Science.gov

Sample records for standardized assessment protocol

  1. Assessing impacts of roads: application of a standard assessment protocol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duniway, Michael C.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive management of road networks depends on timely data that accurately reflect the impacts those systems are having on ecosystem processes and associated services. In the absence of reliable data, land managers are left with little more than observations and perceptions to support management decisions of road-associated disturbances. Roads can negatively impact the soil, hydrologic, plant, and animal processes on which virtually all ecosystem services depend. The Interpreting Indicators of Rangeland Health (IIRH) protocol is a qualitative method that has been demonstrated to be effective in characterizing impacts of roads. The goal of this study were to develop, describe, and test an approach for using IIRH to systematically evaluate road impacts across large, diverse arid and semiarid landscapes. We developed a stratified random sampling approach to plot selection based on ecological potential, road inventory data, and image interpretation of road impacts. The test application on a semiarid landscape in southern New Mexico, United States, demonstrates that the approach developed is sensitive to road impacts across a broad range of ecological sites but that not all the types of stratification were useful. Ecological site and road inventory strata accounted for significant variability in the functioning of ecological processes but stratification based on apparent impact did not. Analysis of the repeatability of IIRH applied to road plots indicates that the method is repeatable but consensus evaluations based on multiple observers should be used to minimize risk of bias. Landscape-scale analysis of impacts by roads of contrasting designs (maintained dirt or gravel roads vs. non- or infrequently maintained roads) suggests that future travel management plans for the study area should consider concentrating traffic on fewer roads that are well designed and maintained. Application of the approach by land managers will likely provide important insights into

  2. Importance of Standardized DXA Protocol for Assessing Physique Changes in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Nana, Alisa; Slater, Gary J; Hopkins, Will G; Halson, Shona L; Martin, David T; West, Nicholas P; Burke, Louise M

    2016-06-01

    The implications of undertaking DXA scans using best practice protocols (subjects fasted and rested) or a less precise but more practical protocol in assessing chronic changes in body composition following training and a specialized recovery technique were investigated. Twenty-one male cyclists completed an overload training program, in which they were randomized to four sessions per week of either cold water immersion therapy or control groups. Whole-body DXA scans were undertaken with best practice protocol (Best) or random activity protocol (Random) at baseline, after 3 weeks of overload training, and after a 2-week taper. Magnitudes of changes in total, lean and fat mass from baseline-overload, overload-taper and baseline-taper were assessed by standardization (Δmean/SD). The standard deviations of change scores for total and fat-free soft tissue mass (FFST) from Random scans (2-3%) were approximately double those observed in the Best (1-2%), owing to extra random errors associated with Random scans at baseline. There was little difference in change scores for fat mass. The effect of cold water immersion therapy on baseline-taper changes in FFST was possibly harmful (-0.7%; 90% confidence limits ±1.2%) with Best scans but unclear with Random scans (0.9%; ±2.0%). Both protocols gave similar possibly harmful effects of cold water immersion therapy on changes in fat mass (6.9%; ±13.5% and 5.5%; ±14.3%, respectively). An interesting effect of cold water immersion therapy on training-induced changes in body composition might have been missed with a less precise scanning protocol. DXA scans should be undertaken with Best.

  3. Toxicity testing of dispersed oil requires adherence to standardized protocols to assess potential real world effects.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Gina; Clark, James; Aurand, Don

    2013-06-01

    Recently, several researchers have attempted to address Deepwater Horizon incident environmental fate and effects issues using laboratory testing and extrapolation procedures that are not fully reliable measures for environmental assessments. The 2013 Rico-Martínez et al. publication utilized laboratory testing approaches that severely limit our ability to reliably extrapolate such results to meaningful real-world assessments. The authors did not adopt key methodological elements of oil and dispersed oil toxicity standards. Further, they drew real-world conclusions from static exposure tests without reporting actual exposure concentrations. Without this information, it is not possible to compare their results to other research or real spill events that measured and reported exposure concentrations. The 1990s' Chemical Response to Oil Spills: Ecological Effects Research Forum program was established to standardize and conduct exposure characterization in oil and dispersed oil aquatic toxicity testing (Aurand and Coelho, 2005). This commentary raises awareness regarding the necessity of standardized test protocols.

  4. A model standardized risk assessment protocol for use with hazardous waste sites.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, G M; Day, R

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a model standardized risk assessment protocol (SRAP) for use with hazardous waste sites. The proposed SRAP focuses on the degree and patterns of evidence that exist for a significant risk to human populations from exposure to a hazardous waste site. The SRAP was designed with at least four specific goals in mind: to organize the available scientific data on a specific site and to highlight important gaps in this knowledge; to facilitate rational, cost-effective decision making about the best distribution of available manpower and resources; to systematically classify sites roughly according to the level of risk they pose to surrounding human populations; and to promote an improved level of communication among professionals working in the area of waste site management and between decision makers and the local population. PMID:2050062

  5. Assessing transportation infrastructure impacts on rangelands: test of a standard rangeland assessment protocol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duniway, Michael C.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Pyke, David A.; Toledo, David

    2010-01-01

    Linear disturbances associated with on- and off-road vehicle use on rangelands has increased dramatically throughout the world in recent decades. This increase is due to a variety of factors including increased availability of all-terrain vehicles, infrastructure development (oil, gas, renewable energy, and ex-urban), and recreational activities. In addition to the direct impacts of road development, the presence and use of roads may alter resilience of adjoining areas through indirect effects such as altered site hydrologic and eolian processes, invasive seed dispersal, and sediment transport. There are few standardized methods for assessing impacts of transportation-related land-use activities on soils and vegetation in arid and semi-arid rangelands. Interpreting Indicators of Rangeland Health (IIRH) is an internationally accepted qualitative assessment that is applied widely to rangelands. We tested the sensitivity of IIRH to impacts of roads, trails, and pipelines on adjacent lands by surveying plots at three distances from these linear disturbances. We performed tests at 16 randomly selected sites in each of three ecosystems (Northern High Plains, Colorado Plateau, and Chihuahuan Desert) for a total of 208 evaluation plots. We also evaluated the repeatability of IIRH when applied to road-related disturbance gradients. Finally, we tested extent of correlations between IIRH plot attribute departure classes and trends in a suite of quantitative indicators. Results indicated that the IIRH technique is sensitive to direct and indirect impacts of transportation activities with greater departure from reference condition near disturbances than far from disturbances. Trends in degradation of ecological processes detected with qualitative assessments were highly correlated with quantitative data. Qualitative and quantitative assessments employed in this study can be used to assess impacts of transportation features at the plot scale. Through integration with remote

  6. Standard Protocol and Quality Assessment of Soil Phosphorus Speciation by P K-Edge XANES Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Werner, Florian; Prietzel, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorus (P) in soils is most often bound as phosphate to one or more of the following four elements or compounds: calcium, aluminum, iron, and soil organic matter. A promising method for direct P speciation in soils is synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the K-edge of P. However, the quality of this method is debated controversially, partly because a standard protocol for reproducible spectrum deconvolution is lacking and minor modifications of the applied deconvolution procedure can lead to considerable changes in the P speciation results. On the basis of the observation that appropriate baseline correction and edge-step normalization are crucial for correct linear combination (LC) fitting results, we established a standard protocol for the deconvolution and LC fitting of P K-edge XANES spectra. We evaluated the quality of LC fits obtained according to this standard protocol with 16 defined dilute (2 mg P g(-1)) ternary mixtures of aluminum phosphate, iron phosphate, hydroxyapatite, and phytic acid in a quartz matrix. The LC fitting results were compared with the contribution of the different P compounds to total P in the various mixtures. Compared to using a traditional LC fitting procedure, our standard protocol reduced the fitting error by 6% (absolute). However, P portions smaller than 5% should be confirmed with other methods or excluded from the P speciation results. A publicly available database of P K-edge XANES reference spectra was initiated.

  7. The Impact of National Standards Assessment in New Zealand, and National Testing Protocols in Norway on Indigenous Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özerk, Kamil; Whitehead, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper first provides a critic of the implementation of compulsory national assessment protocols internationally, and then nationally through a review of the implementation process used for the introduction of National Standards in New Zealand, and National Testing in Norwegian mainstream schools. It then reviews the impact of these two…

  8. Proposal for the Development of a Standardized Protocol for Assessing the Economic Costs of HIV Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, Steven D.; Pearson, Cynthia R.; Eachus, Susan R.; Berg, Karina M.; Grimes, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Maximizing our economic investment in HIV prevention requires balancing the costs of candidate interventions against their effects and selecting the most cost-effective interventions for implementation. However, many HIV prevention intervention trials do not collect cost information, and those that do use a variety of cost data collection methods and analysis techniques. Standardized cost data collection procedures, instrumentation, and analysis techniques are needed to facilitate the task of assessing intervention costs and to ensure comparability across intervention trials. This article describes the basic elements of a standardized cost data collection and analysis protocol and outlines a computer-based approach to implementing this protocol. Ultimately, the development of such a protocol would require contributions and “buy-in” from a diverse range of stakeholders, including HIV prevention researchers, cost-effectiveness analysts, community collaborators, public health decision makers, and funding agencies. PMID:18301128

  9. National Sample Assessment Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    These protocols represent a working guide for planning and implementing national sample assessments in connection with the national Key Performance Measures (KPMs). The protocols are intended for agencies involved in planning or conducting national sample assessments and personnel responsible for administering associated tenders or contracts,…

  10. Development of a Standard Protocol for the Harmonic Analysis of Radial Pulse Wave and Assessing Its Reliability in Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Wei; Chen, Jiang-Ming; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to establish a standard protocol and to quantitatively assess the reliability of harmonic analysis of the radial pulse wave measured by a harmonic wave analyzer (TD01C system). Both intraobserver and interobserver assessments were conducted to investigate whether the values of harmonics are stable in successive measurements. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a Bland-Altman plot were used for this purpose. For the reliability assessments of the intraobserver and the interobserver, 22 subjects (mean age 45 ± 14 years; 14 males and 8 females) were enrolled. The first eleven harmonics of the radial pulse wave presented excellent repeatability ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) for the intraobserver assessment and high reproducibility (ICCs range from 0.83 to 0.96 and [Formula: see text]) for the interobserver assessment. The Bland-Altman plot indicated that more than 90% of harmonic values fell within two standard deviations of the mean difference. Thus, we concluded that the harmonic analysis of the radial pulse wave using the TD01C system is a feasible and reliable method to assess a hemodynamic characteristic in clinical trial.

  11. The Evaluation of Franco-Quebec Victims of Child Sexual Abuse and Their Mothers: The Implementation of a Standard Assessment Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, John; Friedrich, William N.; Cyr, Mireille; Theriault, Chantal; Perron, Alain; And Others

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated a standard assessment protocol with 48 Franco-Quebec victims of child sexual abuse and 40 nonoffending mothers. The protocol was favorably received by child protection service workers, supervisors, mothers, and victims. Among specific results were that the rate of symptom-free children was lower (19%) and that of…

  12. A standardized, evidence-based protocol to assess clinical actionability of genetic disorders associated with genomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jessica Ezzell; Irving, Stephanie A.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Buchanan, Adam; Jensen, Brian; Lee, Kristy; Martin, Christa Lese; Milko, Laura; Muessig, Kristin; Niehaus, Annie D.; O'Daniel, Julianne; Piper, Margaret A.; Ramos, Erin M.; Schully, Sheri D.; Scott, Alan F.; Slavotinek, Anne; Sobreira, Nara; Strande, Natasha; Weaver, Meredith; Webber, Elizabeth M.; Williams, Marc S.; Berg, Jonathan S.; Evans, James P.; Goddard, Katrina A.B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Genome and exome sequencing can identify variants unrelated to the primary goal of sequencing. Detecting pathogenic variants associated with an increased risk of a medical disorder enables clinical interventions to improve future health outcomes in patients and their at-risk relatives. The Clinical Genome Resource, or ClinGen, aims to assess clinical actionability of genes and associated disorders as part of a larger effort to build a central resource of information regarding the clinical relevance of genomic variation for use in precision medicine and research. Methods: We developed a practical, standardized protocol to identify available evidence and generate qualitative summary reports of actionability for disorders and associated genes. We applied a semiquantitative metric to score actionability. Results: We generated summary reports and actionability scores for the 56 genes and associated disorders recommended by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics for return as secondary findings from clinical genome-scale sequencing. We also describe the challenges that arose during the development of the protocol that highlight important issues in characterizing actionability across a range of disorders. Conclusion: The ClinGen framework for actionability assessment will assist research and clinical communities in making clear, efficient, and consistent determinations of actionability based on transparent criteria to guide analysis and reporting of findings from clinical genome-scale sequencing. Genet Med 18 12, 1258–1268. PMID:27124788

  13. Evaluation of a new electromagnetic tracking system using a standardized assessment protocol.

    PubMed

    Hummel, J; Figl, M; Birkfellner, W; Bax, M R; Shahidi, R; Maurer, C R; Bergmann, H

    2006-05-21

    This note uses a published protocol to evaluate a newly released 6 degrees of freedom electromagnetic tracking system (Aurora, Northern Digital Inc.). A practice for performance monitoring over time is also proposed. The protocol uses a machined base plate to measure relative error in position and orientation as well as the influence of metallic objects in the operating volume. Positional jitter (E(RMS)) was found to be 0.17 mm +/- 0.19 mm. A relative positional error of 0.25 mm +/- 0.22 mm at 50 mm offsets and 0.97 mm +/- 1.01 mm at 300 mm offsets was found. The mean of the relative rotation error was found to be 0.20 degrees +/- 0.14 degrees with respect to the axial and 0.91 degrees +/- 0.68 degrees for the longitudinal rotation. The most significant distortion caused by metallic objects is caused by 400-series stainless steel. A 9.4 mm maximum error occurred when the rod was closest to the emitter, 10 mm away. The improvement compared to older generations of the Aurora with respect to accuracy is substantial.

  14. Early detection of developmental dysplasia of the hip in The Netherlands: the validity of a standardized assessment protocol in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Boere-Boonekamp, M M; Kerkhoff, T H; Schuil, P B; Zielhuis, G A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the validity of the traditionally recommended screening protocol for developmental dysplasia of the hip in infants. METHODS: Study children (n = 1968) underwent a standardized screening examination. RESULTS: The incidence of developmental dysplasia of the hip was 3.7%. The sensitivity of the test protocol was 86%, the specificity was 82%, and the predictive values of positive and negative tests were 16% and 99%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The validity of the screening protocol for developmental dysplasia of the hip is disappointingly low. The yield of adding an ultrasonographic examination to current screening activities needs further study. PMID:9491024

  15. Standardizing the protocol for hemispherical photographs: accuracy assessment of binarization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Glatthorn, Jonas; Beckschäfer, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Hemispherical photography is a well-established method to optically assess ecological parameters related to plant canopies; e.g. ground-level light regimes and the distribution of foliage within the crown space. Interpreting hemispherical photographs involves classifying pixels as either sky or vegetation. A wide range of automatic thresholding or binarization algorithms exists to classify the photographs. The variety in methodology hampers ability to compare results across studies. To identify an optimal threshold selection method, this study assessed the accuracy of seven binarization methods implemented in software currently available for the processing of hemispherical photographs. Therefore, binarizations obtained by the algorithms were compared to reference data generated through a manual binarization of a stratified random selection of pixels. This approach was adopted from the accuracy assessment of map classifications known from remote sensing studies. Percentage correct (Pc) and kappa-statistics (K) were calculated. The accuracy of the algorithms was assessed for photographs taken with automatic exposure settings (auto-exposure) and photographs taken with settings which avoid overexposure (histogram-exposure). In addition, gap fraction values derived from hemispherical photographs were compared with estimates derived from the manually classified reference pixels. All tested algorithms were shown to be sensitive to overexposure. Three of the algorithms showed an accuracy which was high enough to be recommended for the processing of histogram-exposed hemispherical photographs: "Minimum" (Pc 98.8%; K 0.952), "Edge Detection" (Pc 98.1%; K 0.950), and "Minimum Histogram" (Pc 98.1%; K 0.947). The Minimum algorithm overestimated gap fraction least of all (11%). The overestimation by the algorithms Edge Detection (63%) and Minimum Histogram (67%) were considerably larger. For the remaining four evaluated algorithms (IsoData, Maximum Entropy, MinError, and Otsu

  16. Standardizing the Protocol for Hemispherical Photographs: Accuracy Assessment of Binarization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Glatthorn, Jonas; Beckschäfer, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Hemispherical photography is a well-established method to optically assess ecological parameters related to plant canopies; e.g. ground-level light regimes and the distribution of foliage within the crown space. Interpreting hemispherical photographs involves classifying pixels as either sky or vegetation. A wide range of automatic thresholding or binarization algorithms exists to classify the photographs. The variety in methodology hampers ability to compare results across studies. To identify an optimal threshold selection method, this study assessed the accuracy of seven binarization methods implemented in software currently available for the processing of hemispherical photographs. Therefore, binarizations obtained by the algorithms were compared to reference data generated through a manual binarization of a stratified random selection of pixels. This approach was adopted from the accuracy assessment of map classifications known from remote sensing studies. Percentage correct () and kappa-statistics () were calculated. The accuracy of the algorithms was assessed for photographs taken with automatic exposure settings (auto-exposure) and photographs taken with settings which avoid overexposure (histogram-exposure). In addition, gap fraction values derived from hemispherical photographs were compared with estimates derived from the manually classified reference pixels. All tested algorithms were shown to be sensitive to overexposure. Three of the algorithms showed an accuracy which was high enough to be recommended for the processing of histogram-exposed hemispherical photographs: “Minimum” ( 98.8%; 0.952), “Edge Detection” ( 98.1%; 0.950), and “Minimum Histogram” ( 98.1%; 0.947). The Minimum algorithm overestimated gap fraction least of all (11%). The overestimation by the algorithms Edge Detection (63%) and Minimum Histogram (67%) were considerably larger. For the remaining four evaluated algorithms (IsoData, Maximum Entropy, MinError, and Otsu) an

  17. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM)

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. PMID:26188274

  19. STANDARD OPERATING PROTOCOLS FOR DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, D. L.; Stevens, J. L.; Gerdeman, F. W.

    2002-02-25

    Decommissioning projects at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites are conducted under project-specific decision documents, which involve extensive preparation time, public comment periods, and regulatory approvals. Often, the decision documents must be initiated at least one year before commencing the decommissioning project, and they are expensive and time consuming to prepare. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a former nuclear weapons production plant at which hazardous substances and wastes were released or disposed during operations. As a result of the releases, RFETS was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, and is conducting cleanup activities under a federal facilities compliance agreement. Working closely with interested stakeholders and state and federal regulatory agencies, RFETS has developed and implemented an improved process for obtaining the approvals. The key to streamlining the approval process has been the development of sitewide decision documents called Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Standard Operating Protocols or ''RSOPs.'' RSOPs have broad applicability, and could be used instead of project-specific documents. Although no two decommissioning projects are exactly the same and they may vary widely in contamination and other hazards, the basic steps taken for cleanup are usually similar. Because of this, using RSOPs is more efficient than preparing a separate project-specific decision documents for each cleanup action. Over the Rocky Flats cleanup life cycle, using RSOPs has the potential to: (1) Save over 5 million dollars and 6 months on the site closure schedule; (2) Eliminate preparing one hundred and twenty project-specific decision documents; and (3) Eliminate writing seventy-five closure description documents for hazardous waste unit closure and corrective actions.

  20. Modifications to the Standard Sit-and-Reach Flexibility Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Laurence E.; Burke, Darren G.; Pelham, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes several modifications of the standard sit-and-reach flexibility protocol using a new device called the multitest flexometer (MTF). Using the MTF, researchers could take six flexibility measures beyond the stand-and-reach test. The modified protocol allowed the indirect assessment of the influence of the four major muscle groups that…

  1. Communication protocol standards for space data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Adrian J.; Desjardins, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The main elements and requirements of advanced space data networks are identified. The communication protocol standards for use on space missions during the coming decades are described. In particular, the blending of high-performance space-unique data transmission techniques with off-the-shelf open systems interconnection (OSI) protocols is described.

  2. STANDARD MEASUREMENT PROTOCOLS - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual, in support of the Florida Radon Research Program, contains standard protocols for key measurements where data quality is vital to the program. t contains two sections. he first section, soil measurements, contains field sampling protocols for soil gas permeability and...

  3. STANDARD MEASUREMENT PROTOCOLS - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual, in support of the Florida Radon Research Program, contains standard protocols for key measurements where data quality is vital to the program. t contains two sections. he first section, soil measurements, contains field sampling protocols for soil gas permeability and...

  4. Standardized North American marsh bird monitoring protocol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conway, Courtney J.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the population status of many marsh-dependent birds in North America but recent efforts have focused on collecting more reliable information and estimates of population trends. As part of that effort, a standardized survey protocol was developed in 1999 that provided guidance for conducting marsh bird surveys throughout North America such that data would be consistent among locations. The original survey protocol has been revised to provide greater clarification on many issues as the number of individuals using the protocol has grown. The Standardized North American Marsh Bird Monitoring Protocol instructs surveyors to conduct an initial 5-minute passive point-count survey followed by a series of 1-minute segments during which marsh bird calls are broadcast into the marsh following a standardized approach. Surveyors are instructed to record each individual bird from the suite of 26 focal species that are present in their local area on separate lines of a datasheet and estimate the distance to each bird. Also, surveyors are required to record whether each individual bird was detected within each 1-minute subsegment of the survey. These data allow analysts to use several different approaches for estimating detection probability. The Standardized North American Marsh Bird Monitoring Protocol provides detailed instructions that explain the field methods used to monitor marsh birds in North America.

  5. Assessment of a protocol for routine simultaneous myocardial blood flow measurement and standard myocardial perfusion imaging with rubidium-82 on a high count rate positron emission tomography system.

    PubMed

    Tout, Deborah; Tonge, Christine M; Muthu, Sivakumar; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2012-11-01

    High count rate positron emission tomography (PET) systems offer the potential for accurate myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification during first-pass dynamic imaging in conjunction with standard rubidium-82 (Rb-82) PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). We investigate the feasibility of this using a Siemens Biograph mCT. Current routine clinical PET MPI is performed with 1480 MBq (40 mCi) Rb-82. Dynamic first-pass images from 217 consecutive patients were reviewed for evidence of detector saturation, indicating that count rate limits had been exceeded. Phantom acquisitions in the presence of high count rates were performed to assess the effect of detector saturation on quantitative accuracy. Accurate MBF quantification and perfusion imaging using current protocols was successful in 85% of clinical cases. Detector block saturation was observed in 15% of cases, and phantom acquisitions indicate that saturation may have an adverse effect on quantitative accuracy. Visualization of transit or pooling of Rb-82 in the vessels in the axilla was the most consistent feature when saturation occurred. Reduction of administered activity to 1110 MBq (30 mCi) and subsequent evaluation of 159 patients ensured successful MBF quantification while maintaining good diagnostic quality perfusion imaging in 99% of cases. MBF quantification and good-quality standard perfusion imaging can be performed on a high count rate PET system using a single-acquisition protocol. The administered activity requires optimization and we recommend 1110 MBq for PET MPI with a Biograph mCT.

  6. The Space Communications Protocol Standards Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, Alan; Hooke, Adrian J.

    1994-01-01

    In the fall of 1992 NASA and the Department of Defense chartered a technical team to explore the possibility of developing a common set of space data communications standards for potential dual-use across the U.S. national space mission support infrastructure. The team focused on the data communications needs of those activities associated with on-lined control of civil and military aircraft. A two-pronged approach was adopted: a top-down survey of representative civil and military space data communications requirements was conducted; and a bottom-up analysis of available standard data communications protocols was performed. A striking intersection of civil and military space mission requirements emerged, and an equally striking consensus on the approach towards joint civil and military space protocol development was reached. The team concluded that wide segments of the U.S. civil and military space communities have common needs for: (1) an efficient file transfer protocol; (2) various flavors of underlying data transport service; (3) an optional data protection mechanism to assure end-to-end security of message exchange; and (4) an efficient internetworking protocol. These recommendations led to initiating a program to develop a suite of protocols based on these findings. This paper describes the current status of this program.

  7. Satellite-Friendly Protocols and Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, O.; Schmidt, M.; Ebert, J.; Schlemmer, H.; Kastner, S.; Riedler, W.

    2002-01-01

    We are currently observing a development unprecedented with other services, the enormous growth of the Internet. Video, voice and data applications can be supported via this network in high quality. Multi-media applications require high bandwidth which may not be available in many areas. When making proper use of the broadcast feature of a communications satellite, the performance of the satellite-based system can compare favourably to terrestrial solutions. Internet applications are in many cases highly asymmetric, making them very well suited to applications using small and inexpensive terminals. Data from one source may be used simultaneously by a large number of users. The Internet protocol suite has become the de-facto standard. But this protocol family in its original form has not been designed to support guaranteed quality of service, a prerequisite for real-time, high quality traffic. The Internet Protocol has to be adapted for the satellite environment, because long roundtrip delays and the error behaviour of the channel could make it inefficient over a GEO satellite. Another requirement is to utilise the satellite bandwidth as efficiently as possible. This can be achieved by adapting the access system to the nature of IP frames, which are variable in length. In the framework of ESA's ARTES project a novel satellite multimedia system was developed which utilises Multi-Frequency TDMA in a meshed network topology. The system supports Quality of Service (QoS) by reserving capacity with different QoS requirements. The system is centrally controlled by a master station with the implementation of a demand assignment (DAMA) system. A lean internal signalling system has been adopted. Network management is based on the SNMP protocol and industry-standard network management platforms, making interfaces to standard accounting and billing systems easy. Modern communication systems will have to be compliant to different standards in a very flexible manner. The

  8. Melanins and melanogenesis: methods, standards, protocols.

    PubMed

    d'Ischia, Marco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Napolitano, Alessandra; Briganti, Stefania; Garcia-Borron, José-Carlos; Kovacs, Daniela; Meredith, Paul; Pezzella, Alessandro; Picardo, Mauro; Sarna, Tadeusz; Simon, John D; Ito, Shosuke

    2013-09-01

    Despite considerable advances in the past decade, melanin research still suffers from the lack of universally accepted and shared nomenclature, methodologies, and structural models. This paper stems from the joint efforts of chemists, biochemists, physicists, biologists, and physicians with recognized and consolidated expertise in the field of melanins and melanogenesis, who critically reviewed and experimentally revisited methods, standards, and protocols to provide for the first time a consensus set of recommended procedures to be adopted and shared by researchers involved in pigment cell research. The aim of the paper was to define an unprecedented frame of reference built on cutting-edge knowledge and state-of-the-art methodology, to enable reliable comparison of results among laboratories and new progress in the field based on standardized methods and shared information.

  9. Protocol Standards for Reporting Video Data in Academic Journals.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Pamela A; Ignacio, Romeo C; de Moya, Marc A

    2016-04-01

    Editors of biomedical journals have estimated that a majority (40%-90%) of studies published in scientific journals cannot be replicated, even though an inherent principle of publication is that others should be able to replicate and build on published claims. Each journal sets its own protocols for establishing "quality" in articles, yet over the past 50 years, few journals in any field--especially medical education--have specified protocols for reporting the use of video data in research. The authors found that technical and industry-driven aspects of video recording, as well as a lack of standardization and reporting requirements by research journals, have led to major limitations in the ability to assess or reproduce video data used in research. Specific variables in the videotaping process (e.g., camera angle), which can be changed or be modified, affect the quality of recorded data, leading to major reporting errors and, in turn, unreliable conclusions. As more data are now in the form of digital videos, the historical lack of reporting standards makes it increasingly difficult to accurately replicate medical educational studies. Reproducibility is especially important as the medical education community considers setting national high-stakes standards in medicine and surgery based on video data. The authors of this Perspective provide basic protocol standards for investigators and journals using video data in research publications so as to allow for reproducibility.

  10. VALIDATION OF STANDARD ANALYTICAL PROTOCOL FOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is a growing concern with the potential for terrorist use of chemical weapons to cause civilian harm. In the event of an actual or suspected outdoor release of chemically hazardous material in a large area, the extent of contamination must be determined. This requires a system with the ability to prepare and quickly analyze a large number of contaminated samples for the traditional chemical agents, as well as numerous toxic industrial chemicals. Liquid samples (both aqueous and organic), solid samples (e.g., soil), vapor samples (e.g., air) and mixed state samples, all ranging from household items to deceased animals, may require some level of analyses. To meet this challenge, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center, in collaboration with experts from across U.S. EPA and other Federal Agencies, initiated an effort to identify analytical methods for the chemical and biological agents that could be used to respond to a terrorist attack or a homeland security incident. U.S. EPA began development of standard analytical protocols (SAPs) for laboratory identification and measurement of target agents in case of a contamination threat. These methods will be used to help assist in the identification of existing contamination, the effectiveness of decontamination, as well as clearance for the affected population to reoccupy previously contaminated areas. One of the first SAPs developed was for the determin

  11. Anaerobic protocol for assessing industrial waste treatability

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.C.; Khandaker, N.R.

    1996-11-01

    Recent promulgation of strict standards for industrial waste pretreatment has greatly increased the number of wastewaters that are candidates for anaerobic treatment. The challenge with industrial wastes is to determine the potential for anaerobic biodegradation prior to investing large amounts of time and expense in design and field investigation. Various methods have been used to assess the treatability of industrial wastewaters, but the methodology has varied significantly. In response to the need for a consistent procedure for determining the treatability of different industrial wastewaters by anaerobic processes, Young developed an anaerobic treatability screening protocol. The purpose of this paper is to describe the protocol and to report a number of case studies in which the test protocol was used to determine the feasibility of using anaerobic processes for treating specific industrial wastes. Specific examples include food processing wastes, chemical production wastes, petroleum wastes, and landfill leachate. Treatability was based on assessment of the rate and extent of biodegradation, identification of the presence of toxic substances, and dilution effects.

  12. SPIRIT 2013 Statement: defining standard protocol items for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chan, An-Wen; Tetzlaff, Jennifer M; Altman, Douglas G; Laupacis, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Krle A-Jerić, Karmela; Hrobjartsson, Asbjørn; Mann, Howard; Dickersin, Kay; Berlin, Jesse A; Dore, Caroline J; Parulekar, Wendy R; Summerskill, William S M; Groves, Trish; Schulz, Kenneth F; Sox, Harold C; Rockhold, Frank W; Rennie, Drummond; Moher, David

    2015-12-01

    The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol. The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders.

  13. SPIRIT 2013 statement: defining standard protocol items for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chan, An-Wen; Tetzlaff, Jennifer M; Altman, Douglas G; Laupacis, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Krleža-Jerić, Karmela; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Mann, Howard; Dickersin, Kay; Berlin, Jesse A; Doré, Caroline J; Parulekar, Wendy R; Summerskill, William S M; Groves, Trish; Schulz, Kenneth F; Sox, Harold C; Rockhold, Frank W; Rennie, Drummond; Moher, David

    2013-02-05

    The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol.The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders.

  14. Physical therapy assessment and treatment protocol for nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, M B; Woodard, M; Sosa, V; Hunter, L; Mulrow, C D; Gerety, M B; Tuley, M

    1992-08-01

    This article describes a standard protocol for assessing physical function in elderly nursing home residents. Major physical dimensions that are measured with the protocol include range of motion, muscle force, muscle reflex activity, sensation, soft tissue status, balance/coordination, and posture. A practical, functionally prioritized treatment model based on the assessment is also presented. The standardized assessment and treatment plan may be useful to the physical therapist in (1) planning and prioritizing treatment, (2) identifying when goals have been met, (3) recognizing when there is a need for treatment plan modification, and (4) educating physical therapy students in applying problem-solving skills in their treatment sessions.

  15. Comparison of test protocols for standard room/corner tests

    Treesearch

    R. H. White; M. A. Dietenberger; H. Tran; O. Grexa; L. Richardson; K. Sumathipala; M. Janssens

    1998-01-01

    As part of international efforts to evaluate alternative reaction-to-fire tests, several series of room/comer tests have been conducted. This paper reviews the overall results of related projects in which different test protocols for standard room/corner tests were used. Differences in the test protocols involved two options for the ignition burner scenario and whether...

  16. Repeatable assessment protocol for electromagnetic trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidegger, Tamas; Sirokai, Beáta; Fenyvesi, Gábor; Kovács, Levente; Benyó, Balázs; Benyó, Zoltán

    2012-02-01

    In the past decades, many new trends appeared in interventional medicine. One of the most groundbreaking ones is Image-Guided Surgery (IGS). The main benefit of IGS procedures is the reduction of the patient's pain and collateral damage through improved accuracy and targeting. Electromagnetic Tracking (EMT) has been introduced to medical applications as an effective tool for navigation. However, magnetic fields can be severely distorted by ferromagnetic materials and electronic equipment, which is a major barrier towards their wider application. The focus of the study is to determine and compensate the inherent errors of the different types of EMTs, in order to improve their accuracy. Our aim is to develop a standardized, simple and repeatable assessment protocol; to determine tracking errors with sub-millimeter accuracy, hence increasing the measurement precision and reliability. For initial experiments, the NDI Aurora and the Ascension medSAFE systems were used in a standard laboratory environment. We aim to advance to the state-of-the art by describing and disseminating an easily reproducible calibration method, publishing the CAD files of the accuracy phantom and the source of the evaluation data. This should allow the wider spread of the technique, and eventually lead to the repeatable and comparable assessment of EMT systems.

  17. Standard protocol stack for mission control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Adrian J.

    1994-01-01

    It is proposed to create a fully 'open' architectural specification for standardized space mission command and control. By being open, i.e., independent for any particular implementation, diversity and competition will be encouraged among future commercial suppliers of space equipment and systems. Customers of the new standard capability are expected to include: (1) the civil space community (e.g., NASA, NOAA, international Agencies); (2) the military space community (e.g., Air Force, Navy, intelligence); and (3) the emerging commercial space community (e.g., mobile satellite service providers).

  18. Accuracy assessment of EPA protocol gases purchased in 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Coppedge, E.A.; Logan, T.J.; Midgett, M.R.; Shores, R.C.; Messner, M.J.

    1992-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established quality assurance procedures for air pollution measurement systems that are intended to reduce the uncertainty in environmental measurements. The compressed gas standards of the program are used for calibration and audits of continuous emission monitoring systems. EPA's regulations require that the certified values for these standards be traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Materials or to NIST/EPA-approved Certified Reference Materials via either of two traceability protocols. The manufacturer assessment was conducted to: (1) document the accuracy of the compressed gas standards' certified concentrations; and (2) ensure that the compressed gas standards' written certification reports met the documentation requirements of the protocol. All available sources were contacted and the following gas mixtures were acquired: (1) 300-ppm SO2 and 400-ppm NO in N2; and (2) 1500-ppm SO2 and 900-ppm NO in N2.

  19. Standardized protocol for artery-only fingertip replantation.

    PubMed

    Buntic, Rudolf F; Brooks, Darrell

    2010-09-01

    Artery-only fingertip replantation can be reliable if low-resistance flow through the replant is maintained until venous outflow is restored naturally. Injuring the tip of the replant to promote ongoing bleeding augmented with anticoagulation usually accomplishes this; however, such management results in prolonged hospitalization. In this study, we analyzed the outcomes of artery-only fingertip replantation using a standardized postoperative protocol consisting of dextran-40, heparin, and leech therapy. Between 2001 and 2008, we performed 19 artery-only fingertip replants for 17 patients. All patients had the replanted nail plate removed and received intravenous dextran-40, heparin, and aspirin to promote fingertip bleeding and vascular outflow. Anticoagulation was titrated to promote a controlled bleed until physiologic venous outflow was restored by neovascularization. We used medicinal leeches and mechanical heparin scrubbing for acute decongestion. By postoperative day 6, bleeding was no longer promoted. We initiated fluorescent dye perfusion studies to assess circulatory competence and direct further anticoagulant intervention if necessary. The absence of bleeding associated with an initial rise followed by an appropriate fall in fluorescent dye concentration would trigger a weaning of anticoagulation. All of the 19 replants survived. The average length of hospital stay was 9 days (range, 7-17 d). Eleven patients received blood transfusions. The average transfusion was 1.8 units (range, 0-9 units). All patients were happy with the decision to replant, and the cosmetic result. A protocol that promotes temporary, controlled bleeding from the fingertip is protective of artery-only replants distal to the distal interphalangeal joint until physiologic venous outflow is restored. The protocol described is both safe and reliable. The patient should be informed that such replant attempts may result in the need for transfusions and extended hospital stays, factors that

  20. Relationship Between Standardized Glycemic Protocols and Healthcare Cost.

    PubMed

    Coto, Jeffrey A; Yehle, Karen S; Foli, Karen J

    2016-02-01

    Rising healthcare costs and the management of diabetes are financially straining to healthcare organizations. The study purpose was to examine whether a direct relationship existed between the cost of hospitalization, length of stay, excess admission days, and discharge blood glucose (DC-BG) levels and utilizing a standardized glycemic protocol. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted of adult diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-2) patients' pre-diabetic protocol (January 1, 2011-December 31, 2011) and post-diabetic protocol (August 1, 2012-October 31, 2012). The sample included DM-2 inpatients aged ≥ 18 years admitted without complications and/or with abnormal fasting blood glucose. Pre-protocol sample comprised n = 346 subjects and post-protocol sample comprised n = 149 subjects. Patients who received the diabetic protocol in 2012 experienced a decrease in the DC-BG (p < .05) and decrease in excess admission days (p < .05). Evidence supports that utilizing a standardized glycemic protocol improves glycemic control and reduces healthcare cost. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Joint Architecture Standard (JAS) Reliable Data Delivery Protocol (RDDP) specification.

    SciTech Connect

    Enderle, Justin Wayne; Daniels, James W.; Gardner, Michael T.; Eldridge, John M.; Hunt, Richard D.; Gallegos, Daniel E.

    2011-05-01

    The Joint Architecture Standard (JAS) program at Sandia National Laboratories requires the use of a reliable data delivery protocol over SpaceWire. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Goddard Spaceflight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, developed and specified a reliable protocol for its Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite known as GOES-R Reliable Data Delivery Protocol (GRDDP). The JAS program implemented and tested GRDDP and then suggested a number of modifications to the original specification to meet its program specific requirements. This document details the full RDDP specification as modified for JAS. The JAS Reliable Data Delivery Protocol uses the lower-level SpaceWire data link layer to provide reliable packet delivery services to one or more higher-level host application processes. This document specifies the functional requirements for JRDDP but does not specify the interfaces to the lower- or higher-level processes, which may be implementation-dependent.

  2. Wildlife road traffic accidents: a standardized protocol for counting flattened fauna

    PubMed Central

    Collinson, Wendy J; Parker, Daniel M; Bernard, Ric T F; Reilly, Brian K; Davies-Mostert, Harriet T

    2014-01-01

    Previous assessments of wildlife road mortality have not used directly comparable methods and, at present, there is no standardized protocol for the collection of such data. Consequently, there are no internationally comparative statistics documenting roadkill rates. In this study, we used a combination of experimental trials and road transects to design a standardized protocol to assess roadkill rates on both paved and unpaved roads. Simulated roadkill were positioned over a 1 km distance, and trials were conducted at eight different speeds (20–100 km·h−1). The recommended protocol was then tested on a 100-km transect, driven daily over a 40-day period. This recorded 413 vertebrate roadkill, comprising 106 species. We recommend the protocol be adopted for future road ecology studies to enable robust statistical comparisons between studies. PMID:25247063

  3. Wildlife road traffic accidents: a standardized protocol for counting flattened fauna.

    PubMed

    Collinson, Wendy J; Parker, Daniel M; Bernard, Ric T F; Reilly, Brian K; Davies-Mostert, Harriet T

    2014-08-01

    Previous assessments of wildlife road mortality have not used directly comparable methods and, at present, there is no standardized protocol for the collection of such data. Consequently, there are no internationally comparative statistics documenting roadkill rates. In this study, we used a combination of experimental trials and road transects to design a standardized protocol to assess roadkill rates on both paved and unpaved roads. Simulated roadkill were positioned over a 1 km distance, and trials were conducted at eight different speeds (20-100 km·h(-1)). The recommended protocol was then tested on a 100-km transect, driven daily over a 40-day period. This recorded 413 vertebrate roadkill, comprising 106 species. We recommend the protocol be adopted for future road ecology studies to enable robust statistical comparisons between studies.

  4. The Vocational Assessment Protocol: Development and Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Dale F.; Menz, Fredrick E.

    This report describes a 48-month project which developed, field tested, and evaluated the utility of the Vocational Assessment Protocol (VAP) for use with persons with traumatic brain injury resulting in a severe and persistent disability. The VAP is intended to assist in the community-based vocational rehabilitation of these individuals. The VAP…

  5. SUPPLEMENT TO: STANDARD MEASUREMENT PROTOCOLS - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report supplements earlier published standard protocols for key measurements where data quality is vital to the Florida Radon Research Program. The report adds measurements of small canister radon flux and soil water potential to the section on soil measurements. It adds indo...

  6. SUPPLEMENT TO: STANDARD MEASUREMENT PROTOCOLS - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report supplements earlier published standard protocols for key measurements where data quality is vital to the Florida Radon Research Program. The report adds measurements of small canister radon flux and soil water potential to the section on soil measurements. It adds indo...

  7. Biocoder: A programming language for standardizing and automating biology protocols

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Published descriptions of biology protocols are often ambiguous and incomplete, making them difficult to replicate in other laboratories. However, there is increasing benefit to formalizing the descriptions of protocols, as laboratory automation systems (such as microfluidic chips) are becoming increasingly capable of executing them. Our goal in this paper is to improve both the reproducibility and automation of biology experiments by using a programming language to express the precise series of steps taken. Results We have developed BioCoder, a C++ library that enables biologists to express the exact steps needed to execute a protocol. In addition to being suitable for automation, BioCoder converts the code into a readable, English-language description for use by biologists. We have implemented over 65 protocols in BioCoder; the most complex of these was successfully executed by a biologist in the laboratory using BioCoder as the only reference. We argue that BioCoder exposes and resolves ambiguities in existing protocols, and could provide the software foundations for future automation platforms. BioCoder is freely available for download at http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/india/projects/biocoder/. Conclusions BioCoder represents the first practical programming system for standardizing and automating biology protocols. Our vision is to change the way that experimental methods are communicated: rather than publishing a written account of the protocols used, researchers will simply publish the code. Our experience suggests that this practice is tractable and offers many benefits. We invite other researchers to leverage BioCoder to improve the precision and completeness of their protocols, and also to adapt and extend BioCoder to new domains. PMID:21059251

  8. Biocoder: A programming language for standardizing and automating biology protocols.

    PubMed

    Ananthanarayanan, Vaishnavi; Thies, William

    2010-11-08

    Published descriptions of biology protocols are often ambiguous and incomplete, making them difficult to replicate in other laboratories. However, there is increasing benefit to formalizing the descriptions of protocols, as laboratory automation systems (such as microfluidic chips) are becoming increasingly capable of executing them. Our goal in this paper is to improve both the reproducibility and automation of biology experiments by using a programming language to express the precise series of steps taken. We have developed BioCoder, a C++ library that enables biologists to express the exact steps needed to execute a protocol. In addition to being suitable for automation, BioCoder converts the code into a readable, English-language description for use by biologists. We have implemented over 65 protocols in BioCoder; the most complex of these was successfully executed by a biologist in the laboratory using BioCoder as the only reference. We argue that BioCoder exposes and resolves ambiguities in existing protocols, and could provide the software foundations for future automation platforms. BioCoder is freely available for download at http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/india/projects/biocoder/. BioCoder represents the first practical programming system for standardizing and automating biology protocols. Our vision is to change the way that experimental methods are communicated: rather than publishing a written account of the protocols used, researchers will simply publish the code. Our experience suggests that this practice is tractable and offers many benefits. We invite other researchers to leverage BioCoder to improve the precision and completeness of their protocols, and also to adapt and extend BioCoder to new domains.

  9. Comparison of the ramp versus standard exercise protocols.

    PubMed

    Myers, J; Buchanan, N; Walsh, D; Kraemer, M; McAuley, P; Hamilton-Wessler, M; Froelicher, V F

    1991-05-01

    To compare the hemodynamic and gas exchange responses of ramp treadmill and cycle ergometer tests with standard exercise protocols used clinically, 10 patients with chronic heart failure, 10 with coronary artery disease who were asymptomatic during exercise, 11 with coronary artery disease who were limited by angina during exercise and 10 age-matched normal subjects performed maximal exercise using six different exercise protocols. Gas exchange data were collected continuously during each of the following protocols, performed on separate days in randomized order: Bruce, Balke and an individualized ramp treadmill; 25 W/stage, 50 W/stage and an individualized ramp cycle ergometer test. Maximal oxygen uptake was 16% greater on the treadmill protocols combined (21.4 +/- 8 ml/kg per min) versus the cycle ergometer protocols combined (18.1 +/- 7 ml/kg per min) (p less than 0.01), although no differences were observed in maximal heart rate (131 +/- 24 versus 126 +/- 24 beats/min for the treadmill and cycle ergometer protocols, respectively). No major differences were observed in maximal heart rate or maximal oxygen uptake among the various treadmill protocols or among the various cycle ergometer protocols. The ratio of oxygen uptake to work rate, expressed as a slope, was highest for the ramp tests (slope +/- SEE ml/kg per min = 0.80 +/- 2.5 and 0.78 +/- 1.7 for ramp treadmill and ramp cycle ergometer, respectively). The slopes were poorest for the tests with the largest increments in work (0.62 +/- 4.0 and 0.59 +/- 2.8 for the Bruce treadmill and 50 W/stage cycle ergometer, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Standardized cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) protocols 2013 update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This document is an update to the 2008 publication of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) Board of Trustees Task Force on Standardized Protocols. Since the time of the original publication, 3 additional task forces (Reporting, Post-Processing, and Congenital Heart Disease) have published documents that should be referred to in conjunction with the present document. The section on general principles and techniques has been expanded as more of the techniques common to CMR have been standardized. There is still a great deal of development in the area of tissue characterization/mapping, so these protocols have been in general left as optional. The authors hope that this document continues to standardize and simplify the patient-based approach to clinical CMR. It will be updated at regular intervals as the field of CMR advances. PMID:24103764

  11. Standardized cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) protocols 2013 update.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher M; Barkhausen, Jörg; Flamm, Scott D; Kim, Raymond J; Nagel, Eike

    2013-10-08

    This document is an update to the 2008 publication of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) Board of Trustees Task Force on Standardized Protocols. Since the time of the original publication, 3 additional task forces (Reporting, Post-Processing, and Congenital Heart Disease) have published documents that should be referred to in conjunction with the present document. The section on general principles and techniques has been expanded as more of the techniques common to CMR have been standardized. There is still a great deal of development in the area of tissue characterization/mapping, so these protocols have been in general left as optional. The authors hope that this document continues to standardize and simplify the patient-based approach to clinical CMR. It will be updated at regular intervals as the field of CMR advances.

  12. Matriculation Assessment Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; Halliday, Karen

    Assessment testing in California's community colleges (CCC) helps to identify entering students' goals and skills level and to ensure that the students are properly advised of appropriate courses and programs. The California Education Code requires that all assessment instruments be approved by the Office of the Chancellor of the California…

  13. Multilevel Assessments of Science Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quellmalz, Edys S.; Timms, Michael J.; Silberglitt, Matt D.

    2011-01-01

    The Multilevel Assessment of Science Standards (MASS) project is creating a new generation of technology-enhanced formative assessments that bring the best formative assessment practices into classrooms to transform what, how, when, and where science learning is assessed. The project is investigating the feasibility, utility, technical quality,…

  14. [Use of standard protocols in the evaluation of voice disorders].

    PubMed

    Arias, C; Bless, D M; Khidr, A

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a protocol for the use of standard forms in the evaluation of laryngeal structure and function in patients with voice disorders. The forms are designed to cover all the essential parameters needed to reach an accurate descriptive diagnosis which allows us to have an appropriate therapy plan according to the individual's detailed observations. It also gives us a consistent standardized evaluation form to measure changes after therapy whether behavioral, medical or surgical, and to compare different observations across patients. Reporting observations in this consistent manner will make characteristic patterns of different vocal behaviors readily obvious to the researcher or the clinician and reduce the possibility of missing any important details. The protocols are: indirect laryngoscopy, video-stroboscopic-evaluation form, functional voice and auditory perceptual voice evaluation.

  15. A Standardized Protocol for the Initial Evaluation and Documentation of Mild Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kenneth L.; Yunker, Craig A.; Austin, Marchell C.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To present a protocol for the initial assessment and documentation of mild brain injury, a protocol that is used within the Department of Physical Education at the United States Military Academy. Background: Recently, much attention has been given to the assessment and management of mild brain injury by the sports medicine community. Although the classification of and management strategies for mild brain injury have been well disputed, most experts agree on the essentials of the sideline or initial evaluation. According to leading experts, if an athlete has experienced an episode of mild brain injury, the initial signs and symptoms, as well as the course of those signs and symptoms, should be documented. Description: Although many athletic training texts formerly discussed techniques for evaluating an episode of mild brain injury, few present an objective protocol to follow. Our protocol includes 3 components. The first component is the initial evaluation, which incorporates serial observations during the first 20 minutes after injury, with neurologic checks every 5 minutes. The second component includes a take-home sheet for athletes not referred to a physician for further evaluation. The third part of the protocol is a 24-hour postinjury follow-up examination for any signs or symptoms of postconcussion syndrome. Finally, we present the indications for referral to a physician for further evaluation. Clinical Advantages/Recommendations: Using a standard protocol to guide evaluation and to document the initial course of signs and symptoms after mild brain injury allows the sports medicine staff to make better management decisions. In addition, patient instructions and the course of follow-up evaluations can be improved if a standard protocol is employed. Our protocol has been developed to meet the needs both of athletes who are exposed to mild brain injury on a daily basis and of the certified athletic trainers who initially evaluate them; the protocol

  16. DDN (Defense Data Network) Protocol Handbook. Volume 1. DoD Military Standard Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    and IP and move ultimately toward exclusive use of TP-4. Whenever international standards are available and can be rood to support military...the transporting subnetwork. « b. Data The result of fragmenting a datagram, also gram fragment» l f simply referred to ss a fragment...delivery. f. BFTF. Electronic File Transfer Protocol. Electronic mall. *• Fragmentation. The process of breaking the data within a data- gram

  17. DOE limited standard: Operations assessments

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    Purpose of this standard is to provide DOE Field Element assessors with a guide for conducting operations assessments, and provide DOE Field Element managers with the criteria of the EM Operations Assessment Program. Sections 6.1 to 6.21 provide examples of how to assess specific areas; the general techniques of operations assessments (Section 5) may be applied to other areas of health and safety (e.g. fire protection, criticality safety, quality assurance, occupational safety, etc.).

  18. Protocol for aquatic hazard assessment of selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Lemly, A.D.

    1995-05-24

    A procedure is described for conducting an aquatic hazard assessment of selenium. Hazard is characterized in terms of the potential for food-chain bioaccumulation and reproductive impairment in fish and aquatic birds, which are the most sensitive biological responses for estimating ecosystem-level impacts of selenium contamination. Five degrees of hazard are possible depemding on the expected environmental concentrations of selenium, exposure of fish and aquatic birds to toxic concentrations, and resultant potential for reproductive impairment. An example is given to illustrate how the protocol is applied to selenium data from a typical contaminant monitoring program.

  19. From Expert Protocols to Standardized Management of Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Aubry, Camille; Delord, Marion; Michelet, Pierre; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Million, Matthieu; Brouqui, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2017-08-15

    We report here 4 examples of management of infectious diseases (IDs) at the University Hospital Institute Méditerranée Infection in Marseille, France, to illustrate the value of expert protocols feeding standardized management of IDs. First, we describe our experience on Q fever and Tropheryma whipplei infection management based on in vitro data and clinical outcome. Second, we describe our management-based approach for the treatment of infective endocarditis, leading to a strong reduction of mortality rate. Third, we report our use of fecal microbiota transplantation to face severe Clostridium difficile infections and to perform decolonization of patients colonized by emerging highly resistant bacteria. Finally, we present the standardized management of the main acute infections in patients admitted in the emergency department, promoting antibiotics by oral route, checking compliance with the protocol, and avoiding the unnecessary use of intravenous and urinary tract catheters. Overall, the standardization of the management is the keystone to reduce both mortality and morbidity related to IDs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Standardized food images: A photographing protocol and image database.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier, Lisette; van Meer, Floor; van der Laan, Laura N; Viergever, Max A; Smeets, Paul A M

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of food intake has gained much research interest because of the current obesity epidemic. For research purposes, food images are a good and convenient alternative for real food because many dietary decisions are made based on the sight of foods. Food pictures are assumed to elicit anticipatory responses similar to real foods because of learned associations between visual food characteristics and post-ingestive consequences. In contemporary food science, a wide variety of images are used which introduces between-study variability and hampers comparison and meta-analysis of results. Therefore, we created an easy-to-use photographing protocol which enables researchers to generate high resolution food images appropriate for their study objective and population. In addition, we provide a high quality standardized picture set which was characterized in seven European countries. With the use of this photographing protocol a large number of food images were created. Of these images, 80 were selected based on their recognizability in Scotland, Greece and The Netherlands. We collected image characteristics such as liking, perceived calories and/or perceived healthiness ratings from 449 adults and 191 children. The majority of the foods were recognized and liked at all sites. The differences in liking ratings, perceived calories and perceived healthiness between sites were minimal. Furthermore, perceived caloric content and healthiness ratings correlated strongly (r ≥ 0.8) with actual caloric content in both adults and children. The photographing protocol as well as the images and the data are freely available for research use on http://nutritionalneuroscience.eu/. By providing the research community with standardized images and the tools to create their own, comparability between studies will be improved and a head-start is made for a world-wide standardized food image database. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO): implementation of VO standard protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Honda, S.; Kawanomoto, S.; Yasuda, N.; Masunaga, Y.; Ishihara, Y.; Tsutsumi, J.; Nakamoto, H.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2006-07-01

    We developed the third prototype towards a Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO). IVOA standards, such as Simple Image Access and ADQL, were adapted to the system for the first time. We also constructed an OAI-PMH publishing registry, a web service based searchable registry, and VO data services based on SIA and SkyNode protocols. Most of the components were built on open software, except for an XML database used for searchable registry. This paper describes the JVO proto 3 system and results of a performance measurement.

  2. Standards-Based Wireless Sensor Networking Protocols for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Raymond S.

    2010-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have the capacity to revolutionize data gathering in both spaceflight and terrestrial applications. WSNs provide a huge advantage over traditional, wired instrumentation since they do not require wiring trunks to connect sensors to a central hub. This allows for easy sensor installation in hard to reach locations, easy expansion of the number of sensors or sensing modalities, and reduction in both system cost and weight. While this technology offers unprecedented flexibility and adaptability, implementing it in practice is not without its difficulties. Recent advances in standards-based WSN protocols for industrial control applications have come a long way to solving many of the challenges facing practical WSN deployments. In this paper, we will overview two of the more promising candidates - WirelessHART from the HART Communication Foundation and ISA100.11a from the International Society of Automation - and present the architecture for a new standards-based sensor node for networking and applications research.

  3. Establishing a standardized therapeutic testing protocol for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Tsai, Ming-Shung; Lin, Tzer-Bin; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Li, Hung

    2006-11-01

    Several mice models have been created for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA); however, there is still no standard preclinical testing system for the disease. We previously generated type III-specific SMA model mice, which might be suitable for use as a preclinical therapeutic testing system for SMA. To establish such a system and test its applicability, we first created a testing protocol and then applied it as a means to investigate the use of valproic acid (VPA) as a possible treatment for SMA. These SMA mice revealed tail/ear/foot deformity, muscle atrophy, poorer motor performances, smaller compound muscle action potential and lower spinal motoneuron density at the age of 9 to 12 months in comparison with age-matched wild-type littermate mice. In addition, VPA attenuates motoneuron death, increases spinal SMN protein level and partially normalizes motor function in SMA mice. These results suggest that the testing protocol developed here is well suited for use as a standardized preclinical therapeutic testing system for SMA.

  4. Two RFID standard-based security protocols for healthcare environments.

    PubMed

    Picazo-Sanchez, Pablo; Bagheri, Nasour; Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Tapiador, Juan E

    2013-10-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems are widely used in access control, transportation, real-time inventory and asset management, automated payment systems, etc. Nevertheless, the use of this technology is almost unexplored in healthcare environments, where potential applications include patient monitoring, asset traceability and drug administration systems, to mention just a few. RFID technology can offer more intelligent systems and applications, but privacy and security issues have to be addressed before its adoption. This is even more dramatical in healthcare applications where very sensitive information is at stake and patient safety is paramount. In Wu et al. (J. Med. Syst. 37:19, 43) recently proposed a new RFID authentication protocol for healthcare environments. In this paper we show that this protocol puts location privacy of tag holders at risk, which is a matter of gravest concern and ruins the security of this proposal. To facilitate the implementation of secure RFID-based solutions in the medical sector, we suggest two new applications (authentication and secure messaging) and propose solutions that, in contrast to previous proposals in this field, are fully based on ISO Standards and NIST Security Recommendations.

  5. Workshop on laboratory protocol standards for the Molecular Methods Database.

    PubMed

    Klingström, Tomas; Soldatova, Larissa; Stevens, Robert; Roos, T Erik; Swertz, Morris A; Müller, Kristian M; Kalaš, Matúš; Lambrix, Patrick; Taussig, Michael J; Litton, Jan-Eric; Landegren, Ulf; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2013-01-25

    Management of data to produce scientific knowledge is a key challenge for biological research in the 21st century. Emerging high-throughput technologies allow life science researchers to produce big data at speeds and in amounts that were unthinkable just a few years ago. This places high demands on all aspects of the workflow: from data capture (including the experimental constraints of the experiment), analysis and preservation, to peer-reviewed publication of results. Failure to recognise the issues at each level can lead to serious conflicts and mistakes; research may then be compromised as a result of the publication of non-coherent protocols, or the misinterpretation of published data. In this report, we present the results from a workshop that was organised to create an ontological data-modelling framework for Laboratory Protocol Standards for the Molecular Methods Database (MolMeth). The workshop provided a set of short- and long-term goals for the MolMeth database, the most important being the decision to use the established EXACT description of biomedical ontologies as a starting point.

  6. Utility communication protocol standardization IEC 870, a migration towards the utility communications architecture?

    SciTech Connect

    LaPlace, C.; Harmon, G.; Dinkel, G.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the need for standardization among utility communication protocols, the existing status of standardization efforts and the implications of standardization in the future. It provides an overview into the possibilities regarding standardization from several recognized standards organizations including the EPRI Utility Communication Architecture (UCA) specification along with the IEC 870 transmission protocol. Finally it offers a primer on these standards, the definition of the OSI Protocol Reference Model as well as protocols for those who may not have direct experience with them.

  7. Effects of tailored neck-shoulder pain treatment based on a decision model guided by clinical assessments and standardized functional tests. A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A major problem with rehabilitation interventions for neck pain is that the condition may have multiple causes, thus a single treatment approach is seldom efficient. The present study protocol outlines a single blinded randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of tailored treatment for neck-shoulder pain. The treatment is based on a decision model guided by standardized clinical assessment and functional tests with cut-off values. Our main hypothesis is that the tailored treatment has better short, intermediate and long-term effects than either non-tailored treatment or treatment-as-usual (TAU) on pain and function. We sub-sequentially hypothesize that tailored and non-tailored treatment both have better effect than TAU. Methods/Design 120 working women with minimum six weeks of nonspecific neck-shoulder pain aged 20–65, are allocated by minimisation with the factors age, duration of pain, pain intensity and disability in to the groups tailored treatment (T), non-tailored treatment (NT) or treatment-as-usual (TAU). Treatment is given to the groups T and NT for 11 weeks (27 sessions evenly distributed). An extensive presentation of the tests and treatment decision model is provided. The main treatment components are manual therapy, cranio-cervical flexion exercise and strength training, EMG-biofeedback training, treatment for cervicogenic headache, neck motor control training. A decision algorithm based on the baseline assessment determines the treatment components given to each participant of T- and NT-groups. Primary outcome measures are physical functioning (Neck Disability Index) and average pain intensity last week (Numeric Rating Scale). Secondary outcomes are general improvement (Patient Global Impression of Change scale), symptoms (Profile Fitness Mapping neck questionnaire), capacity to work in the last 6 weeks (quality and quantity) and pressure pain threshold of m. trapezius. Primary and secondary outcomes will be reported for

  8. Standardization and optimization of CT protocols to achieve low dose.

    PubMed

    Trattner, Sigal; Pearson, Gregory D N; Chin, Cynthia; Cody, Dianna D; Gupta, Rajiv; Hess, Christopher P; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Kofler, James M; Krishnam, Mayil S; Einstein, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    The increase in radiation exposure due to CT scans has been of growing concern in recent years. CT scanners differ in their capabilities, and various indications require unique protocols, but there remains room for standardization and optimization. In this paper, the authors summarize approaches to reduce dose, as discussed in lectures constituting the first session of the 2013 UCSF Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety and Computed Tomography. The experience of scanning at low dose in different body regions, for both diagnostic and interventional CT procedures, is addressed. An essential primary step is justifying the medical need for each scan. General guiding principles for reducing dose include tailoring a scan to a patient, minimizing scan length, use of tube current modulation and minimizing tube current, minimizing tube potential, iterative reconstruction, and periodic review of CT studies. Organized efforts for standardization have been spearheaded by professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Finally, all team members should demonstrate an awareness of the importance of minimizing dose.

  9. Use of a standardized JaCVAM in vivo rat comet assay protocol to assess the genotoxicity of three coded test compounds; ampicillin trihydrate, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride, and N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), our laboratory examined ampicillin trihydrate (AMP), 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDA) using a standard comet assay validation protocol (v14.2) developed by the JaCVAM validation management team (VMT). Coded samples were received by our laboratory along with basic MSDS information. Solubility analysis and range-finding experiments of the coded test compounds were conducted for dose selection. Animal dosing schedules, the comet assay processing and analysis, and statistical analysis were conducted in accordance with the standard protocol. Based upon our blinded evaluation, AMP was not found to exhibit evidence of genotoxicity in either the rat liver or stomach. However, both NDA and DMH were observed to cause a significant increase in % tail DNA in the rat liver at all dose levels tested. While acute hepatoxicity was observed for these compounds in the high dose group, in the investigators opinion there were a sufficient number of consistently damaged/measurable cells at the medium and low dose groups to judge these compounds as genotoxic. There was no evidence of genotoxicity from either NDA or DMH in the rat stomach. In conclusion, our laboratory observed increased DNA damage from two blinded test compounds in rat liver (later identified as genotoxic carcinogens), while no evidence of genotoxicity was observed for the third blinded test compound (later identified as a non-genotoxic, non-carcinogen). This data supports the use of a standardized protocol of the in vivo comet assay as a cost-effective alternative genotoxicity assay for regulatory testing purposes.

  10. Development of a standardized sequential extraction protocol for simultaneous extraction of multiple actinide elements

    DOE PAGES

    Faye, Sherry A.; Richards, Jason M.; Gallardo, Athena M.; ...

    2017-02-07

    Sequential extraction is a useful technique for assessing the potential to leach actinides from soils; however, current literature lacks uniformity in experimental details, making direct comparison of results impossible. This work continued development toward a standardized five-step sequential extraction protocol by analyzing extraction behaviors of 232Th, 238U, 239,240Pu and 241Am from lake and ocean sediment reference materials. Results produced a standardized procedure after creating more defined reaction conditions to improve method repeatability. A NaOH fusion procedure is recommended following sequential leaching for the complete dissolution of insoluble species.

  11. Towards automatic diabetes case detection and ABCS protocol compliance assessment.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ninad K; Son, Roderick Y; Arnzen, James J

    2012-08-01

    According to the American Diabetes Association, the implementation of the standards of care for diabetes has been suboptimal in most clinical settings. Diabetes is a disease that had a total estimated cost of $174 billion in 2007 for an estimated diabetes-affected population of 17.5 million in the United States. With the advent of electronic medical records (EMR), tools to analyze data residing in the EMR for healthcare surveillance can help reduce the burdens experienced today. This study was primarily designed to evaluate the efficacy of employing clinical natural language processing to analyze discharge summaries for evidence indicating a presence of diabetes, as well as to assess diabetes protocol compliance and high risk factors. Three sets of algorithms were developed to analyze discharge summaries for: (1) identification of diabetes, (2) protocol compliance, and (3) identification of high risk factors. The algorithms utilize a common natural language processing framework that extracts relevant discourse evidence from the medical text. Evidence utilized in one or more of the algorithms include assertion of the disease and associated findings in medical text, as well as numerical clinical measurements and prescribed medications. The diabetes classifier was successful at classifying reports for the presence and absence of diabetes. Evaluated against 444 discharge summaries, the classifier's performance included macro and micro F-scores of 0.9698 and 0.9865, respectively. Furthermore, the protocol compliance and high risk factor classifiers showed promising results, with most F-measures exceeding 0.9. The presented approach accurately identified diabetes in medical discharge summaries and showed promise with regards to assessment of protocol compliance and high risk factors. Utilizing free-text analytic techniques on medical text can complement clinical-public health decision support by identifying cases and high risk factors.

  12. Hydrogen Hazards Assessment Protocol (HHAP): Approach and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the approach and methodology to develop a assessment protocol for hydrogen hazards. Included in the presentation are the reasons to perform hazards assessment, the types of hazard assessments that exist, an analysis of hydrogen hazards, specific information about the Hydrogen Hazards Assessment Protocol (HHAP). The assessment is specifically tailored for hydrogen behavior. The end product of the assesment is a compilation of hazard, mitigations and associated factors to facilitate decision making and achieve the best practice.

  13. Utilization of a standardized tracheostomy capping and decannulation protocol to improve patient safety.

    PubMed

    Pandian, Vinciya; Miller, Christina R; Schiavi, Adam J; Yarmus, Lonny; Contractor, Anisha; Haut, Elliott R; Feller-Kopman, David J; Mirski, Marek A; Morad, Athir H; Carey, John P; Hillel, Alexander T; Maragos, Carol S; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2014-08-01

    To develop and assess the feasibility of a new standardized protocol to guide tracheostomy decannulation. Descriptive review of quality improvement project. A quality improvement project was conducted in the inpatient setting of a tertiary urban academic hospital. Adult patients who had received a tracheostomy and for whom the indication for tracheostomy had resolved were included. A multidisciplinary task force reviewed input from clinicians caring for tracheostomy patients and developed a protocol for screening, capping, and decannulation. The primary outcome measured was successful decannulation. Fifty-seven patients were screened for a capping trial over a 12-month period; 54 were capped. Six patients were lost to follow-up. Fifty patients passed the capping trial, and all 50 were decannulated successfully. When decannulation was pursued in one patient who had twice failed the screening criteria and subsequent capping trials, the patient failed decannulation and ultimately required reintubation for the management of secretions. The screening tool had high sensitivity (90%) and positive predictive value (100%) for successful decannulation. Additionally, the number of reported patient safety concerns decreased from seven in the 6 months preceding implementation of the program to one report in the 6 months after implementation. The new tracheostomy capping and decannulation protocol assisted in predicting both successful and failed decannulation. Although several patients failed certain capping criteria initially, the protocol stipulated modifications of care that enabled successful decannulation. The screening tool had high sensitivity and promoted communication, standardization of practice, and patient safety. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Beyond communication: the role of standardized protocols in a changing health care environment.

    PubMed

    Vardaman, James M; Cornell, Paul; Gondo, Maria B; Amis, John M; Townsend-Gervis, Mary; Thetford, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Communication errors have grave consequences in health care settings. The situation-background-assessment-recommendation (SBAR) protocol has been theorized to improve communication by creating a common language between nurses and physicians in acute care situations. This practice is gaining acceptance across the health care field. However, as yet, there has been little investigation of the ways in which SBAR may have an impact on how health care professionals operate beyond the creation of a common language. The purposes of the study were to explore the implementation of the SBAR protocol and investigate the potential impact of SBAR on the day-to-day experiences of nurses. We performed a qualitative case study of 2 hospitals that were implementing the SBAR protocol. We collected data from 80 semistructured interviews with nurses, nurse manager, and physicians; observation of nursing and other hospital activities; and documents that pertained to the implementation of the SBAR protocol. Data were analyzed using a thematic approach. Our analysis revealed 4 dimensions of impact that SBAR has beyond its use as a communication tool: schema formation, development of legitimacy, development of social capital, and reinforcement of dominant logics. The results indicate that SBAR may function as more than a tool to standardize communication among nurses and physicians. Rather, the findings indicate that SBAR may aid in schema development that allows rapid decision making by nurses, provide social capital and legitimacy for less-tenured nurses, and reinforce a move toward standardization in the nursing profession. Our findings further suggest that standardized protocols such as SBAR may be a cost-effective method for hospital managers and administrators to accelerate the socialization of nurses, particularly new hires.

  15. Development of a standard documentation protocol for communicating exposure models.

    PubMed

    Ciffroy, P; Altenpohl, A; Fait, G; Fransman, W; Paini, A; Radovnikovic, A; Simon-Cornu, M; Suciu, N; Verdonck, F

    2016-10-15

    An important step in building a computational model is its documentation; a comprehensive and structured documentation can improve the model applicability and transparency in science/research and for regulatory purposes. This is particularly crucial and challenging for environmental and/or human exposure models that aim to establish quantitative relationships between personal exposure levels and their determinants. Exposure models simulate the transport and fate of a contaminant from the source to the receptor and may involve a large set of entities (e.g. all the media the contaminants may pass though). Such complex models are difficult to be described in a comprehensive, unambiguous and accessible way. Bad communication of assumptions, theory, structure and/or parameterization can lead to lack of confidence by the user and it may be source of errors. The goal of this paper is to propose a standard documentation protocol (SDP) for exposure models, i.e. a generic format and a standard structure by which all exposure models could be documented. For this purpose, a CEN (European Committee for Standardisation) workshop was set up with objective to agree on minimum requirements for the amount and type of information to be provided on exposure models documentation along with guidelines for the structure and presentation of the information. The resulting CEN workshop agreement (CWA) was expected to facilitate a more rigorous formulation of exposure models description and the understanding by users. This paper intends to describe the process followed for defining the SDP, the standardisation approach, as well as the main components of the SDP resulting from a wide consultation of interested stakeholders. The main outcome is a CEN CWA which establishes terms and definitions for exposure models and their elements, specifies minimum requirements for the amount and type of information to be documented, and proposes a structure for communicating the documentation to different

  16. Development of Standardized Material Testing Protocols for Prosthetic Liners.

    PubMed

    Cagle, John C; Reinhall, Per G; Hafner, Brian J; Sanders, Joan E

    2017-04-01

    A set of protocols was created to characterize prosthetic liners across six clinically relevant material properties. Properties included compressive elasticity, shear elasticity, tensile elasticity, volumetric elasticity, coefficient of friction (CoF), and thermal conductivity. Eighteen prosthetic liners representing the diverse range of commercial products were evaluated to create test procedures that maximized repeatability, minimized error, and provided clinically meaningful results. Shear and tensile elasticity test designs were augmented with finite element analysis (FEA) to optimize specimen geometries. Results showed that because of the wide range of available liner products, the compressive elasticity and tensile elasticity tests required two test maxima; samples were tested until they met either a strain-based or a stress-based maximum, whichever was reached first. The shear and tensile elasticity tests required that no cyclic conditioning be conducted because of limited endurance of the mounting adhesive with some liner materials. The coefficient of friction test was based on dynamic coefficient of friction, as it proved to be a more reliable measurement than static coefficient of friction. The volumetric elasticity test required that air be released beneath samples in the test chamber before testing. The thermal conductivity test best reflected the clinical environment when thermal grease was omitted and when liner samples were placed under pressure consistent with load bearing conditions. The developed procedures provide a standardized approach for evaluating liner products in the prosthetics industry. Test results can be used to improve clinical selection of liners for individual patients and guide development of new liner products.

  17. Whole Body Vibration Exercise Protocol versus a Standard Exercise Protocol after ACL Reconstruction: A Clinical Randomized Controlled Trial with Short Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Berschin, Gereon; Sommer, Björn; Behrens, Antje; Sommer, Hans-Martin

    2014-01-01

    The suitability and effectiveness of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise in rehabilitation after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was studied using a specially designed WBV protocol. We wanted to test the hypothesis if WBV leads to superior short term results regarding neuromuscular performance (strength and coordination) and would be less time consuming than a current standard muscle strengthening protocol. In this prospective randomized controlled clinical trial, forty patients who tore their ACL and underwent subsequent ligament reconstruction were enrolled. Patients were randomized to the whole body vibration (n=20) or standard rehabilitation exercise protocol (n=20). Both protocols started in the 2nd week after surgery. Isometric and isokinetic strength measurements, clinical assessment, Lysholm score, neuromuscular performance were conducted weeks 2, 5, 8 and 11 after surgery. Time spent for rehabilitation exercise was reduced to less than a half in the WBV group. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of clinical assessment, Lysholm score, isokinetic and isometric strength. The WBV group displayed significant better results in the stability test. In conclusion, preliminary data indicate that our whole body vibration muscle exercise protocol seems to be a good alternative to a standard exercise program in ACL-rehabilitation. Despite of its significant reduced time requirement it is at least equally effective compared to a standard rehabilitation protocol. Key points In this prospective randomized controlled clinical trial, we tested the hypothesis if WBV leads to superior short term results regarding neuromuscular performance (strength and coordination) and would be less time consuming than a current standard muscle strengthening protocol in forty patients who underwent ACL reconstruction. Time spent for rehabilitation exercise was reduced to less than a half in the WBV group as compared to the standard exercise group. Both

  18. A proposed protocol for remote control of automated assessment devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kissock, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    Systems and devices that are controlled remotely are becoming more common in security systems in the US Air Force and other government agencies to provide protection of valuable assets. These systems reduce the number of needed personnel while still providing a high level of protection. However, each remotely controlled device usually has its own communication protocol. This limits the ability to change devices without changing the system that provides the communications control to the device. Sandia is pursuing a standard protocol that can be used to communicate with the different devices currently in use, or may be used in the future, in the US Air Force and other government agencies throughout the security community. Devices to be controlled include intelligent pan/tilt mounts, day/night video cameras., thermal imaging cameras, and remote data processors. Important features of this protocol include the ability to send messages of varying length, identify the sender, and more importantly, control remote data processors. As camera and digital signal processor (DSP) use expands, the DSP will begin to reside in the camera itself. The DSP can be used to provide auto-focus, frame-to- frame image registration, video motion detection (VMD), target detection, tracking, image compression, and many other functions. With the serial data control link, the actual DSP software can be updated or changed as required. Coaxial video cables may become obsolete once a compression algorithm is established in the DSP. This paper describes the proposed public domain protocol, features, and examples of use. The authors hope to elicit comments from security technology developers regarding format and use of remotely controlled automated assessment devices. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Assessment of signs of anterior blepharitis using standardized color photographs.

    PubMed

    Bunya, Vatinee Y; Brainard, David H; Daniel, Ebenezer; Massaro-Giordano, Mina; Nyberg, William; Windsor, Elizabeth A; Pearson, Denise J; Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen G; Stone, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    To describe a standardized technique for acquiring and viewing photographic images of eyelids, assess the reproducibility and validity of a grading protocol for signs of anterior blepharitis, and to explore whether the signs depend on the eyelid or the area of the eyelid assessed. Subjects with anterior blepharitis ranging from none to severe were examined by ophthalmologists at clinical sites. Digital images of the eyelids of subjects were acquired using a protocol that allowed for the calibration of color and luminance. Three ophthalmologists at a centralized reading center applied a novel protocol for grading features of anterior blepharitis from the digital images viewed on color-calibrated monitors. The agreement among graders was assessed using percent agreement and weighted kappa statistics (Kw), and the correlation of photographic and clinical gradings was assessed using Spearman correlation coefficients. Agreement among graders was excellent (Kw > 0.80) on the number of eyelid margin vessels and was substantial (Kw between 0.61 and 0.80) for erythema, collarettes, number of engorged vessels, and number of lashes. Grading of the photographic images and the clinical assessments of erythema and lid debris were moderately correlated (r = 0.27-0.45). The grades for different features depended on whether the upper or lower eyelid, eyelid skin or lid margin, and central or lateral lid were assessed. The application of a protocol to obtain and display calibrated digital images of eyelids supports the standardized assessment of anterior blepharitis in clinical care and research studies.

  20. Assessment of Signs of Anterior Blepharitis Using Standardized Color Photographs

    PubMed Central

    Bunya, Vatinee Y.; Brainard, David H.; Daniel, Ebenezer; Massaro-Giordano, Mina; Nyberg, William; Windsor, Eliza; Pearson, Denise J.; Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen G.; Stone, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe a standardized technique for acquiring and viewing photographic images of eyelids, assess the reproducibility and validity of a grading protocol for signs of anterior blepharitis, and explore whether the signs depend on the eyelid or area of eyelid assessed. Methods Subjects with anterior blepharitis ranging from none to severe were examined by ophthalmologists at clinical sites. Digital images of the eyelids of subjects were acquired using a protocol that allowed calibration of color and luminance. Three ophthalmologists at a centralized reading center applied a novel protocol for grading features of anterior blepharitis from the digital images viewed on color-calibrated monitors. The agreement among graders was assessed with percent agreement and weighted kappa statistics (Kw), and the correlation of photographic and clinical gradings was assessed using Spearman correlation coefficients. Results Agreement among graders was excellent (Kw >0.80) on the number of eyelid margin vessels and was substantial (Kw between 0.61 and 0.80) for erythema, collarettes, number of engorged vessels, and number of lashes. Grading of photographic images and the clinical assessments of erythema and lid debris were moderately correlated (r =0.27 to 0.45). The grades for different features depended on whether the upper or lower eyelid, eyelid skin or lid margin, and central or lateral lid were assessed. Conclusions Application of a protocol to obtain and display calibrated digital images of eyelids supports standardized assessment of anterior blepharitis in clinical care and research studies. PMID:24055901

  1. Development and validation of a PulseNet standardized pulsed-field gel electrophoresis protocol for subtyping of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Cooper, K L F; Luey, C K Y; Bird, M; Terajima, J; Nair, G B; Kam, K M; Arakawa, E; Safa, A; Cheung, D T; Law, C P; Watanabe, H; Kubota, K; Swaminathan, B; Ribot, E M

    2006-01-01

    PulseNet is a network that utilizes standardized pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) protocols with the purpose of conducting laboratory-based surveillance of foodborne pathogens. PulseNet standardized PFGE protocols are subject to rigorous testing during the developmental phase and careful evaluation during a validation process assessing its robustness and reproducibility in different laboratories. Here we describe the development and validation of a rapid PFGE protocol for subtyping Vibrio cholerae for use in PulseNet International activities. While the protocol was derived from the existing PulseNet protocol for Escherichia coli O157, various aspects of this protocol were optimized for use with V. cholerae, most notably a change of the primary and secondary restriction enzyme to SfiI and NotI, respectively, and the use of a two-block electrophoresis program. External validation of this protocol was undertaken through a collaboration between three PulseNet Asia Pacific laboratories (Public Health Laboratory Centre, Hong Kong, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan, and International Center for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research-Bangladesh) and PulseNet USA. Comparison of PFGE patterns generated by each of the participating laboratories demonstrated that the protocol is robust and reproducible.

  2. Psychological assessment in XLMR: a proposal for setting international standards.

    PubMed

    Fisch, G S

    2000-01-01

    The need for an agreed upon set of standards for assessing individuals with XLMR was made quite evident this past year at the Fragile X and XLMR Workshop in Strasbourg. Several affected individuals from different families may have been incorrectly diagnosed as MR. Many factors can have a negative affect on IQ testing. As a result, evaluating individuals with cognitive deficits can be problematic. To be effective, psychological assessments must produce uniform results that are consistent with the definition of MR. Therefore, to foster international research in XLMR. I propose a two-stage standardized protocol. To determine which tests may be suitable. I review an assortment of instruments for psychological assessment at each stage, noting their strengths and weaknesses. Afterward, I present a set of standardized protocols based on age and language ability.

  3. Telemetry Transmission over Internet Protocol (TMoIP) Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Protocol ( IGMP ). The IGMP provides support mechanisms to support efficient transport of multicast traffic in IP networks (see Chapter 4). c. When...transport at network level, functions include routing Null layer IP IGMP Layer 2 - Data Link Data transfer between network entities, detect...Management Protocol ( IGMP ). Multicast addresses are identified by the pattern 񓑶" in the first four bits, which corresponds to a first octet of

  4. Developing and implementing computerized protocols for standardization of clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Morris, A H

    2000-03-07

    Humans have only a limited ability to incorporate information in decision making. In certain situations, the mismatch between this limitation and the availability of extensive information contributes to the varying performance and high error rate of clinical decision makers. Variation in clinical practice is due in part to clinicians' poor compliance with guidelines and recommended therapies. The use of decision-support tools is a response to both the information revolution and poor compliance. Computerized protocols used to deliver decision support can be configured to contain much more detail than textual guidelines or paper-based flow diagrams. Such protocols can generate patient-specific instructions for therapy that can be carried out with little interclinician variability; however, clinicians must be willing to modify personal styles of clinical management. Protocols need not be perfect. Several defensible and reasonable approaches are available for clinical problems. However, one of these reasonable approaches must be chosen and incorporated into the protocol to promote consistent clinical decisions. This reasoning is the basis of an explicit method of decision support that allows the rigorous evaluation of interventions, including use of the protocols themselves. Computerized protocols for mechanical ventilation and management of intravenous fluid and hemodynamic factors in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome provide case studies for this discussion.

  5. Why standard brain-computer interface (BCI) training protocols should be changed: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeunet, Camille; Jahanpour, Emilie; Lotte, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Objective. While promising, electroencephaloraphy based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are barely used due to their lack of reliability: 15% to 30% of users are unable to control a BCI. Standard training protocols may be partly responsible as they do not satisfy recommendations from psychology. Our main objective was to determine in practice to what extent standard training protocols impact users’ motor imagery based BCI (MI-BCI) control performance. Approach. We performed two experiments. The first consisted in evaluating the efficiency of a standard BCI training protocol for the acquisition of non-BCI related skills in a BCI-free context, which enabled us to rule out the possible impact of BCIs on the training outcome. Thus, participants (N = 54) were asked to perform simple motor tasks. The second experiment was aimed at measuring the correlations between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. The ten best and ten worst performers of the first study were recruited for an MI-BCI experiment during which they had to learn to perform two MI tasks. We also assessed users’ spatial ability and pre-training μ rhythm amplitude, as both have been related to MI-BCI performance in the literature. Main results. Around 17% of the participants were unable to learn to perform the motor tasks, which is close to the BCI illiteracy rate. This suggests that standard training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching. No correlation was found between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. However, spatial ability played an important role in MI-BCI performance. In addition, once the spatial ability covariable had been controlled for, using an ANCOVA, it appeared that participants who faced difficulty during the first experiment improved during the second while the others did not. Significance. These studies suggest that (1) standard MI-BCI training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching, (2) spatial ability is confirmed as impacting on MI-BCI performance, and (3) when faced

  6. Standard Hydrogen Test Protocols for the NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This brochure summarizes the test protocols used in the NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Laboratory for the quantitative assessment of critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Researchers at the NREL Hydrogen Safety Sensor Test Laboratory developed a variety of test protocols to quantitatively assess critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Many are similar to, but typically more rigorous than, the test procedures mandated by ISO Standard 26142 (Hydrogen Detector for Stationary Applications). Specific protocols were developed for linear range, short-term stability, and the impact of fluctuations in temperature (T), pressure (P), relative humidity (RH), and chemical environment. Specialized tests (e.g., oxygen requirement) may also be performed. Hydrogen safety sensors selected for evaluation are subjected to a thorough regimen of test protocols, as described. Sensor testing is performed at NREL on custom-built sensor test fixtures. Environmental parameters such as T, P, RH, and gas composition are rigorously controlled and monitored. The NREL evaluations are performed on commercial hydrogen detectors, on emerging sensing technologies, and for end users to validate sensor performance for specific application needs. Test results and data are shared with the manufacturer or client via summary reports, teleconference phone calls, and, when appropriate, site visits to manufacturer facilities. Client representatives may also monitor NREL's operation while their technologies are being tested. Manufacturers may use test data to illustrate the analytical capability of their technologies and, more importantly, to guide future developments. NREL uses the data to assess technology gaps and deployment considerations. Per NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory policy, test results are treated as proprietary and are not shared with other manufacturers or other entities without permission. The data may be used by NREL in open publications

  7. Standardizing Quality Assessment of Fused Remotely Sensed Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, C.; Moellmann, J.; Fries, K.

    2017-09-01

    The multitude of available operational remote sensing satellites led to the development of many image fusion techniques to provide high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution images. The comparison of different techniques is necessary to obtain an optimized image for the different applications of remote sensing. There are two approaches in assessing image quality: 1. Quantitatively by visual interpretation and 2. Quantitatively using image quality indices. However an objective comparison is difficult due to the fact that a visual assessment is always subject and a quantitative assessment is done by different criteria. Depending on the criteria and indices the result varies. Therefore it is necessary to standardize both processes (qualitative and quantitative assessment) in order to allow an objective image fusion quality evaluation. Various studies have been conducted at the University of Osnabrueck (UOS) to establish a standardized process to objectively compare fused image quality. First established image fusion quality assessment protocols, i.e. Quality with No Reference (QNR) and Khan's protocol, were compared on varies fusion experiments. Second the process of visual quality assessment was structured and standardized with the aim to provide an evaluation protocol. This manuscript reports on the results of the comparison and provides recommendations for future research.

  8. Observer Use of Standardized Observation Protocols in Consequential Observation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Courtney A.; Yi, Qi; Jones, Nathan D.; Lewis, Jennifer M.; McLeod, Monica; Liu, Shuangshuang

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from a handful of large-scale studies suggests that although observers can be trained to score reliably using observation protocols, there are concerns related to initial training and calibration activities designed to keep observers scoring accurately over time (e.g., Bell, et al, 2012; BMGF, 2012). Studies offer little insight into how…

  9. Testing warning messages on smokers’ cigarette packages: A standardized protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Noel T.; Hall, Marissa G.; Lee, Joseph G. L.; Peebles, Kathryn; Noar, Seth M.; Ribisl, Kurt M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Lab experiments on cigarette warnings typically use a brief one-time exposure that is not paired with the cigarette packs smokers use every day, leaving open the question of how repeated warning exposure over several weeks may affect smokers. This proof of principle study sought to develop a new protocol for testing cigarette warnings that better reflects real-world exposure by presenting them on cigarette smokers’ own packs. Methods We tested a cigarette pack labeling protocol with 76 US smokers ages 18 and older. We applied graphic warnings to the front and back of smokers’ cigarette packs. Results Most smokers reported that at least 75% of the packs of cigarettes they smoked during the study had our warnings. Nearly all said they would participate in the study again. Using cigarette packs with the study warnings increased quit intentions (p<.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest a feasible pack labeling protocol with six steps: (1) schedule appointments at brief intervals; (2) determine typical cigarette consumption; (3) ask smokers to bring a supply of cigarette packs to study appointments; (4) apply labels to smokers’ cigarette packs; (5) provide participation incentives at the end of appointments; and (6) refer smokers to cessation services at end of the study. When used in randomized controlled trials in settings with real-world message exposure over time, this protocol may help identify the true impact of warnings and thus better inform tobacco product labeling policy. PMID:25564282

  10. Standardizing germination protocols for diverse raspberry and blackberry species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most Rubus species exhibit delayed or poor germination because of a deep double dormancy. The objective of this study was to improve Rubus seed germination protocols by defining the seed characteristics of diverse Rubus species and determining scarification and germination requirements. Seeds of fie...

  11. Protocol for cardiac assessment of recreational athletes.

    PubMed

    Chinea, Ana M; Lollett, Carlos; Herrera, Hector; Passariello, Gianfranco; Wong, Sara

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the development of a database on physical fitness is presented. As initial population to fill this database, people who practice recreational sports at the Universidad Simon Bolivar (USB) were chosen. The goal was studying individual physical fitness in order to structure exercise routines that gives certain benefits without risking the individual health, promoting a less sedentary way of life. Before the study, a low-cost noninvasive protocol was designed to determine the level of physical fitness. The methodology consisted of four steps: a) A review of existing protocols to propose a set of physical fitness (International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)), cardiovascular (heart rate variability, heart rate recovery time and arterial blood pressure), anthropomorphic, aerobic (maximum oxygen consumption) and mood state (Profile of Mood State (POMS)) measurements, which allow sketching a complete profile on the sportsman physical fitness. b) Instrumental data collection. c) Electrocardiographic signal processing. d) Data post-processing using multivariate analysis. The database was composed of 26 subject from USB. Ten subjects were soccer players, ten were mountain climbers and six were sedentary people. Results showed that the heart rate recover time after 2-3 min, IPAQ and maximum oxygen consumption have higher weights for classifying individuals according to their habitual physical activity. Heart rate variability, as well as, POMS did not contribute greatly for discriminating recreational sport from sedentary persons.

  12. Thermal cycling for restorative materials: does a standardized protocol exist in laboratory testing? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Morresi, Anna Lucia; D'Amario, Maurizio; Capogreco, Mario; Gatto, Roberto; Marzo, Giuseppe; D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Monaco, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    In vitro tests continue to be an indispensable method for the initial screening of dental materials. Thermal cycling is one of the most widely used procedures to simulate the physiological aging experienced by biomaterials in clinical practice. Consequently it is routinely employed in experimental studies to evaluate materials' performance. A literature review aimed to elucidate test parameters for in vitro aging of adhesive restorations was performed. This study aims to assess whether or not a standardized protocol of thermal cycling has been acknowledged from a review of the literature. An exhaustive literature search, examining the effect of thermal cycling on restorative dental materials, was performed with electronic database and by hand. The search was restricted to studies published from 1998 to August 2013. No language restrictions were applied. The search identified 193 relevant experimental studies. Only twenty-three studies had faithfully applied ISO standard. The majority of studies used their own procedures, showing only a certain consistency within the temperature parameter (5-55°C) and a great variability in the number of cycles and dwell time chosen. A wide variation in thermal cycling parameters applied in experimental studies has been identified. The parameters selected amongst these studies seem to be done on the basis of convenience for the authors in most cases. A comparison of results between studies would appear to be impossible. The available data suggest that further investigations will be required to ultimately develop a standardized thermal cycling protocol.

  13. Standards and Assessment. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter includes three articles, two of which focus on standards for student evaluation and for admission to higher education. "A Measuring Stick for Standards and TEKS: Meeting the Needs of Second Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green, Adela Solis) examines beliefs embodied in the notion of standards; defines content,…

  14. [Neonatal circumcision with local anesthesia. Results of a standardized protocol].

    PubMed

    Ovalle, Alejandra; López, Pedro-Jose; Guelfand, Miguel; Zubieta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal circumcision is a common procedure in the US and other countries, with low rates of complications in trained hands. However, it has recently been incorporated into the clinical environment in Chile. Our goal was to establish a local standardised protocol for neonatal circumcision under local anaesthesia, and evaluate the results and possible complications. A standardised prospective protocol was used on patients who underwent neonatal circumcision. The inclusion criteria were: children <60days and <5kg. The surgical technique used was topical local anaesthesia and penile block, attrition of redundant prepuce and mucosa with Mogen® clamp, and section with scalpel. The protocol was used and evaluated from November 2005 to October 2014 by a paediatric surgeon and/or paediatric urologist trained in the technique. Complications and conditions until final discharge were analysed. The protocol was applied to 108 patients over a 9year period. The mean age at procedure was 9days (1-52). One patient (0.9%) had immediate bleeding, requiring further surgery. All patients were discharged from further medical checks at 1 month, without any other complications. The reason for the procedure was by parental request in 100% of the cases, and always for sociocultural reasons. Neonatal circumcision under local anaesthesia is a simple procedure, and has excellent results in selected patients, and with no major complications. With proper training, and adapting the initial protocol, it can be performed on an outpatient basis, without putting the neonates through the risks of general anaesthesia. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Gradient shimming during magnetic resonance imaging of the liver: comparison of a standard protocol versus a novel reduced protocol.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Mustafa R; Dale, Brian M; Gupta, Rajan T; Horvath, Jeffrey J; Boll, Daniel T; Merkle, Elmar M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of minimizing prescan adjustments on table time and image quality in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. This prospective Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained. Ten volunteers were imaged twice using a noncontrast liver MRI protocol consisting of a total of 10 pulse sequences, once with a standard protocol and once with a fixed table position/minimized prescan adjustment protocol (in random order). Total examination time was evaluated according to a Lean Six Sigma framework. Quantitative sequences, including diffusion-weighted imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient, multi-echo Dixon fat percentage, and the transverse relaxation time, were evaluated and compared between the two protocols. Two experienced readers, blinded to the protocol used, compared image quality between the two protocols. The average number of prescan adjustment steps per examination was reduced from 58.0 to 22.1 using the minimal shimming protocol compared with the normal shimming protocol (P < 0.001). Mean business value added time (scan preparatory time) was reduced by 58% (3 minutes 3 seconds vs 7 minutes 13 seconds), whereas mean total examination time was 20% lower (18 minutes 13 seconds vs 22 minutes 48 seconds, P < 0.001). Quantitative measures obtained using the two protocols were equivalent, and neither reader detected a significant difference in subjective image quality. Fixing table position minimizes prescan adjustments and reduces total table time in liver MRI without adversely affecting image quality.

  16. OCONUS Compliance Assessment Protocols Air Force Supplement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    quality standards for any of the fol- lowing parameters within the last 12 months? a) total coliforms? b) inorganic chemicals? c) fluoride...storage, and disposal facility UFC Unified Facilities Criteria ULV ultra- low volume UPC Uniform Plumbing Code USACERL U.S. Army Construction...fol- lowing goals are established in the memorandum: 1. Manage air pollutant emissions to protect public health, meet clean air standards, and

  17. Comparison of a standard and a detailed postmortem protocol for detecting Mycobacterium bovis in badgers.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, T R; Griffiths, I B; Clifton-Hadley, R S

    2008-10-18

    A standard postmortem protocol, consisting of gross pathology, culture for mycobacteria and limited selective histopathology, was used in the randomised badger culling trial in Great Britain to detect Mycobacterium bovis infection. This standard protocol was compared with a more detailed protocol in which more tissues were examined grossly, more tissues were cultured, more culture slopes were seeded, the culture period was extended and tissues were examined routinely by histopathology. The standard protocol was more sensitive in badgers with gross visible lesions than in badgers with no gross visible lesions. When applied to the study population of badgers, the overall sensitivity of the standard protocol relative to the more detailed protocol was estimated to be 54.6 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval 44.9 to 69.8 per cent). Badgers with tuberculosis (tb) detected by the standard protocol had a mean of 7.6 tissues with microscopic lesions suspicious of tb. The additional badgers detected by the detailed protocol had a mean of 4.4 tissues with microscopic lesions suspicious of tb.

  18. A Standard Mutual Authentication Protocol for Cloud Computing Based Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Prerna; Amin, Ruhul; Karati, Arijit; Biswas, G P; Khan, Muhammad Khurram

    2017-04-01

    Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) supports a standard platform to the patient for getting necessary medical treatment from the doctor(s) via Internet communication. Security protection is important for medical records (data) of the patients because of very sensitive information. Besides, patient anonymity is another most important property, which must be protected. Most recently, Chiou et al. suggested an authentication protocol for TMIS by utilizing the concept of cloud environment. They claimed that their protocol is patient anonymous and well security protected. We reviewed their protocol and found that it is completely insecure against patient anonymity. Further, the same protocol is not protected against mobile device stolen attack. In order to improve security level and complexity, we design a light weight authentication protocol for the same environment. Our security analysis ensures resilience of all possible security attacks. The performance of our protocol is relatively standard in comparison with the related previous research.

  19. Covert video surveillance--an assessment of the Staffordshire protocol.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, T

    1996-01-01

    An assessment of a protocol devised to guide practitioners thinking of using covert video surveillance. Such surveillance is particularly used to help identify cases of Munchausen's syndrome by proxy. The protocol in question has been written by staff at the Academic Department of Paediatrics, North Staffordshire Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent in association with their local Area Child Protection Committee and has been commended by the Department of Health to others wishing to implement covert video surveillance. PMID:8932721

  20. Assessing impacts of roads: Application of a standard assessment protocol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adaptive management of road networks depends on timely data that accurately reflect the impacts of network impacts on ecosystem processes and associated services. In the absence of reliable data, land managers are left with little more than observations and perceptions to support adaptive management...

  1. EPA Traceability Protocol for Assay and Certification of Gaseous Calibration Standards (2012 Revision)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, revised its 1993 version of its traceability protocol for the assay and certification of compressed gas and permeation-device calibration standards. The protocol allows producers o...

  2. EPA Traceability Protocol for Assay and Certification of Gaseous Calibration Standards (2012 Revision)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, revised its 1993 version of its traceability protocol for the assay and certification of compressed gas and permeation-device calibration standards. The protocol allows producers o...

  3. 45 CFR 155.270 - Use of standards and protocols for electronic transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of standards and protocols for electronic transactions. 155.270 Section 155.270 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EXCHANGE ESTABLISHMENT STANDARDS AND OTHER RELATED STANDARDS UNDER...

  4. Document Ordering Standards: The ILL Protocol and Z39.50 Item Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Fay

    1995-01-01

    Describes two standards used to facilitate the interlibrary loan (ILL) and document delivery process in libraries: ANSI (American National Standards Institute) Z39.50, and the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) Interlibrary Loan Protocol; considers the advantages and disadvantages of each; and provides a model for their use in a…

  5. Clinical validation protocols for noninvasive blood pressure monitors and their recognition by regulatory authorities and professional organizations: rationale and considerations for a single unified protocol or standard.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kim-Gau

    2013-10-01

    Standardized protocols for validating the clinical accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitors have been available since 1987. Some of them were developed by standards bodies and others by professional organizations. They have been well-tested through use and progressively improved through multiple revisions; however, many methodological differences exist between them. In addition, for the purpose of regulatory approval or marketing clearance, some protocols are recognized in some countries but not in others; thus, manufacturers have to validate their NIBP monitors to more than one protocol in order to market them worldwide. The use of different protocols not only makes it difficult to compare one device with another but also complicates the validation, regulatory approval, marketing, and public acceptance of NIBP monitors, creating undue burden on manufacturers and unnecessary confusion among users. There is a need for protocol developers, standards bodies, and regulatory authorities to work together to develop and agree on a single unified protocol or standard, one that builds on the strengths of the various protocols that have been developed so far. It is apparent that there is already a trend toward convergence of the various protocols into two protocols, namely, the ISO 81060-2:2009 standard and the 2010 European Society of Hypertension International Protocol. With further reconciliation and consensus, it should be possible to integrate the best features of the ISO, European Society of Hypertension, and other protocols, along with further improvements, into a single unified protocol or standard.

  6. Serial link protocol design: a critique of the X. 25 standard, Level 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.G.

    1983-10-25

    There are certain technical design principles for link communication protocols which, if followed, result in a protocol that is less complex in both concept and implementation, but at the same time provides better service, than if the principles are not followed. These principles include modularization into subprotocols, symmetry between the nodes on the link, and use of the state-exchange model of a conversation rather than the command-response model. The principles are described, the extent to which they are followed by the standard protocol X.25, level 2, is examined, and a protocol adhering to them is presented.

  7. A monitoring protocol to assess tidal restoration of salt marshes on local and regional scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neckles, H.A.; Dionne, M.D.; Burdick, D.M.; Roman, C.T.; Buchsbaum, R.; Hutchins, E.

    2002-01-01

    Assessing the response of salt marshes to tidal restoration relies on comparisons of ecosystem attributes between restored and reference marshes. Although this approach provides an objective basis for judging project success, inferences can be constrained if the high variability of natural marshes masks differences in sampled attributes between restored and reference sites. Furthermore, such assessments are usually focused on a small number of restoration projects in a local area, limiting the ability to address questions regarding the effectiveness of restoration within a broad region. We developed a hierarchical approach to evaluate the performance of tidal restorations at local and regional scales throughout the Gulf of Maine. The cornerstone of the approach is a standard protocol for monitoring restored and reference salt marshes throughout the region. The monitoring protocol was developed by consensus among nearly 50 restoration scientists and practitioners. The protocol is based on a suite of core structural measures that can be applied to any tidal restoration project. The protocol also includes additional functional measures for application to specific projects. Consistent use of the standard protocol to monitor local projects will enable pooling information for regional assessments. Ultimately, it will be possible to establish a range of reference conditions characterizing natural tidal wetlands in the region and to compare performance curves between populations of restored and reference marshes for assessing regional restoration effectiveness.

  8. Low-dose versus standard-dose CT protocol in patients with clinically suspected renal colic.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Schmidlin, Franz R; Iselin, Christophe E; Becker, Christoph D

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare a low-dose abdominal CT protocol, delivering a dose of radiation close to the dose delivered by abdominal radiography, with standard-dose unenhanced CT in patients with suspected renal colic. One hundred twenty-five patients (87 men, 38 women; mean age, 45 years) who were admitted with suspected renal colic underwent both abdominal low-dose CT (30 mAs) and standard-dose CT (180 mAs). Low-dose CT and standard-dose CT were independently reviewed, in a delayed fashion, by two radiologists for the characterization of renal and ureteral calculi (location, size) and for indirect signs of renal colic (renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation, periureteral or renal stranding). Results reported for low-dose CT, with regard to the patients' body mass indexes (BMIs), were compared with those obtained with standard-dose CT (reference standard). The presence of non-urinary tract-related disorders was also assessed. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. In patients with a BMI < 30, low-dose CT achieved 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the detection of indirect signs of renal colic and a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 97% for detecting ureteral calculi. In patients with a BMI < 30, low-dose CT was 86% sensitive for detecting ureteral calculi < 3 mm and 100% sensitive for detecting calculi > 3 mm. Low-dose CT was 100% sensitive and specific for depicting non-urinary tract-related disorders (n = 6). Low-dose CT achieves sensitivities and specificities close to those of standard-dose CT in assessing the diagnosis of renal colic, depicting ureteral calculi > 3 mm in patients with a BMI < 30, and correctly identifying alternative diagnoses.

  9. Protocols for conducting Environmental Management Assessments of DOE organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    To assess the effectiveness of DOE`s environmental programs, the Office of Environmental Audit conducts Environmental Management Assessments of DOE programs and facilities. These assessments take a broad programmatic view of environmental systems which may cover multiple sites. The focus of the assessment is on the infrastructure, systems, programs, and tools to manage environmental issues, not on the compliance issues themselves. Protocols have been developed to assist in the conduct of Environmental Management Assessments. The protocols are, based on and serve as implementing guidelines for the Environmental Management Section of ``Performance Objectives and Criteria for Conducting DOE Environmental Audits`` (DOE/EH-022). They are intended to provide guidance to the Assessment Team in conducting these reviews.

  10. Low dose chest CT protocol (50 mAs) as a routine protocol for comprehensive assessment of intrathoracic abnormality.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishino, Mizuki; Lin, Pei-Jan; Gautam, Shiva; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic capability of low-dose CT (50 mAs) in comparison to standard-dose CT (150 mAs). Fifty-nine consecutive patients underwent two non-contrast chest CT scans with different current-time products (50 and 150 mAs at 120 kVp) on a 64-detector row CT scanner. Three board certified chest radiologists independently reviewed 118 series of 2 mm-thick images (2 series for each of 59 patients) in a random order. The readers assessed abnormal findings including emphysema, ground-glass opacity, reticular opacity, micronodules, bronchiectasis, honeycomb, nodules (>5 mm), aortic aneurysm, coronary artery calcification, pericardial and pleural effusion, pleural thickening, mediastinal tumor and lymph node enlargement. Five-point scale from 1 (definitely absent) to 5 (definitely present) was used to record the results. The rates of score agreement between two images were calculated. Deviation of one observer's score from other two observers was compared between low dose CT and standard dose CT. Mean agreement rate of the lung parenchymal findings between low dose CT and standard dose CT images was 0.836 (range, 0.746-0.926). Mean agreement rates for mediastinal and pleural findings were 0.920 (range, 0.735-1.000). There was no statistically significant difference in the deviation of the observers' scores between low-dose CT and standard-dose CT. Low dose CT protocol at 50 mAs can produce the screening results consistent with standard dose CT protocol (150 mAs), supporting routine use of low dose chest CT protocol.

  11. Harmonization of international risk assessment protocol.

    PubMed

    Toyofuku, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    For over centuries developments in food production and new food safety management systems in most developed countries have been perceived by many to be efficient in the prevention of food-borne disease. Nevertheless a number of problems remain dominant, one of these being the high level of food-borne microbiological disease which seems, for some pathogens, to have increased over the last decades. The development of an interdisciplinary approach with direct interaction between surveillance and risk analysis systems is described as a potential basis for improved prevention of food-borne disease. Quantitative microbiological risk assessment is a relatively new scientific approach, able to link data from food within the entire food chain and the various data on human disease to provide a clear estimation of risk. Today food safety is one of the WHOs top eleven priorities; the Organization calls for more systematic and aggressive steps to be taken to reduce significantly the risk of microbiological food-borne diseases. Dealing with this challenge is one of the major challenges for the 21st century in regard to food safety, implying a significant re-direction of food microbiology efforts in many parts of the world.

  12. Standard Care versus Protocol Based Therapy for New Onset Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Treggiari, Miriam M.; Konstan, Michael W.; Retsch-Bogart, George; Morgan, Wayne; Wagener, Jeff; Gibson, Ronald L.; Khan, Umer; Emerson, Julia; Thompson, Valeria; Elkin, Eric P.; Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The Early Pseudomonal Infection Control (EPIC) randomized trial rigorously evaluated the efficacy of different antibiotic regimens for eradication of newly identified Pseudomonas (Pa) in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Protocol based therapy in the trial was provided based on culture positivity independent of symptoms. It is unclear whether outcomes observed in the clinical trial were different than those that would have been observed with historical standard of care driven more heavily by respiratory symptoms than culture positivity alone. We hypothesized that the incidence of Pa recurrence and hospitalizations would be significantly reduced among trial participants as compared to historical controls whose standard of care preceded the widespread adoption of tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS) as initial eradication therapy at the time of new isolation of Pa. Methods Eligibility criteria from the trial were used to derive historical controls from the Epidemiologic Study of CF (ESCF) who received standard of care treatment from 1995 to 1998, before widespread availability of TIS. Pa recurrence and hospitalization outcomes were assessed over a 15-month time period. Results As compared to 100% of the 304 trial participants, only 296/608 (49%) historical controls received antibiotics within an average of 20 weeks after new onset Pa. Pa recurrence occurred among 104/298 (35%) of the trial participants as compared to 295/549 (54%) of historical controls (19% difference, 95% CI: 12%, 26%, p<0.001). No significant differences in the incidence of hospitalization were observed between cohorts. Conclusions Protocol-based antimicrobial therapy for newly acquired Pa resulted in a lower rate of Pa recurrence but comparable hospitalization rates as compared to a historical control cohort less aggressively treated with antibiotics for new onset Pa. PMID:23818295

  13. Standard care versus protocol based therapy for new onset Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Treggiari, Miriam M; Konstan, Michael W; Retsch-Bogart, George; Morgan, Wayne; Wagener, Jeff; Gibson, Ronald L; Khan, Umer; Emerson, Julia; Thompson, Valeria; Elkin, Eric P; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2013-10-01

    The Early Pseudomonal Infection Control (EPIC) randomized trial rigorously evaluated the efficacy of different antibiotic regimens for eradication of newly identified Pseudomonas (Pa) in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Protocol based therapy in the trial was provided based on culture positivity independent of symptoms. It is unclear whether outcomes observed in the clinical trial were different than those that would have been observed with historical standard of care driven more heavily by respiratory symptoms than culture positivity alone. We hypothesized that the incidence of Pa recurrence and hospitalizations would be significantly reduced among trial participants as compared to historical controls whose standard of care preceded the widespread adoption of tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS) as initial eradication therapy at the time of new isolation of Pa. Eligibility criteria from the trial were used to derive historical controls from the Epidemiologic Study of CF (ESCF) who received standard of care treatment from 1995 to 1998, before widespread availability of TIS. Pa recurrence and hospitalization outcomes were assessed over a 15-month time period. As compared to 100% of the 304 trial participants, only 296/608 (49%) historical controls received antibiotics within an average of 20 weeks after new onset Pa. Pa recurrence occurred among 104/298 (35%) of the trial participants as compared to 295/549 (54%) of historical controls (19% difference, 95% CI: 12%, 26%, P < 0.001). No significant differences in the incidence of hospitalization were observed between cohorts. Protocol-based antimicrobial therapy for newly acquired Pa resulted in a lower rate of Pa recurrence but comparable hospitalization rates as compared to a historical control cohort less aggressively treated with antibiotics for new onset Pa. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Standards-Based Assessment for Principal Interns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koonce, Glenn; Causey, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The Framework for School Leaders, an architecture derived from the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) Standards, is utilized in the design of the Principal Internship Mentor's Assessment (PIMA). PIMA outcomes are reported for average scores for each standard and investigated as a measure of ISLLC Standards achievement and for…

  15. Using the CAS Standards in Assessment Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the use of professional standards of practice in assessment and of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS). It outlines a model for conducting program self-studies and discusses the importance of implementing change based on assessment results.

  16. Using the CAS Standards in Assessment Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the use of professional standards of practice in assessment and of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS). It outlines a model for conducting program self-studies and discusses the importance of implementing change based on assessment results.

  17. Utstein-style audit of Protocol C: a non-standard resuscitation protocol for healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, David; Chamberlain, Douglas; Handley, Anthony; Woollard, Malcolm; Pateman, Jane; Nela, Svetlana; Bryant, Geoffrey

    2011-10-01

    International guidelines for basic life support and defibrillation are identical for lay people and healthcare professionals. In 2002, a small meeting hosted by the Resuscitation Council (UK) debated recent advances in resuscitation science, along with the possibility of more demanding procedures for treating out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) that could take advantage of the expertise available with professional use. The resulting algorithm known as Protocol C could not be tested in a randomized trial for reasons relating to consent, but was introduced by one ambulance service as an observational study. Results from a 2-year period from one city within the service area are presented, using the Utstein style of reporting to show the recommended 'comparator' group whilst also providing epidemiological data on the frequency of cardiac arrest within the community and the outcome of all resuscitation attempts. Manual methods were used to collect data from 2009 and 2010 for cases of cardiac arrest treated by crews from the two ambulance stations within the city of Brighton and Hove. All transported patients were tracked individually through the hospital because no official method of data linkage is available. Outcome data were obtained for survival to hospital discharge, or to 30 days for the few who remained in hospital care for that duration. In the epidemiological analysis, 454 patients with OHCA were treated over 2 years, of whom 151 (33%) had sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) at hospital handover and 59 (13%) survived to discharge or for 30 days. Within the 'comparator' group of 79 patients, 47 (59%) achieved sustained ROSC to hospital handover and 24 (30%) survived. The use of Protocol C has been associated with rates of sustained ROSC to hospital and of survival to discharge that have reached the range of international best practice. The improvement noted in this observational study cannot be ascribed to the new protocol alone; any wider use

  18. The Vocational Assessment Protocol. User's Manual [and] Profiles. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Dale F.

    This packet contains the user's manual and profile sheets for the Vocational Assessment Protocol (VAP), a functional skills profile of vocational-related factors intended for use in the vocational rehabilitation of persons who have acquired a traumatic brain injury. The VAP consists of nine structured rating instruments and a structural summary…

  19. Inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage using a standard comet assay protocol.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Ersson, Clara; Loft, Steffen; Möller, Lennart; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik J; Jones, George D D; Higgins, Jennifer A; Cooke, Marcus; Mistry, Vilas; Karbaschi, Mahsa; Collins, Andrew R; Azqueta, Amaya; Phillips, David H; Sozeri, Osman; Routledge, Michael N; Nelson-Smith, Kirsty; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa; Matullo, Giuseppe; Allione, Alessandra; Stępnik, Maciej; Steepnik, Maciej; Komorowska, Magdalena; Teixeira, João Paulo; Costa, Solange; Corcuera, Laura-Ana; López de Cerain, Adela; Laffon, Blanca; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Møller, Peter

    2012-11-01

    There are substantial inter-laboratory variations in the levels of DNA damage measured by the comet assay. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adherence to a standard comet assay protocol would reduce inter-laboratory variation in reported values of DNA damage. Fourteen laboratories determined the baseline level of DNA strand breaks (SBs)/alkaline labile sites and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites in coded samples of mononuclear blood cells (MNBCs) from healthy volunteers. There were technical problems in seven laboratories in adopting the standard protocol, which were not related to the level of experience. Therefore, the inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage was only analysed using the results from laboratories that had obtained complete data with the standard comet assay protocol. This analysis showed that the differences between reported levels of DNA SBs/alkaline labile sites in MNBCs were not reduced by applying the standard assay protocol as compared with the laboratory's own protocol. There was large inter-laboratory variation in FPG-sensitive sites by the laboratory-specific protocol and the variation was reduced when the samples were analysed by the standard protocol. The SBs and FPG-sensitive sites were measured in the same experiment, indicating that the large spread in the latter lesions was the main reason for the reduced inter-laboratory variation. However, it remains worrying that half of the participating laboratories obtained poor results using the standard procedure. This study indicates that future comet assay validation trials should take steps to evaluate the implementation of standard procedures in participating laboratories.

  20. A standardized sampling protocol for channel catfish in prairie streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vokoun, Jason C.; Rabeni, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    Three alternative gears—an AC electrofishing raft, bankpoles, and a 15-hoop-net set—were used in a standardized manner to sample channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus in three prairie streams of varying size in three seasons. We compared these gears as to time required per sample, size selectivity, mean catch per unit effort (CPUE) among months, mean CPUE within months, effect of fluctuating stream stage, and sensitivity to population size. According to these comparisons, the 15-hoop-net set used during stable water levels in October had the most desirable characteristics. Using our catch data, we estimated the precision of CPUE and size structure by varying sample sizes for the 15-hoop-net set. We recommend that 11–15 repetitions of the 15-hoop-net set be used for most management activities. This standardized basic unit of effort will increase the precision of estimates and allow better comparisons among samples as well as increased confidence in management decisions.

  1. Standardized cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) protocols, society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance: board of trustees task force on standardized protocols

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M; Barkhausen, Jorg; Flamm, Scott D; Kim, Raymond J; Nagel, Eike

    2008-01-01

    Index 1. General techniques 1.1. Stress and safety equipment 1.2. Left ventricular (LV) structure and function module 1.3. Right ventricular (RV) structure and function module 1.4. Gadolinium dosing module. 1.5. First pass perfusion 1.6. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) 2. Disease specific protocols 2.1. Ischemic heart disease 2.1.1. Acute myocardial infarction (MI) 2.1.2. Chronic ischemic heart disease and viability 2.1.3. Dobutamine stress 2.1.4. Adenosine stress perfusion 2.2. Angiography: 2.2.1. Peripheral magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) 2.2.2. Thoracic MRA 2.2.3. Anomalous coronary arteries 2.2.4. Pulmonary vein evaluation 2.3. Other 2.3.1. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathy 2.3.2. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) 2.3.3. Congenital heart disease 2.3.4. Valvular heart disease 2.3.5. Pericardial disease 2.3.6. Masses PMID:18605997

  2. Quantitative Assessment of In-solution Digestion Efficiency Identifies Optimal Protocols for Unbiased Protein Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    León, Ileana R.; Schwämmle, Veit; Jensen, Ole N.; Sprenger, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of mass spectrometry-based protein quantification studies uses peptide-centric analytical methods and thus strongly relies on efficient and unbiased protein digestion protocols for sample preparation. We present a novel objective approach to assess protein digestion efficiency using a combination of qualitative and quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS methods and statistical data analysis. In contrast to previous studies we employed both standard qualitative as well as data-independent quantitative workflows to systematically assess trypsin digestion efficiency and bias using mitochondrial protein fractions. We evaluated nine trypsin-based digestion protocols, based on standard in-solution or on spin filter-aided digestion, including new optimized protocols. We investigated various reagents for protein solubilization and denaturation (dodecyl sulfate, deoxycholate, urea), several trypsin digestion conditions (buffer, RapiGest, deoxycholate, urea), and two methods for removal of detergents before analysis of peptides (acid precipitation or phase separation with ethyl acetate). Our data-independent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS workflow quantified over 3700 distinct peptides with 96% completeness between all protocols and replicates, with an average 40% protein sequence coverage and an average of 11 peptides identified per protein. Systematic quantitative and statistical analysis of physicochemical parameters demonstrated that deoxycholate-assisted in-solution digestion combined with phase transfer allows for efficient, unbiased generation and recovery of peptides from all protein classes, including membrane proteins. This deoxycholate-assisted protocol was also optimal for spin filter-aided digestions as compared with existing methods. PMID:23792921

  3. A standardized protocol to reduce pediatric spine surgery infection: a quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sheila L; Sen, Anish; Staggers, Kristen; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Quality improvement methods are being implemented in various areas of medicine. In an effort to reduce the complex (instrumented) spine infection rate in pediatric patients, a standardized protocol was developed and implemented at an institution with a high case volume of instrumented spine fusion procedures in the pediatric age group. Members of the Texas Children's Hospital Spine Study Group developed the protocol incrementally by using the current literature and prior institutional experience until consensus was obtained. The protocol was prospectively applied to all children undergoing complex spine surgery starting August 21, 2012. Acute infections were defined as positive wound cultures within 12 weeks of surgery, defined in alignment with current hospital infection control criteria. Procedures and infections were measured before and after protocol implementation. This protocol received full review and approval of the Baylor College of Medicine institutional review board. Nine spine surgeons performed 267 procedures between August 21, 2012, and September 30, 2013. The minimum follow-up was 12 weeks. The annual institutional infection rate prior to the protocol (2007-2011) ranged from 3.4% to 8.9%, with an average of 5.8%. After introducing the protocol, the infection rate decreased to 2.2% (6 infections of 267 cases) (p = 0.0362; absolute risk reduction 3.6%; relative risk 0.41 [95% CI 0.18-0.94]). Overall compliance with data form completion was 63.7%. In 4 of the 6 cases of infection, noncompliance with completion of the data collection form was documented; moreover, 2 of the 4 spine surgeons whose patients experienced infections had the lowest compliance rates in the study group. The standardized protocol for complex spine surgery significantly reduced surgical site infection at the authors' institution. The overall compliance with entry into the protocol was good. Identification of factors associated with post-spine surgery wound infection will allow

  4. Cranial palpation pressures used by osteopathy students: effects of standardized protocol training.

    PubMed

    Zegarra-Parodi, Rafael; de Chauvigny de Blot, Pierre; Rickards, Luke D; Renard, Edouard-Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Descriptions of subtle palpatory perceptions in osteopathic cranial palpation can be misperceived by students. Thus, adequate dissemination and replication of cranial palpatory techniques is challenging for osteopathy students. To evaluate the effects of standardized protocol training on cranial palpation of the frontomalar suture. Fourth-year osteopathy students from the European Center for Osteopathic Higher Education in Paris, France, were recruited and randomly divided into three groups. Students in the study group received instruction in a standardized protocol for palpatory assessment of the frontomalar suture; students in the control group did not receive instruction; and the remaining students acted as subjects. A specialized force sensor was placed on the skin covering the left frontomalar suture of each subject. Student practitioners were instructed to palpate subjects' left frontomalar suture using the customary pressure described for evaluation and treatment of somatic dysfunction of the cranium. Pressure measurements were exported to a laptop computer. Twelve students were in each group. Student practitioners' palpation pressures ranged from 0.19 to 1.12 N/cm(2), while mean palpation pressures for each test ranged from 0.27 to 0.98 N/cm(2). The mean (SD) palpation pressure in the study group and control group was 0.55 N/cm(2) (0.16 N/cm(2)) and 0.53 N/cm(2) (0.15 N/cm(2)), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in mean palpation pressures used by the two groups. Substantial variation in test performance was noted in both groups. Palpatory training was ineffective in improving student practitioners' precision of cranial palpation performance. Quantitative feedback of palpation pressures during training may improve outcomes. To our knowledge, data on palpation pressures used during osteopathic cranial manipulation have not been reported previously in the medical literature.

  5. A protocol for lifetime energy and environmental impact assessment of building insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S. Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre O.

    2014-04-01

    This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist, which provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different building insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines. - Highlights: • We proposed a protocol to evaluate the environmental impacts of insulation materials. • The protocol considers all life cycle stages of an insulation material. • Both the direct environmental impacts and the indirect impacts are defined. • Standardized calculation methods for the ‘avoided operational energy’ is defined. • Standardized calculation methods for the ‘avoided environmental impact’ is defined.

  6. Research Notes - Openness and Evolvability - Standards Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    scope of the openness assessment. Note that if a standard (or group of standards) is encapsulated entirely within a granule (i.e. not part of an...infrastructure or interface definition used by the granule ) and is not visible to other granules within the architecture, then the standard does not...substantial number of different) granule vendors to rework their implementation, the migration is unlikely to be a realistic option. 2.1.15 Have changes to

  7. Writing standard operating procedures (SOPs) for cryostorage protocols: using shoot meristem cryopreservation as an example.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith; Benson, Erica E

    2015-01-01

    Standard operating procedures are a systematic way of making sure that biopreservation processes, tasks, protocols, and operations are correctly and consistently performed. They are the basic documents of biorepository quality management systems and are used in quality assurance, control, and improvement. Methodologies for constructing workflows and writing standard operating procedures and work instructions are described using a plant cryopreservation protocol as an example. This chapter is pertinent to other biopreservation sectors because how methods are written, interpreted, and implemented can affect the quality of storage outcomes.

  8. Standards, Assessments & Opting Out, Spring 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advance Illinois, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In the spring, Illinois students will take new state assessments that reflect the rigor and relevance of the new Illinois Learning Standards. But some classmates will sit out and join the pushback against standardized testing. Opt-out advocates raise concerns about over-testing, and the resulting toll on students as well as the impact on classroom…

  9. Using Intellectual Standards To Assess Student Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Richard; Nosich, Gerald M.

    This document provides specific examples of what is involved in applying intellectual criteria and standards to students' reasoning, focusing on elements of reasoning (EORs). The significance of reasoning having elements and the need for standards in assessing reasoning are described. The following are the EORs: (1) purpose, goal, or end in view…

  10. Using Intellectual Standards To Assess Student Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Richard; Nosich, Gerald M.

    This document provides specific examples of what is involved in applying intellectual criteria and standards to students' reasoning, focusing on elements of reasoning (EORs). The significance of reasoning having elements and the need for standards in assessing reasoning are described. The following are the EORs: (1) purpose, goal, or end in view…

  11. Randomized controlled trial of accelerated rehabilitation versus standard protocol following surgical repair of ruptured Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Porter, Mark D; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal management of the acutely ruptured Achilles tendon (TA). Functional bracing alone achieves outcomes similar to those of surgical repair. Surgical repair combined with immediate mobilization may improve the clinical outcome further. The purpose of our study was to determine if an accelerated rehabilitation programme following surgical repair of the ruptured TA could improve clinical outcome, relative to the standard protocol. Patients with an acutely ruptured TA were randomly allocated to undergo an accelerated programme (AP) or standard programme (SP), following surgery. Outcome was assessed at 12 months post-surgery using the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), the heel-raise height and the time taken to return to running. Fifty-one patients completed the study, 25 in the AP group and 26 in the SP group. At 12 months post-surgery, the ATRS results were similar in the two treatment groups (87.46 in AP with standard error (SE) of 0.735 versus 87.12 in SP with SE of 0.75) while the AP group had less lengthening of the TA (0.385 cm, SE 0.166 versus 1.00 cm, SE 0.169) and a more rapid return to running (17.231 weeks, SE 0.401 versus 21.08 weeks, SE 0.409), than the SP group. The accelerated rehabilitation programme resulted in less tendon lengthening, more rapid return to running, but similar ATRS relative to the standard rehabilitation. Immobilization following TA repair may prolong recovery. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Protocol of the COSMIN study: COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments

    PubMed Central

    Mokkink, LB; Terwee, CB; Knol, DL; Stratford, PW; Alonso, J; Patrick, DL; Bouter, LM; de Vet, HCW

    2006-01-01

    Background Choosing an adequate measurement instrument depends on the proposed use of the instrument, the concept to be measured, the measurement properties (e.g. internal consistency, reproducibility, content and construct validity, responsiveness, and interpretability), the requirements, the burden for subjects, and costs of the available instruments. As far as measurement properties are concerned, there are no sufficiently specific standards for the evaluation of measurement properties of instruments to measure health status, and also no explicit criteria for what constitutes good measurement properties. In this paper we describe the protocol for the COSMIN study, the objective of which is to develop a checklist that contains COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments, including explicit criteria for satisfying these standards. We will focus on evaluative health related patient-reported outcomes (HR-PROs), i.e. patient-reported health measurement instruments used in a longitudinal design as an outcome measure, excluding health care related PROs, such as satisfaction with care or adherence. The COSMIN standards will be made available in the form of an easily applicable checklist. Method An international Delphi study will be performed to reach consensus on which and how measurement properties should be assessed, and on criteria for good measurement properties. Two sources of input will be used for the Delphi study: (1) a systematic review of properties, standards and criteria of measurement properties found in systematic reviews of measurement instruments, and (2) an additional literature search of methodological articles presenting a comprehensive checklist of standards and criteria. The Delphi study will consist of four (written) Delphi rounds, with approximately 30 expert panel members with different backgrounds in clinical medicine, biostatistics, psychology, and epidemiology. The final checklist will subsequently be field

  13. Photographing Injuries in the Acute Care Setting: Development and Evaluation of a Standardized Protocol for Research, Forensics, and Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bloemen, Elizabeth M.; Rosen, Tony; Schiroo, Justina A. Cline; Clark, Sunday; Mulcare, Mary R.; Stern, Michael E.; Mysliwiec, Regina; Flomenbaum, Neal E.; Lachs, Mark S.; Hargarten, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Photographing injuries in the acute setting allows for improved documentation as well as assessment by clinicians and others who have not personally examined a patient. This tool is important, particularly for telemedicine, tracking of wound healing, the evaluation of potential abuse, and injury research. Despite this, protocols to ensure standardization of photography in clinical practice, forensics, or research have not been published. In preparation for a study of injury patterns in elder abuse and geriatric falls, our goal was to develop and evaluate a protocol for standardized photography of injuries that may be broadly applied. Methods We conducted a literature review for techniques and standards in medical, forensic, and legal photography. We developed a novel protocol describing types of photographs and body positioning for eight body regions, including instructional diagrams. We revised it iteratively in consultation with experts in medical photography; forensics; and elder, child, and domestic abuse. The resulting protocol requires a minimum of four photos of each injury at multiple distances with and without a ruler/color guide. To evaluate the protocol’s efficacy, multiple research assistants without previous photography experience photographed injuries from a convenience sample of elderly patients presenting to a single large, urban, academic emergency department. A selection of these patients’ images were then evaluated in a blinded fashion by four nontreating emergency medicine physicians and the inter-rater reliability between these physicians was calculated. Results Among the 131 injuries, from 53 patients, photographed by 18 photographers using this protocol, photographs of 25 injuries (10 bruises, seven lacerations, and eight abrasions) were used to assess characterization of the injury. Physicians’ characterizations of the injuries were reliable for the size of the injury (κ = 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77 to 1

  14. State Standards and State Assessment Systems: A Guide to Alignment. Series on Standards and Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Marca, Paul M.; Redfield, Doris; Winter, Phoebe C.

    Alignment of content standards, performance standards, and assessments is crucial. This guide contains information to assist states and districts in aligning their assessment systems to their content and performance standards. It includes a review of current literature, both published and fugitive. The research is woven together with a few basic…

  15. Mathematical Literacy and Standardized Mathematical Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteson, Shirley M.

    2006-01-01

    Mathematical literacy is an important skill that is gaining the attention of mathematics educators. Students are increasingly challenged on standardized assessments to read, create, use, and comprehend numerous mathematical representations as a way of demonstrating mathematical literacy. Test items assessing algebra concepts from the Texas…

  16. Cervical Spine Clearance in Pediatric Trauma Centers: The Need for Standardization and an Evidence-based Protocol.

    PubMed

    Pannu, Gurpal S; Shah, Mitesh P; Herman, Marty J

    Cervical spine clearance in the pediatric trauma patient represents a particularly challenging task. Unfortunately, standardized clearance protocols for pediatric cervical clearance are poorly reported in the literature and imaging recommendations demonstrate considerable variability. With the use of a web-based survey, this study aims to define the methods utilized by pediatric trauma centers throughout North America. Specific attention was given to the identification of personnel responsible for cervical spine care, diagnostic imaging modalities used, and the presence or absence of a written pediatric cervical spine clearance protocol. A 10-question electronic survey was given to members of the newly formed Pediatric Cervical Spine Study Group, all of whom are active POSNA members. The survey was submitted via the online service SurveyMonkey (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/7NVVQZR). The survey assessed the respondent's institution demographics, such as trauma level and services primarily responsible for consultation and operative management of cervical spine injuries. In addition, respondents were asked to identify the protocols and primary imaging modality used for cervical spine clearance. Finally, respondents were asked if their institution had a documented cervical spine clearance protocol. Of the 25 separate institutions evaluated, 21 were designated as level 1 trauma centers. Considerable variation was reported with regards to the primary service responsible for cervical spine clearance. General Surgery/Trauma (44%) is most commonly the primary service, followed by a rotating schedule (33%), Neurosugery (11%), and Orthopaedic Surgery (8%). Spine consults tend to be seen most commonly by a rotating schedule of Orthopaedic Surgery and Neurosurgery. The majority of responding institutions utilize computed tomographic imaging (46%) as the primary imaging modality, whereas 42% of hospitals used x-ray primarily. The remaining institutions reported using a

  17. The Roadmap to Climate Stability Based on IPCC Fifth Assessment Climate Accounting Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Climate Stabilization Council recognizes the severe impact consequences of a rapidly warming climate and the challenging mitigation requirements of reaching the COP21 aspirational goal of +1.5°C. To address this challenge, we have used the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report which presents new methods for projecting increases in average global temperature and new metrics to update global climate accounting protocols. The updated protocols allow us to assess the full spectrum of climate mitigation projects available and identify the ability of specific projects to achieve various climate warming targets at different points in time. This assessment demonstrates the need to continue focusing on reducing and removing the major sources of overall excess heat linked to CO2, methane, black carbon, and tropospheric ozone. These findings also highlight the importance of solar radiation management (SRM) and earth radiation management (ERM) to achieve climate stabilization in the near-term. By integrating advanced life-cycle assessment (LCA) into the protocols, unintended environmental or human health impact trade-offs that may be associated with deployment of specific mitigation options can be identified. These protocols have also been introduced for standardization to the international ISO 14000 process. We conclude by describing the Climate Stabilization Council's role in establishing a platform for the scientific research, evaluation, and implementation of the identified climate mitigation projects.

  18. Behavior Intervention for Students with Externalizing Behavior Problems: Primary-Level Standard Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Gregory J.; Nelson, J. Ron; Sanders, Elizabeth A.; Ralston, Nicole C.

    2012-01-01

    This article examined the efficacy of a primary-level, standard-protocol behavior intervention for students with externalizing behavioral disorders. Elementary schools were randomly assigned to treatment (behavior intervention) or control (business as usual) conditions, and K-3 students were screened for externalizing behavior risk status. The…

  19. [Standardizing a protocol of magnetic resonance imaging of temporomandibular joints. Part I].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, T V

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the standard of a procedure for magnetic resonance imaging of temporomandibular joints, which has been used to examine 275 patients. It describes the study projections, that are most significant for visualization, and scanning protocols. Illustrations of magnetic resonance imaging of the structures of the intact temporomandibular joint are presented.

  20. Assessing public perception of visibility for standard setting exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.

    Using the photographs and optical measurements taken during a summer field program (REVEAL) designed to examine the chemical and physical characteristics of visibility impairment in the Fraser Valley, southwestern British Columbia, a protocol for gauging public perception of visibility in this region was devised and tested in a pilot survey. This paper details the protocol (which is based on previous studies conducted in the United States of America) and analysis techniques for survey responses. A preliminary assessment of the results of the pilot study is also presented. A public perception survey conducted in Denver (Ely et al., 1991), resolved a visibility standard for Denver of bext (total light extinction) = 0.076 × 10 -3 m -1. Assuming a homogeneous atmosphere, this level of bext is approximately equal to a visual range of 50 km. Using a similar protocol, responses from this pilot study were used to extrapolate visibility standards for two suburban locations in the Fraser Valley of bext ≈0.09 × 10 -3-0.105 × 10 -3 m -1 ( bsp (particle light scattering) ≈0.051 × 10 -3-0.063 × 10 -3 m -1) and bsp ≈0.39 × 10 -3 m -1. These levels of light extinction ( bsp is the largest component of bext) relate to approximate visual range of between 40 and 60 km in a homogeneous atmosphere. Possible reasons for the apparent discrepancies between locations are discussed and the effect of survey group are addressed.

  1. Reef Fish Survey Techniques: Assessing the Potential for Standardizing Methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Zachary R.; Zgliczynski, Brian J.; Williams, Gareth J.; Sandin, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Dramatic changes in populations of fishes living on coral reefs have been documented globally and, in response, the research community has initiated efforts to assess and monitor reef fish assemblages. A variety of visual census techniques are employed, however results are often incomparable due to differential methodological performance. Although comparability of data may promote improved assessment of fish populations, and thus management of often critically important nearshore fisheries, to date no standardized and agreed-upon survey method has emerged. This study describes the use of methods across the research community and identifies potential drivers of method selection. An online survey was distributed to researchers from academic, governmental, and non-governmental organizations internationally. Although many methods were identified, 89% of survey-based projects employed one of three methods–belt transect, stationary point count, and some variation of the timed swim method. The selection of survey method was independent of the research design (i.e., assessment goal) and region of study, but was related to the researcher’s home institution. While some researchers expressed willingness to modify their current survey protocols to more standardized protocols (76%), their willingness decreased when methodologies were tied to long-term datasets spanning five or more years. Willingness to modify current methodologies was also less common among academic researchers than resource managers. By understanding both the current application of methods and the reported motivations for method selection, we hope to focus discussions towards increasing the comparability of quantitative reef fish survey data. PMID:27111085

  2. A standard protocol for describing individual-based and agent-based models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimm, Volker; Berger, Uta; Bastiansen, Finn; Eliassen, Sigrunn; Ginot, Vincent; Giske, Jarl; Goss-Custard, John; Grand, Tamara; Heinz, Simone K.; Huse, Geir; Huth, Andreas; Jepsen, Jane U.; Jorgensen, Christian; Mooij, Wolf M.; Muller, Birgit; Pe'er, Guy; Piou, Cyril; Railsback, Steven F.; Robbins, Andrew M.; Robbins, Martha M.; Rossmanith, Eva; Ruger, Nadja; Strand, Espen; Souissi, Sami; Stillman, Richard A.; Vabo, Rune; Visser, Ute; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Simulation models that describe autonomous individual organisms (individual based models, IBM) or agents (agent-based models, ABM) have become a widely used tool, not only in ecology, but also in many other disciplines dealing with complex systems made up of autonomous entities. However, there is no standard protocol for describing such simulation models, which can make them difficult to understand and to duplicate. This paper presents a proposed standard protocol, ODD, for describing IBMs and ABMs, developed and tested by 28 modellers who cover a wide range of fields within ecology. This protocol consists of three blocks (Overview, Design concepts, and Details), which are subdivided into seven elements: Purpose, State variables and scales, Process overview and scheduling, Design concepts, Initialization, Input, and Submodels. We explain which aspects of a model should be described in each element, and we present an example to illustrate the protocol in use. In addition, 19 examples are available in an Online Appendix. We consider ODD as a first step for establishing a more detailed common format of the description of IBMs and ABMs. Once initiated, the protocol will hopefully evolve as it becomes used by a sufficiently large proportion of modellers.

  3. Security analysis of standards-driven communication protocols for healthcare scenarios.

    PubMed

    Masi, Massimiliano; Pugliese, Rosario; Tiezzi, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    The importance of the Electronic Health Record (EHR), that stores all healthcare-related data belonging to a patient, has been recognised in recent years by governments, institutions and industry. Initiatives like the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) have been developed for the definition of standard methodologies for secure and interoperable EHR exchanges among clinics and hospitals. Using the requisites specified by these initiatives, many large scale projects have been set up for enabling healthcare professionals to handle patients' EHRs. The success of applications developed in these contexts crucially depends on ensuring such security properties as confidentiality, authentication, and authorization. In this paper, we first propose a communication protocol, based on the IHE specifications, for authenticating healthcare professionals and assuring patients' safety. By means of a formal analysis carried out by using the specification language COWS and the model checker CMC, we reveal a security flaw in the protocol thus demonstrating that to simply adopt the international standards does not guarantee the absence of such type of flaws. We then propose how to emend the IHE specifications and modify the protocol accordingly. Finally, we show how to tailor our protocol for application to more critical scenarios with no assumptions on the communication channels. To demonstrate feasibility and effectiveness of our protocols we have fully implemented them.

  4. Protocol and standard operating procedures for common use in a worldwide multicenter study on reference values.

    PubMed

    Ozarda, Yesim; Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Barth, Julian H; Klee, George

    2013-05-01

    The reference intervals (RIs) given in laboratory reports have an important role in aiding clinicians in interpreting test results in reference to values of healthy populations. In this report, we present a proposed protocol and standard operating procedures (SOPs) for common use in conducting multicenter RI studies on a national or international scale. The protocols and consensus on their contents were refined through discussions in recent C-RIDL meetings. The protocol describes in detail (1) the scheme and organization of the study, (2) the target population, inclusion/exclusion criteria, ethnicity, and sample size, (3) health status questionnaire, (4) target analytes, (5) blood collection, (6) sample processing and storage, (7) assays, (8) cross-check testing, (9) ethics, (10) data analyses, and (11) reporting of results. In addition, the protocol proposes the common measurement of a panel of sera when no standard materials exist for harmonization of test results. It also describes the requirements of the central laboratory, including the method of cross-check testing between the central laboratory of each country and local laboratories. This protocol and the SOPs remain largely exploratory and may require a reevaluation from the practical point of view after their implementation in the ongoing worldwide study. The paper is mainly intended to be a basis for discussion in the scientific community.

  5. Use of a limited lights and siren protocol in the prehospital setting vs standard usage.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Mark A; Baldino, Kimberly T; Lehrfeld, David P; Linger, Matt; Lustiger, Eliyahu; Cascio, Anthony; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Dossantos, Frank

    2012-05-01

    Our objective was to determine if implementing a standard lights and sirens (L&S) protocol would reduce their use and if this had any effect on patient disposition. In a prospective cohort study, we trained emergency medical services (EMS) personnel from 4 towns in an L&S protocol and enrolled control personnel from 4 addition towns that were not using the protocol. We compare the use of L&S between them over a 6-month period. Our protocol restricted the usage of L&S to patients who had maladies requiring expedited transport. Emergency medical services personnel from the control towns had no such restrictions and were not aware that we were tracking their usage of L&S. We also considered if patient disposition was affected by the judicious usage of L&S. Prehospital EMS personnel who were trained in an L&S protocol were 5.6 times less likely to use L&S when compared with those not trained. Of the 808 patients transported by both types of workers, no difference in patient disposition was observed. Our protocol significantly reduced the use of L&S. Judicious use of L&S has significant implications for transport safety. By allowing for selective transport with L&S usage, we observed no impact in patient disposition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Standardization of a Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Protocol to Investigate Dysphagia in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Harris, R A; Grobman, M E; Allen, M J; Schachtel, J; Rawson, N E; Bennett, B; Ledyayev, J; Hopewell, B; Coates, J R; Reinero, C R; Lever, T E

    2017-03-01

    Videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) is the gold standard for diagnosis of dysphagia in veterinary medicine but lacks standardized protocols that emulate physiologic feeding practices. Age impacts swallow function in humans but has not been evaluated by VFSS in dogs. To develop a protocol with custom kennels designed to allow free-feeding of 3 optimized formulations of contrast media and diets that address limitations of current VFSS protocols. We hypothesized that dogs evaluated by a free-feeding VFSS protocol would show differences in objective swallow metrics based on age. Healthy juvenile, adult, and geriatric dogs (n = 24). Prospective, experimental study. Custom kennels were developed to maintain natural feeding behaviors during VFSS. Three food consistencies (thin liquid, pureed food, and dry kibble) were formulated with either iohexol or barium to maximize palatability and voluntary prehension. Dogs were evaluated by 16 swallow metrics and compared across age groups. Development of a standardized VFSS protocol resulted in successful collection of swallow data in healthy dogs. No significant differences in swallow metrics were observed among age groups. Substantial variability was observed in healthy dogs when evaluated under these physiologic conditions. Features typically attributed to pathologic states, such as gastric reflux, were seen in healthy dogs. Development of a VFSS protocol that reflects natural feeding practices may allow emulation of physiology resulting in clinical signs of dysphagia. Age did not result in significant changes in swallow metrics, but additional studies are needed, particularly in light of substantial normal variation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. Change to a standardized airway clearance protocol for children with bronchiolitis leads to improved care.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Kristen; Pirvu, Daniela; Barbee, Kim; Berg, Nancy; Meyer, Michelle; Gaulke, Lenny; Pate, Brian M; Roberts, Cristine

    2014-01-01

    Nurses at a pediatric hospital identified the liberal utilization of deep nasopharyngeal (NP) suction as the primary airway clearance modality in young children with bronchiolitis. This invasive practice lacked supporting evidence and a standardized approach. Nurses created an interdisciplinary team to develop a less invasive airway clearance protocol. Data from 2years, both pre and post protocol implementation, were analyzed. An 11% decrease in deep NP suctioning resulted in improved or unchanged balancing measures and perceptions of quality of care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving post-stroke dysphagia outcomes through a standardized and multidisciplinary protocol: an exploratory cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Smania, Nicola; Bisoffi, Giulia; Squaquara, Teresa; Zuccher, Paola; Mazzucco, Sara

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is a major cause of dysphagia. Few studies to date have reported on standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approaches to the management of post-stroke dysphagia. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized multidisciplinary protocol on clinical outcomes in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. We performed retrospective chart reviews of patients with post-stroke dysphagia admitted to the neurological ward of Verona University Hospital from 2004 to 2008. Outcomes after usual treatment for dysphagia (T- group) were compared versus outcomes after treatment under a standardized diagnostic and rehabilitative multidisciplinary protocol (T+ group). Outcome measures were death, pneumonia on X-ray, need for respiratory support, and proportion of patients on tube feeding at discharge. Of the 378 patients admitted with stroke, 84 had dysphagia and were enrolled in the study. A significantly lower risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio [OR] 0.20 [0.53-0.78]), pneumonia (OR 0.33 [0.10-1.03]), need for respiratory support (OR 0.48 [0.14-1.66]), and tube feeding at discharge (OR 0.30 [0.09-0.91]) was recorded for the T+ group (N = 39) as compared to the T- group (N = 45). The adjusted OR showed no difference between the two groups for in-hospital death and tube feeding at discharge. Use of a standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approach to the management of post-stroke dysphagia may significantly reduce rates of aspiration pneumonia, in-hospital mortality, and tube feeding in dysphagic stroke survivors. Consistent with the study's exploratory purposes, our findings suggest that the multidisciplinary protocol applied in this study offers an effective model of management of post-stroke dysphagia.

  9. A Protocol for Lifetime Energy and Environmental Impact Assessment of Building Insulation Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors, and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist that provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines.

  10. Low kilovoltage CT of the neck with 70 kVp: comparison with a standard protocol.

    PubMed

    Gnannt, R; Winklehner, A; Goetti, R; Schmidt, B; Kollias, S; Alkadhi, H

    2012-06-01

    CT protocols should aim for radiation doses being as low as reasonably achievable. The purpose of our study was to assess the image quality and radiation dose of neck CT at a tube potential of 70 kVp. Twenty patients (7 female, mean age 51.4 years, age range 19-81 years) underwent contrast-enhanced 64-section CT of the neck at 70 kVp (ATCM, effective tube current-time product 614 eff.mAs, range 467-713 eff.mAs). All 20 patients had a previous neck CT at 120 kVp on the same scanner. Two radiologists assessed image quality and artifacts in the upper, middle, and lower neck. Image noise and attenuation were measured, and the CNR was calculated. Effective radiation dose was calculated. Interobserver agreement regarding image quality of soft tissue for 70-kVp and 120-kVp scans was good to excellent. At 70 kVp, soft tissues were of diagnostic image quality in all scans, whereas the lower cervical spine was not of diagnostic quality in 3 and 4 scans per both readers. No difference was found among 70-kVp and 120-kVp scans for soft tissue image quality in the upper neck, while image quality was significantly better in the middle at 70 kVp (P < .05) and better in the lower third at 120 kVp (P < .05). CNR was significantly higher at 70 kVp in all levels for both readers (P < .001). Effective radiation dose at 70 kVp was significantly lower (0.88 ± 0.2 mSv) than at 120 kVp (1.33 ± 0.2 mSv, P < .001). CT of the cervical soft tissues at 70 kVp is feasible, provides diagnostic image quality with improved CNR, and reduces radiation dose by approximately 34% compared with a standard protocol at 120 kVp. In contrast, low kVp CT of the lower cervical spine suffers from compromised image quality.

  11. Individual versus Standardized Running Protocols in the Determination of VO2max.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Paula F; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Reed, Jennifer L; Zinner, Christoph; Mester, Joachim; Sperlich, Billy

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an individually designed incremental exercise protocol results in greater rates of oxygen uptake (VO2max) than standardized testing. Fourteen well-trained, male runners performed five incremental protocols in randomized order to measure their VO2max: i) an incremental test (INCS+I) with pre-defined increases in speed (2 min at 8.64 km·h(-1), then a rise of 1.44 km·h(-1) every 30 s up to 14.4 km·h(-1)) and thereafter inclination (0.5° every 30 s); ii) an incremental test (INCI) at constant speed (14.4 km·h(-1)) and increasing inclination (2° every 2 min from the initial 0°); iii) an incremental test (INCS) at constant inclination (0°) and increasing speed (0.5 km·h(-1) every 30 s from the initial 12.0 km·h(-1)); iv) a graded exercise protocol (GXP) at a 1° incline with increasing speed (initially 8.64 km·h(-1) + 1.44 km·h(-1) every 5 min); v) an individual exercise protocol (INDXP) in which the runner chose the inclination and speed. VO2max was lowest (-4.2%) during the GXP (p = 0.01; d = 0.06-0.61) compared to all other tests. The highest rating of perceived exertion, heart rate, ventilation and end-exercise blood lactate concentration were similar between the different protocols (p < 0.05). The time to exhaustion ranged from 7 min 18 sec (INCS) to 25 min 30 sec (GXP) (p = 0.01).The VO2max attained by employing an individual treadmill protocol does not differ from the values derived from various standardized incremental protocols. Key pointsThe mean maximum oxygen uptake during the GXP was lower than for all other tests.Differences in the maximum rate of oxygen uptake between the various protocols exhibited considerable inter-individual variation.From the current findings, it can be concluded that well trained athletes are able to perform an individually designed treadmill running protocol.

  12. Assessing Learning: Standards, Principles, and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Urban

    The monograph provides a systematic explication of the underlying standards and principles that have been developed to help adult learners articulate what they know and can do, to clarify their claims to creditable achievement, to help assessors improve the reliability of assessment, and to save assessor time. Ten academic and administrative…

  13. Color gamut assessment standard: construction, characterization and interlaboratory measurement comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libert, John M.; Kelley, Edward F.; Boynton, Paul A.; Brown, Steven W.; Wall, Christine F.; Campbell, Colin

    2003-07-01

    In earlier papers, NIST proposed a standard illumination source and optical filter targets with which to assess the state-of-the-art of display measurement. The Display Measurement Assessment Transfer Standard (DMATS) was designed to present the display metrologist with a rectangular array of targets such as color filters, polarizers, and grilles, back-lighted by uniform illumination, to be measured using methods and instruments typically used in display performance measurement. A "round robin" interlaboratory measurement exercise using the "standard" artifact suite would enable a first order assessment of display measurement reproducibility, i.e., measurement variability within the electronic display community. The rectangular array design of the DMATS was anticipated to present stray light and color contamination challenges to facilitate identification of error sources deriving from measurement protocols, laboratory environment, and equipment. However, complications in dealing with heating problems threatened to delay the planned laboratory intercomparison. The Gamut Assessment Standard (GAS) was thus designed as an interim solution to enable the NIST scientists and participating measurement laboratories to begin collecting data. The GAS consists of a 150 mm diameter integrating sphere standard illumination source with a stray light elimination tube (SLET) mounted at the exit port. A dual six-position filter wheel is mounted at the SLET exit port. One wheel holds a series of neutral density filters and a second interchangeable wheel holds various color filters. This paper describes the design and construction of the GAS, its initial performance characterization by NIST, and comparison measurements made at NPL. Possible design changes suggested by the results of the preliminary intercomparison are discussed, as are plans for future interlaboratory comparisons and potential use of the GAS as a transfer standard for laboratory self-certification.

  14. Robotic telepresence versus standardly supervised stroke alert team assessments.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Cumara B; Hentz, Joseph G; Aguilar, Maria I; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2015-03-01

    Telemedicine has created access to emergency stroke care for patients in all communities, regardless of geography. We hypothesized that there is no difference in speed of assessment between vascular neurologist (VN) robotic telepresence and standard VN-supervised stroke alert patients in a metropolitan primary stroke center. A retrospective stroke alert database was used to identify all robotic telepresence and standardly supervised stroke alert patient assessments at a primary stroke center emergency department from 2009 to 2012. The primary outcome measure was the duration of assessment from stroke alert activation to treatment or downgrade. The sample size was 196 subjects. The mean duration of time from stroke alert activation to initiation of intravenous (IV) thrombolytic treatment or downgrade was 8.6 min longer in the robotic group than in the standard group (p=0.03). Among the subgroup of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with IV thrombolysis, the mean duration of time from activation to treatment was 18 min longer in the robotic group than in the standard group (p=0.01). Safety outcomes including thrombolysis protocol violations (0% versus 1%), post-thrombolysis symptomatic intracranial hemorrhagic complications (3% versus 1%), and death during hospitalization (8% versus 6%) were low in the robotic group and not significantly different from that in the standard group. Standard VN-supervised acute stroke team assessments were swifter than those supervised by robotic telepresence. Safety outcomes of robotic telepresence-supervised stroke alerts were excellent, and this modality may be preferred in circumstances when a VN is not immediately available on-site.

  15. Protocol for intraoperative assessment of the human cerebrovascular glycocalyx

    PubMed Central

    Haeren, R H L; Vink, H; Staals, J; van Zandvoort, M A M J; Dings, J; van Overbeeke, J J; Hoogland, G; Rijkers, K; Schijns, O E M G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adequate functioning of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is important for brain homoeostasis and normal neuronal function. Disruption of the BBB has been described in several neurological diseases. Recent reports suggest that an increased permeability of the BBB also contributes to increased seizure susceptibility in patients with epilepsy. The endothelial glycocalyx is coating the luminal side of the endothelium and can be considered as the first barrier of the BBB. We hypothesise that an altered glycocalyx thickness plays a role in the aetiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common type of epilepsy. Here, we propose a protocol that allows intraoperative assessment of the cerebrovascular glycocalyx thickness in patients with TLE and assess whether its thickness is decreased in patients with TLE when compared with controls. Methods and analysis This protocol is designed as a prospective observational case–control study in patients who undergo resective brain surgery as treatment for TLE. Control subjects are patients without a history of epileptic seizures, who undergo a craniotomy or burr hole surgery for other indications. Intraoperative glycocalyx thickness measurements of sublingual, cortical and hippocampal microcirculation are performed by video microscopy using sidestream dark-field imaging. Demographic details, seizure characteristics, epilepsy risk factors, intraoperative haemodynamic parameters and histopathological evaluation are additionally recorded. Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been ethically approved by the local medical ethical committee (ID: NL51594.068.14) and complies with the Declaration of Helsinki and principles of Good Clinical Practice. Informed consent is obtained before study enrolment and only coded data will be stored in a secured database, enabling an audit trail. Results will be submitted to international peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences. Trial registration number

  16. Standardization of infrared breast thermogram acquisition protocols and abnormality analysis of breast thermograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Gogoi, Usha Rani; Das, Kakali; Ghosh, Anjan Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Majumdar, Gautam

    2016-05-01

    The non-invasive, painless, radiation-free and cost-effective infrared breast thermography (IBT) makes a significant contribution to improving the survival rate of breast cancer patients by early detecting the disease. This paper presents a set of standard breast thermogram acquisition protocols to improve the potentiality and accuracy of infrared breast thermograms in early breast cancer detection. By maintaining all these protocols, an infrared breast thermogram acquisition setup has been established at the Regional Cancer Centre (RCC) of Government Medical College (AGMC), Tripura, India. The acquisition of breast thermogram is followed by the breast thermogram interpretation, for identifying the presence of any abnormality. However, due to the presence of complex vascular patterns, accurate interpretation of breast thermogram is a very challenging task. The bilateral symmetry of the thermal patterns in each breast thermogram is quantitatively computed by statistical feature analysis. A series of statistical features are extracted from a set of 20 thermograms of both healthy and unhealthy subjects. Finally, the extracted features are analyzed for breast abnormality detection. The key contributions made by this paper can be highlighted as -- a) the designing of a standard protocol suite for accurate acquisition of breast thermograms, b) creation of a new breast thermogram dataset by maintaining the protocol suite, and c) statistical analysis of the thermograms for abnormality detection. By doing so, this proposed work can minimize the rate of false findings in breast thermograms and thus, it will increase the utilization potentiality of breast thermograms in early breast cancer detection.

  17. Evaluation of Dogs with Border Collie Collapse, Including Response to Two Standardized Strenuous Exercise Protocols.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Shmon, Cindy; Su, Lillian; Epp, Tasha; Minor, Katie; Mickelson, James; Patterson, Edward; Shelton, G Diane

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and metabolic variables were evaluated in 13 dogs with border collie collapse (BCC) before, during, and following completion of standardized strenuous exercise protocols. Six dogs participated in a ball-retrieving protocol, and seven dogs participated in a sheep-herding protocol. Findings were compared with 16 normal border collies participating in the same exercise protocols (11 retrieving, five herding). Twelve dogs with BCC developed abnormal mentation and/or an abnormal gait during evaluation. All dogs had post-exercise elevations in rectal temperature, pulse rate, arterial blood pH, PaO2, and lactate, and decreased PaCO2 and bicarbonate, as expected with strenuous exercise, but there were no significant differences between BCC dogs and normal dogs. Electrocardiography demonstrated sinus tachycardia in all dogs following exercise. Needle electromyography was normal, and evaluation of muscle biopsy cryosections using a standard panel of histochemical stains and reactions did not reveal a reason for collapse in 10 dogs with BCC in which these tests were performed. Genetic testing excluded the dynamin-1 related exercise-induced collapse mutation and the V547A malignant hyperthermia mutation as the cause of BCC. Common reasons for exercise intolerance were eliminated. Although a genetic basis is suspected, the cause of collapse in BCC was not determined.

  18. Report from the NOAA workshops to standardize protocols for monitoring toxic Pfiesteria species and associated environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Luttenberg, D; Turgeon, D; Higgins, J

    2001-10-01

    Long-term monitoring of water quality, fish health, and plankton communities in susceptible bodies of water is crucial to identify the environmental factors that contribute to outbreaks of toxic Pfiesteria complex (TPC) species. In the aftermath of the 1997 toxic Pfiesteria outbreaks in North Carolina and Maryland, federal and several state agencies agreed that there was a need to standardize monitoring protocols. The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration convened two workshops that brought together state, federal, and academic resource managers and scientific experts to a) seek consensus on responding to and monitoring potential toxic Pfiesteria outbreaks; b) recommend standard parameters and protocols to characterize water quality, fish health, and plankton at historical event sites and potentially susceptible sites; and c) discuss options for integrating monitoring data sets from different states into regional and national assessments. Workshop recommendations included the development of a three-tiered TPC monitoring strategy: Tier 1, rapid event response; Tier 2, comprehensive assessment; and Tier 3, routine monitoring. These tiers correspond to varying levels of water quality, fish health, and plankton monitoring frequency and intensity. Under the strategy, sites are prioritized, depending upon their history and susceptibility to TPC events, and assigned an appropriate level of monitoring activity. Participants also agreed upon a suite of water quality parameters that should be monitored. These recommendations provide guidance to state and federal agencies conducting rapid-response and assessment activities at sites of suspected toxic Pfiesteria outbreaks, as well as to states that are developing such monitoring programs for the first time.

  19. System Assessment Standards: Defining the Market for Industrial Energy Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheaffer, Paul; McKane, Aimee; Tutterow, Vestal; Crane, Ryan

    2009-08-01

    Improved efficiency of industrial systems (e.g., compressed air or steam) contributes to a manufacturing facility?s bottom line, improves reliability, and better utilizes assets. Despite these advantages, many industrial facilities continue to have unrealized system optimization potential. A barrier to realizing this potential is the lack of market definition for system energy efficiency assessment services, creating problems for both service providers in establishing market value for their services and for consumers in determining the relative quality of these system assessment services. On August 19, 2008, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) issued four new draft Standards for trial use that are designed to raise the bar and define the market for these services. These draft Standards set the requirements for conducting an energy assessment at an industrial facility for four different system types: compressed air, process heating, pumping, and steam. The Standards address topics such as organizing and conducting assessments; analyzing the data collected; and reporting and documentation. This paper addresses both the issues and challenges in developing the Standards and the accompanying Guidance Documents, as well as the result of field testing by industrial facilities, consultants, and utilities during the trial use period that ended in January, 2009. These Standards will be revised and released by ASME for public review, and subsequently submitted for approval as American National Standards for publication in late 2009. Plans for a related activity to establish a professional-level program to certify practitioners in the area of system assessments, opportunities to integrate the ASME Standards with related work on industrial energy efficiency, as well as plans to expand the system assessment Standard portfolio are also discussed.

  20. Dosimetric and image quality assessment of different acquisition protocols of a novel 64-slice CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vite, Cristina; Mangini, Monica; Strocchi, Sabina; Novario, Raffaele; Tanzi, Fabio; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Conte, Leopoldo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-03-01

    Dose and image quality assessment in computed tomography (CT) are almost affected by the vast variety of CT scanners (axial CT, spiral CT, low-multislice CT (2-16), high-multislice CT (32-64)) and imaging protocols in use. Very poor information is at the moment available on 64 slices CT scanners. Aim of this work is to assess image quality related to patient dose indexes and to investigate the achievable dose reduction for a commercially available 64 slices CT scanner. CT dose indexes (weighted computed tomography dose index, CTDI w and Dose Length Product, DLP) were measured with a standard CT phantom for the main protocols in use (head, chest, abdomen and pelvis) and compared with the values displayed by the scanner itself. The differences were always below 7%. All the indexes were below the Diagnostic Reference Levels defined by the European Council Directive 97/42. Effective doses were measured for each protocol with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted in an anthropomorphic Alderson Rando phantom and compared with the same values computed by the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator software code and corrected by a factor taking in account the number of slices (from 16 to 64). The differences were always below 25%. The effective doses range from 1.5 mSv (head) to 21.8 mSv (abdomen). The dose reduction system of the scanner was assessed comparing the effective dose measured for a standard phantom-man (a cylinder phantom, 32 cm in diameter) to the mean dose evaluated on 46 patients. The standard phantom was considered as no dose reduction reference. The dose reduction factor range from 16% to 78% (mean of 46%) for all protocols, from 29% to 78% (mean of 55%) for chest protocol, from 16% to 76% (mean of 42%) for abdomen protocol. The possibility of a further dose reduction was investigated measuring image quality (spatial resolution, contrast and noise) as a function of CTDI w. This curve shows a quite flat trend decreasing the dose approximately to 90% and a

  1. Assessment of the effect of larval source management and house improvement on malaria transmission when added to standard malaria control strategies in southern Malawi: study protocol for a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McCann, Robert S; van den Berg, Henk; Diggle, Peter J; van Vugt, Michèle; Terlouw, Dianne J; Phiri, Kamija S; Di Pasquale, Aurelio; Maire, Nicolas; Gowelo, Steven; Mburu, Monicah M; Kabaghe, Alinune N; Mzilahowa, Themba; Chipeta, Michael G; Takken, Willem

    2017-09-22

    Due to outdoor and residual transmission and insecticide resistance, long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) will be insufficient as stand-alone malaria vector control interventions in many settings as programmes shift toward malaria elimination. Combining additional vector control interventions as part of an integrated strategy would potentially overcome these challenges. Larval source management (LSM) and structural house improvements (HI) are appealing as additional components of an integrated vector management plan because of their long histories of use, evidence on effectiveness in appropriate settings, and unique modes of action compared to LLINs and IRS. Implementation of LSM and HI through a community-based approach could provide a path for rolling-out these interventions sustainably and on a large scale. We will implement community-based LSM and HI, as additional interventions to the current national malaria control strategies, using a randomised block, 2 × 2 factorial, cluster-randomised design in rural, southern Malawi. These interventions will be continued for two years. The trial catchment area covers about 25,000 people living in 65 villages. Community participation is encouraged by training community volunteers as health animators, and supporting the organisation of village-level committees in collaboration with The Hunger Project, a non-governmental organisation. Household-level cross-sectional surveys, including parasitological and entomological sampling, will be conducted on a rolling, 2-monthly schedule to measure outcomes over two years (2016 to 2018). Coverage of LSM and HI will also be assessed throughout the trial area. Combining LSM and/or HI together with the interventions currently implemented by the Malawi National Malaria Control Programme is anticipated to reduce malaria transmission below the level reached by current interventions alone. Implementation of LSM and HI through a community

  2. A proposed protocol for the standardized preparation of PRF membranes for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Mito; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Horimizu, Makoto; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Wolff, Larry F; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2012-09-01

    Upon clinical application, thick platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is usually compressed to fit the implantation site. However, it is speculated that the preservation of platelets and plasma content depends on the compression methods used. To accurately evaluate the clinical outcome of PRF, the preparation protocol should be standardized. Freshly prepared PRF clots were compressed into a thin membrane by our novel PRF compression device. The localization of platelets was examined by SEM and immunostaining. Growth factor levels were evaluated by bioassays and cytokine-antibody array techniques. The angiogenic activity was examined by the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay and the scratch assay using HUVEC cultures. Platelets were concentrated on the surface of the region adjacent to the red thrombus and this region was subjected to the experiments. Compared to the PRF membrane compressed by dry gauze (G-PRF), the preservation of the plasma content, 3D-fibrin meshwork, and platelets was more intact in the compressor-prepared PRF membrane (C-PRF). Among the growth factors tested, C-PRF contained PDGF isoforms at higher levels, and significantly stimulated cell proliferation and neovascularization. C-PRF may be useful for grafting while minimizing the loss of bioactive factors. This C-PRF preparation protocol is proposed as a standardized protocol for PRF membrane preparation. Copyright © 2012 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A standardized education protocol significantly reduces traumatic injuries and syncope recurrence: an observational study in 316 patients with vasovagal syncope.

    PubMed

    Aydin, M Ali; Mortensen, Kai; Salukhe, Tushar V; Wilke, Iris; Ortak, Michelle; Drewitz, Imke; Hoffmann, Boris; Müllerleile, Kai; Sultan, Arian; Servatius, Helge; Steven, Daniel; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Meinertz, Thomas; Ventura, Rodolfo; Willems, Stephan

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of a non-pharmacological approach on the frequency of traumatic injuries and syncope recurrence in patients with vasovagal syncope and normal hearts. We report the experience in our syncope centre with a standardized education and teaching protocol for patients with vasovagal syncope. The treatment of vasovagal syncope is often complex and discouraging. Besides medical options, behaviour modification is a main component of therapy but has no statistical evidence to support its use. Between January 1999 and September 2006, we prospectively enrolled all patients with vasovagal syncope. The patients were counselled about the benign nature of their disease. Specific recommendations were made according to a standardized education protocol established at our syncope centre. A pre-/post-study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of our approach on syncope recurrence and frequency of injury as the study endpoints. Complete follow-up data were available from 85% of the study population (316 of 371) after a mean time of 710 ± 286 days (mean age 50 years; standard deviation ± 18 years, 160 female). Eighty-seven patients (27.5%) had a syncope recurrence with 22 suffering an injury during syncope. During the follow-up period, the syncope burden per month was significantly reduced from 0.35 ± 0.03 at initial presentation to 0.08 ± 0.02 (P< 0.001). The frequency of traumatic syncope was significantly lower at the time of recurrence compared with the initial presentation (25 vs. 42%; McNemar's test P= 0.02). A standardized education protocol significantly reduces traumatic injuries and syncope recurrence in patients with vasovagal syncope.

  4. Systematic Review Checklist: A Standardized Technique for Assessing and Reporting Reviews of Life Cycle Assessment Data

    PubMed Central

    Zumsteg, Jennifer M.; Cooper, Joyce S.; Noon, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Systematic review, including meta-analysis, is increasingly utilized in life cycle assessment (LCA). There are currently no widely recognized guidelines for designing, conducting, or reporting systematic reviews in LCA. Other disciplines such as medicine, ecology, and software engineering have both recognized the utility of systematic reviews and created standardized protocols for conducting and reporting systematic reviews. Based largely on the 2009 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement, which updated the preferred format for reporting of such reviews in biomedical research, we provide an introduction to the topic and a checklist to guide the reporting of future LCA reviews in a standardized format. The standardized technique for assessing and reporting reviews of LCA (STARR-LCA) checklist is a starting point for improving the utility of systematic reviews in LCA. PMID:26069437

  5. Adherence to a standardized protocol for measuring grip strength and appropriate cut-off values in adults over 65 years with sarcopenia: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin; Henwood, Tim; Schaap, Laura; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Beaudart, Charlotte; Buckinx, Fanny; Roberts, Helen; Cooper, Cyrus; Cherubini, Antonio; dellʼAquilla, Giuseppina; Maggio, Marcello; Volpato, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    studies. On the other hand, within this definition there still is wide variability in measurement tools and use of cut-off values, which could actually hamper comparability between studies.To assess muscle strength, the EWGSOP has recommended grip strength measurement which is easy and inexpensive. A recent systematic review on the measurement properties of tools to assess sarcopenia concluded that grip strength measurement is a valid and reliable method. In a comprehensive review of the measurement of grip strength in clinical and epidemiological studies by Roberts et al., it was shown that there is wide variability in the choice of equipment and protocols for measuring grip strength. To enable comparison between studies, a standardized approach, incorporating more consistent measurement of grip strength is warranted. Based on the results of the review, a standardized approach was described including the utilization of the widely used Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer, as was a clear assessment protocol. So far, it is unknown whether this approach has been adopted in studies investigating grip strength for sarcopenia. The primary aim of this current review is to identify whether studies are adhering to the suggested protocol, or whether a more common method is prevalent. The EWGSOP has suggested multiple cut-off values to define sarcopenia regarding muscle strength: an absolute cut-off score of 20 kilograms (kg) for women and 30 kg for men, and Body Mass Index (BMI) specific cut-off values for men and women. Alternatively, the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Study suggested cut-off points of 26kg for males and 16kg for females, based on the likelihood of mobility impairment. Similar values have also been suggested by Dodds et al., who generated grip strength reference values and calculated cut-off points 2.5 standard deviations below the mean from 12 United Kingdom (U.K)based epidemiology studies.Recently, Beaudart et al. showed that

  6. Protocol for physical assessment in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Michele R; Moro, Claudia M C; Vosgerau, Dilmeire S R

    2014-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disease that causes pain and fatigue, presenting a negative impact on quality of life. Exercise helps maintaining physical fitness and influences directly on the improvement of quality of life. Develop a protocol for health-related physical fitness assessment of patients with FMS with tests that are feasible and appropriate for this population. An exploratory and analytical literature review was performed, seeking to determine the tests used by the scientific community. With this in mind, we performed a literature revision through the use of virtual libraries databases: PubMed, Bireme, Banco de Teses e Dissertações da Capes and Biblioteca Digital Brasileira de Teses e Dissertações, published in between 1992-2012. A variety of tests was found; the following, by number of citations, stood out: Body Mass Index (BMI) and bioimpedance; 6-minute walk; handgrip strength (dynamometer, 1RM [Repetition Maximum]); Sit and reach and Shoulder flexibility; Foot Up and Go, and Flamingo balance. These are the tests that should make up the protocol for the physical evaluation of FMS patients, emphasizing their ease of use.

  7. Designing isothermal titration calorimetry experiments for the study of 1:1 binding: problems with the "standard protocol".

    PubMed

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2012-05-15

    Literature recommendations for designing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments to study 1:1 binding, M+X -->/<-- MX, are not consistent and have persisted through time with little quantitative justification. In particular, the "standard protocol" employed by most workers involves 20 to 30 injections of titrant to a final titrant/titrand mole ratio (R(m)) of ~ 2-a scheme that can be far from optimal and can needlessly limit applicability of the ITC technique. These deficiencies are discussed here along with other misconceptions. Whether a specific binding process can be studied by ITC is determined less by c (the product of binding constant K and titrand concentration [M](0)) than by the total detectable heat q(tot) and the extent to which M can be converted to MX. As guidelines, with 90% conversion to MX, K can be estimated within 5% over the range 10 to 10(8)M(-1) when q(tot)/σ(q)≈700, where σ(q) is the standard deviation for estimation of q. This ratio drops to ~150 when the stoichiometry parameter n is treated as known. A computer application for modeling 1:1 binding yields realistic estimates of parameter standard errors for use in protocol design and feasibility assessment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Standardization of automated cell-based protocols for toxicity testing of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mónica V; Jahnen-Dechent, Wilhelm; Neuss, Sabine

    2011-07-01

    Advances in high-throughput screening (HTS) instrumentation have led to enormous reduction of costs (e.g., of pipetting stations) and to the development of smaller instruments for automation of day-to-day routines in small research laboratories. In the biomaterials community, there has been an increasing interest for standardized screening protocols to identify cell type-specific cytocompatible biomaterials suitable for tissue engineering (TE) applications. In this study, the authors established a multiplexed assay protocol for toxicity screening of biomaterials using a low- to medium-throughput robotic liquid handling station (LHS). The protocol contains analysis of viability, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis combined in one assay. This study includes performance results of a side-by-side comparison of the EpMotion 5070 LHS and conventional pipetting/dispensing systems. Critical parameters were optimized each for a given platform. Higher accuracy and reproducibility were achieved for LHS compared to manually treated samples. The practicability and accuracy of the method in a typical small laboratory setting were tested by running daily routine tasks by trained and untrained laboratory staff. In addition, advantages and disadvantages as well as the step-by-step application protocol are reported. The approach described provides a potential utility in screening biomaterials toxicity, allowing researchers to meet the needs of low- and medium-throughput laboratories.

  9. Protocol for exercise hemodynamic assessment: performing an invasive cardiopulmonary exercise test in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Natalia C.; Manyoo, Agarwal; Oldham, William M.; Stephens, Thomas E.; Goldstein, Ronald H.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Tracy, Julie A.; Leary, Peter J.; Leopold, Jane A.; Kinlay, Scott; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Systrom, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing (iCPET) combines full central hemodynamic assessment with continuous measurements of pulmonary gas exchange and ventilation to help in understanding the pathophysiology underpinning unexplained exertional intolerance. There is increasing evidence to support the use of iCPET as a key methodology for diagnosing heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension as occult causes of exercise limitation, but there is little information available outlining the methodology to use this diagnostic test in clinical practice. To bridge this knowledge gap, the operational protocol for iCPET at our institution is discussed in detail. In turn, a standardized iCPET protocol may provide a common framework to describe the evolving understanding of mechanism(s) that limit exercise capacity and to facilitate research efforts to define novel treatments in these patients. PMID:26697168

  10. Protocol for exercise hemodynamic assessment: performing an invasive cardiopulmonary exercise test in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Berry, Natalia C; Manyoo, Agarwal; Oldham, William M; Stephens, Thomas E; Goldstein, Ronald H; Waxman, Aaron B; Tracy, Julie A; Leary, Peter J; Leopold, Jane A; Kinlay, Scott; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Systrom, David M; Maron, Bradley A

    2015-12-01

    Invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing (iCPET) combines full central hemodynamic assessment with continuous measurements of pulmonary gas exchange and ventilation to help in understanding the pathophysiology underpinning unexplained exertional intolerance. There is increasing evidence to support the use of iCPET as a key methodology for diagnosing heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension as occult causes of exercise limitation, but there is little information available outlining the methodology to use this diagnostic test in clinical practice. To bridge this knowledge gap, the operational protocol for iCPET at our institution is discussed in detail. In turn, a standardized iCPET protocol may provide a common framework to describe the evolving understanding of mechanism(s) that limit exercise capacity and to facilitate research efforts to define novel treatments in these patients.

  11. A consensus protocol for the standardization of cerebrospinal fluid collection and biobanking.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, C E; Petzold, A; Bennett, J L; Berven, F S; Brundin, L; Comabella, M; Franciotta, D; Frederiksen, J L; Fleming, J O; Furlan, R; Hintzen, R Q; Hughes, S G; Johnson, M H; Krasulova, E; Kuhle, J; Magnone, M C; Rajda, C; Rejdak, K; Schmidt, H K; van Pesch, V; Waubant, E; Wolf, C; Giovannoni, G; Hemmer, B; Tumani, H; Deisenhammer, F

    2009-12-01

    There is a long history of research into body fluid biomarkers in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. However, only a few biomarkers in CSF are being used in clinical practice. One of the most critical factors in CSF biomarker research is the inadequate powering of studies because of the lack of sufficient samples that can be obtained in single-center studies. Therefore, collaboration between investigators is needed to establish large biobanks of well-defined samples. Standardized protocols for biobanking are a prerequisite to ensure that the statistical power gained by increasing the numbers of CSF samples is not compromised by preanalytical factors. Here, a consensus report on recommendations for CSF collection and biobanking is presented, formed by the BioMS-eu network for CSF biomarker research in multiple sclerosis. We focus on CSF collection procedures, preanalytical factors, and high-quality clinical and paraclinical information. The biobanking protocols are applicable for CSF biobanks for research targeting any neurologic disease.

  12. A rater training protocol to assess team performance.

    PubMed

    Eppich, Walter; Nannicelli, Anna P; Seivert, Nicholas P; Sohn, Min-Woong; Rozenfeld, Ranna; Woods, Donna M; Holl, Jane L

    2015-01-01

    Simulation-based methodologies are increasingly used to assess teamwork and communication skills and provide team training. Formative feedback regarding team performance is an essential component. While effective use of simulation for assessment or training requires accurate rating of team performance, examples of rater-training programs in health care are scarce. We describe our rater training program and report interrater reliability during phases of training and independent rating. We selected an assessment tool shown to yield valid and reliable results and developed a rater training protocol with an accompanying rater training handbook. The rater training program was modeled after previously described high-stakes assessments in the setting of 3 facilitated training sessions. Adjacent agreement was used to measure interrater reliability between raters. Nine raters with a background in health care and/or patient safety evaluated team performance of 42 in-situ simulations using post-hoc video review. Adjacent agreement increased from the second training session (83.6%) to the third training session (85.6%) when evaluating the same video segments. Adjacent agreement for the rating of overall team performance was 78.3%, which was added for the third training session. Adjacent agreement was 97% 4 weeks posttraining and 90.6% at the end of independent rating of all simulation videos. Rater training is an important element in team performance assessment, and providing examples of rater training programs is essential. Articulating key rating anchors promotes adequate interrater reliability. In addition, using adjacent agreement as a measure allows differentiation between high- and low-performing teams on video review. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  13. An assessment of cleaning regimes and standards in butchers' shops.

    PubMed

    Worsfold, D; Griffith, C J

    2001-09-01

    Cleaning regimes and standards in retail butchers taking part in the Accelerated HACCP project initiative, were assessed by means of visual inspection, examination of cleaning schedules and ATP bioluminescence assays of selected food and hand contact sites. There was a wide variation in surface ATP results, both within and between butchers' shops, but overall they indicated that food and hand contact surfaces were heavily soiled during food production and service. Although separate preparation equipment/utensils were provided, staff undertook raw and cooked product handling throughout the day, with the concomitant danger of contaminating hand and food contact surfaces. The extent of soiling was generally underestimated when assessed visually, the technique used most commonly by the food retail trade and inspection authorities. Periodic or interim cleaning practices produced a significant improvement in cleanliness assessed visually and with ATP assay; however, these results were generally less satisfactory than those obtained by the use of best practice protocols. A lack of written cleaning schedules and records, training in the correct use of cleaning products and awareness of the importance of cleaning hand contact sites were identified as common defects. The results are discussed in relation to the establishment of an effective HACCP system and recommendations for improving cleaning standards are given.

  14. An Assessment Protocol for Selective Mutism: Analogue Assessment Using Parents as Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schill, Melissa T.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Assesses protocol for conducting a functional analysis of maintaining variables for children with selective mutism. A parent was trained in and later applied various behavior strategies designed to increase speech in an eight-year-old girl with selective mutism. Parent and child ratings of treatment were positive. Presents implications for future…

  15. SILEC: a protocol for generating and using isotopically labeled coenzyme A mass spectrometry standards.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sankha S; Blair, Ian A

    2011-12-08

    Stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture (SILEC) was recently developed to generate isotopically labeled coenzyme A (CoA) and short-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. This was accomplished by modifying the widely used technique of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to include [(13)C(3)(15)N]-pantothenate (vitamin B(5)), a CoA precursor, instead of the isotopically labeled amino acids. The lack of a de novo pantothenate synthesis pathway allowed for efficient and near-complete labeling of the measured CoA species. This protocol provides a step-by-step approach for generating stable isotope-labeled short-chain acyl-CoA internal standards in mammalian and insect cells as well as instructions on how to use them in stable isotope dilution mass spectrometric-based analyses. Troubleshooting guidelines, as well as a list of unlabeled and labeled CoA species, are also included. This protocol represents a prototype for generating stable isotope internal standards from labeled essential nutrients such as pantothenate. The generation and use of SILEC standards takes approximately 2-3 weeks.

  16. SILEC: a protocol for generating and using isotopically labeled coenzyme A mass spectrometry standards

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sankha S; Blair, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture (SILEC) was recently developed to generate isotopically labeled coenzyme A (CoA) and short-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. This was accomplished by modifying the widely used technique of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to include [13C315N]-pantothenate (vitamin B5), a CoA precursor, instead of the isotopically labeled amino acids. The lack of a de novo pantothenate synthesis pathway allowed for efficient and near-complete labeling of the measured CoA species. This protocol provides a step-by-step approach for generating stable isotope-labeled short-chain acyl-CoA internal standards in mammalian and insect cells as well as instructions on how to use them in stable isotope dilution mass spectrometric-based analyses. Troubleshooting guidelines, as well as a list of unlabeled and labeled CoA species, are also included. This protocol represents a prototype for generating stable isotope internal standards from labeled essential nutrients such as pantothenate. The generation and use of SILEC standards takes approximately 2–3 weeks. PMID:22157971

  17. Augmentation of labour by a standard protocol in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Mola, G; Rageau, O

    1990-09-01

    A study to investigate a policy of routine augmentation of dystocic labour by standard protocol encompassing definitions of delay in the first and second stages, dosage and administration of oxytocin, specific contra-indications and monitoring progress of augmented labour. During the 5 months of the study 3,261 women were confined at Port Moresby General Hospital. In 329 of these labour was augmented by a standard regime. Amongst the 161 primigravidae thus augmented there were 8 (5%) caesarean sections and 34 (21.1%) assisted deliveries. Of the 166 multigravidae augmented there were 4 (2.4%) caesarean sections and 20 (12.1%) assisted deliveries. These figures can be compared against a total caesarean rate of 2.4% and an assisted delivery rate of 3% in 1988. Analysis of case controls did not show a significant difference in perinatal outcome for those who were augmented. We conclude that a standard management protocol for augmentation of labour in all cases of delay in the first and second stages of labour, excluding those with specific contra-indications is safe and substantiates further the ascertion that active management of labour is a reasonable alternative to caesarean section for dystocia.

  18. EPA Traceability Protocol for Assay and Certification of Gaseous Calibration Standards (EPA/600/R-12/531, May 2012)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, revised its 1993 version of its traceability protocol for the assay and certification of compressed gas and permeation-device calibration standards. The protocol allows producers of...

  19. EPA Traceability Protocol for Assay and Certification of Gaseous Calibration Standards (EPA/600/R-12/531, May 2012)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, revised its 1993 version of its traceability protocol for the assay and certification of compressed gas and permeation-device calibration standards. The protocol allows producers of...

  20. 76 FR 16250 - Planning Resource Adequacy Assessment Reliability Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 40 Planning Resource Adequacy Assessment Reliability Standard... Standard, BAL-502-RFC-02 (Planning Resource Adequacy Analysis, Assessment and ] Documentation), developed..., Assessment and Documentation), developed by ReliabilityFirst Corporation (RFC) and submitted to the...

  1. Improving anticoagulation therapy using point-of-care testing and a standardized protocol.

    PubMed

    Franke, Curtis A; Dickerson, Lori M; Carek, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Many patients in primary care require anticoagulation with warfarin for the prevention of venous and systemic embolism. Achieving the goal international normalized ratio (INR) with warfarin is challenging. The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to increase the proportion of patients taking warfarin with an INR value within the goal range. We included all patients identified on an anticoagulation log in the family medicine residency practice during 3 time periods: baseline, after point-of-care (POC) testing was initiated (intervention period 1), and after a standardized warfarin-dosing protocol was implemented (intervention period 2). Educational sessions were conducted during each intervention period. Measures included the frequency of INR monitoring and the percentage of office visits in which patients' values were within the goal INR range. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Student t test, and the chi2 test. At baseline, patients had an average of 2.6 INR tests performed, and 30.8% were within the INR goal range. Using POC testing, the frequency of monitoring increased to 4.3 INR tests per patient (P = .04), but the percentage of patients within the INR goal remained low at 32.1% (P=.88). When physicians implemented the standardized protocol to guide warfarin dosing, the frequency of testing was similar (3.8 tests per patient), but the percentage of patients within the INR goal increased to 45.9% (P<.04). POC testing increased the frequency of INR testing, and additional use of a standardized protocol for warfarin dosing increased the percentage of patients within the INR goal range. This model of anticoagulation management could be easily implemented in any family medicine office.

  2. Standardized terminology for clinical trial protocols based on top-level ontological categories.

    PubMed

    Heller, B; Herre, H; Lippoldt, K; Loeffler, M

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for the ontologically based standardization of concepts with regard to the quality assurance of clinical trial protocols. We developed a data dictionary for medical and trial-specific terms in which concepts and relations are defined context-dependently. The data dictionary is provided to different medical research networks by means of the software tool Onto-Builder via the internet. The data dictionary is based on domain-specific ontologies and the top-level ontology of GOL. The concepts and relations described in the data dictionary are represented in natural language, semi-formally or formally according to their use.

  3. Characterizing College Science Assessments: The Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol.

    PubMed

    Laverty, James T; Underwood, Sonia M; Matz, Rebecca L; Posey, Lynmarie A; Carmel, Justin H; Caballero, Marcos D; Fata-Hartley, Cori L; Ebert-May, Diane; Jardeleza, Sarah E; Cooper, Melanie M

    2016-01-01

    Many calls to improve science education in college and university settings have focused on improving instructor pedagogy. Meanwhile, science education at the K-12 level is undergoing significant changes as a result of the emphasis on scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. This framework of "three-dimensional learning" is based on the literature about how people learn science and how we can help students put their knowledge to use. Recently, similar changes are underway in higher education by incorporating three-dimensional learning into college science courses. As these transformations move forward, it will become important to assess three-dimensional learning both to align assessments with the learning environment, and to assess the extent of the transformations. In this paper we introduce the Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol (3D-LAP), which is designed to characterize and support the development of assessment tasks in biology, chemistry, and physics that align with transformation efforts. We describe the development process used by our interdisciplinary team, discuss the validity and reliability of the protocol, and provide evidence that the protocol can distinguish between assessments that have the potential to elicit evidence of three-dimensional learning and those that do not.

  4. Characterizing College Science Assessments: The Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Sonia M.; Matz, Rebecca L.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Carmel, Justin H.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Fata-Hartley, Cori L.; Ebert-May, Diane; Jardeleza, Sarah E.; Cooper, Melanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Many calls to improve science education in college and university settings have focused on improving instructor pedagogy. Meanwhile, science education at the K-12 level is undergoing significant changes as a result of the emphasis on scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. This framework of “three-dimensional learning” is based on the literature about how people learn science and how we can help students put their knowledge to use. Recently, similar changes are underway in higher education by incorporating three-dimensional learning into college science courses. As these transformations move forward, it will become important to assess three-dimensional learning both to align assessments with the learning environment, and to assess the extent of the transformations. In this paper we introduce the Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol (3D-LAP), which is designed to characterize and support the development of assessment tasks in biology, chemistry, and physics that align with transformation efforts. We describe the development process used by our interdisciplinary team, discuss the validity and reliability of the protocol, and provide evidence that the protocol can distinguish between assessments that have the potential to elicit evidence of three-dimensional learning and those that do not. PMID:27606671

  5. Assessing the detection, reporting and investigation of adverse events in clinical trial protocols implemented in Cameroon: a documentary review of clinical trial protocols.

    PubMed

    Ebile, Akoh Walter; Ateudjieu, Jerome; Yakum, Martin Ndinakie; Djuidje, Marceline Ngounoue; Watcho, Pierre

    2015-09-29

    International guidelines recommend ethical and scientific quality standards for managing and reporting adverse events occurring during clinical trials to competent research ethics committees and regulatory authorities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether clinical trial protocols in Cameroon are developed in line with national requirements and international guidelines as far as detecting, reporting and investigating of adverse events is concerned. It was a documentary review of all approved clinical trial protocols that were submitted at the Cameroon National Ethics Committee for evaluation from 1997 through 2012. Data were extracted using a preconceived and validated grid. Protocol review process targeted the title, abstract, objectives, methodology, resources, and the chapter on safety. In total, 106 (4.9 %) clinical trial protocols were identified from 2173 protocols seen in the archive and 104 (4.8 %) included for review. Seventy six (73.1 %) trials did not include the surveillance of adverse events as part of their objective. A total of 91 (87.5 %) protocols did not budget for adverse event surveillance, 76 (73.1 %) did not have a data safety management board (DSMB), 11(10.6 %) included insurance for participants, 47 (45.2 %) did not include a case definition for serious adverse events, 33 (31.7 %) described procedures to detect adverse events, 33 (31.7 %) described procedure for reporting and 22 (21.2 %) described procedure for investigating adverse events. Most clinical trial protocols in Cameroon are developed to focus on benefits and pay little attention to harms. The development of national guidelines can improve the surveillance of adverse events in clinical trial research conducted in Cameroon. Adverse events surveillance tools and a budget are critical for an adequate planning for adverse event surveillance when developing trial protocols. Clinical trial protocols submitted in the Cameroon National Ethics Committee do not adequately plan

  6. Assessment of Service Protocols Adaptability Using a Novel Path Computation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhangbing; Bhiri, Sami; Haller, Armin; Zhuge, Hai; Hauswirth, Manfred

    In this paper we propose a new kind of adaptability assessment that determines whether service protocols of a requestor and a provider are adaptable, computes their adaptation degree, and identifies conditions that determine when they can be adapted. We also propose a technique that implements this adaptability assessment: (1) we construct a complete adaptation graph that captures all service interactions adaptable between these two service protocols. The emptiness or non-emptiness of this graph corresponds to the fact that whether or not they are adaptable; (2) we propose a novel path computation technique to generate all instance sub-protocols which reflect valid executions of a particular service protocol, and to derive all instance sub-protocol pairs captured by the complete adaptation graph. An adaptation degree is computed as a ratio between the number of instance sub-protocols captured by these instance sub-protocol pairs with respect to a service protocol and that of this service protocol; (3) and finally we identify a set of conditions based on these instance sub-protocol pairs. A condition is the conjunction of all conditions specified on the transitions of a given pair of instance sub-protocols. This assessment is a comprehensive means of selecting the suitable service protocol among functionally-equivalent candidates according to the requestor's business requirements.

  7. Data Integration Protocol In Ten-steps (DIPIT): a new standard for medical researchers.

    PubMed

    Dipnall, Joanna F; Berk, Michael; Jacka, Felice N; Williams, Lana J; Dodd, Seetal; Pasco, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    The exponential increase in data, computing power and the availability of readily accessible analytical software has allowed organisations around the world to leverage the benefits of integrating multiple heterogeneous data files for enterprise-level planning and decision making. Benefits from effective data integration to the health and medical research community include more trustworthy research, higher service quality, improved personnel efficiency, reduction of redundant tasks, facilitation of auditing and more timely, relevant and specific information. The costs of poor quality processes elevate the risk of erroneous outcomes, an erosion of confidence in the data and the organisations using these data. To date there are no documented set of standards for best practice integration of heterogeneous data files for research purposes. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe a set of clear protocol for data file integration (Data Integration Protocol In Ten-steps; DIPIT) translational to any field of research. The DIPIT approach consists of a set of 10 systematic methodological steps to ensure the final data are appropriate for the analysis to meet the research objectives, legal and ethical requirements are met, and that data definitions are clear, concise, and comprehensive. This protocol is neither file specific nor software dependent, but aims to be transportable to any data-merging situation to minimise redundancy and error and translational to any field of research. DIPIT aims to generate a master data file that is of the optimal integrity to serve as the basis for research analysis. With linking of heterogeneous data files becoming increasingly common across all fields of medicine, DIPIT provides a systematic approach to a potentially complex task of integrating a large number of files and variables. The DIPIT protocol will ensure the final integrated data is consistent and of high integrity for the research requirements, useful for practical

  8. Assessing Juvenile Salmonid Passage Through Culverts: Field Research in Support of Protocol Development

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Greg D.; Evans, Nathan R.; Pearson, Walter H.; Southard, John A.

    2001-10-30

    The primary goal of our research this spring/ summer was to refine techniques and examine scenarios under which a standardized protocol could be applied to assess juvenile coho salmon (O. kisutch) passage through road culverts. Field evaluations focused on capture-mark- recapture methods that allowed analysis of fish movement patterns, estimates of culvert passability, and potential identification of cues inducing these movements. At this stage, 0+ age coho salmon fry 30 mm to 65 mm long (fork length) were the species and age class of interest. Ultimately, the protocol will provide rapid, statistically rigorous methods for trained personnel to perform standardized biological assessments of culvert passability to a number of juvenile salmon species. Questions to be addressed by the research include the following: ? Do hydraulic structures such as culverts restrict habitat for juvenile salmonids? ? How do existing culverts and retrofits perform relative to juvenile salmonid passage? ? Do some culvert characteristics and hydraulic conditions provide better passage than others? ? Does the culvert represent a barrier to certain size classes of fish? Recommendations addressed issues of study site selection, initial capture, marking, recapture/observations, and estimating movement.

  9. The California Multimedia Risk Assessment Protocol for Alternative Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, T.; Ginn, T. R.; McKone, T. E.; Rice, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Any new fuel in California requires approval by the state agencies overseeing human and environmental health. In order to provide a systematic evaluation of new fuel impacts, California now requires a multimedia risk assessment (MMRA) for fuel approval. The fuel MMRA involves all relevant state agencies including: the California Air Resources Board (CARB), the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), the Office of Environmental Health Hazards Assessment (OEHHA), and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) overseen by the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA). The lead agency for MMRAs is the CARB. The original law requiring a multimedia assessment is California Health and Safety Code 43830.8. In addition, the low carbon fuel standard (LCFS), the Global Warming Solutions Act (AB32), and the Verified Diesel Emission Control Strategy (VDECS) have provisions that can require a multimedia assessment. In this presentation, I give an overview of the California multimedia risk assessment (MMRA) for new fuels that has been recently developed and applied to several alternative fuels. The objective of the California MMRA is to assess risk of potential impacts of new fuels to multiple environmental media including: air, water, and soil. Attainment of this objective involves many challenges, including varying levels of uncertainty, relative comparison of incommensurate risk factors, and differing levels of priority assigned to risk factors. The MMRA is based on a strategy of relative risk assessment and flexible accommodation of distinct and diverse fuel formulations. The approach is tiered by design, in order to allow for sequentially more sophisticated investigations as knowledge gaps are identified and re-prioritized by the ongoing research. The assessment also involves peer review in order to provide coupling between risk assessment and stakeholder investment, as well as constructive or confrontational feedback. The multimedia assessment

  10. Standardized accuracy assessment of the calypso wireless transponder tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, A. M.; Schmitt, D.; Seitel, A.; Chatrasingh, M.; Echner, G.; Oelfke, U.; Nill, S.; Birkfellner, W.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2014-11-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) tracking allows localization of small EM sensors in a magnetic field of known geometry without line-of-sight. However, this technique requires a cable connection to the tracked object. A wireless alternative based on magnetic fields, referred to as transponder tracking, has been proposed by several authors. Although most of the transponder tracking systems are still in an early stage of development and not ready for clinical use yet, Varian Medical Systems Inc. (Palo Alto, California, USA) presented the Calypso system for tumor tracking in radiation therapy which includes transponder technology. But it has not been used for computer-assisted interventions (CAI) in general or been assessed for accuracy in a standardized manner, so far. In this study, we apply a standardized assessment protocol presented by Hummel et al (2005 Med. Phys. 32 2371-9) to the Calypso system for the first time. The results show that transponder tracking with the Calypso system provides a precision and accuracy below 1 mm in ideal clinical environments, which is comparable with other EM tracking systems. Similar to other systems the tracking accuracy was affected by metallic distortion, which led to errors of up to 3.2 mm. The potential of the wireless transponder tracking technology for use in many future CAI applications can be regarded as extremely high.

  11. Effectiveness of various irrigation protocols for the removal of calcium hydroxide from artificial standardized grooves

    PubMed Central

    GOKTURK, Hakan; OZKOCAK, Ismail; BUYUKGEBIZ, Feyzi; DEMIR, Osman

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of laser-activated irrigation (LAI), XP-endo Finisher, CanalBrush, Vibringe, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), and conventional syringe irrigation systems on the removal of calcium hydroxide (CH) from simulated root canal irregularities. Material and Methods The root canals of one hundred and five extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented using Reciproc rotary files up to size R40. The teeth were split longitudinally. Two of the three standard grooves were created in the coronal and apical section of one segment, and another in the middle part of the second segment. The standardized grooves were filled with CH and the root halves were reassembled. After 14 days, the specimens were randomly divided into 7 experimental groups (n=15/group). CH was removed as follows: Group 1: beveled needle irrigation; Group 2: double side-vented needle irrigation; Group 3: CanalBrush; Group 4: XP-endo Finisher; Group 5: Vibringe; Group 6: PUI; Group 7: LAI. The amount of remaining CH in the grooves was scored under a stereomicroscope at 20× magnification. Statistical evaluation was performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Bonferroni-Correction Mann–Whitney U tests. Results Groups 1 and 2 were the least efficient in eliminating CH from the grooves. Groups 6 and 7 eliminated more CH than the other protocols; however, no significant differences were found between these two groups (P>.05). Conclusions Nevertheless, none of the investigated protocols were able to completely remove all CH from all three root regions. LAI and PUI showed less residual CH than the other protocols from artificial grooves. PMID:28678948

  12. Effectiveness of various irrigation protocols for the removal of calcium hydroxide from artificial standardized grooves.

    PubMed

    Gokturk, Hakan; Ozkocak, Ismail; Buyukgebiz, Feyzi; Demir, Osman

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of laser-activated irrigation (LAI), XP-endo Finisher, CanalBrush, Vibringe, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), and conventional syringe irrigation systems on the removal of calcium hydroxide (CH) from simulated root canal irregularities. The root canals of one hundred and five extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented using Reciproc rotary files up to size R40. The teeth were split longitudinally. Two of the three standard grooves were created in the coronal and apical section of one segment, and another in the middle part of the second segment. The standardized grooves were filled with CH and the root halves were reassembled. After 14 days, the specimens were randomly divided into 7 experimental groups (n=15/group). CH was removed as follows: Group 1: beveled needle irrigation; Group 2: double side-vented needle irrigation; Group 3: CanalBrush; Group 4: XP-endo Finisher; Group 5: Vibringe; Group 6: PUI; Group 7: LAI. The amount of remaining CH in the grooves was scored under a stereomicroscope at 20× magnification. Statistical evaluation was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni-Correction Mann-Whitney U tests. Groups 1 and 2 were the least efficient in eliminating CH from the grooves. Groups 6 and 7 eliminated more CH than the other protocols; however, no significant differences were found between these two groups (P>.05). Nevertheless, none of the investigated protocols were able to completely remove all CH from all three root regions. LAI and PUI showed less residual CH than the other protocols from artificial grooves.

  13. Impact of a Respiratory Therapy Assess-and-Treat Protocol on Adult Cardiothoracic ICU Readmissions.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Robert T; Malinowski, Thomas; Baugher, Mitchel; Rowley, Daniel D

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this retrospective medical record review was to report on recidivism to the ICU among adult postoperative cardiac and thoracic patients managed with a respiratory therapy assess-and-treat (RTAT) protocol. Our primary null hypothesis was that there would be no difference in all-cause unexpected readmissions and escalations between the RTAT group and the physician-ordered respiratory care group. Our secondary null hypothesis was that there would be no difference in primary respiratory-related readmissions, ICU length of stay, or hospital length of stay. We reviewed 1,400 medical records of cardiac and thoracic postoperative subjects between January 2015 and October 2016. The RTAT is driven by a standardized patient assessment tool, which is completed by a registered respiratory therapist. The tool develops a respiratory severity score for each patient and directs interventions for bronchial hygiene, aerosol therapy, and lung inflation therapy based on an algorithm. The protocol period commenced on December 1, 2015, and continued through October 2016. Data relative to unplanned admissions to the ICU for all causes as well as respiratory-related causes were evaluated. There was a statistically significant difference in the all-cause unplanned ICU admission rate between the RTAT (5.8% [95% CI 4.3-7.9]) and the physician-ordered respiratory care (8.8% [95% CI 6.9-11.1]) groups (P = .034). There was no statistically significant difference in respiratory-related unplanned ICU admissions with RTAT (36% [95% CI 22.7-51.6]) compared with the physician-ordered respiratory care (53% [95% CI 41.1-64.8]) group (P = .09). The RTAT protocol group spent 1 d less in the ICU (P < .001) and in the hospital (P < .001). RTAT protocol implementation demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in all-cause ICU readmissions. The reduction in respiratory-related ICU readmissions did not reach statistical significance. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. Consensus recommendations for a standardized Brain Tumor Imaging Protocol in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Bendszus, Martin; Boxerman, Jerrold; Barboriak, Daniel; Erickson, Bradley J; Smits, Marion; Nelson, Sarah J; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Alexander, Brian; Goldmacher, Gregory; Wick, Wolfgang; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weller, Michael; Galanis, Evanthia; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Shankar, Lalitha; Jacobs, Paula; Pope, Whitney B; Yang, Dewen; Chung, Caroline; Knopp, Michael V; Cha, Soonme; van den Bent, Martin J; Chang, Susan; Yung, W K Al; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Wen, Patrick Y; Gilbert, Mark R

    2015-09-01

    A recent joint meeting was held on January 30, 2014, with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Cancer Institute (NCI), clinical scientists, imaging experts, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, clinical trials cooperative groups, and patient advocate groups to discuss imaging endpoints for clinical trials in glioblastoma. This workshop developed a set of priorities and action items including the creation of a standardized MRI protocol for multicenter studies. The current document outlines consensus recommendations for a standardized Brain Tumor Imaging Protocol (BTIP), along with the scientific and practical justifications for these recommendations, resulting from a series of discussions between various experts involved in aspects of neuro-oncology neuroimaging for clinical trials. The minimum recommended sequences include: (i) parameter-matched precontrast and postcontrast inversion recovery-prepared, isotropic 3D T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo; (ii) axial 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo acquired after contrast injection and before postcontrast 3D T1-weighted images to control timing of images after contrast administration; (iii) precontrast, axial 2D T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery; and (iv) precontrast, axial 2D, 3-directional diffusion-weighted images. Recommended ranges of sequence parameters are provided for both 1.5 T and 3 T MR systems. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Consensus recommendations for a standardized Brain Tumor Imaging Protocol in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Bendszus, Martin; Boxerman, Jerrold; Barboriak, Daniel; Erickson, Bradley J.; Smits, Marion; Nelson, Sarah J.; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Alexander, Brian; Goldmacher, Gregory; Wick, Wolfgang; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weller, Michael; Galanis, Evanthia; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Shankar, Lalitha; Jacobs, Paula; Pope, Whitney B.; Yang, Dewen; Chung, Caroline; Knopp, Michael V.; Cha, Soonme; van den Bent, Martin J.; Chang, Susan; Al Yung, W.K.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Gilbert, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A recent joint meeting was held on January 30, 2014, with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Cancer Institute (NCI), clinical scientists, imaging experts, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, clinical trials cooperative groups, and patient advocate groups to discuss imaging endpoints for clinical trials in glioblastoma. This workshop developed a set of priorities and action items including the creation of a standardized MRI protocol for multicenter studies. The current document outlines consensus recommendations for a standardized Brain Tumor Imaging Protocol (BTIP), along with the scientific and practical justifications for these recommendations, resulting from a series of discussions between various experts involved in aspects of neuro-oncology neuroimaging for clinical trials. The minimum recommended sequences include: (i) parameter-matched precontrast and postcontrast inversion recovery-prepared, isotropic 3D T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo; (ii) axial 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo acquired after contrast injection and before postcontrast 3D T1-weighted images to control timing of images after contrast administration; (iii) precontrast, axial 2D T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery; and (iv) precontrast, axial 2D, 3-directional diffusion-weighted images. Recommended ranges of sequence parameters are provided for both 1.5 T and 3 T MR systems. PMID:26250565

  16. A Standardized Shift Handover Protocol: Improving Nurses’ Safe Practice in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Malekzadeh, Javad; Mazluom, Seyed Reza; Etezadi, Toktam; Tasseri, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For maintaining the continuity of care and improving the quality of care, effective inter-shift information communication is necessary. Any handover error can endanger patient safety. Despite the importance of shift handover, there is no standard handover protocol in our healthcare settings. Methods: In this one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study conducted in spring and summer of 2011, we recruited a convenience sample of 56 ICU nurses. The Nurses’ Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist was used for data collection. The Content Validity Index and the inter-rater correlation coefficient of the checklist was 0.92 and 89, respectively. We employed the SPSS 11.5 software and the Mc Nemar and paired-samples t test for data analysis. Results: Study findings revealed that nurses’ mean score on the Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist increased significantly from 11.6 (2.7) to 17.0 (1.8) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: using a standard handover protocol for communicating patient’s needs and information improves nurses’ safe practice in the area of basic nursing care. PMID:25276725

  17. The Impact of a Standardized Sodium Protocol on Incidence and Outcome of Dysnatremias in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    Spatenkova, Vera; Bradac, Ondrej; Skrabalek, Pavel

    2015-07-01

    Dysnatremias are common and prognostically serious in neurocritical care. We studied whether a standardized sodium protocol would improve our neurocritical care of dysnatremias. A 5-year prospective study of a standardized sodium protocol for 1,560 patients admitted with various brain diseases in an adult neurologic-neurosurgical intensive care unit (NNICU) was compared with a 5-year retrospective analysis of 1,440 patients without the sodium protocol. Hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium (SNa(+)) < 135 mmol/L and hypernatremia SNa(+ )> 150 mmol/L. The sodium protocol involved measuring SNa(+), serum, and urine osmolality, measured and calculated renal function parameters, fluid intake 40 mL/kg weight/day without hypotonic saline, thiazide, and desmopressin acetate in all normonatremic NNICU patients. In the protocol study, hyponatremia occurred slightly less often (15.7 versus 16.3% of patients; p = 0.684), hypernatremia was significantly higher (respectively 8.5% versus 5.2% of patients; p < 0.001), and no differences were noted in hypo/hypernatremia (p = 0.483). There were no differences in the incidence of hypo-osmolal hyponatremia (respectively 3.5% versus 3.5% of patients; p = 0.987), cerebral salt wasting (CSW; respectively 1.7% versus 1.7% of patients; p = 0.883), syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH; respectively 0.1% versus 0.3% of patients; p = 0.152), central diabetes insipidus (CDI; respectively 1.0% versus 0.6% of patients; p = 0.149). In hyponatremia there were no differences in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score upon onset of hyponatremia (p = 0.294), NNICU mortality (respectively 1.0% versus 0.4% patients; p = 0.074), and bad outcome upon discharge from NNICU (respectively 5.1% versus 6.5% of patients; p = 0.101), but in hypernatremia GCS score upon onset (p < 0.001), mortality (respectively 2.8% versus 1.0%; p < 0.001), and bad outcome from NNICU

  18. Assessing standards of vascular access device care.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Rose

    Vascular access devices (VADs) are essential in health care as they provide vital access for treatment including the infusion of medication, fluids, blood products and nutritional supplements. However, their invasive nature predisposes patients to potential complications, primarily bloodstream infections. This article examines the current standards of VAD care and assesses compliance with current guidelines (national and trust policy) in one hospital setting utilising a practice audit. The audit was conducted in a 500-bed district general hospital over 6 non-consecutive week days. The medical division where the audit took place had 13 wards with 288 beds. A total of 120 VADs were audited, averaging n=9.2 per ward (with a range of 4-18 on each ward). The results demonstrated a collective non-compliance rate of 48%. Although overall compliance was 52%, a poor standard of care was highlighted across the division for all components of the care elements. The post-insertion care of VADs is an essential component of a comprehensive strategy to prevent complications. Consequently, initiatives such as audit, education and feedback should be used in an effort to improve practice and maintain optimal care.

  19. SCORTEN overestimates mortality in the setting of a standardized treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Imahara, Scott D; Holmes, James H; Heimbach, David M; Engrav, Loren E; Honari, Shari; Klein, Matthew B; Gibran, Nicole S

    2006-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare, severe, exfoliative disorder with a high mortality rate. SCORTEN is a recently developed scoring system that estimates severity and predicts mortality in patients with TEN based on seven independent clinical risk factors recorded within the first 24 hours of admission. An increasing SCORTEN level predicts a higher mortality rate. For more than 20 years, the treatment of TEN at our institution has involved the use of a standardized clinical pathway that includes removal of sloughed epidermis, dermal protection with porcine xenograft, early enteral nutrition, and critical care monitoring. We hypothesize that this standardized clinical approach will result in a lower mortality rate than predicted by SCORTEN. A retrospective review was performed on all patients treated for TEN using the standardized pathway from February 1987 to March 2004. SCORTEN was calculated in each patient. One hundred nine patients were treated for TEN during the study period. Overall observed mortality was 20% compared with a SCORTEN predicted mortality of 30%, resulting in a relative reduction in mortality of 33% (P = .011). In addition, observed probability of death was lower than predicted at all levels, except at SCORTEN score of 6 or greater. In conclusion, TEN remains a life-threatening disease with a high mortality rate. Our standardized treatment protocol results in significantly improved outcomes compared to those predicted by SCORTEN.

  20. EuroFlow standardization of flow cytometer instrument settings and immunophenotyping protocols

    PubMed Central

    Kalina, T; Flores-Montero, J; van der Velden, V H J; Martin-Ayuso, M; Böttcher, S; Ritgen, M; Almeida, J; Lhermitte, L; Asnafi, V; Mendonça, A; de Tute, R; Cullen, M; Sedek, L; Vidriales, M B; Pérez, J J; te Marvelde, J G; Mejstrikova, E; Hrusak, O; Szczepański, T; van Dongen, J J M; Orfao, A

    2012-01-01

    The EU-supported EuroFlow Consortium aimed at innovation and standardization of immunophenotyping for diagnosis and classification of hematological malignancies by introducing 8-color flow cytometry with fully standardized laboratory procedures and antibody panels in order to achieve maximally comparable results among different laboratories. This required the selection of optimal combinations of compatible fluorochromes and the design and evaluation of adequate standard operating procedures (SOPs) for instrument setup, fluorescence compensation and sample preparation. Additionally, we developed software tools for the evaluation of individual antibody reagents and antibody panels. Each section describes what has been evaluated experimentally versus adopted based on existing data and experience. Multicentric evaluation demonstrated high levels of reproducibility based on strict implementation of the EuroFlow SOPs and antibody panels. Overall, the 6 years of extensive collaborative experiments and the analysis of hundreds of cell samples of patients and healthy controls in the EuroFlow centers have provided for the first time laboratory protocols and software tools for fully standardized 8-color flow cytometric immunophenotyping of normal and malignant leukocytes in bone marrow and blood; this has yielded highly comparable data sets, which can be integrated in a single database. PMID:22948490

  1. Prospective Use of a Standardized Nonoperative Early Weightbearing Protocol for Achilles Tendon Rupture: 17 Years of Experience.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Timo M; Bremer, Anne K; Krause, Fabian G; Müller, Thorsten; Weber, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Acute traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon can be treated operatively or nonoperatively. Throughout the literature, there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment protocol. To report on 17 years of experience with treating this injury with a standardized nonoperative treatment protocol. Case Series; Level of evidence, 4. The treatment protocol was based on a combination of an equinus cast and rehabilitation boot, which promoted immediate full weightbearing and early functional rehabilitation. A total of 171 patients were consecutively treated and prospectively followed from 1996 to 2013. Assessed were subjective parameters such as pain, loss of strength, return to previous activity level, meteosensitivity, and general satisfaction with the treatment outcome. Clinical assessment included testing of plantar flexion strength and endurance, calf circumference, and tendon length. Subjective and clinical parameters were then used to calculate a modified Thermann score. The correlation between tendon lengthening and function was calculated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. A total of 114 patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months (mean, 27 ± 20 months; range, 12-88 months). The mean Thermann score was 82 ± 13 (range, 41-100), and subjective satisfaction was rated "very good" and "good" in 90%. An inverse correlation was found between tendon length and muscle strength (R = -0.3). There were 11 reruptures (8 with and 3 without an adequate trauma). General complications were 5 deep venous thromboses, 1 complex regional pain syndrome, and minor problems such as transient heel pain (n = 3), heel numbness (n = 1), and cast-associated skin abrasions (n = 4). Seventeen years of experience with a nonoperative treatment protocol for acute rupture of the Achilles tendon confirmed good functional outcome and patient satisfaction. Reruptures mostly occurred with new traumatic events in the vulnerable phase from 6 to 12 weeks after the initial injury

  2. Development of a protocol for the ecological assessment of a special species

    Treesearch

    David Burton

    2004-01-01

    Developing consistent inventory and assessment protocols is important to people working on aspen issues in California and Nevada. Efforts have focused on identifying key indicators of ecological condition within aspen stands. The protocols have incorporated a range of factors that create or affect those indicators. Resulting ecological assessments conducted through the...

  3. The equivalence of multi-axis spine systems: Recommended stiffness limits using a standardized testing protocol.

    PubMed

    Holsgrove, Timothy P; Amin, Dhara B; Pascual, Sonia Ramos; Ding, Boyin; Welch, William C; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Miles, Anthony W; Winkelstein, Beth A; Costi, John J

    2017-09-14

    The complexity of multi-axis spine testing often makes it challenging to compare results from different studies. The aim of this work was to develop and implement a standardized testing protocol across three six-axis spine systems, compare them, and provide stiffness and phase angle limits against which other test systems can be compared. Standardized synthetic lumbar specimens (n=5), comprising three springs embedded in polymer at each end, were tested on each system using pure moments in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Tests were performed using sine and triangle waves with an amplitude of 8Nm, a frequency of 0.1Hz, and with axial preloads of 0 and 500N. The stiffness, phase angle, and R(2) value of the moment against rotation in the principal axis were calculated at the center of each specimen. The tracking error was adopted asa measure of each test system to minimize non-principal loads, defined as the root mean squared difference between actual and target loads. All three test systems demonstrated similar stiffnesses, with small (<14%) but significant differences in 4 of 12 tests. More variability was observed in the phase angle between the principal axis moment and rotation, with significant differences in 10 of 12 tests. Stiffness and phase angle limits were calculated based on the 95% confidence intervals from all three systems. These recommendations can be used with the standard specimen and testing protocol by other research institutions to ensure equivalence of different spine systems, increasing the ability to compare in vitro spine studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Epidemiological standards for assessing quality: a proposal

    PubMed

    Rattner

    1996-01-01

    This paper proposes a strategy for defining indicators to assess the quality of the process of health care, based on the identification of the objectives of the care being delivered and on the verification of whether the technical guidelines for the procedures are being enforced. The article goes on to apply the proposed methodology to the process of health care during childbirth, based on a perspective of comprehensive care and adopting both an individual and collective risk approach. It uses a data bank of 4,558 Simplified Perinatal Clinical Histories (CLAP/PAHO/WHO) from 12 hospitals.The indicators selected were: V.D.R.L., Rh blood typing, antitetanus vaccination, rate of cesarean sections, reception of the baby by a pediatrician at birth, Apgar score, evaluation of the gestational age by physical exam, rooming-in, exclusive breastfeeding upon discharge, and referral for a puerperal consultation. Methods for classification of hospitals were the sum of their scores for each indicator, gold standard, and ranking. This methodology warranted identification of one hospital with excellent quality of care, five with good care, two with fair care, and four whose performances were completely unsatisfactory. Finally, some remarks on the assessment of quality of health care are made and future developments are proposed.

  5. Stream Assessment and Mitigation Protocols: A Review of Commonalities and Differences

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Various stream assessment and stream mitigation protocols in use by federal and state agencies nationwide were compiled and evaluated to determine the degree to which they presented unique, comprehensive procedures to assess stream and riparian functions.

  6. A CAD system and quality assurance protocol for bone age assessment utilizing digital hand atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertych, Arakadiusz; Zhang, Aifeng; Ferrara, Benjamin; Liu, Brent J.

    2007-03-01

    Determination of bone age assessment (BAA) in pediatric radiology is a task based on detailed analysis of patient's left hand X-ray. The current standard utilized in clinical practice relies on a subjective comparison of the hand with patterns in the book atlas. The computerized approach to BAA (CBAA) utilizes automatic analysis of the regions of interest in the hand image. This procedure is followed by extraction of quantitative features sensitive to skeletal development that are further converted to a bone age value utilizing knowledge from the digital hand atlas (DHA). This also allows providing BAA results resembling current clinical approach. All developed methodologies have been combined into one CAD module with a graphical user interface (GUI). CBAA can also improve the statistical and analytical accuracy based on a clinical work-flow analysis. For this purpose a quality assurance protocol (QAP) has been developed. Implementation of the QAP helped to make the CAD more robust and find images that cannot meet conditions required by DHA standards. Moreover, the entire CAD-DHA system may gain further benefits if clinical acquisition protocol is modified. The goal of this study is to present the performance improvement of the overall CAD-DHA system with QAP and the comparison of the CAD results with chronological age of 1390 normal subjects from the DHA. The CAD workstation can process images from local image database or from a PACS server.

  7. A computerized standard protocol order entry for pediatric inpatient acute seizure emergencies reduces time to treatment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Morgan, Robin; Schiff, Linda; Hannah, Debbie; Wheless, James

    2014-02-01

    Time to treatment of seizures is critical to efficacy. We performed a quality initiative and evaluated time to treatment of inpatient seizure emergencies with first- and second-line medicines before and after implementation of a computerized, standard treatment protocol. Data from 125 patients revealed that 179 seizure episodes required first-line antiepileptic drugs, and the mean time to treatment was 7.72 minutes. In 87 episodes, patients (49%) received the drugs within 5 minutes. Forty-six episodes required second-line drugs. In 17 (37%), patients received them within 30 minutes (mean 49.48 minutes). After implementation of the protocol, the mean time to treatment with first-line drugs was 3.74 minutes, a reduction of >50% (P < .0001). The mean time to treatment with second-line drugs was 25.05 minutes, a reduction of ∼50% (P < .0001). This effective model for reducing the time to treatment of seizure emergencies may be useful to similar institutions.

  8. A consensus protocol for the standardization of cerebrospinal fluid collection and biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Teunissen, C E.; Petzold, A; Bennett, J L.; Berven, F S.; Brundin, L; Comabella, M; Franciotta, D; Frederiksen, J L.; Fleming, J O.; Furlan, R; Hintzen, MD, R Q.; Hughes, S G.; Johnson, M H.; Krasulova, E; Kuhle, J; Magnone, M C.; Rajda, C; Rejdak, K; Schmidt, H K.; van Pesch, V; Waubant, E; Wolf, C; Giovannoni, G; Hemmer, B; Tumani, H; Deisenhammer, F

    2009-01-01

    There is a long history of research into body fluid biomarkers in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. However, only a few biomarkers in CSF are being used in clinical practice. One of the most critical factors in CSF biomarker research is the inadequate powering of studies because of the lack of sufficient samples that can be obtained in single-center studies. Therefore, collaboration between investigators is needed to establish large biobanks of well-defined samples. Standardized protocols for biobanking are a prerequisite to ensure that the statistical power gained by increasing the numbers of CSF samples is not compromised by preanalytical factors. Here, a consensus report on recommendations for CSF collection and biobanking is presented, formed by the BioMS-eu network for CSF biomarker research in multiple sclerosis. We focus on CSF collection procedures, preanalytical factors, and high-quality clinical and paraclinical information. The biobanking protocols are applicable for CSF biobanks for research targeting any neurologic disease. GLOSSARY CIS = clinically isolated syndrome; EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; IgG = immunoglobulin G; MALDI-TOF = matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight; MS = multiple sclerosis; MSFC = Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite; SPMS = secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. PMID:19949037

  9. Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic Standardized Assessment (LAP-D).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, David; Lobman, Marcia; Oremland, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic Standardized Assessment, a standardized norm-referenced developmental assessment tool for children between the ages of 30 to 72 months. The test assesses fine motor skills, language skills, cognitive ability, and gross motor development. Its administration, standardization,…

  10. The impact of free or standardized lifestyle and urine sampling protocol on metabolome recognition accuracy.

    PubMed

    Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Gralka, Ewa; Tenori, Leonardo; Konrad, Manuela; Hofmann, Peter; Dieber-Rotheneder, Martina; Turano, Paola; Luchinat, Claudio; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Urine contains a clear individual metabolic signature, although embedded within a large daily variability. Given the potential of metabolomics to monitor disease onset from deviations from the "healthy" metabolic state, we have evaluated the effectiveness of a standardized lifestyle in reducing the "metabolic" noise. Urine was collected from 24 (5 men and 19 women) healthy volunteers over a period of 10 days: phase I, days 1-7 in a real-life situation; phase II, days 8-10 in a standardized diet and day 10 plus exercise program. Data on dietary intake and physical activity have been analyzed by a nation-specific software and monitored by published protocols. Urine samples have been analyzed by (1)H NMR followed by multivariate statistics. The individual fingerprint emerged and consolidated with increasing the number of samples and reaches ~100 % cross-validated accuracy for about 40 samples. Diet standardization reduced both the intra-individual and the interindividual variability; the effect was due to a reduction in the dispersion of the concentration values of several metabolites. Under standardized diet, however, the individual phenotype was still clearly visible, indicating that the individual's signature was a strong feature of the metabolome. Consequently, cohort studies designed to investigate the relation of individual metabolic traits and nutrition require multiple samples from each participant even under highly standardized lifestyle conditions in order to exploit the analytical potential of metabolomics. We have established criteria to facilitate design of urine metabolomic studies aimed at monitoring the effects of drugs, lifestyle, dietary supplements, and for accurate determination of signatures of diseases.

  11. The effect of a standardized protocol for iron supplementation to blood donors low in hemoglobin concentration.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Karin; Bork, Nanna; Asmussen, Lisa

    2008-04-01

    Iron deficiency leading to low hemoglobin concentration (cHb) is a common problem for blood donors as well as for blood banks. A standardized protocol offering iron supplementation based on P-ferritin determination may help to reduce the problem and retain donors. This was a prospective study where 879 blood donors, presenting with cHb at or below the limit of acceptance for donation, were included. The predonation cHb result was read after donation. The donors received 50 iron tablets (JernC or Ferrochel, 100 or 25 mg elemental iron, respectively), and samples for P-ferritin, mean corpuscular volume, and control of cHb were secured. Based on a P-ferritin level of less than 60 microg per L, 20 iron tablets were offered after all following donations. Mean cHb was 7.6 mmol per L (122 g/L) and 8.2 mmol per L (132 g/L) in women and men, respectively. In 80 percent of the women and 48 percent of the men, iron stores were low (P-ferritin < or = 30 microg/L). In the donors returning once or twice, an increase in cHb and P-ferritin was seen. Fifteen donors were permanently deferred due to disease and 36 due to low cHb, but 2 years after the start of the study, 79 percent of the women and 85 percent of the men were still active donors. A standardized protocol offering iron supplementation and simple oral and written advice based on P-ferritin measurements is effective in normalizing cHb and retaining donors presenting with cHb at or below the limit of acceptance for donation.

  12. Impact of a standardized nurse observation protocol including MEWS after Intensive Care Unit discharge.

    PubMed

    De Meester, K; Das, T; Hellemans, K; Verbrugghe, W; Jorens, P G; Verpooten, G A; Van Bogaert, P

    2013-02-01

    Analysis of in-hospital mortality after serious adverse events (SAE's) in our hospital showed the need for more frequent observation in medical and surgical wards. We hypothesized that the incidence of SAE's could be decreased by introducing a standard nurse observation protocol. To investigate the effect of a standard nurse observation protocol implementing the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) and a color graphic observation chart. Pre- and post-intervention study by analysis of patients records for a 5-day period after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge to 14 medical and surgical wards before (n=530) and after (n=509) the intervention. For the total study population the mean Patient Observation Frequency Per Nursing Shift (POFPNS) during the 5-day period after ICU discharge increased from .9993 (95% C.I. .9637-1.0350) in the pre-intervention period to 1.0732 (95% C.I. 1.0362-1.1101) (p=.005) in the post-intervention period. There was an increased risk of a SAE in patients with MEWS 4 or higher in the present nursing shift (HR 8.25; 95% C.I. 2.88-23.62) and the previous nursing shift (HR 12.83;95% C.I. 4.45-36.99). There was an absolute risk reduction for SAE's within 120h after ICU discharge of 2.2% (95% C.I. -0.4-4.67%) from 5.7% to 3.5%. The intervention had a positive impact on the observation frequency. MEWS had a predictive value for SAE's in patients after ICU discharge. The drop in SAE's was substantial but did not reach statistical significance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative sensory testing in the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS): standardized protocol and reference values.

    PubMed

    Rolke, R; Baron, R; Maier, C; Tölle, T R; Treede, R-D; Beyer, A; Binder, A; Birbaumer, N; Birklein, F; Bötefür, I C; Braune, S; Flor, H; Huge, V; Klug, R; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Magerl, W; Maihöfner, C; Rolko, C; Schaub, C; Scherens, A; Sprenger, T; Valet, M; Wasserka, B

    2006-08-01

    The nationwide multicenter trials of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS) aim to characterize the somatosensory phenotype of patients with neuropathic pain. For this purpose, we have implemented a standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol giving a complete profile for one region within 30 min. To judge plus or minus signs in patients we have now established age- and gender-matched absolute and relative QST reference values from 180 healthy subjects, assessed bilaterally over face, hand and foot. We determined thermal detection and pain thresholds including a test for paradoxical heat sensations, mechanical detection thresholds to von Frey filaments and a 64 Hz tuning fork, mechanical pain thresholds to pinprick stimuli and blunt pressure, stimulus/response-functions for pinprick and dynamic mechanical allodynia, and pain summation (wind-up ratio). QST parameters were region specific and age dependent. Pain thresholds were significantly lower in women than men. Detection thresholds were generally independent of gender. Reference data were normalized to the specific group means and variances (region, age, gender) by calculating z-scores. Due to confidence limits close to the respective limits of the possible data range, heat hypoalgesia, cold hypoalgesia, and mechanical hyperesthesia can hardly be diagnosed. Nevertheless, these parameters can be used for group comparisons. Sensitivity is enhanced by side-to-side comparisons by a factor ranging from 1.1 to 2.5. Relative comparisons across body regions do not offer advantages over absolute reference values. Application of this standardized QST protocol in patients and human surrogate models will allow to infer underlying mechanisms from somatosensory phenotypes.

  14. Improving credibility assessment in child sexual abuse allegations: the role of the NICHD investigative interview protocol.

    PubMed

    Hershkowitz, Irit; Fisher, Sara; Lamb, Michael E; Horowitz, Dvora

    2007-02-01

    The study was designed to explore whether the credibility of children's statements regarding their alleged experiences of child sexual abuse could be assessed in a more valid and reliable way when investigative interviews were conducted using the NICHD protocol rather than in an unstructured manner. Forty-two experienced Israeli youth investigators each assessed the credibility of allegations of sexual abuse made by alleged victims of sexual abuse when interviewed either with or without the protocol. Half of the alleged incidents were judged likely to have happened ("plausible") on the basis of independent evidence, while half were deemed unlikely to have happened ("implausible"). More non-protocol than protocol interviews were rated as "No judgment possible" rather than either credible or incredible. Allegations made in protocol interviews were more accurately rated as credible or incredible when they were either plausible or implausible, respectively, than those made in non-protocol statements. Levels of inter-rater reliability were also higher when protocol interviews were rated. The differences were significant only for plausible cases, however. The use of the NICHD protocol facilitated the assessment of credibility by child investigators although incredible allegations (those describing incidents that were unlikely to have happened) remained difficult to detect, even when the protocol was used.

  15. PROFILE: Environmental Impact Assessment Under the National Environmental Policy Act and the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty.

    PubMed

    Ensminger; McCold; Webb

    1999-07-01

    for activities undertaken by all Parties in Antarctica. The Protocol gives clear and strong guidance for protection of specific, valued antarctic environmental resources including intrinsic wilderness and aesthetic values, and the value of Antarctica as an area for scientific research. That guidance requires a higher standard of environmental protection for Antarctica than is required in other parts of the world. This paper shows that taken together NEPA and the Protocol call for closer examination of proposed actions and a more rigorous consideration of environmental impacts than either would alone. Three areas are identified where the EIA provisions of the Protocol could be strengthened to improve its effectiveness. First, the thresholds defined by the Protocol need to be clarified. Specifically, the meanings of the terms "minor" and "transitory" are not clear in the context of the Protocol. The use of "or" in the phrase "minor or transitory" further confuses the meaning. Second, cumulative impact assessment is called for by the Protocol but is not defined. A clear definition could reduce the chance that cumulative impacts would be given inadequate consideration. Finally, the public has limited opportunities to comment on or influence the preparation of initial or comprehensive environmental evaluations. Experience has shown that public input to environmental documents has a considerable influence on agency decision making and the quality of EIA that agencies perform.KEY WORDS: Environment; Impact assessment; Antarctica; NEPA; Protocol; Antarctic Treatyhttp://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00267/bibs/24n1p13.html

  16. EPA Traceability Protocol for Assay and Certification of Gaseous Calibration Standards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air monitoring regulations require the use of Protocol Gases to set air pollution monitors. This protocol balances the government's need for accuracy with the producers' need for flexibility, low cost, and minimum external oversight.

  17. Anthropometric protocols for the construction of new international fetal and newborn growth standards: the INTERGROWTH-21st Project

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, L Cheikh; Knight, HE; Bhutta, Z; Chumlea, WC

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project is to construct new, prescriptive standards describing optimal fetal and preterm postnatal growth. The anthropometric measurements include the head circumference, recumbent length and weight of the infants, and the stature and weight of the parents. In such a large, international, multicentre project, it is critical that all study sites follow standardised protocols to ensure maximal validity of the growth and nutrition indicators used. This paper describes, in detail, the selection of anthropometric personnel, equipment, and measurement and calibration protocols used to construct the new standards. Implementing these protocols at each study site ensures that the anthropometric data are of the highest quality to construct the international standards. PMID:23841804

  18. Forest Soil Disturbance Monitoring Protocol: Volume I: Rapid assessment

    Treesearch

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Ann M. Abbott; Thomas M. Rice

    2009-01-01

    This volume of the Forest Soil Disturbance Monitoring Protocol (FSDMP) describes how to monitor forest sites before and after ground disturbing management activities for physical attributes that could influence site resilience and long-term sustainability. The attributes describe surface conditions that affect site sustainability and hydrologic function. Monitoring the...

  19. A Survey of Standard Protocols for Endodontic Treatment in North of KSA

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Azhar; Qureshi, Beenish; Sghaireen, Mohd G.; AL-Omiri, Mahmoud K.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect information regarding methods, materials, and attitudes employed during the endodontic treatment by dentists in north of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was designed and distributed among 300 dentists in north of Saudi Arabia to collect the data about the standard protocols of endodontic treatment. The collected data was analyzed by using the SPSS 10 computer software. Out of a total of 300 surveyed dentists, the 66% response rate showed that this study was true representation of the endodontic treatment performed by the dentists in north of Saudi Arabia. 152 (76%) were general dentists and 48 (24%) were endodontists. 18 (9%) were using rubber dam as the method of isolation during endodontic treatment. 173 (86.5%) were using only measurement radiographs for working length determination and 27 (13.5%) were using both electronic apex locator and measurement radiographs. 95 (47.5%) of the respondents were using standardized technique and 25 (12.5%) were using step-down as a root canal preparation technique. 127 (63.5%) of the respondents were using lateral condensation technique, with gutta percha points for root canal obturation. PMID:24944823

  20. Standardization and Optimization of Computed Tomography Protocols to Achieve Low-Dose

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Cynthia; Cody, Dianna D.; Gupta, Rajiv; Hess, Christopher P.; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Kofler, James M.; Krishnam, Mayil S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The increase in radiation exposure due to CT scans has been of growing concern in recent years. CT scanners differ in their capabilities and various indications require unique protocols, but there remains room for standardization and optimization. In this paper we summarize approaches to reduce dose, as discussed in lectures comprising the first session of the 2013 UCSF Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety in Computed Tomography. The experience of scanning at low dose in different body regions, for both diagnostic and interventional CT procedures, is addressed. An essential primary step is justifying the medical need for each scan. General guiding principles for reducing dose include tailoring a scan to a patient, minimizing scan length, use of tube current modulation and minimizing tube current, minimizing-tube potential, iterative reconstruction, and periodic review of CT studies. Organized efforts for standardization have been spearheaded by professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Finally, all team members should demonstrate an awareness of the importance of minimizing dose. PMID:24589403

  1. [Process control in acute pain management. An analysis of the degree of organization of applied standard protocols].

    PubMed

    Erlenwein, J; Emons, M I; Hecke, A; Nestler, N; Przemeck, M; Bauer, M; Meißner, W; Petzke, F

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the degree of organization of different standard protocols for acute pain management, as well as the derivation and definition of typical but structurally different models. A total of 85 hospitals provided their written standardized protocols for analysis. Protocols for defined target processes from 76 hospitals and another protocol used by more than one hospital were included into the analysis. The suggested courses of action were theoretically simulated to identify and characterize process types in a multistage evaluation process. The analysis included 148 standards. Four differentiated process types were defined ("standardized order", "analgesic ladder", "algorithm", "therapy path"), each with an increasing level of organization. These four types had the following distribution: 27 % (n = 40) "standardized order", 47 % (n = 70) "analgesic ladder", 22 % (n = 33) "algorithm", 4 % (n = 5) "therapy path". Models with a higher degree of organization included more control elements, such as action and intervention triggers or safety and supervisory elements, and were also associated with a formally better access to medication. For models with a lower degree of organization, immediate courses of action were more dependent on individual decisions. Although not quantifiable, this was particularly evident when simulating downstream courses of action. Interfaces between areas of hospital activity and a cross-departmental-boundary validity were only considered in a fraction of the protocols. Concepts from clinics with a certificate in (acute) pain management were more strongly process-oriented. For children, there were proportionately more simple concepts with a lower degree of organization and less controlling elements. This is the first analysis of a large sample of standardized protocols for acute pain management focusing on the degree of organization and the possible influence on courses of action. The analysis

  2. Psychometric Properties of a Standardized Observation Protocol to Quantify Pediatric Physical Therapy Actions.

    PubMed

    Sonderer, Patrizia; Akhbari Ziegler, Schirin; Gressbach Oertle, Barbara; Meichtry, André; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2017-07-01

    Pediatric physical therapy (PPT) is characterized by heterogeneity. This blurs the evaluation of effective components of PPT. The Groningen Observation Protocol (GOP) was developed to quantify contents of PPT. This study assesses the reliability and completeness of the GOP. Sixty infant PPT sessions were video-taped. Two random samples of 10 videos were used to determine interrater and intrarater reliability using interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) with 95% confidence intervals. Completeness of GOP 2.0 was based on 60 videos. Interrater reliability of quantifying PPT actions was excellent (ICC, 0.75-1.0) in 71% and sufficient to good (ICC, 0.4-0.74) in 24% of PPT actions. Intrarater reliability was excellent in 94% and sufficient to good in 6% of PPT actions. Completeness was good for greater than 90% of PPT actions. GOP 2.0 has good reliability and completeness. After appropriate training, it is a useful tool to quantify PPT for children with developmental disorders.

  3. Using GLOBE Plant Phenology Protocols To Meet the "National Science Education Standards."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bombaugh, Ruth; Sparrow, Elena; Mal, Tarun

    2003-01-01

    Describes how high school biology teachers can use the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program protocols and data in their classrooms. Includes background information on plant phenology, an overview of GLOBE phenology protocols and materials, and implications for protocols with both deciduous trees and grasses…

  4. Using GLOBE Plant Phenology Protocols To Meet the "National Science Education Standards."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bombaugh, Ruth; Sparrow, Elena; Mal, Tarun

    2003-01-01

    Describes how high school biology teachers can use the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program protocols and data in their classrooms. Includes background information on plant phenology, an overview of GLOBE phenology protocols and materials, and implications for protocols with both deciduous trees and grasses…

  5. Common Core State Standards Assessments: Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polikoff, Morgan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were created in response to the shortcomings of No Child Left Behind era standards and assessments. Among those failings were the poor quality of content standards and assessments and the variability in content expectations and proficiency targets across states, as well as concerns related to the economic…

  6. 49 CFR 1572.5 - Standards for security threat assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for security threat assessments. 1572.5... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME AND LAND TRANSPORTATION SECURITY CREDENTIALING AND SECURITY THREAT ASSESSMENTS Procedures and General Standards § 1572.5 Standards for...

  7. 49 CFR 1572.5 - Standards for security threat assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for security threat assessments. 1572.5... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME AND LAND TRANSPORTATION SECURITY CREDENTIALING AND SECURITY THREAT ASSESSMENTS Procedures and General Standards § 1572.5 Standards for...

  8. Educational Standards, Assessment, and the Search for Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Pamela A.; Schutz, Aaron

    2001-01-01

    Examines the nature of the "consensus" reflected in educational standards used to orient high-stakes assessment programs and considers the discourse of standards creation and how standards are used to orient assessment development and performance judgments. Discusses the theoretical perspectives of J. Habermas and H. Gadamer. (Author/SLD)

  9. A test protocol for assessing the hearing status of students with special needs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Chuan; Wang, Nan-Mai; Chiu, Wen-Chen; Liu, Shu-Yu; Chang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Pei-Yu; Chung, King

    2014-10-01

    Individuals with disabilities are often reported to have a high prevalence of undetected hearing disorders/loss, but there is no standardized hearing test protocol for this population. The purposes of this study were (1) to examine the hearing status of students with special needs in Taiwan, and (2) to investigate the use of an on-site hearing test protocol that would adequately detect hearing problems in this population and reduce unnecessary referrals for off-site follow-up services. A total of 238 students enrolled in two schools for special education and one habilitation center participated in the study. Most students had intellectual disabilities and some also had additional syndromes or disorders. A hearing screening protocol including otoscopy, tympanometry, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions was administered to examine students' outer, middle, and inner ear functions, respectively. Pure tone tests were then administered as an on-site follow-up for those who failed or could not be tested using the screening protocol. Only 32.4% of students passed. When administered alone, the referral rate of otoscopy, tympanometry, and otoacoustic emissions were 38.7%, 46.0%, and 48.5%, respectively. The integration of these subtests revealed 52.1% of students needed follow-up services, 11.8% could not be tested, 2.5% had documented hearing loss, and 1.3% needed to be monitored because of negative middle ear pressure. The inclusion of pure tone audiometry increased the passing rate by 9.9% and provided information on hearing sensitivity for an additional 8.6% of students. Hearing assessments and regular hearing screening should be provided as an integral part of health care services for individuals with special needs because of high occurrences of excessive cerumen, middle ear dysfunction, and sensorineural hearing loss. The training of care-givers and teachers of students with special needs is encouraged so that they can help identify hearing problems and reduce

  10. Assessment of Grade of Dysphonia and Correlation With Quality of Life Protocol.

    PubMed

    Spina, Ana Lúcia; Crespo, Agrício Nubiato

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of this study is to check the correlation between vocal self-assessment and results of the Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL) protocol, and whether there is a correlation between perceptual vocal assessment made by voice therapists and the results from the V-RQOL protocol. The study included 245 subjects with vocal complaints. This was a prospective analytical clinical study. Vocal perceptual assessment of each subject with dysphonia was made by three voice therapists, followed by self-assessment made by the subjects themselves, and the application of the V-RQOL protocol. The results have shown poor level of agreement between vocal assessment made by the voice therapists and self-assessment made by the subjects. The statistical analysis indicated that the results of V-RQOL protocol showed significant correlation with the vocal assessment made by the voice therapists and the self-assessment by the subjects. The agreement between the assessments was low and variable; age, gender, professional voice use, and clinical laryngoscopic diagnosis did not influence the agreement level. Protocol V-RQOL is sensitive to vocal assessment made by the voice therapists and self-assessment made by the patient. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The impact of a new standard labor protocol on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingran; Ye, Shenglong; Tao, Liyuan; Wang, Yongqing

    2017-09-25

    To analyze the clinical outcomes following the implementation of a new standard labor procedure. This was a retrospective analysis that included a study group consisting of patients managed based on a new standard labor protocol and a control group comprising patients managed under an old standard labor protocol. The following maternal and perinatal outcomes were compared in the two groups: the indications for a cesarean section and the incidence of cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, fetal distress, neonatal asphyxia and pediatric intervention. We also compared the average number of days spent in the hospital, the incidence of medical disputes and hospitalization expenses. The cesarean section rates for the study and control groups were 19.29% (401/2079) and 33.53% (753/2246), respectively (P < 0.05). The main indications for a cesarean section in the study group were arrest of the active phase of labor, fetal distress and intrapartum fever; the percentages of each indication were significantly different from those of the control group (P < 0.001). The rates of postpartum hemorrhage in the study group and control group were 7.74% (130/1678) and 8.1% (121/1493), respectively (P = 0.710). The incidence rates of severe perineal lacerations were 0.48% (8/1678) for the study group and 0.2% (3/1493) for the control group (P = 0.187). The rates of forceps use were 4.29% (72/1678) in the study group and 2.41% (36/1493) in the control group (P = 0.004). The incidence rate of fetal distress in the study group was 6.24% (169/2709) and 4.67% (105/2246) (P = 0.006) in the control group. No significant difference was observed in the incidence of neonatal asphyxia and pediatric interventions between the two groups (0.74% (20/2709) vs. 8.12% (220/2709) and 17 (0.76%) vs. 161 (7.17%), respectively). The average length of hospital stay was 4.74 ± 1.15 and 2.13 ± 1.23 days (P < 0.01). The incidence of medical disputes was significantly different between the

  12. The effectiveness of an abuse assessment protocol in public health prenatal clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Wiist, W H; McFarlane, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated whether incorporation of an abuse assessment protocol into the routine procedures of the prenatal clinics of a large urban public health department led to increased referral for and assessment, identification, and documentation of abuse. METHODS: Evaluation was conducted at 3 matched prenatal clinics serving a total of 12,000 maternity patients per year. Two clinics used the abuse protocol and 1 did not. An audit was performed at the clinics on a randomly selected sample of 540 maternity patient charts for the 15 months before the protocol was initiated and of 540 records for the 15 months after the protocol was introduced. Ninety-six percent of the patients represented in the sample were Latina. RESULTS: At the clinics using the protocol, abuse assessment increased from 0 to 88%. Detection of abuse increased from 0.8% to 7%. There were no changes at the comparison clinic. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporation of an abuse assessment protocol into the routine procedures of public health department prenatal clinics increases the assessment, identification, and documentation of and referral for abuse among pregnant women. An abuse protocol should be a routine part of maternity care. PMID:10432909

  13. Assessment for the Common Core Mathematics Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Hung-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    This article makes two simple observations about high-stakes assessments. The first is that, because mathematics is a very technical subject, an assessment item can be mathematically flawed regardless of how elementary it is. For this reason, every assessment project needs the active participation of high level mathematicians. A second point is…

  14. Social-Emotional Assessment, Performance, and Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKown, Clark

    2017-01-01

    In the push to boost young people's social and emotional learning (SEL), assessment has lagged behind policy and practice. We have few usable, feasible, and scalable tools to assess children's SEL. And without good assessments, teachers, administrators, parents, and policymakers can't get the data they need to make informed decisions about SEL.…

  15. Comparison of two training programmes in chronic airway limitation patients: standardized versus individualized protocols.

    PubMed

    Vallet, G; Ahmaïdi, S; Serres, I; Fabre, C; Bourgouin, D; Desplan, J; Varray, A; Préfaut, C

    1997-01-01

    This study tested the effect of two methods of training, one individualized at the heart rate corresponding to the gas exchange threshold (GET) and the other at the heart rate corresponding to 50% of maximal heart rate reserve, on maximal and submaximal cardiorespiratory response in 24 patients with chronic airway limitation (CAL). The patients were randomly assigned to either the individualized training group (IT; n = 12) or the standardized training group (ST; n = 12). The training programme consisted of 4 weeks of stationary bicycle exercise, 5 days.week-1. Before reconditioning began, the target level based on heart rate was not significantly different between groups (109 +/- 4 versus 110 +/- 3 beats.min-1, in IT and ST, respectively). Post-training, a significant increase in symptom-limited oxygen uptake (V'O2.sl) and maximal O2 pulse was found in IT, whereas ST exhibited no significant change. In each group, GET was statistically increased in much the same way as V'O2,sl, with a higher increase in IT (p < 0.01) than ST (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, IT exhibited a concomitant and gradual decrease in minute ventilation (V'E), carbon dioxide production (V'CO2), and venous lactate concentration ([La]), whereas ST presented no significant change in these parameters (intergroup p < 0.01). Breathing pattern was also altered after IT, at the same metabolic level and at the same ventilation level (intergroup p < 0.05). Cardiac responses were modified in the two groups. At the same metabolic level, a significantly lower cardiac frequency was found both for IT and ST (intragroup p < 0.05 after training). In contrast, the increase in O2 pulse was only significantly higher in It after training. These data show the greater efficiency of an individualized training protocol based on determination of gas exchange threshold as compared to a standardized protocol, in improving exercise performance, when applied to a patient group. Despite an apparently similar target training level

  16. Audit of a 5-year radiographic protocol for assessment of mandibular third molars before surgical intervention

    PubMed Central

    Schou, S; Christensen, J; Hintze, H; Wenzel, A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To perform an audit of a three-step protocol for radiographic examination of mandibular third molars before surgery. Methods: 1769 teeth underwent surgery. A standardized three-step radiographic protocol was followed: (1) panoramic imaging (PAN), (2) stereoscanography (SCAN) and (3) CBCT. If there was overprojection between the tooth and the canal in PAN, SCAN was performed. If the tooth was determined to be in close contact with the canal in SCAN, CBCT was performed. Close contact between the tooth and the canal was assessed in all images, and patient-reported sensory disturbances from the alveolar inferior nerve were recorded after surgery. The relation between the final radiographic examination and sensory disturbances was determined. Logistic regression analysis tested whether signs for a close contact in PAN/SCAN could predict no bony separation between the tooth and canal in CBCT. Results: 46% of teeth underwent PAN, 31% underwent SCAN and 23% underwent CBCT as the final examination. 21% underwent all three radiographic examinations. 53/76% of teeth with close relation to the canal in PAN/SCAN showed no bony separation in CBCT; if there was close relation in PAN/SCAN, there was 1.6/4.3 times higher probability that no bony separation existed in CBCT. 16 cases of sensory disturbances were recorded: 4 operations were based on PAN, 8 on SCAN and 4 on CBCT. Conclusions: The radiographic protocol was in general followed. SCAN was superior to PAN in predicting no bony separation between the tooth and the canal in CBCT, and there was no relation between sensory disturbances and radiographic method. PMID:25216077

  17. Symposium: Language Assessment in Standards-Based Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menken, Kate; Hudson, Thom; Leung, Constant

    2014-01-01

    This symposium article, to which three authors contribute distinct parts, presents the rationale for standards-based language assessment and examines both the uses and misuses of language assessments in English-speaking countries that are engaged in standards-based education reform. Specifically, they focus on the assessment of emergent bilinguals…

  18. Symposium: Language Assessment in Standards-Based Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menken, Kate; Hudson, Thom; Leung, Constant

    2014-01-01

    This symposium article, to which three authors contribute distinct parts, presents the rationale for standards-based language assessment and examines both the uses and misuses of language assessments in English-speaking countries that are engaged in standards-based education reform. Specifically, they focus on the assessment of emergent bilinguals…

  19. Answers to Essential Questions about Standards, Assessments, Grading, & Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.; Jung, Lee Ann

    2013-01-01

    How do assessments for learning differ from assessments of learning? What is the purpose of grading? After nearly two decades of immersion in standards-based curriculua and instruction, our nation's educators are often still confounded by the (admittedly complex) landscape of standards, assessment, and reporting. In "Answers to Essential…

  20. 42 CFR 493.1299 - Standard: Postanalytic systems quality assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Postanalytic systems quality assessment... Nonwaived Testing Postanalytic Systems § 493.1299 Standard: Postanalytic systems quality assessment. (a) The....1291. (b) The postanalytic systems quality assessment must include a review of the effectiveness of...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1289 - Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. 493... Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1289 Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. (a) The... through 493.1283. (b) The analytic systems quality assessment must include a review of the effectiveness...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1249 - Standard: Preanalytic systems quality assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Preanalytic systems quality assessment... Nonwaived Testing Preanalytic Systems § 493.1249 Standard: Preanalytic systems quality assessment. (a) The....1241 through 493.1242. (b) The preanalytic systems quality assessment must include a review of the...

  3. Answers to Essential Questions about Standards, Assessments, Grading, & Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.; Jung, Lee Ann

    2013-01-01

    How do assessments for learning differ from assessments of learning? What is the purpose of grading? After nearly two decades of immersion in standards-based curriculua and instruction, our nation's educators are often still confounded by the (admittedly complex) landscape of standards, assessment, and reporting. In "Answers to Essential…

  4. 42 CFR 493.1289 - Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. 493... Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1289 Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. (a) The..., assess, and when indicated, correct problems identified in the analytic systems specified in §§ 493.1251...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1289 - Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. 493... Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1289 Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. (a) The..., assess, and when indicated, correct problems identified in the analytic systems specified in §§ 493.1251...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1289 - Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. 493... Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1289 Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. (a) The..., assess, and when indicated, correct problems identified in the analytic systems specified in §§ 493.1251...

  7. The Assessment of Military Multitasking Performance: Validation of a Dual-Task and Multitask Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: Contract W81XWH-12-2-0070 TITLE: Annual Report: The Assessment of Military Multitasking ...Performance: Validation of a Dual-Task and Multitask Protocol (Contract W81XWH-12-2-0070) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Margaret M. Weightman PT...Assessment of Military Multitasking Performance: Validation of a Dual-Task and Multitask Protocol 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  8. A Systematic Review of Protocols for the Three-Dimensional Morphologic Assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Computed Tomographic Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatwary, Tamer M. H.; Patterson, Benjamin O.; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert; Thompson, Matt M.; Holt, Peter J. E.

    2013-02-15

    The morphology of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) directly influences the perioperative outcome and long-term durability of endovascular aneurysm repair. A variety of methods have been proposed for the characterization of AAA morphology using reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images. At present, there is lack of consensus as to which of these methods is most applicable to clinical practice or research. The purpose of this review was to evaluate existing protocols that used 3D CT images in the assessment of various aspects of AAA morphology. An electronic search was performed, from January 1996 to the end of October 2010, using the Embase and Medline databases. The literature review conformed to PRISMA statement standards. The literature search identified 604 articles, of which 31 studies met inclusion criteria. Only 15 of 31 studies objectively assessed reproducibility. Existing published protocols were insufficient to define a single evidence-based methodology for preoperative assessment of AAA morphology. Further development and expert consensus are required to establish a standardized and validated protocol to determine precisely how morphology relates to outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair.

  9. Wireless networking for the dental office: current wireless standards and security protocols.

    PubMed

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Arora, Sarika

    2004-11-15

    Digital radiography has gained immense popularity in dentistry today in spite of the early difficulty for the profession to embrace the technology. The transition from film to digital has been happening at a faster pace in the fields of Orthodontics, Oral Surgery, Endodontics, Periodontics, and other specialties where the radiographic images (periapical, bitewing, panoramic, cephalometric, and skull radiographs) are being acquired digitally, stored within a server locally, and eventually accessed for diagnostic purposes, along with the rest of the patient data via the patient management software (PMS). A review of the literature shows the diagnostic performance of digital radiography is at least comparable to or even better than that of conventional radiography. Similarly, other digital diagnostic tools like caries detectors, cephalometric analysis software, and digital scanners were used for many years for the diagnosis and treatment planning purposes. The introduction of wireless charged-coupled device (CCD) sensors in early 2004 (Schick Technologies, Long Island City, NY) has moved digital radiography a step further into the wireless era. As with any emerging technology, there are concerns that should be looked into before adapting to the wireless environment. Foremost is the network security involved in the installation and usage of these wireless networks. This article deals with the existing standards and choices in wireless technologies that are available for implementation within a contemporary dental office. The network security protocols that protect the patient data and boost the efficiency of modern day dental clinics are enumerated.

  10. Implementing Istanbul Protocol standards for forensic evidence of torture in Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Alejandro; Crosby, Sondra; Xenakis, Stephen; Iacopino, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    The Kyrgyz government declared a policy of "zero tolerance" for torture and began reforms to stop such practice, a regular occurrence in the country's daily life. This study presents the results of 10 forensic evaluations of individuals alleging torture; they represent 35% of all criminal investigations into torture for the January 2011-July 2012 period. All individuals evaluated were male with an average age of 34 years. Police officers were implicated as perpetrators in all cases. All individuals reported being subjected to threats and blunt force trauma from punches, kicks, and blows with objects such as police batons. The most common conditions documented during the evaluations were traumatic brain injury and chronic seizures. Psychological sequelae included post-traumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder, which was diagnosed in seven individuals. In all cases, the physical and psychological evidence was highly consistent with individual allegations of abuse. These forensic evaluations, which represent the first ever to be conducted in Kyrgyzstan in accordance with Istanbul Protocol standards, provide critical insight into torture practices in the country. The evaluations indicate a pattern of brutal torture practices and inadequate governmental and nongovernmental forensic evaluations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidemiological cut-off values for Flavobacterium psychrophilum MIC data generated by a standard test protocol.

    PubMed

    Smith, P; Endris, R; Kronvall, G; Thomas, V; Verner-Jeffreys, D; Wilhelm, C; Dalsgaard, I

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological cut-off values were developed for application to antibiotic susceptibility data for Flavobacterium psychrophilum generated by standard CLSI test protocols. The MIC values for ten antibiotic agents against Flavobacterium psychrophilum were determined in two laboratories. For five antibiotics, the data sets were of sufficient quality and quantity to allow the setting of valid epidemiological cut-off values. For these agents, the cut-off values, calculated by the application of the statistically based normalized resistance interpretation method, were ≤16 mg L(-1) for erythromycin, ≤2 mg L(-1) for florfenicol, ≤0.025 mg L(-1) for oxolinic acid (OXO), ≤0.125 mg L(-1) for oxytetracycline and ≤20 (1/19) mg L(-1) for trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole. For ampicillin and amoxicillin, the majority of putative wild-type observations were 'off scale', and therefore, statistically valid cut-off values could not be calculated. For ormetoprim/sulphadimethoxine, the data were excessively diverse and a valid cut-off could not be determined. For flumequine, the putative wild-type data were extremely skewed, and for enrofloxacin, there was inadequate separation in the MIC values for putative wild-type and non-wild-type strains. It is argued that the adoption of OXO as a class representative for the quinolone group would be a valid method of determining susceptibilities to these agents.

  12. Assessing an improved protocol for plasma microRNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Moret, Inés; Sánchez-Izquierdo, Dolors; Iborra, Marisa; Tortosa, Luis; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Nos, Pilar; Cervera, José; Beltrán, Belén

    2013-01-01

    The first step in biomarkers discovery is to identify the best protocols for their purification and analysis. This issue is critical when considering peripheral blood samples (plasma and serum) that are clinically interesting but meet several methodological problems, mainly complexity and low biomarker concentration. Analysis of small molecules, such as circulating microRNAs, should overcome these disadvantages. The present study describes an optimal RNA extraction method of microRNAs from human plasma samples. Different reagents and commercially available kits have been analyzed, identifying also the best pre-analytical conditions for plasma isolation. Between all of them, the column-based approaches were shown to be the most effective. In this context, miRNeasy Serum/Plasma Kit (from Qiagen) rendered more concentrated RNA, that was better suited for microarrays studies and did not require extra purification steps for sample concentration and purification than phenol based extraction methods. We also present evidences that the addition of low doses of an RNA carrier before starting the extraction process improves microRNA purification while an already published carrier dose can result in significant bias over microRNA profiles. Quality controls for best protocol selection were developed by spectrophotometry measurement of contaminants and microfluidics electrophoresis (Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer) for RNA integrity. Selected donor and patient plasma samples and matched biopsies were tested by Affymetrix microarray technology to compare differentially expressed microRNAs. In summary, this study defines an optimized protocol for microRNA purification from human blood samples, increasing the performance of assays and shedding light over the best way to discover and use these biomarkers in clinical practice.

  13. Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring Assessment: Literature Review and Laboratory Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, R. Scott; Reid, Douglas J.; Hoffman, Michael G.; Sullivan, Greg; Blanchard, Jeremy

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of NILM technologies, a literature review was conducted to identify any test protocols or standardized testing approaches currently in use. The literature review indicated that no consistent conventions were currently in place for measuring the accuracy of these technologies. Consequently, PNNL developed a testing protocol and metrics to provide the basis for quantifying and analyzing the accuracy of commercially available NILM technologies. This report discusses the results of the literature review and the proposed test protocol and metrics in more detail.

  14. Setting technical standards for visual assessment procedures

    Treesearch

    Kenneth H. Craik; Nickolaus R. Feimer

    1979-01-01

    Under the impetus of recent legislative and administrative mandates concerning analysis and management of the landscape, governmental agencies are being called upon to adopt or develop visual resource and impact assessment (VRIA) systems. A variety of techniques that combine methods of psychological assessment and landscape analysis to serve these purposes is being...

  15. Evaluation of Vitamin D Standardization Program protocols for standardizing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D data: a case study of the program's potential for national nutrition and health surveys12345

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, Kevin D; Kiely, Mairead; Kinsella, Michael; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramón A; Tian, Lu; Zhang, Yue; Lucey, Alice; Flynn, Albert; Gibney, Michael J; Vesper, Hubert W; Phinney, Karen W; Coates, Paul M; Picciano, Mary F; Sempos, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing procedures of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] measurement in National Health/Nutrition Surveys to promote 25(OH)D measurements that are accurate and comparable over time, location, and laboratory procedure to improve public health practice. Objective: We applied VDSP protocols to existing ELISA-derived serum 25(OH)D data from the Irish National Adult Nutrition Survey (NANS) as a case-study survey and evaluated their effectiveness by comparison of the protocol-projected estimates with those from a reanalysis of survey serums by using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–tandem MS). Design: The VDSP reference system and protocols were applied to ELISA-based serum 25(OH)D data from the representative NANS sample (n = 1118). A reanalysis of 99 stored serums by using standardized LC–tandem MS and resulting regression equations yielded predicted standardized serum 25(OH)D values, which were then compared with LC–tandem MS reanalyzed values for all serums. Results: Year-round prevalence rates for serum 25(OH)D concentrations <30, <40, and <50 nmol/L were 6.5%, 21.9%, and 40.0%, respectively, via original ELISA measurements and 11.4%, 25.3%, and 43.7%, respectively, when VDSP protocols were applied. Differences in estimates at <30- and <40-nmol/L thresholds, but not at the <50-nmol/L threshold, were significant (P < 0.05). A reanalysis of all serums by using LC–tandem MS confirmed prevalence estimates as 11.2%, 27.2%, and 45.0%, respectively. Prevalences of serum 25(OH)D concentrations >125 nmol/L were 1.2%, 0.3%, and 0.6% by means of ELISA, VDSP protocols, and LC–tandem MS, respectively. Conclusion: VDSP protocols hold a major potential for national nutrition and health surveys in terms of the standardization of serum 25(OH)D data. PMID:23615829

  16. Demonstration and Certification of Amphibian Ecological Risk Assessment Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Histologic observations and a record of tissues examined were entered into a computer-assisted data retrieval system (StarTox, Graham Laboratories...Positioning System I Intensity IACUC Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee IDW Investigation Derived Wastes IPR In-Progress Review IR...sediment clean-up standards to wetland systems . Benthic standards are often developed from large lacustrine (i.e., Great Lakes) databases and have little

  17. Variation in Institutional Review Board (IRB) Responses to a Standard Protocol for a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Surgical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Helfand, Brian T.; Mongiu, Anne K.; Roehrborn, Claus G.; Donnell, Robert F.; Bruskewitz, Reginald; Kaplan, Steven A.; Kusek, John W.; Coombs, Laura; McVary, Kevin T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The primary responsibility of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) is to protect human research subjects and therefore ensure that studies are conducted in accordance with a standard set of ethical principles. A number of studies have compared the responses from IRBs in multicenter clinical trials involving medical therapies. To date, none have been conducted in trials investigating surgical interventions. The intent of this study was to investigate the consistency of the recommendations issued from one institutional IRB to another in the Minimally Invasive Surgical Therapies (MIST) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a multicenter trial with a uniform consent and study protocol. Materials and Methods We obtained the IRB responses from six of the seven participating institutions after the initial submission of the MIST study protocol and classified the responses. We then re-distributed the approved protocols to an IRB at another participating institution and analyzed their review of these protocols. Results We found that both the number and types of responses required for IRB approval of an identical study protocol varied significantly among the participating institutions. We also found that IRB responses were inconsistent in the second review, although all protocols were ultimately approved. Conclusion We conclude that the current system of local IRB review in the context of a multicenter surgical trial is inefficient in the review process and may not provide expertise in overseeing surgical trials. Based on these results, a central surgical IRB may be needed to improve of the ethical review process in multicenter trials. PMID:19375101

  18. Utility of a Standardized Protocol for Submitting Clinically Suspected Endometrial Polyps to the Pathology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Nida S.; Giannico, Giovanna; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess whether a protocol for submitting clinically suspected endometrial polyps will improve the detection rate of polyps and evaluation of the background endometrium. A retrospective review from 1999– 2015 was performed. Cases were divided into: 1) polyps and curetting placed in 2 containers (separate, n=61) and 2) polyps and curettings placed in one container (combined, n=80). Polyps were identified in 100% of cases in the separate compared to 95% in the combined group (p=0.62). The background endometrium was evaluable in 79% in the combined compared to 90% in the separate group (p=0.07). The frequency of hyperplasia without atypia, atypical hyperplasia and carcinoma was 4.4%, 3.6% and 1.5%, respectively. In conclusion, the enhanced rate of polyp detection and evaluation of the background endometrium in the separate group is minimal. This supports the recommendation of submitting endometrial polyps and curetting combined in one container. PMID:27402220

  19. Assessment of protocols for surgical-site preparation in a regional network of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Peñalver-Mompeán, Maria Dolores; Saturno-Hernández, Pedro Jesus; Fonseca-Miranda, Yadira; Gama, Zenewton André da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Surgical-site infection is a preventable adverse event. Implementation of good practices for correct surgical-site preparation can contribute to lessen this safety problem. The objective of this study was to describe the presence and quality of protocols on surgical-site preparation in the Murcia (Spain) regional network of public hospitals. The indicator "existence of protocol for surgical-site preparation" was assessed, as well as the formal quality (expected attributes) and contents (compared to current evidence-based recommendations) of existing documents. Seven of the nine hospitals have a protocol for surgical-site preparation. Opportunities to improve have been identified in relation to the protocols' formal quality and contents. Recommendations related to skin asepsis are incomplete and those related to hair removal contradict existing evidence. Most hospitals have protocols for surgical-site preparation; however, there is great room for improvement, in relation to their expected attributes and to the inclusion of evidence-based recommendations.

  20. Reduced-dose chest CT with 3D automatic exposure control vs. standard chest CT: quantitative assessment of emphysematous changes in smokers' lung parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yamazaki, Youichi; Matsumoto, Keiko; Onishi, Yumiko; Takenaka, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Nishio, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Murase, Kenya; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-06-01

    To determine the capability of reduced-dose chest CT with three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) on quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in smoker' lung parenchyma, compared to standard chest CT. Twenty consecutive smoker patients (mean age 62.8 years) underwent CT examinations using a standard protocol (150 mAs) and a protocol with 3D-AEC. In this study, the targeted standard deviations number was set to 160. For quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in lung parenchyma in each subject using the standard protocol, a percentage of voxels less than -950 HU in the lung (%LAA(-950)) was calculated. The 3D-AEC protocol's %LAA was computed from of voxel percentages under selected threshold CT value. The differences of radiation doses between these two protocols were evaluated, and %LAAs(-950) was compared with the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. Mean dose length products were 780.2 ± 145.5 mGy cm (standard protocol), and 192.0 ± 95.9 (3D-AEC protocol). There was significant difference between them (paired Student's t test, p<0.00001). Meanwhile, only setting -960 HU yielded no significant difference (paired Student's t test, p=0.32) between %LAAs(-950) and 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. In adopting the feasible threshold CT values of the 3D-AEC protocol, the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs were significantly correlated with %LAAs(-950) (r = 0.98, p<0.001) and limits of agreement from Bland-Altman analysis was 0.52 ± 4.3%. Changing threshold CT values demonstrated that reduced-dose chest CT with 3D-AEC can substitute for the standard protocol in assessments of emphysematous change in smoker' lung parenchyma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Water-quality sampling by the U.S. Geological Survey-Standard protocols and procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.

    2010-01-01

    Thumbnail of and link to report PDF (1.0 MB) The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) develops the sampling procedures and collects the data necessary for the accurate assessment and wise management of our Nation's surface-water and groundwater resources. Federal and State agencies, water-resource regulators and managers, and many organizations and interested parties in the public and private sectors depend on the reliability, timeliness, and integrity of the data we collect and the scientific soundness and impartiality of our data assessments and analysis. The standard data-collection methods uniformly used by USGS water-quality personnel are peer reviewed, kept up-to-date, and published in the National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/).

  2. Teacher Assessment Literacy: A Review of International Standards and Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Christopher; LaPointe-McEwan, Danielle; Luhanga, Ulemu

    2016-01-01

    Assessment literacy is a core professional requirement across educational systems. Hence, measuring and supporting teachers' assessment literacy have been a primary focus over the past two decades. At present, there are a multitude of assessment standards across the world and numerous assessment literacy measures that represent different…

  3. Teacher Assessment Literacy: A Review of International Standards and Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Christopher; LaPointe-McEwan, Danielle; Luhanga, Ulemu

    2016-01-01

    Assessment literacy is a core professional requirement across educational systems. Hence, measuring and supporting teachers' assessment literacy have been a primary focus over the past two decades. At present, there are a multitude of assessment standards across the world and numerous assessment literacy measures that represent different…

  4. A Protocol for the Global Sensitivity Analysis of Impact Assessment Models in Life Cycle Assessment.

    PubMed

    Cucurachi, S; Borgonovo, E; Heijungs, R

    2016-02-01

    The life cycle assessment (LCA) framework has established itself as the leading tool for the assessment of the environmental impact of products. Several works have established the need of integrating the LCA and risk analysis methodologies, due to the several common aspects. One of the ways to reach such integration is through guaranteeing that uncertainties in LCA modeling are carefully treated. It has been claimed that more attention should be paid to quantifying the uncertainties present in the various phases of LCA. Though the topic has been attracting increasing attention of practitioners and experts in LCA, there is still a lack of understanding and a limited use of the available statistical tools. In this work, we introduce a protocol to conduct global sensitivity analysis in LCA. The article focuses on the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), and particularly on the relevance of global techniques for the development of trustable impact assessment models. We use a novel characterization model developed for the quantification of the impacts of noise on humans as a test case. We show that global SA is fundamental to guarantee that the modeler has a complete understanding of: (i) the structure of the model and (ii) the importance of uncertain model inputs and the interaction among them. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. Physical Activity Stories: Assessing the "Meaning Standard" in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tyler G.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the "meaning standard" in both national and state content standards suggests that professionals consider it an important outcome of a quality physical education program. However, only 10 percent of states require an assessment to examine whether students achieve this standard. The purpose of this article is to introduce…

  6. Physical Activity Stories: Assessing the "Meaning Standard" in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tyler G.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the "meaning standard" in both national and state content standards suggests that professionals consider it an important outcome of a quality physical education program. However, only 10 percent of states require an assessment to examine whether students achieve this standard. The purpose of this article is to introduce…

  7. Succeeding with Standards: Linking Curriculum, Assessment, and Action Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Judy F.; Harris, Douglas E.

    This book describes a comprehensive process by which schools and districts can turn piecemeal initiatives to incorporate standards into curriculum into a coherent plan. The book explains how to determine who is to teach and assess each standard and how to create a curriculum and assessment plan. It defines effective practice in linking curriculum…

  8. 42 CFR 493.1235 - Standard: Personnel competency assessment policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Personnel competency assessment policies... Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1235 Standard: Personnel competency assessment policies. As specified in the personnel requirements in subpart M, the laboratory must establish and follow...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1235 - Standard: Personnel competency assessment policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard: Personnel competency assessment policies... Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1235 Standard: Personnel competency assessment policies. As specified in the personnel requirements in subpart M, the laboratory must establish and follow...

  10. Modified approach to the characterization of adrenal nodules using a standard abdominal magnetic resonance imaging protocol

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Semelka, Richard C.; Herédia, Vasco; AlObaidiy, Mamdoh; Gomes, Filipe Veloso; Ramalho, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe a modified approach to the evaluation of adrenal nodules using a standard abdominal magnetic resonance imaging protocol. Materials and Methods Our sample comprised 149 subjects (collectively presenting with 132 adenomas and 40 nonadenomas). The adrenal signal intensity index was calculated. Lesions were grouped by pattern of enhancement (PE), according to the phase during which the wash-in peaked: arterial phase (type 1 PE); portal venous phase (type 2 PE); and interstitial phase (type 3 PE). The relative and absolute wash-out values were calculated. To test for mean differences between adenomas and nonadenomas, Student's t-tests were used. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was also performed. Results The mean adrenal signal intensity index was significantly higher for the adenomas than for the nonadenomas (p < 0.0001). Chemical shift imaging showed a sensitivity and specificity of 94.4% and 100%, respectively, for differentiating adenomas from nonadenomas. Of the adenomas, 47.6%, 48.5%, and 3.9%, respectively, exhibited type 1, 2, and 3 PEs. For the mean wash-in proportions, significant differences were found among the enhancement patterns. The wash-out calculations revealed a trend toward better lesion differentiation for lesions exhibiting a type 1 PE, showing a sensitivity and specificity of 71.4% and 80.0%, respectively, when the absolute values were referenced, as well as for lesions exhibiting a type 2 PE, showing a sensitivity and specificity of 68.0% and 100%, respectively, when the relative values were referenced. The calculated probability of a lipid-poor lesion that exhibited a type 3 PE being a nonadenoma was > 99%. Conclusion Subgrouping dynamic enhancement patterns yields high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating adenomas from nonadenomas. PMID:28298728

  11. False-positive diatom test: a real challenge? A post-mortem study using standardized protocols.

    PubMed

    Lunetta, Philippe; Miettinen, Arto; Spilling, Kristian; Sajantila, Antti

    2013-09-01

    The main criticism of the validity of the diatom test for the diagnosis of drowning is based on the potential ante- and post-mortem penetration of diatoms and the finding of diatoms in bodies of non-drowned human beings. However, qualitative and quantitative studies on diatoms in organs of the non-drowned have yielded both conflicting and contradictory results. In the present study, we have analysed under standardised methods the diatom content in several organs of 14 non-drowned human bodies. Overall, only 9 diatoms (6 entire, 3 fragmented) were disclosed in 6 of the 14 non-drowned bodies. Each of these 6 cadavers had only a single "positive" organ. Six diatoms were found in the bone marrow, 2 in the lung, and one in the pleural liquid. No diatoms were recovered from the brain, liver, kidney, or blood samples of any of these 14 bodies. Moreover, in five additional cadavers, whose lungs were injected, prior autopsy, with a 3.5L solution containing a bi-cellulate diatom culture (Thalassiosira baltica, Thalassiosira levanderi) via tracheostomy, a few diatoms appeared in the pleural cavity and in the blood from the left heart chamber, but none in any other internal organs investigated. The results of the presented study demonstrate that the issue of the false-positive diatom test should not be a logical impediment to the performance of the diatom method. However, strict and standardized protocols aimed at avoiding contamination during sample preparation must be used, appropriate separation values set and taxonomic analysis of all diatoms performed.

  12. Risk assessment as standard work in design.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Patricia W

    2013-01-01

    This case study article examines a formal risk assessment as part of the decision making process for design solutions in high risk areas. The overview of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) tool with examples of its application in hospital building projects will demonstrate the benefit of those structured conversations. This article illustrates how two hospitals used FMEA when integrating operational processes with building projects: (1) adjacency decision for Intensive Care Unit (ICU); and (2) distance concern for handling of specimens from Surgery to Lab. Both case studies involved interviews that exposed facility solution concerns. Just-in-time studies using the FMEA followed the same risk assessment process with the same workshop facilitator involving structured conversations in analyzing risks. In both cases, participants uncovered key areas of risk enabling them to take the necessary next steps. While the focus of this article is not the actual design solution, it is apparent that the risk assessment brought clarity to the situations resulting in prompt decision making about facility solutions. Hospitals are inherently risky environments; therefore, use of the formal risk assessment process, FMEA, is an opportunity for design professionals to apply more rigor to design decision making when facility solutions impact operations in high risk areas. Case study, decision making, hospital, infection control, strategy, work environment.

  13. Standardized Assessment of the Developmentally Disabled Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinck, Christine

    Steps are outlined in the construction of two self-report assessment scales designed to measure general life satisfaction and leisure activity levels of developmentally disabled adults. The potential usefulness of a reliable, valid self-report instrument as a measurement tool in client programming is noted in the context of a review of similar…

  14. Hyperthermic tissue sealing devices: a proposed histopathologic protocol for standardizing the evaluation of thermally sealed vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, Ryan H.; Vos, Jeffrey A.; Coad, James E.

    2011-03-01

    Hyperthermic tissue sealing devices are advancing modern laparoscopy and other minimally invasive surgical approaches. Histopathologic evaluation of thermally sealed vessels can provide important information on their associated tissue effects and reactions. However, a standardized systematic approach has not been historically used in the literature. This paper proposes a histologic approach for the analysis of thermally sealed vessels and their basis of hemostasis, including thermal tissue changes, healing, and thrombosis. Histologic evaluation during the first week (Days 3-7) can assess the seal's primary tissue properties. These parameters include the thermal seal's length, architecture, tissue layers involved, adventitial collagen denaturation length, entrapped vapor or blood pockets, tissue homogenization and thermal tissue injury zones. While the architectural features can be assessed in Day 0-3 specimens, the latter thermal injury zones are essentially not assessable in Day 0-3 specimens. Day 14 specimens can provide information on the early healing response to the sealed vessel. Day 30 and longer specimens can be used to evaluate the seal's healing reactions. Assessment of the healing response should include seal site inflammation, granulation tissue, necrosis resorption, fibroproliferative scar healing, and thrombus organization. In order to accurately evaluate these parameters, careful specimen orientation, embedding and multiple histologic sections across the entire seal width are required. When appropriate in vivo post-treatment times are used, thermal vessel seals can be evaluated with routine light microscopy and common histologic staining methods.

  15. Patient-reported outcomes after open carpal tunnel release using a standard protocol with 1 hand therapy visit.

    PubMed

    Mack, Erin M; Callinan, Nancy J; Reams, Megan; Bohn, Deborah C; Chmielewski, Terese L

    Retrospective case series. Open carpal tunnel release (OCTR) is a common treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome, but there is no consensus on the number of hand therapy visits needed to achieve optimal patient outcomes. The purpose is to examine changes in patient-reported symptoms and function over a 12-week period after OCTR with 1 postoperative hand therapy visit. Eligible subjects were consecutive patients treated with a standard OCTR protocol by a fellowship trained hand surgeon that included 1 hand therapy visit at 10-14 days postoperatively. Patients were excluded from participation if they had additional surgery at the time of OCTR, had another upper extremity diagnosis that required therapeutic intervention, or received more or less than 1 visit of hand therapy. Responses on the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) were collected at preoperative and 3 postoperative time points: at the hand therapy visit, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks. Change over time in the BCTQ Symptom Severity Scale and Functional Status Scale was assessed. A total of 134 patients who were treated with the standard protocol had a complete BCTQ data set. Both BCTQ scales showed significant improvement over time. The Symptom Severity Scale showed significant improvement by the hand therapy visit at 10-14 days postoperatively, whereas significant improvement on the Functional Status Scale did not occur until 6 weeks postoperatively. The magnitude of change from preoperative to 12 weeks postoperative was 1.51 points on the Symptom Severity Scale and 0.91 points on the Functional Status Scale. Complication rates were low with an incidence of 13% for pillar pain and palm pain combined. Patient-reported symptoms and function improved significantly up to 12 weeks after OCTR. Moreover, there was a low incidence of pillar and palm pain. In a retrospective review of patients with a favorable prognosis based on having no need for extra surgical procedures or additional therapy visits, one therapy visit

  16. USE OF BROMOERGOCRYPTINE IN THE VALIDATION OF PROTOCOLS FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF MECHANISMS OF EARLY PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Validated protocols for evaluating maternally mediated mechanisms of early pregnancy failure in rodents are needed for use in the risk assessment process. To supplement previous efforts in the validation of a panel of protocols assembled for this purpose, bromoergocryptine (BEC) ...

  17. USE OF BROMOERGOCRYPTINE IN THE VALIDATION OF PROTOCOLS FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF MECHANISMS OF EARLY PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Validated protocols for evaluating maternally mediated mechanisms of early pregnancy failure in rodents are needed for use in the risk assessment process. To supplement previous efforts in the validation of a panel of protocols assembled for this purpose, bromoergocryptine (BEC) ...

  18. Changes in Body Mass Index and Lipid Profile in Psoriatic Patients After Treatment With Standard Protocol of Infliximab.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Amir Houshang; Mortazavi, Hossein; Balighi, Kamran; Hosseini, Mahboubeh Sadat; Azizpour, Arghavan; Hejazi, Seyyedeh Pardis; Goodarzi, Azadeh; Darvari, Seyyedeh Bahareh

    2016-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic and inflammatory dermatologic disease. Psoriasis may predispose to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. However, the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor in mediating this risk is controversial. Regarding frequent use of infliximab in psoriasis, and the hypothesis that anti TNF-α treatment may increase Body Mass Index (BMI) and alter lipid profile in these patients, the aim of this study was to assess changes in BMI and Lipid Profile and level of leptin in Psoriatic Patients under Treatment of Standard Protocol of Infliximab in a 24 week period. This study was accomplished as a before-after study. Twenty-seven psoriatic patients were included, and standard infliximab therapy was applied. All patients underwent 3 times of blood collection and in each session; LDL, HDL, Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Leptin, and PASI score were measured at the start of the study and at the 12th and 24th week of follow-up. Twenty-five patients consisted of 18 (72%) male and 7 (28%) female subjects were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 36.91±13.31 years. PASI score demonstrated significant decrease after 24 weeks; however, BMI and HDL and leptin showed a significant increase during treatment. Significant negative correlation was seen between Leptin and PASI score changes (r=0.331, P=0.042). HDL and BMI had the most correlations with leptin (positive correlation) and PASI score (negative correlation). Results demonstrated a dramatic decrease in PASI, increase in BMI and HDL and increased in leptin; somewhat correlated to each other. These results suggest that patients taking infliximab should take more care of their weight and lipid profile, while on treatment.

  19. Development of pig welfare assessment protocol integrating animal-, environment-, and management-based measures.

    PubMed

    Renggaman, Anriansyah; Choi, Hong L; Sudiarto, Sartika Ia; Alasaarela, Laura; Nam, Ok S

    2015-01-01

    Due to increased interest in animal welfare, there is now a need for a comprehensive assessment protocol to be used in intensive pig farming systems. There are two current welfare assessment protocols for pigs: Welfare Quality® Assessment Protocols (applicable in the Europe Union), that mostly focuses on animal-based measures, and the Swine Welfare Assurance Program (applicable in the United States), that mostly focuses on management- and environment-based measures. In certain cases, however, animal-based measures might not be adequate for properly assessing pig welfare status. Similarly, welfare assessment that relies only on environment- and management-based measures might not represent the actual welfare status of pigs. Therefore, the objective of this paper was to develop a new welfare protocol by integrating animal-, environment-, and management-based measures. The background for selection of certain welfare criteria and modification of the scoring systems from existing welfare assessment protocols are described. The developed pig welfare assessment protocol consists of 17 criteria that are related to four main principles of welfare (good feeding, good housing, good health, and appropriate behavior). Good feeding, good housing, and good health were assessed using a 3-point scale: 0 (good welfare), 1 (moderate welfare), and 2 (poor welfare). In certain cases, only a 2-point scale was used: 0 (certain condition is present) or 2 (certain condition is absent). Appropriate behavior was assessed by scan sampling of positive and negative social behaviors based on qualitative behavior assessment and human-animal relationship tests. Modification of the body condition score into a 3-point scale revealed pigs with a moderate body condition (score 1). Moreover, additional criteria such as feed quality confirmed that farms had moderate (score 1) or poor feed quality (score 2), especially those farms located in a high relative humidity region. The developed protocol can be

  20. The standardization of nonsterile compounding: a study in quality control and assessment for hormone compounding.

    PubMed

    Wiley, T S; Odegard, R D; Raden, J; Haraldsen, J T

    2014-01-01

    Sterile and nonsterile compounding of medication has attracted much attention over the last few years due to the onset of various infections and negative compounding practices. This paper reports on the standardization of compounded hormones utilizing the Wiley Protocol, which provides nonsynthetic bioidentical estradiol, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and testosterone in a transdermal topical cream base for women and men in a standardized dosing regimen. Here, we present data from 2008 through 2012, which details the process of standardization and quality testing of the hormones through submission of random compounded samples for quality control and assessment. Pharmacies delivering the Wiley Protocol were required to follow the same compounding formulation, as well as submit random samples for quarterly testing. Sample concentrations were tested using high-performance liquid chromatography. We found that pharmacies that submitted samples had a 91% passing rating with a percent of target of 98.6% +/- 8.4%. It was also determined that pharmacies that prepared more compounded cream had a higher passing rating than those that prepared limited quantities. We found that standardization across multiple pharmacies could be achieved through quarterly testing of submitted samples by a third-party laboratory when following necessary procedures as defined by the Wiley Protocol. It was also determined that experience and training were a critical factor in the mixing of compounded prescriptions, with high consistency and accuracy providing patient safety.

  1. On-Farm Welfare Assessment Protocol for Adult Dairy Goats in Intensive Production Systems

    PubMed Central

    Battini, Monica; Stilwell, George; Vieira, Ana; Barbieri, Sara; Canali, Elisabetta; Mattiello, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary The Animal Welfare Indicators (AWIN) project developed a practical welfare assessment protocol for lactating dairy goats in intensive husbandry systems, using animal-based indicators that cover the whole multidimensional concept of animal welfare. The strict collaboration between scientists and stakeholders resulted in an easy-to-use protocol that provides farmers or veterinarians with comprehensive but clear feedback on the welfare status of the herd in less than three hours. The protocol, which highlights key points and motivates farmers to achieve improvements, has received much attention from interested parties. Abstract Within the European AWIN project, a protocol for assessing dairy goats’ welfare on the farm was developed. Starting from a literature review, a prototype including animal-based indicators covering four welfare principles and 12 welfare criteria was set up. The prototype was tested in 60 farms for validity, reliability, and feasibility. After testing the prototype, a two-level assessment protocol was proposed in order to increase acceptability among stakeholders. The first level offers a more general overview of the welfare status, based on group assessment of a few indicators (e.g., hair coat condition, latency to the first contact test, severe lameness, Qualitative Behavior Assessment), with no or minimal handling of goats and short assessment time required. The second level starts if welfare problems are encountered in the first level and adds a comprehensive and detailed individual evaluation (e.g., Body Condition Score, udder asymmetry, overgrown claws), supported by an effective sampling strategy. The assessment can be carried out using the AWIN Goat app. The app results in a clear visual output, which provides positive feedback on welfare conditions in comparison with a benchmark of a reference population. The protocol may be a valuable tool for both veterinarians and technicians and a self-assessment instrument for

  2. Students' Attitudes toward a Group Coursework Protocol and Peer Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraes, Caroline; Michaelidou, Nina; Canning, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a knowledge gap by presenting an empirical investigation of a group coursework protocol and peer assessment system (GCP&PAS) used in a UK university to support postgraduate marketing students in their assessed group activities. The aim of the research was to examine students' understanding of the GCP&PAS and their…

  3. Toward Fairness in Assessing Student Groupwork: A Protocol for Peer Evaluation of Individual Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellenz, Martin R.

    2006-01-01

    A key challenge for management instructors using graded groupwork with students is to find ways to maximize student learning from group projects while ensuring fair and accurate assessment methods. This article presents the Groupwork Peer-Evaluation Protocol (GPEP) that enables the assessment of individual contributions to graded student…

  4. Students' Attitudes toward a Group Coursework Protocol and Peer Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraes, Caroline; Michaelidou, Nina; Canning, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a knowledge gap by presenting an empirical investigation of a group coursework protocol and peer assessment system (GCP&PAS) used in a UK university to support postgraduate marketing students in their assessed group activities. The aim of the research was to examine students' understanding of the GCP&PAS and their…

  5. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards.

    PubMed

    Lontok, Katherine S; Zhang, Hubert; Dougherty, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using a consensus list of American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) core concepts. We also compared the NGSS against state science standards. Our goals were to assess the potential of the new standards to support genetic literacy and to determine if they improve the coverage of genetics concepts relative to state standards. We found that expert reviewers cannot identify ASHG core concepts within the new standards with high reliability, suggesting that the scope of content addressed by the standards may be inconsistently interpreted. Given results that indicate that the disciplinary core ideas (DCIs) included in the NGSS documents produced by Achieve, Inc. clarify the content covered by the standards statements themselves, we recommend that the NGSS standards statements always be viewed alongside their supporting disciplinary core ideas. In addition, gaps exist in the coverage of essential genetics concepts, most worryingly concepts dealing with patterns of inheritance, both Mendelian and complex. Finally, state standards vary widely in their coverage of genetics concepts when compared with the NGSS. On average, however, the NGSS support genetic literacy better than extant state standards.

  6. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards

    PubMed Central

    Lontok, Katherine S.; Zhang, Hubert; Dougherty, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using a consensus list of American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) core concepts. We also compared the NGSS against state science standards. Our goals were to assess the potential of the new standards to support genetic literacy and to determine if they improve the coverage of genetics concepts relative to state standards. We found that expert reviewers cannot identify ASHG core concepts within the new standards with high reliability, suggesting that the scope of content addressed by the standards may be inconsistently interpreted. Given results that indicate that the disciplinary core ideas (DCIs) included in the NGSS documents produced by Achieve, Inc. clarify the content covered by the standards statements themselves, we recommend that the NGSS standards statements always be viewed alongside their supporting disciplinary core ideas. In addition, gaps exist in the coverage of essential genetics concepts, most worryingly concepts dealing with patterns of inheritance, both Mendelian and complex. Finally, state standards vary widely in their coverage of genetics concepts when compared with the NGSS. On average, however, the NGSS support genetic literacy better than extant state standards. PMID:26222583

  7. Validity and responsiveness of the Clubfoot Assessment Protocol (CAP). A methodological study.

    PubMed

    Andriesse, Hanneke; Roos, Ewa M; Hägglund, Gunnar; Jarnlo, Gun-Britt

    2006-03-15

    The Clubfoot Assessment Protocol (CAP) is a multi dimensional instrument designed for longitudinal follow up of the clubfoot deformity during growth. Item reliability has shown to be sufficient. In this article the CAP's validity and responsiveness is studied using the Dimeglio classification scoring as a gold standard. Thirty-two children with 45 congenital clubfeet were assessed prospectively and consecutively at ages of new-born, one, two, four months and two years of age. For convergent/divergent construct validity the Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated. Discriminate validity was evaluated by studying the scores in bilateral clubfeet. The floor-ceiling effects at baseline (untreated clubfeet) and at two years of age (treated clubfeet) were evaluated. Responsiveness was evaluated by using effect sizes (ES) and by calculating if significant changes (Wilcoxons signed test) had occurred between the different measurement occasions. High to moderate significant correlation were found between CAP mobility I and morphology and the Dimeglio scores (rs = 0.77 and 0.44 respectively). Low correlation was found between CAP muscle function, mobility II and motion quality and the Dimeglio scoring system (rs = 0.20, 0.09 and 0.06 respectively). Of 13 children with bilateral clubfeet, 11 showed different CAP mobility I scores between right and left foot at baseline (untreated) compared with 5 with the Dimeglio score. At the other assessment occasions the CAP mobility I continued to show higher discrimination ability than the Dimeglio. No floor effects and low ceiling effects were found in the untreated clubfeet for both instruments. High ceiling effects were found in the CAP for the treated children and low for the Dimeglio. Responsiveness was good. ES from untreated to treated ranged from 0.80 to 4.35 for the CAP subgroups and was 4.68 for the Dimeglio. The first four treatment months, the CAP mobility I had generally higher ES compared with the Dimeglio. The

  8. Validity and responsiveness of the Clubfoot Assessment Protocol (CAP). A methodological study

    PubMed Central

    Andriesse, Hanneke; Roos, Ewa M; Hägglund, Gunnar; Jarnlo, Gun-Britt

    2006-01-01

    Background The Clubfoot Assessment Protocol (CAP) is a multi dimensional instrument designed for longitudinal follow up of the clubfoot deformity during growth. Item reliability has shown to be sufficient. In this article the CAP's validity and responsiveness is studied using the Dimeglio classification scoring as a gold standard. Methods Thirty-two children with 45 congenital clubfeet were assessed prospectively and consecutively at ages of new-born, one, two, four months and two years of age. For convergent/divergent construct validity the Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated. Discriminate validity was evaluated by studying the scores in bilateral clubfeet. The floor-ceiling effects at baseline (untreated clubfeet) and at two years of age (treated clubfeet) were evaluated. Responsiveness was evaluated by using effect sizes (ES) and by calculating if significant changes (Wilcoxons signed test) had occurred between the different measurement occasions. Results High to moderate significant correlation were found between CAP mobility I and morphology and the Dimeglio scores (rs = 0.77 and 0.44 respectively). Low correlation was found between CAP muscle function, mobility II and motion quality and the Dimeglio scoring system (rs = 0.20, 0.09 and 0.06 respectively). Of 13 children with bilateral clubfeet, 11 showed different CAP mobility I scores between right and left foot at baseline (untreated) compared with 5 with the Dimeglio score. At the other assessment occasions the CAP mobility I continued to show higher discrimination ability than the Dimeglio. No floor effects and low ceiling effects were found in the untreated clubfeet for both instruments. High ceiling effects were found in the CAP for the treated children and low for the Dimeglio. Responsiveness was good. ES from untreated to treated ranged from 0.80 to 4.35 for the CAP subgroups and was 4.68 for the Dimeglio. The first four treatment months, the CAP mobility I had generally higher ES

  9. Protocol for the Assessment of Potential Health Effects from Embedded Metal Fragments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    compare the results to a standard test material such as Type 316L stainless steel, an alloy considered accept- able for use in medical implants. It...should be noted that the con- ditions specifi ed in the testing protocols are of such a severity as to corrode Type 316L stainless steel, and, as such

  10. Divided Timed and Continuous Timed Assessment Protocols and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perucca, David.

    2013-01-01

    Children from a low socioeconomic status (SES) are exposed to numerous stress factors that are negatively associated with sustained attention and academic performance. This association suggests that the timed component of lengthy assessments may be unfair for students from such backgrounds, as they may have an inability to sustain attention during…

  11. Toward an HRD Auditing Protocol: Assessing HRD Risk Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clardy, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Even though HRD-related programs and activities carry risks that should be monitored and assessed, there is little literature on how auditing applies to the HRD function; the existing literature on the topic defines HRD auditing in widely different ways. The nature of risk for organizational process is discussed, followed by a review of the…

  12. Toward an HRD Auditing Protocol: Assessing HRD Risk Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clardy, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Even though HRD-related programs and activities carry risks that should be monitored and assessed, there is little literature on how auditing applies to the HRD function; the existing literature on the topic defines HRD auditing in widely different ways. The nature of risk for organizational process is discussed, followed by a review of the…

  13. The Development of an Assessment Protocol for Reactive Attachment Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheperis, Carl J.; Doggett, R. Anthony; Hoda, Nicholas E.; Blanchard, Tracy; Renfro-Michel, Edina L.; Holdiness, Sacky H.; Schlagheck, Robyn

    2003-01-01

    Proposes a battery of semi-structured interviews, global assessment scales, attachment-specific scales, and behavioral observations to help mental health counselors identify Reactive Attachment Disorder, a syndrome associated with extreme attachment problems. (Contains 25 references and 2 tables.) (GCP)

  14. Demonstration and Commercialization of the Sediment Ecosystem Assessment Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    NISE Naval Innovative Science and Engineering NPDES National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System OF Outfall PAH Polycyclic aromatic...Stormwater Effects Assessment). Current methods prescribed in a wide variety of National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Municipal...often exhibiting a first-flush effect, with a majority of pollutant loading occurring during the first during early runoff periods. Furthermore, runoff

  15. Effects of Adding an Internet-Based Pain Coping Skills Training Protocol to a Standardized Education and Exercise Program for People With Persistent Hip Pain (HOPE Trial): Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim L; Rini, Christine; Keefe, Francis; French, Simon; Nelligan, Rachel; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Dobson, Fiona; Abbott, J Haxby; Dalwood, Andrew; Vicenzino, Bill; Harris, Anthony; Hinman, Rana S

    2015-10-01

    Persistent hip pain in older people is usually due to hip osteoarthritis (OA), a major cause of pain, disability, and psychological dysfunction. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether adding an Internet-based pain coping skills training (PCST) protocol to a standardized intervention of education followed by physical therapist-instructed home exercise leads to greater reductions in pain and improvements in function. An assessor-, therapist-, and participant-blinded randomized controlled trial will be conducted. The study will be conducted in a community setting. The participants will be 142 people over 50 years of age with self-reported hip pain consistent with hip OA. Participants will be randomly allocated to: (1) a control group receiving a 24-week standardized intervention comprising an 8-week Internet-based education package followed by 5 individual physical therapy exercise sessions plus home exercises (3 times weekly) or (2) a PCST group receiving an 8-week Internet-based PCST protocol in addition to the control intervention. Outcomes will be measured at baseline and 8, 24, and 52 weeks, with the primary time point at 24 weeks. Primary outcomes are hip pain on walking and self-reported physical function. Secondary outcomes include health-related quality-of-life, participant-perceived treatment response, self-efficacy for pain management and function, pain coping attempts, pain catastrophizing, and physical activity. Measurements of adherence, adverse events, use of health services, and process measures will be collected at 24 and 52 weeks. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed at 52 weeks. A self-reported diagnosis of persistent hip pain will be used. The findings will help determine whether adding an Internet-based PCST protocol to standardized education and physical therapist-instructed home exercise is more effective than education and exercise alone for persistent hip pain. This study has the potential to guide clinical practice toward innovative

  16. Satellite Communications Using Commercial Protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Griner, James H.; Dimond, Robert; Frantz, Brian D.; Kachmar, Brian; Shell, Dan

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been working with industry, academia, and other government agencies in assessing commercial communications protocols for satellite and space-based applications. In addition, NASA Glenn has been developing and advocating new satellite-friendly modifications to existing communications protocol standards. This paper summarizes recent research into the applicability of various commercial standard protocols for use over satellite and space- based communications networks as well as expectations for future protocol development. It serves as a reference point from which the detailed work can be readily accessed. Areas that will be addressed include asynchronous-transfer-mode quality of service; completed and ongoing work of the Internet Engineering Task Force; data-link-layer protocol development for unidirectional link routing; and protocols for aeronautical applications, including mobile Internet protocol routing for wireless/mobile hosts and the aeronautical telecommunications network protocol.

  17. Web-Based Assessment of Physical Education Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Marybell

    2012-01-01

    Why would a school district consider implementing a district-wide, web-based assessment of student achievement of physical education standards? Why should any school or school district assume the expense, both in terms of time and money, of adopting an online assessment tool for physical education to assess students' cognitive and motor skills?…

  18. Web-Based Assessment of Physical Education Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Marybell

    2012-01-01

    Why would a school district consider implementing a district-wide, web-based assessment of student achievement of physical education standards? Why should any school or school district assume the expense, both in terms of time and money, of adopting an online assessment tool for physical education to assess students' cognitive and motor skills?…

  19. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrino, James W., Ed.; Wilson, Mark R., Ed.; Koenig, Judith A., Ed.; Beatty, Alexandra S., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Assessments, understood as tools for tracking what and how well students have learned, play a critical role in the classroom. "Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards" develops an approach to science assessment to meet the vision of science education for the future as it has been elaborated in "A Framework…

  20. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrino, James W., Ed.; Wilson, Mark R., Ed.; Koenig, Judith A., Ed.; Beatty, Alexandra S., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Assessments, understood as tools for tracking what and how well students have learned, play a critical role in the classroom. "Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards" develops an approach to science assessment to meet the vision of science education for the future as it has been elaborated in "A Framework…

  1. Depression Awareness and Self-Management Through the Internet: Protocol for an Internationally Standardized Approach

    PubMed Central

    Koburger, Nicole; Larkin, Celine; Karwig, Gillian; Coffey, Claire; Maxwell, Margaret; Harris, Fiona; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; van Audenhove, Chantal; Sisask, Merike; Alexandrova-Karamanova, Anna; Perez, Victor; Purebl, György; Cebria, Annabel; Palao, Diego; Costa, Susana; Mark, Lauraliisa; Tóth, Mónika Ditta; Gecheva, Marieta; Ibelshäuser, Angela; Gusmão, Ricardo; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression incurs significant morbidity and confers increased risk of suicide. Many individuals experiencing depression remain untreated due to systemic and personal barriers to care. Guided Internet-based psychotherapeutic programs represent a promising means of overcoming such barriers and increasing the capacity for self-management of depression. However, existing programs tend to be available only in English and can be expensive to access. Furthermore, despite evidence of the effectiveness of a number of Internet-based programs, there is limited evidence regarding both the acceptability of such programs and feasibility of their use, for users and health care professionals. Objective This paper will present the protocol for the development, implementation, and evaluation of the iFightDepression tool, an Internet-based self-management tool. This is a cost-free, multilingual, guided, self-management program for mild to moderate depression cases. Methods The Preventing Depression and Improving Awareness through Networking in the European Union consortium undertook a comprehensive systematic review of the available evidence regarding computerized cognitive behavior therapy in addition to a consensus process involving mental health experts and service users to inform the development of the iFightDepression tool. The tool was implemented and evaluated for acceptability and feasibility of its use in a pilot phase in 5 European regions, with recruitment of users occurring through general practitioners and health care professionals who participated in a standardized training program. Results Targeting mild to moderate depression, the iFightDepression tool is based on cognitive behavioral therapy and addresses behavioral activation (monitoring and planning daily activities), cognitive restructuring (identifying and challenging unhelpful thoughts), sleep regulation, mood monitoring, and healthy lifestyle habits. There is also a tailored version of the tool for

  2. Biorepository standards and protocols for collecting, processing, and storing human tissues.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput assays for gene expression (genomics), proteins (proteomics), and metabolites (metabolomics) have engendered a parallel need for well-annotated human biological samples. Samples from both diseased and unaffected normal tissues are often required. Biorepositories consist of a specimen bank linked to a database of information. Assuring chain of custody and annotation of samples with relevant clinical information is required. The value of samples to end users is generally commensurate with the quality and extent of relevant clinical data included with the samples. Procurement of tissues is often done with parallel pre- and/or post-treatment venipuncture to obtain blood and tissue samples from the same subject. Biorepositories must also process, preserve, and distribute samples to end users. Like traditional libraries, biorepositories are meant to be used, and they are most useful when the needs of end users (researchers) are considered in the planning and development process. Ethics review and an awareness of regulatory requirements for storage, transport, and distribution are required. In the USA, Institutional Review Boards are the local regulatory entities that review protocols for banking of human biological tissues. Governmental and professional agencies and organizations provide some guidelines for standard operating procedures. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers For Disease Control (CDC), and professional organizations such as the American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB), the American Association of Blood Banks, The International Red Cross, International Society for Biological Repositories (ISBER) and other organizations provide guidelines for biorepositories and banking of human tissues (see Table 1). To date, these guidelines are directed largely toward procurement, banking, and distribution of human tissues for therapeutic uses. In the international setting, the World Health Organization provides ethical

  3. A standardized protocol for the prevention of clinically relevant venous air embolism during neurosurgical interventions in the semisitting position.

    PubMed

    Jadik, Senol; Wissing, Heimo; Friedrich, Karin; Beck, Jürgen; Seifert, Volker; Raabe, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    We report the results and complications associated with standardized intraoperative management designed for the prevention of hemodynamically relevant venous air embolism during surgery performed in the semisitting position. A protocol for preoperative evaluation and intraoperative monitoring was developed and applied in 187 consecutive patients who underwent surgery in the semisitting position between 1999 and 2004. The protocol included preoperative transesophageal echocardiography examination (TEE), intraoperative TEE monitoring, catheterization of the right atrium and a combination of fluid input, positive end expiratory pressure, and standardized positioning aiming at a positive pressure in the transverse and sigmoid sinuses. Data were collected retrospectively from the charts and intraoperative anesthesiological protocols of the patients for the incidence of clinically relevant air embolism (i.e., TEE-diagnosed air embolism plus a decrease in end tidal CO2 or hemodynamic changes) and other complications related to the semisitting position. Three cases (1.6%) of relevant venous air embolism occurred in 187 patients. Only 1 case (0.5%) was hemodynamically relevant, with temporary arterial blood pressure decrease and heart rate increase. Pneumatocephalus leading to lethargy was a frequent postoperative finding, which resolved spontaneously in all except 1 patient with epileptic seizure and oculomotor nerve palsy attributable to space-occupying subdurally trapped air, which had to be treated surgically. There was no permanent morbidity or mortality related to the semisitting position. Fear of massive venous air embolism is one reason for dramatic decline in the use of the semisitting position in neurosurgical practice. We found that strict adherence to a standardized protocol using TEE monitoring before and during surgery; exclusion of patients with patent foramen ovale; and a combination of positive end expiratory pressure, fluid input, and a standardized

  4. Comparison of subjective assessment protocols for digital cinema applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larabi, M.-C.

    2010-01-01

    Quality assessment is becoming an important issue in the framework of image processing. This need is expressed by the fact that the quality threshold of end-users has been shifted up because of the large availability of high fidelity sensors at very affordable price. This observation has been made for different application domains such as printing, compression, transmission, and so on. Starting from this, it becomes very important to manufacturers and producers to provide products of high quality to attract the consumer. This high interest on quality means that tools to measure it have to be available. This work is dedicated to the comparison of subjective methodologies in the digital cinema framework. The main goal is to determine with a group of observers, which methodology is better for assessing digital cinema content and what is the annoyance level associated to each of them. Several configurations are tested side by side, Butterfly, one by one, Horizontal scroll, vertical scroll, Horizontal and vertical scroll.

  5. Comparison of low- and ultralow-dose computed tomography protocols for quantitative lung and airway assessment.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Emily; Sloan, Chelsea; Newell, John D; Sieren, Jered P; Saylor, Melissa; Vidal, Craig; Hogue, Shayna; De Stefano, Frank; Sieren, Alexa; Hoffman, Eric A; Sieren, Jessica C

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures are increasingly being developed and used to characterize lung disease. With recent advances in CT technologies, we sought to evaluate the quantitative accuracy of lung imaging at low- and ultralow-radiation doses with the use of iterative reconstruction (IR), tube current modulation (TCM), and spectral shaping. We investigated the effect of five independent CT protocols reconstructed with IR on quantitative airway measures and global lung measures using an in vivo large animal model as a human subject surrogate. A control protocol was chosen (NIH-SPIROMICS + TCM) and five independent protocols investigating TCM, low- and ultralow-radiation dose, and spectral shaping. For all scans, quantitative global parenchymal measurements (mean, median and standard deviation of the parenchymal HU, along with measures of emphysema) and global airway measurements (number of segmented airways and pi10) were generated. In addition, selected individual airway measurements (minor and major inner diameter, wall thickness, inner and outer area, inner and outer perimeter, wall area fraction, and inner equivalent circle diameter) were evaluated. Comparisons were made between control and target protocols using difference and repeatability measures. Estimated CT volume dose index (CTDIvol) across all protocols ranged from 7.32 mGy to 0.32 mGy. Low- and ultralow-dose protocols required more manual editing and resolved fewer airway branches; yet, comparable pi10 whole lung measures were observed across all protocols. Similar trends in acquired parenchymal and airway measurements were observed across all protocols, with increased measurement differences using the ultralow-dose protocols. However, for small airways (1.9 ± 0.2 mm) and medium airways (5.7 ± 0.4 mm), the measurement differences across all protocols were comparable to the control protocol repeatability across breath holds. Diameters, wall thickness, wall area fraction

  6. Is there an advantage to be gained from adding digital image cytometry of brush cytology to a standard biopsy protocol in patients with Barrett's esophagus?

    PubMed

    Borovicka, J; Schönegg, R; Hell, M; Kradolfer, D; Bauerfeind, P; Dorta, G; Netzer, P; Binek, J; Meyenberger, C; Fischer, J E; Spieler, P

    2009-05-01

    The current gold standard in Barrett's esophagus monitoring consists of four-quadrant biopsies every 1-2 cm in accordance with the Seattle protocol. Adding brush cytology processed by digital image cytometry (DICM) may further increase the detection of patients with Barrett's esophagus who are at risk of neoplasia. The aim of the present study was to assess the additional diagnostic value and accuracy of DICM when added to the standard histological analysis in a cross-sectional multicenter study of patients with Barrett's esophagus in Switzerland. One hundred sixty-four patients with Barrett's esophagus underwent 239 endoscopies with biopsy and brush cytology. DICM was carried out on 239 cytology specimens. Measures of the test accuracy of DICM (relative risk, sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios) were obtained by dichotomizing the histopathology results (high-grade dysplasia or adenocarcinoma vs. all others) and DICM results (aneuploidy/intermediate pattern vs. diploidy). DICM revealed diploidy in 83% of 239 endoscopies, an intermediate pattern in 8.8%, and aneuploidy in 8.4%. An intermediate DICM result carried a relative risk (RR) of 12 and aneuploidy a RR of 27 for high-grade dysplasia/adenocarcinoma. Adding DICM to the standard biopsy protocol, a pathological cytometry result (aneuploid or intermediate) was found in 25 of 239 endoscopies (11%; 18 patients) with low-risk histology (no high-grade dysplasia or adenocarcinoma). During follow-up of 14 of these 18 patients, histological deterioration was seen in 3 (21%). DICM from brush cytology may add important information to a standard biopsy protocol by identifying a subgroup of BE-patients with high-risk cellular abnormalities.

  7. Summary Report Panel 1: The Need for Protocols and Standards in Research on Underwater Noise Impacts on Marine Life.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christine; Ainslie, Michael A; de Jong, Christ A F; Racca, Roberto; Stocker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    As concern about anthropogenic noise and its impacts on marine fauna is increasing around the globe, data are being compared across populations, species, noise sources, geographic regions, and time. However, much of the raw and processed data are not comparable due to differences in measurement methodology, analysis and reporting, and a lack of metadata. Common protocols and more formal, international standards are needed to ensure the effectiveness of research, conservation, regulation and practice, and unambiguous communication of information and ideas. Developing standards takes time and effort, is largely driven by a few expert volunteers, and would benefit from stakeholders' contribution and support.

  8. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design

    PubMed Central

    Pache, Roland A.; Ollikainen, Noah; Kundert, Kale; O'Meara, Matthew J.; Smith, Colin A.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks) to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a “best practice” set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available. PMID:26335248

  9. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design.

    PubMed

    Ó Conchúir, Shane; Barlow, Kyle A; Pache, Roland A; Ollikainen, Noah; Kundert, Kale; O'Meara, Matthew J; Smith, Colin A; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks) to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a "best practice" set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available.

  10. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants' adherence to the protocol, use

  11. A Field-Based Testing Protocol for Assessing Gross Motor Skills in Preschool Children: The CHAMPS Motor Skills Protocol (CMSP)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Harriet G.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Jeter, Chevy; Jones, Shaverra; Pate, Russell R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a valid and reliable tool for use in assessing motor skills in preschool children in field based settings. The development of the CHAMPS (Children’s Activity and Movement in Preschool Study) Motor Skills Protocol (CMSP) included evidence of its reliability and validity for use in field-based environments as part of large epidemiological studies. Following pilot work, 297 children (3-5 years old) from 22 preschools were tested using the final version of the CMSP and the TGMD-2. Reliability of the CMSP and interobserver reliability were determined using intraclass correlation procedures (ICC; ANOVA). Concurrent validity was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients to compare the CMSP to the original Test of Gross Motor Development (2nd Edition) (TGMD-2). Results indicated that test reliability, interobserver reliability and validity coefficients were all high, generally above R/r = 0.90. Significant age differences were found. Outcomes indicate that the CMSP is an appropriate tool for assessing motor development of 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children in field-based settings that are consistent with large-scale trials. PMID:21532999

  12. Establishing eutrophication assessment standards for four lake regions, China.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shouliang; Ma, Chunzi; Xi, Beidou; Su, Jing; Zan, Fengyu; Ji, Danfeng; He, Zhuoshi

    2013-10-01

    The trophic status assessment of lakes in different lake regions may provide important and fundamental information for lake trophic state classification and eutrophication control. In this study, a region-specific lake eutrophication assessment standard was established through a frequency distribution method based on chlorophyll-a concentration. The assessment standards under the oligotrophic state for lakes in the Eastern plain, Yungui Plateau, Northeast Plain and Mountain Mongolia-Xinjiang regions are total phosphorus of 0.068, 0.005, 0.011, 0.005 mg/L; total nitrogen of 1.00, 0.16, 0.37, 0.60 mg/L; Secchi depth of 0.60, 8.00, 1.55, 3.00 m; and COD(Mn) of 2.24, 1.00, 5.11, 4.00 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, a region-specific comprehensive trophic level index was developed to provide an understandable assessment method for the public. The results indicated that the frequency distribution analysis based on chlorophyll-a combined with trophic level index provided a useful metric for the assessment of the lake trophic status. In addition, the difference of eutrophication assessment standards in different lake regions was analyzed, which suggested that the sensitivities of algae to nutrients and the assessment standard of trophic status possessed significant regional differences for the four lake ecoregions. Lake eutrophication assessment standards would contribute to maximizing the effectiveness of future management strategies, to control and minimize lake eutrophication problems.

  13. Incommunicado detention and torture in Spain, Part II: Enhanced credibility assessment based on the Istanbul Protocol.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sales, Pau; Morentin, Benito; Barrenetxea, Olatz; Navarro-Lashayas, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    The Istanbul Protocol (IP) is the key instrument in the documentation of allegations of torture. However, few scientific studies have evaluated its effectiveness as a tool to assess credibility of allegations of ill-treatment or torture. Present data on the credibility of allegations of torture in a sample of 45 Basque people held in short-term incommunicado detention between 1980 and 2012, using a modified version of the Standard Evaluation Form for Credibility Assessment (SEC), a new tool to assess credibility based on the IP. Each case was evaluated by two psychiatrists, a psychologist and a physician through a layered system of simultaneous, independent assessments, blind audits and peer-review processes. Clinical interviews following the IP were contrasted with psychometric tests and external documentary evidence by independent experts. All available data were structured using the SEC and cases were accordingly classified as having Maximum consistency, Highly Consistent, Consistent or Inconsistent. According to the SEC, 53% of allegations of torture were considered to have Maximum Consistency, 31% Highly consistent, 15% Consistent and 0% Inconsistent. The items that most contributed to the overall credibility assessment came from the psychological evaluation, including the description of alleged torture, emotional reactions, objective functional changes, changes in identity and worldviews and clinical diagnosis. There was little contribution from previous medical reports. When applied competently, the IP is an essential tool in the documentation of torture. Our study shows: (a) evidence that allegations of ill-treatment and torture in the Basque Country are consistent and credible, being ascertained beyond reasonable doubt and aside from any political debate; (b) the wider use of the IP as a tool to assess credibility of allegations of ill-treatment and torture; and, (c) the usefulness of the SEC as a tool. The SEC can help as a tool for documenting torture in

  14. Lexical Analysis of Words on Commonly Used Standardized Spelling Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoon, Mary Beth; Masterson, Julie J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the morphological characteristics (i.e., number of morphemes in each word, degree of transparency between a derived morpheme and its root word) and frequency data (i.e., the standard frequency index; SFI) of six commonly used standardized spelling assessments and their alternate forms (when available).…

  15. Peer Review of Assessment Network: Supporting Comparability of Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Sara; Beckett, Jeff; Saunders, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to test the need in the Australian higher education (HE) sector for a national network for the peer review of assessment in response to the proposed HE standards framework and propose a sector-wide framework for calibrating and assuring achievement standards, both within and across disciplines, through the establishment of…

  16. Peer Review of Assessment Network: Supporting Comparability of Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Sara; Beckett, Jeff; Saunders, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to test the need in the Australian higher education (HE) sector for a national network for the peer review of assessment in response to the proposed HE standards framework and propose a sector-wide framework for calibrating and assuring achievement standards, both within and across disciplines, through the establishment of…

  17. Perceived Effects of Standards-Based Grading on Student Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoernke, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how the implementation of a district-wide standards-based grading system affected the ways in which high school teachers assessed students' academic achievement. The researcher used a bounded case study to observe and interview three participating secondary teachers in a rural Wisconsin high school that used standards-based…

  18. Assessing the Assessors: JMC Administrators Critique the Nine ACEJMC Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinardy, Scott; Crawford, Jerry, II.

    2013-01-01

    For nearly ninety years, journalism professionals and academics have attempted to develop standards by which to prepare college students for the media industry. For nearly 70 years, the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC) has assessed programs based on its standards. This study surveyed administers of…

  19. Conceptual Acrobatics: Talking about Assessment Standards in the Transparency Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jane; Bloxham, Sue; den Outer, Birgit; Price, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Since their introduction in the 1990s, explicit standards documents have pervaded higher education assessment--success likely linked to their compatibility with constructive alignment and quality assurance regimes. Researchers, however, criticise that such documents are based on a misconception of standards as explicit and absolute, when in fact…

  20. Assessing the Efficacy of an App-Based Method of Family Planning: The Dot Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Shattuck, Dominick C; Jennings, Victoria H

    2017-01-01

    course of 13 menstrual cycles to assess pregnancy status over time. This paper outlines the protocol for this efficacy trial, following the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Intervention Trials checklist, to provide an overview of the rationale, methodology, and analysis plan. Participants will be asked to provide daily sexual history data and periodically answer surveys administered through a call center or directly on their phone. Results Funding for the study was provided in 2013 under the United States Agency for International Development Fertility Awareness for Community Transformation project. Recruitment for the study will begin in January of 2017. The study is expected to last approximately 18 months, depending on recruitment. Findings on the study’s primary outcomes are expected to be finalized by September 2018. Conclusions Reproducibility and transparency, important aspects of all research, are particularly critical in developing new approaches to research design. This protocol outlines the first study to prospectively test both the efficacy (correct use) and effectiveness (actual use) of a pregnancy prevention app. This protocol and the processes it describes reflect the dynamic integration of mobile technologies, a call center, and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–compliant study procedures. Future fertility app studies can build on our approaches to develop methodologies that can contribute to the evidence base around app-based methods of contraception. ClinicalTrial ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02833922; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02833922 (Archived be WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6nDkr0e76) PMID:28100441

  1. Assessing the Efficacy of an App-Based Method of Family Planning: The Dot Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rebecca G; Shattuck, Dominick C; Jennings, Victoria H

    2017-01-18

    assess pregnancy status over time. This paper outlines the protocol for this efficacy trial, following the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Intervention Trials checklist, to provide an overview of the rationale, methodology, and analysis plan. Participants will be asked to provide daily sexual history data and periodically answer surveys administered through a call center or directly on their phone. Funding for the study was provided in 2013 under the United States Agency for International Development Fertility Awareness for Community Transformation project. Recruitment for the study will begin in January of 2017. The study is expected to last approximately 18 months, depending on recruitment. Findings on the study's primary outcomes are expected to be finalized by September 2018. Reproducibility and transparency, important aspects of all research, are particularly critical in developing new approaches to research design. This protocol outlines the first study to prospectively test both the efficacy (correct use) and effectiveness (actual use) of a pregnancy prevention app. This protocol and the processes it describes reflect the dynamic integration of mobile technologies, a call center, and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study procedures. Future fertility app studies can build on our approaches to develop methodologies that can contribute to the evidence base around app-based methods of contraception. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02833922; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02833922 (Archived be WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6nDkr0e76).

  2. Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice: Development of a Standardized Clinical Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempster, Gail B.; Gerratt, Bruce R.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie; Hillman, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article presents the development of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V) following a consensus conference on perceptual voice quality measurement sponsored by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's Special Interest Division 3, Voice and Voice Disorders. The CAPE-V protocol and recording form were…

  3. Variation in Seed Dormancy in Echinochloa and the Development of a Standard Protocol for Germination Testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station maintains more than 300 accessions of Echinochloa representing 15 species from a diverse cross-section of nations and growing conditions from around the world. With such a diverse collection, no single germination-testing protocol was adequate f...

  4. Uncertainties in sediment erodibility estimates due to a lack of standards for experimental protocols and data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Lawrence P

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative prediction of the erodibility of muds and mud-sand mixtures is, at present, seldom possible without resorting to direct measurements, preferably in situ. A variety of devices and protocols have been developed for erosion testing, but a considerable degree of uncertainty remains with regard to the accuracy and comparability of the resulting data. This paper argues that differences in experimental protocols and data analysis procedures are a major contributing factor to uncertainty in estimates of sediment erodibility. In particular, the likelihood of a time-dependent erosion rate response under typical erosion testing conditions means that the time history of applied forcing and the chosen protocols for analyzing and interpreting data directly affect derived erosion parameters. Several straightforward ways to address this problem are suggested, including standardization of experimental design and data analysis protocols, explicit recognition and adoption of appropriate erosion model(s), and allowing for potential time/depth changes in erodibility. Experimentalists should also archive and share erosion-test time series, not just derived parameters, so that data sets may be reanalyzed within a different framework if necessary. An example is presented from an intercomparison experiment between the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences Sea Carousel and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Microcosm System, carried out in the upper Chesapeake Bay (Maryland, USA) in May 2002. Derived parameters appear to be incompatible when the data are analyzed using different procedures, but real similarities and differences are readily apparent when the data are analyzed using the same procedures.

  5. 78 FR 14654 - Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... reference updated business practice standards adopted by the Wholesale Electric Quadrant of the North... offered. The standards also require each regional transmission organization (RTO) and independent system... business practice standards adopted by the Wholesale Electric Quadrant (WEQ) of the North American Energy...

  6. Leading the Transition from the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards to the General Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Rieke, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    Schools are facing many changes in the ways that teaching, learning, and assessment take place. Most states are moving from individual state standards to the new Common Core State Standards, which will be fewer, higher, and more rigorous than most current state standards. As the next generation of assessments used for accountability are rolled…

  7. Leading the Transition from the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards to the General Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Rieke, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    Schools are facing many changes in the ways that teaching, learning, and assessment take place. Most states are moving from individual state standards to the new Common Core State Standards, which will be fewer, higher, and more rigorous than most current state standards. As the next generation of assessments used for accountability are rolled…

  8. ASK Standards: Assessment, Skills, and Knowledge Content Standards for Student Affairs Practitioners and Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Assessment Skills and Knowledge (ASK) standards seek to articulate the areas of content knowledge, skill and dispositions that student affairs professionals need in order to perform as practitioner-scholars to assess the degree to which students are mastering the learning and development outcomes the professionals intend. Consistent with…

  9. ASK Standards: Assessment, Skills, and Knowledge Content Standards for Student Affairs Practitioners and Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Assessment Skills and Knowledge (ASK) standards seek to articulate the areas of content knowledge, skill and dispositions that student affairs professionals need in order to perform as practitioner-scholars to assess the degree to which students are mastering the learning and development outcomes the professionals intend. Consistent with…

  10. A low-dose and an ultra-low-dose contrast agent protocol for coronary CT angiography in a clinical setting: quantitative and qualitative comparison to a standard dose protocol.

    PubMed

    Benz, Dominik C; Gräni, Christoph; Hirt Moch, Beatrice; Mikulicic, Fran; Vontobel, Jan; Fuchs, Tobias A; Stehli, Julia; Clerc, Olivier F; Possner, Mathias; Pazhenkottil, Aju P; Gaemperli, Oliver; Buechel, Ronny R; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a low-dose (LD) and an ultra-LD (ULD) contrast protocol for coronary CT angiography on qualitative and quantitative image parameters in a clinical setting. We scanned 120 consecutive patients with a 256-slice CT scanner applying a LD (60 patients, 35-55 ml) or ULD (60 patients, 25-45 ml) contrast protocol adapted to the body mass index. Visually assessed image quality and attenuation measured in each coronary segment were retrospectively compared in 20 consecutive patients scanned with a normal-dose (ND, 40-105 ml) contrast protocol. Visually assessed image quality did not differ significantly among protocols. By contrast, attenuation obtained from the ULD protocol (median contrast volume 35 ml) differed significantly from the LD (median 45 ml) and ND (median 70 ml) protocols in the coronary segments (316 ± 52 vs 363 ± 60 and 359 ± 52 HU, p < 0.001). Attenuation did not differ significantly between the LD and ND protocol. The proportion of patients with inadequate coronary vessel attenuation was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the ULD protocol (37%) than in the ND (5%) and LD (10%) protocols but did not differ significantly between the ND and LD protocols. In a clinical setting, a LD contrast protocol with a median volume of 45 ml is feasible for the latest generation 256-slice coronary CT angiography as it yields attenuation comparable to a ND protocol. By contrast, the implementation of an ULD protocol remains challenging. Advances in knowledge: Although not perceived by the naked eye, an ULD contrast protocol in a clinical setting yields attenuation below a threshold for diagnostic image quality.

  11. Using Simple Linear Regression to Assess the Success of the Montreal Protocol in Reducing Atmospheric Chlorofluorocarbons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Following the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) recommendation to use real data, an example is presented in which simple linear regression is used to evaluate the effect of the Montreal Protocol on atmospheric concentration of chlorofluorocarbons. This simple set of data, obtained from a public archive, can…

  12. Using Simple Linear Regression to Assess the Success of the Montreal Protocol in Reducing Atmospheric Chlorofluorocarbons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Following the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) recommendation to use real data, an example is presented in which simple linear regression is used to evaluate the effect of the Montreal Protocol on atmospheric concentration of chlorofluorocarbons. This simple set of data, obtained from a public archive, can…

  13. ASSESSMENT OF DE-71, A COMMERCIAL POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYLETHER (PBDE) MIXTURE, IN THE EDSP MALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    ASSESSMENT OF DE-71, A COMMERCIAL POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHER (PBDE) MIXTURE, IN THE EDSP MALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOL. T.E. Stoker1, J. Ferrell1, J.M. Hedge2, K. M. Crofton2, R.L. Cooper1 and S.C. Laws1. 1 Reprod. Tox. Div., 2 Neurotox. Div., NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, NC.

    P...

  14. Training Organizations in Use of a Modified Stream Visual Assessment Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obropta, Christopher C.; Yergeau, Steven E.

    2011-01-01

    The Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP) was evaluated as a means to increase watershed surveys in New Jersey. Groups were trained in an SVAP modified for New Jersey streams. Participants in three training workshops were surveyed to determine the usefulness of SVAP as a cost-effective method to evaluate watershed health. Many respondents found…

  15. Treatment Integrity Assessment in the Schools: An Evaluation of the Treatment Integrity Planning Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    The Treatment Integrity Planning Protocol (TIPP) provides a structured process for collaboratively creating a treatment integrity assessment within a consultation framework. The authors evaluated the effect of the TIPP on the implementation of an intervention designed to improve the consistency of students' mathematics performance. Treatment…

  16. Development and Use of an Eating Disorder Assessment and Treatment Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Lois A.; Weitzman, Lauren M.; Mountain, Lisa M.; Nelson, Kris L.; Oakley, Danielle R.; Smith, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Counseling centers have been challenged to effectively treat the growing number of college students who struggle with disordered eating. In response to this critical issue, an Eating Disorder Assessment and Treatment Protocol (EDATP) was developed to assist clinical disposition in the counseling center setting and identify treatment guidelines…

  17. ASSESSMENT OF DE-71, A COMMERCIAL POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYLETHER (PBDE) MIXTURE, IN THE EDSP MALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    ASSESSMENT OF DE-71, A COMMERCIAL POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHER (PBDE) MIXTURE, IN THE EDSP MALE PUBERTAL PROTOCOL. T.E. Stoker1, J. Ferrell1, J.M. Hedge2, K. M. Crofton2, R.L. Cooper1 and S.C. Laws1. 1 Reprod. Tox. Div., 2 Neurotox. Div., NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, NC.

    P...

  18. Training Organizations in Use of a Modified Stream Visual Assessment Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obropta, Christopher C.; Yergeau, Steven E.

    2011-01-01

    The Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP) was evaluated as a means to increase watershed surveys in New Jersey. Groups were trained in an SVAP modified for New Jersey streams. Participants in three training workshops were surveyed to determine the usefulness of SVAP as a cost-effective method to evaluate watershed health. Many respondents found…

  19. Treatment Integrity Assessment in the Schools: An Evaluation of the Treatment Integrity Planning Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    The Treatment Integrity Planning Protocol (TIPP) provides a structured process for collaboratively creating a treatment integrity assessment within a consultation framework. The authors evaluated the effect of the TIPP on the implementation of an intervention designed to improve the consistency of students' mathematics performance. Treatment…

  20. A protocol for the health and fitness assessment of NBA players.

    PubMed

    Scheller, A; Rask, B

    1993-04-01

    The assessment of the health and fitness of elite basketball players should be a multidisciplinary process. We have described an organized, efficient, and comprehensive protocol for preseason physical evaluations that could be used at the university as well as professional level.

  1. Development and Use of an Eating Disorder Assessment and Treatment Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Lois A.; Weitzman, Lauren M.; Mountain, Lisa M.; Nelson, Kris L.; Oakley, Danielle R.; Smith, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Counseling centers have been challenged to effectively treat the growing number of college students who struggle with disordered eating. In response to this critical issue, an Eating Disorder Assessment and Treatment Protocol (EDATP) was developed to assist clinical disposition in the counseling center setting and identify treatment guidelines…

  2. Higher Education Quality Assessment Model: Towards Achieving Educational Quality Standard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noaman, Amin Y.; Ragab, Abdul Hamid M.; Madbouly, Ayman I.; Khedra, Ahmed M.; Fayoumi, Ayman G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a developed higher education quality assessment model (HEQAM) that can be applied for enhancement of university services. This is because there is no universal unified quality standard model that can be used to assess the quality criteria of higher education institutes. The analytical hierarchy process is used to identify the…

  3. Approaching Standards for Mathematics Assessment. ERIC/CSMEE Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Patricia A.; Hartog, Martin D.

    Current assessment practices in the classroom can affect the movement toward a child-centered curriculum in mathematics education. The mathematical community is addressing the challenge to implement standards in the areas of testing, assessment, and accountability in order to maintain this movement. This digest: (1) discusses what makes current…

  4. Higher Education Quality Assessment Model: Towards Achieving Educational Quality Standard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noaman, Amin Y.; Ragab, Abdul Hamid M.; Madbouly, Ayman I.; Khedra, Ahmed M.; Fayoumi, Ayman G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a developed higher education quality assessment model (HEQAM) that can be applied for enhancement of university services. This is because there is no universal unified quality standard model that can be used to assess the quality criteria of higher education institutes. The analytical hierarchy process is used to identify the…

  5. 24 CFR 115.206 - Performance assessments; Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Performance assessments; Performance standards. 115.206 Section 115.206 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... AGENCIES Certification of Substantially Equivalent Agencies § 115.206 Performance assessments;...

  6. 24 CFR 115.206 - Performance assessments; Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Performance assessments; Performance standards. 115.206 Section 115.206 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... AGENCIES Certification of Substantially Equivalent Agencies § 115.206 Performance assessments;...

  7. Spanish Translations of a Standard Assessment Battery for Marital Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, D. Eugene; Thurber, Shawn L.; Crane, Brent E.

    2003-01-01

    To better serve the growing number of Spanish-speaking couples and families in the U.S., it is useful to have a battery of instruments to assess the nature of their marital distress. This article presents the standard assessment battery that Brigham Young University uses to evaluate marital distress. (Contains 11 references and 1 table.) (GCP)

  8. Safety and cost-effectiveness of a clinical protocol implemented to standardize the use of Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab antivenom at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Weant, Kyle A; Bowers, Rebecca C; Reed, Janelle; Braun, Kristopher A; Dodd, David M; Baker, Stephanie N

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the safety and cost-effectiveness of a clinical protocol adopted in June 2006 that included a comprehensive, objective assessment of snake bite envenomations and standardized the use of Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab antivenom (FabAV). Retrospective medical record review. Academic medical center that serves as the regional level I trauma center. Seventy-five adults treated with FabAV for snake envenomations in the emergency department between June 1, 2003, and June 1, 2009; 30 patients received treatment according to the protocol (treatment group), and 45 patients received treatment that did not adhere to the protocol (control group). Demographic and envenomation characteristics, as well as treatment details, were collected for all patients. In addition, information on quantity of FabAV vials required, length of hospital stay, and length of intensive care unit stay were compared between the treatment and control groups. In the treatment group, significantly fewer vials of FabAV were used (2.5 vs 4.727 vials, p=0.007). This decreased in usage correlated to a cost savings of approximately $2000/patient. Despite no significant difference in the severity of the envenomations between the two groups (p=0.379), the treatment group experienced a significantly shorter hospital length of stay (1.933 vs 2.791 days, p=0.030). No significant difference in the progression to fasciotomy or the development of allergic reactions was noted between the two groups. Use of a clinical protocol related to snake envenomations resulted in approximately two fewer vials of FabAV required for each patient. In addition, the treatment group experienced a shorter hospital length of stay without a corresponding increase in adverse events or envenomation progression. Data show that use of the protocol was cost-effective. The development of institution-specific multidisciplinary protocols regarding snake bite envenomations is recommended. Clinical pharmacists can play a vital role in

  9. Reliability and criterion validity of an observation protocol for working technique assessments in cash register work.

    PubMed

    Palm, Peter; Josephson, Malin; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Kjellberg, Katarina

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the intra- and inter-observer reliability and criterion validity of an observation protocol, developed in an iterative process involving practicing ergonomists, for assessment of working technique during cash register work for the purpose of preventing upper extremity symptoms. Two ergonomists independently assessed 17 15-min videos of cash register work on two occasions each, as a basis for examining reliability. Criterion validity was assessed by comparing these assessments with meticulous video-based analyses by researchers. Intra-observer reliability was acceptable (i.e. proportional agreement >0.7 and kappa >0.4) for 10/10 questions. Inter-observer reliability was acceptable for only 3/10 questions. An acceptable inter-observer reliability combined with an acceptable criterion validity was obtained only for one working technique aspect, 'Quality of movements'. Thus, major elements of the cashiers' working technique could not be assessed with an acceptable accuracy from short periods of observations by one observer, such as often desired by practitioners. Practitioner Summary: We examined an observation protocol for assessing working technique in cash register work. It was feasible in use, but inter-observer reliability and criterion validity were generally not acceptable when working technique aspects were assessed from short periods of work. We recommend the protocol to be used for educational purposes only.

  10. Identification of Geotrichum candidum at the species and strain level: proposal for a standardized protocol.

    PubMed

    Gente, S; Sohier, D; Coton, E; Duhamel, C; Gueguen, M

    2006-12-01

    In this study, the M13 primer was used to distinguish Geotrichum candidum from the anamorphic and teleomorphic forms of other arthrospore-forming species (discriminatory power = 0.99). For intraspecific characterization, the GATA4 primer showed the highest level of discrimination for G. candidum among the 20 microsatellite primers tested. A molecular typing protocol (DNA concentration, hybridization temperature and type of PCR machine) was optimized through a series of intra- and interlaboratory trials. This protocol was validated using 75 strains of G. candidum, one strain of G. capitatum and one strain of G. fragrans, and exhibited a discrimination score of 0.87. This method could therefore be used in the agro-food industries to identify and to evaluate biodiversity and trace strains of G. candidum. The results show that the GATA4 primer might be used to differentiate strains according to their ecological niche.

  11. Development and validation of a PulseNet standardized protocol for subtyping isolates of Cronobacter species.

    PubMed

    Brengi, Silvina P; O'Brien, Stephen B; Pichel, Mariana; Iversen, Carol; Arduino, Matthew; Binsztein, Norma; Jensen, Bette; Pagotto, Franco; Ribot, Efrain M; Stephan, Roger; Cernela, Nicole; Cooper, Kara; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-09-01

    Cronobacter (formerly known as Enterobacter sakazakii) is a genus comprising seven species regarded as opportunistic pathogens that can be found in a wide variety of environments and foods, including powdered infant formula (PIF). Cronobacter sakazakii, the major species of this genus, has been epidemiologically linked to cases of bacteremia, meningitis in neonates, and necrotizing enterocolitis, and contaminated PIF has been identified as an important source of infection. Robust and reproducible subtyping methods are required to aid in the detection and investigation, of foodborne outbreaks. In this study, a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) protocol was developed and validated for subtyping Cronobacter species. It was derived from an existing modified PulseNet protocol, wherein XbaI and SpeI were the primary and secondary restriction enzymes used, generating an average of 14.7 and 20.3 bands, respectively. The PFGE method developed was both reproducible and discriminatory for subtyping Cronobacter species.

  12. Average recovery time from a standardized intravenous sedation protocol and standardized discharge criteria in the general dental practice setting.

    PubMed Central

    Lepere, A. J.; Slack-Smith, L. M.

    2002-01-01

    Intravenous sedation has been used in dentistry for many years because of its perceived advantages over general anesthesia, including shorter recovery times. However, there is limited literature available on recovery from intravenous dental sedation, particularly in the private general practice setting. The aim of this study was to describe the recovery times when sedation was conducted in private dental practice and to consider this in relation to age, weight, procedure type, and procedure time. The data were extracted from the intravenous sedation records available with 1 general anesthesia-trained dental practitioner who provides ambulatory sedation services to a number of private general dental practices in the Perth, Western Australia Metropolitan Area. Standardized intravenous sedation techniques as well as clear standardized discharge criteria were utilized. The sedatives used were fentanyl, midazolam, and propofol. Results from 85 patients produced an average recovery time of 19 minutes. Recovery time was not associated with the type or length of dental procedures performed. PMID:15384295

  13. Field Test Protocol. Standard Internal Load Generation for Unoccupied Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Christensen, D.; Barker, G.; Hancock, E.

    2011-06-01

    This document describes a simple and general way to generate House Simulation Protocol (HSP)-consistent internal sensible and latent loads in unoccupied homes. It is newly updated based on recent experience, and provides instructions on how to calculate and set up the operational profiles in unoccupied homes. The document is split into two sections: how to calculate the internal load magnitude and schedule, and then what tools and methods should be used to generate those internal loads to achieve research goals.

  14. Field Test Protocol: Standard Internal Load Generation in Unoccupied Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Christensen, D.; Barker, G.; Hancock, E.

    2011-06-01

    This document describes a simple and general way to generate House Simulation Protocol (HSP)-consistent internal sensible and latent loads in unoccupied homes. It is newly updated based on recent experience, and provides instructions on how to calculate and set up the operational profiles in unoccupied homes. The document is split into two sections: how to calculate the internal load magnitude and schedule, and then what tools and methods should be used to generate those internal loads to achieve research goals.

  15. Standardized mastery content assessments for predicting NCLEX-RN outcomes.

    PubMed

    Emory, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Nurse educators need predictors of failure for early intervention. This study investigated the predictability of fundamentals, mental health, and pharmacology standardized assessment scores to identify the risk of baccalaureate students' failure on the NCLEX-RN. Using logistic regression the pharmacology assessment score was predictive with 73.7% accuracy. Use of the pharmacology assessment can assist in early identification of at-risk students in efforts to better prepare for the NCLEX-RN examination.

  16. Standardized Protocol for Virtual Surgical Plan and 3-Dimensional Surgical Template-Assisted Single-Stage Mandible Contour Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xi; Qiao, Jia; Girod, Sabine; Niu, Feng; Liu, Jian Feng; Lee, Gordon K; Gui, Lai

    2017-09-01

    Mandible contour surgery, including reduction gonioplasty and genioplasty, has become increasingly popular in East Asia. However, it is technically challenging and, hence, leads to a long learning curve and high complication rates and often needs secondary revisions. The increasing use of 3-dimensional (3D) technology makes accurate single-stage mandible contour surgery with minimum complication rates possible with a virtual surgical plan (VSP) and 3-D surgical templates. This study is to establish a standardized protocol for VSP and 3-D surgical templates-assisted mandible contour surgery and evaluate the accuracy of the protocol. In this study, we enrolled 20 patients for mandible contour surgery. Our protocol is to perform VSP based on 3-D computed tomography data. Then, design and 3-D print surgical templates based on preoperative VSP. The accuracy of the method was analyzed by 3-D comparison of VSP and postoperative results using detailed computer analysis. All patients had symmetric, natural osteotomy lines and satisfactory facial ratios in a single-stage operation. The average relative error of VSP and postoperative result on the entire skull was 0.41 ± 0.13 mm. The average new left gonial error was 0.43 ± 0.77 mm. The average new right gonial error was 0.45 ± 0.69 mm. The average pognion error was 0.79 ± 1.21 mm. Patients were very satisfied with the aesthetic results. Surgeons were very satisfied with the performance of surgical templates to facilitate the operation. Our standardized protocol of VSP and 3-D printed surgical templates-assisted single-stage mandible contour surgery results in accurate, safe, and predictable outcome in a single stage.

  17. The Institution of a Standardized Investigation Protocol for Sudden Infant Death in the Eastern Metropole, Cape Town, South Africa(,)().

    PubMed

    Dempers, Johan J; Coldrey, Jean; Burger, Elsie H; Thompson, Vonita; Wadee, Shabbir A; Odendaal, Hein J; Sens, Mary Ann; Randall, Brad B; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Kinney, Hannah C

    2016-11-01

    The rate for the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in Cape Town, South Africa, is estimated to be among the highest in the world (3.41/1000 live births). In several of these areas, including those of extreme poverty, only sporadic, nonstandardized infant autopsy, and death scene investigation (DSI) occurred. In this report, we detail a feasibility project comprising 18 autopsied infants with sudden and unexpected death whose causes of death were adjudicated according to the 1991 NICHD definitions (SIDS, n = 7; known cause of death, n = 7; and unclassified, n = 4). We instituted a standardized autopsy and infant DSI through a collaborative effort of local forensic pathology officers and clinical providers. The high standard of forensic investigation met international standards, identified preventable disease, and allowed for incorporation of research. We conclude that an effective infant autopsy and DSI protocol can be established in areas with both high sudden unexpected infant death, and elsewhere. (SUID)/SIDS risk and infrastructure challenges.

  18. Randomized single-blind multicenter trial comparing the effects of standard and augmented acupuncture protocols on sleep quality and depressive symptoms in patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiuyun; Wu, Qian; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Zhenhua; Fan, Li; Chen, Xiaokai; He, Qing; Ma, Rui; Wu, Yanan; Jiang, Shuo; Xu, Shujun; Fu, Wenbin

    2017-09-12

    The study was aimed to compare the effects of standard and augmented acupuncture on depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances in patients with depression. This is a randomized, single-blind, multicenter trial. 140 subjects with clinical insomnia (score of ≥ 7 on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)) were randomized to the standard (LI4, LIV3, EX-HN3, and GV20) or augmented (LI4, LIV3, EX-HN3, GV20, LU7, and KID6, including intradermal needles for sustained treatment) acupuncture groups. Participants received two sessions weekly for six weeks. In trial, The primary outcomes were improvements in PSQI and the Hamilton Rating Scale (HAMD). Secondary outcomes were treatment credibility and adverse events. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, week 3, end of treatment, and 4-week follow-up. From the 105 randomized patients, 89 completed the trial and were included in the final analyses. Better efficacy was observed in the augmented group compared with the standard acupuncture to improve the PSQI and HAMD at week 3, end of treatment, and 4-week follow-up (all p < .05). The HAMD scores improved with time, except between end of treatment and 4-week follow-up, while in the standard group, HAMD scored improved from baseline to week 3, and stopped improving thereafter. The PSQI scores improved with time in the two groups, except between end of treatment and 4-week follow-up. Compared with the standard protocol, the augmented acupuncture protocol had a better efficacy to treat depression and to improve sleep quality of patients with depression.

  19. Assessment of Protocol Designed to Detect Endocine Disrupting Effects of Flutamide in Xenopus Tropicalis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Program. The frogs were exposed to the model anti- androgenic...the study were to develop a protocol that could be used for a standard U.S. EPA testing procedure in the Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing...compounds. As a consequence of this requirement, the USEPA established an Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Advisory Committee (EDSTAC

  20. Neuropsychological assessment and cerebral vascular disease: the new standards.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, O; Leclercq, C; Bugnicourt, J-M; Roussel, M; Moroni, C; Quaglino, V; Beaunieux, H; Taillia, H; Nédélec-Ciceri, C; Bonnin, C; Thomas-Anterion, C; Varvat, J; Aboulafia-Brakha, T; Assal, F

    2013-10-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) includes vascular dementia (VaD), vascular mild cognitive impairment (VaMCI) and mixed dementia. In clinical practice, VCI concerns patients referred for clinical stroke or cognitive complaint. To improve the characterization of VCI and to refine its diagnostic criteria, an international group has elaborated a new standardized evaluation battery of clinical, cognitive, behavioral and neuroradiological data which now constitutes the reference battery. The adaption of the battery for French-speaking subjects is reported as well as preliminary results of the on-going validation study of the GRECOG-VASC group [Clinical Trial NCT01339195]. The diagnostic accuracy of various screening tests is reviewed and showed an overall sub-optimal sensitivity (<0.8). Thus, the general recommendation is to perform systematically a comprehensive assessment in stroke patients at risk of VCI. Furthermore,the use of a structured interview has been shown to increase the detection of dementia. In addition to the well known NINDS-AIREN criteria of VaD, criteria of VCI have been recently proposed which are based on the demonstration of a cognitive disorder by neuropsychological testing and either history of clinical stroke or presence of vascular lesion by neuroimaging suggestive of a link between cognitive impairment and vascular disease. A memory deficit is no longer required for the diagnosis of VaD as it is based on the cognitive decline concerning two or more domains that affect activities of daily living. Both VaMCI and VaD are classified as probable or possible. These new criteria have yet to be validated. Considerable uncertainties remain regarding the determinant of VCI, and especially the lesion amount inducing VCI and VaD. The interaction between lesion amount and its location is currently re-examined using recent techniques for the analysis of MRI data. The high frequency of associated Alzheimer pathology is now assessable in vivo using amyloid

  1. Additionality and permanence standards in California's Forest Offset Protocol: A review of project and program level implications.

    PubMed

    Ruseva, T; Marland, E; Szymanski, C; Hoyle, J; Marland, G; Kowalczyk, T

    2017-08-01

    A key component of California's cap-and-trade program is the use of carbon offsets as compliance instruments for reducing statewide GHG emissions. Under this program, offsets are tradable credits representing real, verifiable, quantifiable, enforceable, permanent, and additional reductions or removals of GHG emissions. This paper focuses on the permanence and additionality standards for offset credits as defined and operationalized in California's Compliance Offset Protocol for U.S. Forest Projects. Drawing on a review of the protocol, interviews, current offset projects, and existing literature, we discuss how additionality and permanence standards relate to project participation and overall program effectiveness. Specifically, we provide an overview of offset credits as compliance instruments in California's cap-and-trade program, the timeline for a forest offset project, and the factors shaping participation in offset projects. We then discuss the implications of permanence and additionality at both the project and program levels. Largely consistent with previous work, we find that stringent standards for permanent and additional project activities can present barriers to participation, but also, that there may be a trade-off between project quality and quantity (i.e. levels of participation) when considering overall program effectiveness. We summarize what this implies for California's forest offset program and provide suggestions for improvements in light of potential program diffusion and policy learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A protocol using coho salmon to monitor Tongass National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan standards and guidelines for fish habitat.

    Treesearch

    M.D. Bryant; Trent McDonald; R. Aho; B.E. Wright; Michelle Bourassa. Stahl

    2008-01-01

    We describe a protocol to monitor the effectiveness of the Tongass Land Management Plan (TLMP) management standards for maintaining fish habitat. The protocol uses juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in small tributary streams in forested watersheds. We used a 3-year pilot study to develop detailed methods to estimate juvenile salmonid...

  3. Biosafety assessment protocols for new organisms in New Zealand: Can they apply internationally to emerging technologies?

    SciTech Connect

    Barratt, B.I.P. . E-mail: barbara.barratt@agresearch.co.nz; Moeed, A.; Malone, L.A.

    2006-05-15

    An analysis of established biosafety protocols for release into the environment of exotic plants and biological control agents for weeds and arthropod pests has been carried out to determine whether such protocols can be applied to relatively new and emerging technologies intended for the primary production industries, such as transgenic plants. Example case studies are described to indicate the scope of issues considered by regulators who make decisions on new organism releases. No transgenic plants have been released to date in New Zealand, but two field test approvals are described as examples. An analysis of the biosafety protocols has shown that, while many of the risk criteria considered for decision-making by regulators are similar for all new organisms, a case-by-case examination of risks and potential impacts is required in order to fully assess risk. The value of post-release monitoring and validation of decisions made by regulators is emphasised.

  4. Chesapeake Bay regions of concern: Geographical targeting protocol for remediation, reduction, prevention and assessment actions

    SciTech Connect

    Batiuk, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    As a result of a two year reevaluation of a Basinwide Toxics Reduction Strategy, the Chesapeake Bay Program identified the need to more effectively direct reduction and prevention actions toward regional areas with known toxic problems as well as areas where significant potential exists for toxic impacts on living resources and habitats. Building upon the geographical targeting efforts in the Great Lakes and Puget Sound, a protocol was established for identifying and categorizing areas ranging from known toxic problems to areas with low probability for adverse effects to insufficient data. The identification protocol is based on a series of criteria which include evaluation of sediment contamination concentrations and ambient sediment toxicity. The process for development and application of the Regions of Concern protocol along with a focus on the sediment assessment criteria and how they influenced the over-all categorization of regions will be presented.

  5. Improving shift report focus and consistency with the situation, background, assessment, recommendation protocol.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Paul; Gervis, Mary Townsend; Yates, Lauren; Vardaman, James M

    2013-01-01

    The Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation (SBAR) protocol was used to improve shift reports in 4 medical-surgical units. The SBAR protocol is increasingly advocated for use during shift reports, but data on the efficacy are limited. Nurses were trained on SBAR in 4 medical-surgical units in a tertiary care hospital. Nurse tasks, tools, and locations were recorded during observation audits. The average time for shift reports did not decrease using SBAR. Nurses spent significantly more time on tasks specific to report. There was significantly more dialogue and less writing with SBAR. The introduction of SBAR made reports more focused, with more time spent discussing the patient and less on transcribing information. The SBAR protocol provides a concise and prioritized structure that enables consistent, comprehensive, and patient-centric reports.

  6. Assessment and risk classification protocol for patients in emergency units1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Michele de Freitas Neves; Oliveira, Gabriela Novelli; Pergola-Marconato, Aline Maino; Marconato, Rafael Silva; Bargas, Eliete Boaventura; Araujo, Izilda Esmenia Muglia

    2014-01-01

    Objective to develop, validate the contents and verify the reliability of a risk classification protocol for an Emergency Unit. Method the content validation was developed in a University Hospital in a country town located in the state of Sao Paulo and was carried out in two stages: the first with the individual assessment of specialists and the second with the meeting between the researchers and the specialists. The use of the protocol followed a specific guide. Concerning reliability, the concordance or equivalent method among observers was used. Results the protocol developed showed to have content validity and, after the suggested changes were made, there were excellent results concerning reliability. Conclusion the assistance flow chart was shown to be easy to use, and facilitate the search for the complaint in each assistance priority. PMID:26107828

  7. 78 FR 45096 - Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Made To Comply With 12 Order No. 890 Objectives and Requirements 1. Service Across Multiple.... 16 890 Objectives and Requirements C. Other Standards 18 1. Coordinate Interchange Standards 18 2... revised pro forma OATT designed to better achieve the objectives of preventing undue discrimination and...

  8. The consortium for the standardization of influenza seroepidemiology (CONSISE): a global partnership to standardize influenza seroepidemiology and develop influenza investigation protocols to inform public health policy.

    PubMed

    Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Broberg, Eeva; Engelhardt, Othmar G; Wood, John; Nicoll, Angus

    2013-05-01

    CONSISE - The consortium for the Standardization of Influenza Seroepidemiology - is a global partnership to develop influenza investigation protocols and standardize seroepidemiology to inform health policy. This international partnership was formed in 2011 and was created out of a need, identified during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, for timely seroepidemiological data to better estimate pandemic virus infection severity and attack rates to inform policy decisions. CONSISE has developed into a consortium of two interactive working groups: epidemiology and laboratory, with a steering committee composed of individuals from several organizations. CONSISE has had two international meetings with more planned for 2013. We seek additional members from public health agencies, academic institutions and other interested parties.

  9. A standardized staining protocol for L1CAM on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using automated platforms.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Mina; Harari, Ayelet; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Zeimet, Alain G; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Altevogt, Peter

    2014-06-25

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is overexpressed in many human cancers and can serve as a biomarker for prognosis in most of these cancers (including type I endometrial carcinomas). Here we provide an optimized immunohistochemical staining procedure for a widely used automated platform (VENTANA™), which has recourse to commercially available primary antibody and detection reagents. In parallel, we optimized the staining on a semi-automated BioGenix (i6000) 
immunostainer. These protocols yield good stainings and should represent the basis for a reliable and standardized immunohistochemical detection of L1CAM in a variety of malignancies in different laboratories.

  10. Assessment of a screening protocol for type 2 diabetes in community pharmacy. The DiabNow Study.

    PubMed

    Fikri-Benbrahim, Narjis; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; Saéz-Benito, Loreto; Luque, Blanca Suárez; Corpas, José Pedro García; Moullin, Joanna C; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance and feasibility of a protocol for screening type 2 diabetes in community pharmacy. Performance was primarily assessed by measuring stakeholders' adherence (pharmacists, patients and physicians) to the protocol's components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A standard operating protocol (SOP) and minimum data set (MDS) for nursing and medical handover: considerations for flexible standardization in developing electronic tools.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul; Wong, Ming Chao; Yee, Kwang Chien

    2009-01-01

    As part of Australia's participation in the World Health Organization, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) is the leading federal government technical agency involved in the area of clinical handover improvement. The ACSQHC has funded a range of handover improvement projects in Australia including one at the Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH), Tasmania. The RHH project aims to investigate the potential for generalizable and transferable clinical handover solutions throughout the medical and nursing disciplines. More specifically, this project produced an over-arching minimum data set (MDS) and over-arching standardized operating protocol (SOP) based on research work on nursing and medical shift-to-shift clinical handover in general medicine, general surgery and emergency medicine. The over-arching MDS consists of five headings: situational awareness, patient identification, history and information, responsibility and tasks and accountability. The over-arching SOP has five phases: preparation; design; implementation; evaluation; and maintenance. This paper provides an overview of the project and the approach taken. It considers the implications of these standardized operating protocols and minimum data sets for developing electronic clinical handover support tools. Significantly, the paper highlights a human-centred design approach that actively involves medical and nursing staff in data collection, analysis, interpretation, and systems design. This approach reveals the dangers of info-centrism when considering electronic tools, as information emerges as the only factor amongst many others that influence the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical handover.

  12. [Food Security in Europe: comparison between the "Hygiene Package" and the British Retail Consortium (BRC) & International Food Standard (IFS) protocols].

    PubMed

    Stilo, A; Parisi, S; Delia, S; Anastasi, F; Bruno, G; Laganà, P

    2009-01-01

    The birth of Hygiene Package and of the Reg. CE no 2073/2005 in the food production field signalled a change in Italy. This process started in Italy in 1997 with the legislative decree no 155 on Self-control but in reality, it was implemented in the UK in 1990 with the promulgation of the Food Safety Act. This legal act was influenced by some basic rules corresponding to the application of HACCP standards. Since 1990 the British chains of distribution (Retailers) have involved all aspects of the food line in this type of responsibility. Due to this growing awareness for a need for greater regulation, a protocol, edited by British Retail Consortium was created in 1998. This protocol acted as a "stamp" of approval for food products and it is now known as the BRC Global Food Standard. In July 2008, this protocol became effective in its fifth version. After the birth of BRC, also French and German Retailers have established a standard practically equivalent and perhaps more pertinent to safety food, that is International Food Standard (IFS). The new approach is specific to the food field and strictly applies criteria which will ensure "safety, quality and legality" of food products, similarly to ISO 22000:2005 (mainly based on BRC & IFS past experiences). New standards aim to create a sort of green list with fully "proper and fit" Suppliers only, because of comprehensible exigencies of Retailers. It is expected, as we have shown, that Auditor authorities who are responsible for ensuring that inspections are now carried out like the Hygiene Package, will find these new standards useful. The advantages of streamlining this system is that it will allow enterprises to diligently enforce food safety practices without fear of upset or legal consequence, to improve the quality (HACCP) of management & traceability system; to restrict wastes, reprocessing and withdrawal of products. However some discordances about the interpretation of certain sub-field norms (e.g., water

  13. Assessing most practical and effective protocols to sanitize hands of poultry catching crew members.

    PubMed

    Racicot, M; Kocher, A; Beauchamp, G; Letellier, A; Vaillancourt, J-P

    2013-08-01

    Catching crew members can heavily contaminate their hands with organic material. They can act as mechanical vector and spread diseases between farms. Hand hygiene is an important issue for the industry as a whole and for human health by reducing contamination risks. Many studies, in human medicine, tend to make hand rub a standard for hand hygiene. However, few studies have tested the effectiveness of hand hygiene products on visibly contaminated hands. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of practical hand sanitization protocols: water and soap, degreasing cream and hand wipes, all combined with alcohol-based hand gel. The use of alcohol-based gel alone was also evaluated. For the reduction of coliforms after washing, there was no statistically significant difference between protocols when the initial level of bacterial contamination was low to moderate. When hands were highly contaminated, the alcohol-based gel alone was less effective than the degreasing cream combined with the alcohol-based gel (p=0.002). As for the reduction in total aerobic bacteria counts, there was no difference between protocols when the initial level of bacterial contamination was low. The water, soap and alcohol-based gel protocol was more effective than the scrubbing wipes and alcohol-based gel protocol when hands were moderately (p=0.002) and highly contaminated (p=0.001). All protocols were effective in neutralizing Salmonella on hands. Reducing the level of bacterial contamination on hands before using an alcohol-based gel seems important to ensure effective hand sanitation for highly and moderately contaminated hands. This can be done by using a degreasing cream or water and soap. Based on the survey, catching crew members preferred using warm water and soap compared to a degreasing cream. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. New developed urological protocols for the Uro Dyna-CT reduce radiation exposure of endourological patients below the levels of the low dose standard CT scans.

    PubMed

    Rassweiler, M-C; Banckwitz, R; Koehler, C; Mueller-Allissat, B; Michel, M-S; Häcker, A; Ritter, M

    2014-10-01

    Cross-sectional imaging by computed tomography (CT) is associated with higher radiation dose compared to plain X-ray. The Uro Dyna-CT provides CT-like images in the endourological operating room. Our aim was to reduce the radiation exposure of endourological patients with the Uro Dyna-CT and optimize the cross-sectional image quality. For the hard contrast protocol, two artificial stones were placed in a Rando-Alderson phantom's left kidney region. Relevant parameters of the standard abdomen protocol were changed. After each modification, two urologists subjectively evaluated the image quality. We developed two customized protocols (standard, low-dose) for hard contrast imaging. To optimize the examination protocol for soft tissue imaging a standardized cone beam phantom was used. Parameters of the preset high-resolution protocol were changed to develop a protocol with similar objective image quality but lower radiation dose. To evaluate the effective radiation dose we embedded 129 thermoluminescence dosimeters in the kidney and ureter region of the Rando-Alderson phantom and performed each protocol five times (stone, soft tissue) and ten times (low-dose protocol). Mean effective dose values per 3D-examination were calculated. We detected a dose area product (DAP) 776.2 (standard) and 163.5 μGym(2) (low-dose) for the stone protocols with an effective dose of 1.96 and 0.33 mSv, respectively. The soft tissue protocol produced a DAP of 5,070 μGym(2) and an effective dose of 7.76 mSv. Our newly developed examination protocols for the Uro Dyna-CT provide CT-like image quality during urological interventions with low radiation dose.

  15. How we treat: management of life-threatening primary postpartum hemorrhage with a standardized massive transfusion protocol.

    PubMed

    Burtelow, Matthew; Riley, Ed; Druzin, Maurice; Fontaine, Magali; Viele, Maurene; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim

    2007-09-01

    Management of massive, life-threatening primary postpartum hemorrhage in the labor and delivery service is a challenge for the clinical team and hospital transfusion service. Because severe postpartum obstetrical hemorrhage is uncommon, its occurrence can result in emergent but variable and nonstandard requests for blood products. The implementation of a standardized massive transfusion protocol for the labor and delivery department at our institution after a maternal death caused by amniotic fluid embolism is described. This guideline was modeled on a existing protocol used by the trauma service mandating emergency release of 6 units of group O D- red cells (RBCs), 4 units of fresh frozen or liquid plasma, and 1 apheresis unit of platelets (PLTs). The 6:4:1 fixed ratio of uncrossmatched RBCs, plasma, and PLTs allows the transfusion service to quickly provide blood products during the acute phase of resuscitation and allows the clinical team to anticipate and prevent dilutional coagulopathy. The successful management of three cases of massive primary postpartum hemorrhage after the implementation of our new massive transfusion protocol in the maternal and fetal medicine service is described.

  16. Environmental assessment. Energy efficiency standards for consumer products

    SciTech Connect

    McSwain, Berah

    1980-06-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 requires DOE to prescribe energy efficiency standards for 13 consumer products. The Consumer Products Efficiency Standards (CPES) program covers: refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, water heaters, room air conditioners, home heating equipment, kitchen ranges and ovens, central air conditioners (cooling and heat pumps), furnaces, dishwashers, television sets, clothes washers, and humidifiers and dehumidifiers. This Environmental Assessment evaluates the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts expected as a result of setting efficiency standards for all of the consumer products covered by the CPES program. DOE has proposed standards for eight of the products covered by the Program in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR). DOE expects to propose standards for home heating equipment, central air conditioners (heat pumps only), dishwashers, television sets, clothes washers, and humidifiers and dehumidifiers in 1981. No significant adverse environmental or socioeconomic impacts have been found to result from instituting the CPES.

  17. A cross-platform survey of CT image quality and dose from routine abdomen protocols and a method to systematically standardize image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Duan, Xinhui; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M.; Bruesewitz, Michael R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-11-01

    Through this investigation we developed a methodology to evaluate and standardize CT image quality from routine abdomen protocols across different manufacturers and models. The influence of manufacturer-specific automated exposure control systems on image quality was directly assessed to standardize performance across a range of patient sizes. We evaluated 16 CT scanners across our health system, including Siemens, GE, and Toshiba models. Using each practice’s routine abdomen protocol, we measured spatial resolution, image noise, and scanner radiation output (CTDIvol). Axial and in-plane spatial resolutions were assessed through slice sensitivity profile (SSP) and modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements, respectively. Image noise and CTDIvol values were obtained for three different phantom sizes. SSP measurements demonstrated a bimodal distribution in slice widths: an average of 6.2  ±  0.2 mm using GE’s ‘Plus’ mode reconstruction setting and 5.0  ±  0.1 mm for all other scanners. MTF curves were similar for all scanners. Average spatial frequencies at 50%, 10%, and 2% MTF values were 3.24  ±  0.37, 6.20  ±  0.34, and 7.84  ±  0.70 lp cm-1, respectively. For all phantom sizes, image noise and CTDIvol varied considerably: 6.5-13.3 HU (noise) and 4.8-13.3 mGy (CTDIvol) for the smallest phantom; 9.1-18.4 HU and 9.3-28.8 mGy for the medium phantom; and 7.8-23.4 HU and 16.0-48.1 mGy for the largest phantom. Using these measurements and benchmark SSP, MTF, and image noise targets, CT image quality can be standardized across a range of patient sizes.

  18. Development and Validation of an Internationally-Standardized, High-Resolution Capillary Gel-Based Electrophoresis PCR-Ribotyping Protocol for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Fawley, Warren N.; Knetsch, C. W.; MacCannell, Duncan R.; Harmanus, Celine; Du, Tim; Mulvey, Michael R.; Paulick, Ashley; Anderson, Lydia; Kuijper, E. J.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    PCR-ribotyping has been adopted in many laboratories as the method of choice for C. difficile typing and surveillance. However, issues with the conventional agarose gel-based technique, including inter-laboratory variation and interpretation of banding patterns have impeded progress. The method has recently been adapted to incorporate high-resolution capillary gel-based electrophoresis (CE-ribotyping), so improving discrimination, accuracy and reproducibility. However, reports to date have all represented single-centre studies and inter-laboratory variability has not been formally measured or assessed. Here, we achieved in a multi-centre setting a high level of reproducibility, accuracy and portability associated with a consensus CE-ribotyping protocol. Local databases were built at four participating laboratories using a distributed set of 70 known PCR-ribotypes. A panel of 50 isolates and 60 electronic profiles (blinded and randomized) were distributed to each testing centre for PCR-ribotype identification based on local databases generated using the standard set of 70 PCR-ribotypes, and the performance of the consensus protocol assessed. A maximum standard deviation of only ±3.8bp was recorded in individual fragment sizes, and PCR-ribotypes from 98.2% of anonymised strains were successfully discriminated across four ribotyping centres spanning Europe and North America (98.8% after analysing discrepancies). Consensus CE-ribotyping increases comparability of typing data between centres and thereby facilitates the rapid and accurate transfer of standardized typing data to support future national and international C. difficile surveillance programs. PMID:25679978

  19. A cross-platform survey of CT image quality and dose from routine abdomen protocols and a method to systematically standardize image quality

    PubMed Central

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Duan, Xinhui; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M.; Bruesewitz, Michael R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    Through this investigation we developed a methodology to evaluate and standardize CT image quality from routine abdomen protocols across different manufacturers and models. The influence of manufacturer-specific automated exposure control systems on image quality was directly assessed to standardize performance across a range of patient sizes. We evaluated 16 CT scanners across our health system, including Siemens, GE, and Toshiba models. Using each practice’s routine abdomen protocol, we measured spatial resolution, image noise, and scanner radiation output (CTDIvol). Axial and in-plane spatial resolutions were assessed through slice sensitivity profile (SSP) and modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements, respectively. Image noise and CTDIvol values were obtained for three different phantom sizes. SSP measurements demonstrated a bimodal distribution in slice widths: an average of 6.2 ± 0.2 mm using GE’s “Plus” mode reconstruction setting and 5.0 ± 0.1 mm for all other scanners. MTF curves were similar for all scanners. Average spatial frequencies at 50%, 10%, and 2% MTF values were 3.24 ± 0.37, 6.20 ± 0.34, and 7.84 ± 0.70 lp/cm, respectively. For all phantom sizes, image noise and CTDIvol varied considerably: 6.5–13.3 HU (noise) and 4.8–13.3 mGy (CTDIvol) for the smallest phantom; 9.1–18.4 HU and 9.3–28.8 mGy for the medium phantom; and 7.8–23.4 HU and 16.0–48.1 mGy for the largest phantom. Using these measurements and benchmark SSP, MTF, and image noise targets, CT image quality can be standardized across a range of patient sizes. PMID:26459751

  20. NASA Standard for Models and Simulations: Credibility Assessment Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babula, Maria; Bertch, William J.; Green, Lawrence L.; Hale, Joseph P.; Mosier, Gary E.; Steele, Martin J.; Woods, Jody

    2009-01-01

    As one of its many responses to the 2003 Space Shuttle Columbia accident, NASA decided to develop a formal standard for models and simulations (M&S). Work commenced in May 2005. An interim version was issued in late 2006. This interim version underwent considerable revision following an extensive Agency-wide review in 2007 along with some additional revisions as a result of the review by the NASA Engineering Management Board (EMB) in the first half of 2008. Issuance of the revised, permanent version, hereafter referred to as the M&S Standard or just the Standard, occurred in July 2008. Bertch, Zang and Steeleiv provided a summary review of the development process of this standard up through the start of the review by the EMB. A thorough recount of the entire development process, major issues, key decisions, and all review processes are available in Ref. v. This is the second of a pair of papers providing a summary of the final version of the Standard. Its focus is the Credibility Assessment Scale, a key feature of the Standard, including an example of its application to a real-world M&S problem for the James Webb Space Telescope. The companion paper summarizes the overall philosophy of the Standard and an overview of the requirements. Verbatim quotes from the Standard are integrated into the text of this paper, and are indicated by quotation marks.

  1. Comparison between standard and reduced volume radiotherapy in bladder preservation trimodality protocol for muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Arafat, Waleed; Darwish, Azza; Naoum, George E; Sameh, Wael; Husseiny, Gamal El; Abd-El-Gawad, Fathy; Samir, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Aim Our aim is to compare the toxicity, pelvic nodal relapse, and overall survival of whole bladder irradiation only to the standard technique of whole pelvis irradiation followed by bladder boost in patients with muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma undergoing bladder preservation protocol. Material and method A total of 60 patients with transitional cell carcinoma, stage T2-3, N0, M0 bladder cancer were subjected to maximal transurethral resection bladder tumour (TURB). Then, the patients were randomised into two groups: group I (30 patients) to receive whole pelvis radiotherapy 44 Gy followed by 20 Gy bladder boost. While group II (30 patients) were randomised to receive whole bladder radiotherapy alone for a total dose of 64 Gy. In both groups, concomitant cisplatin and paclitaxel were given weekly throughout the whole course of radiotherapy where conventional 2 Gy/fraction were used. Additionally, four cycles of adjuvant cisplatin and paclitaxel were given after the end of the chemoradiotherapy induction course. Results The first assessment after the induction chemoradiotherapy showed that complete response was achieved in 73.3% of patients in group I and 76.7% of the patients in group II. After a median follow-up of 2 years, regional relapse occurred in 7.1% of patients in group I and 10.3% in group II. (p = 1). Distant metastases were detected in 17.9% of patient in group I and 13.8% in group II (p = 0.73). The 2-year disease-free survival was 60% in group I and 63.3% in group II (p = 0.79). The whole 2-year overall survival was 75% in group I and 79.3% in group II (p = 0.689). Radiation gastrointestinal (GI) acute toxicity was higher in group I than in group II (p = 0.001), while late GI radiation toxicity was comparable in both groups. Conclusion Treating the bladder only, without elective pelvic nodal irradiation, did not compromise pelvic control rate, but significantly decreased the acute radiation toxicity. PMID:27899955

  2. Metabolomics Workbench: An international repository for metabolomics data and metadata, metabolite standards, protocols, tutorials and training, and analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Azam, Kenan; Vadivelu, Ilango; Burant, Charles; Edison, Arthur; Fiehn, Oliver; Higashi, Richard; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Sumner, Susan; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2016-01-04

    The Metabolomics Workbench, available at www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, is a public repository for metabolomics metadata and experimental data spanning various species and experimental platforms, metabolite standards, metabolite structures, protocols, tutorials, and training material and other educational resources. It provides a computational platform to integrate, analyze, track, deposit and disseminate large volumes of heterogeneous data from a wide variety of metabolomics studies including mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) data spanning over 20 different species covering all the major taxonomic categories including humans and other mammals, plants, insects, invertebrates and microorganisms. Additionally, a number of protocols are provided for a range of metabolite classes, sample types, and both MS and NMR-based studies, along with a metabolite structure database. The metabolites characterized in the studies available on the Metabolomics Workbench are linked to chemical structures in the metabolite structure database to facilitate comparative analysis across studies. The Metabolomics Workbench, part of the data coordinating effort of the National Institute of Health (NIH) Common Fund's Metabolomics Program, provides data from the Common Fund's Metabolomics Resource Cores, metabolite standards, and analysis tools to the wider metabolomics community and seeks data depositions from metabolomics researchers across the world.

  3. Reproducibility of microbial mutagenicity assays. I. Tests with Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli using a standardized protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkel, V.C.; Zeiger, E.; Brusick, D.; McCoy, E.; McGregor, D.; Mortelmans, K.; Rosenkranz, H.S.; Simmon, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    The Salmonella/microsome test developed by Ames and his coworkers has been widely used in the evaluation of chemicals for genotoxic potential. Although the value of this assay is well recognized, there have been no comprehensive studies on the interlaboratory reproducibility of the method using a standardized protocol. A program was therefore initiated to compare the results obtained in four laboratories from testing a series of coded mutagens and nonmutagens using a standardized protocol. Additional objectives of this study were to compare male Fisher 344 rat, B6C3F1 mouse, and Syrian hamster liver S-9 preparations for the activation of chemicals; to compare Aroclor 1254-induced liver S-9 from all three species with the corresponding non-induced liver S-9's; and to compare the response of Escherichia coli WP-2 uvrA with the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains recommended by Ames. Since a primary use of in vitro microbial mutagenesis tests is the identification of potential carcinogens by their mutagenicity, the authors decided to compare the animal species and strains used by the National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program (NCI/NTP) for animal carcinogenicity studies.

  4. Metabolomics Workbench: An international repository for metabolomics data and metadata, metabolite standards, protocols, tutorials and training, and analysis tools

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Azam, Kenan; Vadivelu, Ilango; Burant, Charles; Edison, Arthur; Fiehn, Oliver; Higashi, Richard; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Sumner, Susan; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2016-01-01

    The Metabolomics Workbench, available at www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, is a public repository for metabolomics metadata and experimental data spanning various species and experimental platforms, metabolite standards, metabolite structures, protocols, tutorials, and training material and other educational resources. It provides a computational platform to integrate, analyze, track, deposit and disseminate large volumes of heterogeneous data from a wide variety of metabolomics studies including mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) data spanning over 20 different species covering all the major taxonomic categories including humans and other mammals, plants, insects, invertebrates and microorganisms. Additionally, a number of protocols are provided for a range of metabolite classes, sample types, and both MS and NMR-based studies, along with a metabolite structure database. The metabolites characterized in the studies available on the Metabolomics Workbench are linked to chemical structures in the metabolite structure database to facilitate comparative analysis across studies. The Metabolomics Workbench, part of the data coordinating effort of the National Institute of Health (NIH) Common Fund's Metabolomics Program, provides data from the Common Fund's Metabolomics Resource Cores, metabolite standards, and analysis tools to the wider metabolomics community and seeks data depositions from metabolomics researchers across the world. PMID:26467476

  5. An Interprofessional Quality Improvement Initiative to Standardize Pediatric Extubation Readiness Assessment.

    PubMed

    Abu-Sultaneh, Samer; Hole, Acrista J; Tori, Alvaro J; Benneyworth, Brian D; Lutfi, Riad; Mastropietro, Christopher W

    2017-10-01

    Establishing protocols to wean mechanical ventilation and assess readiness for extubation, with the goal of minimizing morbidity associated with extubation failure and prolonged mechanical ventilation, have become increasingly important in contemporary PICUs. The aim of this quality improvement initiative is to establish a respiratory therapist-led daily spontaneous breathing trial protocol to standardize extubation readiness assessment and documentation in our PICU. A quality improvement project. Single center, tertiary care Children's Hospital PICU. All intubated patients admitted to PICU requiring conventional mechanical ventilation between February 2013 and January 2016. A working group of pediatric intensivists, respiratory therapists, nurses, and information technology specialists established the protocol, standardized documentation via the electronic medical record, and planned education. Daily spontaneous breathing trial protocol implementation began in February 2015. All patients on mechanical ventilation were screened daily at approximately 4 AM by a respiratory therapist to determine daily spontaneous breathing trial eligibility. If all screening criteria were met, patients were placed on continuous positive airway pressure of 5 cm H2O with pressure support of 8 cm H2O for up to 2 hours. If tolerated, patients would be extubated to supplemental oxygen delivered via nasal cannula in the morning, after intensivist approval. Daily audits were done to assess screening compliance and accuracy of documentation. We analyzed data from 398 mechanically ventilated patients during daily spontaneous breathing trial period (February 2015-January 2016), compared with 833 patients from the pre-daily spontaneous breathing trial period (February 2013-January 2015). During the daily spontaneous breathing trial period, daily screening occurred in 92% of patients. Extubation failure decreased from 7.8% in the pre-daily spontaneous breathing trial period to 4.5% in daily

  6. Standardized patient and standardized interdisciplinary team meeting: validation of a new performance-based assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Misuzu; Nagoshi, Michael; Oshiro-Wong, Celeste; Tin, Maung; Wen, Aida; Masaki, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    The interdisciplinary team (IDT) approach is critical in the care of elderly adults. Performance-based tools to assess IDT skills have not been well validated. A novel assessment tool, the standardized patient (SP) and standardized interdisciplinary team meeting (SIDTM), consisting of two stations, was developed. First, trainees evaluate a SP hospitalized after a fall. Second, trainees play the role of the physician in a standardized IDT meeting with a standardized registered nurse (SRN) and standardized medical social worker (SMSW) for discharge planning. The SP-SIDTM was administered to 52 fourth-year medical students (MS4s) and six geriatric medicine fellows (GMFs) in 2011/12. The SP, SRN, and SMSW scored trainee performance on dichotomous checklists of clinical tasks and Likert scales of communication skills, which were compared according to level of training using t-tests. Trainees rated the SP-SIDTM experience as moderately difficult, length of time about right, and believability moderate to high. Reliability was high for both cases (Cronbach α = 0.73-0.87). Interobserver correlation between SRN and SMSW checklist scores (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.82, P < .001) and total scores (r = 0.69, P < .001) were high. The overall score on the SP-SIDTM case was significantly higher for GMF (75) than for MS4 (65, P = .002). These observations support the validity of this novel assessment tool.

  7. Effects of Adding an Internet-Based Pain Coping Skills Training Protocol to a Standardized Education and Exercise Program for People With Persistent Hip Pain (HOPE Trial): Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Rini, Christine; Keefe, Francis; French, Simon; Nelligan, Rachel; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Dobson, Fiona; Haxby Abbott, J.; Dalwood, Andrew; Vicenzino, Bill; Harris, Anthony; Hinman, Rana S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent hip pain in older people is usually due to hip osteoarthritis (OA), a major cause of pain, disability, and psychological dysfunction. Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether adding an Internet-based pain coping skills training (PCST) protocol to a standardized intervention of education followed by physical therapist–instructed home exercise leads to greater reductions in pain and improvements in function. Design An assessor-, therapist-, and participant-blinded randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Setting The study will be conducted in a community setting. Participants The participants will be 142 people over 50 years of age with self-reported hip pain consistent with hip OA. Intervention Participants will be randomly allocated to: (1) a control group receiving a 24-week standardized intervention comprising an 8-week Internet-based education package followed by 5 individual physical therapy exercise sessions plus home exercises (3 times weekly) or (2) a PCST group receiving an 8-week Internet-based PCST protocol in addition to the control intervention. Measurements Outcomes will be measured at baseline and 8, 24, and 52 weeks, with the primary time point at 24 weeks. Primary outcomes are hip pain on walking and self-reported physical function. Secondary outcomes include health-related quality-of-life, participant-perceived treatment response, self-efficacy for pain management and function, pain coping attempts, pain catastrophizing, and physical activity. Measurements of adherence, adverse events, use of health services, and process measures will be collected at 24 and 52 weeks. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed at 52 weeks. Limitations A self-reported diagnosis of persistent hip pain will be used. Conclusions The findings will help determine whether adding an Internet-based PCST protocol to standardized education and physical therapist–instructed home exercise is more effective than education and exercise

  8. Protocol for building a reference standard sequence library for DNA-based seafood identification.

    PubMed

    Deeds, Jonathan R; Handy, Sara M; Fry, Frederick; Granade, Hudson; Williams, Jeffrey T; Powers, Monica; Shipp, Robert; Weigt, Lee A

    2014-01-01

    With the recent adoption of a DNA sequencing-based method for the species identification for seafood products by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a library of standard sequences derived from reference specimens with authoritative taxonomic authentication was required. Provided here are details of how the FDA and its collaborators are building this reference standard sequence library that will be used to confirm the accurate labeling of seafood products sold in interstate commerce in the United States. As an example data set from this library, information for 117 fish reference standards, representing 94 species from 43 families in 15 orders, collected over a 4-year period from the Gulf of Mexico, U.S., that are now stored at the Smithsonian Museum Support Center in Suitland, MD, are provided.

  9. Timeline and Approach to Standards and Assessments. State Implementation of Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kimberly; Mira, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The following profiles address the basic decisions and actions that state education policy-makers--in the state departments of education, unless otherwise noted--are taking to foster successful statewide implementation of the new standards and aligned assessments in 15 states. These profiles provide a descriptive overview of each state's…

  10. Timeline and Approach to Standards and Assessments. State Implementation of College- and Career-Readiness Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kimberly; Mira, Mary Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The following profiles address decisions and actions that state education policy-makers--in the state departments of education, unless otherwise noted--are taking to foster successful statewide implementation of their states' new college- and career-readiness standards and aligned assessments. These profiles provide a descriptive overview of each…

  11. Benchmarks Curricular Planning and Assessment Framework: Utilizing Standards without Introducing Standardization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Erika N.

    2010-01-01

    The national early learning community faces the challenge of using early learning standards and assessments to improve learning environments while preserving educators' freedom to plan early childhood curriculum that accord with a child-centered focus and developmentally appropriate practices. Drawing on recent developments in approaches to…

  12. The development of an evidence based assessment protocol for intimate partner violence in the U.S. Army.

    PubMed

    Forgey, Mary Ann; Badger, Lee; Krase, Kathryn

    2011-05-01

    The importance of conducting evidence based assessment has been widely acknowledged by many professions, including social work. In this study, the U.S. Army, in partnership with University researchers, developed an evidence based assessment protocol to assist the individual social worker in conducting his/her assessment of intimate partner violence. The protocol development process involved posing answerable research questions about intimate partner violence assessment content and method and then adhering to the steps of evidence based practice to answer those questions. Key to the protocol development process was the partnership created between researchers and practitioners as part of an expert panel.

  13. Focused Anecdotal Records Assessment: A Tool for Standards-Based, Authentic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd-Batstone, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the tension between standards-based assessment on a macro level and authentic assessment on a micro level. Content standards arguably supply systematic criteria for quantitative measures to report trends and establish policy. Qualitative measures, such as rubrics, student profiles, and observational records, fill in the gaps…

  14. Guidelines for Assessing Michigan Standards in Industrial Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Ronald J.

    This document presents Michigan's standards in industrial technology education and details assessment procedures that will enable Michigan industrial technology teachers to analyze, upgrade, and justify their current programs. The introductory section contains the following materials: a discussion of supportive organizations; an overview of…

  15. Motivational Effects of Standardized Language Assessment on Chinese Young Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Chuqiao

    2016-01-01

    This review paper examines how standardized language assessment affects Chinese young learners' motivation for second-language learning. By presenting the historical and contemporary contexts of the testing system in China, this paper seeks to demonstrate the interrelationship among cultural, social, familial, and individual factors, which…

  16. National Health Education Standards: Developing an "Exit Competencies" Assessment Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garman, J. F.; Hayduk, D. M.; Posey, N. L.; Teske, C. J.; Crider, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an evaluation instrument that assessed health literacy competencies, specific to the national health education standards, that would provide less variability in response interpretation and greater speed of scoring than available in existing instruments. Methodology: Content was developed by professional practitioners with…

  17. Instructional Sensitivity of a State's Standards-Based Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Jerome V.; Welsh, Megan E.; Corson, Nina M.

    2007-01-01

    The accuracy of achievement test score inferences largely depends on the sensitivity of scores to instruction focused on tested objectives. Sensitivity requirements are particularly challenging for standards-based assessments because a variety of plausible instructional differences across classrooms must be detected. For this study, we developed a…

  18. Sediment Ecosystem Assessment Protocol (SEAP): An Accurate and Integrated Weight-of-Evidence Based System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    DATE JAN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sediment Ecosystem Assessment Protocol (SEAP): An Accurate and...characteristics for various test types . Q-P.l.= Qwiklite (Pyrocystis lunula); Q-C.h.=QwikLite (Ceratocorys horrida); S.p.=Strongylocentrotus purpuratus...Median effective concentration EJ Emergent juvenile ERDC Engineer Research and Development Center ERL Effects range low ERM Effects range median

  19. The challenges of standardizing colonial waterbird survey protocols - what is working? What is not?

    Treesearch

    Melanie Steinkamp; Peter Frederick; Katharine Parsons; Harry Carter; Mike Parker

    2005-01-01

    Our ability to manage and conserve colonial waterbird species throughout Mexico, Meso-America, Canada, the Caribbean nations, and the United States is presently hampered by a lack of reliable information on the status and trends of their populations, information that can only be obtained by collecting comparable data using standardized data collection techniques that...

  20. 77 FR 24427 - Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... (DSM-EE) subcommittee began work on this issue. This effort led to the adoption and ratification by...\\ During NAESB's work on Phase II, the WEQ DSM-EE Wholesale Demand Response Work Group (WEQ DR work group... in NAESB's DSM-EE subcommittee meetings and WEQ's Executive Committee meetings. The standards...

  1. An agenda for assessing and improving conservation impacts of sustainability standards in tropical agriculture.

    PubMed

    Milder, Jeffrey C; Arbuthnot, Margaret; Blackman, Allen; Brooks, Sharon E; Giovannucci, Daniele; Gross, Lee; Kennedy, Elizabeth T; Komives, Kristin; Lambin, Eric F; Lee, Audrey; Meyer, Daniel; Newton, Peter; Phalan, Ben; Schroth, Götz; Semroc, Bambi; Van Rikxoort, Henk; Zrust, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Sustainability standards and certification serve to differentiate and provide market recognition to goods produced in accordance with social and environmental good practices, typically including practices to protect biodiversity. Such standards have seen rapid growth, including in tropical agricultural commodities such as cocoa, coffee, palm oil, soybeans, and tea. Given the role of sustainability standards in influencing land use in hotspots of biodiversity, deforestation, and agricultural intensification, much could be gained from efforts to evaluate and increase the conservation payoff of these schemes. To this end, we devised a systematic approach for monitoring and evaluating the conservation impacts of agricultural sustainability standards and for using the resulting evidence to improve the effectiveness of such standards over time. The approach is oriented around a set of hypotheses and corresponding research questions about how sustainability standards are predicted to deliver conservation benefits. These questions are addressed through data from multiple sources, including basic common information from certification audits; field monitoring of environmental outcomes at a sample of certified sites; and rigorous impact assessment research based on experimental or quasi-experimental methods. Integration of these sources can generate time-series data that are comparable across sites and regions and provide detailed portraits of the effects of sustainability standards. To implement this approach, we propose new collaborations between the conservation research community and the sustainability standards community to develop common indicators and monitoring protocols, foster data sharing and synthesis, and link research and practice more effectively. As the role of sustainability standards in tropical land-use governance continues to evolve, robust evidence on the factors contributing to effectiveness can help to ensure that such standards are designed and

  2. Protocol standards and implementation within the digital engineering laboratory computer network (DELNET) using the universal network interface device (UNID). Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phister, P. W., Jr.

    1983-12-01

    Development of the Air Force Institute of Technology's Digital Engineering Laboratory Network (DELNET) was continued with the development of an initial draft of a protocol standard for all seven layers as specified by the International Standards Organization's (ISO) Reference Model for Open Systems Interconnections. This effort centered on the restructuring of the Network Layer to perform Datagram routing and to conform to the developed protocol standards and actual software module development of the upper four protocol layers residing within the DELNET Monitor (Zilog MCZ 1/25 Computer System). Within the guidelines of the ISO Reference Model the Transport Layer was developed utilizing the Internet Header Format (IHF) combined with the Transport Control Protocol (TCP) to create a 128-byte Datagram. Also a limited Application Layer was created to pass the Gettysburg Address through the DELNET. This study formulated a first draft for the DELNET Protocol Standard and designed, implemented, and tested the Network, Transport, and Application Layers to conform to these protocol standards.

  3. Critical sources of bacterial contamination and adoption of standard sanitary protocol during semen collection and processing in Semen Station

    PubMed Central

    Sannat, Chandrahas; Nair, Ajit; Sahu, S. B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. A.; Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Shende, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present investigation was conducted to locate the critical sources of bacterial contamination and to evaluate the standard sanitation protocol so as to improve the hygienic conditions during collection, evaluation, and processing of bull semen in the Semen Station. Materials and Methods: The study compared two different hygienic procedures during the collection, evaluation and processing of semen in Central Semen Station, Anjora, Durg. Routinely used materials including artificial vagina (AV) inner liner, cone, semen collection tube, buffer, extender/diluter, straws; and the laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box and laminar air flow (LAF) cabinet of extender preparation lab, processing lab, sealing filling machine, and bacteriological lab were subjected to bacteriological examination in two phases of study using two different sanitary protocols. Bacterial load in above items/environment was measured using standard plate count method and expressed as colony forming unit (CFU). Results: Bacterial load in a laboratory environment and AV equipments during two different sanitary protocol in present investigation differed highly significantly (p<0.001). Potential sources of bacterial contamination during semen collection and processing included laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box, and LAF cabinets; AV equipments, including AV Liner and cone. Bacterial load was reduced highly significantly (p<0.001) in AV liner (from 2.33±0.67 to 0.50±0.52), cone (from 4.16±1.20 to 1.91±0.55), and extender (from 1.33±0.38 to 0) after application of improved practices of packaging, handling, and sterilization in Phase II of study. Glasswares, buffers, and straws showed nil bacterial contamination in both the phases of study. With slight modification in fumigation protocol (formalin @600 ml/1000 ft3), bacterial load was significantly decreased (p<0.001) up to 0-6 CFU in processing lab (from 6.43±1.34 to 2.86±0.59), pass box (from 12.13±2

  4. Critical sources of bacterial contamination and adoption of standard sanitary protocol during semen collection and processing in Semen Station.

    PubMed

    Sannat, Chandrahas; Nair, Ajit; Sahu, S B; Sahasrabudhe, S A; Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Shende, R K

    2015-05-01

    The present investigation was conducted to locate the critical sources of bacterial contamination and to evaluate the standard sanitation protocol so as to improve the hygienic conditions during collection, evaluation, and processing of bull semen in the Semen Station. The study compared two different hygienic procedures during the collection, evaluation and processing of semen in Central Semen Station, Anjora, Durg. Routinely used materials including artificial vagina (AV) inner liner, cone, semen collection tube, buffer, extender/diluter, straws; and the laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box and laminar air flow (LAF) cabinet of extender preparation lab, processing lab, sealing filling machine, and bacteriological lab were subjected to bacteriological examination in two phases of study using two different sanitary protocols. Bacterial load in above items/environment was measured using standard plate count method and expressed as colony forming unit (CFU). Bacterial load in a laboratory environment and AV equipments during two different sanitary protocol in present investigation differed highly significantly (p<0.001). Potential sources of bacterial contamination during semen collection and processing included laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box, and LAF cabinets; AV equipments, including AV Liner and cone. Bacterial load was reduced highly significantly (p<0.001) in AV liner (from 2.33±0.67 to 0.50±0.52), cone (from 4.16±1.20 to 1.91±0.55), and extender (from 1.33±0.38 to 0) after application of improved practices of packaging, handling, and sterilization in Phase II of study. Glasswares, buffers, and straws showed nil bacterial contamination in both the phases of study. With slight modification in fumigation protocol (formalin @600 ml/1000 ft(3)), bacterial load was significantly decreased (p<0.001) up to 0-6 CFU in processing lab (from 6.43±1.34 to 2.86±0.59), pass box (from 12.13±2.53 to 3.78±0.79), and nil bacterial

  5. [A protocol of assessment, follow-up and nutritional action at a nursing home].

    PubMed

    Abajo del Alamo, C; García Rodicio, S; Calabozo Freile, B; Ausín Pérez, L; Casado Pérez, J; Catalá Pindado, M A

    2008-01-01

    1) To assess the nutritional status of able elderly, institutionalized at a nursing home; 2) To propose the required nutritional interventions; 3) To establish a consensus protocol for nutritional assessment and follow-up at the Center. Cross-sectional study on all able residents, carrying out: 1) Mini Nutritional Assessment Test; 2) Anthropometrical assessment; 3) Biochemical assessment; and 4) an additional questionnaire (gathering information on dental prostheses, swallowing difficulties, and special diets or oral supplements). Analysis of these data to implement appropriate recommendations and elaborating a nutritional protocol. The mean age of the 50 residents assessed was 84 years [66-97], mean weight 62 kg [35-87], mean height 154 cm [140-175], mean body mass index 26 [15.6-36], mean tricipital fold 18.1 mm [4-36], and mean muscle arm circumference 20.6 cm [14.7-27.1]. By using the Mini Nutritional Assessment Test we identified 3/50 (6% [95% CI: 1-16]) malnourished residents, and 6/50 (12% [95% CI: 4-24]) residents at risk for malnourishment. The body mass index allowed to identify 11/50 (22% [95% CI: 11-35]) overweighed residents-body mass index 27-29-, 10/50 (20% [95% CI: 10-33]) with grade I obesity -body mass index 30-35 and 1/50 (2% [95% CI: 0-10]) with grade II obesity-body mass index > 35-. None of them presented values below the 5th percentile for both the tricipital fold and the muscle arm circumference. Values above the 95th percentile were found in 10/50 (20% [95% CI: 10-33]) residents for the tricipital fold and in 7/50 (14% [95% CI: 5-26]) for the muscle arm circumference, both criteria being present in 3 residents. In all of them the body mass index mayor was > 27. When analyzing the biochemical parameters, the results were not concordant, since laboratory workups analyzed were not always done at the same time as the interview. After analyzing the data obtained, a nutritional assessment and follow-up protocol was elaborated in collaboration

  6. Reliability assessment and correlation analysis of 3 protocols to measure trunk muscle strength and endurance.

    PubMed

    Juan-Recio, Casto; López-Plaza, Diego; Barbado Murillo, David; García-Vaquero, M Pilar; Vera-García, Francisco J

    2017-03-30

    Different methods have been developed to quantify trunk muscle strength and endurance. However, some important protocol characteristics are still unclear, hindering the selection of the most suitable tests in each specific situation. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and the relationship between 3 representative tests of the most common type of protocols used to assess trunk muscle strength and endurance. Twenty-seven healthy men performed each test twice spaced 1 month apart.Trunk strength and endurance were evaluated with an isokinetic dynamometer and 2 field tests including Biering-Sørensen test and Flexion-rotation trunk test. All tests showed a good relative consistency (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]> 0.75), except for the isokinetic endurance variables which had low-moderate reliability (0.37 < ICC > 0.65). Absolute reliability seemed slightly better in the isokinetic protocol than in the field tests, which showed about 12% of test-retest score increase. No significant correlations were found between test scores. After a familiarisation period for the field tests, the 3 protocols can be used to obtain reliable measures of trunk muscle strength and endurance. Based on the correlation analysis, these measures are not related, which highlights the importance of selecting the most suitable trunk test for each situation.

  7. Recommended volumetric capacity definitions and protocols for accurate, standardized and unambiguous metrics for hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parilla, Philip A.; Gross, Karl; Hurst, Katherine; Gennett, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The ultimate goal of the hydrogen economy is the development of hydrogen storage systems that meet or exceed the US DOE's goals for onboard storage in hydrogen-powered vehicles. In order to develop new materials to meet these goals, it is extremely critical to accurately, uniformly and precisely measure materials' properties relevant to the specific goals. Without this assurance, such measurements are not reliable and, therefore, do not provide a benefit toward the work at hand. In particular, capacity measurements for hydrogen storage materials must be based on valid and accurate results to ensure proper identification of promising materials for further development. Volumetric capacity determinations are becoming increasingly important for identifying promising materials, yet there exists controversy on how such determinations are made and whether such determinations are valid due to differing methodologies to count the hydrogen content. These issues are discussed herein, and we show mathematically that capacity determinations can be made rigorously and unambiguously if the constituent volumes are well defined and measurable in practice. It is widely accepted that this occurs for excess capacity determinations and we show here that this can happen for the total capacity determination. Because the adsorption volume is undefined, the absolute capacity determination remains imprecise. Furthermore, we show that there is a direct relationship between determining the respective capacities and the calibration constants used for the manometric and gravimetric techniques. Several suggested volumetric capacity figure-of-merits are defined, discussed and reporting requirements recommended. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate these protocols and concepts.

  8. Validation of a stream and riparian habitat assessment protocol using stream salamanders in the southwest Virginia coalfields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweeten, Sara E.; Ford, W. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Within the central Appalachia Coalfields, the aquatic impacts of large-scale land uses, such as surface mining, are of particular ecological concern. Identification and quantification of land use impacts to aquatic ecosystems are a necessary first step to aid in mitigation of negative consequences to biota. However, quantifying physical environmental quality such as stream and riparian habitat often can be quite difficult, particularly when there is time or fiscal limitations. As such, standard protocols such as the U.S. EPA’s Stream Habitat Rapid Bioassessment Protocol have been established to be cost- and time-effective. This protocol estimates ten different stream and riparian conditions on a scale of 0 to 20. Unfortunately, using estimations can be problematic because of large potential variation in the scoring depending on differences in training, experience, and opinion of the personnel doing the estimations. In order to help negate these biases and provide a simplified process, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) developed a functional assessment for streams that measures 11 stream and riparian variables along with watershed land use to calculate three different scores, a hydrology score, biogeochemical score, and habitat score. In our study, we examined the correlation of stream salamander presence and abundance to the three USACE scores. In the summer of 2013, we visited 70 sites in the southwest Virginia Coalfields multiple times to collect salamanders and quantify stream and riparian microhabitat parameters. Using occupancy and abundance analyses, we found strong relationships among three Desmognathus spp. and the USACE Habitat FCI score. Accordingly, the Habitat FCI score provides a reasonable assessment of physical instream and riparian conditions that may serve as a surrogate for understanding the community composition and integrity of aquatic salamander in the region.

  9. Hypersensitivity and desensitization to antineoplastic agents: outcomes of 189 procedures with a new short protocol and novel diagnostic tools assessment.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Burgaleta, R; Berges-Gimeno, M P; Angel-Pereira, D; Ferreiro-Monteagudo, R; Guillen-Ponce, C; Pueyo, C; Gomez de Salazar, E; Alvarez-Cuesta, E

    2013-07-01

    Desensitization to antineoplastic agents is becoming a standard of care. Efforts to establish and improve these techniques are being made at many institutions. Our aims are to evaluate a new rapid desensitization protocol designed to be shorter (approximately 4 h) and safer (reducing hazardous drugs exposure risks) and to assess the oxaliplatin-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) as a novel diagnostic tool. Prospective, observational, longitudinal study with patients who, for a 1-year period, suffered reactions to antineoplastic agents and were referred to the Desensitization Program at Ramon y Cajal University Hospital (RCUH). Patients were included or excluded as desensitization candidates after anamnesis, skin testing, risk assessment, and graded challenge. Specific IgE was determined in oxaliplatin-reactive patients. Candidate patients were desensitized using the new RCUH rapid desensitization protocol. Of 189 intravenous rapid desensitizations, 188 were successfully accomplished in the 23 patients who met inclusion criteria for desensitization (of 58 referred patients). No breakthrough reactions occurred in 94% of desensitizations, and most breakthrough reactions were mild. In 10 oxaliplatin-reactive patients, 38 desensitizations were successfully accomplished. Sensitivity for oxaliplatin-specific IgE was 38% (0.35UI/l cutoff point) and 54% (0.10UI/l cutoff point); specificity was 100% for both cutoff points. In the hands of a Desensitization Program, managed by drug desensitization experts, this new protocol has proven an effective therapeutic tool for hypersensitivity to several antineoplastic agents (oxaliplatin, carboplatin, paclitaxel, docetaxel, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab); moreover, it improves safety handling of hazardous drugs. We report the first large series of oxaliplatin desensitizations. Oxaliplatin-specific IgE determination could be helpful. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Use of standardized visual assessments of riparian and stream condition to manage riparian bird habitat in eastern Oregon.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Hilary A; Zack, Steve

    2009-07-01

    The importance of riparian vegetation to support stream function and provide riparian bird habitat in semiarid landscapes suggests that standardized assessment tools that include vegetation criteria to evaluate stream health could also be used to assess habitat conditions for riparian-dependent birds. We first evaluated the ability of two visual assessments of woody vegetation in the riparian zone (corridor width and height) to describe variation in the obligate riparian bird ensemble along 19 streams in eastern Oregon. Overall species richness and the abundances of three species all correlated significantly with both, but width was more important than height. We then examined the utility of the riparian zone criteria in three standardized and commonly used rapid visual riparian assessment protocols--the USDI BLM Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) assessment, the USDA NRCS Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), and the U.S. EPA Habitat Assessment Field Data Sheet (HAFDS)--to assess potential riparian bird habitat. Based on the degree of correlation of bird species richness with assessment ratings, we found that PFC does not assess obligate riparian bird habitat condition, SVAP provides a coarse estimate, and HAFDS provides the best assessment. We recommend quantitative measures of woody vegetation for all assessments and that all protocols incorporate woody vegetation height. Given that rapid assessments may be the only source of information for thousands of kilometers of streams in the western United States, incorporating simple vegetation measurements is a critical step in evaluating the status of riparian bird habitat and provides a tool for tracking changes in vegetation condition resulting from management decisions.

  11. Inter- and intra-laboratory standardization of TUNEL assay for assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, S; Sharma, R; Gupta, S; Cakar, Z; De Geyter, C; Agarwal, A

    2017-05-01

    One of the challenges with the sperm DNA fragmentation results is the inconsistency and the large variability in the results obtained by different techniques. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay quantifies the incorporation of fluoresceinated dUTP into single- and double-strand DNA breaks by labeling the 3'-OH terminal with TdT. The goal of this study was optimize the TUNEL protocol for assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation by standardization of the method and comparison of the data across two reference laboratories (i) at Basel, Switzerland and (ii) Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USA. Semen samples from 31 subjects grouped into three cohorts. Sperm DNA fragmentation was data measured by two experienced operators at two different laboratories using identical semen samples, assay kit, protocol and acquisition settings using identical flow cytometers (BD Accuri C6). No significant differences were observed between the duplicates in any of the experiments performed. By including an additional washing step after fixation in paraformaldehyde, a high correlation was seen between the two laboratories (r = 0.94). A strong positive correlation was observed between the average sperm DNA fragmentation rates (r = 0.719). The mean sperm DNA fragmentation measured in each laboratory was similar. Both flow cytometers were identical in their settings and performance. This inter- and intra-laboratory study establishes that TUNEL is a reproducible assay when utilizing a standardized staining protocol and flow cytometer acquisition settings. Standardization and consensual guidelines for TUNEL validate the assay and establishes TUNEL as a robust test for measuring sperm DNA fragmentation especially in a multicenter setting. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  12. Objective Assessment of Checklist Fidelity Using Digital Audio Recording and a Standardized Scoring System Audit.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Douglas; Barber, Kimberly R; Danic, Michael

    2016-11-02

    The use of the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) has been reported to significantly reduce operative morbidity and mortality rates. Recent findings have cast doubt on the efficacy of such checklists in improving patient safety. The effectiveness of surgical safety checklists cannot be fully measured or understood without an accurate assessment of implementation fidelity, most effectively through direct observations of the checklist process. Here, we describe the use of a secure audio recording protocol in conjunction with a novel standardized scoring system to assess checklist compliance rates. We used a black box digital audio recording protocol to observe the execution of SSCs in real time. A novel checklist scoring system was used to quantify the implementation fidelity of a modified version of the SSC. Physician and staff perception of patient safety was also surveyed before and after implementation. Audio-recorded audits revealed a precisely executed checklist 73.6% of the time compared with a previously reported compliance rate of 97.6%. Implementation fidelity was highest during preanesthesia and preincision checklist sections, whereas postprocedure checklist compliance and fidelity was consistently the lowest. Positive attitudes on patient safety by surgical staff increased by 11% from baseline. The use of a secure digital audio recording protocol is a simple yet effective tool for observing checklist performance. Moreover, the implementation of a standardized scoring system allows for the objective evaluation of checklist fidelity. Together, they provide a powerful auditing tool for identifying improvement.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  13. A Field-Based Testing Protocol for Assessing Gross Motor Skills in Preschool Children: The Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Harriet G.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Jeter, Chevy; Jones, Shaverra; Pate, Russell R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable tool for use in assessing motor skills in preschool children in field-based settings. The development of the Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol included evidence of its reliability and validity for use in field-based environments as part of large…

  14. A Field-Based Testing Protocol for Assessing Gross Motor Skills in Preschool Children: The Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Harriet G.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Jeter, Chevy; Jones, Shaverra; Pate, Russell R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable tool for use in assessing motor skills in preschool children in field-based settings. The development of the Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol included evidence of its reliability and validity for use in field-based environments as part of large…

  15. Standards to support learning and assessment in practice.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-01-27

    This is the first article in a series of 11 that will offer guidance to new and existing mentors and practice teachers to enable them to develop in their role and help them to gather a portfolio of evidence that meets the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice (SSLAP). This article provides background to the development of the standards and outlines the SSLAP, including the four main stages of the framework, the eight domains and outcomes, and the five principles required for the roles of mentor, sign-off mentor and practice teacher. The requirements for maintaining the mentor and practice teacher roles are explored.

  16. Application of a standardized screening protocol for diagnosis of invasive mold infections in children with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Shannon M; Pokala, Hanumantha R; Siegel, Jane D; McClay, John E; Leonard, David; Kwon, Jeannie; Timmons, Charles F; Winick, Naomi J

    2016-12-01

    This study describes a standardized screening protocol for diagnosis of invasive mold infections in pediatric oncology patients with neutropenia and prolonged or recurrent fever. A retrospective chart review was performed of children receiving intensive chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies who developed invasive mold infections from 2004 to 2011. Characteristics and outcomes were compared before and after implementation of the screening protocol in November 2006. The screen includes direct nasal endoscopy performed at the bedside by an otorhinolaryngologist, noncontrast computed tomography (CT) of the chest, and abdominal ultrasound in patients with neutropenia and prolonged or recurrent fever. Fifty patients had proven, probable, or possible invasive mold infections. Before routine use of direct nasal endoscopy, invasive nasosinal disease was detected in 5 of 19 patients (26 %) and all had a compatible clinical presentation. Thirteen of 31 patients (42 %) in the post-screen group had nasosinal disease, and fever was the only sign for 8 patients (62 %). Twenty-four patients with nasosinal disease had a sinus CT, and radiologic findings of bony erosion or peri-sinus invasion were never detected. Eight of 19 patients in the pre-screen group died from mold infection (42.1 %) versus 4 of 31 (12.9 %) in the post-screen group (p = 0.04). A screening protocol including direct nasal endoscopy, noncontrast chest CT, and abdominal ultrasound was effective in detecting invasive mold infections in at-risk patients. Nasosinal involvement often occurs before specific symptoms develop, and sinus CTs are insensitive and nonspecific. Bedside nasal endoscopy precludes radiation exposure associated with sinus CT and was associated with decrease in mold-related mortality, likely due to earlier diagnosis and initiation of appropriate antifungal therapy.

  17. Development of a simplified and standardized protocol with potential for high-throughput for sperm cryopreservation in zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huiping; Jones, Carrie; Varga, Zoltan M.; Tiersch, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    Sperm cryopreservation offers potential for long-term storage of genetic resources. However, the current protocols for zebrafish Danio rerio are cumbersome and poorly reproducible. Our objective was to facilitate adoption of cryopreservation by streamlining methods from sperm collection through thawing and use. First, sperm activation was evaluated, and motility was completely inhibited when osmolality of the extender was ≥ 295 to 300 mOsmol/kg. To evaluate cryoprotectant toxicity, sperm were incubated with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), N, N-dimethyl acetamide (DMA), methanol, or glycerol at 5, 10, and 15% concentrations. Based on motility, DMSO, DMA, and methanol (≤ 10%) were less toxic; therefore, sperm were cryopreserved using these cryoprotectants at cooling rates of 10 and 20 °C/min. The highest motility (mean ± SD) (35 ± 23%; P ≤ 0.0001) and fertility (13 ± 8%; P ≤ 0.001) in thawed sperm were obtained with the combination of 8% methanol and a cooling rate of 10 °C/min. Further evaluations of 8% methanol and 10 °C/min were performed with males from populations with high (2.05 ± 0.24) and low (1.18 ± 0.12) body condition (P = 0.0001). Motility of thawed sperm from the two populations was 38 ± 16% and 78 ± 10% (P = 0.0001), and fertilization was 6 ± 6% and 33 ± 20% (P = 0.0001). These values were positively related with body condition factor. Overall, this study simplified and standardized sperm cryopreservation, and established a protocol using French straws as a freezing container and an extender without powdered milk. This protocol can be readily adapted for high-throughput application using automated equipment, and motility and fertility comparable to previous reports were obtained. Male variability and sperm quality remain important considerations for future work, especially in mutant and inbred lines. PMID:17544099

  18. Development of a simplified and standardized protocol with potential for high-throughput for sperm cryopreservation in zebrafish Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiping; Carmichael, Carrie; Varga, Zoltan M; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2007-07-15

    Sperm cryopreservation offers potential for long-term storage of genetic resources. However, the current protocols for zebrafish Danio rerio are cumbersome and poorly reproducible. Our objective was to facilitate adoption of cryopreservation by streamlining methods from sperm collection through thawing and use. First, sperm activation was evaluated, and motility was completely inhibited when osmolality of the extender was >/=295-300mOsmol/kg. To evaluate cryoprotectant toxicity, sperm were incubated with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethyl acetamide (DMA), methanol, or glycerol at 5, 10, and 15% concentrations. Based on motility, DMSO, DMA, and methanol (standardized sperm cryopreservation, and established a protocol using French straws as a freezing container and an extender without powdered milk. This protocol can be readily adapted for high-throughput application using automated equipment, and motility and fertility comparable to previous reports were obtained. Male variability and sperm quality remain important considerations for future work, especially in mutant and inbred lines.

  19. Design and Evaluation of a Protocol to Assess Electronic Travel Aids for Persons Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havik, Else M.; Steyvers, Frank J. J. M.; van der Velde, Hanneke; Pinkster, J. Christiaan; Kooijman, Aart C.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated a protocol that was developed to assess how beneficial electronic travel aids are for persons who are visually impaired. Twenty persons with visual impairments used an electronic travel device (Trekker) for six weeks to conform to the protocol, which proved useful in identifying successful users of the device. (Contains 2…

  20. Design and Evaluation of a Protocol to Assess Electronic Travel Aids for Persons Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havik, Else M.; Steyvers, Frank J. J. M.; van der Velde, Hanneke; Pinkster, J. Christiaan; Kooijman, Aart C.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated a protocol that was developed to assess how beneficial electronic travel aids are for persons who are visually impaired. Twenty persons with visual impairments used an electronic travel device (Trekker) for six weeks to conform to the protocol, which proved useful in identifying successful users of the device. (Contains 2…

  1. Syntheses of isoxazoline-carbocyclic nucleosides and their antiviral evaluation: a standard protocol.

    PubMed

    Quadrelli, Paolo; Vazquez Martinez, Naiara; Scrocchi, Roberto; Corsaro, Antonino; Pistarà, Venerando

    2014-01-01

    The current synthesis of racemic purine and pyrimidine isoxazoline-carbocyclic nucleosides is reported, detailing the key-steps for standard and reliable preparations. Improved yields were obtained by the proper tuning of the single synthetic steps, opening the way for the preparation of a variety of novel compounds. Some of the obtained compounds were also evaluated against a wide variety of DNA and RNA viruses including HIV. No specific antiviral activity was observed in the cases at hand. Novel compounds were prepared for future biological tests.

  2. Syntheses of Isoxazoline-Carbocyclic Nucleosides and Their Antiviral Evaluation: A Standard Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Quadrelli, Paolo; Vazquez Martinez, Naiara; Scrocchi, Roberto; Corsaro, Antonino; Pistarà, Venerando

    2014-01-01

    The current synthesis of racemic purine and pyrimidine isoxazoline-carbocyclic nucleosides is reported, detailing the key-steps for standard and reliable preparations. Improved yields were obtained by the proper tuning of the single synthetic steps, opening the way for the preparation of a variety of novel compounds. Some of the obtained compounds were also evaluated against a wide variety of DNA and RNA viruses including HIV. No specific antiviral activity was observed in the cases at hand. Novel compounds were prepared for future biological tests. PMID:25544956

  3. Leg wash protocol to assess the skin moisturization potential of personal cleansing products.

    PubMed

    Ertel, K D; Neumann, P B; Hartwig, P M; Rains, G Y; Keswick, B H

    1999-12-01

    Many personal cleansers claim to provide a skin moisturization benefit, but there has been relatively little discussion in the scientific literature of the clinical methods that provide the basis for such claims. We have developed a leg wash method to assess the dry skin improvement potential of personal cleansing products. The protocol is performed on 'natural' dry leg skin to avoid potential confounds that may result from applying cleansers to soap-damaged skin. Washes are conducted over a period of days or weeks, with visual and instrumental assessments performed at various times throughout the period to characterize products' short-term and cumulative skin effects. Studies conducted with a variety of personal cleansing technologies demonstrate the method's ability to discriminate products on the basis of their dry skin improvement potential. Further, results from a series of eleven leg wash studies conducted with the same treatment pair under different test conditions (time of year, test facility, expert grader) demonstrate the protocol's robustness. The data generated under this protocol show that personal cleansing products differ widely in their ability to improve dry skin. Our results indicate that there is a wide range of efficacy among moisturizing personal cleansing products, with some products delivering a significant dry skin improvement benefit even for periods as long as 24 hours.

  4. Conformal radiotherapy, reduced boost volume, hyperfractionated radiotherapy, and online quality control in standard-risk medulloblastoma without chemotherapy: Results of the French M-SFOP 98 protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Carrie, Christian . E-mail: carrie@lyon.fnclcc.fr; Muracciole, Xavier; Gomez, Frederic

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Between December 1998 and October 2001, patients <19 years old were treated for standard-risk medulloblastoma according to the Medulloblastome-Societe Francaise d'Oncologie Pediatrique 1998 (M-SFOP 98) protocol. Patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy (36 Gy in 36 fractions) to the craniospinal axis, a boost with conformal therapy restricted to the tumor bed (to a total dose of 68 Gy in 68 fractions), and no chemotherapy. Records of craniospinal irradiation were reviewed before treatment start. Results: A total of 48 patients were considered assessable. With a median follow-up of 45.7 months, the overall survival and progression-free survival rate at 3 years was 89% and 81%, respectively. Fourteen major deviations were detected and eight were corrected. No relapses occurred in the frontal region and none occurred in the posterior fossa outside the boost volume. Nine patients were available for volume calculation without reduction of the volume irradiated. We observed a reduction in the subtentorial volume irradiated to >60 Gy, but a slight increase in the volume irradiated to 40 Gy. No decrease in intelligence was observed in the 22 children tested during the first 2 years. Conclusion: This hyperfractionated radiotherapy protocol with a reduced boost volume and without chemotherapy was not associated with early relapses in children. Moreover, intellectual function seemed to be preserved. These results are promising.

  5. The effect of standard pain assessment on pain and analgesic consumption amount in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Erden, Sevilay; Demir, Sevil Güler; Kanatlı, Ulunay; Danacı, Fatma; Carboğa, Banu

    2017-02-01

    Pain assessment has a key role in relief of the postoperative pain. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of the Standard Pain Assessment Protocol (SPAP), which we developed based on acute pain guidelines, on pain level, and analgesic consumption. The study population consisted of a total of 101 patients who had arthroscopic shoulder surgery. The routine pain assessment was administered to the control group, while the SPAP was administered to the study group. The routine pain therapy of the clinic was administered to the subjects from both groups based on the pain assessment. Throughout the study, pain was assessed nearly two times more in the study group (p<0.001) and the mean pain levels were lower at 8th-11th hours in the study group (p<0.001). Pain assessment was not performed after 12th hour despite the severe pain in the control group, and, therefore, analgesia was administered at irregular intervals or was not administered at all. However, the hours of analgesic administration were found to be more regular according to the pain levels of the patients in the study group. In conclusion, the SPAP reduced the pain level by providing regular analgesia when used in combination with regular pain assessment. This article highlights the appropriate assessment for patients with surgical pain. In majority of literature on the subject, the authors emphasize the importance of Standard Pain Assessment Protocol to provide adequate pain relief. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Standards for clinical trials in sexual dysfunctions of women: research designs and outcomes assessment.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Julia R; Guess, Marsha K; Connell, Kathleen; Melman, Arnold; Hyde, Janet Shibley; Segraves, R Taylor; Wyllie, Michael G

    2004-07-01

    Clinical trials on sexual dysfunctions in women are limited in spite of the fact that sexual dysfunctions are likely more common in women than in men. Currently there are no medications approved for treatment in women, and limited data on drug efficacy or psychological efficacy in well-controlled studies. To provide recommendations/guidelines concerning state-of-the-art knowledge for the research design and outcome assessment standards for clinical trials in women's sexual dysfunctions. An International Consultation in collaboration with the major urology and sexual medicine associations assembled over 200 multidisciplinary experts from 60 countries into 17 committees. Committee members established specific objectives and scopes for various male and female sexual medicine topics. The recommendations concerning state-of-the-art knowledge in the respective sexual medicine topic represent the opinion of experts from five continents developed in a process over a 2-year period. Concerning the Standards for Clinical Trials in Women's Sexual Dysfunctions Committee, there were seven experts from two countries. Expert opinion was based on grading of evidence-based medical literature, widespread internal committee discussion, public presentation and debate. A comprehensive update was created which included references and recommended guidelines for rationale and design of clinical trials, study populations, outcome assessments, protocol design and implementation, data analysis and reporting, as well as ethical and clinical issues related to sexual dysfunction research. There is a need for more research in developing standards to be used when performing clinical trials and outcomes assessment research in sexual dysfunctions of women.

  7. Validation of the G.LAB MD2200 wrist blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension, the British Hypertension Society, and the International Organization for Standardization Protocols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Han; Ye, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Da-Peng; Cheng, Kang; Zhang, Chun-Hai; Wan, Yi

    2017-04-01

    To validate the G.LAB MD2200 automated wrist blood pressure (BP) monitors according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) revision 2010, the British Hypertension Society (BHS), and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 81060-2:2013 protocols. The device was assessed on 33 participants according to the ESH requirements and was then tested on 85 participants according to the BHS and ISO 81060-2:2013 criteria. The validation procedures and data analysis followed the protocols precisely. The G.LAB MD2200 devices passed all parts of ESH-IP revision 2010 for both systolic and diastolic BP, with a device-observer difference of 2.15±5.51 and 1.51±5.16 mmHg, respectively. The device achieved A/A grading for the BHS protocol and it also fulfilled the criteria of ISO 81060-2:2013, with mean differences of systolic and diastolic BP between the device and the observer of 2.19±5.21 and 2.11±4.70 mmHg, respectively. The G.LAB MD2200 automated wrist BP monitor passed the ESH-IP revision 2010 and the ISO 81060-2:2013 protocol, and achieved the A/A grade of the BHS protocol, which can be recommended for self-measurement in the general population.

  8. A proposed 30-45 minute 4 page standard protocol to evaluate rheumatoid arthritis (SPERA) that includes measures of inflammatory activity, joint damage, and longterm outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pincus, T; Brooks, R H; Callahan, L F

    1999-02-01

    A proposed 4 page, 30-45 minute standard protocol to assess rheumatoid arthritis (SPERA) is described that includes all relevant measures of inflammatory activity such as joint swelling, measures of joint damage such as joint deformity, and outcomes such as joint replacement surgery, to monitor patients in longterm observational studies. Forms are included: (1) a patient self-report modified health assessment questionnaire (MHAQ) to assess function, pain, fatigue, psychological distress, symptoms, and drugs used; (2) assessor-completed forms: "RA clinical features" --criteria for RA, functional class, family history, extraarticular disease, comorbidities, joint surgery, radiographic score, and laboratory findings. (3) A 32 joint count with 5 variables: (a) a "shorthand" normal/abnormal so that normal joints require no further detailed assessment; (b) tenderness or pain on motion; (c) swelling; (d) limited motion or deformity; (e) previous surgeries; physical measures of function, i.e., grip strength, walk time, and button test. (4) Medication review of previous disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD), work history, and years of education. The forms allow cost effective acquisition of all relevant measures of activity, damage, and outcomes in routine clinical care, and allow recognition that measures of activity may show similar or improved values over 5-10 years, while measures of damage and outcomes indicate severe progression in the same patients. The SPERA is feasible to acquire most known relevant measures of activity, damage, and outcomes in RA in 30-45 min in usual clinical settings, to provide a complete database for analyses of longterm outcomes.

  9. Revised Recommendations of the Consortium of MS Centers Task Force for a Standardized MRI Protocol and Clinical Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Traboulsee, A.; Simon, J.H.; Stone, L.; Fisher, E.; Jones, D.E.; Malhotra, A.; Newsome, S.D.; Oh, J.; Reich, D.S.; Richert, N.; Rammohan, K.; Khan, O.; Radue, E.-W.; Ford, C.; Halper, J.; Li, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY An international group of neurologists and radiologists developed revised guidelines for standardized brain and spinal cord MR imaging for the diagnosis and follow-up of MS. A brain MR imaging with gadolinium is recommended for the diagnosis of MS. A spinal cord MR imaging is recommended if the brain MR imaging is nondiagnostic or if the presenting symptoms are at the level of the spinal cord. A follow-up brain MR imaging with gadolinium is recommended to demonstrate dissemination in time and ongoing clinically silent disease activity while on treatment, to evaluate unexpected clinical worsening, to re-assess the original diagnosis, and as a new baseline before starting or modifying therapy. A routine brain MR imaging should be considered every 6 months to 2 years for all patients with relapsing MS. The brain MR imaging protocol includes 3D T1-weighted, 3D T2-FLAIR, 3D T2-weighted, post-single-dose gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted sequences, and a DWI sequence. The progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy surveillance protocol includes FLAIR and DWI sequences only. The spinal cord MR imaging protocol includes sagittal T1-weighted and proton attenuation, STIR or phase-sensitive inversion recovery, axial T2- or T2*-weighted imaging through suspicious lesions, and, in some cases, postcontrast gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. The clinical question being addressed should be provided in the requisition for the MR imaging. The radiology report should be descriptive, with results referenced to previous studies. MR imaging studies should be permanently retained and available. The current revision incorporates new clinical information and imaging techniques that have become more available. PMID:26564433

  10. Enhancing the interpretation of stated choice analysis through the application of a verbal protocol assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahill, K.L.; Marion, J.L.; Lawson, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    A stated choice survey was employed to evaluate the relative importance of resource, social, and management attributes by asking visitors to select preferred configurations of these attributes. A verbal protocol assessment was added to consider how respondents interpret and respond to stated choice questions applied to hikers of a popular trail at Acadia National Park. Results suggest that visitors are sensitive to changes in public access to the trail and its ecological conditions, with level of encounters least important. Verbal protocol results identified considnations made by respondents that provide insight to their evaluations of alternative recreation setting configurations. These insights help clarify issues important to visitors that stated choice results on their own do not provide.

  11. The spinning task: a new protocol to easily assess motor coordination and resistance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Blazina, Ana R; Vianna, Mônica R; Lara, Diogo R

    2013-12-01

    The increasing use of adult zebrafish in behavioral studies has created the need for new and improved protocols. Our investigation sought to evaluate the swimming behavior of zebrafish against a water current using the newly developed Spinning Task. Zebrafish were individually placed in a beaker containing a spinning magnetic stirrer and their latency to be swept into the whirlpool was recorded. We characterized that larger fish (>4 cm) and lower rpm decreased the swimming time in the Spinning Task. There was also a dose-related reduction in swimming after acute treatment with haloperidol, valproic acid, clonazepam, and ethanol, which alter coordination. Importantly, at doses that reduced swimming time in the Spinning Task, these drugs influenced absolute turn angle (ethanol increased and the other drugs decreased), but had no effect of distance travelled in a regular water tank. These results suggest that the Spinning Task is a useful protocol to add information to the assessment of zebrafish motor behavior.

  12. Assessment of the effect of the Montreal Protocol on atmospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, Tatiana A.; Rozanov, Eugene V.; Schlesinger, Michael E.; Andronova, Natalia G.; Malyshev, Sergey L.; Karol, Igor L.; Zubov, Vladimir A.

    Ozone depletion is a major global scientific and environmental problem. One of its causes is the anthropogenic increase of CFCs in the atmosphere, which results in the enhancement of the concentration of reactive chlorine in the stratosphere. To reduce the influence of anthropogenic ozone-depleting substances, the Montreal Protocol was agreed by Governments in 1987, with several Amendments adopted later. What has been the result of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments (MPA)? Here we present the first 3D-model assessment of the effect of the MPA on atmospheric ozone which has been performed with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) Atmospheric Chemical Transport Model (ACTM). We find that the MPA has saved up to 2% of the present-day total ozone in the Northern Hemisphere and about 5% in the Southern Hemisphere. Our calculations also show that CFCs do not play the major role in the observed recent total ozone variations.

  13. Validation of a standard forensic anthropology examination protocol by measurement of applicability and reliability on exhumed and archive samples of known biological attribution.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Raffaela Arrabaça; Evison, Martin Paul; Costa Junior, Moacyr Lobo da; Silveira, Teresa Cristina Pantozzi; Secchieri, José Marcelo; Guimarães, Marco Aurelio

    2017-10-01

    Forensic anthropology makes an important contribution to human identification and assessment of the causes and mechanisms of death and body disposal in criminal and civil investigations, including those related to atrocity, disaster and trafficking victim identification. The methods used are comparative, relying on assignment of questioned material to categories observed in standard reference material of known attribution. Reference collections typically originate in Europe and North America, and are not necessarily representative of contemporary global populations. Methods based on them must be validated when applied to novel populations. This study describes the validation of a standardized forensic anthropology examination protocol by application to two contemporary Brazilian skeletal samples of known attribution. One sample (n=90) was collected from exhumations following 7-35 years of burial and the second (n=30) was collected following successful investigations following routine case work. The study presents measurement of (1) the applicability of each of the methods: used and (2) the reliability with which the biographic parameters were assigned in each case. The results are discussed with reference to published assessments of methodological reliability regarding sex, age and-in particular-ancestry estimation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Six-day postoperative impact of a standardized nurse observation and escalation protocol: a preintervention and postintervention study.

    PubMed

    De Meester, Koen; Haegdorens, Filip; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Verpooten, Gert A; Holvoet, Annelies; Van Bogaert, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the impact of a standardized nurse observation and escalation protocol on observation frequency, the measurement of vital signs, and the incidence of in-hospital mortality and resurgery. This is a preintervention and postintervention study by analysis of patient records for a 6-day postoperative period of all adult patients hospitalized in 4 hospital wards after surgery during a preintervention (November 2010 to March 2011; n = 2359) and postintervention (November 2011 to March 2012; n = 1888) period implementing a standardized nurse observation and escalation protocol including the Modified Early Warning Score. The mean patient observation frequency per nursing shift increased from 0.9076 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8921-0.9231) preintervention to 0.9940 (95% CI, 0.9708-1.0172; P < .001) postintervention and was lower in case of 6-day postoperative mortality (0.6686 [95% CI, 0.4984-0.8388] vs other patients 0.9475 [95% CI, 0.9340-0.9610]; P = .003) or resurgery (0.8402 [95% CI, 0.7894-0.8909] vs other patients 0.9564 [95% CI, 0.9378-0.9657]; P = .003). The mean number of vital signs measured per observation episode increased from a mean of 1.81 (95% CI, 1.79-1.83) preintervention to 2.45 (95% CI, 2.39-2.51; P < .001) postintervention. The relative risk reduction was 73.7% (95% CI, 22.8-91.0; P = .015) for 6-day postoperative in-hospital mortality and 30.9% (95% CI, 9.5-47.2; P = .007) for 6-day postoperative resurgery. © 2013.

  15. Formulation of a standardized protocol and determination of the size and appearance of the spleen in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Sayre, Rebecca S; Spaulding, Kathy A

    2014-04-01

    Standard protocol for splenic measurement is warranted to aid in interpretation when sonographically imaging the spleen of cats. The purpose of this study was to describe the appearance and size of healthy cat spleens, and to develop a standard method of evaluation. Data were obtained from 31 clinically healthy non-sedated cats with no sonographic abnormalities. The sonographic appearance of the spleen's relative echogenicity compared to the left renal cortex and the hepatic parenchyma was recorded. Splenic height was measured at three sites. Three measurements were determined at each site, and the mean value of these three measurements was determined and used for data analysis. A significance level of P <0.05 was used for analysis, which was performed using S-PLUS software (version 8.1). The mean proximal height of the spleen was 7.1 mm. The mean body sagittal height was 9.3 mm. The mean height of the tail of the spleen was 8.7 mm (95% confidence interval). The splenic parenchymal echogenicity was less than the left renal cortex echogenicity and greater than the liver in 17/31cats; less than the left kidney cortex and equal to the liver in 5/31cats; equal to the cortex of the left kidney and greater than the liver in 5/31 cats; equal to the liver and renal cortex in 2/31 cats; and less than the liver and kidney with the renal cortex less than the liver in 2/31 cats. The protocol recommended for consistent evaluation of the spleen in the cat includes three specific measurements.

  16. Steps Towards the Standardization of a More Efficient Uplink Protocol and Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazz, Greg J.; Greenberg, Edward

    2006-01-01

    In June 2004, NASA announced a new vision for the further exploration of the Moon and Mars. The vision includes a long-term human and robotic program to explore the solar system, starting with a return to the Moon that will ultimately enable future exploration of Mars and other destinations. Inherent in this endeavor is the need to transfer the communication technology developed for lunar missions to deep space whenever possible. Furthermore, greater data throughput on the uplink will be required for future nominal operations for the Exploration missions given their highly interactive nature and the need to send files in both directions. Therefore, it is prudent for standards bodies i.e., CCSDS to develop the underlying communication recommendations necessary to deliver greater data throughput to meet future agencies' needs.

  17. Steps Towards the Standardization of a More Efficient Uplink Protocol and Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazz, Greg J.; Greenberg, Edward

    2006-01-01

    In June 2004, NASA announced a new vision for the further exploration of the Moon and Mars. The vision includes a long-term human and robotic program to explore the solar system, starting with a return to the Moon that will ultimately enable future exploration of Mars and other destinations. Inherent in this endeavor is the need to transfer the communication technology developed for lunar missions to deep space whenever possible. Furthermore, greater data throughput on the uplink will be required for future nominal operations for the Exploration missions given their highly interactive nature and the need to send files in both directions. Therefore, it is prudent for standards bodies i.e., CCSDS to develop the underlying communication recommendations necessary to deliver greater data throughput to meet future agencies' needs.

  18. Standardizing Physiologic Assessment Data to Enable Big Data Analytics.

    PubMed

    Matney, Susan A; Settergren, Theresa Tess; Carrington, Jane M; Richesson, Rachel L; Sheide, Amy; Westra, Bonnie L

    2016-07-18

    Disparate data must be represented in a common format to enable comparison across multiple institutions and facilitate big data science. Nursing assessments represent a rich source of information. However, a lack of agreement regarding essential concepts and standardized terminology prevent their use for big data science in the current state. The purpose of this study was to align a minimum set of physiological nursing assessment data elements with national standardized coding systems. Six institutions shared their 100 most common electronic health record nursing assessment data elements. From these, a set of distinct elements was mapped to nationally recognized Logical Observations Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC®) and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT®) standards. We identified 137 observation names (55% new to LOINC), and 348 observation values (20% new to SNOMED CT) organized into 16 panels (72% new LOINC). This reference set can support the exchange of nursing information, facilitate multi-site research, and provide a framework for nursing data analysis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. A protocol for identifying suitable biomarkers to assess fish health: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Biomarkers have been used extensively to provide the connection between external levels of contaminant exposure, internal levels of tissue contamination, and early adverse effects in organisms. Objectives To present a three-step protocol for identifying suitable biomarkers to assess fish health in coastal and marine ecosystems, using Gladstone Harbour (Australia) as a case study. Methods Prior to applying our protocol, clear working definitions for biomarkers were developed to ensure consistency with the global literature on fish health assessment. First, contaminants of concern were identified based on the presence of point and diffuse sources of pollution and available monitoring data for the ecosystem of interest. Second, suitable fish species were identified using fisheries dependent and independent data, and prioritised based on potential pathways of exposure to the contaminants of concern. Finally, a systematic and critical literature review was conducted on the use of biomarkers to assess the health of fish exposed to the contaminants of concern. Results/Discussion We present clear working definitions for bioaccumulation markers, biomarkers of exposure, biomarkers of effect and biomarkers of susceptibility. Based on emission and concentration information, seven metals were identified as contaminants of concern for Gladstone Harbour. Twenty out of 232 fish species were abundant enough to be potentially suitable for biomarker studies; five of these were prioritised based on potential pathways of exposure and susceptibility to metals. The literature search on biomarkers yielded 5,035 articles, of which 151met the inclusion criteria. Based on our review, the most suitable biomarkers include bioaccumulation markers, biomarkers of exposure (CYP1A, EROD, SOD, LPOX, HSP, MT, DNA strand breaks, micronuclei, apoptosis), and biomarkers of effect (histopathology, TAG:ST). Conclusion Our protocol outlines a clear pathway to identify suitable biomarkers to

  20. Standardization of protocols to test wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) for reaction to blast in a biocontainment laboratory

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growth medium, spore age, and inoculum density are essential factors for determining host responses to a plant pathogen. The standardization of these factors is important to obtain adequate and reproducible disease assessments. We are testing US wheat cultivars for reaction to the exotic disease bla...

  1. A Retrospective Analysis of the Effectiveness of the Longevity Protocol for Assessing the Risk of Implant Failure.

    PubMed

    Testori, Tiziano; Clauser, Carlo; Deflorian, Matteo; Capelli, Matteo; Zuffetti, Francesco; Fabbro, Massimo Del

    2016-12-01

    A new, computerized diagnostic tool, called the Longevity Protocol, was recently developed to predict implant failure. The present retrospective analysis was undertaken to assess the prognostic validity of this protocol. A selected group of patients who had been treated with implants over the past 10 years at six dental clinics and experienced implant failure were included in the analysis. Another group of patients with similar characteristics, not experiencing implant failure, was used as control. In April of 2015, data about each of the patients was entered into the Longevity Protocol database. For each patient, the risk assessment produced by the protocol was compared to whether the implants eventually failed. The implant failure predictions and actual implant failures were compared. The Longevity Protocol analyzed the possible failure of 595 implants placed in 221 patients (323 implants placed in 138 patients classified as low risk, 180 implants placed in 55 patients classified as moderate risk, and 92 implants placed in 28 patients classified as high risk). The actual percentage of implant failure in the three groups was 10%, 15%, and 22%, respectively. The differences between the groups were statistically significant. The sensitivity and specificity of the Longevity Protocol was 84.9% and 11.90% in the high/moderate risk group and 47.17% and 32.74% in the low risk group, respectively. Statistically significant results were obtained. The Longevity Protocol reliably identified patients who risked implant failure. The protocol appears to be an important tool for prognosis assessment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Assessment of an extraction protocol to detect the major mastitis-causing pathogens in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Cressier, B; Bissonnette, N

    2011-05-01

    Despite all efforts to control its spread, mastitis remains the most costly disease for dairy farmers worldwide. One key component of better control of this disease is identification of the causative bacterial agent during udder infections in cows. Mastitis is complex, however, given the diversity of pathogens that must be identified. Development of a rapid and efficient bacterial species identification tool is thus necessary. This study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of bacterial DNA extraction for the automated molecular detection of major mastitis-causing pathogens directly in milk samples to complement traditional microbiological identification. Extraction and detection procedures were designed and optimized to achieve detection in a respectable time frame, at a reasonable cost, and with a high throughput capacity. The following species were identified: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Klebsiella spp. (including Klebsiella oxytoca and Klebsiella pneumoniae). The detection procedure includes specific genomic DNA amplification by multiplex PCR for each species, separation by capillary electrophoresis, and laser-assisted automated detection. The specificity of the primers was assessed with a panel of bacteria representing mastitis-negative control species. The extraction protocol comprised multiple steps, starting with centrifugation for fat removal, followed by heating in the presence of a cation exchange resin to trap divalent ions. The analytical sensitivity was 100 cfu/mL for milk samples spiked with Staph. aureus, Strep. dysgalactiae, and E. coli, with a tendency for K. pneumoniae. The detection limit was 500 cfu/mL for Strep. uberis and Strep. agalactiae. The overall diagnostic sensitivity (95.4%) and specificity (97.3%) were determined in a double-blind randomized assay by processing 172 clinical milk samples with microbiological characterization as the

  3. A protocol for comprehensive assessment of bulbar dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Yunusova, Yana; Green, Jordan R; Wang, Jun; Pattee, Gary; Zinman, Lorne

    2011-02-21

    Improved methods for assessing bulbar impairment are necessary for expediting diagnosis of bulbar dysfunction in ALS, for predicting disease progression across speech subsystems, and for addressing the critical need for sensitive outcome measures for ongoing experimental treatment trials. To address this need, we are obtaining longitudinal profiles of bulbar impairment in 100 individuals based on a comprehensive instrumentation-based assessment that yield objective measures. Using instrumental approaches to quantify speech-related behaviors is very important in a field that has primarily relied on subjective, auditory-perceptual forms of speech assessment(1). Our assessment protocol measures performance across all of the speech subsystems, which include respiratory, phonatory (laryngeal), resonatory (velopharyngeal), and articulatory. The articulatory subsystem is divided into the facial components (jaw and lip), and the tongue. Prior research has suggested that each speech subsystem responds differently to neurological diseases such as ALS. The current protocol is designed to test the performance of each speech subsystem as independently from other subsystems as possible. The speech subsystems are evaluated in the context of more global changes to speech performance. These speech system level variables include speaking rate and intelligibility of speech. The protocol requires specialized instrumentation, and commercial and custom software. The respiratory, phonatory, and resonatory subsystems are evaluated using pressure-flow (aerodynamic) and acoustic methods. The articulatory subsystem is assessed using 3D motion tracking techniques. The objective measures that are used to quantify bulbar impairment have been well established in the speech literature and show sensitivity to changes in bulbar function with disease progression. The result of the assessment is a comprehensive, across-subsystem performance profile for each participant. The profile, when compared to

  4. Mercury Assessment and Monitoring Protocol for the Bear Creek Watershed, Colusa County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suchanek, Thomas H.; Hothem, Roger L.; Rytuba, James J.; Yee, Julie L.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the known information on the occurrence and distribution of mercury (Hg) in physical/chemical and biological matrices within the Bear Creek watershed. Based on these data, a matrix-specific monitoring protocol for the evaluation of the effectiveness of activities designed to remediate Hg contamination in the Bear Creek watershed is presented. The monitoring protocol documents procedures for collecting and processing water, sediment, and biota for estimation of total Hg (TotHg) and monomethyl mercury (MMeHg) in the Bear Creek watershed. The concurrent sampling of TotHg and MMeHg in biota as well as water and sediment from 10 monitoring sites is designed to assess the relative bioavailability of Hg released from Hg sources in the watershed and identify environments conducive to Hg methylation. These protocols are designed to assist landowners, land managers, water quality regulators, and scientists in determining whether specific restoration/mitigation actions lead to significant progress toward achieving water quality goals to reduce Hg in Bear and Sulphur Creeks.

  5. Using broadband spatially resolved NIRS to assess muscle oxygenation during altered running protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukourakis, Georg; Vafiadou, Maria; Steimers, André; Geraskin, Dmitri; Neary, Patrick; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    We used spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SRS-NIRS) to assess calf and thigh muscle oxygenation during running on a motor-driven treadmill. Two protocols were used: An incremental speed protocol (velocity = 6 - 12 km/h, ▵v = 2 km/h) was performed in 3 minute stages, while a pacing paradigm modulated step frequency alternatively (2.3 Hz [SLow]; 3.3 Hz [SHigh]) during a constant velocity for 2 minutes each. A SRS-NIRS broadband system (600 - 1000 nm) was used to measure total haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation (SO2). An accelerometer was placed on the hip joints to measure limb acceleration through the experiment. The data showed that the calf (SO2 58 to 42%) desaturated to a significantly lower level than the thigh (61 to 54%). During the pacing protocol, SO2 was significantly different between the SLow vs. SHigh trials. Additionally, physiological data as measured by spirometry were different between the SLow vs. SHigh pacing trials (VO2 (2563+/- 586 vs. 2503 +/- 605 mL/min). Significant differences in VO2 at the same workload (speed) indicate alterations in mechanical efficiency. These data suggest that SRS broadband NIRS can be used to discern small changes in muscle oxygenation, making this device useful for metabolic exercise studies in addition to spirometry and movement monitoring by accelerometers.

  6. What standardized tests ignore when assessing individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio, Marcela; Campos, Ruth; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2016-01-01

    In this article we critique the use of traditional standardized tests for the cognitive assessment of children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Limitations stem from the lack of integrating (a) results from research into the psychological functioning of these populations, and (b) the main arguments underlying models of human development. We identify four secondary issues in this discussion: (1) these instruments cannot be used with children who have particularly low cognitive functioning; (2) little or no variance in the scores obtained by individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders, because all are at floor, prevent adequate interpretations; (3) measurements do not provide information useful for the design of intervention strategies; and (4) different cognitive and/or neural processes may underlie behavioural scores ‘in the normal range’. Rethinking traditional assessment methods in favour of technologically-mediated games yields new cognitive assessment possibilities. PMID:26778874

  7. Assessing medical students' communication skills by the use of standardized patients: emphasizing standardized patients' quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, M; Labaf, A; Monjazebi, F; Jalili, M; Mirzazadeh, M; Ponzer, S; Masiello, I

    2014-06-01

    The objective structured examination is one of the most valid, reliable, and effective tools for assessing clinical and communication skills, often by use of standard patients (SPs). SPs can also be assessors of those skills. One of the crucial areas when utilizing SP-based assessment is the quality and consistency assurance of their portrayal of the case and their ability to fill in checklists in an adequate way. The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of SPs' ability to assess students' communication skill via a Calgary-Cambridge checklist. This cross-sectional and correlational study was conducted at the Tehran University of Medical Science. We first analyzed validity; the criterion validity of the SPs' filling in the checklists was assessed through determining the correlation between the SPs' completed checklists and the checklists filled in by three physician raters individually and then reproducibility: it was assessed by a test-retest approach inter-rater reliability. The mean correlation for assessing the validity of SPs' completed checklists by individual SPs was 0.81. The inter-rater reliability was calculated by kappa coefficient, and the total correlation among the three raters was 0.85. The reliability of the test-retest approach showed no significant differences between the test and re-test results. The increased number of medical students and different faculties' responsibilities such as doing educational, research, and health services duties assessing medical student communication skills is a complex issue. The results of our study showed that trained SPs can be used as a valid tool to assess medical students' communication skills, which is also more cost effective and reduces work load of medical faculties.

  8. Assessing Urban Walking Trail Use and Changes in the Trail Environment Using Systematic Observational Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Duncan C.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Kugler, Kassandra A.; Colabianchi, Natalie; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Reed, Julian; Schmidt, Sara C.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the extent to which two systematic observation protocols which were modified for underserved communities (low income, minorities) could be utilized to reliably assess a) use of walking trails and b) physical environmental features of these trails. This study was a supplement to the Positive Action for Today's Health (PATH) walking trial. The modified tools were shown to be reliable methods for a) measuring trail use and b) assessing physical features of the trail in underserved environments. Reliability data for measuring trail use were found to be high (ICC = .98, p < .01). Reliabilities for measuring features of the trail ranged from fair to highly reliable (κ = .77 - 1.00; ICC = .34 - 1.00). The observation tools that were customized for this study were shown to be reliable instruments for measuring trail use and assessing physical features of walking trails in underserved communities. PMID:22795357

  9. Assessment of the ability of wheelchair subjects with spinal cord injury to perform a specific protocol of shoulder training: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Dellabiancia, Fabio; Filippi, Maria Vittoria; De Santis, Elisa; Alpi, Daniele; Magrini, Paola; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: a regular program of exercises in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) can contribute to reduce the risk of upper extremities injuries. Methods: in this prospective laboratory study we tested the hypothesis that a training machine developed for able-body users is suitable for a shoulder training protocol in 11 paraplegic subjects with SCI. Overall subjects were assessed with the SCIM III, CS, DASH and standard shoulder examination. We set a protocol of shoulder exercises performed with a training machine. Overall subjects were able to perform the protocol but 2 did not complete the exercises n° 6 and 7. The position of the wheelchair during each exercise was recorded. Wheelchair position/loading level were significantly correlated with the protocol n° 2, 3 and 5 as well as BMI/loading level for the exercises n° 5 and 9 and age/loading level for the exercise n° 7. Clinical scores were neither correlated with loading nor with anthropometric data. Results/Conclusions: from the analysis of data collected in this study arised that: 1) the training machine needs some adjustments for paraplegic subjects, 2) the training protocol was appropriate except for the exercises needing a torso-rotation and 3) the template for wheelchair position may be a valid guide for an optimal paraplegic shoulder training. PMID:25332931

  10. Importance of sunscreen products spreading protocol and substrate roughness for in vitro sun protection factor assessment.

    PubMed

    Fageon, L; Moyal, D; Coutet, J; Candau, D

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of substrate roughness and of product spreading method on in vitro sun protection factor (SPF) measurement and to define the experimental conditions most appropriate to reach the best level of correlation to in vivo SPF. In vitro SPF assessment was carried out on 13 products (including different formulation types with SPF from 20 to 75) using various in vitro SPF protocols and comparing related predictive potential regarding in vivo SPF. In the first part, two spreading methods were compared on two types of PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate plate with different roughness. The impact of a second spreading step after product drying was also evaluated. From the various investigated parameters, it was shown that (i) a higher roughness (Ra = 4, 5 microm) was preferred for O/W formulations (ii) using a defined sequence of light linear and circular strokes was more adequate than monitoring product spreading in terms of time and pressure (iii) both correlation to in vivo SPF and results variability were improved when a second spreading step was added. The altered protocol showed a good predictive potential regarding in vivo SPF values for O/W formulations (correlation coefficient 0.92, correlation curve slope 0.98) and coefficient of variation of in vitro results (14% of the mean SPF value) close to what is usually obtained in vivo. The repeatability of the protocol was also demonstrated. In the second part, we evaluated the impact of PMMA plate pre-treatment with paraffinum liquidum before spreading the product to get a better correlation between in vivo and in vitro SPF values for W/O formulations. This allowed us to define a protocol suitable for both O/W and W/O formulations.

  11. Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae: Development of a Standardized Protocol for Optochin Susceptibility Testing Using Total Lab Automation

    PubMed Central

    Panitz, Jessica; Burckhardt, Florian; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Optochin susceptibility is one parameter used in the laboratory to identify Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, a single standardized procedure does not exist. Optochin is included neither in the current EUCAST breakpoint tables nor in the CLSI performance standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We wanted to establish an evidence-based protocol for optochin testing for our Total Lab Automation. Methods. We tested seven different agars and four different reading time points (7 h, 12 h, 18 h, and 24 h). To accommodate for serotype diversity, all tests were done with 99 different strains covering 34 different serotypes of S. pneumoniae. We calculated a multivariable linear regression using data from 5544 inhibition zones. Results. Reading was possible for all strains at 12 h. Agar type and manufacturer influenced the size of the inhibition zones by up to 2 mm and they varied considerably depending on serotype (up to 3 mm for serotype 3). Depending on agar and reading time point, up to 38% of inhibition zones were smaller than the cut-off of 14 mm; that is, the result of the test was false-negative. Conclusions. Shortening incubation time from 24 h to 12 h for optochin susceptibility testing is feasible. Agar and incubation time have to be chosen carefully to avoid false-negative results. PMID:28401155

  12. Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae: Development of a Standardized Protocol for Optochin Susceptibility Testing Using Total Lab Automation.

    PubMed

    Burckhardt, Irene; Panitz, Jessica; Burckhardt, Florian; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Optochin susceptibility is one parameter used in the laboratory to identify Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, a single standardized procedure does not exist. Optochin is included neither in the current EUCAST breakpoint tables nor in the CLSI performance standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We wanted to establish an evidence-based protocol for optochin testing for our Total Lab Automation. Methods. We tested seven different agars and four different reading time points (7 h, 12 h, 18 h, and 24 h). To accommodate for serotype diversity, all tests were done with 99 different strains covering 34 different serotypes of S. pneumoniae. We calculated a multivariable linear regression using data from 5544 inhibition zones. Results. Reading was possible for all strains at 12 h. Agar type and manufacturer influenced the size of the inhibition zones by up to 2 mm and they varied considerably depending on serotype (up to 3 mm for serotype 3). Depending on agar and reading time point, up to 38% of inhibition zones were smaller than the cut-off of 14 mm; that is, the result of the test was false-negative. Conclusions. Shortening incubation time from 24 h to 12 h for optochin susceptibility testing is feasible. Agar and incubation time have to be chosen carefully to avoid false-negative results.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of refractometer and Brix refractometer to assess failure of passive transfer in calves: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Buczinski, S; Fecteau, G; Chigerwe, M; Vandeweerd, J M

    2016-06-01

    Calves are highly dependent of colostrum (and antibody) intake because they are born agammaglobulinemic. The transfer of passive immunity in calves can be assessed directly by dosing immunoglobulin G (IgG) or by refractometry or Brix refractometry. The latter are easier to perform routinely in the field. This paper presents a protocol for a systematic review meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic accuracy of refractometry or Brix refractometry versus dosage of IgG as a reference standard test. With this review protocol we aim to be able to report refractometer and Brix refractometer accuracy in terms of sensitivity and specificity as well as to quantify the impact of any study characteristic on test accuracy.

  14. Applying International Standards for Hydrokinetic Energy Resource Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of hydrokinetic energy is the conversion of the kinetic energy of moving water into another more useful form of energy, frequently electricity. This water motion may be in the form of waves, tides, ocean currents or river flows. In addition to the development of the technology, the successful extraction of hydrokinetic energy requires a better understanding of physical, environmental and social aspects of the resource and their interactions with the technology. To assist with the development of the hydrokinetic industry as a whole, much work over the past decade has been completed developing international technical standards which can be used by the full range of stakeholders in the hydrokinetic industry. To support the design of projects for tidal energy extraction, a new International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Specification (TS) has recently been published outlining a standardized methodology for performing resource assessments. In addition, presently work is ongoing on producing another TS for performing resource assessments on in-stream river projects. While the specific technology for extracting the energy from tidal and river flows may be similar, the methodologies for performing the respective resource assessments is quite different due to the differing nature of the physical processes involved. This presentation will discuss both the tidal and in-stream river methodologies, highlighting their respective key aspects. In addition, a case study illustrating the use of the published tidal TS will be presented.

  15. Implications of Stein's Paradox for Environmental Standard Compliance Assessment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Song S; Stow, Craig A; Cha, YoonKyung

    2015-05-19

    The implications of Stein's paradox stirred considerable debate in statistical circles when the concept was first introduced in the 1950s. The paradox arises when we are interested in estimating the means of several variables simultaneously. In this situation, the best estimator for an individual mean, the sample average, is no longer the best. Rather, a shrinkage estimator, which shrinks individual sample averages toward the overall average is shown to have improved overall accuracy. Although controversial at the time, the concept of shrinking toward overall average is now widely accepted as a good practice for improving statistical stability and reducing error, not only in simple estimation problems, but also in complicated modeling problems. However, the utility of Stein's insights are not widely recognized in the environmental management community, where mean pollutant concentrations of multiple waters are routinely estimated for management decision-making. In this essay, we introduce Stein's paradox and its modern generalization, the Bayesian hierarchical model, in the context of environmental standard compliance assessment. Using simulated data and nutrient monitoring data from wadeable streams around the Great Lakes, we show that a Bayesian hierarchical model can improve overall estimation accuracy, thereby improving our confidence in the assessment results, especially for standard compliance assessment of waters with small sample sizes.

  16. Standardized method to assess medicines' acceptability: focus on paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Fabrice; Vallet, Thibault; Pensé-Lhéritier, Anne-Marie; Aoussat, Ameziane

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this article was to present an original standardized tool assessing the medicine's acceptability whichever their characteristics and the patient features. An acceptability map was built with objective measures from medicine use assessments collected in real-life conditions. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was used for the mapping process. Hierarchical classification on the principal components (HCPC) of the MCA was performed for the clustering process corresponding to distinct acceptability profiles. The results presented here focus on 234 evaluations issued from the paediatric population and gathered in four clusters: 'well-accepted' (50%), 'accepted' (19%), 'poorly accepted' (25%) and 'not accepted' medicines (6%). The first one was characterized by a dose fully taken, in a short time, with a patient's positive reaction; the second by a longer administration time, a neutral reaction and the use of methods to achieve administration (reward, divided dose). Differentiation between the two last clusters was, respectively, originated by a required dose partially taken or not taken. The acceptability profile of each medicine can be evaluated with the map position of the related patient's assessments barycentre. This tool should satisfy expectations in terms of methods for appropriate acceptability evaluation and standardized comparison among medicines. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. A proposal of a standardized protocol to evaluate waterproof effect of eyeliner and mascara.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Seo, Y K; Boo, Y C; Koh, J S

    2016-06-01

    Eye make-up products must have waterproofing properties to make sure that their colours do not smudge or wash away easily and remain intact despite water or perspiration. Until now, most research has focused on composition and components of make-up products and not on the level of waterproof. This study aimed to find methods to assess the waterproof degree of eyeliners and mascaras and determine the suitability of these methods. Twenty female subjects were selected to test the waterproof of eyeliners, whereas 20 sets of false eyelashes were used to evaluate the waterproof of mascaras. For evaluating water-resistant properties, after test sites where eyeliners and mascaras were applied were immersed in water and natural drying for over 20 min (not artificial drying by drier etc.), L* value of the eyeliners applied on the forearm before and after the immersions, and intensity analysis values of mascaras applied on the false eyelashes were used to calculate the mean percentage waterproof removal ratio (%WPR). A product was hypothesized to be water resistant if the value for the mean %WPR was ≤50%. The non-waterproof eyeliners were not waterproof if their mean %WPR was >50%, whereas the waterproof eyeliners were waterproof if their mean %WPR was <50%. For mascaras, the mean %WPR was <50% after 1- to 2-h marks after immersion in water for both non-waterproof and waterproof products. After 3-4 h, the mean %WPR for the non-waterproof mascaras was >50%, rendering them not waterproof, whereas the mean %WPR for the waterproof mascaras was <50%, making them waterproof. We have evaluated the waterproof properties by analysing photographed images of the test sites where eyeliners and mascaras were applied. Results of the comparison between non-waterproof and waterproof eyeliners and mascaras, and the methods used, in particular, will be found useful in evaluating waterproof of other make-up products. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  18. Assessment of opacimeter calibration according to International Standard Organization 10155.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J F

    2001-01-01

    This paper compares the calibration method for opacimeters issued by the International Standard Organization (ISO) 10155 with the manual reference method for determination of dust content in stack gases. ISO 10155 requires at least nine operational measurements, corresponding to three operational measurements per each dust emission range within the stack. The procedure is assessed by comparison with previous calibration methods for opacimeters using only two operational measurements from a set of measurements made at stacks from pulp mills. The results show that even if the international standard for opacimeter calibration requires that the calibration curve is to be obtained using 3 x 3 points, a calibration curve derived using 3 points could be, at times, acceptable in statistical terms, provided that the amplitude of individual measurements is low.

  19. Evolutionary cognitive therapy versus standard cognitive therapy for depression: a protocol for a blinded, randomized, superiority clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Giosan, Cezar; Cobeanu, Oana; Mogoase, Cristina; Muresan, Vlad; Malta, Loretta S; Wyka, Katarzyna; Szentagotai, Aurora

    2014-03-19

    Depression is estimated to become the leading cause of disease burden globally by 2030. Despite existing efficacious treatments (both medical and psychotherapeutic), a large proportion of patients do not respond to therapy. Recent insights from evolutionary psychology suggest that, in addition to targeting the proximal causes of depression (for example, targeting dysfunctional beliefs by cognitive behavioral therapy), the distal or evolutionary causes (for example, inclusive fitness) should also be addressed. A randomized superiority trial is conducted to develop and test an evolutionary-driven cognitive therapy protocol for depression, and to compare its efficacy against standard cognitive therapy for depression. Romanian-speaking adults (18 years or older) with elevated Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores (>13), current diagnosis of major depressive disorder or major depressive episode (MDD or MDE), and MDD with comorbid dysthymia, as evaluated by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), are included in the study. Participants are randomized to one of two conditions: 1) evolutionary-driven cognitive therapy (ED-CT) or 2) cognitive therapy (CT). Both groups undergo 12 psychotherapy sessions, and data are collected at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and the 3-month follow-up. Primary outcomes are depressive symptomatology and a categorical diagnosis of depression post-treatment. This randomized trial compares the newly proposed ED-CT with a classic CT protocol for depression. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to integrate insights from evolutionary theories of depression into the treatment of this condition in a controlled manner. This study can thus add substantially to the body of knowledge on validated treatments for depression. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN64664414The trial was registered in June 2013. The first participant was enrolled on October 3, 2012.

  20. Perioperative Standard Oral Nutrition Supplements Versus Immunonutrition in Patients Undergoing Colorectal Resection in an Enhanced Recovery (ERAS) Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Pedro; Soriano-Irigaray, Leticia; Ramirez, Jose Manuel; Garcea, Alessandro; Blasco, Olga; Blanco, Francisco Javier; Brugiotti, Carlo; Miranda, Elena; Arroyo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare immunonutrition versus standard high calorie nutrition in patients undergoing elective colorectal resection within an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) program. Despite progress in recent years in the surgical management of patients with colorectal cancer (ERAS programs), postoperative complications are frequent. Nutritional supplements enriched with immunonutrients have recently been introduced into clinical practice. However, the extent to which the combination of ERAS protocols and immunonutrition benefits patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery is unknown. The SONVI study is a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial with 2 parallel treatment groups receiving either the study product (an immune-enhancing feed) or the control supplement (a hypercaloric hypernitrogenous supplement) for 7 days before colorectal resection and 5 days postoperatively. A total of 264 patients were randomized. At baseline, both groups were comparable in regards to age, sex, surgical risk, comorbidity, and analytical and nutritional parameters. The median length of the postoperative hospital stay was 5 days with no differences between the groups. A decrease in the total number of complications was observed in the immunonutrition group compared with the control group, primarily due to a significant decrease in infectious complications (23.8% vs. 10.7%, P = 0.0007). Of the infectious complications, wound infection differed significantly between the groups (16.4% vs. 5.7%, P = 0.0008). Other infectious complications were lower in the immunonutrition group but were not statistically significantly different. The implementation of ERAS protocols including immunonutrient-enriched supplements reduces the complications of patients undergoing colorectal resection. This study is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT02393976. PMID:27227930

  1. Proposal for the standardization of flow cytometry protocols to detect minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valério; Beltrame, Miriam Perlingeiro; Ferreira, Silvia Inês Alejandra Cordoba Pires; Souto, Elizabeth Xisto; Malvezzi, Mariester; Yamamoto, Mihoko

    2015-01-01

    Minimal residual disease is the most powerful predictor of outcome in acute leukemia and is useful in therapeutic stratification for acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocols. Nowadays, the most reliable methods for studying minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction. Both provide similar results at a minimal residual disease level of 0.01% of normal cells, that is, detection of one leukemic cell in up to 10,000 normal nucleated cells. Currently, therapeutic protocols establish the minimal residual disease threshold value at the most informative time points according to the appropriate methodology employed. The expertise of the laboratory in a cancer center or a cooperative group could be the most important factor in determining which method should be used. In Brazil, multiparametric flow cytometry laboratories are available in most leukemia treatment centers, but multiparametric flow cytometry processes must be standardized for minimal residual disease investigations in order to offer reliable and reproducible results that ensure quality in the clinical application of the method. The Minimal Residual Disease Working Group of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation (SBTMO) was created with that aim. This paper presents recommendations for the detection of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on the literature and expertise of the laboratories who participated in this consensus, including pre-analytical and analytical methods. This paper also recommends that both multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction are complementary methods, and so more laboratories with expertise in immunoglobulin/T cell receptor (Ig/TCR) gene assays are necessary in Brazil. PMID:26670404

  2. Evolutionary cognitive therapy versus standard cognitive therapy for depression: a protocol for a blinded, randomized, superiority clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is estimated to become the leading cause of disease burden globally by 2030. Despite existing efficacious treatments (both medical and psychotherapeutic), a large proportion of patients do not respond to therapy. Recent insights from evolutionary psychology suggest that, in addition to targeting the proximal causes of depression (for example, targeting dysfunctional beliefs by cognitive behavioral therapy), the distal or evolutionary causes (for example, inclusive fitness) should also be addressed. A randomized superiority trial is conducted to develop and test an evolutionary-driven cognitive therapy protocol for depression, and to compare its efficacy against standard cognitive therapy for depression. Methods/design Romanian-speaking adults (18 years or older) with elevated Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores (>13), current diagnosis of major depressive disorder or major depressive episode (MDD or MDE), and MDD with comorbid dysthymia, as evaluated by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), are included in the study. Participants are randomized to one of two conditions: 1) evolutionary-driven cognitive therapy (ED-CT) or 2) cognitive therapy (CT). Both groups undergo 12 psychotherapy sessions, and data are collected at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and the 3-month follow-up. Primary outcomes are depressive symptomatology and a categorical diagnosis of depression post-treatment. Discussion This randomized trial compares the newly proposed ED-CT with a classic CT protocol for depression. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to integrate insights from evolutionary theories of depression into the treatment of this condition in a controlled manner. This study can thus add substantially to the body of knowledge on validated treatments for depression. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN64664414 The trial was registered in June 2013. The first participant was enrolled on October 3, 2012. PMID

  3. Analysis of dental students' written peer feedback from a prospective peer assessment protocol.

    PubMed

    Tricio, J; Woolford, M; Escudier, M

    2016-11-01

    Peer assessment and feedback is encouraged to enhance students' learning. The aim of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively analyse pre-clinical and clinical dental students' written peer feedback provided as part of a continuous, formative and structured peer assessment protocol. A total of 309 Year-2 and Year-5 dental students were invited to participate in a peer assessment and peer feedback protocol. Consenting volunteer students were trained to observe each other whilst working in the skills laboratory (Year-2) and in the dental clinic (Year-5). Subsequently, they followed a structured protocol of peer assessment and peer feedback using specially designed work-based forms during a complete academic year. The content of their written feedback was coded according to the UK General Dental Council domain, sign (positive or negative), specificity (task specific or general), and grouped into themes. A total of 108 participants (40 Year-2 and 68 Year-5) completed 1169 peer assessment work-based forms (516 pre-clinical and 653 clinical); 94% contained written feedback. The large majority (82%) of Year-2 feedback represented the clinical domain, 89% were positive, 77% were task specific, and they were grouped into 14 themes. Year-5 feedback was related mostly to Management and Leadership (37%) and Communication (32%), 64% were positive, 75% task specific, and they were clustered into 24 themes. The content of the feedback showed notable differences between Year-2 and Year-5 students. Senior students focused more on Communication and Management and Leadership skills, whilst juniors were more concerned with clinical skills. Year-5 students provided 13% negative feedback compared to only 2% from Year-2. Regulatory focus theory is discussed to explain these differences. Both groups provided peer feedback on a wide and different range of themes. However, four themes emerged in both groups: efficiency, infection control, time management and working speed. A

  4. Brain collection, standardized neuropathologic assessment, and comorbidity in ADNI participants

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Erin E.; Perrin, Richard J.; Vincent, Benjamin; Baxter, Michael; Morris, John C.; Cairns, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Neuropathology Core (ADNI-NPC) facilitates brain donation, ensures standardized neuropathologic assessments, and maintains a tissue resource for research. Methods The ADNI-NPC coordinates with performance sites to promote autopsy consent, facilitate tissue collection and autopsy administration, and arrange sample delivery to the NPC, for assessment using NIA-AA neuropathologic diagnostic criteria. Results The ADNI-NPC has obtained 45 participant specimens and neuropathologic assessments have been completed in 36 to date. Challenges in obtaining consent at some sites have limited the voluntary autopsy rate to 58%. Among assessed cases, clinical diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer disease (AD) is 97%; however, 58% show neuropathologic comorbidities. Discussion Challenges facing autopsy consent and coordination are largely resource-related. The neuropathologic assessments indicate that ADNI’s clinical diagnostic accuracy for AD is high; however, many AD cases have comorbidities that may impact the clinical presentation, course, and imaging and biomarker results. These neuropathologic data permit multimodal and genetic studies of these comorbidities to improve diagnosis and provide etiologic insights. PMID:26194314

  5. Understanding Barriers to Evidence-Based Assessment: Clinician Attitudes toward Standardized Assessment Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen-Doss, Amanda; Hawley, Kristin M.

    2010-01-01

    In an era of evidence-based practice, why are clinicians not typically engaged in evidence-based assessment? To begin to understand this issue, a national multidisciplinary survey was conducted to examine clinician attitudes toward standardized assessment tools. There were 1,442 child clinicians who provided opinions about the psychometric…

  6. Understanding Barriers to Evidence-Based Assessment: Clinician Attitudes toward Standardized Assessment Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen-Doss, Amanda; Hawley, Kristin M.

    2010-01-01

    In an era of evidence-based practice, why are clinicians not typically engaged in evidence-based assessment? To begin to understand this issue, a national multidisciplinary survey was conducted to examine clinician attitudes toward standardized assessment tools. There were 1,442 child clinicians who provided opinions about the psychometric…

  7. Assessing Outside the Bubble: Performance Assessment for Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Jesica M.; Bristow, Lora J.; Coriell, Bryn P.; Jensen, Mark E.; Johnson, Leif E.; Luring, Sara R.; Lyons-Tinsley, Mary Ann; Mefford, Megan M.; Neu, Gwen L.; Samulski, Emerson T.; Warner, Timothy D.; White, Mathew F.

    2011-01-01

    The adoption of Common Core State Standards has increased the need for assessments capable of measuring more performance-based outcomes. This monograph brings together the current literature and resources for the development and implementation of performance assessment. The text was written as part of a project-based graduate course and has…

  8. Comparative assessment of three standardized robotic surgery training methods.

    PubMed

    Hung, Andrew J; Jayaratna, Isuru S; Teruya, Kara; Desai, Mihir M; Gill, Inderbir S; Goh, Alvin C

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate three standardized robotic surgery training methods, inanimate, virtual reality and in vivo, for their construct validity. To explore the concept of cross-method validity, where the relative performance of each method is compared. Robotic surgical skills were prospectively assessed in 49 participating surgeons who were classified as follows: 'novice/trainee': urology residents, previous experience <30 cases (n = 38) and 'experts': faculty surgeons, previous experience ≥30 cases (n = 11). Three standardized, validated training methods were used: (i) structured inanimate tasks; (ii) virtual reality exercises on the da Vinci Skills Simulator (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA); and (iii) a standardized robotic surgical task in a live porcine model with performance graded by the Global Evaluative Assessment of Robotic Skills (GEARS) tool. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to evaluate performance differences between novices and experts (construct validity). Spearman's correlation coefficient (ρ) was used to measure the association of performance across inanimate, simulation and in vivo methods (cross-method validity). Novice and expert surgeons had previously performed a median (range) of 0 (0-20) and 300 (30-2000) robotic cases, respectively (P < 0.001). Construct validity: experts consistently outperformed residents with all three methods (P < 0.001). Cross-method validity: overall performance of inanimate tasks significantly correlated with virtual reality robotic performance (ρ = -0.7, P < 0.001) and in vivo robotic performance based on GEARS (ρ = -0.8, P < 0.0001). Virtual reality performance and in vivo tissue performance were also found to be strongly correlated (ρ = 0.6, P < 0.001). We propose the novel concept of cross-method validity, which may provide a method of evaluating the relative value of various forms of skills education and assessment. We externally confirmed the construct validity of each featured training tool. © 2013 BJU

  9. Systematic Review Protocol to Assess the Effectiveness of Usability Questionnaires in mHealth App Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Leming; Bao, Jie; Parmanto, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    Usability questionnaires have a wide use in mobile health (mHealth) app usability studies. However, no systematic review has been conducted for assessing the effectiveness of these questionnaires. This paper describes a protocol for conducting a systematic review of published questionnaire-based mHealth app usability studies. In this systematic review, we will select recently published (2008-2017) articles from peer-reviewed journals and conferences that describe mHealth app usability studies and implement at least one usability questionnaire. The search strategy will include terms such as "mobile app" and "usability." Multiple databases such as PubMed, CINAHL, IEEE Xplore, ACM Digital Library, and INSPEC will be searched. There will be 2 independent reviewers in charge of screening titles and abstracts as well as determining those articles that should be included for a full-text review. The third reviewer will act as a mediator between the other 2 reviewers. Moreover, a data extraction form will be created and used during the full article data analysis. Notably, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines will be followed in reporting this protocol. A preliminary search produced 1271 articles, 40 of which are duplicate records. The inclusion-exclusion criteria are being strictly followed in performing the ongoing study selection. Usability questionnaires are an important tool in mHealth app usability studies. This review will summarize the usability questionnaires used in published research articles while assessing the efficacy of these questionnaires in determining the usability of mHealth apps.

  10. Systematic Review Protocol to Assess the Effectiveness of Usability Questionnaires in mHealth App Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jie; Parmanto, Bambang

    2017-01-01

    Background Usability questionnaires have a wide use in mobile health (mHealth) app usability studies. However, no systematic review has been conducted for assessing the effectiveness of these questionnaires. Objective This paper describes a protocol for conducting a systematic review of published questionnaire-based mHealth app usability studies. Methods In this systematic review, we will select recently published (2008-2017) articles from peer-reviewed journals and conferences that describe mHealth app usability studies and implement at least one usability questionnaire. The search strategy will include terms such as “mobile app” and “usability.” Multiple databases such as PubMed, CINAHL, IEEE Xplore, ACM Digital Library, and INSPEC will be searched. There will be 2 independent reviewers in charge of screening titles and abstracts as well as determining those articles that should be included for a full-text review. The third reviewer will act as a mediator between the other 2 reviewers. Moreover, a data extraction form will be created and used during the full article data analysis. Notably, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines will be followed in reporting this protocol. Results A preliminary search produced 1271 articles, 40 of which are duplicate records. The inclusion-exclusion criteria are being strictly followed in performing the ongoing study selection. Conclusions Usability questionnaires are an important tool in mHealth app usability studies. This review will summarize the usability questionnaires used in published research articles while assessing the efficacy of these questionnaires in determining the usability of mHealth apps. PMID:28765101

  11. Development and validation of a SYBR-Green I real-time PCR protocol to detect hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) in foods through calibration via plasmid reference standard.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Matteo; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Travaglia, Fabiano; Garino, Cristiano; Arlorio, Marco

    2009-12-09

    Many tree nuts are considered to be a serious problem in food safety, because of the presence of causative factors in IgE-mediated food allergies. Among these, hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) seeds are largely used in a range of confectionery products and contain many well-characterized allergens. DNA-based methods and ELISA tests may prove to be useful to assess the presence of hidden ingredients in foods. The aim of this work was the development and validation of a species-specific SYBR Green I real-time PCR protocol for the detection of hazelnut in foods. A novel efficient primer pair on the Cor a 8 genomic coding region was designed by preparing a plasmid vector-based internal reference standard to calibrate the PCR. A good sensitivity, down to 20 (genomic) and 15 (plasmid) DNA copies, was established. All of the commercial samples considered in our study (containing hazelnut as ingredient or as a potential trace cross-contamination) were effectively amplified by PCR, showing a perfect correspondence with an ELISA commercial test, employed as a reference standard method.

  12. Interviews for the assessment of long-term incapacity for work: a study on adherence to protocols and principles

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Wout EL; Wind, Haije; van Dijk, Frank JH; Willems, Han HBM

    2009-01-01

    Background Assessments for long-term incapacity for work are performed by Social Insurance Physicians (SIPs) who rely on interviews with claimants as an important part of the process. These interviews are susceptible to bias. In the Netherlands three protocols have been developed to conduct these interviews. These protocols are expert- and practice-based. We studied to what extent these protocols are adhered to by practitioners. Methods We compared the protocols with one another and with the ICF and the biopsychosocial approach. The protocols describe semi-structured interviews with comparable but not identical topics. All protocols prescribe that the client's opinion on his capacity for work, and his arguments, need to be determined and assessed. We developed a questionnaire to elicit the adherence SIPs have to the protocols, their underlying principles and topics. We conducted a survey among one hundred fifty-five experienced SIPs in the Netherlands. Results Ninety-eight SIPs responded (64%). All respondents used some form of protocol, either one of the published protocols or their own mix. We found no significant relation between training and the use of a particular protocol. Ninety percent use a semi-structured interview. Ninety-five percent recognise having to verify what the claimant says and eighty-three percent feel the need to establish a good relation (p = 0.019). Twelve topics are basically always addressed by over eighty percent of the respondents. The claimant's opinion of being fit for his own work or other work, and his claim of incapacity and his health arguments for that claim, reach a hundred percent. Description of claimants' previous work reaches ninety-nine percent. Conclusion Our study shows professional consensus among experienced Dutch SIPs about the principle of assessment on arguments, the principle of conducting a semi-structured interview and the most crucial interview topics. This consensus can be used to further develop a protocol for

  13. Interviews for the assessment of long-term incapacity for work: a study on adherence to protocols and principles.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Wout E L; Wind, Haije; van Dijk, Frank J H; Willems, Han H B M

    2009-06-02

    Assessments for long-term incapacity for work are performed by Social Insurance Physicians (SIPs) who rely on interviews with claimants as an important part of the process. These interviews are susceptible to bias. In the Netherlands three protocols have been developed to conduct these interviews. These protocols are expert- and practice-based. We studied to what extent these protocols are adhered to by practitioners. We compared the protocols with one another and with the ICF and the biopsychosocial approach. The protocols describe semi-structured interviews with comparable but not identical topics. All protocols prescribe that the client's opinion on his capacity for work, and his arguments, need to be determined and assessed. We developed a questionnaire to elicit the adherence SIPs have to the protocols, their underlying principles and topics. We conducted a survey among one hundred fifty-five experienced SIPs in the Netherlands. Ninety-eight SIPs responded (64%). All respondents used some form of protocol, either one of the published protocols or their own mix. We found no significant relation between training and the use of a particular protocol. Ninety percent use a semi-structured interview. Ninety-five percent recognise having to verify what the claimant says and eighty-three percent feel the need to establish a good relation (p = 0.019). Twelve topics are basically always addressed by over eighty percent of the respondents. The claimant's opinion of being fit for his own work or other work, and his claim of incapacity and his health arguments for that claim, reach a hundred percent. Description of claimants' previous work reaches ninety-nine percent. Our study shows professional consensus among experienced Dutch SIPs about the principle of assessment on arguments, the principle of conducting a semi-structured interview and the most crucial interview topics. This consensus can be used to further develop a protocol for interviewing in the assessment of

  14. Establishment of a Universal Size Standard Strain for Use with the PulseNet Standardized Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Protocols: Converting the National Databases to the New Size Standard

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Susan B.; Vauterin, Paul; Lambert-Fair, Mary Ann; Van Duyne, M. Susan; Kubota, Kristy; Graves, Lewis; Wrigley, Donna; Barrett, Timothy; Ribot, Efrain

    2005-01-01

    The PulseNet National Database, established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1996, consists of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns obtained from isolates of food-borne pathogens (currently Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Shigella, and Listeria) and textual information about the isolates. Electronic images and accompanying text are submitted from over 60 U.S. public health and food regulatory agency laboratories. The PFGE patterns are generated according to highly standardized PFGE protocols. Normalization and accurate comparison of gel images require the use of a well-characterized size standard in at least three lanes of each gel. Originally, a well-characterized strain of each organism was chosen as the reference standard for that particular database. The increasing number of databases, difficulty in identifying an organism-specific standard for each database, the increased range of band sizes generated by the use of additional restriction endonucleases, and the maintenance of many different organism-specific strains encouraged us to search for a more versatile and universal DNA size marker. A Salmonella serotype Braenderup strain (H9812) was chosen as the universal size standard. This strain was subjected to rigorous testing in our laboratories to ensure that it met the desired criteria, including coverage of a wide range of DNA fragment sizes, even distribution of bands, and stability of the PFGE pattern. The strategy used to convert and compare data generated by the new and old reference standards is described. PMID:15750058

  15. Positive animal welfare states and reference standards for welfare assessment.

    PubMed

    Mellor, D J

    2015-01-01

    Developments in affective neuroscience and behavioural science during the last 10-15 years have together made it increasingly apparent that sentient animals are potentially much more sensitive to their environmental and social circumstances than was previously thought to be the case. It therefore seems likely that both the range and magnitude of welfare trade-offs that occur when animals are managed for human purposes have been underestimated even when minimalistic but arguably well-intentioned attempts have been made to maintain high levels of welfare. In light of these neuroscience-supported behaviour-based insights, the present review considers the extent to which the use of currently available reference standards might draw attention to these previously neglected areas of concern. It is concluded that the natural living orientation cannot provide an all-embracing or definitive welfare benchmark because of its primary focus on behavioural freedom. However assessments of this type, supported by neuroscience insights into behavioural motivation, may now carry greater weight when used to identify management practices that should be avoided, discontinued or substantially modified. Using currently accepted baseline standards as welfare reference points may result in small changes being accorded greater significance than would be the case if they were compared with higher standards, and this could slow the progress towards better levels of welfare. On the other hand, using "what animals want" as a reference standard has the appeal of focusing on the specific resources or conditions the animals would choose themselves and can potentially improve their welfare more quickly than the approach of making small increments above baseline standards. It is concluded that the cautious use of these approaches in different combinations could lead to recommendations that would more effectively promote positive welfare states in hitherto neglected areas of concern.

  16. The K-nearest neighbor algorithm predicted rehabilitation potential better than current Clinical Assessment Protocol.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mu; Chen, Wenhong; Hirdes, John P; Stolee, Paul

    2007-10-01

    There may be great potential for using computer-modeling techniques and machine-learning algorithms in clinical decision making, if these can be shown to produce results superior to clinical protocols currently in use. We aim to explore the potential to use an automatic, data-driven, machine-learning algorithm in clinical decision making. Using a database containing comprehensive health assessment information (the interRAI-HC) on home care clients (N=24,724) from eight community-care regions in Ontario, Canada, we compare the performance of the K-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm and a Clinical Assessment Protocol (the "ADLCAP") currently used to predict rehabilitation potential. For our purposes, we define a patient as having rehabilitation potential if the patient had functional improvement or remained at home over a follow-up period of approximately 1 year. The KNN algorithm has a lower false positive rate in all but one of the eight regions in the sample, and lower false negative rates in all regions. Compared using likelihood ratio statistics, KNN is uniformly more informative than the ADLCAP. This article illustrates the potential for a machine-learning algorithm to enhance clinical decision making.

  17. Using a Smartphone-Based Ecological Momentary Assessment Protocol With Community Dwelling Older African Americans.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Heather; Tarraf, Wassim; Saleh, Dan J; Cutchin, Malcolm P

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the feasibility of smartphone-based Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) approaches to collect psychosocial data from older populations, especially disadvantaged older populations. In response to this gap, this report provides evidence of the feasibility and utility of a smartphone-based EMA approach for real-time assessment with older African Americans. In addition, we share lessons learned about how to improve utility. Ninety-seven older African Americans ages 55 and older (range: 55-95 years) used an Android smartphone loaded with an EMA application to provide data about their everyday activities and stress four times per day for seven consecutive days. Exit interviews early in the study suggested enhancements to the EMA interface. Adherence was demonstrated with response completion rates of 92-98% on EMA measures and no participant attrition based on the EMA protocol. Our findings suggest using a smartphone-based EMA approach for data collection is feasible and has utility with older African Americans. We most likely enhanced adherence by testing, training, monitoring, and adapting the EMA protocol using input from older adults early in the EMA design process.

  18. Preoperative vestibular assessment protocol of cochlear implant surgery: an analytical descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Sato, Eduardo Setsuo; Ribeiro, Douglas Jósimo Silva; Tsuji, Robinson Koji

    Cochlear implants are undeniably an effective method for the recovery of hearing function in patients with hearing loss. To describe the preoperative vestibular assessment protocol in subjects who will be submitted to cochlear implants. Our institutional protocol provides the vestibular diagnosis through six simple tests: Romberg and Fukuda tests, assessment for spontaneous nystagmus, Head Impulse Test, evaluation for Head Shaking Nystagmus and caloric test. 21 patients were evaluated with a mean age of 42.75±14.38 years. Only 28% of the sample had all normal test results. The presence of asymmetric vestibular information was documented through the caloric test in 32% of the sample and spontaneous nystagmus was an important clue for the diagnosis. Bilateral vestibular areflexia was present in four subjects, unilateral arreflexia in three and bilateral hyporeflexia in two. The Head Impulse Test was a significant indicator for the diagnosis of areflexia in the tested ear (p=0.0001). The sensitized Romberg test using a foam pad was able to diagnose severe vestibular function impairment (p=0.003). The six clinical tests were able to identify the presence or absence of vestibular function and function asymmetry between the ears of the same individual. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Standard portrait image and image quality assessment: II. Triplet comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Keiichi; Kanafusa, Kunihiko; Umemoto, Hiroshi; Takemura, Kazuhiko; Urabe, Hitoshi; Hirai, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo; Hatada, Toyohiko

    2000-12-01

    We have already proposed a standard portrait for the assessment of preferable skin tone. The present report describes a psycho physical experimental method, i.e., simultaneous triplet comparison that has been developed for the assessment of skin tone by using the portrait and that is characterized not only by a scalability, stability and reproducibility of the resulting scale values, but also by a reduce stress on observers. We have confirmed that the present simultaneous triplet comparison has a degree of scalability and stability almost equivalent to that of paired comparison that is most widely used for similar purposes, and that the stress on observers is about half as much as that of paired comparison.

  20. Application of spreadsheets to standardize transportation radiological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, J.D.; Neuhauser, K.S.; Smith, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    Because of the complexity, volume of data and calculations required, one preferred analytical tool to perform transportation risk assessments is the RADTRAN computer code. RADTRAN combines user-determined material, packaging, transportation, demographic and meteorological factors, with health physics data to calculate expected radiological consequences and accident risk from transporting radioactive materials by all commercial modes including truck, rail, ship, air and barge. The computer code consists of two major modules for each transport mode: the incident-free module, in which doses from normal transport are calculated; and the accident module, in which dose consequences and probabilities are evaluated to generate risk estimates. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development of a standardized procedure to perform transportation radiological risk assessments employing conventional spreadsheet programs to automate generation of RADTRAN input files and post-processing analysis of the resulting output.

  1. State trends in ecological risk assessment and standard setting

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M R; Fowler, K M; Bilyard, G R

    1993-02-01

    The purposes of this paper are (1) to identify key states' activities and plans related to setting cleanup standards using the ecological risk assessment process, and (2) to discuss the impacts these actions may have on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) environmental restoration program. This report is prepared as part of a larger task, the purpose of which is to identify and assess state regulatory trends and legal developments that may impact DOE's environmental restoration program. Results of this task are intended to provide DOE with advance notice of potentially significant regulatory developments so as to enhance DOE's ability to influence these developments and to incorporate possible regulatory and policy changes into its planning process.

  2. Reliability assessment at airline inspection facilities. Volume 2: Protocol for an eddy current inspection reliability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Floyd; Borgonovi, Giancarlo; Roach, Dennis; Schurman, Don; Smith, Ron

    1993-05-01

    The Aging Aircraft NDI Development and Demonstration Center (AANC) at Sandia National Laboratories is charged by the FAA to support technology transfer, technology assessment, and technology validation. A key task facing the center is the establishment of a consistent and systematic methodology to assess the reliability of inspections through field experiments. This task is divided into three major areas: reliability of eddy current lap splice inspections at transport aircraft maintenance facilities; reliability of inspection at commuter aircraft maintenance facilities; and reliability of inspection associated with visual inspection of aircraft structural parts. Volume 2 is the second document in a series of three describing the planning, execution, and results of an eddy current inspection field experiment. This document provides a detailed description of the experimental hardware and protocols. It also describes the methodology to be used in the analysis of the data.

  3. Proposal and content validation of an orofacial myofunctional assessment protocol for individuals with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Andréia Fernandes; Fukushiro, Ana Paula; Genaro, Katia Flores

    2015-01-01

    To create and validate the content of an orofacial myofunctional assessment protocol for individuals with cleft lip and palate. The first version of an orofacial myofunctional assessment protocol for individuals with cleft lip and palate was created by two speech-language pathologists, who contemplated the structural and functional aspects of the stomatognathic system. This version was analyzed by other two speech-language pathologists experienced in cleft lip and palate assessment, who suggested changes that led to the second version of the protocol. Dynamic and static images necessary for performing the orofacial myofunctional examination were recorded from three individuals with cleft lip and palate, who represented three life stages: childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Five examiners evaluated the images, applied the proposed protocol, and judged each item regarding its clarity to validate the content, from Content Validity Index. The assessment protocol was finalized with 13 items, ten related to structural aspects and three related to functional aspects, with their corresponding sub-items. The general agreement in the validation of its content was 100%, so that only one stage was required. A protocol to evaluate the orofacial myofunctional aspects of individuals with cleft lip and palate was created with 13 items, as well as their corresponding sub-items, and its content was validated.

  4. Standardized assessment of infrared thermographic fever screening system performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Pfefer, Joshua; Casamento, Jon; Wang, Quanzeng

    2017-03-01

    Thermal modalities represent the only currently viable mass fever screening approach for outbreaks of infectious disease pandemics such as Ebola and SARS. Non-contact infrared thermometers (NCITs) and infrared thermographs (IRTs) have been previously used for mass fever screening in transportation hubs such as airports to reduce the spread of disease. While NCITs remain a more popular choice for fever screening in the field and at fixed locations, there has been increasing evidence in the literature that IRTs can provide greater accuracy in estimating core body temperature if appropriate measurement practices are applied - including the use of technically suitable thermographs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a battery of evaluation test methods for standardized, objective and quantitative assessment of thermograph performance characteristics critical to assessing suitability for clinical use. These factors include stability, drift, uniformity, minimum resolvable temperature difference, and accuracy. Two commercial IRT models were characterized. An external temperature reference source with high temperature accuracy was utilized as part of the screening thermograph. Results showed that both IRTs are relatively accurate and stable (<1% error of reading with stability of +/-0.05°C). Overall, results of this study may facilitate development of standardized consensus test methods to enable consistent and accurate use of IRTs for fever screening.

  5. Involuntary reflexive pelvic floor muscle training in addition to standard training versus standard training alone for women with stress urinary incontinence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Luginbuehl, Helena; Lehmann, Corinne; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Kuhn, Annette; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2015-11-17

    Pelvic floor muscle training is effective and recommended as first-line therapy for female patients with stress urinary incontinence. However, standard pelvic floor physiotherapy concentrates on voluntary contractions even though the situations provoking stress urinary incontinence (for example, sneezing, coughing, running) require involuntary fast reflexive pelvic floor muscle contractions. Training procedures for involuntary reflexive muscle contractions are widely implemented in rehabilitation and sports but not yet in pelvic floor rehabilitation. Therefore, the research group developed a training protocol including standard physiotherapy and in addition focused on involuntary reflexive pelvic floor muscle contractions. The aim of the planned study is to compare this newly developed physiotherapy program (experimental group) and the standard physiotherapy program (control group) regarding their effect on stress urinary incontinence. The working hypothesis is that the experimental group focusing on involuntary reflexive muscle contractions will have a higher improvement of continence measured by the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence (short form), and - regarding secondary and tertiary outcomes - higher pelvic floor muscle activity during stress urinary incontinence provoking activities, better pad-test results, higher quality of life scores (International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire) and higher intravaginal muscle strength (digitally tested) from before to after the intervention phase. This study is designed as a prospective, triple-blinded (participant, investigator, outcome assessor), randomized controlled trial with two physiotherapy intervention groups with a 6-month follow-up including 48 stress urinary incontinent women per group. For both groups the intervention will last 16 weeks and will include 9 personal physiotherapy consultations and 78 short home training sessions (weeks 1

  6. Genotoxicity assessment of mouse oocytes by comet assay before vitrification and after warming with three vitrification protocols.

    PubMed

    Berthelot-Ricou, Anais; Perrin, Jeanne; di Giorgio, Carole; de Meo, Michel; Botta, Alain; Courbiere, Blandine

    2013-09-01

    To assess the genotoxicity of three oocyte vitrification protocols. Murine assay. Biogenotoxicology research laboratory. CD1 female mice. Three mouse oocyte groups were exposed to three commercialized human oocyte vitrification protocols. Protocols 1 and 2 contained dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol (EG), and protocol 3 contained EG and 1,2-propanediol (PrOH). DNA damage was first evaluated by comet assay after oocyte exposure to the three different equilibration and vitrification solutions. Comet assay was also performed after full vitrification and warming procedure and compared with a negative control group (oocytes stored in medium culture only) and a positive control group (oocytes exposed to hydrogen peroxide just before comet assay). DNA damage was quantified as Olive tail moment (OTM). Statistical analysis consisted of a Shapiro-Wilk test. Then, median protocol OTM was compared with the negative control group with the Mann-Whitney U test. The difference was considered to be statistically significant if the P value was <.05. In both parts of our study, protocols 1 and 2 did not induce significant DNA damage, whereas protocol 3 induced statistically higher DNA damage compared with the negative control group. Vitrification protocols containing PrOH induced significant DNA damage on mouse oocytes, both before cooling and after warming. Therefore, for the moment, we prefer vitrification techniques without PrOH while we await more studies on PrOH toxicity and long-term evaluation. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Different thresholds of myocardial ischemia in ramp and standard bruce protocol exercise tests in patients with positive exercise stress tests and angiographically demonstrated coronary arterial narrowing.

    PubMed

    Noël, Martin; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul; Dagenais, Gilles R; Bogaty, Peter

    2007-04-01

    Gradual instead of abrupt increases in workload favor a more physiologic response in terms of hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. Therefore, we investigated whether myocardial ischemia is attenuated with a ramp compared with a standard Bruce exercise protocol in patients with coronary artery disease. We compared electrocardiographic ischemic parameters on the standard Bruce protocol treadmill and the individualized ergocycle ramp protocol in 18 men with coronary artery disease and a reproducible ischemic electrocardiographic exercise test. Oxygen consumption (VO2), ischemic threshold (rate-pressure product [RPP]=systolic blood pressure x heart rate at 1-mm ST-segment depression), and maximum ST-segment depression corresponding to the highest RPP common to the 2 tests were determined. Ischemic threshold was higher with the ramp than with the Bruce protocol (23,420+/-5,732 vs 20,018+/-3,542 beats.min/mm Hg, p=0.007). Peak RPP was higher during the ramp than during the Bruce protocol (28,492+/-6,450 vs 25,519+/-6,067 beats.min/mm Hg, respectively, p=0.02) despite similar peak VO2 (25.59+/-5.05 vs 26.39+/-4.65 mlO2.kg-1.min-1, respectively, p=0.6). Maximum ST-segment depression corresponding to the highest RPP common to the 2 tests was less with the ramp than with the Bruce protocol (-1.2+/-0.9 vs -1.9+/-0.7 mm, p=0.003). In conclusion, exercise-induced myocardial ischemia is markedly attenuated on the more gradually increasing workload of the individualized ramp ergocycle compared with the standard Bruce treadmill protocol. This effect is unexplained by energy expenditure (VO2) or myocardial work (RPP) and is consistent with a "warm-up" ischemic mechanism.

  8. Pig welfare assessment: development of a protocol and its use by veterinary undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Wright, Angela J; Powney, Sonya L; Nevel, Amanda; Wathes, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to teaching welfare assessment is described and has been used with two cohorts of first-year veterinary undergraduates (totaling 515 students). The welfare assessment protocol was devised and trialed using pigs as an exemplar, but its principles are applicable to other species. A robust learning scheme was created, comprising didactic teaching, interactive seminars, practical hands-on training, and computer-based learning. Practical training included a formative virtual assessment of clinical signs of health and welfare using Questionmark Perception, which improved the students' performance significantly. Validation studies are being carried out to establish if acceptable levels of inter-observer variability can be achieved by students conducting on-farm assessments of pig welfare during their extramural studies program. The resulting assessments of welfare will be analyzed in a cross-sectional epidemiological study to identify risk factors for good and poor welfare, and the results will be fed back to participating farmers. This new approach enables veterinary students to learn key transferable skills in the early stages of their education and provides a strong grounding in a holistic approach to animal welfare.

  9. Very Low Intravenous Contrast Volume Protocol for Computed Tomography Angiography Providing Comprehensive Cardiac and Vascular Assessment Prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pulerwitz, Todd C.; Khalique, Omar K.; Nazif, Tamim N.; Rozenshtein, Anna; Pearson, Gregory D.N.; Hahn, Rebecca T.; Vahl, Torsten P.; Kodali, Susheel K.; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B.; D'Souza, Belinda; Po, Ming Jack; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a lifesaving procedure for many patients high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high in this population, and thus a very low contrast volume (VLCV) computed tomography angiography (CTA) protocol providing comprehensive cardiac and vascular imaging would be valuable. Methods 52 patients with severe, symptomatic aortic valve disease, undergoing pre-TAVR CTA assessment from 2013-4 at Columbia University Medical Center were studied, including all 26 patients with CKD (eGFR<30mL/min) who underwent a novel VLCV protocol (20mL of iohexol at 2.5mL/s), and 26 standard-contrast-volume (SCV) protocol patients. Using a 320-slice volumetric scanner, the protocol included ECG-gated volume scanning of the aortic root followed by medium-pitch helical vascular scanning through the femoral arteries. Two experienced cardiologists performed aortic annulus and root measurements. Vascular image quality was assessed by two radiologists using a 4-point scale. Results VLCV patients had mean(±SD) age 86±6.5, BMI 23.9±3.4 kg/m2 with 54% men; SCV patients age 83±8.8, BMI 28.7±5.3 kg/m2, 65% men. There was excellent intra- and inter-observer agreement for annular and root measurements, and excellent agreement with 3D-transesophageal echocardiographic measurements. Both radiologists found diagnostic-quality vascular imaging in 96% of VLCV and 100% of SCV cases, with excellent inter-observer agreement. Conclusions This study is the first of its kind to report the feasibility and reproducibility of measurements for a VLCV protocol for comprehensive pre-TAVR CTA. There was excellent agreement of cardiac measurements and almost all studies were diagnostic quality for vascular access assessment. PMID:27061253

  10. The first Australian nurse practitioner census: A protocol to guide standardized collection of information about an emergent professional group.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Sandy; Gardner, Glenn; Gardner, Anne; Della, Phillip; Gibb, Michelle; Millar, Lynne

    2010-10-01

    Internationally, collection of reliable data on new and evolving health-care roles is crucial. We describe a protocol for design and administration of a national census of an emergent health-care role, namely nurse practitioners in Australia using databases held by regulatory authorities. A questionnaire was developed to obtain data on the role and scope of practice of Australian nurse practitioners. Our tool comprised five sections and included a total of 56 questions, using 28 existing items from the National Nursing and Midwifery Labour Force Census and nine items recommended in the Nurse Practitioner Workforce Planning Minimum Data Set. Australian Nurse Registering Authorities (n = 6) distributed the survey on our behalf. This paper outlines our instrument and methods. The survey was administered to 238 authorized Australian nurse practitioners (85% response rate). Rigorous collection of standardized items will ensure health policy is informed by reliable and valid data. We will re-administer the survey 2 years following the first survey to measure change over time. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Experimental model of tooth movement in mice: a standardized protocol for studying bone remodeling under compression and tensile strains.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Silvana Rodrigues de Albuquerque; Moura, Adriana Pedrosa; Andrade, Ildeu; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Garlet, Thiago Pompermaier; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2012-11-15

    During orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), alveolar bone is resorbed by osteoclasts in compression sites (CS) and is deposited by osteoblasts in tension sites (TS). The aim of this study was to develop a standardized OTM protocol in mice and to investigate the expression of bone resorption and deposition markers in