral to ‘active’ intervention will be based on falls risk determined from balance screen. The primary outcome is peripheral fracture; secondary outcomes include number with at least one fracture, falls, mortality, quality of life and health service resource use at 18 months, captured using self-report and routine healthcare activity data. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol has approval from the National Research Ethics Service (REC reference 10/H0401/36; Protocol V.3.1, 21/May/2013). User groups and patient representatives were consulted to inform trial design. Results will be reported at conferences and in peer-reviewed publications. A patient-friendly summary of trial findings will be published on the prevention

  9. A cluster randomised controlled trial of advice, exercise or multifactorial assessment to prevent falls and fractures in community-dwelling older adults: protocol for the prevention of falls injury trial (PreFIT).

    PubMed

    Bruce, Julie; Lall, Ranjit; Withers, Emma J; Finnegan, Susanne; Underwood, Martin; Hulme, Claire; Sheridan, Ray; Skelton, Dawn A; Martin, Finbarr; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-01-18

    Falls are the leading cause of accident-related mortality in older adults. Injurious falls are associated with functional decline, disability, healthcare utilisation and significant National Health Service (NHS)-related costs. The evidence base for multifactorial or exercise interventions reducing fractures in the general population is weak. This protocol describes a large-scale UK trial investigating the clinical and cost-effectiveness of alternative falls prevention interventions targeted at community dwelling older adults. A three-arm, pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial, conducted within primary care in England, UK. Sixty-three general practices will be randomised to deliver one of three falls prevention interventions: (1) advice only; (2) advice with exercise; or (3) advice with multifactorial falls prevention (MFFP). We aim to recruit over 9000 community-dwelling adults aged 70 and above. Practices randomised to deliver advice will mail out advice booklets. Practices randomised to deliver 'active' interventions, either exercise or MFFP, send all trial participants the advice booklet and a screening survey to identify participants with a history of falling or balance problems. Onward referral to 'active' intervention will be based on falls risk determined from balance screen. The primary outcome is peripheral fracture; secondary outcomes include number with at least one fracture, falls, mortality, quality of life and health service resource use at 18 months, captured using self-report and routine healthcare activity data. The study protocol has approval from the National Research Ethics Service (REC reference 10/H0401/36; Protocol V.3.1, 21/May/2013). User groups and patient representatives were consulted to inform trial design. Results will be reported at conferences and in peer-reviewed publications. A patient-friendly summary of trial findings will be published on the prevention of falls injury trial (PreFIT) website. This protocol adheres to the

  10. Variability of United States Online Rehabilitation Protocols for Proximal Hamstring Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Lightsey, Harry M; Kantrowitz, David E; Swindell, Hasani W; Trofa, David P; Ahmad, Christopher S; Lynch, T Sean

    2018-02-01

    The optimal postoperative rehabilitation protocol following repair of complete proximal hamstring tendon ruptures is the subject of ongoing investigation, with a need for more standardized regimens and evidence-based modalities. To assess the variability across proximal hamstring tendon repair rehabilitation protocols published online by United States (US) orthopaedic teaching programs. Cross-sectional study. Online proximal hamstring physical therapy protocols from US academic orthopaedic programs were reviewed. A web-based search using the search term complete proximal hamstring repair rehabilitation protocol provided an additional 14 protocols. A comprehensive scoring rubric was developed after review of all protocols and was used to assess each protocol for both the presence of various rehabilitation components and the point at which those components were introduced. Of 50 rehabilitation protocols identified, 35 satisfied inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Twenty-five protocols (71%) recommended immediate postoperative bracing: 12 (34%) prescribed knee bracing, 8 (23%) prescribed hip bracing, and 5 (14%) did not specify the type of brace recommended. Fourteen protocols (40%) advised immediate nonweightbearing with crutches, while 16 protocols (46%) permitted immediate toe-touch weightbearing. Advancement to full weightbearing was allowed at a mean of 7.1 weeks (range, 4-12 weeks). Most protocols (80%) recommended gentle knee and hip passive range of motion and active range of motion, starting at a mean 1.4 weeks (range, 0-3 weeks) and 4.0 weeks (range, 0-6 weeks), respectively. However, only 6 protocols (17%) provided specific time points to initiate full hip and knee range of motion: a mean 8.0 weeks (range, 4-12 weeks) and 7.8 weeks (range, 0-12 weeks), respectively. Considerable variability was noted in the inclusion and timing of strengthening, stretching, proprioception, and cardiovascular exercises. Fifteen protocols (43%) required completion of

  11. Standardized Protocol for Virtual Surgical Plan and 3-Dimensional Surgical Template-Assisted Single-Stage Mandible Contour Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xi; Qiao, Jia; Girod, Sabine; Niu, Feng; Liu, Jian Feng; Lee, Gordon K; Gui, Lai

    2017-09-01

    Mandible contour surgery, including reduction gonioplasty and genioplasty, has become increasingly popular in East Asia. However, it is technically challenging and, hence, leads to a long learning curve and high complication rates and often needs secondary revisions. The increasing use of 3-dimensional (3D) technology makes accurate single-stage mandible contour surgery with minimum complication rates possible with a virtual surgical plan (VSP) and 3-D surgical templates. This study is to establish a standardized protocol for VSP and 3-D surgical templates-assisted mandible contour surgery and evaluate the accuracy of the protocol. In this study, we enrolled 20 patients for mandible contour surgery. Our protocol is to perform VSP based on 3-D computed tomography data. Then, design and 3-D print surgical templates based on preoperative VSP. The accuracy of the method was analyzed by 3-D comparison of VSP and postoperative results using detailed computer analysis. All patients had symmetric, natural osteotomy lines and satisfactory facial ratios in a single-stage operation. The average relative error of VSP and postoperative result on the entire skull was 0.41 ± 0.13 mm. The average new left gonial error was 0.43 ± 0.77 mm. The average new right gonial error was 0.45 ± 0.69 mm. The average pognion error was 0.79 ± 1.21 mm. Patients were very satisfied with the aesthetic results. Surgeons were very satisfied with the performance of surgical templates to facilitate the operation. Our standardized protocol of VSP and 3-D printed surgical templates-assisted single-stage mandible contour surgery results in accurate, safe, and predictable outcome in a single stage.

  12. The influence of age and exercise modality on growth hormone bioactivity in women.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Scott E; Kraemer, William J; Looney, David P; Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Hymer, Wesley C

    2014-01-01

    Prior research has indicated that the loss of skeletal muscle mass and bone mineral density observed with aging is related to the prominent age-related decline in the concentration of serum growth hormone (GH). However, there is limited data on the effects of aging on GH responses to acute bouts of heavy resistance exercise (HRE) and aerobic exercise (AE). The present investigation examined the effects of a HRE protocol and an AE protocol on immunoreactive GH (IGH) and bioactive GH (BGH) in active young and old women. Older women had a diminished serum IGH response to both the HRE and AE protocols compared to the younger women, however a similar response was not observed in serum BGH. Additionally, the HRE protocol elicited a greater BGH response than the AE protocol exclusively in the younger group. Regardless of exercise mode, aging induces an increase in growth hormone polymerization that specifically results in a loss of serum growth hormone immunoreactivity without a concurrent loss of serum growth hormone bioactivity. The greater BGH response to the HRE protocol found in the younger group can be attributed to an unknown serum factor of molecular weight between 30 and 55kD that either potentiated growth hormone bioactivity in response to HRE or inhibited growth hormone bioactivity in response to AE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anaerobic threshold employed on exercise training prescription and performance assessment for laboratory rodents: A short review.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Phablo; Mendes, Sávio Victor Diogenes; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique; Ceccatto, Vânia Marilande

    2016-04-15

    Several studies have generated numerous terms in the field of exercise training prescription and performance assessment that often do not match the information previously demonstrated by many other works, generating much debate and resulting in an immense pool of scientific results. Several protocols in exercise training prescription and performance assessment have been proposed for these purposes by many reasons. In the field of exercise science, the protocol must be thoroughly investigated and provide real tools to be reproducible. Many laboratories have been adapting and developing evaluation protocols and testing on physical training of rodents in different experimental conditions. In this context, mice, rats and rabbits are preferentially chosen due to easy manipulation and good response to exercise, and comparable at results obtained with humans in compatible effort intensities. But, the exercise training programs and aerobic-anaerobic transition assessment proposed for animal models vary extensively, depending on the species, gender, age, type of stimulus, type of exercise, type of method and also on the specific objectives of the program. This short review demonstrates the need in offering tools performed by invasive measurement to assess the anaerobic threshold by blood lactate employed on evolution of aerobic-anaerobic parameters of rodents. The objective of this short review was to present and to discuss physical evaluation protocols applications to rodents. The table submitted may give a basis for anaerobic threshold employed on exercise training prescription and performance assessment for laboratory rodents in future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectiveness of resistance exercise compared to aerobic exercise without insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nery, Cybelle; Moraes, Silvia Regina Arruda De; Novaes, Karyne Albino; Bezerra, Márcio Almeida; Silveira, Patrícia Verçoza De Castro; Lemos, Andrea

    Physical exercise has been used to mitigate the metabolic effects of diabetes mellitus. To evaluate the effect of resistance exercise when compared to aerobic exercise without insulin therapy on metabolic and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Papers were searched on the databases MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, LILACS, and SCIELO, without language or date of publication limits. Clinical trials that compared resistance exercise to aerobic exercise in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who did not use insulin therapy were included. The quality of evidence and risk of bias were assessed using the GRADE system and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool, respectively. Meta-analysis was also used, whenever possible. Two reviewers extracted the data independently. Eight eligible articles were included in this study, with a total of 336 individuals, with a mean age of 48-58 years. The protocols of aerobic and resistance exercise varied in duration from eight to 22 weeks, 30-60min/day, three to five times/week. Overall the available evidence came from a very low quality of evidence and there was an increase in Maximal oxygen consumption (mean difference: -2.86; 95% CI: -3.90 to -1.81; random effect) for the resistance exercise and no difference was found in Glycated hemoglobin, Body mass index, High-density lipoprotein cholesterol, Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Resistance exercise appears to be more effective in promoting an increase in Maximal oxygen consumption in protocols longer than 12 weeks and there is no difference in the control of glycemic and lipid levels between the two types of exercise. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Pretreatment with low-energy shock waves induces renal vasoconstriction during standard SWL: a treatment protocol known to reduce lithotripsy-induced renal injury

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Rajash K.; Bailey, Michael R.; Paun, Marla; Gao, Sujuan; Connors, Bret A.; Willis, Lynn R.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and Objective A great deal of effort has been focused on developing new treatment protocols to reduce tissue injury to improve the safety of shock wave lithotripsy. This has led to the discovery that pretreatment of the kidney with a series of low-energy shock waves (SWs) will substantially reduce the hemorrhagic lesion that normally results from a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs. Because renal blood flow is reduced following low- or high-energy SWL, and may therefore contribute to this effect, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that the pretreatment protocol induces renal vasoconstriction sooner than the standard protocol for SW delivery. Methods Female farm pigs (6-weeks old) were anesthetized with isoflurane and the lower pole of the right kidney treated with SWs using the HM3 lithotripter. Pulsed Doppler sonography was used to measure resistive index (RI) in blood vessels as a reflection of resistance/impedance to blood flow. RI was recorded from a single intralobar artery located in the targeted pole of the kidney, and measurements taken from pigs given sham SW treatment (Group 1; no SWs, n = 4), a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs (Group 2; 2000 SWs, 24 kV, 120 SWs/min, n = 7), low-energy SW pretreatment followed by high-energy SWL (Group 3; 500 SWs, 12 kV, 120 SWs/min + 2000 SWs, 24 kV, 120 SWs/min, n = 8) and low-energy SW pretreatment alone (Group 4; 500 SWs, 12 kV, 120 SWs/min, n = 6). Results Baseline RI (~ 0.61) was similar for all groups. Pigs receiving sham SW treatment (Group 1) had no significant change in RI. A standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs (Group 2) did not significantly alter RI during treatment, but did increase RI at 45-min into the post-SWL period. Low-energy SWs did not alter RI in Group 3 pigs, but subsequent treatment with a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs resulted in a significantly earlier (at 1000 SWs) and greater (two-fold) rise in RI than that observed in Group 2 pigs

  16. Effects of different impact exercise modalities on bone mineral density in premenopausal women: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Carroll, Sean

    2010-05-01

    Our objective was to assess the effects of differing modes of impact exercise on bone density at the hip and spine in premenopausal women through systematic review and meta-analysis. Electronic databases, key journals and reference lists were searched for controlled trials investigating the effects of impact exercise interventions on lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN) and total hip (TH) bone mineral density (BMD) in premenopausal women. Exercise protocols were categorised according to impact loading characteristics. Weighted mean difference (WMD) meta-analyses were undertaken. Heterogeneity amongst trials was assessed. Fixed and random effects models were applied. Inspection of funnel plot symmetry was performed. Trial quality assessment was also undertaken. Combined protocols integrating odd- or high-impact exercise with high-magnitude loading (resistance exercises), were effective in increasing BMD at both LS and FN [WMD (fixed effect) 0.009 g cm(-2) 95% CI (0.002-0.015) and 0.007 g cm(-2) 95% CI (0.001-0.013); P = 0.011 and 0.017, respectively]. High-impact only protocols were effective on femoral neck BMD [WMD (fixed effect) 0.024 g cm(-2) 95% CI (0.002-0.027); P < 0.00001]. Funnel plots showed some asymmetry for positive BMD outcomes. Insufficient numbers of protocols assessing TH BMD were available for assessment. Exercise programmes that combine odd- or high-impact activity with high-magnitude resistance training appear effective in augmenting BMD in premenopausal women at the hip and spine. High-impact-alone protocols are effective only on hip BMD in this group. However, diverse methodological and reporting discrepancies are evident in published trials.

  17. Effectiveness of various irrigation protocols for the removal of calcium hydroxide from artificial standardized grooves

    PubMed Central

    GOKTURK, Hakan; OZKOCAK, Ismail; BUYUKGEBIZ, Feyzi; DEMIR, Osman

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of laser-activated irrigation (LAI), XP-endo Finisher, CanalBrush, Vibringe, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), and conventional syringe irrigation systems on the removal of calcium hydroxide (CH) from simulated root canal irregularities. Material and Methods The root canals of one hundred and five extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented using Reciproc rotary files up to size R40. The teeth were split longitudinally. Two of the three standard grooves were created in the coronal and apical section of one segment, and another in the middle part of the second segment. The standardized grooves were filled with CH and the root halves were reassembled. After 14 days, the specimens were randomly divided into 7 experimental groups (n=15/group). CH was removed as follows: Group 1: beveled needle irrigation; Group 2: double side-vented needle irrigation; Group 3: CanalBrush; Group 4: XP-endo Finisher; Group 5: Vibringe; Group 6: PUI; Group 7: LAI. The amount of remaining CH in the grooves was scored under a stereomicroscope at 20× magnification. Statistical evaluation was performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Bonferroni-Correction Mann–Whitney U tests. Results Groups 1 and 2 were the least efficient in eliminating CH from the grooves. Groups 6 and 7 eliminated more CH than the other protocols; however, no significant differences were found between these two groups (P>.05). Conclusions Nevertheless, none of the investigated protocols were able to completely remove all CH from all three root regions. LAI and PUI showed less residual CH than the other protocols from artificial grooves. PMID:28678948

  18. Effects of Different Resistance Training Protocols on Upper-Body Strength and Endurance Development in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Loud, Rita LaRosa; O'Connell, Jill; Glover, Scott; O'Connell, Jason; Westcott, Wayne L.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effects of four resistance training protocols on upper body strength and muscular endurance development in children. Untrained children trained twice per week for 8 weeks, using general conditioning exercises and different upper-body conditioning protocols. Results indicated that higher-repetition training protocols enhanced…

  19. Effect of Daily Supine LBNP Exercise on Gastrointestinal Motility During Antiorthostatic Bedrest in Normal Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; DeKerlegand, D.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Space flight alters gastrointestinal (GI) function in general, and GI motility, in particular. This can decrease appetite, affect the body's ability to absorb nutrients, fluids and electrolytes, and contribute to a negative energy balance. Antiorthostatic bed rest (ABR) has been used to simulate microgravity-induced physiological changes in human subjects. The objective of this investigation is to determine if daily supine lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exercise will maintain GI motility at near normal levels during ABR. Eight subjects participated in the study protocol consisting of an ambulatory phase scheduled before bedrest periods and two 14 day bed rest (6 deg head-down tilt) periods, once with and another time without exercise. Supine treadmill running in an LBNP chamber was used for exercise. Mouth-to-cecum transit time (MCTT) of lactulose was measured indirectly using the rise in breath hydrogen level after oral administration of lactulose (20 g) following a standard low-fiber breakfast. GI motility during ambulatory and ABR periods was assessed using MCTT data. Results of this Study indicate that GI motility during ABR without exercise decreased by 45% [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 56.2 +/- 6.0 (Ambulatory); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (ABR)]. Supine LBNP exercise did not significantly alter this reduction in GI motility during ABR [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 81.3 +/- 4.2 (Exercise); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (No Exercise)]. These results suggest that supine LBNP exercise may not be an effective countermeasure for microgravity-induced decrements in GI motility and function.

  20. Rehabilitation protocol for patellar tendinopathy applied among 16- to 19-year old volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Biernat, Ryszard; Trzaskoma, Zbigniew; Trzaskoma, Lukasz; Czaprowski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of rehabilitation protocol applied during competitive period for the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. A total of 28 male volleyball players were divided into two groups. Fifteen from experimental group (E) and 13 from control group (C) fulfilled the same tests 3 times: before the training program started (first measurement), after 12 weeks (second measurement) and after 24 weeks (third measurement). The above-mentioned protocol included the following: USG imagining with color Doppler function, clinical testing, pain intensity evaluation with VISA-P questionnaire, leg muscle strength and power and jumping ability measurements. The key element of the rehabilitation program was eccentric squat on decline board with additional unstable surface. The essential factor of the protocol was a set of preventive functional exercises, with focus on eccentric exercises of hamstrings. Patellar tendinopathy was observed in 18% of the tested young volleyball players. Implementation of the presented rehabilitation protocol with eccentric squat on decline board applied during sports season lowered the pain level of the young volleyball players. Presented rehabilitation protocol applied without interrupting the competitive period among young volleyball players together with functional exercises could be an effective method for the treatment of patellar tendinopathy.

  1. Effect of antioxidant supplementation on exercise-induced cardiac troponin release in cyclists: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Klinkenberg, Lieke J J; Res, Peter T; Haenen, Guido R; Bast, Aalt; van Loon, Luc J C; van Dieijen-Visser, Marja P; Meex, Steven J R

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac troponin is the biochemical gold standard to diagnose acute myocardial infarction. Interestingly however, elevated cardiac troponin concentrations are also frequently observed during and after endurance-type exercise. Oxidative stress associated with prolonged exercise has been proposed to contribute to cardiac troponin release. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of 4 week astaxanthin supplementation (a potent cartenoid antioxidant) on antioxidant capacity and exercise-induced cardiac troponin release in cyclists. Thirty-two well-trained male cyclists (age 25±5, weight 73±7 kg, maximum O2 uptake 60±5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), Wmax 5.4±0.5 W·kg(-1); mean ± SD) were repeatedly subjected to a laboratory based standardized exercise protocol before and after 4 weeks of astaxanthin (20 mg/day), or placebo supplementation in a double-blind randomized manner. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, at 60 min of cycling and immediately post-exercise (≈ 120 min). The pre-supplementation cycling trial induced a significant rise of median cardiac troponin T concentrations from 3.2 (IQR 3.0-4.2) to 4.7 ng/L (IQR 3.7-6.7), immediately post-exercise (p<0.001). Four weeks of astaxanthin supplementation significantly increased mean basal plasma astaxanthin concentrations from non-detectable values to 175±86 µg·kg(-1). However, daily astaxanthin supplementation had no effect on exercise-induced cardiac troponin T release (p = 0.24), as measured by the incremental area under the curve. Furthermore, the elevation in basal plasma astaxanthin concentrations was not reflected in changes in antioxidant capacity markers (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, uric acid, and malondialdehyde). Markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein) and exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase) were equally unaffected by astaxanthin supplementation. Despite substantial increases in plasma astaxanthin concentrations, astaxanthin

  2. Exercise to Counteract Loss of Bone and Muscle During Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Men with Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    finishers in the current study on age and body mass index . This will enable us to evaluate BMD and body composition changes in response to exercise in men...support from the Clinical Nutrition Research Unit (CNRU) • prepare data forms • prepare data base • train research staff Final approval of the protocol...the local IRB on 19 Feb 2008. In the past year, the consent form underwent minor changes to update standard language used by the local IRB (approved

  3. Acylated Ghrelin and Circulatory Oxidative Stress Markers Responses to Acute Resistance and Aerobic Exercise in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Carteri, Randhall B; Lopes, André Luis; Schöler, Cinthia M; Correa, Cleiton Silva; Macedo, Rodrigo C; Gross, Júlia Silveira; Kruger, Renata Lopes; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo I; Reischak-Oliveira, Álvaro

    2016-06-01

    Since exercise increases the production of reactive oxygen species in different tissues, the objective of this study is to evaluate, compare and correlate the acute effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in circulatory markers of oxidative stress and acylated ghrelin (AG) in postmenopausal women. Ten postmenopausal women completed different protocols: a control session (CON), an aerobic exercise session (AERO); and a single-set (SSR) or 3-set (MSR) resistance exercise protocol. After exercise, both MSR (P = .06) and AERO (P = .02) sessions showed significant increased lipid peroxidation compared with baseline levels. CON and SSR sessions showed no differences after exercise. No differences were found between sessions at any time for total glutathione, glutathione dissulfide or AG concentrations. Exercise significantly increased lipid peroxidation compared with baseline values. As pro oxidant stimuli is necessary to promote chronic adaptations to the antioxidant defenses induced by exercise, our findings are important to consider when evaluating exercise programs prescription variables aiming quality of life in this population.

  4. Exercise and bone mass in adults.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Fuentes, Teresa; Guerra, Borja; Calbet, Jose A L

    2009-01-01

    There is a substantial body of evidence indicating that exercise prior to the pubertal growth spurt stimulates bone growth and skeletal muscle hypertrophy to a greater degree than observed during growth in non-physically active children. Bone mass can be increased by some exercise programmes in adults and the elderly, and attenuate the losses in bone mass associated with aging. This review provides an overview of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies performed to date involving training and bone measurements. Cross-sectional studies show in general that exercise modalities requiring high forces and/or generating high impacts have the greatest osteogenic potential. Several training methods have been used to improve bone mineral density (BMD) and content in prospective studies. Not all exercise modalities have shown positive effects on bone mass. For example, unloaded exercise such as swimming has no impact on bone mass, while walking or running has limited positive effects. It is not clear which training method is superior for bone stimulation in adults, although scientific evidence points to a combination of high-impact (i.e. jumping) and weight-lifting exercises. Exercise involving high impacts, even a relatively small amount, appears to be the most efficient for enhancing bone mass, except in postmenopausal women. Several types of resistance exercise have been tested also with positive results, especially when the intensity of the exercise is high and the speed of movement elevated. A handful of other studies have reported little or no effect on bone density. However, these results may be partially attributable to the study design, intensity and duration of the exercise protocol, and the bone density measurement techniques used. Studies performed in older adults show only mild increases, maintenance or just attenuation of BMD losses in postmenopausal women, but net changes in BMD relative to control subjects who are losing bone mass are beneficial in

  5. Efficacy, Safety and Mechanisms of Blood Flow Restricted Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This 20 minute talk will review studies in the peer-reviewed literature related to the effectiveness of blood flow restricted exercise as an exercise training program. There is controversy regarding the talk with cover the effectiveness of various exercise protocols and these differences will be compared and contrasted. Unpublished data from my laboratory at Syracuse University will be presented (see other abstract), as well as some unpublished work from the labs of Manini, Clark and Rasmussen (none are NASA funded).

  6. Oxidative stress and inflammation: liver responses and adaptations to acute and regular exercise.

    PubMed

    Pillon Barcelos, Rômulo; Freire Royes, Luiz Fernando; Gonzalez-Gallego, Javier; Bresciani, Guilherme

    2017-02-01

    The liver is remarkably important during exercise outcomes due to its contribution to detoxification, synthesis, and release of biomolecules, and energy supply to the exercising muscles. Recently, liver has been also shown to play an important role in redox status and inflammatory modulation during exercise. However, while several studies have described the adaptations of skeletal muscles to acute and chronic exercise, hepatic changes are still scarcely investigated. Indeed, acute intense exercise challenges the liver with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation onset, whereas regular training induces hepatic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory improvements. Acute and regular exercise protocols in combination with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory supplementation have been also tested to verify hepatic adaptations to exercise. Although positive results have been reported in some acute models, several studies have shown an increased exercise-related stress upon liver. A similar trend has been observed during training: while synergistic effects of training and antioxidant/anti-inflammatory supplementations have been occasionally found, others reported a blunting of relevant adaptations to exercise, following the patterns described in skeletal muscles. This review discusses current data regarding liver responses and adaptation to acute and regular exercise protocols alone or combined with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory supplementation. The understanding of the mechanisms behind these modulations is of interest for both exercise-related health and performance outcomes.

  7. Effect of long-term exercise training on blood viscosity during endurance exercise at an anaerobic threshold intensity.

    PubMed

    Adachi, H; Sakurai, S; Tanehata, M; Oshima, S; Taniguchi, K

    2000-11-01

    Blood viscosity (etaB) is low in athletes, but the effect of exercise training on etaB during endurance exercise at an anaerobic threshold (AT) intensity in non-athletes is not well known, although it is known that exercise training sometimes induces the hyperviscosity syndrome. Fourteen subjects were recruited and divided into 2 groups: those who trained at an AT intensity for 30 min/day, 3 times weekly for 1 year (Group T, n=8), and sedentary subjects (Group C, n=6). The test protocol consisted of a single 30-min treadmill exercise at each individual's AT intensity, which was determined in advance. The etaB, plasma viscosity (etaP), and hematocrit were measured just before and at the end of the treadmill exercise. The subjects were not allowed to drink any water before exercise. In the Group C subjects, the hematocrit and etaP increased significantly and the etaB tended to increase. However, in the Group T subjects, the hematocrit and etaP did not increase and the etaB decreased significantly. These data indicate that long-term exercise training attenuates the increase in blood viscosity during exercise.

  8. Cardiac risk stratification in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a review of protocols

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anne Kastelianne França; Barbosa, Marianne Penachini da Costa de Rezende; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda Barbosa; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2014-01-01

    Objective Gather and describe general characteristics of different protocols of risk stratification for cardiac patients undergoing exercise. Methods We conducted searches in LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and SciELO electronic databases, using the following descriptors: Cardiovascular Disease, Rehabilitation Centers, Practice Guideline, Exercise and Risk Stratification in the past 20 years. Results Were selected eight studies addressing methods of risk stratification in patients undergoing exercise. Conclusion None of the methods described could cover every situation the patient can be subjected to; however, they are essential to exercise prescription. PMID:25140477

  9. Including the Copenhagen Adduction Exercise in the FIFA 11+ Provides Missing Eccentric Hip Adduction Strength Effect in Male Soccer Players: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Harøy, Joar; Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Bjørkheim, André; Rolstad, Linn E; Hölmich, Per; Bahr, Roald; Andersen, Thor Einar

    2017-11-01

    The FIFA 11+ was developed as a complete warm-up program to prevent injuries in soccer players. Although reduced hip adduction strength is associated with groin injuries, none of the exercises included in the FIFA 11+ seem to specifically target hip adduction strength. To investigate the effect on eccentric hip adduction strength of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program with or without the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. We recruited 45 eligible players from 2 U19 elite male soccer teams. Players were randomized into 2 groups; 1 group carried out the standard FIFA 11+ program, while the other carried out the FIFA 11+ but replaced the Nordic hamstring exercise with the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Both groups performed the intervention 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. Players completed eccentric strength and sprint testing before and after the intervention. Per-protocol analyses were performed, and 12 players were excluded due to low compliance (<67% of sessions completed). The main outcome was eccentric hip adduction strength (N·m/kg). Between-group analyses revealed a significantly greater increase in eccentric hip adduction strength of 0.29 Nm/kg (8.9%; P = .01) in favor of the group performing the Copenhagen adduction exercise, whereas no within-group change was noted in the group that used the standard FIFA 11+ program (-0.02 N·m/kg [-0.7%]; P = .69). Including the Copenhagen adduction exercise in the FIFA 11+ program increases eccentric hip adduction strength, while the standard FIFA 11+ program does not. Registration: Registration: ISRCTN13731446 (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry).

  10. Size, shape, and stamina: the impact of left ventricular geometry on exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Carolyn S P; Grewal, Jasmine; Borlaug, Barry A; Ommen, Steve R; Kane, Garvan C; McCully, Robert B; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2010-05-01

    Although several studies have examined the cardiac functional determinants of exercise capacity, few have investigated the effects of structural remodeling. The current study evaluated the association between cardiac geometry and exercise capacity. Subjects with ejection fraction > or = 50% and no valvular disease, myocardial ischemia, or arrhythmias were identified from a large prospective exercise echocardiography database. Left ventricular mass index and relative wall thickness were used to classify geometry into normal, concentric remodeling, eccentric hypertrophy, and concentric hypertrophy. All of the subjects underwent symptom-limited treadmill exercise according to standard Bruce protocol. Maximal exercise tolerance was measured in metabolic equivalents. Of 366 (60+/-14 years; 57% male) subjects, 166 (45%) had normal geometry, 106 (29%) had concentric remodeling, 40 (11%) had eccentric hypertrophy, and 54 (15%) had concentric hypertrophy. Geometry was related to exercise capacity: in descending order, the maximum achieved metabolic equivalents were 9.9+/-2.8 in normal, 8.9+/-2.6 in concentric remodeling, 8.6+/-3.1 in eccentric hypertrophy, and 8.0+/-2.7 in concentric hypertrophy (all P<0.02 versus normal). Left ventricular mass index and relative wall thickness were negatively correlated with exercise tolerance in metabolic equivalents (r=-0.14; P=0.009 and r=-0.21; P<0.001, respectively). Augmentation of heart rate and ejection fraction with exercise were blunted in concentric hypertrophy compared with normal, even after adjusting for medications. In conclusion, the pattern of ventricular remodeling is related to exercise capacity among low-risk adults. Subjects with concentric hypertrophy display the greatest limitation, and this is related to reduced systolic and chronotropic reserve. Reverse remodeling strategies may prevent or treat functional decline in patients with structural heart disease.

  11. Resistance exercise increases intramuscular NF-κb signaling in untrained males.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Jeremy R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Jajtner, Adam R; Church, David D; Beyer, Kyle S; Oliveira, Leonardo P; La Monica, Michael B; Riffe, Joshua J; Muddle, Tyler W D; Baker, Kayla M; Fukuda, David H; Roberts, Michael D; Hoffman, Jay R

    2016-12-01

    The NF-κB signaling pathway regulates multiple cellular processes following exercise stress. This study aims to examine the effects of an acute lower-body resistance exercise protocol and subsequent recovery on intramuscular NF-κB signaling. Twenty-eight untrained males were assigned to either a control (CON; n = 11) or exercise group (EX; n = 17) and completed a lower-body resistance exercise protocol consisting of the back squat, leg press, and leg extension exercises. Skeletal muscle microbiopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis pre-exercise (PRE), 1-hour (1H), 5-hours (5H), and 48-hours (48H) post-resistance exercise. Multiplex signaling assay kits (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA, USA) were used to quantify the total protein (TNFR1, c-Myc) or phosphorylation status of proteins belonging to the NF-κB signaling pathway (IKKa/b, IkBα, NF-κB) using multiplex protein assay. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis was used to determine the effects of the exercise bout on intramuscular signaling at each time point. Additionally, change scores were analyzed by magnitude based inferences to determine a mechanistic interpretation. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a trend for a two-way interaction between the EX and CON Group (p = 0.064) for c-Myc post resistance exercise. Magnitude based inference analysis suggest a "Very Likely" increase in total c-Myc from PRE-5H and a "Likely" increase in IkBα phosphorylation from PRE-5H post-resistance exercise. Results indicated that c-Myc transcription factor is elevated following acute intense resistance exercise in untrained males. Future studies should examine the role that post-resistance exercise NF-κβ signaling plays in c-Myc induction, ribosome biogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration.

  12. Effectiveness of a Rapid Lumbar Spine MRI Protocol Using 3D T2-Weighted SPACE Imaging Versus a Standard Protocol for Evaluation of Degenerative Changes of the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Sayah, Anousheh; Jay, Ann K; Toaff, Jacob S; Makariou, Erini V; Berkowitz, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Reducing lumbar spine MRI scanning time while retaining diagnostic accuracy can benefit patients and reduce health care costs. This study compares the effectiveness of a rapid lumbar MRI protocol using 3D T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrast with different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) sequences with a standard MRI protocol for evaluation of lumbar spondylosis. Two hundred fifty consecutive unenhanced lumbar MRI examinations performed at 1.5 T were retrospectively reviewed. Full, rapid, and complete versions of each examination were interpreted for spondylotic changes at each lumbar level, including herniations and neural compromise. The full examination consisted of sagittal T1-weighted, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE), and STIR sequences; and axial T1- and T2-weighted TSE sequences (time, 18 minutes 40 seconds). The rapid examination consisted of sagittal T1- and T2-weighted SPACE sequences, with axial SPACE reformations (time, 8 minutes 46 seconds). The complete examination consisted of the full examination plus the T2-weighted SPACE sequence. Sensitivities and specificities of the full and rapid examinations were calculated using the complete study as the reference standard. The rapid and full studies had sensitivities of 76.0% and 69.3%, with specificities of 97.2% and 97.9%, respectively, for all degenerative processes. Rapid and full sensitivities were 68.7% and 66.3% for disk herniation, 85.2% and 81.5% for canal compromise, 82.9% and 69.1% for lateral recess compromise, and 76.9% and 69.7% for foraminal compromise, respectively. Isotropic SPACE T2-weighted imaging provides high-quality imaging of lumbar spondylosis, with multiplanar reformatting capability. Our SPACE-based rapid protocol had sensitivities and specificities for herniations and neural compromise comparable to those of the protocol without SPACE. This protocol fits within a 15-minute slot, potentially reducing costs and discomfort for a large subgroup of

  13. Using a simulation cell for exercise realism.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Ken

    2013-01-01

    A simulation cell or SimCell is an effective and flexible tool for control of emergency management exercises. It allows exercise participants to interact, via simulation, with a wide variety of nonplaying organizations and officials. Adapted from military application, the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) applied, developed, and refined the SimCell concept for emergency management exercises. It has now been incorporated into national exercise guidance through the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program, and has been used in a wide variety of national, regional, and local exercises. This article reviews development of the SimCell concept in CSEPP, briefly surveys current practice incorporating SimCells in exercise control, and offers practical lessons-learned and tips on using a SimCell to best advantage. Lessons learned include using a SimCell as an exercise-control hub; preparing inject material for exercise controllers as part of the Master Scenario Event List; laying the groundwork for success through exercise player and controller training; developing protocol for SimCell communications; and capturing feedback from SimCell controllers for inclusion in the exercise evaluation reporting process. The SimCell concept is flexible and can be applied to a variety of exercise types and through a variety of methods.

  14. Understanding the theoretical underpinning of the exercise component in a fall prevention programme for older adults with mild dementia: a realist review protocol.

    PubMed

    Booth, Vicky; Harwood, Rowan; Hood, Victoria; Masud, Tahir; Logan, Philippa

    2016-07-19

    Older adults with mild dementia are at an inc