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Sample records for standardized endoskeleton-including hip

  1. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  2. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  3. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  4. Hip Arthroplasty in Obese Patients: Rising Prevalence–Standard Procedures?

    PubMed Central

    Skutek, Michael; Wirries, Nils; von Lewinski, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    We examined our experience and, in particular, complications associated with total hip arthroplasty in obese and morbidly obese patients. We prospectively gathered 50 patients in a matched control series including 25 obese and morbidly obese patients. All patients were operated using the direct lateral approach and standard postoperative protocols. Operating room time, complications, dislocations, blood loss, cup position and clinical parameters using the Harris Hip Score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index results were compared. Although there were some significant differences in clinical outcomes, standard procedures yielded good overall results and an acceptable rate of complications. Details approaching this patient entity are being discussed. PMID:27433302

  5. Hip Arthroplasty in Obese Patients: Rising Prevalence-Standard Procedures?

    PubMed

    Skutek, Michael; Wirries, Nils; von Lewinski, Gabriela

    2016-06-27

    We examined our experience and, in particular, complications associated with total hip arthroplasty in obese and morbidly obese patients. We prospectively gathered 50 patients in a matched control series including 25 obese and morbidly obese patients. All patients were operated using the direct lateral approach and standard postoperative protocols. Operating room time, complications, dislocations, blood loss, cup position and clinical parameters using the Harris Hip Score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index results were compared. Although there were some significant differences in clinical outcomes, standard procedures yielded good overall results and an acceptable rate of complications. Details approaching this patient entity are being discussed. PMID:27433302

  6. A preliminary biomechanical study of a novel carbon-fibre hip implant versus standard metallic hip implants.

    PubMed

    Bougherara, Habiba; Zdero, Rad; Dubov, Anton; Shah, Suraj; Khurshid, Shaheen; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2011-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a widespread surgical approach for treating severe osteoarthritis of the human hip. Aseptic loosening of standard metallic hip implants due to stress shielding and bone loss has motivated the development of new materials for hip prostheses. Numerically, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model that mimicked hip implants was used to compare a new hip stem to two commercially available implants. The hip implants simulated were a novel CF/PA12 carbon-fibre polyamide-based composite hip stem, the Exeter hip stem (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ, USA), and the Omnifit Eon (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ, USA). A virtual axial load of 3 kN was applied to the FE model. Strain and stress distributions were computed. Experimentally, the three hip stems had their distal portions rigidly mounted and had strain gauges placed along the surface at 3 medial and 3 lateral locations. Axial loads of 3 kN were applied. Measurements of axial stiffness and strain were taken and compared to FE analysis. The overall linear correlation between FE model versus experimental strains showed reasonable results for the lines-of-best-fit for the Composite (Pearson R(2)=0.69, slope=0.82), Exeter (Pearson R(2)=0.78, slope=0.59), and Omnifit (Pearson R(2)=0.66, slope=0.45), with some divergence for the most distal strain locations. From FE analysis, the von Mises stress range for the Composite stem was much lower than that in the Omnifit and Exeter implants by 200% and 45%, respectively. The preliminary experiments showed that the Composite stem stiffness (1982 N/mm) was lower than the metallic hip stem stiffnesses (Exeter, 2460 N/mm; Omnifit, 2543 N/mm). This is the first assessment of stress, strain, and stiffness of the CF/PA12 carbon-fibre hip stem compared to standard commercially-available devices.

  7. Mid-term clinical results of total hip arthroplasty using a Wagner standard cup for dysplastic hip

    PubMed Central

    Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Nozawa, Masahiko; Yuasa, Takahito; Aritomi, Kentaro; Ogawa, Seiki; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty depends on many factors. We must not forget fundamental things those are design of outer surface of the component, that leads bone ingrowth into the prosthesis, better initial stability, and better insertional techniques. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty with a Wagner standard cup for patients who had acetabular dysplasia. Patients and methods Fifty-four patients with 55 hips underwent primary metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (Metasul prosthesis) with a Wagner standard cup (44–48 mm in outer diameter) and were followed for a minimum of 10 years. All patients received the same type of cementless femoral component (Natural hip stem) and femoral head (28 mm in diameter). Results Seventeen of the 55 Wagner standard cups (30.9%) showed aseptic loosening over a mean period of 3.6 years after surgery, and there were no bone anchors on the outer surface of the 16 retrieved cups. Conclusion From our experience, the small Wagner standard cup does not achieve sufficient osteointegration and we do not recommend the use of this cup, especially for patients with acetabular dysplasia and/or those with a small stature. PMID:25561751

  8. Minimal-invasive posterior approach for total hip arthroplasty versus standard lateral approach.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Iris; Haas, Holger; Adams, Tim S; Szalay, Gabor; Klein, Heiko; Kordelle, Jens

    2011-08-01

    In this prospective study we compared clinical and radiological results and rehabilitation progress of 64 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty using the standard lateral approach with 64 patients operated with a minimal-invasive (MIS) posterior approach. The outcome of our study did not show any significant differences with regard to patient's safety such as complication rate and radiological assessment of the cup position. There was no difference in the duration of surgery, blood loss, hospital stay and postoperative leg length discrepancy. Rehabilitation milestones were achieved earlier by MIS patients and three and six months postoperatively, the Harris Hip Score of the MIS group was significantly higher.

  9. Isolation of immunomodulatory triterpene acids from a standardized rose hip powder (Rosa canina L.).

    PubMed

    Saaby, Lasse; Jäger, Anna Katharina; Moesby, Lise; Hansen, Erik Wind; Christensen, Søren Brøgger

    2011-02-01

    A previously published systematic review and a metaanalysis have concluded that the consumption of standardized rose hip powder (Rosa canina L.) can reduce pain in osteoarthritis patients. Synovial inflammation has been suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and mainly to involve infiltration of the synovial membrane by macrophages. Therefore, the immunomodulatory effect of standardized rose hip powder of Rosa canina L. was investigated and active principles isolated using the Mono Mac 6 cell line as a model for human macrophages. Treatment of Mono Mac 6 cells with the residue of a crude dichloromethane extract of rose hip powder significantly and concentration dependently inhibited the lipopolysaccharide induced interleukin-6 release. Through bioassay-guided fractionation the immunomodulatory effect of the dichloromethane extract was correlated to a mixture of three triterpene acids; oleanolic acid, betulinic acid and ursolic acid (IC(50) 21 ± 6 µm). Further studies revealed that only oleanolic acid and ursolic acid, but not betulinic acid, could inhibit the lipopolysaccharide induced interleukin-6 release from Mono Mac 6 cells when tested separately. Combination of either oleanolic acid or ursolic acid with betulinic acid enhanced the immunomodulatory effect of the two triterpene acids.

  10. Standard Transgluteal versus Minimal Invasive Anterior Approach in hip Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Consecutive Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ilchmann, Thomas; Gersbach, Silke; Zwicky, Lukas; Clauss, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A minimally invasive anterior approach (MIS) was compared to a standard lateral approach in primary total hip arthroplasty. Clinical and radiological outcomes were analyzed 6 weeks, 12 weeks, one year and two years after surgery. The duration of surgery was longer, mobility one week after surgery was better and time of hospitalization was shorter for minimally invasive-treated patients. They had less pain during movement, limping, better Harris Hip Score and satisfaction after 6 weeks, which remained after 12 weeks and 1 year, but not after two years. There were two deep infections in the MIS group. Radiological results were not affected. The infections might be a point of concern, but there were no other disadvantages of the MIS approach. In fact, early rehabilitation was facilitated and clinical results were improved. Our results encourage the continuous use of the MIS anterior approach instead of the lateral approach. PMID:24416475

  11. Reproducibility of Acetabular Landmarks and a Standardized Coordinate System Obtained from 3D Hip Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Mabee, Myles; Dulai, Sukhdeep; Thompson, Richard B; Jaremko, Jacob L

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound detection of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is limited by variation in acetabular appearance and alpha angle measurements, which change with position of the ultrasound probe. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound captures the entire acetabular shape, and a reproducible "standard central plane" may be generated, from two landmarks located on opposite ends of the acetabulum, for measurement of alpha angle and other indices. Two users identified landmarks on 51 3D ultrasounds, with ranging severity of disease, and inter- and intra-observer reproducibility of landmark and "standard plane" locations was compared; landmarks were chosen within 2 mm, and the "standard plane" rotation was reproducible within 10° between observers. We observed no difference in variability between alpha angles measured on the "standard plane" in comparison with 2D ultrasound. Applications of the standardized 3D ultrasound central plane will be to fuse serial ultrasounds for follow-up and development of new indices of 3D deformity. PMID:25394808

  12. Survivorship of standard versus modified posterior surgical approaches in metal-on-metal hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    M. Takamura, K.; Maher, P.; Nath, T.; Su, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOMHR) is available as an alternative option for younger, more active patients. There are failure modes that are unique to MOMHR, which include loosening of the femoral head and fractures of the femoral neck. Previous studies have speculated that changes in the vascularity of the femoral head may contribute to these failure modes. This study compares the survivorship between the standard posterior approach (SPA) and modified posterior approach (MPA) in MOMHR. Methods A retrospective clinical outcomes study was performed examining 351 hips (279 male, 72 female) replaced with Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR, Smith and Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) in 313 patients with a pre-operative diagnosis of osteoarthritis. The mean follow-up period for the SPA group was 2.8 years (0.1 to 6.1) and for the MPA, 2.2 years (0.03 to 5.2); this difference in follow-up period was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Survival analysis was completed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results At four years, the Kaplan–Meier survival curve for the SPA was 97.2% and 99.4% for the MPA; this was statistically significant (log-rank; p = 0.036). There were eight failures in the SPA and two in the MPA. There was a 3.5% incidence of femoral head collapse or loosening in the SPA and 0.4% in the MPA, which represented a significant difference (p = 0.041). There was a 1.7% incidence of fractures of the femoral neck in the SPA and none in the MPA (p = 0.108). Conclusion This study found a significant difference in survivorship at four years between the SPA and the MPA (p = 0.036). The clinical outcomes of this study suggest that preserving the vascularity of the femoral neck by using the MPA results in fewer vascular-related failures in MOMHRs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:150–4 PMID:24842931

  13. Superior effect of forceful compared with standard traction mobilizations in hip disability?

    PubMed

    Vaarbakken, Kjartan; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2007-09-01

    THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO COMPARE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO COMPILED PHYSIOTHERAPY PROGRAMS: one including forceful traction mobilizations, the other including traction with unknown force, in patients with hip disability according to ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001; WHO), using a block randomized, controlled trial with two parallel treatment groups in a regular private outpatient physiotherapy practice. In the experimental group (E; n = 10) and control group (C; n = 9), the mean (+/-SD) age for all participants was 59 +/- 12 years. They were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, had persistent pain located at the hip joint for >8 weeks and hip hypomobility. Both groups received exercise, information and manual traction mobilization. In E, the traction force was progressed to 800 N, whereas in C it was unknown. Major outcome measure was the median total change score >/=20 points or >/=50% of the disease- and joint-specific Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), compiled of Pain, Stiffness, Function and Hip-related quality of life (ranging 0-100). The mean (range) treatments received were 13 (7-16) over 5-12 weeks and 20 (18-24) over 12 weeks for E and C, respectively. The experimental group showed superior clinical post-treatment effect on HOOS (>/=20 points), in six of 10 participants compared with none of nine in the control group (p = 0.011). The effect size was 1.1. The results suggest that a compiled physiotherapy program including forceful traction mobilizations are short-term effective in reducing self-rated hip disability in primary healthcare. The long-term effect is to be documented.

  14. Superior effect of forceful compared with standard traction mobilizations in hip disability?

    PubMed Central

    Vaarbakken, Kjartan; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two compiled physiotherapy programs: one including forceful traction mobilizations, the other including traction with unknown force, in patients with hip disability according to ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001; WHO), using a block randomized, controlled trial with two parallel treatment groups in a regular private outpatient physiotherapy practice. In the experimental group (E; n = 10) and control group (C; n = 9), the mean (±SD) age for all participants was 59 ± 12 years. They were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, had persistent pain located at the hip joint for >8 weeks and hip hypomobility. Both groups received exercise, information and manual traction mobilization. In E, the traction force was progressed to 800 N, whereas in C it was unknown. Major outcome measure was the median total change score ≥20 points or ≥50% of the disease- and joint-specific Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), compiled of Pain, Stiffness, Function and Hip-related quality of life (ranging 0–100). The mean (range) treatments received were 13 (7–16) over 5–12 weeks and 20 (18–24) over 12 weeks for E and C, respectively. The experimental group showed superior clinical post-treatment effect on HOOS (≥20 points), in six of 10 participants compared with none of nine in the control group (p = 0.011). The effect size was 1.1. The results suggest that a compiled physiotherapy program including forceful traction mobilizations are short-term effective in reducing self-rated hip disability in primary healthcare. The long-term effect is to be documented. PMID:18833335

  15. What does standard rehabilitation practice after total hip replacement in the UK entail? results of a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is evidence of prolonged poor function in patients following total hip replacement (THR). Studies of progressive resistance training (PRT) interventions to improve function are often compared to ‘standard’ practice which is not well defined. This study aimed to investigate ‘standard’ rehabilitation care in the UK after total hip replacement (THR) as well as determine whether PRT was part of ‘standard’ care. Methods After ethical approval, questionnaire item development about rehabilitation practice was guided by a focus group interview (after informed consent) with physiotherapists (n = 4; >5 years post-qualification) who regularly treated THR patients. An online questionnaire investigating the exercises prescribed and rehabilitation practice following THR was developed and sent to physiotherapists working in hospitals in the UK. The survey was performed from January to May 2011. The survey results were analysed (frequency (%) of responses) focusing on the exercises the physiotherapists considered important, as well as their use of PRT in prescribed regimes. Results 106 responses were obtained from physiotherapists in the UK. The survey respondents considered that the most important muscles to target in all phases of rehabilitation were the hip abductors (62.2%), followed by the quadriceps (16.9%), and other muscles (21%). Exercise type prescribed revealed no consensus, with weight bearing (42%), functional (45%) and Bed-based/Bridging/Postural exercises (13%) favoured. 83.7% were able to define the basis of progressive resistance training (PRT), but only 33% prescribed it. Conclusions Standard physiotherapy rehabilitation in the UK after THR is variable, and appears to rarely include PRT. This may be a factor in prolonged poor function in some patients after this common operation. PMID:23496875

  16. Metal ion levels and lymphocyte counts: ASR hip resurfacing prosthesis vs. standard THA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Wear particles from metal–on–metal arthroplasties are under suspicion for adverse effects both locally and systemically, and the DePuy ASR Hip Resurfacing System (RHA) has above–average failure rates. We compared lymphocyte counts in RHA and total hip arthroplasty (THA) and investigated whether cobalt and chromium ions affected the lymphocyte counts. Method In a randomized controlled trial, we followed 19 RHA patients and 19 THA patients. Lymphocyte subsets and chromium and cobalt ion concentrations were measured at baseline, at 8 weeks, at 6 months, and at 1 and 2 years. Results The T–lymphocyte counts for both implant types declined over the 2–year period. This decline was statistically significant for CD3+CD8+ in the THA group, with a regression coefficient of –0.04 × 109cells/year (95% CI: –0.08 to –0.01). Regression analysis indicated a depressive effect of cobalt ions in particular on T–cells with 2–year whole–blood cobalt regression coefficients for CD3+ of –0.10 (95% CI: –0.16 to –0.04) × 109 cells/parts per billion (ppb), for CD3+CD4+ of –0.06 (–0.09 to –0.03) × 109 cells/ppb, and for CD3+CD8+ of –0.02 (–0.03 to –0.00) × 109 cells/ppb. Interpretation Circulating T–lymphocyte levels may decline after surgery, regardless of implant type. Metal ions—particularly cobalt—may have a general depressive effect on T– and B–lymphocyte levels. Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov under # NCT01113762 PMID:23597114

  17. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from your hip joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. A hip replacement can Relieve pain Help your hip joint work better Improve walking and other movements The ...

  18. The effectiveness of a standardized rose hip powder, containing seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity, skin wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Phetcharat, L; Wongsuphasawat, K; Winther, K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of a rose hip powder (Hyben Vital®) made from seeds and shells on cell senescence, skin wrinkling, and aging. Methods A total of 34 healthy subjects, aged 35–65 years, with wrinkles on the face (crow’s-feet) were subjected to a randomized and double-blinded clinical study of the effects of the rose hip powder, as compared to astaxanthin, a well-known remedy against wrinkles. During the 8-week study, half of the participants ingested the standardized rose hip product, while the other half ingested astaxanthin. Objective measurements of facial wrinkles, skin moisture, and elasticity were made by using Visioscan, Corneometer, and Cutometer at the beginning of the study, after 4 weeks, and after 8 weeks. Evaluation of participant satisfaction of both supplements was assessed using questionnaires. In addition, the effect of the rose hip preparation on cell longevity was measured in terms of leakage of hemoglobin through red cell membranes (hemolytic index) in blood samples kept in a blood bank for 5 weeks. Significance of all values was attained with P≤0.05. Results In the double-blinded study, the rose hip group showed statistically significant improvements in crow’s-feet wrinkles (P<0.05), skin moisture (P<0.05), and elasticity (P<0.05) after 8 weeks of treatment. A similar improvement was observed for astaxanthin, with P-values 0.05, 0.001, and 0.05. Likewise, both groups expressed equal satisfaction with the results obtained in their self-assessment. The rose hip powder further resulted in increased cell longevity of erythrocyte cells during storage for 5 weeks in a blood bank. Conclusion Results suggest that intake of the standardized rose hip powder (Hyben Vital®) improves aging-induced skin conditions. The apparent stabilizing effects of the rose hip product on cell membranes of stored erythrocyte cells observed in this study may contribute to improve the cell longevity and obstructing skin aging. PMID:26604725

  19. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  20. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. (Watch the video to learn about what goes ...

  1. Hip Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIPS. See your doctor. Use ice and an anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve the pain. *3. Do you ... hip pain may be from ARTHRITIS. Try an anti-inflammatory medicine. If you don't feel better, see ...

  2. Rose Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your health provider.AspirinThe body breaks down aspirin to get rid of it. Rose hip contains ... of vitamin C might decrease the breakdown of aspirin. Taking large amount of rose hip along with ...

  3. Migration and head penetration of Vitamin-E diffused cemented polyethylene cup compared to standard cemented cup in total hip arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial (E1 HIP)

    PubMed Central

    Sköldenberg, Olof; Rysinska, Agata; Chammout, Ghazi; Salemyr, Mats; Muren, Olle; Bodén, Henrik; Eisler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In vitro, Vitamin-E-diffused, highly cross-linked polyethylene (PE) has been shown to have superior wear resistance and improved mechanical properties when compared to those of standard highly cross-linked PE liners used in total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety of a new cemented acetabular cup with Vitamin-E-doped PE regarding migration, head penetration and clinical results. Methods and analysis In this single-centre, double-blinded, randomised controlled trial, we will include 50 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis scheduled for THA and randomise them in a 1:1 ratio to a cemented cup with either argon gas-sterilised PE (control group) or Vitamin-E-diffused PE (vitamin-e group). All patients and the assessor of the primary outcome will be blinded and the same uncemented stem will be used for all participants. The primary end point will be proximal migration of the cup at 2 years after surgery measured with radiostereometry. Secondary end points include proximal migration at other follow-ups, total migration, femoral head penetration, clinical outcome scores and hip-related complications. Patients will be followed up at 3 months and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 years postoperatively. Results Results will be analysed using 95% CIs for the effect size. A regression model will also be used to adjust for stratification factors. Ethics and dissemination The ethical committee at Karolinska Institutet has approved the study. The first results from the study will be disseminated to the medical community via presentations and publications in relevant medical journals when the last patient included has been followed up for 2 years. Trial registration number NCT02254980. PMID:27388352

  4. Hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Amorim Cabrita, Henrique Antônio Berwanger; de Castro Trindade, Christiano Augusto; de Campos Gurgel, Henrique Melo; Leal, Rafael Demura; de Souza Marques, Ricardo da Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a safe method for treating a variety of pathological conditions that were unknown until a decade ago. Femoroacetabular impingement is the commonest of these pathological conditions and the one with the best results when treated early on. The instruments and surgical technique for hip arthroscopy continue to evolve. New indications for hip arthroscopy has been studied as the ligamentum teres injuries, capsular repair in instabilities, dissection of the sciatic nerve and repair of gluteal muscles tears (injuries to the hip rotator cuff), although still with debatable reproducibility. The complication rate is low, and ever-better results with fewer complications should be expected with the progression of the learning curve.

  5. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip replacement surgery, the damaged portions of the hip joint are removed. The ball (femoral head) is removed ... hip or leg Swelling at or near the hip joint A limp or change in walking ability Noise ( ...

  6. Mini-Incision versus Standard Incision Total Hip Arthroplasty Regarding Surgical Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-Qi; Cui, Zhuang; Yu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose It remains controversial whether mini-incision (MI) benefits patients in total hip arthroplasty (THA). We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the effects of MI on surgical and functional outcomes in THA patients. Methods A systematic electronic literature search (up to May 2013) was conducted to identify RCTs comparing MI with standard incision (SI) THA. The primary outcome measures were surgical and functional outcomes. According to the surgical approach taken, MI THA patients were divided into four subgroups for sub-group meta-analysis. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) or risk differences (RDs) with accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and pooled using a fixed-effect or random-effect model according to the heterogeneity. Results A total of 14 RCTs involving THA 1,174 patients met the inclusion criteria. The trials were medium risk of bias. The overall meta-analysis showed MI THA reduced total blood loss (95% CI, -201.83 to -21.18; p=.02) and length of hospital stay ( 95% CI, -0.67 to -0.08; p=.01) with significant heterogeneity. However, subgroup meta-analysis revealed posterior MI THA had perioperative advantages of reduced surgical duration ( 95% CI, -8.45 to -2.67; P<.001), less blood loss ( 95% CI, -107.20 to -1.73; P=.04) and shorter hospital stay ( 95% CI, -0.74 to -0.06; p=.002) with low heterogeneity. There were no significant differences between MI and SI THA groups in term of pain medication dose, functional outcome (HHS), radiological outcome or complications (P>.05, respectively). Conclusions Although no definite overall conclusion can be arrived at on whether MI THA is superior to SI THA, posterior MI THA clearly result in a significant decrease in surgical duration, blood loss and hospital stay. It seems to be a safe minimally invasive surgical procedure without increasing the risk of component malposition or complications. PMID:24265792

  7. Internal snapping hip syndrome in dynamic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Maczuch, Jarosław; Skupiński, Jarosław; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Wawrzynek, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is an audible or palpable snap in a hip joint during movement which may be accompanied by pain or locking. It is typically seen in young athletes performing activities requiring repeated extreme movements of the hip. It may also follow a physical trauma, intramuscular injections or surgeries. There are two main forms of snapping hip: extra- or intra-articular. Extra-articular snapping hip is elicited by an abnormal movement of specific tendons and is divided into two forms: internal and external. The internal form of snapping hip syndrome is attributed to an abrupt movement of an iliopsoas tendon against an iliopectineal eminence. Radiograph results in patients with this form of snapping tend to be normal. Dynamic ultrasound is the gold standard diagnostic technique in both forms of extra-articular snapping hip syndrome. The objective of the following text is to describe a step-by-step dynamic ultrasonography examination in internal extra-articular snapping hip syndrome in accordance to the proposed checklist protocol. To evaluate abrupt movement of an involved tendon, the patient needs to perform specific provocation tests during the examination. With its real-time imaging capabilities, dynamic ultrasonography detects the exact mechanism of the abnormal tendon friction during hip movement in a noninvasive way. It also allows for a diagnosis of additional hip tissue changes which may be causing the pain. PMID:27679733

  8. Internal snapping hip syndrome in dynamic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Piechota, Małgorzata; Maczuch, Jarosław; Skupiński, Jarosław; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Wawrzynek, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is an audible or palpable snap in a hip joint during movement which may be accompanied by pain or locking. It is typically seen in young athletes performing activities requiring repeated extreme movements of the hip. It may also follow a physical trauma, intramuscular injections or surgeries. There are two main forms of snapping hip: extra- or intra-articular. Extra-articular snapping hip is elicited by an abnormal movement of specific tendons and is divided into two forms: internal and external. The internal form of snapping hip syndrome is attributed to an abrupt movement of an iliopsoas tendon against an iliopectineal eminence. Radiograph results in patients with this form of snapping tend to be normal. Dynamic ultrasound is the gold standard diagnostic technique in both forms of extra-articular snapping hip syndrome. The objective of the following text is to describe a step-by-step dynamic ultrasonography examination in internal extra-articular snapping hip syndrome in accordance to the proposed checklist protocol. To evaluate abrupt movement of an involved tendon, the patient needs to perform specific provocation tests during the examination. With its real-time imaging capabilities, dynamic ultrasonography detects the exact mechanism of the abnormal tendon friction during hip movement in a noninvasive way. It also allows for a diagnosis of additional hip tissue changes which may be causing the pain. PMID:27679733

  9. Internal snapping hip syndrome in dynamic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Maczuch, Jarosław; Skupiński, Jarosław; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Wawrzynek, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is an audible or palpable snap in a hip joint during movement which may be accompanied by pain or locking. It is typically seen in young athletes performing activities requiring repeated extreme movements of the hip. It may also follow a physical trauma, intramuscular injections or surgeries. There are two main forms of snapping hip: extra- or intra-articular. Extra-articular snapping hip is elicited by an abnormal movement of specific tendons and is divided into two forms: internal and external. The internal form of snapping hip syndrome is attributed to an abrupt movement of an iliopsoas tendon against an iliopectineal eminence. Radiograph results in patients with this form of snapping tend to be normal. Dynamic ultrasound is the gold standard diagnostic technique in both forms of extra-articular snapping hip syndrome. The objective of the following text is to describe a step-by-step dynamic ultrasonography examination in internal extra-articular snapping hip syndrome in accordance to the proposed checklist protocol. To evaluate abrupt movement of an involved tendon, the patient needs to perform specific provocation tests during the examination. With its real-time imaging capabilities, dynamic ultrasonography detects the exact mechanism of the abnormal tendon friction during hip movement in a noninvasive way. It also allows for a diagnosis of additional hip tissue changes which may be causing the pain.

  10. Basic Hip Arthroscopy: Supine Patient Positioning and Dynamic Fluoroscopic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mannava, Sandeep; Howse, Elizabeth A; Stone, Austin V; Stubbs, Allston J

    2015-08-01

    Hip arthroscopy serves as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of various conditions that afflict the hip. This article reviews the basics of hip arthroscopy by demonstrating supine patient positioning, fluoroscopic evaluation of the hip under anesthesia, and sterile preparation and draping. Careful attention to detail during the operating theater setup ensures adequate access to the various compartments of the hip to facilitate the diagnosis of disease and treatment with minimally invasive arthroscopy. Furthermore, having a routine method for patient positioning and operative setup improves patient safety, as well as operative efficiency, as the operative team becomes familiar with the surgeon's standard approach to hip arthroscopy cases.

  11. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of the hip; CDH; Pavlik harness ... dislocation Shorter leg on the side with the hip dislocation Uneven skin folds of thigh or buttocks After ...

  12. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002975.htm Hip joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hip joint replacement is surgery to replace all or part ...

  13. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  14. Bursitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Repeated overuse or stress of the hip Rheumatoid arthritis Gout Pseudogout Injury of the hip Infection with bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus (or a staph infection) Diabetes Spine problems, such as scoliosis Uneven leg lengths ...

  15. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... or part of your hip joint with an artificial joint. This artificial joint is called a prosthesis. ... be careful that you do not dislocate your artificial hip, especially in the first few months after ...

  16. The unstable total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, F; Murena, L; Zatti, G; Cherubino, P

    2008-01-01

    Background: Dislocation is one of the most common complications of total hip arthroplasty with a reported dislocation rate of 3.2%. Despite increased experience with hip replacement, the overall rate has not yet changed. The aim of this paper is to review the most recent literature published on this topic and indexed in Medline, in order to clarify the main risk factors, and to standardize a treatment protocol of such an important complication of prosthetic surgery. Materials and Methods: Medline database was searched using key words: “hip dislocation”, “hip instability” from 1980-2007. Studies were eligible for review and included if they met the following criteria: (1) publication in English, (2) clinical trials (3) review papers. Results: The risk of first-time dislocation as a function of time after the surgery is not well understood. Most, but not all, series have demonstrated that the risk of dislocation is highest during the first few months after hip arthroplasty; however, first-time late dislocation can also occur many years after the procedure. Several risk factors were described, including the surgical approach, the diameter of the head, impingement, component malposition, insufficient abductor musculature. In addition, there are also many treatment options, such as long-term bracing after closed reduction, component reorientation, capsulorraphy, trochanteric advancement, increasing offset, exchange of the modular head and the polyethylene liner, insertion of constrained liner. Conclusion: Preventing hip dislocation is obviously the best strategy. Surgeons must take into account patient and surgical risk factors. For patients at high risk for dislocation the surgeon should accurately restore leg length and femoral offset; the use of larger femoral heads, posterior transosseous repair of the capsulotendinous envelope if posterior approach is chosen or the use of a lateral approach should be considered. Proper patient education and postoperative

  17. Are Hip Precautions Necessary Post Total Hip Arthroplasty? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Barnsley, Leslie; Page, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a common and effective treatment of hip osteoarthritis. Activity restrictions known as hip precautions are widely practiced in rehabilitation post THA, aiming to foster healing and prevent hip dislocation. The focused clinical question was: Does the application of hip precautions in patients post THA versus unrestricted activities significantly decrease the risk of prosthetic dislocation? Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted for randomized controlled trials or cohort studies with a comparative group and minimum 6 months follow-up, with dislocation as an end point. Retrieved titles were assessed independently by 2 reviewers for inclusion and underwent standardized data extraction. Results: Title search produced 80 potentially relevant articles. Five articles were retrieved for data extraction of which 2 met a prior eligibility criteria. No eligible studies were found that concerned posterior approaches to hip arthroplasty, so the results of this review concern only anterolateral approaches. Neither included study showed any benefit of hip precautions in preventing dislocation. Conclusion: The rate of dislocation after anterolateral THA is low and is not improved by hip precautions. Hip precautions are associated with a slower return to activities, significant expense, and decreased patient satisfaction. Existing studies risk being compromised by a type II error, but a definitive study may be prohibitively large and expensive. PMID:26328242

  18. HipMatch: an object-oriented cross-platform program for accurate determination of cup orientation using 2D-3D registration of single standard X-ray radiograph and a CT volume.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan; Steppacher, Simon D; Murphy, Stephen B; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Tannast, Moritz

    2009-09-01

    The widely used procedure of evaluation of cup orientation following total hip arthroplasty using single standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is known inaccurate, largely due to the wide variability in individual pelvic orientation relative to X-ray plate. 2D-3D image registration methods have been introduced for an accurate determination of the post-operative cup alignment with respect to an anatomical reference extracted from the CT data. Although encouraging results have been reported, their extensive usage in clinical routine is still limited. This may be explained by their requirement of a CAD model of the prosthesis, which is often difficult to be organized from the manufacturer due to the proprietary issue, and by their requirement of either multiple radiographs or a radiograph-specific calibration, both of which are not available for most retrospective studies. To address these issues, we developed and validated an object-oriented cross-platform program called "HipMatch" where a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining an iterative landmark-to-ray registration with a 2D-3D intensity-based registration was implemented to estimate a rigid transformation between a pre-operative CT volume and the post-operative X-ray radiograph for a precise estimation of cup alignment. No CAD model of the prosthesis is required. Quantitative and qualitative results evaluated on cadaveric and clinical datasets are given, which indicate the robustness and the accuracy of the program. HipMatch is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway), VTK, and Coin3D and is transportable to any platform. PMID:19328585

  19. Learning curve for a modified Watson-Jones minimally invasive approach in primary total hip replacement: analysis of complications and early results versus the standard-incision posterior approach.

    PubMed

    Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Chiron, Philippe; Accadbled, Franck; Molinier, François; Tricoire, Jean-Louis; Puget, Jean

    2006-12-01

    We analysed the learning curve of an anterolateral minimally invasive (ALMI) approach for primary total hip replacement (THR). The first 42 THR's with large-diameter heads implanted through this approach (group 1) were compared to a cohort of 58 THR's with a 28-mm head performed through a standard-incision posterior approach (group 2). No selection was made and the groups were comparable. Implant positioning as well as early clinical results were satisfactory and were comparable in the two groups. In group 1, the rate of intraoperative complications was significantly higher (greater trochanter fracture in 4 cases, cortical perforation in 3 cases, calcar fracture in one case, nerve palsy in one case, secondary tilting of the metal back in 2 cases) than in group 2 (one nerve palsy and one calcar crack). At 6 months, one revision of the acetabular cup was performed in group 1 for persistent pain, whereas in group 2, we noted 3 dislocations (2 were revised) and 2 periprosthetic femoral fractures. Our study showed a high rate of intra- and perioperative complications during the learning curve for an ALMI approach. These are more likely to occur in obese or osteoporotic patients, and in those with bulky muscles or very stiff hips. Postoperative complications were rare. The early clinical results are excellent and we may expect to achieve better results with a more standardised procedure. During the initial period of the learning curve, it would be preferable to select patients with an appropriate morphology.

  20. Hip fracture as the tracer condition.

    PubMed

    Kassim Javaid, M; Chana, Jasroop; Cooper, Cyrus

    2013-12-01

    Hip fractures represent the most severe complication of osteoporosis from the perspectives of the patient, carer, health care system and society. Given the strong association with age, numbers are set to rise significantly in the next few decades despite evidence that the age adjusted rates in some countries are either plateauing or falling. Given the almost invariable need for inpatient admission, hospital administrative data for hip fractures remain a robust measure of number of hip fractures in the community and can be extrapolated to determine the total expected number of clinical fragility fractures from the same population. Both process and outcome standards have now been developed to benchmark clinical quality in the care of patients with hip fractures and fragility fractures at other sites. PMID:24836330

  1. Transient Synovitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and swelling of the tissues around the hip joint. Usually only one hip is affected. This condition ... to reduce the swelling and inflammation around the hip joint. Your child's doctor will probably ask you to ...

  2. Measurement outcomes from hip simulators.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Danielle; Shelton, Julia C

    2016-05-01

    Simulation of wear in total hip replacements has been recognised as an important factor in determining the likelihood of clinical success. However, accurate measurement of wear can be problematic with factors such as number and morphology of wear particles produced as well as ion release proving more important in the biological response to hip replacements than wear volume or wear rate alone. In this study, hard-on-hard (CoCr alloy, AgCrN coating) and hard-on-soft (CoCr alloy and CrN coating on vitamin E blended highly cross-linked polyethylene) bearing combinations were tested in an orbital hip simulator under standard and some adverse conditions. Gravimetric wear rates were determined for all bearings, with cobalt and where applicable, silver release determined throughout testing. Isolation of wear particles from the lubricating fluid was used to determine the influence of different bearing combinations and wear conditions on particle morphology. It was found that cobalt and silver could be measured in the lubricating fluid even when volumetric wear was not detectable. In hard-on-hard bearings, Pearson's correlation of 0.98 was established between metal release into the lubricating fluid and wear volume. In hard-on-soft bearings, coating the head did not influence the polyethylene wear rates measured under standard conditions but did influence the cobalt release; the diameter influenced both polyethylene wear and cobalt release, and the introduction of adverse testing generated smaller polyethylene particles. While hip simulators can be useful to assess the wear performance of a new material or design, measurement of other outcomes may yield greater insight into the clinical behaviour of the bearings in vivo. PMID:26888886

  3. The prevalence of predisposing deformity in osteoarthritic hip joints.

    PubMed

    Klit, Jakob; Gosvig, Kasper; Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Troelsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that hip joint deformities may be major contributors to the development of osteoarthritis, and the term 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' may be inappropriate in many cases. Our study cohort was derived from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Sub-study, a cross sectional population-based database of 4151 individuals, all of whom had a standard anteroposterior weight-bearing pelvic radiograph taken. Hip joints were classified according to type and degree of deformity. We defined hip osteoarthritis by a minimum joint space width of < or = 2 mm. This cut-off has a significant relationship in both sexes with the clinical presentation. The study cohort which fulfilled these inclusion criteria consisted of 322 females (149 right hips and 173 left hips) and 162 males (77 right hips and 85 left hips) with osteoarthritis. We found an overall prevalence of predisposing hip deformities in females of 62.4% and in males of 78.9%. Minor and major deformities showed the same prevalence. Both sexes had a comparable prevalence of minor and major hip joint deformity, except for pistol grip deformity, which was more prevalent in men. We concluded that 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' is uncommon, and that even minor predisposing deformities are associated with hip osteoarthritis.

  4. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... thigh bone. The thigh bone is called the femur. It is part of the hip joint. Hip pain is a related topic. ... to 4 hours. If you have an intertrochanteric fracture (the area below the femur neck), your surgeon will use a special metal ...

  5. Formed HIP Can Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Kester Diederik

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  6. The World Hip Trauma Evaluation Study 3

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, N.; Achten, J.; Griffin, X. L.; Costa, M. L.; Reed, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately half of all hip fractures are displaced intracapsular fractures. The standard treatment for these fractures is either hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. The recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on hip fracture management recommends the use of ‘proven’ cemented stem arthroplasty with an Orthopaedic Device Evaluation Panel (ODEP) rating of at least 3B (97% survival at three years). The Thompsons prosthesis is currently lacking an ODEP rating despite over 50 years of clinical use, likely due to the paucity of implant survival data. Nationally, adherence to these guidelines is varied as there is debate as to which prosthesis optimises patient outcomes. Design This study design is a multi-centre, multi-surgeon, parallel, two arm, standard-of-care pragmatic randomised controlled trial. It will be embedded within the WHiTE Comprehensive Cohort Study (ISRCTN63982700). The main analysis is a two-way equivalence comparison between Hemi-Thompson and Hemi-Exeter polished taper with Unitrax head. Secondary outcomes will include radiological leg length discrepancy measured as per Bidwai and Willett, mortality, re-operation rate and indication for re-operation, length of index hospital stay and revision at four months. This study will be supplemented by the NHFD (National Hip Fracture Database) dataset. Discussion Evidence on the optimum choice of prosthesis for hemiarthroplasty of the hip is lacking. National guidance is currently based on expert opinion rather than empirical evidence. The incidence of hip fracture is likely to continue to increase and providing high quality evidence on the optimum Cite this article: A. L. Sims. The World Hip Trauma Evaluation Study 3: Hemiarthroplasty Evaluation by Multicentre Investigation – WHITE 3: HEMI – An Abridged Protocol. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:18–25. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.51.2000473 PMID:26825319

  7. Science writing competition: Hip, hip, hooray!

    PubMed

    Pewsey, Emma

    2013-03-12

    X-rays are best known for showing where bones have fractured, but researchers can also use X-rays to investigate why bones break, which could lead to treatments that reduce the number of elderly people who suffer broken hips.

  8. Influence of anaesthesia on canine hip dysplasia score.

    PubMed

    Genevois, J-P; Chanoit, G; Carozzo, C; Remy, D; Fau, D; Viguier, E

    2006-10-01

    Hip dysplasia (HD) scores, based on the five grades, as defined by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, were compared between anaesthetized (group 1, n = 3839) and non-sedated non-anaesthetized dogs (group 2, n = 1517). Each dog was radiographed in the standard ventro-dorsal hip joint extended position. Each radiograph was evaluated by the same reader blinded regarding the dog's status of anaesthesia. Results showed that there was a significant difference in hip dysplasia prevalence between group 1 (22%) compared with group 2 (9%) (P < 0.005). This difference was the result of a lower rate of hip-joint laxity assessment and the measurement of Norberg-Olsson angle <105 degrees in group 2 compared with group 1. The acetabular and femoral morphologies were not significantly different between the groups. The data confirm that the scoring of dogs for HD on standard radiographs with the hip joints extended is influenced by anaesthesia. PMID:16970631

  9. Influence of anaesthesia on canine hip dysplasia score.

    PubMed

    Genevois, J-P; Chanoit, G; Carozzo, C; Remy, D; Fau, D; Viguier, E

    2006-10-01

    Hip dysplasia (HD) scores, based on the five grades, as defined by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, were compared between anaesthetized (group 1, n = 3839) and non-sedated non-anaesthetized dogs (group 2, n = 1517). Each dog was radiographed in the standard ventro-dorsal hip joint extended position. Each radiograph was evaluated by the same reader blinded regarding the dog's status of anaesthesia. Results showed that there was a significant difference in hip dysplasia prevalence between group 1 (22%) compared with group 2 (9%) (P < 0.005). This difference was the result of a lower rate of hip-joint laxity assessment and the measurement of Norberg-Olsson angle <105 degrees in group 2 compared with group 1. The acetabular and femoral morphologies were not significantly different between the groups. The data confirm that the scoring of dogs for HD on standard radiographs with the hip joints extended is influenced by anaesthesia.

  10. Return to sport after hip arthroscopy: aggregate recommendations from high-volume hip arthroscopy centers.

    PubMed

    Domb, Benjamin G; Stake, Christine E; Finch, Nathan A; Cramer, T Luke

    2014-10-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical technique often performed in athletes who want an expeditious return to sport. To the authors' knowledge, no studies in the literature provide a time frame or criteria for return to sport after hip arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to develop an aggregate recommendation for return to sport after hip arthroscopy based on data assimilated from high-volume hip arthroscopy centers. Twenty-seven orthopedic surgeons from high-volume hip arthroscopy centers completed a survey regarding return to sport after hip arthroscopy. The questionnaire asked surgeons to give a time frame for return to sport and to choose meaningful criteria that an athlete must meet prior to return to sport. Surgeons were asked to categorize various common sports as high, medium, or low risk with regard to the hip. The aggregate results were used to create standardized recommendations for time, criteria, and risk for return to competitive sports. Regarding time frame for return to sport, 70% of surgeons recommended 12 to 20 weeks. In addressing criteria for return to sport, 85% of surgeons recommended that patients need to be able to reproduce all motions involved in their sport without pain. A majority of surgeons recommended criteria of pain-free running, jumping, lateral agility drills, and single-leg squats. Finally, surgeons categorized sports requiring the most movement and impact of the hip joint (football, basketball, wrestling, and martial arts) as high-risk sports. Sports with less impact on the hip, such as golf, were ranked as low risk.

  11. Improved limb positioning and hip access during hip arthroscopy with articulated traction device.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; McConkey, Mark O; Young, David A

    2013-02-01

    Surgeons use hip arthroscopy to address intra-articular pathology of the hip. To access the central compartment, traction must be applied to the leg. Various types of equipment and techniques have been used, but many have limitations. Improved ability to assess the offending pathology is achieved with improved ability to move the hip joint in space during surgery. Dynamic assessment of femoroacetabular impingement allows the surgeon to gauge the adequacy of resection. We describe the use of an articulated traction device that allows complete surgeon control over the leg position, as well as the freedom to place the leg in virtually any position with ease, unencumbered by the mechanics of a standard traction table. This device provides the surgeon with an improved ability to dynamically assess the hip and removes some of the responsibility of the operating room staff for intraoperative leg positioning. PMID:23802095

  12. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M.; Kowalczuk, M.; Simunovic, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia is controversial in the orthopaedic community, as the outcome literature has been variable and inconclusive. We hypothesise that outcomes of hip arthroscopy may be diminished in the setting of hip dysplasia, but outcomes may be acceptable in milder or borderline cases of hip dysplasia. Methods A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating the outcome of hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia up to July 2015. Study parameters including sample size, definition of dysplasia, outcomes measures, and re-operation rates were obtained. Furthermore, the levels of evidence of studies were collected and quality assessment was performed. Results The systematic review identified 18 studies investigating hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, with 889 included patients. Criteria used by the studies to diagnose hip dysplasia and borderline hip dysplasia included centre edge angle in 72% of studies but the range of angles were quite variable. Although 89% of studies reported improved post-operative outcome scores in the setting of hip dysplasia, revision rates were considerable (14.1%), with 9.6% requiring conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion The available orthopaedic literature suggests that although improved outcomes are seen in hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, there is a high rate of re-operation and conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Furthermore, the criteria used to define hip dysplasia vary considerably among published studies. Cite this article: M. Yeung, M. Kowalczuk, N. Simunovic, O. R. Ayeni. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:225–231. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000533. PMID:27313136

  13. The impact and consequences of hip fracture in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Jaglal, Susan B.; Sherry, Paul G.; Schatzker, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To assess the magnitude and the burden of hip fracture on the health care system, including time trends in hip fracture rates, in-hospital death rates, length of hospital stay (LHS) and discharge destination. Design A retrospective study of discharge abstracts. Setting The Province of Ontario. Patients All patients (n = 93 660) over the age of 50 years and with a diagnosis of hip fracture discharged from hospital between 1981 and 1992 (excluding transfers). Main Outcome Measures Age-sex standardized hip fracture rates per 1000 population, in-hospital death rates and age-adjusted mean LHS. Results The overall hip fracture rate was 3.3 per 1000 persons (1.7 per 1000 men and 4.6 per 1000 women). There was no change in rates between 1981 and 1992 (p = 0.089), but there have been increases in the numbers of hip fractures. There was no change in the in-hospital death rate over time (p = 0.78). The age-adjusted mean LHS in 1981 was 28.6 days compared with 22.2 days in 1992. The numbers of hip fractures will increase from 8490 in 1990 to 16 963 in 2010. Conclusions Despite stable age-adjusted rates of hip fractures, the doubling of the number of hip fractures by the year 2010 due to an aging population will become an increasing burden on the health care system. PMID:8769920

  14. HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by elimination or redesign of processes and use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age, and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  15. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemiarthroplasty to replace the ball part of your hip joint. You should have received physical therapy while you were in the hospital or at a rehabilitation center before going home from the hospital.

  16. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  17. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as sprinting, kicking, and changing direction while running or moving, can stretch and tear the hip flexors. Runners, people who do martial arts, and football, soccer, and hockey players are more likely to have ...

  18. PAP/HIP protein is an obesogenic factor.

    PubMed

    Secq, Veronique; Mallmann, Cecilia; Gironella, Meritxell; Lopez, Belen; Closa, Daniel; Garcia, Stéphane; Christa, Laurence; Montalto, Giuseppe; Dusetti, Nelson; Iovanna, Juan L

    2014-02-01

    In this article we report the obesogenic role of the acute phase protein PAP/HIP. We found that the transgenic TgPAP/HIP mice develop spontaneous obesity under standard nutritional conditions, with high levels of glucose, leptin, and LDL and low levels of triglycerides and HDL in blood. Accordingly, PAP/HIP-deficient mice are skinny under standard nutritional conditions. We also found that expression of PAP/HIP is induced in intestinal epithelial cells in response to gavage with olive oil and this induction is AG490 sensitive. We demonstrated that incubation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with a low concentration as 1 ng/ml of recombinant PAP/HIP results in accelerated BrdU incorporation in vitro. PAP/HIP-dependent adipocytes growth is sensitive to the MEK inhibitor U0126. Finally, patients with severe obesity present higher blood levels of PAP/HIP than non-obese control individuals. Altogether our data suggest that PAP/HIP could be a mediator of fat tissue development, released by the intestine and induced by the presence of food into the gut.

  19. The Hyperflexible Hip

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Alexander E.; Bedi, Asheesh; Tibor, Lisa M.; Zaltz, Ira; Larson, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Dance, gymnastics, figure skating, and competitive cheerleading require a high degree of hip range of motion. Athletes who participate in these sports use their hips in a mechanically complex manner. Evidence Acquisition: A search of the entire PubMed database (through December 2013) and additional searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Whether innate or acquired, dancers and gymnasts have some hypermobility that allows their hips to be placed in potentially impinging or unstable positions required for their given activity. Such extremes of motion can result in both intra-articular and extra-articular impingement as well as compensatory osseous and muscular pathology. In addition, dancers and gymnasts are susceptible to impingement-induced instability. Dancers with innate generalized hyperlaxity are at increased risk of injury because of their activities and may require longer recovery times to return to play. Both nonoperative and operative treatments (arthroscopic and open) have an important role in returning flexibility athletes to their preoperative levels of sport and dance. Conclusion: Because of the extreme hip motion required and the compensatory soft tissue laxity in dancers and gymnasts, these athletes may develop instability, impingement, or combinations of both. This frequently occurs in the setting of subtle pathoanatomy or in patients with normal bony anatomy. With appropriate surgical indications and the correct operative technique, the treating surgeon can anticipate high levels of return to play for the gymnast and dancer with hip pain. PMID:26137181

  20. Bipolar hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Liu, Shubing; Guan, Changyong; Yu, Fangyuan; Wu, Shenguang; Jiang, Changliang

    2011-12-01

    Our aim was to compare hip arthroplasty with internal screw fixation in the repair of intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients with osteoporosis. Of 112 included patient, 70 (81.81 ± 4.88 years) received hip arthroplasty with a prosthesis specially designed for intertrochanteric fractures, and 42 (83.46 ± 5.11 years) underwent plate-screw fixation. The hip arthroplasty group had significantly longer operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and total volume of blood transfused but had shorter time to beginning weight-bearing (5.94 ± 2.76 vs 23.68 ± 22.01 days) and higher postoperative Harris hip score (91.37 ± 4.80 vs 86.14 ± 5.46). In the arthroplasty group, there were 2 dislocations; and in the plate-screw fixation group, there were 5 internal fixation failures. Hip arthroplasty is preferable to internal fixation in elderly patients (age >80 years) with osteoporosis. PMID:21530148

  1. Extreme Kinematics in Selected Hip Hop Dance Sequences.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Shaw; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Woo, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Hip hop dance has many styles including breakdance (breaking), house, popping and locking, funk, streetdance, krumping, Memphis jookin', and voguing. These movements combine the complexity of dance choreography with the challenges of gymnastics and acrobatic movements. Despite high injury rates in hip hop dance, particularly in breakdance, to date there are no published biomechanical studies in this population. The purpose of this study was to compare representative hip hop steps found in breakdance (toprock and breaking) and house and provide descriptive statistics of the angular displacements that occurred in these sequences. Six expert female hip hop dancers performed three choreographed dance sequences, top rock, breaking, and house, to standardized music-based tempos. Hip, knee, and ankle kinematics were collected during sequences that were 18 to 30 sec long. Hip, knee, and ankle three-dimensional peak joint angles were compared in repeated measures ANOVAs with post hoc tests where appropriate (p<0.01). Peak angles of the breaking sequence, which included floorwork, exceeded the other two sequences in the majority of planes and joints. Hip hop maximal joint angles exceeded reported activities of daily living and high injury sports such as gymnastics. Hip hop dancers work at weight-bearing joint end ranges where muscles are at a functional disadvantage. These results may explain why lower extremity injury rates are high in this population. PMID:26395613

  2. Extreme Kinematics in Selected Hip Hop Dance Sequences.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Shaw; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Woo, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Hip hop dance has many styles including breakdance (breaking), house, popping and locking, funk, streetdance, krumping, Memphis jookin', and voguing. These movements combine the complexity of dance choreography with the challenges of gymnastics and acrobatic movements. Despite high injury rates in hip hop dance, particularly in breakdance, to date there are no published biomechanical studies in this population. The purpose of this study was to compare representative hip hop steps found in breakdance (toprock and breaking) and house and provide descriptive statistics of the angular displacements that occurred in these sequences. Six expert female hip hop dancers performed three choreographed dance sequences, top rock, breaking, and house, to standardized music-based tempos. Hip, knee, and ankle kinematics were collected during sequences that were 18 to 30 sec long. Hip, knee, and ankle three-dimensional peak joint angles were compared in repeated measures ANOVAs with post hoc tests where appropriate (p<0.01). Peak angles of the breaking sequence, which included floorwork, exceeded the other two sequences in the majority of planes and joints. Hip hop maximal joint angles exceeded reported activities of daily living and high injury sports such as gymnastics. Hip hop dancers work at weight-bearing joint end ranges where muscles are at a functional disadvantage. These results may explain why lower extremity injury rates are high in this population.

  3. Hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Carmelo; Perugia, Dario; Carcangiu, Alessandro; Monaco, Edoardo; Speranza, Attilio; Ferretti, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture typically leads to profound functional disability and pain. Salvage treatment with hip arthroplasty may be considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of hip arthroplasty performed as a salvage procedure after the failed treatment of an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Twenty-one patients were treated in our hospital with hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of intertrochanteric hip fracture. There were sixteen women and five men with a mean age of 75.8 years (range 61-85 years). Fourteen patients had failure of a previous nail fixation procedure, five had failure of a plate fixation, one of hip screws fixation and one of Ender nail fixation. In 19 out of 21 patients we performed a total hip arthroplasty-14 cases used modular implants with long-stems and five cases used a standard straight stem. In 2 of 21 cases we used a bipolar hemiarthroplasty. A statistically significant improvement was found comparing pre and postoperative conditions (p < 0.05). Our experience confirms that total hip arthroplasty is a satisfactory salvage procedure after failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture in elderly patients with few serious orthopaedic complications and acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:19572131

  4. Hip impingement: beyond femoroacetabular

    PubMed Central

    Bardakos, Nikolaos V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, femoroacetabular impingement has been at the forefront of clinical practice as a cause of hip pain in young adults. As arthroscopic techniques for the hip continue to evolve, the possible presence of a new group of conditions creating mechanical conflict in and around the hip joint (ischiofemoral, subspine and iliopsoas impingement) has recently been elucidated whilst interest in already known ‘impingement’ syndromes (pelvic-trochanteric and pectineofoveal impingement) is now revived. This article attempts to increase awareness of these relatively uncommon clinical entities by describing their pathomorphology, contact mechanics, treatment and published results available to present. It is hoped that such knowledge will diversify therapeutic options for the clinician, thereby improving outcomes in a small but not negligible portion of patients with previously unexplained persistent symptoms. PMID:27011843

  5. Hip joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip socket. The socket is usually made of metal. A liner that fits inside the socket. It ... usually plastic, but some surgeons use ceramic and metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  6. Epidemiology of hip fractures in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Harumi; Owan, Ichiro; Kudoh, Hirohisa; Horizono, Hidehiro; Arakaki, Kaoru; Ikema, Yasunari; Shinjo, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Kaori; Kanaya, Fuminori

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the current incidence of hip fractures in Okinawa prefecture and compared the data with those obtained in our previous study, which was conducted using similar methods in 1987/1988. All patients, aged 50 years or older and residing in Okinawa, admitted to Okinawa hospitals in 2004 for a fresh hip fracture were identified from hospital registries. Details were obtained from the medical records and radiographs of all patients and classified according to fracture type (cervical or trochanteric), age, sex, and fracture location. Subtrochanteric fractures and pathological fractures were excluded. A total of 1,349 patients (242 men and 1,107 women) were admitted for a fresh hip fracture in 2004. Their average age was 76.9 years for men and 82.4 years for women. There were 671 cervical fractures, 654 trochanteric fractures, and 24 unclassified proximal femoral fractures. Comparing the data from 1987/1988 to those from 2004, the total number of hip fractures increased by 188%, from 469 to 1,349. The age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000, standardized to the 2000 US population, were 75.7 and 296.1 in 1987/1988 and 123.6 and 420 in 2004 for men and women, respectively. The incidence rates in all age groups (at 5-year intervals) were higher in 2004 than in 1987/1988, indicating that people 50 years of age or older became more susceptible to hip fractures. Accordingly, the accretion of the hip fracture incidence rate was greater than that which could be explained purely by changes in population size and structure.

  7. Ceramic on ceramic hip arthroplasty in fused hips

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Taek-Rim; Lee, Tae-Min; Ahn, Yeong-Seub

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most literature in the field of total hip arthroplasty (THA) for fused hips, until date has reported the results of using metal on polyethylene and ceramic on polyethylene bearings. Results of THA using ceramic on ceramic (CoC) bearings in fused hips have not been published in literature. This study reports the results of cementless THA using CoC articulation perfomed in fused hips. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three patients (25 hips) with fused hips underwent conversion to THA using CoC bearings and were followed up for a mean 5.4 years. The conventional posterolateral approach was used in 15 hips, a modified two incision technique in 7 hips and a direct lateral approach with greater trochanteric osteotomy in 3 hips. Postoperatively, range of motion exercises were encouraged after 2–3 days of bed rest and subsequent gradual weight bearing using crutches was begun. Results: Mean Harris hip score improved from 42.4 to 84.2 and mean leg lengthening of 36.6 mm was achieved. In the average 5.4 years (range 2.8-9.1 years) followup there were no cases with osteolysis around acetabular cup and femoral stem. In this study, there was no case of ceramic fracture. There was one case of squeaking. Conclusion: This study suggests that cementless THA performed for fused hips with CoC bearings can provide good early clinical results. PMID:26015635

  8. [Squatting cast for biomechanical treatment of decentred hip joints].

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, E; Lick-Schiffer, W; Lojpur, M; Baumgartner, F; Spieß, T; Tschauner, C

    2014-12-01

    The so-called "congenital" luxation of the hip joint is endemic in Central Europe and occurs in about 1% of all newborn infants. By the means of ultrasonographic diagnosis according to the Graf method an early detection instantly after birth has become a good clinical routine in the German-speaking countries. Sonography-based conservative treatment has become the gold standard. The cast in squatting ("human") position is a standard procedure in order to retain the originally decentred or unstable hip joints in the reduced position: 100° flexion and 50° abduction are necessary to fix the hip joint in the reduced position without the risk of avascular necrosis. After the fixation in a squatting-cast, a period of functional bracing in flexed position enhances bony maturation. This two-phase functional conservative treatment can avoid later osteotomies or even early total hip replacement.

  9. HIP quench technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, C.; Westerlund, J.; Zimmerman, F.X.

    1996-12-31

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is a viable production process today for densifying metals, ceramics, and composites to achieve fully dense parts. One major drawback for conventional HIPing is the long ten to twelve hour cycle time resulting in low productivity and high processing cost. Drastic furnace improvements have been made in the late 1980`s with the advent of Uniform Rapid Cooling (URC) called HIP Quenching. This innovation allows floor/floor cycles as short as four to five hours with one hour soak depending on the material to be HIPed. A flow device such as a fan is utilized at the base of the furnace for forced gas convection in promoting main features to: (1) accelerate time for heating, soaking and cooling; (2) add combined solution heat treating; and (3) reduce thermal distortion of parts with varying cross-sections. All three points promise to positively effect better economy with improved property and quality to promote the HIP process further. This paper describes the URC technology and illustrates a couple of HIP Quench studies made for a turbine disc and efficient High Speed Steel powder consolidation.

  10. Congenital hip dislocation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is unknown but genetic factors may play a role. Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is ...

  11. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  12. Hip Morphology Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Cristián; Diaz, Jorge; Brañes, Julian; Chaparro, Felipe; Barahona, Maximiliano; Salazar, Alfonso; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is the result of a mechanical conflict in the hip joint, and its diagnosis is based on clinical and radiological parameters. To our knowledge, there are no published studies describing the radiologic characteristics of FAI in Latin American populations. Purpose: To describe the radiological features associated with FAI in an asymptomatic Chilean population. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We prospectively recruited asymptomatic patients with no history or symptoms of hip pathology who underwent abdomen-pelvis computed tomography (CT) for a nonorthopaedic indication. The acetabular and femoral parameters related to FAI were measured. Results: We studied 101 subjects (202 hips) with a mean age of 36.8 ± 14.4 years. The mean center-edge angle was 39.4° ± 7.2°. The crossover sign was present in 34 cases (33.7%). The mean alpha angle was 49.7° ± 8.3°. Depending on the cut points chosen for FAI-related parameters, between 39.6% and 69.3% of an asymptomatic Chilean population were found to have morphological features related to FAI. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the proposed pathological threshold values in the literature cannot be extrapolated to a Chilean population, and this must be taken into consideration when evaluating Latin American patients with hip pain. PMID:26535273

  13. Early Attempts at Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  14. Hip Arthroscopy: A Brief History.

    PubMed

    Kandil, Abdurrahman; Safran, Marc R

    2016-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a fast-growing and evolving field. Like knee and shoulder arthroscopy, hip arthroscopy began as a diagnostic procedure and then progressed to biopsy and resection of abnormalities. Subsequently, it has evolved to repair of various tissues and treatment of underlying causes. As the understanding of the hip joint and its associated pathophysiology grows, indications will continue to expand for this diagnostic and therapeutic modality. This article outlines the historic developments of hip arthroscopy, including advancements in instrumentation and techniques from the days of the first hip arthroscopies to the present day.

  15. Conus hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H; Wagner, M

    2001-01-01

    50 years ago, prosthetic replacement of the hip joint ushered in a new epoch in orthopaedics. Total hip replacement made it possible to remove a severely diseased, painful hip and restore normal function and a normal quality of life to the afflicted patient. The early results of total hip replacement are almost all spectacular and hip replacement has become the most successful type of orthopaedic surgery. These good results using an approach that was technically relatively simple resulted in a temptation to implant prosthetic hip joints with ever increasing frequency in ever younger patients. This led to the emergence of new problems, which were not so clearly recognised at the outset: it emerged that the stability of prosthetic hip joints was of limited duration. This had the following consequence: If a total hip prosthesis is implanted in an elderly person whose remaining life-expectancy is shorter than the longevity of the prosthesis, hip replacement is a life-long solution. We can therefore say that, for a patient who has only 10 to 15 years left to live, their hip problem is solved by total hip replacement. For young people, who still have a long life expectancy in front of them, it is different. They will experience failure of the artificial joint and require further surgery. The commonest and most important type of failure in total hip prostheses is aseptic loosening, which is associated with resorption of bone at the site of the prosthesis. The cause of this phenomenon has only gradually been recognised in the course of the years. Initially, the unanimous opinion was that the methacrylate cement, used to fix the components of the prosthesis in the bone, was the definitive cause of aseptic loosening because fissures and fractures of the cement were almost always found during surgical revision of loosened joints. There was talk of "cement disease" and great efforts were made to improve the quality of the cement and the cementing technique. Moreover, even

  16. Total hip replacement in young adults with hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Dysplasia of the hip increases the risk of secondary degenerative change and subsequent total hip replacement. Here we report on age at diagnosis of dysplasia, previous treatment, and quality of life for patients born after 1967 and registered with a total hip replacement due to dysplasia in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We also used the medical records to validate the diagnosis reported by the orthopedic surgeon to the register. Methods Subjects born after January 1, 1967 and registered with a primary total hip replacement in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the period 1987–2007 (n = 713) were included in the study. Data on hip symptoms and quality of life (EQ-5D) were collected through questionnaires. Elaborating information was retrieved from the medical records. Results 540 of 713 patients (76%) (corresponding to 634 hips) returned the questionnaires and consented for additional information to be retrieved from their medical records. Hip dysplasia accounted for 163 of 634 hip replacements (26%), 134 of which were in females (82%). Median age at time of diagnosis was 7.8 (0–39) years: 4.4 years for females and 22 years for males. After reviewing accessible medical records, the diagnosis of hip dysplasia was confirmed in 132 of 150 hips (88%). Interpretation One quarter of hip replacements performed in patients aged 40 or younger were due to an underlying hip dysplasia, which, in most cases, was diagnosed during late childhood. The dysplasia diagnosis reported to the register was correct for 88% of the hips. PMID:21434808

  17. Effect of high hip center on stress for dysplastic hip.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Li, Zongming

    2014-07-01

    High hip center reconstruction has been advocated in treating deficient acetabulum. However, there is no consensus on the clinical outcome of this technique. In addition, it remains unclear to what extend this technique restores the normal hip biomechanics. The goal of this study was to investigate stress above the acetabular dome in response to a range of high hip center positioning for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia. This study consisted of 2 main parts, radiologic and biomechanical. Pelvic radiographs of 18 patients were studied to determine the amount of displacement of the hip center in the superior direction compared with the normal side. Second, qualitative and quantitative changes in stress on cortical and trabecular bone in the region of the acetabular dome as a result of superior displacement of the hip center were analyzed with subject-specific finite element models. The results showed that the range of the hip center position in the superior direction for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia was 0 to 15 mm above the contralateral femoral head center. When superior displacement of the hip center exceeded 5 mm above the anatomic hip center, cortical bone mass on the 2 thickest cross-sections above the acetabular dome decreased quickly and the stress value on posterolateral cortical bone was obviously lower than the normal level. This study showed that to restore the normal load above the acetabular dome, there is a limit of 5 mm above the anatomic hip center for high hip center acetabular reconstruction for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia. PMID:24992059

  18. Extra-articular Snapping Hip

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Context: Snapping hip, or coxa saltans, is a vague term used to describe palpable or auditory snapping with hip movements. As increasing attention is paid to intra-articular hip pathologies such as acetabular labral tears, it is important to be able to identify and understand the extra-articular causes of snapping hip. Evidence Acquisition: The search terms snapping hip and coxa sultans were used in PubMed to locate suitable studies of any publication date (ending date, November 2008). Results: Extra-articular snapping may be caused laterally by the iliotibial band or anteriorly by the iliopsoas tendon. Snapping of the iliopsoas tendon usually requires contraction of the hip flexors and may be difficult to differentiate from intra-articular causes of snapping. Dynamic ultrasound can help detect abrupt tendon translation during movement, noninvasively supporting the diagnosis of extra-articular snapping hip. The majority of cases of snapping hip resolve with conservative treatment, which includes avoidance of aggravating activities, stretching, and anti-inflammatory medication. In recalcitrant cases, surgery to lengthen the iliotibial band or the iliopsoas tendon has produced symptom relief but may result in prolonged weakness. Conclusions: In treating active patients with snapping soft tissues around the hip, clinicians should recognize that the majority of cases resolve without surgical intervention, while being mindful of the potential for concomitant intra-articular and internal snapping hips. PMID:23015936

  19. Geographic Variation in Hip Fracture Among United States Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Geetanjoli; Zullo, Andrew R.; Berry, Sarah D.; Lee, Yoojin; McConeghy, Kevin; Kiel, Doug P.; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite high rates of hip fracture among United States (US) nursing home (NH) residents, little is known about geographic variation in hip fracture incidence. We used nationally representative data to identify geographic variation in hip fracture among US NH residents. Design and setting Retrospective cohort study using Part A claims for a 100% of Medicare enrollees in 15,289 NHs linked to NH minimum data set and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting databases. Participants A total of 891,085 long-stay (continuous residence of ≥100 days) NH residents ≥65 years old. Measurements Medicare Part A claims documenting a hip fracture. Mean incidence rates of hip fracture for long-stay NH residents were calculated for each state and US Census Division from 2007 to 2010. Results The age-, sex-, and race-adjusted incidence rate of hip fracture ranged from 1.49 hip fractures/100 person-years (Hawaii) to 3.60 hip fractures/100 person-years (New Mexico), with a mean of 2.38 (standard deviation 0.43) hip fractures/100 person-years. The mean incidence of hip fracture was 1.7-fold greater in the highest quintile than the lowest. Conclusions We observed modest US state and regional variation in hip fracture incidence among long-stay NH residents. Future studies should assess whether state policies or NH characteristics explain the variation. PMID:27461867

  20. Hip Arthroscopy in the Presence of Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jayasekera, Narlaka; Aprato, Alessandro; Villar, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : Hip arthroscopy is a well established therapeutic intervention for an increasing number of painful hip conditions. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is commonly associated with intra-articular hip pathology. However, some surgeons perceive patients with hip dysplasia as poor candidates for hip arthroscopy. Our aim was to describe early outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for patients with DDH, who also had femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treated when necessary, and to compare these outcomes against a control group of patients without DDH. Methods : Prospective case-control study of 68 consecutive hip arthroscopy patients assessed with a modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) preoperatively and at six weeks, six months, and one year after surgery. Presence of DDH was determined using a standard anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiograph to measure the centre-edge angle (CEA) of Wiberg, with a CEA < 20º used as threshold for diagnosis of DDH. Results : 12 patients (eight female and four male) with acetabular dysplasia and mean CEA of 15.4º (9º to 19º). The control, nondysplastic group comprised 54 patients (23 females and 31 males) with a mean CEA of 33.1º (22º to 45º). All patients in the dysplastic group had a labral tear and 11 (91.7%) had associated femoral cam impingement lesion addressed at arthroscopy. Our study demonstrates a significant (p=0.02) improvement in outcome in the dysplastic group at one year using the mHHS. Conclusion : Hip arthroscopy in the presence of DDH is effective in relieving pain for at least one year after surgery although does not address underlying acetabular abnormality. PMID:26069512

  1. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  11. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The implications of a diagnosis of congenital dislocation of the hip and the importance of the role of the family physician in early detection and treatment are identified. A review of the salient clinical features of congenital dislocation of the hip is undertaken. The results of a survey carried out in the author's practice on an unusual incidence of congenital dislocated hip are reviewed. PMID:21308053

  12. Heterotopic ossification after hip arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Eyal; Sharfman, Zachary T.; Rath, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) after hip arthroscopy is the abnormal formation of mature lamellar bone within extra skeletal soft tissues. HO may lead to pain, impaired range of motion and possibly revision surgery. There has been a substantial amount of recent research on the pathophysiology, prophylaxis and treatment of HO associated with open and arthroscopic hip surgery. This article reviews the literature on the aforementioned topics with a focus on their application in hip arthroscopy. PMID:27011859

  13. Capsular Management in Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D

    2016-07-01

    The hip capsule is a highly complex anatomic structure, which influences normal hip motion and biomechanics. A dynamic stabilizing capsular contribution exists in the iliocapsularis and gluteus minimus, among other musculotendinous structures crossing the joint. Variable types and sizes of capsulotomy are necessary to sufficiently visualize and address the bony and soft tissue pathologic source of symptoms. Unrepaired capsulotomies may leave the hip significantly unstable to variable degrees. Capsular closure is a necessary part of a comprehensive arthroscopic hip preservation procedure. Greater titration of the degree of plication may be performed for patients with risk factors for postoperative instability. PMID:27343391

  14. Cartilage restoration technique of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Larrain, Catalina

    2016-01-01

    Hip cartilage lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and can be an elusive source of pain. Treatment may present difficulties due to localization and spherical form of the joint and is most commonly limited to excision, debridement, thermal chondroplasty and microfractures. This chapter will focus in new technologies to enhance the standard techniques. These new technologies are based in stem cells therapies; as intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear concentrate in a platelet-rich plasma matrix and expanded mesenchymal stem cells seeded in a collagen membrane. This review will discuss the bases, techniques and preliminary results obtained with the use of stem cells for the treatment of hip cartilage lesions. PMID:27026816

  15. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH), the hip joint has not formed normally. The ball is loose ... be taken to provide detailed pictures of the hip joint. Treatment When DDH is detected at birth, it ...

  16. Hip dysplasia in the skeletally mature patient.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rachel Y; Kaye, Ian David; Slover, James; Feldman, David

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hip development causes one-quarter to one-half of all hip disease. Dysplastic hips typically share characteristic anatomic abnormalities. The dysplastic acetabulum is typically shallow, lateralized, and anteverted with insufficient coverage anteriorly, superiorly, and laterally. The dysplastic proximal femur has a small femoral head with excessive femoral neck anteversion and a short neck with an increased neck shaft angle. These characteristic changes result in intraarticular pathology leading to hip arthritis. A variety of treatment options exist based on the degree of dysplasia and the amount of concomitant hip arthritis. Treatment options include hip arthroscopy, acetabular or femoral osteotomies, hip arthrodesis, and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25150325

  17. Hip-Hop Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Marcella Runell

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop music and culture are often cited as being public pedagogy, meaning the music itself has intrinsic educational value. Non-profit organizations and individual educators have graciously taken the lead in utilizing hip-hop to educate. As the academy continues to debate its effectiveness, teachers and community organizers are moving forward.…

  18. Representin': Drawing from Hip-Hop and Urban Youth Culture to Inform Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Jason G.

    2009-01-01

    The potential of drawing from urban youth culture, and hip-hop more specifically, to serve as a bridge to the standard curriculum has been well documented. However, the richness and potential benefits of hip-hop are more far-reaching and present significant implications for teacher education and professional development efforts as well. This…

  19. Hip-Hop and a Hybrid Text in a Postsecondary English Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Deborah M.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the epistemology present in hip-hop music and its reflection in the writing of one African American student in a postsecondary transitional English class. An integration of hip-hop and academic literacy practices in the student's essay challenges the supremacy of a "standard" academic English and deficit perspectives about…

  20. Assessment of adult hip dysplasia and the outcome of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Troelsen, Anders

    2012-06-01

    rapid ultrasound examination performed by an experienced examiner can potentially alter the traditional diagnostic algorithm in which magnetic resonance arthrography remains the gold standard. PERIACETABULAR OSTEOTOMY FOR SURGICAL TREATMENT OF HIP DYSPLASIA IN ADULTS: Encouraging hip joint survival and clinical outcome were reported at medium-term follow-up after periacetabular osteotomy. The small number of studies reporting the outcome beyond a 5-year follow-up is in contrast to the wide application of the periacetabular osteotomy. The performed analysis of predictors of conversion to total hip replacement following periacetabular osteotomy documented the importance of different biomechanical and degenerative factors. Knowledge about factors predicting early conversion to total hip replacement has the potential to refine patient selection and to improve treatment by periacetabular osteotomy. Cartilage thickness was documented to be preserved up to 2,5 years after periacetabular osteotomy. All but 1 hip joint had acetabular labral tears, thus indicating that the presence of labral tears does not accelerate cartilage degeneration after periacetabular osteotomy. PMID:22677250

  1. Wear testing of total hip replacements under severe conditions.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fabry, Christian; Reinders, Joern; Dammer, Rebecca; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Bader, Rainer; Sonntag, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Controlled wear testing of total hip replacements in hip joint simulators is a well-established and powerful method, giving an extensive prediction of the long-term clinical performance. To understand the wear behavior of a bearing and its limits under in vivo conditions, testing scenarios should be designed as physiologically as possible. Currently, the ISO standard protocol 14242 is the most common preclinical testing procedure for total hip replacements, based on a simplified gait cycle for normal walking conditions. However, in recent years, wear patterns have increasingly been observed on retrievals that cannot be replicated by the current standard. The purpose of this study is to review the severe testing conditions that enable the generation of clinically relevant wear rates and phenomena. These conditions include changes in loading and activity, third-body wear, surface topography, edge wear and the role of aging of the bearing materials. PMID:26048088

  2. Arthroscopic Bullet Removal from the Acetabulum (Hip Joint)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asiri, Jamal; Wong, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has been shown to offer minimally invasive access to the hip joint compared with standard open arthrotomy. The use of arthroscopy for diagnosing and treating disorders about the hip continues to evolve. This study describes a case that involves arthroscopic removal of a bullet from a low-velocity gunshot wound. The patient sustained a gunshot wound that entered the abdomen and traversed the small bowel, sigmoid colon then penetrated the urinary bladder before ending up in the medial wall of the acetabulum. After surgical repair of the viscus, the bullet was retrieved from the hip joint using standard arthroscopic portals and a fracture table. A number of issues led to the decision to use arthroscopy. Most importantly was the need to minimize soft tissue dissection, which was required to access the bullet, without interfering with previous wound at the suprapubic area. The risks of potential bullet fragmentation and migration, as well as a possible abdominal compartment syndrome were considered before proceeding. Arthroscopy allowed adequate inspection of the articular surface, irrigation of the joint, and removal of the foreign body while avoiding an invasive arthrotomy with its associated morbidity and soft tissue disruption. This surgical technique afforded a very satisfactory outcome for this patient and serves as a model for others when encountering a similar injury pattern in a trauma patient. It is a procedure that can be performed safely, quickly, and with minimal complications for surgeons with experience in arthroscopy of the hip joint. PMID:23741592

  3. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  8. [Ceramic cups for hip endoprostheses. 4: Never mix and match].

    PubMed

    Willmann, G

    1998-06-01

    Femoral ball heads for total hip replacement are made of various materials, e.g. cobalt chrome alloy, coated metal, or various ceramics. Standard sockets are made of polyethylene, alumina ceramics, or CFRP. Due to tribological reasons some of the combinations of head and socket that seem possible are prohibited. The approved and prohibited combinations are reviewed and reasons for not approving are discussed.

  9. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were made with the hip joint in each of 3 positions: (1) a neutral hip joint position, (2) an abduction hip joint position, and (3) an abduction with external rotation hip joint position. [Results] Gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. Gluteus maximus activity was also significantly higher in the abduction hip joint position than in the neutral hip joint position. Hamstring activity was significantly lower when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise selectively activates the gluteus maximus. PMID:25540492

  10. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  11. [Pseudotumors caused by hip prostheses].

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Lohman, Martina; Alberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    More than 100000 hip replacements have been performed in Finland. In the hip replacement operations performed due to osteoarthritis, the artificial joint surfaces are made of metal, plastic or ceramics. Pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) sliding surfaces have received worldwide attention. Soft issue lesions, not always symptomatic, may develop around the joint replacements. These may even require joint revision surgery. PMID:26237883

  12. Peak torque, reaction time, and rate of torque development of hip abductors and adductors of older women.

    PubMed

    Morcelli, Mary Hellen; Rossi, Denise Martineli; Karuka, Aline Harumi; Crozara, Luciano Fernandes; Hallal, Camilla Zamfolini; Marques, Nise Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Mauro; Navega, Marcelo Tavella

    2016-01-01

    Impaired muscle function at the hip has been implicated to be a major factor related to falls in older adults. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the rate of torque development (RTD), reaction time (RT), and peak torque (PT) of hip abductors and hip adductors in young women (YW), older women nonfallers (ONF), and older women fallers (OF). Eighteen YW and 44 older women divided among OF (n = 20) and ONF (n = 24) performed maximum isometric hip abductor and adduction contractions on a dynamometer. YW had 40% greater PT and 61.5% greater RTD for hip abductors than the ONF. Compared with OF, YW had 47.5% greater PT and 68% greater RTD. OF showed less RTD at 150 ms (31%) and 200 ms (34.5%) than ONF for hip abductors. PT of hip adductors was 52% greater in YW than in the two older groups, whereas RTD was 71% greater. OF showed less RTD than ONF for hip abductors according to standardized effect sizes. No RT differences were observed between the three groups. We conclude that older women (OF and ONF) have less strength and ability to develop force rapidly than YW for hip abductors and adductors. Low hip strength and slowed force development in ONF during hip abduction may increase fall risk in older women.

  13. The hip in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bleck, E E

    1980-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery can alleviate the hip flexion, adduction, and medial rotation deformities of the hip and improve the function and appearance of gait. To accomplish this, however, careful examination and prudence in the operative procedure to avoid overdoing and overcorrecting are important. Orthopedic surgery can prevent subluxation and dislocation of the hip before the age of seven years, and consequently repetitive radiographic examinations of the hip in children who have spastic paralysis of the hip musculature should be a routine procedure. Subluxation and dislocation of the hip, when established, can be successfully treated with orthopedic surgical procedures. Physicians must keep in mind that the spastic paralysis of cerebral palsy originates in the brain, and therefore the spasticity cannot be eliminated. The best that can be done is to weaken or remove some muscles as deforming forces and to achieve compromises for continued function. The goal should be optimal independence for the child and adolescent during development, and freedom from pain with deteriorating function due to degenerative arthritis in the adult. PMID:7360505

  14. Curved-stem Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hip resurfacing is an attractive concept because it preserves rather than removes the femoral head and neck. Most early designs had high failure rates, but one unique design had a femoral stem. Because that particular device appeared to have better implant survival, this study assessed the clinical outcome and long-term survivorship of a hip resurfacing prosthesis. Four hundred forty-five patients (561 hips) were retrospectively reviewed after a minimum of 20 years’ followup or until death; 23 additional patients were lost to followup. Patients received a metal femoral prosthesis with a small curved stem. Three types of acetabular reconstructions were used: (1) cemented polyurethane; (2) metal-on-metal; and (3) polyethylene secured with cement or used as the liner of a two-piece porous-coated implant. Long-term results were favorable with the metal-on-metal combination only. The mean overall Harris hip score was 92 at 2 years of followup. None of the 121 patients (133 hips) who received metal-on-metal articulation experienced failure. The failure rate with polyurethane was 100%, and the failure rate with cemented polyethylene was 41%. Hip resurfacing with a curved-stem femoral component had a durable clinical outcome when a metal-on-metal articulation was used. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18338217

  15. DYSPLASIA OF HIP DEVELOPMENT: UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    Guarniero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The term “developmental dysplasia of the hip” (DDH) includes a wide spectrum of abnormalities that affect the hip during its growth, ranging from dysplasia to joint dislocation and going through different degrees of coxofemoral subluxation. The incidence of DDH is variable, and depends on a number of factors, including geographical location. Approximately one in 1,000 newborn infants may present hip dislocation and around 10 in 1,000 present hip instability. Brazil has an incidence of five per 1,000 in terms of findings of a positive Ortolani sign, which is the early clinical sign for detecting the disorder. The risk factors for DDH include: female sex, white skin color, primiparity, young mother, breech presentation at birth, family history, oligohydramnios, newborns with greater weight and height, and deformities of the feet or spine. Hip examinations should be routine for newborns, and should be emphasized in maternity units. Among newborns and infants, the diagnosis of DDH is preeminently clinical and is made using the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers. Conventional radiography is of limited value for confirming the diagnosis of DDH among newborns, and ultrasound of the hip is the ideal examination. The treatment of DDH is challenging, both for pediatric orthopedists and for general practitioners. The objectives of the treatment include diagnosis as early as possible, joint reduction and stabilization of the hip in a secure position. Classically, treatment options are divided according to different age groups, at the time of diagnosis. PMID:27022528

  16. Microinstability of the Hip and the Splits Radiograph.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D; Gerrie, Brayden J; Lintner, David M; Varner, Kevin E; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    A normal hip has a natural tendency toward stability because of both osseous and soft tissue structures. Hip motion is primarily rotational around a center of rotation. When the femoral head and its center of rotation translate, with or without rotation, the inherent stability of the femoroacetabular articulation may be lost. The spectrum of hip instability ranges from subtle microinstability to traumatic dislocation. Microinstability may be the cause or the effect of several other hip pathologies. Soft tissue contributions to stability include the static capsule, dynamic musculotendinous units, and underlying generalized connective tissue (eg, Ehlers-Danlos). Osseous contributions include multiple femoral and acetabular radiographic coverage parameters. Iatrogenic contributions include an unrepaired capsulotomy, overresection of the acetabular rim (iatrogenic dysplasia), overresection of cam osteochondroplasty, iliopsoas tenotomy, labral debridement, and ligamentum teres debridement. Patients with hip microinstability often have deep groin pain, exhibited by a C sign. These patients frequently participate in flexibility sports and activities, such as ballet, gymnastics, figure skating, and martial arts. On physical examination, generalized hypermobility syndromes should be assessed, as should loss of log-roll external rotation recoil, excessive abduction, trochanteric-pelvic impingement, and abductor fatigue. Standard imaging, including plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography, should be analyzed for all causes of hip pain. A new plain radiograph, the splits radiograph is introduced here, consistently showing lateral femoral head translation and creation of a vacuum sign, showing hip microinstability. The splits radiograph is illustrated in a 22-year-old female dancer who presented with bilateral deep anterolateral groin pain. PMID:26730687

  17. Bilateral total hip replacement in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David Michael; Magill, Paul; Mulhall, Kevin James

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case of bilateral total hip replacements (THRs) in a 56-year-old patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). The considerations for the perioperative period and the outcome are discussed. Preoperative planning included an anaesthetic review and availability of fiberoptic intubation due to poor mouth opening. Perioperatively, contractures can make positioning and exposure difficult but in this case a standard posterior approach was taken. Particular attention was given to soft tissue balancing given the theoretical risk of dislocation. There were no perioperative complications. Postoperatively there has been improvement in pain and hip scores but the patient has failed to return to work. Objective improvements in range of motion (ROM) have not been made. This experience suggests THR is a safe and effective treatment for osteoarthritic hip pain in patients with AMC but patients should be informed that ROM is unlikely to improve. PMID:26607193

  18. Review on squeaking hips

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Yadin David; Munir, Selin; Donohoo, Shane; Walter, William Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Squeaking is a well-recognized complication for hard-on-hard bearings. The nature of squeaking is not yet completely understood however it is considered a multifactorial phenomenon. Patient, implant, and surgical factors play a role in squeaking. It is believed that mechanisms damaging the fluid film lubrication in which these bearings function optimally have a critical role. Such mechanisms include edge loading, stripe wear, impingement, third body particles and ceramic fracture. The resonance of metallic parts can produce noise in the human audible range hence the implant metallurgic composition and design may play a role. Implant positioning can facilitate impingement and edge loading enhancing the occurrence of squeaking. The recent introduction of large heads (> 36 mm) 4th generation ceramic-on-ceramic bearing may accentuate the conditions facilitating noise formation; however the current literature is insufficient. Clinically, squeaking may manifest in extreme hip positions or during normal gait cycle however it is rarely associated with pain. Evaluations of patients with squeaking include clinical and radiographic assessments. Computer tomography is recommended as it can better reveal ceramic breakage and implant malposition. The treatments for most squeaking patients include reassurance and activity modification. However for some, noise can be a problem, requiring further surgical intervention. In the occurrence of ceramic fracture, implant failure, extreme components malposition, instability and impingement, surgery should be advised. This review will aim to discuss the current literature regarding squeaking. PMID:26601063

  19. Results of hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Favetti, Fabio; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo; Panegrossi, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background The renewed popularity of resurfacing hip arthroplasty in the last 10 years has generated a remarkable quantity of scientific contributions based on mid- and short-term follow-up. More than one paper has reported a consistent early revision rate as a consequence of biological or biomechanical failure. Two major complications are commonly described with resurfacing implants: avascular necrosis and femoral-neck fracture. A close relationship between these two events has been suggested, but not firmly demonstrated, whereas cementing technique seems to be better understood as potential cause of failure. Methods We performed an in vitro study in which four different resurfacing implants were evaluated with a simulated femoral head, two types of cement, (low and high viscosity) and two cementing techniques: direct (cement apposition directly on the femoral head) and indirect (cement poured into the femoral component). Results High-viscosity cement showed homogeneous distribution over the entire femoral head. Low-viscosity cement showed a massive polar concentration with insufficient, if not absent, distribution in the equatorial zone. Conclusion Polar cement concentration could be a risk factor for early implant failure due to two effects on the femoral head: biological (excessive local exothermic reaction could cause osteocyte necrosis) and biomechanical (which could lead to uneven load distribution on the femoral head). PMID:21234563

  20. Pharmacological treatment of heterotopic ossification following hip and acetabular surgery.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Robert J; Ng, Boon Han; Gamie, Zakareya; El Masry, Mohamed A; Velonis, Stylianos; Schizas, Constantin; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2008-04-01

    Heterotopic ossification is a common complication following total hip arthroplasty and surgery following acetabular trauma. It is associated with pain and a decreased range of movement. Prophylaxis is achieved by either non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment or localised irradiation therapy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the evidence for pharmacological agents used for the prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification following hip and acetabular surgery. The study used a comprehensive literature search to identify all major clinical studies investigating the pharmacological agents used in the prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification following hip and acetabular surgery. It was concluded that indometacin remains the 'gold standard' for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis following total hip arthroplasty and is the only drug proven to be effective against heterotopic ossification following acetabular surgery. Following total hip arthroplasty, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including naproxen and diclofenac, are equally as effective as indometacin and can be considered as alternative first-line treatments. Celecoxib is also of equal efficacy to indometacin and is associated with significantly fewer gastrointestinal side effects. However, serious concerns were raised over the safety of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for the cardiovascular system and these should be used cautiously.

  1. Improved SB2 orbits for HIP 12081 and HIP 87895

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.; Arenou, F.; Guillout, P.; Pourbaix, D.; Tal-Or, L.; Famaey, B.; Lebreton, Y.; Mazeh, T.

    2013-11-01

    We are observing a selection of about 70 double-lined binaries (SB2s) with the T193/SOPHIE in order to improve their orbital elements. Our goal is to obtain the masses of the components with a 1 % accuracy when the astrometric observations of Gaia are available. After 6 semesters of observations, the two best observed stars are HIP 12081 and HIP 87895. These stars are used to verify that the 1 % accuracy could really be obtained at the end of the programme. The radial velocities of their components were derived using the TODMOR algorithm, and their orbital elements were calculated. It appears that the minimum masses of the components of HIP 12081 are already both obtained with an accuracy around 0.5 %. For HIP 87895, the relative precisions of the minimum masses of the primary and of the secondary component are 2.7 and 1.5 %, respectively, but they were obtained from only 9 spectra and they should be improved once more observations have been obtained. Ancient interferometric observations of HIP 87895 are also taken into account and the actual masses of the components are derived. Although these measurements are far from being as accurate as those expected from Gaia, the relative errors of the masses are only 2.6 and 1.5 % respectively. We thus conclude that our programme would lead to masses with the announced accuracy if the observations are continued.

  2. Effects of Cobalt and Chromium Levels Following Modular Hip Stem Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Koziara, Christopher R; Lombardo, Daniel J; Petersen-Fitts, Graysen R; Jildeh, Toufic R; Morawa, Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    Due to the increased number of revision total hip arthroplasties (THAs) to correct pain secondary to fretting from modular hip stems, this study was conducted in an effort to correlate objective findings of serum cobalt (Co) levels, serum chromium (Cr) levels, and/or reactive tissue seen on metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a patient's need for revision THA. The study group comprised 66 patients, 18 of whom received MARS MRI. Serum Co levels, serum Cr levels, and standard numeric rating scale for pain were documented for all patients. Statistical analysis was then performed to determine whether there was a correlation between the aforementioned variables and the need for revision THA. Serum Cr levels were higher in patients with positive reactive tissue findings on MARS MRI, although this only approached significance (P=.083). Serum Co levels were higher in those undergoing revision THA, but this also only approached significance (P=.076). Pain scores were significantly different between those undergoing revision and those not (P<.001). It is the opinion of the authors that there is no objective finding in this study that can be used to identify patients who require revision THA secondary to fretting of a modular hip stem prosthesis. Only a patient's stated pain level can assist a surgeon in the decision-making process regarding the need for revision THA secondary to fretting. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):288-292.]. PMID:27337670

  3. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Noordin, Shahryar; Umer, Masood; Hafeez, Kamran; Nawaz, Haq

    2010-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a spectrum of anatomical abnormalities of the hip joint in which the femoral head has an abnormal relationship with the acetabulum. Most studies report an incidence of 1 to 34 cases per 1,000 live births and differences could be due to different diagnostic methods and timing of evaluation. Risk factors include first born status, female sex, positive family history, breech presentation and oligohydramnios. Clinical presentations of DDH depend on the age of the child. Newborns present with hip instability, infants have limited hip abduction on examination, and older children and adolescents present with limping, joint pain, and/or osteoarthritis. Repeated, careful examination of all infants from birth and throughout the first year of life until the child begins walking is important to prevent late cases. Provocative testing includes the Barlow and Ortolani maneuvers. Other signs, such as shorting of the femur with hips and knees flexed (Galeazzi sign), asymmetry of the thigh or gluteal folds, and discrepancy of leg lengths are potential clues. Treatment depends on age at presentation and outcomes are much better when the child is treated early, particularly during the first six months of life. PMID:21808709

  4. The Fate of the Contralateral Hip in Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Nepple, Jeffrey J.; Louer, Craig; Clohisy, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The pathophysiology of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) remains to be better understood. Only a fraction of all individuals with bony FAI morphology will ever develop hip symptoms or osteoarthritis. The purpose of the current study was to determine (1) rates of initial and subsequent symptom development in the contralateral hip of patients with symptomatic ipsilateral FAI and (2) to identify predictors of symptomatic contralateral FAI. Methods: The study cohort included 179 consecutive patients presenting for surgical treatment of FAI. Patients were excluded if they had previously underwent contralateral surgery. At baseline and postoperative follow-up time points, patients recorded standardized outcome questionnaires, including the presence of symptoms in the contralateral hip. Significant symptoms were defined as the presence of at least mild pain, while none or slight pain was not included. All patients underwent AP pelvis and bilateral 45 degree Dunn lateral radiographs at baseline. Patients developing symptoms in the contralateral hip were subclassified as having symptoms at presentation (initial symptoms) or developing symptoms during the follow-up period (symptom development). Patients were followed over a minimum of one year time period postoperatively. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of symptoms development. Results: The study cohort had a mean age of 30.2 years and included 60.3% females. FAI was classified as isolated cam in 63.1% (n=113), isolated pincer 1.1% (n=2), and combined type in 35.8% (n=64). Forty-two (23.5%) of patients had initial symptoms in the contralateral hip. Twenty-two additional hips developed symptoms during the follow-up period (16.1% of initially asymptomatic hips). For multivariate logistic regression of any symptoms development (initial or subsequent), competitive athletes (p=0.041) and contralateral HNO ratio on AP pelvis (p=0.009). However, the overall model poorly

  5. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable.

  6. Total Hip Arthroplasty Dislocations Are More Complex Than They Appear: A Case Report of Intraprosthetic Dislocation of an Anatomic Dual-Mobility Implant After Closed Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Bradford S.; De Martino, Ivan; Sculco, Thomas; Sculco, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty is a successful operation for the treatment of hip pain. One of the common complications of hip arthroplasty is dislocation. While reduction of standard prosthetic dislocations is highly successful, new prostheses add the potential for new complications. Case Report: We present the case of a patient who experienced intraprosthetic dislocation of an anatomic dual-mobility total hip prosthesis after a closed hip reduction and include the prereduction and postreduction radiographic findings. Conclusion: Emergency department physicians should be aware of intraprosthetic dislocation. This complication can be easily missed because the metal/ceramic femoral head appears to be reduced in the acetabulum. PMID:27303232

  7. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  8. The use of hip arthroscopy in the management of the pediatric hip

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopy of the pediatric hip began in 1977 with a publication by Gross. Interest was relatively slow to develop in the 1980s and 1990s. Coupled with the success of hip arthroscopy in the adult, interest heightened in applying the procedure to a variety of pediatric hip disorders, given that the alternative was an open surgical hip dislocation. The success of this initial group of pediatric hip arthroscopist’s has further expanded the application of hip arthroscopy as the primary or adjunct procedure for the management of intra-articular problems of the pediatric hip. PMID:27583144

  9. Subspine Hip Impingement: An Unusual Cause of Hip Pain in an Elite Weightlifter.

    PubMed

    Nabhan, Dustin C; Moreau, William J; McNamara, Shannen C; Briggs, Karen K; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    Anterior hip pain can be difficult to diagnose due to the many pathologies and overlapping pain patterns that exist in the hip region. Clinical findings of pain at the anterior inferior iliac spine with passive hip flexion, proximal quadriceps pain and weakness, and painful impingement tests of the hip may be indicative of subspine hip impingement. This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of anterior hip pain, including subspine impingement and femoroacetabular impingement in an elite weightlifter. This case also describes how with the correct diagnosis and treatment, the athlete returned to play to her previous level of sport 11 months after a complex hip injury. PMID:27618239

  10. The use of hip arthroscopy in the management of the pediatric hip.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dennis R

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopy of the pediatric hip began in 1977 with a publication by Gross. Interest was relatively slow to develop in the 1980s and 1990s. Coupled with the success of hip arthroscopy in the adult, interest heightened in applying the procedure to a variety of pediatric hip disorders, given that the alternative was an open surgical hip dislocation. The success of this initial group of pediatric hip arthroscopist's has further expanded the application of hip arthroscopy as the primary or adjunct procedure for the management of intra-articular problems of the pediatric hip. PMID:27583144

  11. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  12. Dual mobility cups in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Ivan; Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios Konstantinos; Sculco, Peter Keyes; Sculco, Thomas Peter

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is considered one of the most successful surgical procedures in orthopaedics. With the increase in the number of THAs performed in the world in the next decades, reducing or preventing medical and mechanical complications such as post-operative THA instability will be of paramount importance, particularly in an emerging health care environment based on quality control and patient outcome. Dual mobility acetabular component (also known as unconstrained tripolar implant) was introduced in France at the end of the 1970s as an alternative to standard sockets, to reduce the risk of THA dislocation in patients undergoing primary THA in France. Dual mobility cups have recently gained wider attention in the United States as an alternative option in the prevention and treatment of instability in both primary and revision THA and offer the benefit of increased stability without compromising clinical outcomes and implant longevity. In this article, we review the use of dual mobility cup in total hip arthroplasty in terms of its history, biomechanics, outcomes and complications based on more than 20 years of medical literature. PMID:25035820

  13. Hip-Hop and the Academic Canon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abe, Daudi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the hip-hop movement has risen from the margins to become the preeminent force in US popular culture. In more recent times academics have begun to harness the power of hip-hop culture and use it as a means of infusing transformative knowledge into the mainstream academic discourse. On many college campuses, hip-hop's…

  14. Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hip Replacement (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Hip Replacement Potpuna zamjena kuka - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Total Hip Replacement 全髋关节置换 - 简体中文 ( ...

  15. Total hip replacement for arthritis following tuberculosis of hip

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Garg, Bhavuk; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present the results of total hip arthroplasty (THA) for post tubercular arthritis of the hip joint. METHODS: Sixty-five patients (45 male, 20 female) with previously treated tuberculosis of the hip joint underwent cementless THA for post tubercular arthritis. The average age at the time of THA was 48 years (range 29 to 65 years). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, chest X-ray and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were done preoperatively to confirm resolution of the disease and to rule out any residual disease. Intra-operative samples were taken for microbiological examination, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and histological examination. Patients were started on anti-tubercular drugs one week before the operation and continued for 6 mo post operatively. The patients were followed up clinically using the Harris hip score as well as radiologically for any loosening of the implants, osteolysis and any recurrence of tuberculosis. Any complications especially the recurrence of the infection was also recorded. RESULTS: The mean interval from completion of antitubercular therapy for tuberculosis to surgery was 4.2 years (range, 2-6 years). Preoperatively, 17 patients had ankylosis whereas 48 patients had functional but painful range of motion. The mean surgical time was 97 min (range, 65-125) whereas the mean blood loss was 600 mL (range, 400-900 mL). The average follow up was 8.3 years (range 6-11 years). The average Harris Hip score improved from 27 preoperatively to 91 at the final follow up. Seventeen patients had acetabular protrusion which was managed with impaction grafting and cementless acetabular cup. The bone graft had consolidated in all these 17 patients at the follow up. Two patients developed discharging sinuses at 9 and 11 mo postoperatively respectively. The discharge tested positive for tuberculosis on the PCR. Both these patients were put on antitubercular therapy for another year. Both of them recovered and had no

  16. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  6. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  7. [Congenital hip dysplasia, screening and therapy].

    PubMed

    Kolb, A; Windhager, R; Chiari, C

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation are relatively common pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system in infants. An early and certain diagnosis can now be achieved by sonographic hip screening within the framework of screening examination programs. This early diagnostic procedure in infants is essential particularly for a conservative treatment strategy. Therefore, apart from possessing in-depth knowledge, training of the examiner in specialist courses is of central importance. This article presents an overview of the entity of congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation, the diagnostics and treatment with special emphasis on recent developments. PMID:26489825

  8. New approach to the treatment of adolescent hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shibo; Zhao, Dewei; Yang, Lei

    2013-07-01

    Hip dysplasia refers to the acetabular or femoral head shape and size and the relationships among their unusual growth; the most common types are acetabular hypogenesis and head mortar containing extraordinarily. The cause of disease is still not clear. There is a lack of unified classification standards and clinical diagnosis criteria. The main pathological change is the performance of the above of acetabular and the frontal defects. The acetabular bone is transferred to the hip center, which reduces femoral head acetabular tolerance and causes insufficient coverage. DDH (Developmental Dysplasia of Hip) may be associated with different degrees of hip subluxation, the acetabular bone becomes lighter and the hip joint capsule around the relaxation is the main cause of dislocation [1]. The patients with DDH and relationship have an involuted femoral articular surface, with abnormal relations. This can lead to articular cartilage degeneration, and cause osteoarthritis, which has a serious influence on patients' mental health and quality of life [2]. Therefore, the acetabular malformation must be corrected. This is performed by renewing the stability of articulation and decreasing the abnormal joint stress by the research and application. Nowadays, there is a simple operation based on the acetabular technique, the description of the three places: steel ilium osteotomies acetabular, joint capsule osteotomies around, Pemberton's description of the joint capsule around ilium osteotomies, etc. In particular, each has their respective advantages with regard to the operation method. However, complex, surgical trauma surgery methods also exist; nevertheless, pelvic change is heavy, the graft will not last as long, and may also be absorbed, among other shortcomings. In this report we use the lateral femoral screw with belt/vascular pedicle flap transfer of the ilium acetabular in the treatment of adolescent hip dysplasia, using a method that is different from other current

  9. Biotribology of artificial hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Di Puccio, Francesca; Mattei, Lorenza

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty can be considered one of the major successes of orthopedic surgery, with more than 350000 replacements performed every year in the United States with a constantly increasing rate. The main limitations to the lifespan of these devices are due to tribological aspects, in particular the wear of mating surfaces, which implies a loss of matter and modification of surface geometry. However, wear is a complex phenomenon, also involving lubrication and friction. The present paper deals with the tribological performance of hip implants and is organized in to three main sections. Firstly, the basic elements of tribology are presented, from contact mechanics of ball-in-socket joints to ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear laws. Some fundamental equations are also reported, with the aim of providing the reader with some simple tools for tribological investigations. In the second section, the focus moves to artificial hip joints, defining materials and geometrical properties and discussing their friction, lubrication and wear characteristics. In particular, the features of different couplings, from metal-on-plastic to metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic, are discussed as well as the role of the head radius and clearance. How friction, lubrication and wear are interconnected and most of all how they are specific for each loading and kinematic condition is highlighted. Thus, the significant differences in patients and their lifestyles account for the high dispersion of clinical data. Furthermore, such consideration has raised a new discussion on the most suitable in vitro tests for hip implants as simplified gait cycles can be too far from effective implant working conditions. In the third section, the trends of hip implants in the years from 2003 to 2012 provided by the National Joint Registry of England, Wales and Northern Ireland are summarized and commented on in a discussion. PMID:25621213

  10. Hip Imaging in Athletes: Sports Imaging Series.

    PubMed

    Agten, Christoph A; Sutter, Reto; Buck, Florian M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2016-08-01

    Hip or groin pain in athletes is common and clinical presentation is often nonspecific. Imaging is a very important diagnostic step in the work-up of athletes with hip pain. This review article provides an overview on hip biomechanics and discusses strategies for hip imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MR arthrography and traction MR arthrography). The authors explain current concepts of femoroacetabular impingement and the problem of high prevalence of cam- and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic persons. With the main focus on MR imaging, the authors present abnormalities of the hip joint and the surrounding soft tissues that can occur in athletes: intraarticular and extraarticular hip impingement syndromes, labral and cartilage disease, microinstability of the hip, myotendinous injuries, and athletic pubalgia. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27429142

  11. Techniques and Results for Open Hip Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Hellman, Michael D.; Haughom, Bryan; Stover, Michael D.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    While hip arthroscopy grows in popularity, there are still many circumstances under which open hip preservation is the most appropriately indicated. This article specifically reviews open hip preservation procedures for a variety of hip conditions. Femoral acetabular impingement may be corrected using an open surgical hip dislocation. Acetabular dysplasia may be corrected using a periacetabular osteotomy. Acetabular protrusio may require surgical hip dislocation with rim trimming and a possible valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy. Legg–Calve–Perthes disease produces complex deformities that may be better served with osteotomies of the proximal femur and/or acetabulum. Chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis may also benefit from a surgical hip dislocation and/or proximal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26649292

  12. Techniques and Results for Open Hip Preservation.

    PubMed

    Levy, David M; Hellman, Michael D; Haughom, Bryan; Stover, Michael D; Nho, Shane J

    2015-01-01

    While hip arthroscopy grows in popularity, there are still many circumstances under which open hip preservation is the most appropriately indicated. This article specifically reviews open hip preservation procedures for a variety of hip conditions. Femoral acetabular impingement may be corrected using an open surgical hip dislocation. Acetabular dysplasia may be corrected using a periacetabular osteotomy. Acetabular protrusio may require surgical hip dislocation with rim trimming and a possible valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy. Legg-Calve-Perthes disease produces complex deformities that may be better served with osteotomies of the proximal femur and/or acetabulum. Chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis may also benefit from a surgical hip dislocation and/or proximal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26649292

  13. [Prevention with hip protectors. Biomechanical aspects in falls and hip fractures].

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, J B

    1996-12-01

    The cascade of events leading to hip fracture is: a fall, protective responses, impact to the hip, local energy absorption and bone strength. A fall from standing height on the hip corresponds to a force of about 3500 N and the bone strength of the proximal femur in elderly women and men ranges between 2000 to 6000 N. Efficient hip protective systems have been developed and may be a significant factor in the prevention of hip fractures among the elderly with propensity to fall and osteoporosis. Theoretically, more than 90 per cent of all hip fractures can be prevented, and a substantial reduction in the rate of hip fractures can be obtained, when systematic intervention programs are initiated among nursing home residents. Prevention of hip fractures among home dwellers may be a greater challenge, although preliminary results seem promising. Improvement in design has made the protectors more compliant and may facilitate the aim of preventing hip fractures.

  14. Reproduction of Hip Offset and Leg Length in Navigated Total Hip Arthroplasty: How Accurate Are We?

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Mahajan, Vivek; Deakin, Angela H; Deep, Kamal

    2015-06-01

    This study assesses how accurately we can restore hip offset and leg length in navigated total hip arthroplasty (THA). 152 consecutive patients with navigated THA formed the study group. The contra-lateral hip formed control for measuring hip offset and leg length. All radiological measurements were made using Orthoview digital software. In the normal hip offset group, the mean is 75.73 (SD- 8.61). In the reconstructed hip offset group, the mean is 75.35 (SD - 7.48). 95.39% had hip offset within 6 mm of opposite side while 96.04% had leg length restored within 6 mm of contra-lateral side. Equivalence test revealed that the two groups of hip offsets were essentially the same. We conclude that computer navigation can successfully reproduce hip offset and leg length accurately.

  15. Frontal plane kinematics of the hip during running: Are they related to hip anatomy and strength?

    PubMed

    Baggaley, Michael; Noehren, Brian; Clasey, Jody L; Shapiro, Robert; Pohl, Michael B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive hip adduction has been associated with a number of lower extremity overuse running injuries. The excessive motion has been suggested to be the result of reduced strength of the hip abductor musculature. Hip anatomical alignment has been postulated to influence hip abduction (HABD) strength and thus may impact hip adduction during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hip anatomy, HABD strength, and frontal plane kinematics during running. Peak isometric HABD strength, 3D lower extremity kinematics during running, femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA), and pelvis width-femur length (PW-FL) ratio were recorded for 25 female subjects. Pearson correlations (p<0.05) were performed between variables. A fair relationship was observed between femoral NSA and HABD strength (r=-0.47, p=0.02) where an increased NSA was associated with reduced HABD strength. No relationship was observed between HABD strength and hip adduction during running. None of the anatomical measurements, NSA or PW-FL, were associated with hip adduction during running. Deviations in the femoral NSA have a limited ability to influence peak isometric hip abduction strength or frontal plane hip kinematics during running. Hip abduction strength does also not appear to be linked with changes in hip kinematics. These findings in healthy individuals question whether excessive hip adduction typically seen in female runners with overuse injuries is caused by deviations in hip abduction strength or anatomical structure.

  16. Erythrocyte antioxidant protection of rose hips (Rosa spp.).

    PubMed

    Widén, C; Ekholm, A; Coleman, M D; Renvert, S; Rumpunen, K

    2012-01-01

    Rose hips are popular in health promoting products as the fruits contain high content of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate whether health benefits are attributable to ascorbic acid, phenols, or other rose-hip-derived compounds. Freeze-dried powder of rose hips was preextracted with metaphosphoric acid and the sample was then sequentially eluted on a C(18) column. The degree of amelioration of oxidative damage was determined in an erythrocyte in vitro bioassay by comparing the effects of a reducing agent on erythrocytes alone or on erythrocytes pretreated with berry extracts. The maximum protection against oxidative stress, 59.4 ± 4.0% (mean ± standard deviation), was achieved when incubating the cells with the first eluted meta-phosphoric extract. Removal of ascorbic acid from this extract increased the protection against oxidative stress to 67.9 ± 1.9%. The protection from the 20% and 100% methanol extracts was 20.8 ± 8.2% and 5.0 ± 3.2%, respectively. Antioxidant uptake was confirmed by measurement of catechin by HPLC-ESI-MS in the 20% methanol extract. The fact that all sequentially eluted extracts studied contributed to protective effects on the erythrocytes indicates that rose hips contain a promising level of clinically relevant antioxidant protection.

  17. THE NATURE OF THE HYPER-RUNAWAY CANDIDATE HIP 60350

    SciTech Connect

    Irrgang, Andreas; Przybilla, Norbert; Heber, Ulrich; Fernanda Nieva, M.; Schuh, Sonja

    2010-03-01

    Young, massive stars in the Galactic halo are widely supposed to be the result of an ejection event from the Galactic disk forcing some stars to leave their place of birth as so-called runaway stars. Here, we present a detailed spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of the runaway B star HIP 60350 to determine which runaway scenario-a supernova explosion disrupting a binary system or dynamical interaction in star clusters-may be responsible for HIP 60350's peculiar orbit. Based on a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium approach, a high-resolution optical echelle spectrum was examined to revise spectroscopic quantities and for the first time to perform a differential chemical abundance analysis with respect to the B-type star 18 Peg. The results together with proper motions from the Hipparcos Catalog further allowed the three-dimensional kinematics of the star to be studied numerically. The abundances derived for HIP 60350 are consistent with a slightly supersolar metallicity agreeing with the kinematically predicted place of birth {approx}6 kpc away from the Galactic center. However, they do not exclude the possibility of an alpha-enhanced abundance pattern expected in the case of the supernova scenario. Its outstanding high Galactic rest-frame velocity of 530 +- 35 km s{sup -1} is a consequence of ejection in the direction of Galactic rotation and slightly exceeds the local Galactic escape velocity in a standard Galactic potential. Hence, HIP 60350 may be unbound to the Galaxy.

  18. Prophylactic antibiotics in elective hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, C. J.; Metcalfe, D.; Elgohari, S.; Oswald, T.; Masters, J. P.; Rymaszewska, M.; Reed, M. R.; Sprowson†, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We wanted to investigate regional variations in the organisms reported to be causing peri-prosthetic infections and to report on prophylaxis regimens currently in use across England. Methods Analysis of data routinely collected by Public Health England’s (PHE) national surgical site infection database on elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures between April 2010 and March 2013 to investigate regional variations in causative organisms. A separate national survey of 145 hospital Trusts (groups of hospitals under local management) in England routinely performing primary hip and/or knee arthroplasty was carried out by standard email questionnaire. Results Analysis of 189 858 elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and 1116 surgical site infections found statistically significant variations for some causative organism between regions. There was a 100% response rate to the prophylaxis questionnaire that showed substantial variation between individual trust guidelines. A number of regimens currently in use are inconsistent with the best available evidence. Conclusions The approach towards antibiotic prophylaxis in elective arthroplasty nationwide reveals substantial variation without clear justification. Only seven causative organisms are responsible for 89% of infections affecting primary hip and knee arthroplasty, which cannot justify such widespread variation between prophylactic antibiotic policies. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:181–189. PMID:26585304

  19. Relationship between pelvic incidence and osteoarthritis of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, D. S.; Bohl, M. S.; Liu, R. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral spine, and specifically pelvic incidence (PI), has been implicated in the development of spine pathology, but generally ignored with regards to diseases of the hip. We aimed to determine if increased PI is correlated with higher rates of hip osteoarthritis (HOA). The effect of PI on the development of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) was used as a negative control. Methods We studied 400 well-preserved cadaveric skeletons ranging from 50 to 79 years of age at death. Each specimen’s OA of the hip and knee were graded using a previously described method. PI was measured from standardised lateral photographs of reconstructed pelvises. Multiple regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between age and PI with HOA and KOA. Results The mean age was 60.2 years (standard deviation (sd) 8.1), and the mean PI was 46.7° (sd 10.7°). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between increased PI and HOA (standardised beta = 0.103, p = 0.017). There was no correlation between PI and KOA (standardised beta = 0.003, p = 0.912). Conclusion Higher PI in the younger individual may contribute to the development of HOA in later life. Cite this article: Dr J. J. Gebhart. Relationship between pelvic incidence and osteoarthritis of the hip. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:66–72. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000552. PMID:26912384

  20. Retrieval analysis of 240 metal-on-metal hip components, comparing modular total hip replacement with hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Matthies, A; Underwood, R; Cann, P; Ilo, K; Nawaz, Z; Skinner, J; Hart, A J

    2011-03-01

    This study compared component wear rates and pre-revision blood metal ions levels in two groups of failed metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties: hip resurfacing and modular total hip replacement (THR). There was no significant difference in the median rate of linear wear between the groups for both acetabular (p = 0.4633) and femoral (p = 0.0872) components. There was also no significant difference in the median linear wear rates when failed hip resurfacing and modular THR hips of the same type (ASR and Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR)) were compared. Unlike other studies of well-functioning hips, there was no significant difference in pre-revision blood metal ion levels between hip resurfacing and modular THR. Edge loading was common in both groups, but more common in the resurfacing group (67%) than in the modular group (57%). However, this was not significant (p = 0.3479). We attribute this difference to retention of the neck in resurfacing of the hip, leading to impingement-type edge loading. This was supported by visual evidence of impingement on the femur. These findings show that failed metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and modular THRs have similar component wear rates and are both associated with raised pre-revision blood levels of metal ions. PMID:21357950

  1. The influence of hip rotation on femoral offset in plain radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Frink, Michael; Gulati, Aashish; Murray, David; Renkawitz, Tobias; Bücking, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Boese, Christoph Kolja

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Adequate restoration of femoral offset (FO) is critical for successful outcome after hip arthroplasty or fixation of hip fracture. Previous studies have identified that hip rotation influences the projected femoral offset (FOP) on plain anteroposterior (AP) radiographs, but the precise effect of rotation is unknown. Patients and methods We developed a novel method of assessing rotation-corrected femoral offset (FORC), tested its clinical application in 222 AP hip radiographs following proximal femoral nailing, and validated it in 25 cases with corresponding computed tomography (CT) scans. Results The mean FORC was 57 (29–93) mm, which differed significantly (p < 0.001) from the mean FOP 49 (22–65) mm and from the mean femoral offset determined by the standard method: 49 (23–66) mm. FORC correlated closely with femoral offset assessed by CT (FOCT); the Spearman correlation coefficient was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.88–0.97). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the assessment of FORC by AP hip radiographs correlating the repeated measurements of 1 observer and of 2 independent blinded observers was 1.0 and 1.0, respectively. Interpretation Hip rotation affects the FOP on plain AP radiographs of the hip in a predictable way and should be adequately accounted for. PMID:24954484

  2. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers.

  3. Osteonecrosis: avoiding total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2002-06-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head afflicts approximately 20,000 new patients per year, at an average age of 38. Of the patients seen in our institution, 25% are <25 years old. Without treatment, most of these patients can be expected to need a total hip arthroplasty. Joint-preserving procedures have a significant failure rate, and some have significant morbidity. It is desirable to avoid or delay total hip arthroplasty because most patients with osteonecrosis outlive the current state-of-the-art prostheses. Four issues need to be weighed to arrive at a reasonable algorithm for the preservative treatment of osteonecrosis: i) patient risk factors, ii) morbidity of the proposed procedure, iii) size of the lesion, and iv) stage of the lesion. All of the issues must be considered to make sense out of a complex clinical situation.

  4. Total hip replacement for developmental dysplasia of hip and postoperative nursing.

    PubMed

    Zong, S J; Wang, F; Hu, S L

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical effect of total hip replacement for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and analyze the postoperative nursing. Sixty patients (78 hips) aged 18-75 years (average 58.6±2.31 years) who received total hip replacement for treatment of DDH at the Zhengzhou People’s Hospital, Henan, China, from April 2013 to June 2016 were selected as research subjects. Twenty-four patients were male (30 hips) and 36 were female (48 hips). Of the 60 patients, according to Crowe typing, 24 were type I (30 hips), 26 were type II (34 hips), 6 were type III (8 hips) and 4 were type IV (6 hips). According to the Harris hip score system, the score of all hips was 39.46±3.56 points average (18-56 points) before treatment and resulted as 89.60±4.25 points (79-98 points) at the last follow-up, showing a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Complications such as wound infection, dislocation, fracture of femoral shaft, femoral nerve and injury of sciatic nerve were not found after treatment. A total of 48 cases (58 hips) obtained excellent curative results (93.33% recovery), 8 cases (14 hips) good (92.31% recovery), and 4 cases (6 hips) medium. Total hip replacement proved to be effective in treating DDH and secondary osteoarthritis. Moreover, soft tissue release and an optimum degree recovery of anatomic form and physiological function of the diseased hip is an important basis for reconstructing the acetabulum and stabilizing acetabulum prosthesis. PMID:27049089

  5. Osteoporotic Hip and Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Hip and spine fractures represent just a portion of the burden of osteoporosis; however, these fractures require treatment and often represent a major change in lifestyle for the patient and their family. The orthopedic surgeon plays a crucial role, not only in the treatment of these injuries but also providing guidance in prevention of future osteoporotic fractures. This review provides a brief epidemiology of the fractures, details the surgical techniques, and outlines the current treatment guidelines for orthopedic surgeons. PMID:26246944

  6. Candida glabrata prosthetic hip infection.

    PubMed

    Bartalesi, Filippo; Fallani, Stefania; Salomoni, Elena; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Meli, Massimo; Pecile, Patrizia; Cassetta, Maria Iris; Latella, Leonardo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Novelli, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    We present a case of a 60-year-old Caucasian woman carrying a 2-year-old hip prosthesis infected by Candida glabrata dose-dependent susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Resection arthroplasty was performed. Six weeks of caspofungin plus liposomal amphotericin combination therapy achieved joint sterilization and allowed a successfully reimplantation arthroplasty. In addition we review 9 cases of C. glabrata prosthetic joint infection described to date in the literature.

  7. Hip arthroplasty by matching cups.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Y

    1978-01-01

    A total hip surface arthroplasty consisting of matching cups and uncemented prosthetic components is a noteworthy operation. The femoral cup obtains cylindrical support from the femoral head which is reamed in the shape of a cylinder. The acetabular cup is metallic with a polyethylene liner. It is mobile over the bone but its position is constrained by contact with the femoral cup and therefore "self-centering." On the femoral side, the cup must be placed strictly in the axis of the femoral neck. The main consideration in femoral head surface replacement is the vitality of the underlying bone. Necrosis was observed in the earliest clinical trials but there have been no cases of necrosis in the past 3 1/2 years. This is attributed to a more limited surgical approach in which only the anterior part of the gluteus medius is divided and all the posterior elements of the hip are preserved. The acetabulum is sufficiently reamed to receive the cup, which protrudes beyond the external margins of the acetabulum in all positions. Errors have been committed while perfecting the prosthetic material, but the results as determined by a 6 1/2 year follow-up on purely metallic cups are encouraging. Metal-polyethylene cups presently under investigation have almost a 2 year follow-up. The reaction of the acetabulum to an uncemented cup is not yet known. However, the existence of 2 sliding surfaces and the fact that the acetabular cup moves only during the extremes of hip movement, is reason to assume that if the acetabulum is not reamed to expose cancellous bone, the risks of protrusion are minimal or delayed. Total surface arthroplasty by concentric cups has been performed in 335 hips to date. The operation is especially recommended when osteotomy is no longer possible and disabling coxarthrosis is present in relatively young patients. PMID:729253

  8. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Elmer E.

    1976-01-01

    Congenital dislocation or subluxation of the hip (congenital acetabular dysplasia) is a complete or partial displacement of the femoral head out of the acetabulum. The physical signs essential for diagnosis are age related. In newborns the tests for instability are the most sensitive. After the neonatal period, and until the age of walking, tightness of the adductor muscles is the most reliable sign. Early diagnosis is vital for successful treatment of this partially genetically determined condition. Various therapeutic measures, ranging from abduction splinting to open reduction and osteotomy, may be required. Following diagnosis in the first month of life, the average treatment time in one recent series was only 2.3 months from initiation of therapy to attainment of a normal hip. When the diagnosis was not made until 3 to 6 months of age, ten months of treatment was required to achieve the same outcome. When the diagnosis is not made, or the treatment is not begun until after the age of 6, a normal hip will probably not develop in any patient. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:1251603

  9. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancharoen, K.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω.

  10. Cover Story: The Miseducation of Hip-Hop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    2000-01-01

    Some higher education officials believe that hip-hop music is eating away at the morals, and ultimately the classroom experience, of today's college students. Discusses why the gap exists between student and faculty attitudes toward hip-hop, how hip-hop music represents blackness, how people perceive hip-hop youth, the positive side of hip-hop,…

  11. Recent trends in hip fracture rates by race/ethnicity among older US adults.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicole C; Saag, Kenneth G; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Smith, Wilson K; Kilgore, Meredith L; Morrisey, Michael A; Yun, Huifeng; Zhang, Jie; Delzell, Elizabeth S

    2012-11-01

    Hip fracture incidence has declined among whites in the United States since 1995, but data on recent trends in racial and ethnic minorities are limited. The goal of this analysis was to investigate hip fracture incidence trends in racial/ethnic subgroups of older Medicare beneficiaries. We conducted a cohort study to determine annual hip fracture incidence rates from 2000 through 2009 using the Medicare national random 5% sample. Beneficiaries were eligible if they were ≥65 years of age and had 90 days of consecutive full fee-for-service Medicare coverage with no hip fracture claims. Race/ethnicity was self-reported. The incidence of hip fracture was identified using hospital diagnosis codes or outpatient diagnosis codes paired with fracture repair procedure codes. We computed age-standardized race/ethnicity-specific incidence rates and assessed trends in the rates over time using linear regression. On average, 821,475 women and 632,162 men were included in the analysis each year. Beneficiaries were predominantly white (88%), with African, Hispanic, and Asian Americans making up 8%, 1.5%, and 1.5% of the population, respectively. We identified 102,849, 4,119, 813, and 1,294 hip fractures in white, black, Asian, and Hispanic beneficiaries over the 10 years. A significant decreasing trend (p < 0.05) in hip fracture incidence from 2000-2001 to 2008-2009 was present in white women and men. Black and Asian beneficiaries experienced nonsignificant declines. Irrespective of gender, the largest rate of decline was seen in beneficiaries ≥75 years of age. The overall and age-specific rates of Hispanic women or men changed minimally over time. Hip fracture incidence rates continued to decline in recent years among white Medicare beneficiaries. Further research is needed to understand mechanisms responsible for declining rates in some and not others, as hip fractures continue to be a major problem among the elderly.

  12. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  13. Metal-on-metal hip joint tribology.

    PubMed

    Dowson, D; Jin, Z M

    2006-02-01

    The basic tribological features of metal-on-metal total hip replacements have been reviewed to facilitate an understanding of the engineering science underpinning the renaissance of these hard-on-hard joints. Metal-on-polymer hip replacements operate in the boundary lubrication regime, thus leading to the design guidance to reduce the femoral head diameter as much as is feasible to minimize frictional torque and volumetric wear. This explains why the gold-standard implant of this form from the past half-century had a diameter of only 22.225 mm (7/8 in). Metal-on-metal implants can operate in the mild mixed lubrication regime in which much of the applied load is supported by elastohydrodynamic films. Correct tribological design leads to remarkably low steady state wear rates. Promotion of the most effective elastohydrodynamic films calls for the largest possible head diameters and the smallest clearances that can reasonably be adopted, consistent with fine surface finishes, good sphericity and minimal structural elastic deformation of the cup on its foundations. This guidance, which is opposite in form to that developed for metal-on-polymer joints, is equally valid for solid (monolithic) metallic heads on metallic femoral stems and surface replacement femoral shells. Laboratory measurements of friction and wear in metal-on-metal joints have confirmed their potential to achieve a very mild form of mixed lubrication. The key lies in the generation of effective elastohydrodynamic lubricating films of adequate thickness compared with the composite roughness of the head and cup. The calculation of the film thickness is by no means easy, but the full procedure is outlined and the use of an empirical formula that displays good agreement with calculations based upon the full numerical solutions is explained. The representation of the lambda ratio, lambda, embracing both film thickness and composite roughness, is described.

  14. Hip involvement in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, K; Fex, E; Johnsson, K; Geborek, P

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study early hip involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography in the detection of hip joint synovitis in RA. METHODS--Study I: The number of hip joint replacements was recorded in a cohort of 113 patients with RA of at least five years disease duration followed from an early stage. Study II: Ultrasonography was evaluated as a method to identify hip joint synovitis in 76 patients with RA of shorter disease duration, by relating it to radiograms and clinical findings. RESULTS--Study I: Twenty one hip joint replacements were performed in 15 of the 113 patients. The median disease duration at the time of first arthroplasty was 48 (range 10-76) months; the annual incidence was approximately constant between two and six years. High disease activity at the start of the study was predictive of requirement for hip prosthesis. Study II: Hip ultrasonography was pathological in 13 of the 76 patients studied, bilaterally in nine. Hip joint synovitis could not be confirmed on clinical grounds only as seven of the patients with positive ultrasonographic findings were asymptomatic, and the remaining six patients had only mild symptoms of hip involvement. Also, six of the 63 patients with normal ultrasonography had mild symptoms. There was no difference regarding demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings in patients with and without hip synovitis. CONCLUSIONS--Early hip joint destruction giving symptoms mostly at a very late stage is frequent in RA. Ultrasonography rather than signs or symptoms could identify patients with hip joint involvement and provide a rationale for early treatment. Images PMID:7880121

  15. Pelvic Incidence in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Ibrahim J.; Rasouli, Mohammad R.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Restrepo, Santiago; Albert, Todd J.; Radcliff, Kris E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain and disability that results in considerable social and medical costs. Mechanics such as posture, alignment and orientation of the hips and the spinal column and the relationship between these factors have been implicated in the development of both hip and spine pathologies. This study aims to test the hypothesis if pelvic incidence varies in patients with and without osteoarthritis. We assessed the relationship between spinopelvic alignment as measured by pelvic incidence (PI) and the presence of hip OA. Methods: We collected supine pelvis CT scans of 1,012 consecutive patients not known to have hip OA. Our first group consisted of 95 patients with moderate to severe hip OA as per radiology reports. The second group included 87 patients with no evidence of hip OA. Power analysis revealed the need for 77 patients per group to find a mean difference in PI of 5° or less between both groups. Two trained physicians independently measured the PI to account for inter-observer reliability. Results: Patients with moderate to severe hip OA had a mean PI of 56.5°±12.8°. The mean PI for patients without hip OA was 57.2°±7.5°. An independent samples t-test revealed no significant difference between the PI values of the two groups. Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.754 demonstrated a high inter-observer reliability. Conclusion: There was no difference in PI angle of hip OA patients and “healthy” patients. Our measurements of patients without OA were almost identical to the reported normal PI values in the literature. It appears that hip OA is not associated with PI angle, refuting the hypothesis made in previous studies, stating that elevated PI contributes to the future development of hip arthritis. CT scan seems to be a reliable and accurate way of assessing pelvic incidence. PMID:27200390

  16. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  17. International variation in hip replacement rates

    PubMed Central

    Merx, H; Dreinhofer, K; Schrader, P; Sturmer, T; Puhl, W; Gunther, K; Brenner, H

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To summarise epidemiological data on the frequency of hip replacements in the countries of the developed world, especially in countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and to investigate whether missing consensus criteria for the indication for total hip replacement (THR) result in different replacement rates. Methods: Country-specific hip replacement rates were collected using the available literature, different data sources of national authorities, and estimates of leading hip replacement manufacturers. Results: According to administrative and literature data sources the reported crude primary THR rate varied between 50 and 130 procedures/100 000 inhabitants in OECD countries in the 1990s. The crude overall hip implantation rate, summarising THR, partial hip replacement, and hip revision procedures, was reported to range from 60 to 200 procedures/100 000 inhabitants in the late 1990s. Moreover, large national differences were seen in the relationship between total and partial hip replacement procedures. Conclusion: The reported differences in hip replacement rates in OECD countries are substantial. They may be due to various causes, including different coding systems, country-specific differences in the healthcare system, in total expenditure on health per capita, in the population age structure, and in different indication criteria for THR. PMID:12594106

  18. Surgical hip dislocation: techniques for success.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Sink, Ernest L

    2014-01-01

    Surgical hip dislocation (SHD) is a versatile approach used to address both intra-articular and extra-articular pathology around the hip joint in both pediatric and adult patients. It allows anterior dislocation of the femoral head for direct visualization of the hip joint while preserving femoral head vascularity and minimizing trauma to the abductor musculature. Previously described indications for SHD include femoroacetabular impingement, deformity resulting from Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, periarticular trauma, benign lesions of the hip joint, and osteochondral lesions. In this review, we will describe current surgical techniques, indications, and clinical outcomes for SHD. PMID:25207733

  19. Modular noncemented total hip arthroplasty for congenital dislocation of the hip. Case report and design rationale.

    PubMed

    Gorski, J M

    1988-03-01

    The highest rate of failure and the greatest technical difficulty in total hip arthroplasty occurs with congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH). Predisposing factors are failure to secure special femoral components to fit an extremely narrow and straight medullary cavity with space for only a very thin mantle of cement. The acetabulum is usually atrophic, and bone grafts are commonly required to support a small-diameter cup. The young age of the average patient and high levels of activity contribute to cement failure. A new modular cementless prosthesis provides excellent immediate skeletal fixation and pain relief in CDH patients. Five modular components are screwed or press-fit into bone. The modular approach facilitates implantation, reduces inventory, and is adaptable to unforeseen problems. These advantages are ordinarily absent with standard or custom cemented components. Modular components may also permit easier revision. The prosthesis is made of titanium alloy for its superalloy strength, elastic modulus, and bioinertness. By omitting the cement mantle, press-fit is obtained with the largest possible implant. The large size minimizes stem breakage in these young, small bones. Excellent short-term results suggest that modular cementless implants are indicated in some patients with CDH.

  20. Modular noncemented total hip arthroplasty for congenital dislocation of the hip. Case report and design rationale.

    PubMed

    Gorski, J M

    1988-03-01

    The highest rate of failure and the greatest technical difficulty in total hip arthroplasty occurs with congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH). Predisposing factors are failure to secure special femoral components to fit an extremely narrow and straight medullary cavity with space for only a very thin mantle of cement. The acetabulum is usually atrophic, and bone grafts are commonly required to support a small-diameter cup. The young age of the average patient and high levels of activity contribute to cement failure. A new modular cementless prosthesis provides excellent immediate skeletal fixation and pain relief in CDH patients. Five modular components are screwed or press-fit into bone. The modular approach facilitates implantation, reduces inventory, and is adaptable to unforeseen problems. These advantages are ordinarily absent with standard or custom cemented components. Modular components may also permit easier revision. The prosthesis is made of titanium alloy for its superalloy strength, elastic modulus, and bioinertness. By omitting the cement mantle, press-fit is obtained with the largest possible implant. The large size minimizes stem breakage in these young, small bones. Excellent short-term results suggest that modular cementless implants are indicated in some patients with CDH. PMID:3342552

  1. Hip2Norm: an object-oriented cross-platform program for 3D analysis of hip joint morphology using 2D pelvic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G; Tannast, M; Anderegg, C; Siebenrock, K A; Langlotz, F

    2007-07-01

    We developed an object-oriented cross-platform program to perform three-dimensional (3D) analysis of hip joint morphology using two-dimensional (2D) anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs. Landmarks extracted from 2D AP pelvic radiographs and optionally an additional lateral pelvic X-ray were combined with a cone beam projection model to reconstruct 3D hip joints. Since individual pelvic orientation can vary considerably, a method for standardizing pelvic orientation was implemented to determine the absolute tilt/rotation. The evaluation of anatomically morphologic differences was achieved by reconstructing the projected acetabular rim and the measured hip parameters as if obtained in a standardized neutral orientation. The program had been successfully used to interactively objectify acetabular version in hips with femoro-acetabular impingement or developmental dysplasia. Hip(2)Norm is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway) for graphical user interface (GUI) and is transportable to any platform. PMID:17499878

  2. Hip2Norm: an object-oriented cross-platform program for 3D analysis of hip joint morphology using 2D pelvic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G; Tannast, M; Anderegg, C; Siebenrock, K A; Langlotz, F

    2007-07-01

    We developed an object-oriented cross-platform program to perform three-dimensional (3D) analysis of hip joint morphology using two-dimensional (2D) anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs. Landmarks extracted from 2D AP pelvic radiographs and optionally an additional lateral pelvic X-ray were combined with a cone beam projection model to reconstruct 3D hip joints. Since individual pelvic orientation can vary considerably, a method for standardizing pelvic orientation was implemented to determine the absolute tilt/rotation. The evaluation of anatomically morphologic differences was achieved by reconstructing the projected acetabular rim and the measured hip parameters as if obtained in a standardized neutral orientation. The program had been successfully used to interactively objectify acetabular version in hips with femoro-acetabular impingement or developmental dysplasia. Hip(2)Norm is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway) for graphical user interface (GUI) and is transportable to any platform.

  3. Sensitivity to metals in 40 patients with failed hip endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Milavec-Puretić, V; Orlić, D; Marusić, A

    1998-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to metals and tissue reaction around a failed implant were investigated in 40 patients undergoing revision hip arthroplasty. Metal sensitivity was tested using a standard cutaneous patch test. Nine patients were positive for chromium, nickel, cobalt, metal rust or endoprosthesis scrapings, or combinations of these allergens. Patients with positive or negative patch test did not differ in terms of their age, sex, primary diagnosis, number of endoprosthesis revisions, length of implant function, presence of other metal parts around the implant, circulating immunocomplexes, and histological appearance of the tissue around the implant. We conclude that stainless steel endoprostheses may be safely used for repeated revision hip arthroplasty, and that hypersensitivity to metals probably does not play a significant role in the loosening of the endoprosthesis.

  4. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear. PMID:26375527

  5. Knitted outer gloves in primary hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tanner, J; Wraighte, P; Howard, P

    2006-01-01

    A randomised trial was carried out to determine the rate of perforation to inner gloves when comparing latex with knitted gloves during hip and knee arthroplasty. Members of the surgical team were randomised to wear either two pairs of latex gloves (standard double gloving) or a knitted glove on top of a latex glove. In addition, participants completed a visual analogue assessment of their overall satisfaction with the gloves. A total of 406 inner gloves were tested for perforations over a four-month period: 23% of inner gloves were perforated when latex outer gloves were used and 6% of inner gloves were perforated when knitted outer gloves were used. In total, there were 64 perforations to the inner gloves; only one of these perforations was detected by the glove wearer. Wearing knitted outer gloves during hip and knee arthroplasty statistically significantly reduces the risk of perforation to inner latex gloves (p<0.0001).

  6. Abnormal Development of the Femoral Head Epiphysis in an Infant with no Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Apparent on Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Hakan; Gunay, Cuneyd; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the investigation of hip development in newborns and infants, ultrasonography and radiography are widely used, but their optimal roles in this setting remain controversial. Case Report: Here we describe an 8.5-month-old infant who had undergone hip radiography at a primary care facility and was referred to our hospital to be evaluated for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Ultrasonography showed no developmental dysplasia of the hip according to standard criteria, but developmental retardation of the femoral head was apparent on the radiograph. Conclusion: This patient's findings demonstrate that abnormalities in femoral head epiphysis development can go undetected during routine ultrasonographic evaluations for developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:27298982

  7. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    are a focus of concern. Risk of Cancer To date, only one study has examined the incidence of cancer after MOM and polyethylene on metal total hip arthroplasties. The results were compared to that of general population in Finland. The mean duration of follow-up for MOM arthroplasty was 15.7 years; for polyethylene arthroplasty, it was 12.5 years. The standardized incidence ratio for all cancers in the MOM group was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.79–1.13). In the polyethylene on metal group it was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.68–0.86). The combined standardized incidence ratio for lymphoma and leukemia in the patients who had MOM THR was 1.59 (95% CI, 0.82–2.77). It was 0.59 (95% CI, 0.29–1.05) for the patients who had polyethylene on metal THR. Patients with MOM THR had a significantly higher risk of leukemia. All patients who had leukemia were aged over than 60 years. Cobalt Cardiotoxicity   Epidemiological Studies of Myocardiopathy of Beer Drinkers An unusual type of myocardiopathy, characterized by pericardial effusion, elevated hemoglobin concentrations, and congestive heart failure, occurred as an epidemic affecting 48 habitual beer drinkers in Quebec City between 1965 and 1966. This epidemic was directly related the consumption of a popular beer containing cobalt sulfate. The epidemic appeared 1 month after cobalt sulfate was added to the specific brewery, and no further cases were seen a month after this specific chemical was no longer used in making this beer. A beer of the same name is made in Montreal, and the only difference at that time was that the Quebec brand of beer contained about 10 times more cobalt sulphate. Cobalt has been added to some Canadian beers since 1965 to improve the stability of the foam but it has been added in larger breweries only to draught beer. However, in small breweries, such as those in Quebec City, separate batches were not brewed for bottle and draught beer; therefore, cobalt was added to all of the beer processed in this brewery. In March 1966

  8. Burnishing Techniques Strengthen Hip Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1990s, Lambda Research Inc., of Cincinnati, Ohio, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn Research Center to demonstrate low plasticity burnishing (LPB) on metal engine components. By producing a thermally stable deep layer of compressive residual stress, LPB significantly strengthened turbine alloys. After Lambda patented the process, the Federal Aviation Administration accepted LPB for repair and alteration of commercial aircraft components, the U.S. Department of Energy found LPB suitable for treating nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain. Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed LPB to completely eliminate the occurrence of fretting fatigue failures in modular hip implants.

  9. Infection after primary hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The aim of the present study was to assess incidence of and risk factors for infection after hip arthroplasty in data from 3 national health registries. We investigated differences in risk patterns between surgical site infection (SSI) and revision due to infection after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and hemiarthroplasty (HA). Materials and methods This observational study was based on prospective data from 2005–2009 on primary THAs and HAs from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR), the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register (NHFR), and the Norwegian Surveillance System for Healthcare–Associated Infections (NOIS). The Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) was used for evaluation of case reporting. Cox regression analyses were performed with revision due to infection as endpoint for data from the NAR and the NHFR, and with SSI as the endpoint for data from the NOIS. Results The 1–year incidence of SSI in the NOIS was 3.0% after THA (167/5,540) and 7.3% after HA (103/1,416). The 1–year incidence of revision due to infection was 0.7% for THAs in the NAR (182/24,512) and 1.5% for HAs in the NHFR (128/8,262). Risk factors for SSI after THA were advanced age, ASA class higher than 2, and short duration of surgery. For THA, the risk factors for revision due to infection were male sex, advanced age, ASA class higher than 1, emergency surgery, uncemented fixation, and a National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) risk index of 2 or more. For HAs inserted after fracture, age less than 60 and short duration of surgery were risk factors of revision due to infection. Interpretation The incidences of SSI and revision due to infection after primary hip replacements in Norway are similar to those in other countries. There may be differences in risk pattern between SSI and revision due to infection after arthroplasty. The risk patterns for revision due to infection appear to be different for HA and THA. PMID:22066562

  10. HIP Joining of Cemented Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Derby, B.; Miodownik, M.

    1999-04-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is investigated as a technique for joining the cermet WC-15% Co to itself. Encapsulation of the specimens prior to HIPing was carried out using steel encapsulation, glass encapsulation and self encapsulation. The bonds were evaluated using a four point bend method. It is shown that the glass and steel encapsulation methods have a number of inherent problems which make them inappropriate for near net shape processing. In contrast the novel self encapsulation method, described for the first time in this communication, is both simple and effective, producing joined material with bulk strength. The concept of self encapsulation is potentially widely applicable for joining composite materials.

  11. Botulinum toxin type A injections for the management of muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Anil; Zywiel, Michael G; Ulrich, Slif D; McGrath, Mike S; Seyler, Thorsten M; Marker, David R; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Background Development of hip adductor, tensor fascia lata, and rectus femoris muscle contractures following total hip arthroplasties are quite common, with some patients failing to improve despite treatment with a variety of non-operative modalities. The purpose of the present study was to describe the use of and patient outcomes of botulinum toxin injections as an adjunctive treatment for muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty. Methods Ten patients (14 hips) who had hip adductor, abductor, and/or flexor muscle contractures following total arthroplasty and had been refractory to physical therapeutic efforts were treated with injection of botulinum toxin A. Eight limbs received injections into the adductor muscle, 8 limbs received injections into the tensor fascia lata muscle, and 2 limbs received injection into the rectus femoris muscle, followed by intensive physical therapy for 6 weeks. Results At a mean final follow-up of 20 months, all 14 hips had increased range in the affected arc of motion, with a mean improvement of 23 degrees (range, 10 to 45 degrees). Additionally all hips had an improvement in hip scores, with a significant increase in mean score from 74 points (range, 57 to 91 points) prior to injection to a mean of 96 points (range, 93 to 98) at final follow-up. There were no serious treatment-related adverse events. Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injections combined with intensive physical therapy may be considered as a potential treatment modality, especially in difficult cases of muscle tightness that are refractory to standard therapy. PMID:19709429

  12. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  13. Process for HIP canning of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A single step is relied on in the canning process for hot isostatic pressing (HIP) metallurgy composites. The composites are made from arc sprayed and plasma sprayed monotape. The HIP can is of compatible refractory metal and is sealed at high vacuum and temperature. This eliminates outgassing during hot isostatic pressing.

  14. Hip Arthroscopy: Tales From the Crypt.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Philippon, Marc J; Safran, Marc R; Sampson, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Complications after hip arthroscopy vary in frequency and severity, even for experienced surgeons. It is important for surgeons to be aware of some of the more dramatic, often unusual, and always memorable (nightmarish) complications of hip arthroscopy and understand how they are caused, how they can be treated, and how they can be prevented.

  15. Hip Arthroscopy: Tales From the Crypt.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Philippon, Marc J; Safran, Marc R; Sampson, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Complications after hip arthroscopy vary in frequency and severity, even for experienced surgeons. It is important for surgeons to be aware of some of the more dramatic, often unusual, and always memorable (nightmarish) complications of hip arthroscopy and understand how they are caused, how they can be treated, and how they can be prevented. PMID:27049210

  16. Sonography of Sports Injuries of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Aaron R. L.; Seidenberg, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports-related injuries of the hip are a common complaint of both competitive and recreational athletes of all ages. The anatomic and biomechanical complexity of the hip region often cause diagnostic uncertainty for the clinicians evaluating these injuries. Therefore, obtaining additional diagnostic information is often crucial for providing injured athletes with a prompt and accurate diagnosis so they can return to activity as soon as possible. Musculoskeletal ultrasound is becoming increasingly important in evaluating and treating sports-related injuries of the hip. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in May of 2013 for English-language articles pertaining to sonography of sports injuries of the hip using the following keywords in various combinations: musculoskeletal, ultrasound, hip, hip sonography, and sports. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Musculoskeletal ultrasound is currently being used for both diagnosis and treatment in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions affecting the hip, including tendinosis, tendon/muscle strains, ligamentous sprains, enthesopathies, growth plate injuries, fractures, bursitis, effusions, synovitis, labral tears, and snapping hip. Therapeutically, it is used to guide injections, aspirations, and biopsies. Conclusion: Musculoskeletal ultrasound use is expanding and will likely continue to do so as more clinicians realize its capabilities. Characteristics, including accessibility, portability, noninvasiveness, dynamic examination, power Doppler examination, and low cost highlight the potential of ultrasound. PMID:25364486

  17. Minimally invasive total hip replacement: the posterolateral approach.

    PubMed

    Bottner, Friedrich; Delgado, Samuel; Sculco, Thomas P

    2006-05-01

    Our experience with the posterolateral mini-incision technique over the last 8 years has shown that total hip arthroplasty can be performed safely and effectively in properly selected patients through a much smaller incision than the one traditionally used. The main advantage of the posterolateral approach compared with other mini-incisions is its simplicity, with shortened operating time as a result. While the surgical time for a posterior approach is an average of 37 to 70 minutes throughout the literature, the 2-incision approach prolongs the surgery by a factor of 2 or 3. Compared with the anterior or 2-incision approach, the posterolateral and anterolateral approaches also have a much lower incidence of perioperative complications, with the rate being similar to rates seen with a standard incision. For the 2-incision technique and the anterior mini-incision approach, perioperative periprosthetic fracture rates of up to 8.7% and 8.4%, respectively, have been described. Surgeons who traditionally used an anterolateral standard approach might prefer an anterolateral mini-incision. The anterolateral mini-incision total hip arthroplasty has demonstrated excellent results; in the past it was suggested that the anterolateral approach has a higher incidence of heterotopic bone formation and impaired early abductor function, but more recent studies show no difference in abductor strength and limping between the anterolateral and posterior approaches. On the other hand, the posterior approach has been associated with an increased risk of postoperative dislocations. We did not encounter an increased incidence of postoperative dislocation at our institution. This might be related to the routine repair of the external rotators and the capsule in all patients. In summary, both the anterolateral and the posterior mini-incision approaches are reasonable alternatives, and surgeons should choose the approach that they feel most comfortable with. Statements in the press and by

  18. Asymmetric Hip Rotation in Professional Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Patrick C.; Patel, Jayesh K.; Ramkumar, Prem N.; Noble, Philip C.; Lintner, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a renewed interest in examining the association between hip range of motion and injury in athletes, and the data on baseball players are conflicting. Understanding whether asymmetrical hip rotation is a normal adaptation or a risk factor for injury will help therapists, trainers, and physicians develop rehabilitation programs to improve kinetic energy transfer and prevent injury. As our knowledge of hip pathology among baseball pitchers improves, establishing baselines for hip motion is critical in the further assessment of injury. Hypothesis: Because of the repetitive nature of throwing sports and the adaptive changes documented in the shoulder, elite baseball pitchers would have characteristic patterns of hip internal and external rotations on their dominant throwing side (stance) and their nondominant side (stride) in extension. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Computer software was used to measure passive internal and external rotations on digital photographs of 111 professional baseball pitchers. Results: In right-handed pitchers, there was significantly more internal rotation in the stance hip than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349) and significantly more external rotation in the stride hip than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001). While the mean difference in external rotation was 4.7°, 32% of the subjects had a >10° increase in external rotation on the stride hip relative to the stance hip. This population was statistically different from the remaining group for older age (P = .0053), lower body mass index (P = .0379), and more years in professional baseball (P = .0328). In the smaller number of left-handed pitchers, side-to-side differences in hip rotation were found but were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Pitchers showed more internal rotation on their stance hip and more external rotation on their stride hip. Although the mean

  19. Auditing hip ultrasound screening of infants at increased risk of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, C; Donoghue, V; Murphy, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Clinical examination, while useful, has been shown to be insufficient as the sole screening method in infants. Ultrasound examination at 8 weeks in high risk infants is an integral part of the screening process in some units. Aims: To show the efficiency of hip sonography in detection of developmental dysplasia of the hips in those without clinically dislocated hips. Methods: All infants born at the National Maternity Hospital between January 1994 and December 2001 were included. All those with clinically dislocated hips were treated by a Pavlik harness and referred for follow up to a paediatric orthopaedic surgeon. An 8 week hip ultrasound scan was performed for those infants with stable hips on examination but who met the following criteria: (1) a first degree relative with congenital dislocation of hips; (2) breech presentation at birth; and (3) a persistent "click" at birth in an otherwise stable hip. Results: During the period of study a total of 52 893 infants were born in the National Maternity Hospital. Based on the criteria above, 5485 hip ultrasound scans were performed. Of those scanned, 18 (0.33%) were found to have dislocated hips and 153 (2.78%) to have dysplasic hips. The 18 infants with dislocation were treated with Pavlik harness; the remaining 153 were followed up by serial ultrasound examinations but did not require active intervention. Conclusions: Among the population of infants at increased risk of developmental dysplasia of the hip, the hip screening programme identified 18 cases among 5485 infants; a rate of 3.2 per 1000. Hip sonography is therefore worthwhile. PMID:15908620

  20. Persons with Chronic Hip Joint Pain Exhibit Reduced Hip Muscle Strength

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Michael J.; Sahrmann, Shirley A.; Bloom, Nancy J.; Steger-May, Karen; Clohisy, John C.; Salsich, Gretchen B.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Controlled Laboratory Cross-Sectional Study OBJECTIVES To assess strength differences of the hip rotator and abductor muscle groups in young adults with chronic hip joint pain (CHJP) and asymptomatic controls. A secondary objective was to determine if strength in the uninvolved hip of those with unilateral CHJP differs from asymptomatic controls. BACKGROUND Little is known about the relationship between hip muscle strength and CHJP in young adults. METHODS 35 participants with CHJP and 35 matched controls (18 to 40 years of age) participated. Using hand-held dynamometry, strength of the hip external rotators (ERs) and internal rotators (IRs) was assessed with the hip flexed to 90° (ERs90°, IRs90°) and 0° (ERs0°, IRs0°). To assess ER and IR strength, the hip was placed at the end-range of external rotation and internal rotation, respectively. Strength of the hip abductors (ABDs) was assessed in sidelying, with the hip in 15° of abduction. Break tests were performed to determine maximum muscle force and the average torque was calculated using the corresponding moment arm. Independent samples t-tests were used to compare strength values between the 1) involved limb in participants with CHJP and corresponding limb in the matched controls and 2) the uninvolved limb in participants with unilateral CHJP and corresponding limb in the matched controls. RESULTS Compared to controls, participants with CHJP demonstrated weakness of 16–28%, (P<0.01) in all muscle groups tested in the involved hip. The uninvolved hip of 22 subjects with unilateral CHJP demonstrated weakness of 18% and 16% (P<0.05) in the ERs0° and ABDs, respectively when compared to the corresponding limb of the matched controls. CONCLUSION Our results demonstrate that persons with CHJP have weakness in the hip rotator and hip abductor muscles. Weakness also was found in the uninvolved hip of persons with CHJP. PMID:25299750

  1. Rehabilitation of the hip following sports injury.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Timothy F; Slattery, Aimee A

    2010-01-01

    An athlete often presents to the rehabilitation specialist with either a nonspecific referral, such as "hip pain," or with a diagnosis of a more specific hip pathology. The highly skilled clinician is trained to look at the "linkage" between the trunk and all parts of the lower extremity. Why is the hip not transferring the load well? Where is the breakdown? The gluteus medius, pelvic stability, and supportive muscular slings are of great importance when optimizing the function of the hip. The hip is subjected to forces equal to multiples of the body weight and requires osseous, articular and myofascial integrity for stability. This is the mind set when devising an athlete's rehabilitative program, looking at all influential factors that affect joint movement and integrity.

  2. Unstable total hip arthroplasty: detailed overview.

    PubMed

    Berry, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hip dislocation is one of the most common complications of THA. Good preoperative planning, good postoperative patient education, accurate intraoperative component positioning, rigorous intraoperative testing of hip stability, and good repair of soft tissues during closure all help prevent dislocation. Early postoperative dislocations and first or second dislocations usually are treated with closed reduction and a hip guide brace or hip spica cast, but when dislocation becomes recurrent, surgical treatment usually is needed. When possible, surgical treatment is based on identifying and treating a specific problem leading to the dislocation, such as implant malposition, inadequate soft-tissue tension, or impingement. In selected circumstances, constrained implants or bipolar or tripolar implants provide powerful tools to restore hip stability.

  3. Review of quality of x-rays for templating for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faiz; Ahmad, Tayyab; Condon, Finbarr; Lenehan, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Digital templating of x-rays for total hip arthroplasty is used routinely for pre-operative planning. This is to assure that appropriately sized implants are selected to replicate patient's hip biomechanics. Multiple studies have shown that templating does not always correspond to the final implants used. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of the x-rays taken pre-operatively for templating for total hip arthroplasty. We undertook a review of a series of pre-operative templating pelvis x-rays in 100 consecutive patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. These x-rays were compared against set criteria to determine their suitability for use for templating. We determined that six x-rays met the criteria whereas ninety four x-rays did not meet the criteria for suitable x-rays. Twenty patients had repeat x-rays. The reasons for unsuitability were inadequate opposite femur (66%), absence or incomplete template (54%), inadequate femur length (47%), external rotation (39%), absence of opposite hip (4%). The twenty repeated x-rays were also reviewed for the same parameters and two (10%) satisfied the established criteria. It is imperative that x-rays for templating for total hip arthroplasty are done to a strict standard to obtain an x-ray that is appropriate for templating and there is minimal exposure of the patient to irradiation.

  4. Arthroscopic Treatment for Primary Septic Arthritis of the Hip in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Primary septic arthritis is a rare differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in adults. Inspired by the success of all-arthroscopic treatment in pediatric patients, we developed a diagnostic and surgical pathway for our adult patients. Methods. Seven patients, average age 44 ± 13.7 years with acute hip pain since 4.4 ± 2.9 days in the average, were included. Septic arthritis was confirmed by joint aspiration and dissemination was excluded by MRI and standard radiographs. Surgical treatment consisted of immediate arthroscopic lavage using 4 portals for debridement, high-volume irrigation, partial synovectomy, and drainage. Results. Patients were treated in hospital for 12.4 ± 3.1 days (range 7–16 days). WBC and CRP returned to physiological levels. During the mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 19.4 months (range 13–66 months) no patient showed recurrence of infection. The 5 patients with an unimpaired hip joint prior to the infection had a mean modified Harris Hip Score of 94 ± 5.6 points (range 91–100) at final follow-up. Conclusions. Arthroscopic therapy using a minimally invasive approach with low perioperative morbidity for the treatment of primary septic arthritis of the adult hip is able to restore normal hip function in acute cases without dissemination of the infection. Level of Evidence. IV. PMID:27800188

  5. Association between market concentration of hospitals and patient health gain following hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pistollato, Michele; Charlesworth, Anita; Devlin, Nancy; Propper, Carol; Sussex, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between market concentration of hospitals (as a proxy for competition) and patient-reported health gains after elective primary hip replacement surgery. Methods Patient Reported Outcome Measures data linked to NHS Hospital Episode Statistics in England in 2011/12 were used to analyse the association between market concentration of hospitals measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) and health gains for 337 hospitals. Results The association between market concentration and patient gain in health status measured by the change in Oxford Hip Score (OHS) after primary hip replacement surgery was not statistically significant at the 5% level both for the average patient and for those with more than average severity of hip disease (OHS worse than average). For 12,583 (49.1%) patients with an OHS before hip replacement surgery better than the mean, a one standard deviation increase in the HHI, equivalent to a reduction of about one hospital in the local market, was associated with a 0.104 decrease in patients’ self-reported improvement in OHS after surgery, but this was not statistically significant at the 5% level. Conclusions Hospital market concentration (as a proxy for competition) appears to have no significant influence (at the 5% level) on the outcome of elective primary hip replacement. The generalizability of this finding needs to be investigated. PMID:25213207

  6. Risk estimates for hip fracture from clinical and densitometric variables and impact of database selection in Lebanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Badra, Mohammad; Mehio-Sibai, Abla; Zeki Al-Hazzouri, Adina; Abou Naja, Hala; Baliki, Ghassan; Salamoun, Mariana; Afeiche, Nadim; Baddoura, Omar; Bulos, Suhayl; Haidar, Rachid; Lakkis, Suhayl; Musharrafieh, Ramzi; Nsouli, Afif; Taha, Assaad; Tayim, Ahmad; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2009-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture incidence vary greatly worldwide. The data, if any, on clinical and densitometric characteristics of patients with hip fractures from the Middle East are scarce. The objective of the study was to define risk estimates from clinical and densitometric variables and the impact of database selection on such estimates. Clinical and densitometric information were obtained in 60 hip fracture patients and 90 controls. Hip fracture subjects were 74 yr (9.4) old, were significantly taller, lighter, and more likely to be taking anxiolytics and sleeping pills than controls. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) database selection resulted in a higher sensitivity and almost equal specificity in identifying patients with a hip fracture compared with the Lebanese database. The odds ratio (OR) and its confidence interval (CI) for hip fracture per standard deviation (SD) decrease in total hip BMD was 2.1 (1.45-3.05) with the NHANES database, and 2.11 (1.36-2.37) when adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI). Risk estimates were higher in male compared with female subjects. In Lebanese subjects, BMD- and BMI-derived hip fracture risk estimates are comparable to western standards. The study validates the universal use of the NHANES database, and the applicability of BMD- and BMI-derived risk fracture estimates in the World Health Organization (WHO) global fracture risk model, to the Lebanese. PMID:19246223

  7. Automated measurement of diagnostic angles for hip dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Raedt, Sepp; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken; Rømer, Lone; Søballe, Kjeld; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2013-03-01

    A fully automatic method for measuring diagnostic angles of hip dysplasia is presented. The method consists of the automatic segmentation of CT images and detection of anatomical landmarks on the femur and acetabulum. The standard angles used in the diagnosis of hip dysplasia are subsequently automatically calculated. Previous work in automating the measuring of angles required the manual segmentation or delineation of the articular joint surface. In the current work automatic segmentation is established using graph-cuts with a cost function based on a sheetness score to detect the sheet-like structure of the bone. Anatomical landmarks are subsequently detected using heuristics based on ray-tracing and the distance to the approximated acetabulur joint surface. Standard diagnositic angles are finally calculated and presented for interpretation. Experiments using 26 patients, showed a good agreement with gold standard manual measurements by an expert radiologist as performed in daily practice. The mean difference for the five angles was between -1:1 and 2:0 degrees with a concordance correlation coefficient between 0:87 and 0:93. The standard deviation varied between 2:3 and 4:1 degrees. These values correspond to values found in evaluating interobserver and intraobserver variation for manual measurements. The method can be used in clinical practice to replace the current manual measurements performed by radiologists. In the future, the method will be integrated into an intraoperative surgical guidance system.

  8. [Symptoms. Localizations: knee, hip, hands, spine, other localizations].

    PubMed

    Pérez Martín, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of osteoarthritis vary widely from patient to patient, depending especially on the localization on the disease. There is a poor correlation between radiological involvement and pain. In general, symptom onset is gradual and symptoms increase slowly but progressively. The most commonly affected joints are the knees, hips, hands, and spine. The main signs and symptoms are pain, stiffness, joint deformity, and crepitus. Pain is mechanical and its causes are multifactorial; in the initial phases, pain usually manifests in self-limiting episodes but may subsequently be almost constant. The criteria of the American college of Rheumatology for the classification of osteoarthritis of the knee, hip and hands are an aid to classification and standardization but are not useful for diagnosis. Hip osteoarthritis usually produces inguinal pain in the internal and anterior sections of the muscle extending to the knee and, with progression, tends to limit mobility. Knee osteoarthritis is more frequent in women and is usually associated with hand osteoarthritis and obesity. In hand osteoarthritis, the most commonly affected joints are the distal interphalangeal joints, followed by the proximal interphalangeal joints and the trapeziometacarpal joints; the development of Heberden and Bouchard nodes is common; involvement of the trapeziometacarpal joint is called rhizarthrosis and is one of the forms of osteoarthritis that produces the greatest limitation on hand function. Osteoarthritis of the spine affects the facet joints and the vertebral bodies. Other, less frequent, localizations are the foot, elbow and shoulder, which are generally secondary forms of osteoarthritis.

  9. Unfractionated heparin and mechanical thromboprophylaxis in hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Flávio Luís; Marins, Murilo Humberto Tobias; Raddi, Thiago Bortoletto; Picado, Celso Hermínio Ferraz

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of unfractionated heparin associated with mechanical prophylaxis as a method for preventing venous thromboembolism in hip arthroplasty. METHOD: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 181 hip arthroplasties out of 216 consecutive cases performed over a period of 39 months in our hospital. We excluded 35 cases due to non-adherence to the standardized method of thromboprophylaxis or loss to follow-up. All arthroplasties evaluated completed one-year follow-up after surgery with five consultations at predefined periods. Efficacy of the proposed method was evaluated by the occurrence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism confirmed by specific tests and safety was determined by the lack of occurrence of major bleeding according to criteria established by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. RESULTS: There were four cases of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (2.2%), with three cases of deep vein thrombosis (1.65%) and one case of pulmonary embolism (0.55%). We found one case of severe bleeding (0.55%). CONCLUSION: Unfractionated heparin associated with mechanical prophylaxis proved to be an effective and safe method for preventing venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty, presenting rates of thromboembolic complications and major bleeding within the range reported with other methods currently used of thromboprophylaxis. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series PMID:26327803

  10. [Symptoms. Localizations: knee, hip, hands, spine, other localizations].

    PubMed

    Pérez Martín, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of osteoarthritis vary widely from patient to patient, depending especially on the localization on the disease. There is a poor correlation between radiological involvement and pain. In general, symptom onset is gradual and symptoms increase slowly but progressively. The most commonly affected joints are the knees, hips, hands, and spine. The main signs and symptoms are pain, stiffness, joint deformity, and crepitus. Pain is mechanical and its causes are multifactorial; in the initial phases, pain usually manifests in self-limiting episodes but may subsequently be almost constant. The criteria of the American college of Rheumatology for the classification of osteoarthritis of the knee, hip and hands are an aid to classification and standardization but are not useful for diagnosis. Hip osteoarthritis usually produces inguinal pain in the internal and anterior sections of the muscle extending to the knee and, with progression, tends to limit mobility. Knee osteoarthritis is more frequent in women and is usually associated with hand osteoarthritis and obesity. In hand osteoarthritis, the most commonly affected joints are the distal interphalangeal joints, followed by the proximal interphalangeal joints and the trapeziometacarpal joints; the development of Heberden and Bouchard nodes is common; involvement of the trapeziometacarpal joint is called rhizarthrosis and is one of the forms of osteoarthritis that produces the greatest limitation on hand function. Osteoarthritis of the spine affects the facet joints and the vertebral bodies. Other, less frequent, localizations are the foot, elbow and shoulder, which are generally secondary forms of osteoarthritis. PMID:24467955

  11. Silver-Coated Hip Megaprosthesis in Oncological Limb Savage Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, G.; D'Adamio, S.; Careri, S.; Rosa, MA.; Maccauro, G.

    2016-01-01

    Silver coating has demonstrated good antimicrobial activity and low toxicity. Silver-coated megaprostheses have been introduced in oncological musculoskeletal surgery considering the high rate of infection. We conducted a retrospective analysis on 68 cases of primary or metastatic bone tumors, affecting the proximal femur, treated between 2005 and 2016 with wide margins resection and tumor implants reconstruction. All patients were treated by the same surgeon, with antibiotic prophylaxis according to a standard protocol. In 55.9% of patients silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty was implanted; in the remaining 44.1% uncoated megaprostheses were implanted. Patients were reevaluated recording the complications and focusing the analysis on infective complications. The average follow-up was 46.5 months. No patient has shown any sign of local or general silver toxicity. A SEM analysis was conducted on the 3-silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty explanted confirming a severe degradation with a small amount of residual silver on the coating surface. Silver-coated hip prostheses have a lower rate of early infection than traditional implants but showed a reduction of antimicrobial activity for silver coating wear. We recommend using silver-coated prosthesis as primary implants for limb salvage surgery, in primary or metastatic bone tumors affecting the proximal femur, considering the absence of signs of toxicity and the lower rate of early infection. PMID:27642605

  12. Polyethylene Oxidation in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Evolution and New Advances

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Medel, Francisco; Puértolas, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the gold standard acetabular bearing material for hip arthroplasty. Its successful performance has shown consistent results and survivorship in total hip replacement (THR) above 85% after 15 years, with different patients, surgeons, or designs. As THR results have been challenged by wear, oxidation, and liner fracture, relevant research on the material properties in the past decade has led to the development and clinical introduction of highly crosslinked polyethylenes (HXLPE). More stress on the bearing (more active, overweighted, younger patients), and more variability in the implantation technique in different small and large Hospitals may further compromise the clinical performance for many patients. The long-term in vivo performance of these materials remains to be proven. Clinical and retrieval studies after more than 5 years of in vivo use with HXLPE in THR are reviewed and consistently show a substantial decrease in wear rate. Moreover, a second generation of improved polyethylenes is backed by in vitro data and awaits more clinical experience to confirm the experimental improvements. Also, new antioxidant, free radical scavengers, candidates and the reinforcement of polyethylene through composites are currently under basic research. Oxidation of polyethylene is today significantly reduced by present formulations, and this forgiving, affordable, and wellknown material is still reliable to meet today’s higher requirements in total hip replacement. PMID:20111694

  13. Silver-Coated Hip Megaprosthesis in Oncological Limb Savage Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, G.; D'Adamio, S.; Careri, S.; Rosa, MA.; Maccauro, G.

    2016-01-01

    Silver coating has demonstrated good antimicrobial activity and low toxicity. Silver-coated megaprostheses have been introduced in oncological musculoskeletal surgery considering the high rate of infection. We conducted a retrospective analysis on 68 cases of primary or metastatic bone tumors, affecting the proximal femur, treated between 2005 and 2016 with wide margins resection and tumor implants reconstruction. All patients were treated by the same surgeon, with antibiotic prophylaxis according to a standard protocol. In 55.9% of patients silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty was implanted; in the remaining 44.1% uncoated megaprostheses were implanted. Patients were reevaluated recording the complications and focusing the analysis on infective complications. The average follow-up was 46.5 months. No patient has shown any sign of local or general silver toxicity. A SEM analysis was conducted on the 3-silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty explanted confirming a severe degradation with a small amount of residual silver on the coating surface. Silver-coated hip prostheses have a lower rate of early infection than traditional implants but showed a reduction of antimicrobial activity for silver coating wear. We recommend using silver-coated prosthesis as primary implants for limb salvage surgery, in primary or metastatic bone tumors affecting the proximal femur, considering the absence of signs of toxicity and the lower rate of early infection.

  14. Silver-Coated Hip Megaprosthesis in Oncological Limb Savage Surgery.

    PubMed

    Donati, F; Di Giacomo, G; D'Adamio, S; Ziranu, A; Careri, S; Rosa, Ma; Maccauro, G

    2016-01-01

    Silver coating has demonstrated good antimicrobial activity and low toxicity. Silver-coated megaprostheses have been introduced in oncological musculoskeletal surgery considering the high rate of infection. We conducted a retrospective analysis on 68 cases of primary or metastatic bone tumors, affecting the proximal femur, treated between 2005 and 2016 with wide margins resection and tumor implants reconstruction. All patients were treated by the same surgeon, with antibiotic prophylaxis according to a standard protocol. In 55.9% of patients silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty was implanted; in the remaining 44.1% uncoated megaprostheses were implanted. Patients were reevaluated recording the complications and focusing the analysis on infective complications. The average follow-up was 46.5 months. No patient has shown any sign of local or general silver toxicity. A SEM analysis was conducted on the 3-silver-coated hip hemiarthroplasty explanted confirming a severe degradation with a small amount of residual silver on the coating surface. Silver-coated hip prostheses have a lower rate of early infection than traditional implants but showed a reduction of antimicrobial activity for silver coating wear. We recommend using silver-coated prosthesis as primary implants for limb salvage surgery, in primary or metastatic bone tumors affecting the proximal femur, considering the absence of signs of toxicity and the lower rate of early infection. PMID:27642605

  15. [Ultrasonography of the neonatal hip: state of the art and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Ortore, P; Fodor, G; Silverio, R; Milani, C; Psenner, K

    1996-01-01

    Since the first studies by Graf, medical interest for neonatal hip sonography (US) has grown, till the redefinition of the name itself of the pathologic condition, which has been recently renamed developmental dysplasia of the hip. After briefly reviewing our personal series of patients (18,388 hips studied from March, 1986, through June, 1995, with 2.81% positives according to Graf, 0.65% of them with subluxated hips), several issues are discussed relative to US of the neonatal hip in the study of dysplasia, namely: 1) technique, 2) measurements, 3) unstable hips, 4) screening, 5) protocols, 6) perspectives. Relative to the technique, Graf's method is currently the method of choice because it is easy to perform (single scanning) and repeatable, different from what other authors, particularly Novick and Harcke, suggested; they use a dynamic approach with more scans and different stress tests. Moreover, in Graf's technique, special attention is paid to the need for correct measurements, which phase was criticized by Couture who complained of its claimed complexity. Hip measurements are an important step in the study of this condition thanks to the information they yield the physician who can thus customize the therapy. The problem of the unstable hip and focal ligament laxity is discussed, which is hypothesized to be a possible cause of hip dysplasia misdiagnosis; according to Graf and Tönnis, this condition is related mostly to hormonal factors and has no actual clinical importance in the possible evolution to a pathologic condition. US of the neonatal hip must be set in a general screening program for newborns to be carried out by the 6th week of life to achieve optimal recovery in positive newborns, without limiting it to supposedly at risk groups. Moreover, the cost-benefit ratio of US screening is emphasized, provided that both medical staff and units are used correctly. A working diagnostic-therapeutic protocol is needed to plan standard epidemiologic

  16. Reconstruction of the Acetabulum in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Christodoulou, Michael; Sasalos, Gregory; Babis, George C

    2014-09-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) or congenital hip dysplasia (CDH) is the most prevalent developmental childhood hip disorder. It includes a wide spectrum of hip abnormalities ranging from dysplasia to subluxation and complete dislocation of the hip joint. The natural history of neglected DDH in adults is highly variable. The mean age of onset of symptoms is 34.5 years for dysplastic DDH, 32.5 years for low dislocation, 31.2 years for high dislocation with a false acetabulum, and 46.4 years for high dislocation without a false acetabulum. Thorough understanding of the bony and soft tissue deformities induced by dysplasia is crucial for the success of total hip arthroplasty. It is important to evaluate the existing acetabular deformity three-dimensionally, and customize the correction in accordance with the quantity and location of ace tabular deficiencies. Acetabular reconstruction in patients with DDH is challenging. Interpretation of published data is difficult and should be done with caution because most series include patients with different types of hip disease. In general, the complication rate associated with THA is higher in patients with hip dysplasia than it is in patients with osteoarthritis. Overall, clinical and functional outcomes following THA in patients hip dysplasia (DDH) differ from those treated for primary hip osteoarthritis, possibly due to the lower age and level of activity. Although function scores decline with age, the scores for pain and range of motion presented with a statistically significant improvement in the long-term. PMID:25386570

  17. Epidemiology of osteoporotic hip fractures in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Angel Antonio; Ferrandez, Luis; Gil, Enrique; Moreno, Alonso

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a multicentre study, divided into a retrospective and a prospective portion. The retrospective study evaluated osteoporotic hip fractures that occurred during 2002. The prospective study evaluated osteoporotic hip fractures that occurred during May 2003. The study was conducted in 77 hospitals in Spain and comprised patients 60 years of age and over. In the retrospective study we registered 13,195 hip fractures. Of the patients, 74% were women and 26% were men. The mean age was 80.7±8.4 years. The average incidence was 6.94±0.44 hip fractures per 1,000 inhabitants/year (95% CI, 6.07–7.82). In the prospective study, we registered 1,399 hip fractures. This represents a monthly incidence of 0.60±0.04 hip fractures per 1,000 inhabitants/year (95% CI, 0.51–0.69). Of the subjects, 74% were women and 26% were men. The mean age was 81.4±8.1 years. Using these data, we calculated the average annual prevalence in 2003 to be 7.20 fractures per 1,000 inhabitants. Thirty-three percent had previously suffered a hip fracture. Prior to the fracture, only 18% had received medical treatment for osteoporosis. After discharge from the hospital, only 26% were receiving pharmacological treatment for osteoporosis. PMID:16328387

  18. Mechanical Evaluation of Polymer Composite Hip Protectors

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Jose Daniel Diniz; Barbosa, Ayrles S. Gonçalves; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Hip fractures often result in serious health implications, particularly in the geriatric population, and have been related to long-term morbidity and death. In most cases, these fractures are caused by impact loads in the area of the greater trochanter, which are produced in a fall. This work is aimed at developing hip protectors using composite materials and evaluating their effectiveness in preventing hip fractures under high impact energy (120 J). The hip protectors were developed with an inner layer of energy absorbing soft material and an outer rigid shell of fiberglass-reinforced polymer composite. According to the experimental results, all tested configurations proved to be effective at reducing the impact load to below the average fracture threshold of proximal femur. Furthermore, an addition of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) to the impacted area of the composite shell proved to be beneficial to increase impact strength of the hip protectors. Thus, composite hip protectors proved to be a viable alternative for a mechanically efficient and cost-effective solution to prevent hip fractures. PMID:20871841

  19. Process optimized minimally invasive total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, Philipp; Oszwald, Markus; Ishaque, Bernd; Ahmed, Gaffar; Blessing, Recha; Thorey, Fritz; Ottersbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse a new concept of using the the minimally invasive direct anterior approach (DAA) in total hip replacement (THR) in combination with the leg positioner (Rotex- Table) and a modified retractor system (Condor). We evaluated retrospectively the first 100 primary THR operated with the new concept between 2009 and 2010, regarding operation data, radiological and clinical outcome (HOOS). All surgeries were perfomed in a standardized operation technique including navigation. The average age of the patients was 68 years (37 to 92 years), with a mean BMI of 26.5 (17 to 43). The mean time of surgery was 80 min. (55 to 130 min). The blood loss showed an average of 511.5 mL (200 to 1000 mL). No intra-operative complications occurred. The postoperative complication rate was 6%. The HOOS increased from 43 points pre-operatively to 90 (max 100 points) 3 months after surgery. The radiological analysis showed an average cup inclination of 43° and a leg length discrepancy in a range of +/− 5 mm in 99%. The presented technique led to excellent clinic results, showed low complication rates and allowed correct implant positions although manpower was saved. PMID:22577504

  20. Process optimized minimally invasive total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Gebel, Philipp; Oszwald, Markus; Ishaque, Bernd; Ahmed, Gaffar; Blessing, Recha; Thorey, Fritz; Ottersbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse a new concept of using the the minimally invasive direct anterior approach (DAA) in total hip replacement (THR) in combination with the leg positioner (Rotex- Table) and a modified retractor system (Condor). We evaluated retrospectively the first 100 primary THR operated with the new concept between 2009 and 2010, regarding operation data, radiological and clinical outcome (HOOS). All surgeries were perfomed in a standardized operation technique including navigation. The average age of the patients was 68 years (37 to 92 years), with a mean BMI of 26.5 (17 to 43). The mean time of surgery was 80 min. (55 to 130 min). The blood loss showed an average of 511.5 mL (200 to 1000 mL). No intra-operative complications occurred. The postoperative complication rate was 6%. The HOOS increased from 43 points pre-operatively to 90 (max 100 points) 3 months after surgery. The radiological analysis showed an average cup inclination of 43° and a leg length discrepancy in a range of +/- 5 mm in 99%. The presented technique led to excellent clinic results, showed low complication rates and allowed correct implant positions although manpower was saved. PMID:22577504

  1. Gait and stair function in total and resurfacing hip arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shrader, M Wade; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Jacofsky, Marc C; Jacofsky, David J

    2009-06-01

    Standard total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the established surgical treatment for patients older than 65 years with progressive osteoarthritis but survivorship curves wane in patients younger than 50. Resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) is an alternative for younger, active patients reportedly providing superior range of motion. Quantitative investigation of functional recovery following arthroplasty may elucidate limitations that aid in device selection. Although limited long-term kinematic data are available, the early rate of recovery and gait compensations are not well described. This information may aid in refining rehabilitation protocols based on limitations specific to the implant. We presumed hip motion and forces for subjects receiving RHA are more similar to age-matched controls during physically demanding tasks, such as stair negotiation, at early time points than those for THA. In a pilot study, we quantified walking and stair negotiation preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively for seven patients with RHA (mean age, 49 years), seven patients with standard THA (mean age, 52 years), and seven age-matched control subjects (mean age, 56 years). Although both treatment groups demonstrated trends toward functional recovery, the RHA group had greater improvements in hip extension and abduction moment indicating typical loading of the hip. Further investigation is needed to determine if differences persist long term or are clinically meaningful. PMID:19305961

  2. BLEEDING OF FEMORAL HEAD DURING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY FOR OSTEOARTHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Sotomayor, Marco Yánez; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the bleeding of the femoral head on hip osteoarthritis in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred and three hips affected by primary hip osteoarthritis were evaluated. After surgical dislocation, the femoral head was divided into four quadrants, and micro perforations were made in order to observe and assess the presence of bleeding, as early type (EB), late type (LB) or without bleeding (WB). Results: We observed early bleeding (EB) in the upper quadrant in 16 hips (15.5%), late bleeding in 14 hips (13.6%) and no bleeding (WB) in 73 hips (70.9%). The anterior quadrant showed EB in 24 hips (23.3%), LB in 7 hips (6.8%) and WB in 72 hips (69.9%). The lower quadrant presented EB in 40 hips (38.8%), LB 14 hips (13.6%) and WB in 49 hips (47.6%). The posterior quadrant showed EB in 39 hips (37.9%), LB 19 hips (18.4%) and WB in 45 hips (43.7%). Comparing BMI and gender, we found no association between these parameters (p> 0.05). Conclusions: The inferior and posterior quadrant had the highest bleeding levels, following the path of the medial circumflex artery. Level of Evidence III, Therapeutic Study. PMID:26981036

  3. [Dysplasia in the development of the hip].

    PubMed

    Moraleda, L; Albiñana, J; Salcedo, M; Gonzalez-Moran, G

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) causes anatomical changes that cause early coxarthrosis. Although risf factors have been determined, the aetiology and physiopathology remains exactly unknown. Neonatal screening with physical examination and ultrasound have been stablished in order to diagnose this disease early in life. A diagnosis in the first months of life is essential as it enables a normal hip to form and prevent the appearance of early coxarthrosis. Treatment principles are to be able to reduce the hip without provoking avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and to normalize the acetabular development. Knowledge of the orthopaedic and surgical options is essential in order to achieve success in the treatment.

  4. Mesoderm Differentiation from hiPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hiroyuki; Era, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells are very attractive tools for modeling diseases and regenerative medicine. However, to achieve them, the efficient differentiation methods of hiPS cells into aimed cell type in vitro are necessary. Because mesoderm cells are useful in particular, we have developed the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells into mesoderm cells previously. In this time, these methods were improved for hiPS cells and now human mesoderm cells are able to be obtained efficiently. It is certain that the new methods are applicable to various studies and therapies.

  5. Comparison of trunk and hip muscle activity during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activity of trunk and hip muscles during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension. [Subjects] The study enrolled 18 participants. [Methods] Two exercises (hip and lumbar extension) and two ranges (180° and <180°) were studied. [Results] Differences in degree of extension affected the percentage maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the lumbar erector spinae and biceps femoris muscles, with significantly higher average values at >180° than at 180° lumbar extension. No significant differences were found in gluteus maximus activity according to exercise type or range. [Conclusion] Hip extension may be more effective and safer for lumbar rehabilitation than lumbar extension.

  6. Catastrophic failure of ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty presenting as squeaking hip

    PubMed Central

    Malem, David; Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Shah, Bhavik

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman with osteoarthritis had a ceramic-on-ceramic left total hip arthroplasty, including ceramic femoral head and acetabular liner. At 5 years after surgery, the patient developed onset of a very loud squeaking noise, which could be heard 25 m from her, associated with limited hip movement. Findings at revision surgery included a broken ceramic femoral head component, complete wear of the ceramic acetabular component, and black wear debris. Squeaking hip after ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty may be associated with catastrophic failure of the arthroplasty components. PMID:23429031

  7. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... JW, Crockarell JR. Arthroplasty of the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ... 24820247 . Mihalko WM. Arthroplasty of the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ...

  8. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... JW, Crockarell JR. Arthroplasty of the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ... 3. Mihalk WM. Arthroplasty of the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ...

  9. Understanding and Treating the Snapping Hip.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yi-Meng; Lewis, Cara L; Kim, Young-Jo

    2015-12-01

    Snapping hip, or coxa saltans is a palpable or auditory snapping with movement of the hip joint. Extra-articular snapping is divided into external and internal types, and is caused laterally by the iliotibial band and anteriorly by the iliopsoas tendon. Snapping of the iliopsoas usually requires contraction of the hip flexors and may be difficult to distinguish from intra-articular coxa saltans. Ultrasound can be a useful modality to dynamically detect tendon translation during hip movement to support the diagnosis of extra-articular snapping. Coxa saltans is typically treated with conservative measures including anti-inflammatories, stretching, and avoidance of inciting activities. Recalcitrant cases are treated with surgery to lengthen the iliopsoas or the iliotibial band. PMID:26524554

  10. Microbial assisted High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) degradation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Arya J; Sekhar, Vini C; Bhaskar, Thallada; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-08-01

    The efficacy of newly isolated Pseudomonas and Bacillus strains to degrade brominated High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) was investigated. Viability of these cultures while using e-plastic as sole carbon source was validated through Triphenyl Tetrazolium Chloride (TTC). Four days incubation of HIPS emulsion with Bacillus spp. showed 94% reduction in turbidity and was 97% with Pseudomonas spp. Confirmation of degradation was concluded by HPLC, NMR, FTIR, TGA and weight loss analysis. NMR spectra of the degraded film revealed the formation of aliphatic carbon chain with bromine and its release. FTIR analysis of the samples showed a reduction in CH, CO and CN groups. Surface changes in the brominated HIPS film was visualized through SEM analysis. Degradation with Bacillus spp showed a weight loss of 23% (w/w) of HIPS film in 30days.

  11. Taking care of your new hip joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cabrera AL. Total hip replacement. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine ... Groomes TE. Total knee replacement. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine ...

  12. Hip and groin injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K; Strickland, S M; Warren, R

    2001-01-01

    Although athletic injuries about the hip and groin occur less commonly than injuries in the extremities, they can result in extensive rehabilitation time. Thus, an accurate diagnosis and well-organized treatment plan are critical. Because loads of up to eight times body weight have been demonstrated in the hip joint during jogging, presumably even greater loads can occur during vigorous athletic competition. The available imaging modalities are effective diagnostic tools when selected on the basis of a thorough history and physical examination. Considerable controversy exists as to the cause and optimal treatment of groin pain in athletes, or the so-called "sports hernia." There has also been significant recent attention focused on intraarticular lesions that may be amenable to hip arthroscopy. This article briefly reviews several common hip and groin conditions affecting athletic patients and highlights some newer topics. PMID:11476397

  13. Apparent spontaneous joint restoration in hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Gregory P; Brand, Richard A

    2002-11-01

    Dramatic spontaneous restoration of the joint space in osteoarthritis of the hip is rare, although limited fibrocartilaginous repair is common. Regeneration of the apparent radiographic joint space seems to be associated with peripheral osteophyte formation, but it is difficult to isolate other well-defined factors that promote it. Previous documentation of the phenomenon exists in scattered case reports before the era of widespread total hip replacement. Two recent cases are presented in which patients with bilateral disease had unilateral total hip replacement with simultaneous diminished pain in the contralateral hip accompanied by restoration of the radiographic joint space. Secondary stability, unloading, peripheral osteophyte formation, and other possible factors likely contribute to these unusual natural outcomes of coxarthrosis.

  14. American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Replacement Surgery Will my artificial joint set off airport security metal detectors? Preventing Infection in Your Joint at ... Knee Replacement Will my artificial joint set off airport security metal detectors? Contact Us Draft Hip Arthroplasty Performance ...

  15. Arthroscopic Hip Revision Surgery for Residual FAI

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher M.; Giveans, Russell; Bedi, Asheesh; Samuelson, Kathryn M.; Stone, Rebecca M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: There is a steep surgical learning curve when managing femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and residual FAI can lead to continued pain and disability. There is very limited data reporting outcomes after revision arthroscopy for residual FAI. Methods: The records of patients that underwent arthroscopic hip revision surgery for residual FAI based on plain radiographs and 3D CT scans were reviewed. Pre and post-operative structural pathomorphology, intra-operative findings, and pre and post-operative outcomes measures using Modified Harris Hip Scoring (MHHS), SF-12 scoring, and pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) were evaluated. Outcomes after revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared to a cohort that underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction. Results: 59 patients (85 hips) underwent arthroscopic revision FAI correction (mean 20.8 months follow-up). There were 98 previous arthroscopic surgeries and 4 previous surgical dislocations. There were 39 males and 46 females with a mean age of 29.5 years (range 16 - 59). 80 hips had residual cam-type FAI, and 64 hips had residual pincer-type FAI and underwent femoral and rim resections, respectively. The labrum was debrided in 27 hips, repaired in 48 hips and reconstructed with allograft in 8 hips. Adhesions were excised for 54 hips. The results of revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared to 154 patients (169 hips) that underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction (mean 25.2 months follow-up). The mean improvement for outcomes scores after revision FAI correction was 18.9 points (MHHS, p<.01), 13.4 points (SF-12, p<.01), and 2.2 points (VAS, p<.01) compared to 23.7 points (MHHS, p<.01), 22.3 points (SF-12, p<.01), and 4.6 points (VAS, p<.01) after primary arthroscopic FAI correction. Most recent outcomes scores and mean improvement in outcome scores were significantly better after primary (81.1% good/ excellent results) compared to revision (69.8% good/excellent results) FAI correction (MHS

  16. An overview of hip injuries in running.

    PubMed

    Paluska, Scott A

    2005-01-01

    Running has steadily gained in worldwide popularity and is the primary exercise modality for many individuals of all ages. Its low cost, versatility, convenience and related health benefits appeal to men and women of broad cultural, ethnic and economic backgrounds. With more children and adults participating in recreational and competitive running, the incidence of injuries has steadily increased. Most running-related injuries affecting the lower extremities are due to preventable training errors, and some may necessitate medical evaluation or a significant reduction in training. Hip injuries in runners are due to interactions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that adversely affect the complex regional anatomy. Acute or chronic hip pain presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge because the vague, nonspecific symptoms and signs may originate from local, regional or distant foci. Muscle strains and tendonitis are the most common aetiologies of hip pain and typically result from sudden acceleration/deceleration manoeuvres, direction changes or eccentric contractions. Apophysitis and avulsion fractures may affect younger runners and produce localised pain at muscle attachment sites. Iliotibial band syndrome is a common cause of lateral hip and knee symptoms characterised by sharp or burning pain that is exacerbated by activity. Bursitis, due to repetitive activity or acute trauma, may affect the trochanteric, ischial or iliopectineal bursae. Hip osteoarthritis may also produce persistent pain that worsens with running. Stress fractures are potentially serious conditions that affect women more frequently than men. Snapping hip syndrome is a benign condition that results from tight connective tissues' passing repeatedly over the greater trochanter, anterior hip capsule, lesser trochanter, femoral head or iliopectineal eminence. Acetabular labral tears, sports hernias and nerve entrapment syndromes are also potential causes of persistent hip pain in runners

  17. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  18. Celiac Disease in Women with Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Cobb, Haley; Gao, Lisa Y.; Hawkes, William; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Kolatkar, Nikheel S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Objective Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Methods Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and the control group (n=51), all of whom were from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Results Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (p< 0.0001) in the hip fracture cohorts compared to the elective joint replacement cohort (14.1 ng/ml vs. 21.3 ng/ml, respectively). There were no differences in the percentage of subjects with a positive tissue transglutaminase in the women with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.61%, respectively). Conclusion Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not prove useful, although larger prospective studies among hip fracture subjects are needed. PMID:23732553

  19. Snapping hip: etiopathogenesis and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Noia, F; Miceli, D; Rotini, R; Fontanesi, G

    1999-01-01

    Snapping hip is a polymorphous pathology the genesis of which is multifactorial, characterized by a snapping sensation which may be painful, and occurring during movement of the hip or during walking. Clinical and instrumental diagnosis for an accurate etiopathogenetic classification is essential to correct surgical treatment, that must be reserved only for cases with painful symptoms and with disorders in walking. The authors provide a classification system of the syndrome, describing four different varieties of the pathology and relative surgical treatment.

  20. [Treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hack, Juliana; Bliemel, Christopher; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Bücking, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Hip fractures are among the most common fractures in elderly people. The annual number of femoral fractures is even expected to increase because of an aging society. Due to the high number of comorbidities, there are special challenges in treating geriatric hip fracture patients, which require a multidisciplinary management. This includes surgical treatment allowing full weight bearing in the immediate postoperative period, osteoporosis treatment and falls prevention as well as an early ortho-geriatric rehabilitation program.

  1. Developmental dysplasia of the hip: diagnosis and management to 18 months.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Nicholas M P

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip represents a spectrum of disease ranging from transient neonatal instability to established dislocation. It is accepted that female sex, breech presentation, and family history are risk factors for the disease. Early diagnosis by clinical examination or ultrasound imaging is emphasized, with splint treatment ideally commencing by 6 weeks of age. Treatment using the Pavlik harness is successful in up to 90% of patients. Ultrasound imaging is the gold standard for monitoring a patient during harness wear. Failed splintage or late presentation usually necessitates surgical intervention depending on the patient's age and the severity of the hip dysplasia and displacement. PMID:24720316

  2. Hip adductors' strength, flexibility, and injury risk.

    PubMed

    Hrysomallis, Con

    2009-08-01

    The hip adductor muscle group plays an important role in both movement and stability at the hip joint in many athletic pursuits. Injury to this muscle group has been reported in a number of sports, among them, ice hockey, soccer, Australian football, and swimming. The identification of muscle characteristics that predispose a muscle to injury is an important step in developing conditioning programs to reduce injury risk. Muscle strength and range of motion are 2 parameters that may influence injury risk. The aim of this review was to examine the relationship between hip adductors' strength, flexibility, and injury risk. Strength testing has involved isokinetic or hand-held dynamometry. Flexibility has usually been assessed by goniometry during maximal hip abduction. An association has been reported between adductor strength deficits and injury for ice hockey players. Low adductor flexibility has also been identified as a risk factor for injury in soccer players. An intervention program that strengthened the hip adductors had some success in reducing injury risk for ice hockey players. There is some low- to moderate-level evidence from cohort studies to suggest that flexibility and strength are related to injury risk in particular sports and that an intervention program may be effective in reducing injury risk. Higher level evidence from randomized controlled trials is required to firmly establish the link between hip adductor flexibility, strength, and injury. PMID:19620912

  3. Quality of life impairments after hip arthroscopy in people with hip chondropathy

    PubMed Central

    Filbay, Stephanie R.; Kemp, Joanne L.; Ackerman, Ilana N.; Crossley, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Many young individuals undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery have hip chondropathy. The impact of mild or more severe hip chondropathy 1–2 years following arthroscopy is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to (i) compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depression scores between people who underwent arthroscopic treatment for hip chondropathy 1–2 years previously and pain-free controls; (ii) compare HRQoL, hip-related quality of life (QoL) and anxiety/depression scores in people with mild versus severe hip chondropathy and (iii) compare hip-related QoL items between chondropathy groups. The Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33), EuroQol-5D and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were compared between 71 individuals aged 18–60 years following arthroscopic treatment for hip chondroplasty (12–24 months previously) and 46 healthy controls. Comparisons were also performed between people with mild (Outerbridge grade 1–2) and severe (Outerbridge grade 3–4) hip chondropathy. Participants following arthroscopic treatment for hip chondroplasty reported worse HRQoL, hip-related QoL and anxiety, compared with pain-free controls (all P < 0.05), but no difference in self-care (P = 0.20). There were differences between mild and severe chondropathy groups for pain during sport/recreation [median (IQR) 20 (5–80) versus 60 (25–90) P = 0.01), pain after activity (40 (20–75) versus 75 (50–90) P = 0.01), difficulty maintaining fitness (30 (10–70) versus 75 (35–85) P = 0.02) and reduced hip confidence. Hip chondropathy was associated with significant QoL impairment, with severe chondropathy associated with the greatest impairment. The identification of specific areas of QoL impairment provides avenues to target rehabilitation and support. PMID:27583152

  4. Quality of life impairments after hip arthroscopy in people with hip chondropathy.

    PubMed

    Filbay, Stephanie R; Kemp, Joanne L; Ackerman, Ilana N; Crossley, Kay M

    2016-07-01

    Many young individuals undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery have hip chondropathy. The impact of mild or more severe hip chondropathy 1-2 years following arthroscopy is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to (i) compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depression scores between people who underwent arthroscopic treatment for hip chondropathy 1-2 years previously and pain-free controls; (ii) compare HRQoL, hip-related quality of life (QoL) and anxiety/depression scores in people with mild versus severe hip chondropathy and (iii) compare hip-related QoL items between chondropathy groups. The Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33), EuroQol-5D and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were compared between 71 individuals aged 18-60 years following arthroscopic treatment for hip chondroplasty (12-24 months previously) and 46 healthy controls. Comparisons were also performed between people with mild (Outerbridge grade 1-2) and severe (Outerbridge grade 3-4) hip chondropathy. Participants following arthroscopic treatment for hip chondroplasty reported worse HRQoL, hip-related QoL and anxiety, compared with pain-free controls (all P < 0.05), but no difference in self-care (P = 0.20). There were differences between mild and severe chondropathy groups for pain during sport/recreation [median (IQR) 20 (5-80) versus 60 (25-90) P = 0.01), pain after activity (40 (20-75) versus 75 (50-90) P = 0.01), difficulty maintaining fitness (30 (10-70) versus 75 (35-85) P = 0.02) and reduced hip confidence. Hip chondropathy was associated with significant QoL impairment, with severe chondropathy associated with the greatest impairment. The identification of specific areas of QoL impairment provides avenues to target rehabilitation and support. PMID:27583152

  5. [Fatigue property analysis of prosthesis of hip joint with two different materials].

    PubMed

    Tang, Gang; Wang, Jiange; Luo, Hongxia

    2015-02-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) is replacing the prosthesis stem similar to human bone that takes advantage of the material with both good mechanical properties and biocompatibility to the damaged articular surface. Thus it can not only alleviate or even eliminate the pain but also effectively maintain the joint stability and freedom and restore its normal performance. Finite element analysis was used in this study to establish a 3D model of artificial hip stem, and explore its fatigue properties of different materials to ensure the safety and reliability. The calculating obtained two results of different metal hip prosthesis, including lifetime and deformation. The minimum service life of titanium prosthesis reaches 568 million times, which satisfies ISO standards, while the stainless steel does not suit to be a prosthesis material. PMID:25997269

  6. Variations in the trunnion surface topography between different commercially available hip replacement stems.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Walter, William L; Walsh, William Robert

    2015-01-01

    Modular hip implants allows for the adjustment of leg length, offset, and the ability to remove the head for acetabular exposure during primary and revision surgery. The design of the Morse taper facilitates the intimate contact of the conical trunnion of the femoral stem (male component), with the conical bore of the femoral head (female component). Orthopaedic trunnion tapers are not standardized and vary in length, taper angle, and base dimension. Variations in the design and surface characteristics of the trunnion, will directly reflect on the interface at the taper junction and can influence the likelihood of subsequent wear, corrosion and longevity of the implant. The effect of surface topography of trunnions on commercially available hip stems has not yet been considered as a possible contributing factor in the corrosion observed at taper junctions. In this study we analyzed the surface topography and surface roughness of randomly selected commercially available femoral hip stem trunnions to obtain a greater insight into their surface characteristics.

  7. Pressure sores and hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Haleem, S; Heinert, G; Parker, M J

    2008-02-01

    Development of pressure sores during hospital admission causes morbidity and distress to the patient, increases strain on nursing resources, delaying discharge and possibly increasing mortality. A hip fracture in elderly patients is a known high-risk factor for development of pressure sores. We aimed to determine the current incidence of pressure sores and identify those factors which were associated with an increased risk of pressure sores. We retrospectively analysed prospectively collected data of 4654 consecutive patients admitted to a single unit. One hundred and seventy-eight (3.8%) of our patients developed pressure sores. Patient factors that increased the risk of pressure sores were increased age, diabetes mellitus, a lower mental test score, a lower mobility score, a higher ASA score, lower admission haemoglobin and an intra-operative drop in blood pressure. The risk was higher in patients with an extracapsular neck of femur fracture and patients with an increased time interval between admission to hospital and surgery. Our studies indicate that while co-morbidities constitute a substantial risk in an elderly population, the increase in incidence of pressure sores can be reduced by minimising delays to surgery. PMID:18234201

  8. [Candida infection in hip alloarthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Prenzel, K L; Isenberg, J; Helling, H J; Rehm, K E

    2003-01-01

    A 46-year-old polytoxicomanic patient underwent a total hip replacement for necrosis of the femoral head. The patient suffered additionally from chronic pancreatitis with insulin-dependent diabetes and polyneuropathy. Three weeks later he developed a deep wound infection followed by surgical revision. The infection persisted despite further revision operations and systemically and locally applied antibiotics. After removal of the prosthesis,microbiology revealed Staphylococcus aureus, enterococcus,and Candida parapsilosis. Five additional revision operations, application of suction-irrigation drainage, and systemically administered antibiotics could not stop the infectious process. The patient was transferred to our institution 3 months after primary surgery. The joint defect was filled with a PMMA Palacos spacer. This time biopsies were only positive for Candida albicans. After 12 days of antifungal therapy with fluconazole,microbiological biopsies were sterile. The spacer was removed and femoral extension applied. After 4 weeks of further antifungal therapy, a revision prosthesis was implanted. Until now no signs of infection have appeared.

  9. Functional evaluation of total hip arthroplasty with five- to ten-year follow-up evaluation.

    PubMed

    Perrin, T; Dorr, L D; Perry, J; Gronley, J; Hull, D B

    1985-05-01

    Forty-seven patients with unilateral hip disease had a preoperative and postoperative gait analysis of total hip arthroplasty with a follow-up period of five to ten years. The object was to correlate the levels of function with mechanical loosening. Unilateral total hip arthroplasty in uncomplicated patients restored function to 80% of normal over a two- to four-year period. Patients followed longer than five years appeared to have an accelerated decline in function unassociated with pain. No Class C patient, regardless of age or gait velocity, developed loosening or required revision of the hip prosthesis. Survivorship studies revealed an 85%-90% incidence of loosening by the seventh postoperative year in Class A patients 55 years or younger and those walking preoperatively at more than 50% of normal gait velocity. In these same two groups of patients, the probability of revision for mechanical failure by ten years is 58% for age and 66% for fast walkers. The majority of patients in this study had a technical rating not acceptable by present standards so that these results represent most likely the worst prognosis for longevity of total hip arthroplasty. In high-risk patients, protected ambulation with crutches for six months postoperation may improve their prognosis.

  10. Effect of cup inclination on predicted contact stress-induced volumetric wear in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, B; Košak, R; Daniel, M; Kralj-Iglič, V; Dolinar, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the lifetime of the total hip endoprosthesis, it is necessary to understand mechanisms leading to its failure. In this work, we address volumetric wear of the artificial cup, in particular the effect of its inclination with respect to the vertical. Volumetric wear was calculated by using mathematical models for resultant hip force, contact stress and penetration of the prosthesis head into the cup. Relevance of the dependence of volumetric wear on inclination of the cup (its abduction angle ϑA) was assessed by the results of 95 hips with implanted endoprosthesis. Geometrical parameters obtained from standard antero-posterior radiographs were taken as input data. Volumetric wear decreases with increasing cup abduction angle ϑA. The correlation within the population of 95 hips was statistically significant (P = 0.006). Large cup abduction angle minimises predicted volumetric wear but may increase the risk for dislocation of the artificial head from the cup in the one-legged stance. Cup abduction angle and direction of the resultant hip force may compensate each other to achieve optimal position of the cup with respect to wear and dislocation in the one-legged stance for a particular patient.

  11. Hip reconstruction osteotomy by Ilizarov method as a salvage option for abnormal hip joints.

    PubMed

    Umer, Masood; Rashid, Haroon; Umer, Hafiz Muhammad; Raza, Hasnain

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint instability can be secondary to congenital hip pathologies like developmental dysplasia (DDH) or acquired such as sequel of infective or neoplastic process. An unstable hip is usually associated with loss of bone from the proximal femur, proximal migration of the femur, lower-extremity length discrepancy, abnormal gait, and pain. In this case series of 37 patients coming to our institution between May 2005 and December 2011, we report our results in treatment of unstable hip joint by hip reconstruction osteotomy using the Ilizarov method and apparatus. This includes an acute valgus and extension osteotomy of the proximal femur combined with gradual varus and distraction (if required) for realignment and lengthening at a second, more distal, femoral osteotomy. 18 males and 19 females participated in the study. There were 17 patients with DDH, 12 with sequelae of septic arthritis, 2 with tuberculous arthritis, 4 with posttraumatic arthritis, and 2 with focal proximal femoral deficiency. Outcomes were evaluated by using Harris Hip Scoring system. At the mean follow-up of 37 months, Harris Hip Score had significantly improved in all patients. To conclude, illizarov hip reconstruction can successfully improve Trendelenburg's gait. It supports the pelvis and simultaneously restores knee alignment and corrects lower-extremity length discrepancy (LLD). PMID:24895616

  12. Hip reconstruction osteotomy by Ilizarov method as a salvage option for abnormal hip joints.

    PubMed

    Umer, Masood; Rashid, Haroon; Umer, Hafiz Muhammad; Raza, Hasnain

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint instability can be secondary to congenital hip pathologies like developmental dysplasia (DDH) or acquired such as sequel of infective or neoplastic process. An unstable hip is usually associated with loss of bone from the proximal femur, proximal migration of the femur, lower-extremity length discrepancy, abnormal gait, and pain. In this case series of 37 patients coming to our institution between May 2005 and December 2011, we report our results in treatment of unstable hip joint by hip reconstruction osteotomy using the Ilizarov method and apparatus. This includes an acute valgus and extension osteotomy of the proximal femur combined with gradual varus and distraction (if required) for realignment and lengthening at a second, more distal, femoral osteotomy. 18 males and 19 females participated in the study. There were 17 patients with DDH, 12 with sequelae of septic arthritis, 2 with tuberculous arthritis, 4 with posttraumatic arthritis, and 2 with focal proximal femoral deficiency. Outcomes were evaluated by using Harris Hip Scoring system. At the mean follow-up of 37 months, Harris Hip Score had significantly improved in all patients. To conclude, illizarov hip reconstruction can successfully improve Trendelenburg's gait. It supports the pelvis and simultaneously restores knee alignment and corrects lower-extremity length discrepancy (LLD).

  13. Invariant hip moment pattern while walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2011-03-15

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons hold significant potential for gait assistance and rehabilitation; however, we have a limited understanding of how people adapt to walking with robotic devices. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that people reduce net muscle moments about their joints when robotic assistance is provided. This reduction in muscle moment results in a total joint moment (muscle plus exoskeleton) that is the same as the moment without the robotic assistance despite potential differences in joint angles. To test this hypothesis, eight healthy subjects trained with the robotic hip exoskeleton while walking on a force-measuring treadmill. The exoskeleton provided hip flexion assistance from approximately 33% to 53% of the gait cycle. We calculated the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between the average of data from the last 15 min of the powered condition and the unpowered condition. After completing three 30-min training sessions, the hip exoskeleton provided 27% of the total peak hip flexion moment during gait. Despite this substantial contribution from the exoskeleton, subjects walked with a total hip moment pattern (muscle plus exoskeleton) that was almost identical and more similar to the unpowered condition than the hip angle pattern (hip moment RMSD 0.027, angle RMSD 0.134, p<0.001). The angle and moment RMSD were not different for the knee and ankle joints. These findings support the concept that people adopt walking patterns with similar joint moment patterns despite differences in hip joint angles for a given walking speed. PMID:21333995

  14. HIP HOP for HIV Awareness: Using Hip Hop Culture to Promote Community-Level HIV Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Mandy J.; Hallmark, Camden J.; McNeese, Marlene; Blue, Nike; Ross, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to determine the effectiveness of the HIP HOP for HIV Awareness intervention, an innovative model utilising an exchange of an HIV test for a hip hop concert ticket, in a metropolitan city among African American youth and young adults. A subset of intervention participants participated in standardised testing, sex…

  15. The 1963 Hip-Hop Machine: Hip-Hop Pedagogy as Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an alternative invention strategy for research-based argumentative writing. Investigates the coincidental usage of the term "whatever" in hip-hop, theory, and composition studies. Presents a "whatever-pedagogy" identified as "hip-hop pedagogy," a writing practice that models itself after digital sampling's rhetorical strategy of…

  16. A 12-year ecological study of hip fracture rates among older Taiwanese adults.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ding-Cheng; Lee, Yow-Shan; Wu, Ya-Ju; Tsou, Hsiao-Hui; Chen, Cheng-Ting; Hwang, Jawl-Shan; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Yang, Rong-Sen

    2013-11-01

    Hip fracture rates in Taiwan are among the highest in the world. The aim of this study was to describe the trends of hip fracture hospitalizations among Taiwanese elderly (aged ≥ 65 years) and the trends of antiosteoporosis medication expenditure from 1999 to 2010. We conducted an ecological study using inpatient health care-utilization data from the Department of Health, and medication expenditure data from the IMS Health, Taiwan. The International Classification of Disease, Clinical Modification, 9th version, code 820 was used to identify hip fracture hospitalizations. Medications included alendronate, calcitonin, ibandronate, raloxifene, strontium ranelate, teriparatide, and zoledronic acid. Year 2010 was assigned as the reference point for age-standardized rates, currency exchange (to the US dollar), and discount rates. Over the 12-year study period, age-standardized hip fracture hospitalizations decreased by 2.7 % annually (p for trend < 0.001) for Taiwanese elders. The decline was more obvious among those aged ≥75 years (6.1 %). However, the number of hip fracture hospitalizations increased from 14,342 to 18,023. Total hospitalization costs increased by US$0.6 ± 0.2 million annually (p for trend = 0.002); however, the per capita costs decreased by US$23.0 ± 8.0 (p for trend = 0.017). The total medication expenditure increased 7.2-fold, from US$8.1 million to US$58.9 million, accounting for an increase in the overall pharmaceutical market by fivefold, from 3.4 to 15.9 ‰ (both p for trend < 0.001). From 1999 to 2010, there was a decline in hip fracture rates among elderly Taiwanese adults with a concomitant increase in antiosteoporosis medication expenditure.

  17. Powered hip exoskeletons can reduce the user's hip and ankle muscle activations during walking.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Tommaso; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we study the human locomotor adaptation to the action of a powered exoskeleton providing assistive torque at the user's hip during walking. To this end, we propose a controller that provides the user's hip with a fraction of the nominal torque profile, adapted to the specific gait features of the user from Winter's reference data . The assistive controller has been implemented on the ALEX II exoskeleton and tested on ten healthy subjects. Experimental results show that when assisted by the exoskeleton, users can reduce the muscle effort compared to free walking. Despite providing assistance only to the hip joint, both hip and ankle muscles significantly reduced their activation, indicating a clear tradeoff between hip and ankle strategy to propel walking. PMID:23529105

  18. ELIGIBILITY FOR THE HIP-RESURFACING ARTHROPLASTY PROCEDURE: AN EVALUATION ON 592 HIPS

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva; Duarte, David Marcelo; Takano, Marcelo Itiro; Sugiyama, Mauricio Morita

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the percentage of ideal patients who would be eligible for hip-resurfacing surgery at a reference service for hip arthroplasty. Methods: Out of all the cases of hip arthroplasty operated at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo (HSPE) between January 2009 and December 2010, we assessed a total of 592 procedures that would fit the criteria for indication for resurfacing arthroplasty, after clinical and radiological evaluation according to the criteria established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and by Seyler et al. Results: Among the total number of hip replacement arthroplasty cases, 5.74% of the patients were eligible. Among the patients who underwent primary arthroplasty, we found that 8.23% presented ideal conditions for this procedure. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that this type of surgery still has a limited role among hip surgery methods. PMID:27047851

  19. Arthroscopic intervention in early hip disease.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joseph C; Lee, Jo-Ann

    2004-12-01

    Advancement in diagnostic and therapeutic applications for hip arthroscopy have dispelled previous myths about early hip disease. Arthroscopic findings have established the following facts: Acetabular labral tears do occur; acetabular chondral lesions do exist; tears are most frequently anterior and often associated with sudden twisting or pivoting motions; and labral tears often occur in association with articular cartilage lesions of the adjacent acetabulum or femoral head, and if present for years, contribute to the progression of delamination process of the chondral cartilage. Magnetic resonance arthrography represents an improvement over conventional magnetic resonance imaging, it does have limitations when compared with direct observation. Although indications for hip arthroscopy are constantly expanding, the most common indications include: labral tears, loose bodies, chondral flap lesions of the acetabular or femoral head, synovial chondromatosis, foreign body removal, and crystalline hip arthropathy (gout, pseudogout, and others). Contraindications include conditions that limit the potential for hip distraction such as joint ankylosis, dense heterotopic bone formation, considerable protrusio, or morbid obesity. Complication rates have been reported between 0.5 and 5%, most often related to distraction and include sciatic or femoral nerve palsy, avascular necrosis, and compartment syndrome. Transient peroneal or pudendal nerve effects and chondral scuffing have been associated with difficult or prolonged distraction. Meticulous consideration to patient positioning, distraction time and portal placement are essential. Judicious patient selection and diagnostic expertise are critical to successful outcomes. Candidates for hip arthroscopy should include only those patients with mechanical symptoms (catching, locking, or buckling) that have failed to respond to conservative therapy. The extent of articular cartilage involvement has the most direct relationship

  20. Arthroscopic intervention in early hip disease.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joseph C; Lee, Jo-Ann

    2004-12-01

    Advancement in diagnostic and therapeutic applications for hip arthroscopy have dispelled previous myths about early hip disease. Arthroscopic findings have established the following facts: Acetabular labral tears do occur; acetabular chondral lesions do exist; tears are most frequently anterior and often associated with sudden twisting or pivoting motions; and labral tears often occur in association with articular cartilage lesions of the adjacent acetabulum or femoral head, and if present for years, contribute to the progression of delamination process of the chondral cartilage. Magnetic resonance arthrography represents an improvement over conventional magnetic resonance imaging, it does have limitations when compared with direct observation. Although indications for hip arthroscopy are constantly expanding, the most common indications include: labral tears, loose bodies, chondral flap lesions of the acetabular or femoral head, synovial chondromatosis, foreign body removal, and crystalline hip arthropathy (gout, pseudogout, and others). Contraindications include conditions that limit the potential for hip distraction such as joint ankylosis, dense heterotopic bone formation, considerable protrusio, or morbid obesity. Complication rates have been reported between 0.5 and 5%, most often related to distraction and include sciatic or femoral nerve palsy, avascular necrosis, and compartment syndrome. Transient peroneal or pudendal nerve effects and chondral scuffing have been associated with difficult or prolonged distraction. Meticulous consideration to patient positioning, distraction time and portal placement are essential. Judicious patient selection and diagnostic expertise are critical to successful outcomes. Candidates for hip arthroscopy should include only those patients with mechanical symptoms (catching, locking, or buckling) that have failed to respond to conservative therapy. The extent of articular cartilage involvement has the most direct relationship

  1. Prevention of congenital dislocation of the hip in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Miranda, L; Palomo, J M; Monzonis, J; Marti, V

    1988-01-01

    Routine examination and early treatment of any instability in the hips of newborns has recently been called into question after a period of universal agreement. The hips of 49,937 neonates were prospectively studied by a general hip screening. Every unstable hip--449 in 317 children--was immediately treated with a Von Rosen splint for a 3-month-period. Overall, satisfactory reduction of the incidence of established congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH) was achieved. Risk factors leading to unstable hips (sex, first birth, and breech birth) and the development of CDH (time of stabilization) were considered.

  2. Neuromuscular hip biomechanics and pathology in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Torry, Michael R; Schenker, Mara L; Martin, Hal D; Hogoboom, Doug; Philippon, Marc J

    2006-04-01

    Although hip arthroscopic techniques have been developed and evolved over the last 5 to 10 years to help active athletes, the mechanisms of athletic hip injuries across various sports are not well understood. The purpose of this article is to review the literature related to the osseous and ligamentous support as well as the neuromuscular control strategies associated with hip joint mechanics. The neuromuscular contributions to hip stability and mobility with respect to gait will be provided because this data represents the largest body of knowledge regarding hip function. Further, this article will present and describe probable mechanisms of injury in sporting activities most often associated with hip injury in the young athlete.

  3. Natural acetabular orientation in arthritic hips

    PubMed Central

    Goudie, S. T.; Deakin, A. H.; Deep, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Acetabular component orientation in total hip arthroplasty (THA) influences results. Intra-operatively, the natural arthritic acetabulum is often used as a reference to position the acetabular component. Detailed information regarding its orientation is therefore essential. The aim of this study was to identify the acetabular inclination and anteversion in arthritic hips. Methods Acetabular inclination and anteversion in 65 symptomatic arthritic hips requiring THA were measured using a computer navigation system. All patients were Caucasian with primary osteoarthritis (29 men, 36 women). The mean age was 68 years (SD 8). Mean inclination was 50.5° (SD 7.8) in men and 52.1° (SD 6.7) in women. Mean anteversion was 8.3° (SD 8.7) in men and 14.4° (SD 11.6) in women. Results The difference between men and women in terms of anteversion was significant (p = 0.022). In 75% of hips, the natural orientation was outside the safe zone described by Lewinnek et al (anteversion 15° ± 10°; inclination 40° ± 10°). Conclusion When using the natural acetabular orientation to guide component placement, it is important to be aware of the differences between men and women, and that in up to 75% of hips natural orientation may be out of what many consider to be a safe zone. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:6–10. PMID:25628463

  4. Arthroscopic Treatment for External Snapping Hip

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jae Youn; Kwak, Hong Suk; Yoon, Kang Sup; Chang, Jae Suk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic treatment for recalcitrant external snapping hip. Materials and Methods Between September 2011 and June 2013, we evaluated 7 patients (10 cases) with snapping hip who were refractory to conservative treatments for at least 3 months. Two patients (4 cases) were impossible to adduct both knees in 90°of hip flexion. Surgery was done in lateral decubitus position, under spinal anesthesia. We made 2 arthroscopic portals to operate the patients, and used cross-cutting with flap resection technique to treat the lesion. We performed additional gluteal sling release in those 2 patients (4 cases) with adduction difficulty. Average follow-up length was 19 months (range, 12-33 months). Clinical improvement was evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS), modified Harris hip score (mHHS), and also investigated for presence of limping or other complications as well. Results The VAS decreased from 6.8 (range, 6-9) preoperatively to 0.2 (range, 0-2) postoperatively, and the mHHS improved from 68.2 to 94.8 after surgery. None of the patients complained of post-operative wound problem or surgical complications. Conclusion The clinical outcome of arthroscopic treatment for recalcitrant external snapping hip was encouraging and all patients were also satisfied with the cosmetic results. PMID:27536576

  5. Trajectories of depressive symptoms after hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cristancho, P.; Lenze, E. J.; Avidan, M. S.; Rawson, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hip fracture is often complicated by depressive symptoms in older adults. We sought to characterize trajectories of depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture and examine their relationship with functional outcomes and walking ability. We also investigated clinical and psychosocial predictors of these trajectories. Method We enrolled 482 inpatients, aged ≥60 years, who were admitted for hip fracture repair at eight St Louis, MO area hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Participants with current depression diagnosis and/or notable cognitive impairment were excluded. Depressive symptoms and functional recovery were assessed with the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Functional Recovery Score, respectively, for 52 weeks after fracture. Health, cognitive, and psychosocial variables were gathered at baseline. We modeled depressive symptoms using group-based trajectory analysis and subsequently identified correlates of trajectory group membership. Results Three trajectories emerged according to the course of depressive symptoms, which we termed ‘resilient’, ‘distressed’, and ‘depressed’. The depressed trajectory (10% of participants) experienced a persistently high level of depressive symptoms and a slower time to recover mobility than the other trajectory groups. Stressful life events prior to the fracture, current smoking, higher anxiety, less social support, antidepressant use, past depression, and type of implant predicted membership of the depressed trajectory. Conclusions Depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture are associated with poorer functional status. Clinical and psychosocial variables predicted membership of the depression trajectory. Early identification and intervention of patients in a depressive trajectory may improve functional outcomes after hip fracture. PMID:27032698

  6. Cystic lesion around the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Goto, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Issei; Sairyo, Koichi; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a narrative review of cystic lesions around the hip and primarily consists of 5 sections: Radiological examination, prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment. Cystic lesions around the hip are usually asymptomatic but may be observed incidentally on imaging examinations, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Some cysts may enlarge because of various pathological factors, such as trauma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), and may become symptomatic because of compression of surrounding structures, including the femoral, obturator, or sciatic nerves, external iliac or common femoral artery, femoral or external iliac vein, sigmoid colon, cecum, small bowel, ureters, and bladder. Treatment for symptomatic cystic lesions around the hip joint includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, needle aspiration, and surgical excision. Furthermore, when these cysts are associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and THA, primary or revision THA surgery will be necessary concurrent with cyst excision. Knowledge of the characteristic clinical appearance of cystic masses around the hip will be useful for determining specific diagnoses and treatments. PMID:26495246

  7. Prosthetic hip-associated cobalt toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pizon, Anthony F; Abesamis, Michael; King, Andrew M; Menke, Nathan

    2013-12-01

    Prosthetic hip-associated cobalt toxicity (PHACT) is gaining recognition due to the use of metal-on-metal total hip replacements. Identifying true toxicity from merely elevated cobalt levels can be extremely difficult due to the lack of available data. An extensive review of the medical literature was undertaken to characterize cobalt toxicity from prosthetic hips. As an objective approach to making the diagnosis of PHACT, we suggest the following criteria: (1) elevated serum or whole blood cobalt levels due to a prosthetic hip, (2) at least two test-confirmed findings consistent with cobalt toxicity, and (3) exclusion of other etiologies. Adhering to objective diagnostic data for PHACT is a realistic and prudent method by which to eliminate the subjectivity of vague or difficult to identify complaints. These diagnostic criteria are not meant to evaluate prosthetic hardware failure, but as a means to identify systemic cobalt toxicity. Finally, assessment of cobalt toxicity from prosthetic hips should be done in conjunction with a medical toxicologist. PMID:24258006

  8. Hip and ankle range of motion and hip muscle strength in young female ballet dancersand controls

    PubMed Central

    Bennell, K.; Khan, K. M.; Matthews, B.; De Gruyter, M.; Cook, E.; Holzer, K.; Wark, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the hip and ankle range of motion and hip muscle strength in 8-11 year old novice female ballet dancers and controls. METHODS: Subjects were 77 dancers and 49 controls (mean (SD) age 9.6 (0.8) and 9.6 (0.7) years respectively). Supine right active hip external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR) were measured using an inclinometer. A turnout protractor was used to assess standing active turnout range. The measure of ER achieved from below the hip during turnout (non-hip ER) was calculated by subtracting hip ER range from turnout range, and hip ER:IR was derived by dividing ER range by IR range. Range of right weight bearing ankle dorsiflexion was measured in a standing lunge using two methods: the distance from the foot to the wall (in centimetres) and the angle of the shank to the vertical via an inclinometer (in degrees). Right calf muscle range was measured in weight bearing using an inclinometer. A manual muscle tester was used to assess right isometric hip flexor, internal rotator, external rotator, abductor, and adductor strength. RESULTS: Dancers had less ER (p<0.05) and IR (p<0.01) range than controls but greater ER:IR (p<0.01). Although there was no difference in turnout between groups, the dancers had greater non-hip ER. Dancers had greater range of ankle dorsiflexion than controls, measured in both centimetres (p<0.01) and degrees (p<0.05), but similar calf muscle range. After controlling for body weight, controls had stronger hip muscles than dancers except for hip abductor strength which was similar. Regression analyses disclosed a moderate relation between turnout and hip ER (r = 0.40). There were no significant correlations between range of motion and training years and weekly training hours. CONCLUSIONS: Longitudinal follow up will assist in determining whether or not hip and ankle range in young dancers is genetically fixed and unable to be improved with further balletic training. 


 PMID:10522638

  9. Impact of hip fracture on mortality: a cohort study in hip fracture discordant identical twins.

    PubMed

    Michaëlsson, Karl; Nordström, Peter; Nordström, Anna; Garmo, Hans; Byberg, Liisa; Pedersen, Nancy L; Melhus, Håkan

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have shown a long-lasting higher mortality after hip fracture, but the reasons for the excess risk are not well understood. We aimed to determine whether a higher mortality after hip fracture exists when controlling for genetic constitution, shared environment, comorbidity, and lifestyle by use of a nationwide cohort study in hip fracture discordant monozygotic twins. All 286 identical Swedish twin pairs discordant for hip fracture (1972 to 2010) were identified. Comorbidity and lifestyle information was retrieved by registers and questionnaire information. We used intrapair Cox regression to compute multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for death. During follow-up, 143 twins with a hip fracture died (50%) compared with 101 twins (35%) without a hip fracture. Through the first year after hip fracture, the rate of death increased fourfold in women (HR = 3.71; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32-10.40) and sevenfold in men (HR = 6.67; 95% CI 1.47-30.13). The increased rate in women only persisted during the first year after hip fracture (HR after 1 year = 0.99; 95% CI 0.66-1.50), whereas the corresponding HR in men was 2.58 (95% CI 1.02-6.62). The higher risk in men after the hip fracture event was successively attenuated during follow-up. After 5 years, the hazard ratio in men with a hip fracture was 1.19 (95% CI 0.29-4.90). On average, the hip fracture contributed to 0.9 years of life lost in women (95% CI 0.06-1.7) and 2.7 years in men (95% CI 1.7-3.7). The potential years of life lost associated with the hip fracture was especially pronounced in older men (>75 years), with an average loss of 47% (95% CI 31-61) of the expected remaining lifetime. We conclude that both women and men display a higher mortality after hip fracture independent of genes, comorbidity, and lifestyle. PMID:23821464

  10. HIP10680/HIP10679: a visual binary in the beta Pictoris association with the fastest rotating member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, S.; Hentunen, V.-P.; Zambelli, R.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of a multi-filter photometric monitoring of the wide binary HIP10680/HIP10679 WE found both component to be variable with amplitude up to delta V = 0.03 mag in the case of HIP10680 and delta V = 0.07 mag in the case of HIP10679. We could measure the rotation periods P = 0.2396 d of the hotter F5V component HIP10680 and P = 0.777 d of the cooler G5V component HIP10679. We found that the rotation axes of both components are aligned with an inclination i = 10.

  11. Cementless total hip replacement without femoral osteotomy in patients with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip: minimum 15-year clinical and radiological results.

    PubMed

    Imbuldeniya, A M; Walter, W L; Zicat, B A; Walter, W K

    2014-11-01

    We describe the clinical and radiological results of cementless primary total hip replacement (THR) in 25 patients (18 women and seven men; 30 THRs) with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Their mean age at surgery was 47 years (23 to 89). In all, 21 hips had Crowe type III dysplasia and nine had Crowe type IV. Cementless acetabular components with standard polyethylene liners were introduced as close to the level of the true acetabulum as possible. The modular cementless S-ROM femoral component was used with a low resection of the femoral neck. A total of 21 patients (25 THRs) were available for review at a mean follow-up of 18.7 years (15.8 to 21.8). The mean modified Harris hip score improved from 46 points pre-operatively to 90 at final follow up (p < 0.001). A total of 15 patients (17 THRs; 57%) underwent revision of the acetabular component at a mean of 14.6 years (7 to 20.8), all for osteolysis. Two patients (two THRs) had symptomatic loosening. No patient underwent femoral revision. Survival with revision of either component for any indication was 81% at 15 years (95% CI 60.1 to 92.3), with 21 patients at risk. This technique may reduce the need for femoral osteotomy in severe DDH, while providing a good long-term functional result. PMID:25371455

  12. A Two Phase Treatment of an Infected Hip Endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ciriviri, Jasmin; Talevski, Darko; Nestorovski, Zoran; Vraniskoski, Tode; Mishevska-Perchinkova, Snežana

    2015-01-01

    The revision of the two phase treatment represents a golden standard in the treatment of infected endoprosthesis. Throughout this study, the results of 21 patients with an infected hip endoprosthesis treated in two phases have been processed, with the use of an antibiotic spacer, within the period of 2009 and 2012. Thereby, a unique protocol for diagnosis and treatment of infections has been applied to all the patients, which entails a preoperational x-ray image, laboratory findings (Se, CRP), as well as a puncture aspiration with a microbiological and biochemical examination of the aspirated fragments. The operational treatment consists of: taking a sample for microbiological and histopathological diagnosis, removal of the implanted endoprosthesis, excision of the avascular and necrotic tissue and installing an antibiotic spacer. Postoperatively, the patients are treated with a parenteral application of an antibiotics based on an antibiogram, throughout a period of two weeks, and later on an oral treatment, a combination of two antibiotics, depending on the antibiogram, within the following four to six weeks. After the appeasement of the local findings and the laboratory results, a revision with a removal of the antibiotic spacer and reimplantation of an endoprosthesis - revisional or primary has been conducted on the patients, depending on the bone deficit. The functionality of the joint is graded based on the Haris Hip Score. The patients are being observed postoperatively for a period of 12 to 36 months. A definite reimplantation has been applied to 20 patients, while one patient has been treated with a resection method. The Haris Hip Score was 45 preoperatively, and 80 postoperatively. The applied protocol of the treatment of infected endoprosthesis is effective in the eradication of the infection and the final reimplantation. PMID:27442385

  13. Effects of arthroscopic-assisted surgery on irreducible developmental dislocation of hip by mid-term follow-up: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Fa; Yan, Ya-Bo; Xu, Chao; Li, Tian-Qing; Zhao, Tian-Feng; Liu, Ning; Huang, Lu-Yu; Zhang, Chun-Li; Lei, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the indications, surgical technique, and the clinical effects of arthroscopic-assisted treatment of irreducible developmental dislocation of the hip by mid-term follow-up. Arthroscopic-assisted surgeries were performed on 40 children (52 hips) between January 2005 and December 2009. Anterior and antero-superior greater trochanter portals were used in these treatments. Spica cast and abduction splint were applied for 3 months postoperatively. The follow-up was conducted on every 3 months postoperatively. During 12-month follow-up, a secondary treatment such as acetabuloplasty and/or femoral osteotomy (shortening, varus, and derotation) was applied if the acetabular angle was greater than 25°. The pelvic acetabular angle, Mckay and Severin score were evaluated every 6 months in all children. With 36 to 96 months (average 71 months) follow-up, 35 children (44 hips) were successfully followed up with complete case data while 5 children unsuccessfully. According to Tönnis classification, there were 5 grade 1 hips, 14 grade 2 hips, 14 grade 3 hips, 11 grade 4 hips, in which 3 children (4 hips) were failed in arthroscopic reduction and femoral head avascular necrosis occurred in 2 children (4 hips). According to Mckay standard, the good rate is 100%. According to Severin standard, the good rate is 84.1%. Arthroscopic assisted treatment is an effective way of reduction of the irreducible hip. Compared with the open reduction, arthroscopic treatment combined with acetabuloplasty and/or femoral osteotomy has advantages of less trauma and better function preservation. PMID:27537595

  14. Resolving controversies in hip fracture care: the need for large collaborative trials in hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Mohit; Sprague, Sheila; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2009-07-01

    Hip fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the burden of disability associated with hip fractures globally vindicate the need for high-quality research to advance the care of patients with hip fractures. Historically, large, multi-centre randomized controlled trials have been rare in the orthopaedic trauma literature. Similar to other medical specialties, orthopaedic research is currently undergoing a paradigm shift from single centre initiatives to larger collaborative groups. This is evident with the establishment of several collaborative groups in Canada, in the United States, and in Europe, which has proven that multi-centre trials can be extremely successful in orthopaedic trauma research.Despite ever increasing literature on the topic of his fractures, the optimal treatment of hip fractures remains unknown and controversial. To resolve this controversy large multi-national collaborative randomized controlled trials are required. In 2005, the International Hip Fracture Research Collaborative was officially established following funding from the Canadian Institute of Health Research International Opportunity Program with the mandate of resolving controversies in hip fracture management. This manuscript will describe the need, the information, the organization, and the accomplishments to date of the International Hip Fracture Research Collaborative.

  15. Resolving Controversies in Hip Fracture Care: The Need for Large Collaborative Trials in Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Mohit; Sprague, Sheila; Schemitsch, Emil H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Hip fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the burden of disability associated with hip fractures globally vindicates the need for high-quality research to advance the care of patients with hip fractures. Historically, large, multi-centre randomized controlled trials have been rare in the orthopaedic trauma literature. Similar to other medical specialties, orthopaedic research is currently undergoing a paradigm shift from single centre initiatives to larger collaborative groups. This is evident with the establishment of several collaborative groups in Canada, in the United States, and in Europe, which has proven that multi-centre trials can be extremely successful in orthopaedic trauma research. Despite ever increasing literature on the topic of his fractures, the optimal treatment of hip fractures remains unknown and controversial. To resolve this controversy large multi-national collaborative randomized controlled trials are required. In 2005, the International Hip Fracture Research Collaborative was officially established following funding from the Canadian Institute of Health Research International Oppurtunity Program with the mandate of resolving controversies in hip fracture management. This manuscript will describe the need, the information, the organization, and the accomplishments to date of the International Hip Fracture Research Collaborative. PMID:19550238

  16. Total hip arthroplasty after rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideya; Takatori, Yoshio; Moro, Toru; Oshima, Hirofumi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether the outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) are equal to those of primary THA, and to elucidate the characteristics of THA after RAO. The clinical and radiographic findings of THA after RAO (44 hips), with minimum 24 months of follow-up, were compared with a matched control group of 58 hips without prior RAO. We found that the outcomes in terms of functional scores and complication rates did not differ between THA after RAO and THA without previous pelvic osteotomy, indicating that the results of THA after RAO are equivalent to those of primary THA. Although THA after RAO requires technical considerations, similar clinical outcomes to primary THA can be expected. PMID:25456635

  17. The pathophysiology of osteoporotic hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, David

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporotic hip fractures have a profound impact on the physical health and psychosocial wellbeing of patients. In addition, osteoporosis has considerable economic implications and is projected to become an increasing burden on developed economies over the coming decades. Nevertheless, the risk factors for both osteoporosis and hip fracture are both well understood and preventable, often with only minor lifestyle changes. This narrative review explores the pathological process underlying osteoporosis and considers how each of the major risk factors contributes to the pathology of this disease. It is hoped that a greater understanding of individual risk factors will result in renewed efforts to promote increased bone density before patients present with hip fracture. PMID:18523524

  18. Eastern portal, looking W. Note hipped roof covered with wood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Eastern portal, looking W. Note hipped roof covered with wood shingles, added in 1993. The hipped roof is unique in U.S. covered bridges. - Doe River Bridge, Spanning Doe River, Third Avenue, Elizabethton, Carter County, TN

  19. Differences between the alpha angles measured manually and digitally from paediatric hip ultrasonograms.

    PubMed

    Sariyilmaz, Kerim; Saglam, Yavuz; Ozkunt, Okan; Yildiz, Fatih; Sungur, Mustafa; Hurmeydan, Onder Murat; Goksan, Suleyman Bora

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal whether a meaningful difference is caused by measuring the alpha angle in hip ultrasonography manually or digitally to help the early diagnosis and treatment of DDH and observe the treatment implications of any such difference. All ultrasound images were obtained by same orthopaedist, and each hip was measured twice by two investigators with different levels of experience. Standard images were taken, and a printout of the standard images were obtained. The alpha angle was measured digitally by using the sonography device. The alpha angle was also measured by pencil, ruler and goniometer on the printout after 2 days. One hundred and two hips of 51 babies, at a mean age of 14 weeks, were assessed. The mean alpha angle measured manually with a goniometer was 64.4° (±1.6°), while that measured on the ultrasonography device was 65.3° (±0.9°). This difference was found to be statistically different (p = 0.016). Typology changes occurred in a total of 10 hips out of 102 as a result of manual and digital measurements. However, this study showed reduction in alpha angle variation and considerable advantages for manual alpha angle measurement with pencil and goniometer on a printout compared to computer-based measurement; future studies are needed to understand these differences caused by each measurement method. PMID:25869106

  20. Prediction of hip displacement in children with cerebral palsy: development of the CPUP hip score.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, M; Hägglund, G; Riad, J; Rodby-Bousquet, E; Wagner, P

    2015-10-01

    Hip displacement, defined in this study as a migration percentage (MP) of more than 40%, is a common, debilitating complication of cerebral palsy (CP). In this prospective study we analysed the risk of developing hip displacement within five years of the first pelvic radiograph. All children with CP in southern and western Sweden are invited to register in the hip surveillance programme CPUP. Inclusion criteria for the two groups in this study were children from the CPUP database born between 1994 and 2009 with Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) III to V. Group 1 included children who developed hip displacement, group 2 included children who did not develop hip displacement over a minimum follow-up of five years. A total of 145 children were included with a mean age at their initial pelvic radiograph of 3.5 years (0.6 to 9.7). The odds ratio for hip displacement was calculated for GMFCS-level, age and initial MP and head-shaft angle. A risk score was constructed with these variables using multiple logistic regression analysis. The predictive ability of the risk score was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC). All variables had a significant effect on the risk of a MP > 40%. The discriminatory accuracy of the CPUP hip score is high (AUC = 0.87), indicating a high ability to differentiate between high- and low-risk individuals for hip displacement. The CPUP hip score may be useful in deciding on further follow-up and treatment in children with CP.

  1. Lesion of the hip abductor mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Caviglia, Horacio; Cambiaggi, Guillermo; Vattani, Nosrat; Landro, María Eulalia; Galatro, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The disruption of the abductor muscles of the hip after hip revision surgery often causes limping, pain, and instability of the implant. The purpose of our paper is to describe a mesh technique to repair hip abductor mechanism injuries after hip revision. Patients and methods: Forty-six patients with hip abductor damage after prosthetic revision were treated. Inclusion criteria were: patients presenting with prosthetic loosening, complaint of pain, and with a positive Trendelenburg sign due to deficient abductor muscle mechanisms. Thirty-one were women (67.39%) with an average age of 64 years (34–82 years). The number of previous revision surgeries was three (two to seven). The Merle d’Aubigné score and variants before and after treatment were also reported. Results: In the postoperative follow-up after hip revision with the mesh technique, the Merle d’Aubigné score improved and the Trendelenburg sign was negative in 78.3% of the patients (p < 0.001). Also, the Trendelenburg test with the knee flexed was negative in 60.9% (p < 0.001) and the stair-climbing test was negative in 60.9% of cases (p < 0.001). The gluteus medius test in the lateral position was negative in 52.2% of patients, and in the lateral position with the knee flexed it was negative in 47.8% of patients (p < 0.001). Discussion: Repair of the abductor mechanism with the mesh technique has proven effective for both partial and total lesions. PMID:27382925

  2. Acute arthritis of the hip--case series describing emergency physician performed ultrasound guided hip arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Joseph; Denne, Nick; Miller, Miryam; Larrabee, Hollynn; Lander, Owen

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of acute hip arthritis where arthrocentesis was able to be performed rapidly, at the bedside by the emergency physician using ultrasound guidance, expediting diagnosis and patient care. In the first case, the patient, who was 23 weeks pregnant, was diagnosed with septic hip arthritis, taken for operative washout of the joint and did very well postoperatively with no pregnancy or other complications. In the second case, the patient was determined to have a noninfectious etiology and also did well. Skilled ultrasound guidance allows hip arthrocentesis to be performed by the treating clinician, decreasing the time to diagnosis and definitive care.

  3. Hip Arthroscopy for Incarcerated Acetabular Labrum following Reduction of Traumatic Hip Dislocation: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung-Mo; Lee, Woo-Yong; Noh, Chang-Kyun; Zheng, Long

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic hip fracture-dislocations are associated with chondral and labral pathology as well as loose bodies that can be incarcerated in the hip joint. Incarceration, such as interposed labrum between acetabulum and femoral head that is not readily visualized preoperatively, is a rare but important cause of pain and can potentially be a source for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis. We present three cases, arthroscopic surgery of incarcerated acetabular osseo-labral fragment following reduction of traumatic hip fracture-dislocation. PMID:27777919

  4. What would you do?: challenges in hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, A V; Cameron, H U; Della Valle, C J; Jones, R E; Paprosky, W G; Ranawat, C S

    2012-11-01

    A moderator and panel of five experts led an interactive session in discussing five challenging and interesting patient case presentations involving surgery of the hip. The hip pathologies reviewed included failed open reduction internal fixation of subcapital femoral neck fracture, bilateral hip disease, evaluation of pain after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty, avascular necrosis, aseptic loosening secondary to osteolysis and polyethylene wear, and management of ceramic femoral head fracture.

  5. Imaging of hip injuries in dancers.

    PubMed

    Chow, Alex Hung Lit; Morrison, William B

    2011-01-01

    Dancers are quite prone to injuries in the hip region. Imaging plays a key role in evaluation of the pain resulting from such injuries, as proximity of structures and cross-innervation can result in a clinical dilemma regarding the specific injury, and thus origin of the pain generator. Advanced imaging techniques, including MRI, ultrasound, and multidetector CT, are becoming increasingly important in the workup of injuries in athletes, yet radiographs remain an essential component. This article presents a variety of injuries in the hip and groin region that may be seen in dancers and discusses the utility of basic and advanced imaging modalities.

  6. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. METHODS: This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. RESULTS: The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. CONCLUSION: Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement “gold standard” among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life. PMID:26925384

  7. Comparing results of clinical versus ultrasonographic examination in developmental dysplasia of hip

    PubMed Central

    Arti, Hamidreza; Mehdinasab, Seyed Abdoulhossein; Arti, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Developmental dysplasia of hip (DDH) is one of the congenital anomalies in newborns that if not diagnosed and treated on time can lead to a severe disability. Although clinical examination is a very useful way for screening, but in some patients, a confirmatory diagnostic method such as ultrasonography is needed. The aim of the present study is to compare the sensitivity and specificity of clinical examination and ultrasonography in early detecting of DDH. Materials and Methods: A total of 5800 of newborns were examined by orthopedic surgeon as a screening method. The newborns with risk factors or suspicious on clinical examination were introduced to repeat clinical and ultrasonographic examination of hip. The results were collected and recorded by a check list and then the sensitivity and specificity of clinical examination were calculated. Results: Of 5701 newborns (11402 hips) who were studied by two methods of clinical examination and ultrasonography (by Graf method), the overall incidence of DDH was 29 per 1000. Only 94 hips (13.5%) of 694 disordered ones according to clinical examination were involved on ultrasonographic evaluation. A total of 240 hips of 334 (72%) involved hips according to ultrasonography (Graf type IIb or more) were diagnosed normal on clinical examination, considering ultrasonography as a gold standard method of evaluating DDH, the sensitivity and specificity of clinical examination were calculated 28.1% and 94.5%, respectively. Conclusion: According to the present study, ultrasonogeraphic examination has a high valuable in screening of DDH and the clinical examination done by an experienced orthopedic surgeon has an acceptable value in primary screening of DDH in developing countries for detecting of healthy neonates, but if the newborn has a risk factor or is suspicious on clinical examination, it will be necessary to get assistance from ultrasonography by an experienced sonographer. PMID:24523795

  8. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  9. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in developmental dysplasia of the hip with end stage osteoarthritis: 2-7 years' clinical results.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Tugrul; Guclu, Berk; Karaguven, Dogac; Kaya, Alper; Akan, Burak; Cetin, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2011, 102 hips of 78 patients with end-stage osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). According to the Crowe's classification, 22 hips (21%) were type 1, 19 hips (18%) were type 2, 22 hips (21%) were type 3 and 39 hips (38%) were type 4 respectively. Functional and clinical analyses were performed by Harris Hip Scores (HHS). There were 73 (71%) excellent or good results according to HHS. The postoperative HHS was significantly lower in patients who underwent femoral shortening (p<0.01). We observed 25 (24.5%) complications in total, 15 (14.7%) of which required revision surgery. The authors concluded that THA for DDH is a safe and a reliable procedure with good clinical outcomes. PMID:25907395

  10. [Geometry of the hip joint: methodology and guidelines].

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Drago; Crnković, Tomislav

    2013-03-01

    An hip fracture is an significant personal, family and health issue of people older than 65 years. In the first year of the fracture up to 30% of the injured die and about 50% of them never regain their formal degree of independence in fulfilling day-to-day activities. Estimations are that throughout 30 years in the world there will be around 6 million hip fractures per year which is about four times the todays amount. Todays predictions of hip fractures based on the hip geometry have shown us that the hip geometry is an independent variable of the bone mineral density. The hip geometry is more resistant to the effect of various factors than the bone mineral density and the changes throu life are a lot slower. The uniqueness and the sensitivity of the hip geometry in predicting a fracture is high and acceptable in research results of most authors. In this review we present the previous relevant knowledge about the measures and factors which determines the hip geometry and the accepted amount of pictorial methods of hip display. We have compared the methodology and the patients of eleven randomly picked writings on predicting hip fracture based on the hip geometry. We highlight the need of further refinement of the methodology and the more balanced selection of patients for a greater conformity in future writings. The hip geometry has shown it self as an useful diagnostical instrument but there is still more room for its improvement.

  11. Candida tropicalis: diagnostic dilemmas for an unusual prosthetic hip infection.

    PubMed

    Lidder, Surjit; Tasleem, A; Masterson, S; Carrington, R W J

    2013-06-01

    Infection is the third commonest cause of total hip arthroplasty failure. Infections of the hip with Candida species are extremely rare with only a few reports in the literature. A case of a 76-year-old female subject is presented illustrating both the difficulty in initial diagnosis and the challenges faced in hip reconstruction.

  12. Hip-Hopping across China: Intercultural Formulations of Local Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Catrice

    2012-01-01

    The linguistic dimensions of globalized hip-hop cannot be understood simply as a byproduct of English as an American export. As hip-hop mobilizes, it is common (and arguably necessary) for global hip-hop communities to struggle through purposeful, semiotically rooted dialectics over what constitutes "authentic" and respectable forms of local…

  13. Revolutionizing Environmental Education through Indigenous Hip Hop Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorlewski, Julie; Porfilio, Brad J.

    2012-01-01

    Based upon the life histories of six Indigenous hip hop artists of the Beat Nation artist collective, this essay captures how Indigenous hip hop has the potential to revolutionize environmental education. Hip hop provides Indigenous youth an emancipatory space to raise their opposition to neocolonial controls of Indigenous territories that…

  14. A Simple Technique for the Positioning of a Patient with an above Knee Amputation for an Ipsilateral Extracapsular Hip Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Davarinos, N.; Ellanti, P.; McCoy, G.

    2013-01-01

    The positioning of the patient on the fracture table is critical to the successful reduction and operative fixation of hip fractures which are fixed using the dynamic hip screw system (DHS). There is a standard setup which is commonly used with relative ease. Yet the positioning of patients with amputations either above or below knee of the affected side can pose a significant challenge. We describe a novel positioning technique used on a 51-year old patient with a right above knee amputation who sustained an intertrochanteric extracapsular hip fracture. PMID:24416607

  15. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Alister J.; Sandison, Ann; Quinn, Paul; Sampson, Barry; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Skinner, John A.; Goode, Angela; Powell, Jonathan J.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.

    2009-11-01

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  16. Hip resurfacing after iliofemoral distraction for type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip a case report.

    PubMed

    Sambri, A; Cadossi, M; Mazzotti, A; Faldini, C; Giannini, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip is a surgical challenge because of the modified anatomy of the acetabulum which is deficient in its shape with poor bone quality, torsional deformities of the femur and the altered morphology of femoral head. Particularly in Crowe type III and IV, additional surgical challenges are present, such as limb-length discrepancy and adductor muscle contractures. This is a bilateral hip dysplasia case where bilateral hip replacement was indicated, on the left side with a resurfacing one and on the other side a two stage procedure using a iliofemoral external fixator to restore equal leg length with a lower risk of complications. This case report shows both the negative clinical outcome of the left and the excellent one of the right hip where the dysplasia was much more severe. Patient selection and implant positioning are crucial in determining long-term results. PMID:27218252

  17. Combined Anterior and Posterior Approach in Total Hip Arthroplasty for Crowe IV Dysplasia or Ankylosed Hips.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Kyun; Kim, Ki-Choul; Ha, Yong-chan; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated 70 patients (71 hips) who underwent complex total hip arthroplasty (THA) through the combined anterior and posterior approach. Sixty-five patients (32 dislocated hips and 34 ankylosed hips) were followed-up at a minimum of 3 years (median, 6 years; range, 3-10 years). Seven patients (10.6%), who had transient paresthesia on the anterior thigh, recovered within 3 months. All patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of range of motion, pain and recovery of walking. At the latest follow-up, all prostheses had bone-ingrown stability without any detectable wear or osteolysis. The combined approach allows an excellent exposure of the acetabulum for accurate cup alignment, leg lengthening and mobilization of joint in complex THA without trochanteric osteotomy, excessive abductor release and femoral shortening osteotomy. PMID:25682205

  18. Three-dimensional computerized selection of hip prostheses in patients with congenital dislocated hips.

    PubMed

    Gelalis, L D; Xenakis, T A; Hantes, M; Vartziotis, K; Soucacos, P N

    2001-11-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of the combined use of computed tomography (CT) and computer-aided design (CAD) in the preoperative evaluation and implant selection in 20 patients (20 hips) with congenital dislocation of the hip who were scheduled to undergo total hip arthroplasty. Computerized selection of the femoral implant with optimum fit and fill was made after a three-dimensional reconstruction of the femoral canal using CT data and CAD. Implantation of all sizes of 5 noncemented and 2 cemented femoral implants was simulated using CATIA software (IBM, Kingstone, NY). When patients underwent surgery, 18 of 20 preselected prostheses agreed by type and size with the prostheses implanted. The remaining 2 preselected implants agreed by type only. In patients with dislocated and dysplastic hips, combined use of CT and CAD allows effective preoperative planning by providing the surgeon with vital information about the proximal femoral canal geometry and the possible femoral implant with optimum fit and fill to be used.

  19. Hip resurfacing after iliofemoral distraction for type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip a case report.

    PubMed

    Sambri, A; Cadossi, M; Mazzotti, A; Faldini, C; Giannini, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip is a surgical challenge because of the modified anatomy of the acetabulum which is deficient in its shape with poor bone quality, torsional deformities of the femur and the altered morphology of femoral head. Particularly in Crowe type III and IV, additional surgical challenges are present, such as limb-length discrepancy and adductor muscle contractures. This is a bilateral hip dysplasia case where bilateral hip replacement was indicated, on the left side with a resurfacing one and on the other side a two stage procedure using a iliofemoral external fixator to restore equal leg length with a lower risk of complications. This case report shows both the negative clinical outcome of the left and the excellent one of the right hip where the dysplasia was much more severe. Patient selection and implant positioning are crucial in determining long-term results.

  20. Featherless Dinosaurs and the Hip-Hop Simulacrum: Reconsidering Hip-Hop's Appropriateness for the Music Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    This article offers considerations for music teachers interested in including hip-hop music in their classrooms but who might feel concerned with or overwhelmed by issues of appropriateness. Two concerns related to hip-hop music are examined: language and negative social themes. Commercial interests in hip-hop music have created a simulacrum (or…

  1. The Formation of "Hip-Hop Academicus"--How American Scholars Talk about the Academisation of Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderman, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Social activism and education have been associated with hip-hop since it emerged in New York City 38 years ago. Therefore, it might not be surprising that universities have become interested in hip-hop. This article aims to highlight this "hip-hop academisation" and analyse the discursive mechanisms that manifest in these academisation…

  2. [Hip Fracture--Epidemiology, Management and Liaison Service. Risk factor for hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2015-04-01

    Many risk factors have been identified for hip fracture, including female, advanced age, osteoporosis, previous fractures, low body weight or low body mass index, alcohol drinking, smoking, family history of fractures, use of glucocorticoid, factors related to falls, and bone strength. The factors related to falls are number of fall, frail, post stroke, paralysis, muscle weakness, anti-anxiety drugs, anti-depression drugs, and sedatives. Dementia and respiratory disease and others have been reported to be risk factors for secondary hip fracture.

  3. Correlation of Hip Fracture with Other Fracture Types: Toward a Rational Composite Hip Fracture Endpoint

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F.; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Adler, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Methods Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between1999-2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics, were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regards to the timing of the events. Results 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, p<0.0001), femur (0.15, p<0.0001), and shoulder (0.11, p<0.0001). Conclusions Pelvic, acetabular, femur, and shoulder fractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. PMID:26151123

  4. Preventable mortality in geriatric hip fracture inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, S. M.; Hardy, B. M.; Byth, P. L.; Brown, T. L.; Attia, J.; Balogh, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    There is a high rate of mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip. We aimed to determine the rate of preventable mortality and errors during the management of these patients. A 12 month prospective study was performed on patients aged > 65 years who had sustained a fracture of the hip. This was conducted at a Level 1 Trauma Centre with no orthogeriatric service. A multidisciplinary review of the medical records by four specialists was performed to analyse errors of management and elements of preventable mortality. During 2011, there were 437 patients aged > 65 years admitted with a fracture of the hip (85 years (66 to 99)) and 20 died while in hospital (86.3 years (67 to 96)). A total of 152 errors were identified in the 80 individual reviews of the 20 deaths. A total of 99 errors (65%) were thought to have at least a moderate effect on death; 45 reviews considering death (57%) were thought to have potentially been preventable. Agreement between the panel of reviewers on the preventability of death was fair. A larger-scale assessment of preventable mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip is required. Multidisciplinary review panels could be considered as part of the quality assurance process in the management of these patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014;96-B:1178–84. PMID:25183587

  5. Three brothers with algodystrophy of the hip.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, J; Ott, H

    1983-01-01

    We describe the clinical features of algodystrophy of the hip in 3 brothers, probably the first familial presentation of this disease to be reported. The symptoms and evolution of the disease are as usually described. The familial presentation suggests a genetic predisposition. HLA typing showed an identity of antigenic formula in the 3 brothers, a rare coincidence. Images PMID:6882038

  6. Contralateral Total Hip Arthroplasty After Hindquarter Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Sommerville, Scott M. M.; Patton, James T.; Luscombe, Jonathan C.; Grimer, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the management and outcome of a 62-year old lady who developed severe osteoarthritis of the hip, nine years after a hindquarter amputation for radiation-induced sarcoma of the contralateral pelvis. The difficulties of stabilising the pelvis intraoperatively and the problems of postoperative rehabilitation are outlined. The operation successfully relieved her pain and restored limited mobility. PMID:17496994

  7. Injury incidence in hip hop dance.

    PubMed

    Ojofeitimi, S; Bronner, S; Woo, H

    2012-06-01

    Hip hop dance has rapidly become a popular international art form. There is limited information on injury patterns in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine injury incidence and patterns among three groups of hip hop dancers. Three hundred and twelve intermediate, advanced, and expert hip hop dancers were recruited at battles, dance conferences, clubs, and on dance related web sites within the United States and internationally. A Web-based survey was conducted over a 6-month period. Inclusion criteria included intermediate and advanced level dancers over the age of 13. Dancers were divided into three main categories: Breakers, Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Separate analysis of variances were used to compare injury pattern differences between groups. Two hundred and thirty-two dancers reported a total of 738 injuries. Five hundred and six of these (sustained by 205 dancers) were time-loss (TL) injuries. Annual injury incidence was 237% (162% involving TL). Lower extremity injuries were 52% and upper extremity injuries 32% of total injuries. Breakers had a higher injury incidence compared with Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Hip hop dancers report injury rates that are higher than other dance forms but similar to gymnastics. These dancers should be educated concerning injury prevention, biomechanics, and use of protective equipment.

  8. Multimodal Hip Hop Productions as Media Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, K. C. Nat

    2012-01-01

    This study draws on ethnographic data from a year-long multimodal media production (MMP) course and the experience of an African American female adolescent who used the production of multimodal Hip Hop texts to express her creativity and growing socially conscious view of the world. The study demonstrates how students made meaning multimodally and…

  9. Current status of noncemented hip implants.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H

    1987-01-01

    Recently the operative techniques, instrumentation, design, and material properties of bony ingrowth total hip replacement have been greatly improved. I prefer a hemispherical acetabular component fixed with screws going through the metal shell. The titanium mesh allows microinterlock with new bone, and macrointerlock is obtained by adding bone graft into the unused screw holes. The femoral component, made of Tivanium with titanium mesh attached to it by a new process called diffusion bonding, retains superalloy fatigue strength characteristics. An intimate press fit is assured by the specific operative technique, and both the fiber mesh and the collar provide proximal stress transfer. The design affords a nondestructive method for removal if necessary. The short-term clinical results are promising; most patients function as well as with cemented total hip replacement. The incidence of thigh pain has been significantly reduced since prior reports of cementless total hip replacement; however, a few patients still have thigh pain. The results in revision surgery are also promising, but as in cemented total hip replacement, the functional capacity of revision cases is usually lower than primary cases. There is an increased capacity to correct complex and difficult acetabular problems with this acetabular component. Obviously, long-term data are needed to establish the behavior of these implants over the immediate and long term.

  10. Current status of noncemented hip implants.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H

    1987-01-01

    Recently the operative techniques, instrumentation, design, and material properties of bony ingrowth total hip replacement have been greatly improved. I prefer a hemispherical acetabular component fixed with screws going through the metal shell. The titanium mesh allows microinterlock with new bone, and macrointerlock is obtained by adding bone graft into the unused screw holes. The femoral component, made of Tivanium with titanium mesh attached to it by a new process called diffusion bonding, retains superalloy fatigue strength characteristics. An intimate press fit is assured by the specific operative technique, and both the fiber mesh and the collar provide proximal stress transfer. The design affords a nondestructive method for removal if necessary. The short-term clinical results are promising; most patients function as well as with cemented total hip replacement. The incidence of thigh pain has been significantly reduced since prior reports of cementless total hip replacement; however, a few patients still have thigh pain. The results in revision surgery are also promising, but as in cemented total hip replacement, the functional capacity of revision cases is usually lower than primary cases. There is an increased capacity to correct complex and difficult acetabular problems with this acetabular component. Obviously, long-term data are needed to establish the behavior of these implants over the immediate and long term. PMID:3818349

  11. The Philippine "Hip Hop Stick Dance"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a dance that blends the traditional cultural heritage of the Philippines with modern music and moves. "Hip Hop Stick Dance" incorporates Tinikling (the Philippine national dance) and Arnis (a Filipino style of martial arts) to create a contemporary combination of rhythm, dance, and fitness. It was designed to introduce…

  12. The Rap on Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piekarski, Bill

    2004-01-01

    From its humble origins some 30 years ago in New York's bombed-out, poverty-ravaged South Bronx, hip-hop has risen to become a dominant cultural force both here and abroad. Strictly defined, the term refers to the entire cultural constellation that accompanies rap music, which in 2001 surpassed country music as the most popular musical genre in…

  13. Lateral Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Grumet, Robert C.; Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Historically, the term greater trochanteric pain syndrome has been used to describe a spectrum of conditions that cause lateral-sided hip pain, including greater trochanteric bursitis, snapping iliotibial band, and/or strains or tendinopathy of the abductor mechanism. Diagnosis of these conditions may be difficult because clinical presentations are variable and sometimes inconclusive. Especially difficult is differentiating intrinsic pain from pain referred to the greater trochanteric region. The purposes of this article are to review the relevant anatomy and pathophysiology of the lateral hip. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature conducted through a MEDLINE search of all relevant papers between 1980 and January 2010. Results: Recent advances in imaging and an improved understanding of pathomechanics have helped to guide the evaluation, diagnosis, and appropriate treatment for patients presenting with lateral hip pain. Conclusion: Various diagnostic tools and treatment modalities can be used to effectively manage the athletic patient presenting with lateral hip pain. PMID:23015937

  14. A Multicenter Approach Evaluating the Impact of Vitamin E-Blended Polyethylene in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; van Wasen, Andrea; Warwas, Sebastian; Landgraeber, Stefan; Haversath, Marcel; Group, VITAS

    2014-01-01

    Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials as a liner in total hip arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve design and material properties over the last 50 years. Antioxidants seems to be a promising alternative to further increase durability and reduce polyethylene wear in long term. As of yet, only in vitro results are available. While they are promising, there is yet no clinical evidence that the new material shows these advantages in vivo. To answer the question if vitamin-E enhanced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is able to improve long-term survivorship of cementless total hip arthroplasty we initiated a randomized long-term multicenter trial. Designed as a superiority study, the oxidation index assessed in retrieval analyses of explanted liners was chosen as primary parameter. Radiographic results (wear rate, osteolysis, radiolucency) and functional outcome (Harris Hip Scores, University of California-Los Angeles, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Visual Analogue Scale) will serve as secondary parameters. Patients with the indication for a cementless total hip arthroplasty will be asked to participate in the study and will be randomized to either receive a standard hip replacement with a highly cross-linked UHMWPE-X liner or a highly cross-linked vitamin-E supplemented UHMWPE-XE liner. The follow-up will be 15 years, with evaluation after 5, 10 and 15 years. The controlled randomized study has been designed to determine if Vitamin-E supplemented highly cross-linked polyethylene liners are superior to standard XLPE liners in cementless total hip arthroplasty. While several studies have been started to evaluate the influence of vitamin-E, most of them evaluate wear rates and functional results. The approach used for this multicenter study, to analyze the oxidation status of retrieved implants, should make it possible to directly evaluate the ageing process and development of the implant

  15. Uncemented custom femoral components in hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose We have developed an individually designed, uncemented femoral component for achievement of improved strain distribution and fixation to the bone, to make uncemented stems more applicable in femurs of abnormal size and shape, and to improve the joint mechanics. Here we describe the design of the implant and present the results of a prospective clinical study with at least 7 years of follow-up. Patients and methods The prostheses are produced by CAD-CAM technique. The design of the stem is based on CT information, and the neck design is based on the surgeon's planning of the center of rotation, femoral head offset, and leg length correction. The first-generation stem produced before 2001 had a proximal HA coating and a sand-blasted distal part that was down-scaled to avoid contact with compact bone. The second-generation stem had a porous coating beneath the HA layer and the distal part of the stem was polished. The implant was used in 762 hips (614 patients) from 1995 until 2009. 191 of these hips were followed for 7 years and 83 others were followed for 10 years, and these hips are included in the present study. Mean age at surgery was 48 (20–65) years. Congenital dysplasia of the hip was the reason for osteoarthritis in 46% and 57% of the hips in respective groups. Merle d'Aubigné score was recorded in 152 and 75 hips in the two groups. Prostheses followed for 10 years, and almost all in the 7-year group, were first-generation stems. Results The 7- and 10-year cumulative revision rates were 1.1% and 2.4%, respectively, with stem revision for any reason as endpoint. The clinical results were similar at 7 and 10 years, with Merle d'Aubigné scores of 17. Intraoperative trochanteric fissures occurred in 2 of the 191 operations (1.0%); both healed after wiring. In hips followed for 7 years, 2 periprosthetic fractures occurred; exchange of the stem was necessary in both. One additional fracture occurred between 7 and 10 years, and it was

  16. SUSHI: the Super Simple Hip score for younger patients.

    PubMed

    Henkus, Hans-Erik; Van Kampen, Paulien M; Van Der Linden, Marleen H; Hogervorst, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of a simple patient-based score for young patients with hip problems which concentrates on activities that are difficult for someone with a hip problem and includes an activity rating scale that measures the highest level of physical activity reached during the past year. We compared the super simple hip score (SUSHI) with the more extensive hip osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS) and evaluated the validity, sensitivity to change and floor and ceiling effects of the SUSHI score. We found that the SUSHI score is an adequate score to measure hip problems and that this score was preferred to the HOOS score by patients.

  17. Symptomatic hip plica: MR arthrographic and arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Lee D; Haims, Andrew; Medvecky, Michael; McCallum, John

    2010-12-01

    Two cases of unilateral hip pain are reported in which MR arthrography demonstrated a prominent band medial to the ligamentum teres, running in the AP direction, consistent with a hip plica. Both patients underwent hip arthroscopy with resection of the band. No labral tear or additional intra-articular pathological features was identified in either case. Both patients became asymptomatic following surgery and have remained such. The pathology report demonstrated the specimens to be a synovial band with fibroconnective tissue. This is the first MR arthrographic report of the identification and resection of a symptomatic hip plica. The symptomatic plica may represent an alternative diagnosis for mechanical hip pain.

  18. Ipsilateral Intracapsular Hip Fracture 2 Years after Fixation of Extracapsular Fracture by Dynamic Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Farhan; Nunag, Perrico; Mustafa, Abubakar; Pillai, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sustaining an intracapsular fracture in a hip which was previously fixed with dynamic hip screw for extracapsular fracture, is a very rarely reported occurrence. We present one such case in order to discuss the presentation and management of this fracture. We have also reviewed the literature and pooled the previously reported cases to look at potential cause & risk factors. Case Report: A 92 year old female, presented with new onset hip pain following a trivial injury. Couple of years back, she had sustained an extracapsular fracture on same side which was treated by DHS fixation. Further investigations confirmed a de-novo fracture which was treated by removal of DHS and cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Conclusion: This complication might not be as rare as earlier thought to be. All patients, especially elderly females who present with new onset hip pain following DHS fixation of their hip fracture previously must be evaluated for a de-novo intracapsular fracture. On confirmation of diagnosis, they can be treated by removal of dynamic hip screw and hemiarthroplasty as most of these are low demand elderly patients. PMID:27299034

  19. Fixation method does not affect restoration of rotation center in hip replacements: A single-site retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aseptic loosening is one of the greatest problems in hip replacement surgery. The rotation center of the hip is believed to influence the longevity of fixation. The aim of this study was to compare the influence of cemented and cementless cup fixation techniques on the position of the center of rotation because cemented cup fixation requires the removal of more bone for solid fixation than the cementless technique. Methods We retrospectively compared pre- and post-operative positions of the hip rotation center in 25 and 68 patients who underwent artificial hip replacements in our department in 2007 using cemented or cementless cup fixation, respectively, with digital radiographic image analysis. Results The mean horizontal and vertical distances between the rotation center and the acetabular teardrop were compared in radiographic images taken pre- and post-operatively. The mean horizontal difference was −2.63 mm (range: -11.00 mm to 10.46 mm, standard deviation 4.23 mm) for patients who underwent cementless fixation, and −2.84 mm (range: -10.87 to 5.30 mm, standard deviation 4.59 mm) for patients who underwent cemented fixation. The mean vertical difference was 0.60 mm (range: -20.15 mm to 10.00 mm, standard deviation 3.93 mm) and 0.41 mm (range: -9.26 mm to 6.54 mm, standard deviation 3.58 mm) for the cementless and cemented fixation groups, respectively. The two fixation techniques had no significant difference on the position of the hip rotation center in the 93 patients in this study. Conclusions The hip rotation center was similarly restored using either the cemented or cementless fixation techniques in this patient cohort, indicating that the fixation technique itself does not interfere with the position of the center of rotation. To completely answer this question further studies with more patients are needed. PMID:22686355

  20. Hip resurfacing: history, current status, and future.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, Harlan C; Le Duff, Michel J

    2015-01-01

    Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) presents several advantages over conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA), including conservation and preservation of bone, reduced risk of dislocation, easy replication of hip biomechanics and easy revision if needed. It is a particularly appealing procedure for young patients. HRA has been performed for over 40 years following the same technological advances as THA. The bearing material used by most designs is metal-on-metal (MoM), which has the best compromise between strength and wear properties. However, MoM HRA has a specific set of possible complications. Aseptic femoral failures were initially the most prevalent cause for revision but progress in patient selection and surgical technique seem to have resolved this problem. Wear-related failures (high metal ion levels and adverse local tissue reactions) are now the main concern, and are essentially associated with poor acetabular component design and orientation, to which MoM is more sensitive than other bearing materials. The concept of functional coverage is key to understanding how MoM bearings are affected by edge wear. Only a 3-D assessment of cup position (e.g., the contact patch to rim distance) provides the necessary information to determine the role of cup positioning in relationship with abnormal bearing wear.The concept of hip resurfacing is more valid today than ever as the age of the patients in need of hip arthroplasty keeps getting lower. The recent publication of several excellent long-term survivorship results suggests that selection of a well-designed resurfacing system and accuracy in the placement of the cup can achieve long-term durability. PMID:26109156

  1. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Osteonecrosis of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Mark D; Roberts, Catherine C; Bencardino, Jenny T; Appel, Marc; Arnold, Erin; Chang, Eric Y; Dempsey, Molly E; Fox, Michael G; Fries, Ian Blair; Greenspan, Bennett S; Hochman, Mary G; Jacobson, Jon A; Mintz, Douglas N; Newman, Joel S; Rosenberg, Zehava S; Rubin, David A; Small, Kirstin M; Weissman, Barbara N

    2016-02-01

    Osteonecrosis of the hip (Legg-Calvé-Perthes) is a common disease, with 10,000-20,000 symptomatic cases annually in the United States. The disorder affects both adults and children and is most frequently associated with trauma and corticosteroid usage. The initial imaging evaluation of suspected hip osteonecrosis is done using radiography. MRI is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for diagnosis of osteonecrosis of the hip. The clinical significance of hip osteonecrosis is dependent on its potential for articular collapse. The likelihood of articular collapse is significantly increased with involvement of greater than 30%-50% of the femoral head area, which is optimally evaluated by MRI, often in the sagittal plane. Contrast-enhanced MRI may be needed to detect early osteonecrosis of the hip in pediatric patients, revealing hypoperfusion. In patients with a contraindication for MRI, use of either CT or bone scintigraphy with SPECT (single-photon emission CT) are alternative radiologic methods of assessment. Imaging helps guide treatment, which may include core decompression, osteotomy, and ultimately, need for joint replacement. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26846390

  2. The Warwick Hip Trauma Evaluation Two – an abridged protocol for the WHiTE Two Study

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, X. L.; McArthur, J.; Achten, J.; Parsons, N.; Costa, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal femur are one of the greatest challenges facing the medical community, constituting a heavy socioeconomic burden worldwide. Controversy exists regarding the optimal treatment for independent patients with displaced intracapsular fractures of the proximal femur. The recognised alternatives are hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement. At present there is no established standard of care, with both types of arthroplasty being used in many centres. The principal advantages of total hip replacement are a functional benefit over hemiarthroplasty and a reduced risk of revision surgery. The principal criticism is the increased risk of dislocation. We believe that an alternative acetabular component may reduce the risk of dislocation but still provide the functional benefit of total hip replacement in these patients. We therefore propose to investigate the dislocation risk of a dual-mobility acetabular component compared with standard polyethylene component in total hip replacement for independent patients with displaced intracapsular fractures of the proximal femur within the framework of the larger WHiTE (Warwick Hip Trauma Evaluation) Comprehensive Cohort Study. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:210–13. PMID:24089291

  3. Hip Rotational Velocities During the Full Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Gulgin, Heather; Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Since labral pathology in professional golfers has been reported, and such pathology has been associated with internal/external hip rotation, quantifying the rotational velocity of the hips during the golf swing may be helpful in understanding the mechanism involved in labral injury. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the peak internal/external rotational velocities of the thigh relative to the pelvis during the golf swing. Fifteen female, collegiate golfers participated in the study. Data were acquired through high-speed three dimensional (3-D) videography using a multi-segment bilateral marker set to define the segments, while the subjects completed multiple repetitions of a drive. The results indicated that the lead hip peak internal rotational velocity was significantly greater than that of the trail hip external rotational velocity (p = 0.003). It appears that the lead hip of a golfer experiences much higher rotational velocities during the downswing than that of the trail hip. In other structures, such as the shoulder, an increased risk of soft tissue injury has been associated with high levels of rotational velocity. This may indicate that, in golfers, the lead hip may be more susceptible to injury such as labral tears than that of the trailing hip. Key points Lead hip of golfer experiences significantly higher rotational velocities than the trail hip. Golfers may be more susceptible to injuries on the lead hip. Clubhead velocities were consistent with elite female golfers. PMID:24149541

  4. Socket and cup surface replacement of the hip.

    PubMed

    Nishio, A; Eguchi, M; Kaibara, N

    1978-01-01

    To improve the surgical results of severe osteoarthritis of the hip, surface replacement of the hip using a double cup without cement was employed on 75 hips during the period from 1972 to 1977. The results of the procedures have been analyzed on 67 hips followed for more than 6 months. The most dramatic improvement following the procedure has been pain relief, observed in 58 of 67 hips (86%). Three reoperations were necessary. Failures were treated satisfactorily either by total hip replacement, or by arthrodesis and/or by placing a new cup on the head respectively. There was no operative death, pulmonary embolism, thrombophlebitis, nor deep infection. We do not think this procedure replaces more definitive surgery such as the Charnley-type total hip replacement, but it is a good adjunctive procedure particularly in patients younger than 60 years of age.

  5. Eleven-year results of the ABG I hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Muddu, B. N.

    2006-01-01

    The ABG I uncemented hip prosthesis has demonstrated an unacceptably high failure rate and poor functional outcome in our patients. A prospective review was performed of 38 implanted hips with a mean follow-up of 11 years. Sixteen hips have been revised or are candidates for revision hip surgery, due principally to polyethylene wear and pelvic osteolysis. Contributing factors were likely to be the poor wear characteristics of the polyethylene liners—which were gamma irradiated in air—and the thinness of these liners. Of further concern were the poor pain and function scores in the remaining hips [mean Harris Hip Scores (HHS) of 70 (SD 22) at 11-year follow-up]. The influence of the surgical learning curve on clinical results may have been an important factor. Undersized femoral components were associated with poor pain and functional scores in five patients with HHS < 60. All ABG I hip implants must remain under careful, long-term review. PMID:16521011

  6. Capsular Plication for Treatment of Iatrogenic Hip Instability

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Grzybowski, Jeffrey; Salata, Michael J.; Mather, Richard C.; Aoki, Stephen K.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly reported reasons for persistent hip pain after hip arthroscopy are residual femoroacetabular impingement, dysplasia and dysplasia variants, or extra-articular impingement. There are some cases in which the underlying osseous pathomorphology has been appropriately treated, and the cause of persistent hip pain can be soft-tissue injuries such as chondrolabral tears or capsular abnormalities. Capsular defects after hip arthroscopy may suggest an alteration of the biomechanical properties of the iliofemoral ligament and lead to iatrogenically induced hip instability. There are a growing number of biomechanical and clinical studies showing the importance of capsular management during hip arthroscopy. We describe the workup, examination under anesthesia, diagnostic arthroscopy, and technique of capsular plication for iatrogenic instability of the hip. PMID:26870636

  7. Bilateral Femoral Nutrient Foraminal Cement Penetration during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross; Bhumbra, Rej S; Marston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cement pressurisation is important for the insertion of both the acetabular and femoral components during Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Secondary to pressurization the rare phenomenon of unilateral cement incursion into the nutrient foramen has previously been reported. No bilateral case has been reported to date. This has implications both for misdiagnosis of periprosthetic fractures and for medico-legal consequences due to a presumed adverse intra-operative event. Case Report: We present a case report of a 59 year old, caucasian female who underwent staged bilateral cemented Stanmore THA. The post-operative radiographs demonstrate evidence of bilateral nutrient foramen penetration intra-operatively by standard viscosity cement. The patient suffered no adverse consequences. Conclusions: In summary, cement extravasation into the nutrient foramen is an important differential to be considered in presence of posterior-medial cement in the diaphysis of femur following THA. This requires no further intervention and has no effect on the outcome.

  8. Usefulness of Arthroscopic Treatment of Painful Hip after Acetabular Fracture or Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung-Taek; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Kim, Dong-Yeol; Zheng, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background Painful hip following hip dislocation or acetabular fracture can be an important signal for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis due to intraarticular pathology. However, there is limited literature discussing the use of arthroscopy for the treatment of painful hip. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effectiveness and benefit of arthroscopic treatment for patients with a painful hip after major trauma. Methods From July 2003 to February 2013, we reviewed 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation and were followed up for a minimum of 2 postoperative years. The degree of osteoarthritis based on the Tonnis classification pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up was determined. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) and modified Harris hip score (MHHS), and range of motion (ROM) of the hip pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up. Results There were nine male and four female patients with a mean age at surgery of 28 years (range, 20 to 50 years). The mean follow-up period of the patients was 59.8 months (range, 24 to 115 months), and the mean interval between initial trauma and arthroscopic treatment was 40.8 months (range, 1 to 144 months). At the final follow-up, VAS and MHHS improved significantly from 6.3 and 53.4 to 3.0 and 88.3, respectively (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in hip flexion, abduction, adduction, external rotation, and internal rotation as minor improvements from 113.1°, 38.5°, 28.5°, 36.5°, and 22.7° to 118.5°, 39.0°, 29.2°, 38.9°, and 26.5° were observed, respectively (p = 0.070, p = 0.414, p = 0.317, p = 0.084, and p = 0.136, respectively). None of the patients exhibited progression of osteoarthritis of the hip at the final follow-up. Conclusions Arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation is effective and delays

  9. Greater Hip Extension but Not Hip Abduction Explosive Strength Is Associated With Lesser Hip Adduction and Knee Valgus Motion During a Single-Leg Jump-Cut

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Baker; Johnson, Samuel T.; Chang, Eunwook; Pollard, Christine D.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationships between hip abductor and extensor strength and frontal plane hip and knee motions that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk are equivocal. However, previous research on these relationships has evaluated relatively low-level movement tasks and peak torque rather than a time-critical strength measure such as the rate of torque development (RTD). Hypothesis: Females with greater hip abduction and extension RTD would exhibit lesser frontal plane hip and knee motion during a single-leg jump-cutting task. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty recreationally active females performed maximal isometric contractions and single-leg jump-cuts. From recorded torque data, hip extension and abduction RTD was calculated from torque onset to 200 ms after onset. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify frontal plane hip and knee kinematics during the movement task. For each RTD measure, jump-cut biomechanics were compared between participants in the highest (high) and lowest (low) RTD tertiles. Results: No differences in frontal plane hip and knee kinematics were identified between high and low hip abduction RTD groups. However, those in the high hip extension RTD group exhibited lower hip adduction (high, 3.8° ± 3.0°; low, 6.5° ± 3.0°; P = .019) and knee valgus (high, –2.5° ± 2.3°; low, –4.4° ± 3.2°; P = .046) displacements during the jump-cut. Conclusion: In movements such as cutting that are performed with the hip in a relatively abducted and flexed position, the ability of the gluteus medius to control hip adduction may be compromised. However, the gluteus maximus, functioning as a hip abductor, may take on a pivotal role in controlling hip adduction and knee valgus motion during these types of tasks. Clinical Relevance: Training with a specific emphasis on increasing explosive strength of the hip extensors may be a means through which to improve frontal plane hip and knee

  10. Custom Cementless Stem Improves Hip Function in Young Patients at 15-year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Flecher, Xavier; Pearce, Oliver; Parratte, Sebastien; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    THA in young patients is challenging regarding restoration and survival because patients are young, active, and tend to have disturbed anatomy. We asked whether a three-dimensional custom cementless stem could restore hip function, decrease osteolysis and wear, and enhance stem survival in young patients. We retrospectively reviewed 212 patients (233 hips) younger than 50 years (mean, 40 years) at a followup of 5 to 16 years (mean, 10 years). The Merle D’Aubigné-Postel and Harris hip scores improved at last followup. No thigh pain was recorded for any of the patients; 187 of the 212 patients (88%) had full activity recovery, 206 had full range of motion, and 151 had a score greater than 80 points for all five categories of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome score. Five patients had femoral osteolysis not associated with pain. With revision for any reason as an end point, the survivorship was 87% (range, 77%–97%) at 15 years, and considering stem revision only, the survivorship was 93% (confidence interval, 90%–97%) at 15 years. Our data compare favorably with those from series using standard cementless stems at the same followup with a high percentage of patients achieving functional restoration and a low rate of complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19690930

  11. The relationship between hip, knee and ankle muscle mechanical characteristics and gait transition speed.

    PubMed

    Ranisavljev, Igor; Ilic, Vladimir; Markovic, Srdjan; Soldatovic, Ivan; Stefanovic, Djordje; Jaric, Slobodan

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationship between mechanical characteristics of hip, knee and ankle extensor and flexor muscle groups and gait transition speed. The sample included 29 physically active male adults homogenized regarding their anthropometric dimensions. Isokinetic and isometric leg muscle mechanical characteristics were assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer, while individual walk-to-run (WRT) and run-to-walk transition speeds (RWT) were determined using the standard increment protocol. The relationship between transition speeds and mechanical variables scaled to body size was determined using Pearson correlation and stepwise linear regression. The highest correlations were found for isokinetic power of ankle dorsal flexors and WRT (r=.468, p<.01) and the power of hip extensors and RWT (r=.442, p<.05). These variables were also the best predictors of WRT and RWT revealing approximately 20% of explained variance. Under the isometric conditions, the maximal force and rate of force development of hip flexors and ankle plantar flexors were moderately related with WRT and RWT (ranged from r=.340 to .427). The only knee muscle mechanical variable that correlated with WRT was low velocity knee flexor torque (r=.366, p<.05). The results generally suggest that the muscle mechanical properties, such as the power of ankle dorsal flexors and hip extensors, influence values of WRT and RWT.

  12. Rehabilitation in patients with dementia following hip fracture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jennifer; Koziak, Adriana; Buddingh, Sarah; Liang, Jieyun; Buckingham, Jeanette; Beaupre, Lauren A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Best rehabilitation practices after hip fracture for people with dementia have not been established. A systematic review was conducted to determine current evidence for rehabilitation in this population, including residents in continuing care. Methods: Standardized review methodology was used to search eight databases for literature on hip-fracture rehabilitation for people with dementia. Eligible studies included participants with dementia who had a hip fracture; performed a rehabilitation intervention; and evaluated one or more of function, ambulation, discharge location, or falls. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale was used to assess validity. Results: A total of 13 studies were included: five randomized controlled trials (RCTs), seven prospective cohort series, and one retrospective cohort study. Average quality ratings for RCTs and cohort studies were good and fair respectively. Participants with mild to moderate dementia receiving rehabilitation showed similar relative gains in function to those without dementia. Only one study examined the effect of rehabilitation among residents in continuing care. Conclusions: People with mild or moderate dementia may show improved function and ambulation and decreased fall risk after rehabilitation post hip fracture, similar to gains achieved by those without dementia. More research is required to ascertain the effect of rehabilitation in people with moderate to severe dementia, including those residing in continuing-care settings.

  13. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  14. Tribological characterisation of UHMWPE used in dual mobility total hip prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essefi, I.; Hakkouna, H.; Ouenzerfi, G.; Mollon, G.; Hamza, S.; Renault, E.; Berthier, Y.; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A.-M.

    2016-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty represents an effective solution for bone and joint diseases. Nevertheless, the hip prosthesis has a limited lifetime, in the average around fifteen years. Their improvement, especially their dual mobility is the objective of this study. Therefore, our strategy is focused on improving the material by comparing three types of polyethylene to determine the best one from a friction mechanism and wear rate minimization standpoint. A dual mobility hip prosthesis, containing a two-sided steel and cobalt chrome cup, was tested with a TORNIER hip joint simulator in calf serum. The rubbed surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal fluorescence microscopy. All these multiscale characterization techniques (from nanoscale to millimeter and micro- scale) showed that the velocity accommodation mechanism is different from one type of polyethylene to another. The wear in the case of standard polyethylene was noticeable and the particles were large and scattered between the surface of polyethylene, the surface of the cup and in the calf serum. For the crosslinked polyethylene, the particles coming from the wear, were not as large, but they were spread the same way as the first case. Even though it shares the same accommodation principle on the detachment of the material with the crosslinked polyethylene the wear particles for the crosslinked vitaminized polyethylene were large and they were only found on the surface of the polyethylene.

  15. Validity and reliability of clinical tests for assessing hip passive stiffness.

    PubMed

    Carvalhais, Viviane Otoni do Carmo; de Araújo, Vanessa Lara; Souza, Thales Rezende; Gonçalves, Gabriela Gomes Pavan; Ocarino, Juliana de Melo; Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2011-06-01

    Inadequate levels of hip passive joint stiffness have been associated with the occurrence of movement dysfunction, development of pathologies and reduction in performance. Clinical tests, designed to evaluate hip joint stiffness, may allow the identification of improper stiffness levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity as well as the intra- and inter-examiners reliabilities of clinical measures used to assess hip passive stiffness during internal rotation. Fifteen healthy participants were subjected to test-retest evaluations by two examiners. Two clinical measures were performed: 'position of first detectable resistance' and 'change in passive resistance torque'. The results of these tests were compared to the passive stiffness measured with an isokinetic dynamometer (gold standard measure). A significant correlation was found between the stiffness measured with the isokinetic dynamometer and the clinical measures of 'position of first detectable resistance' (r=-0.85 to -0.86, p<0.001) and 'change in passive resistance torque' (r=0.78 to 0.84, p≤0.001). The Intraclass Correlation Coefficients for intra- and inter-examiners reliabilities varied from 0.95 to 0.99. Thus, the results demonstrated that the clinical measures have adequate validity and reliability for obtaining information on hip passive stiffness during internal rotation. PMID:21212014

  16. The role of acetabular and femoral osteotomies in reconstructive surgery of the hip: 2005 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Thomas R; Phillips, William; Kantor, Stephen R; Santore, Richard F

    2005-12-01

    Femoral and acetabular osteotomies have enduring and useful roles in the ongoing surgical treatment of patients with various hip conditions. The classic indication for intertrochanteric valgus osteotomy is to induce healing of femoral neck nonunions. Additional indications include posttraumatic deformity, limb-length inequality, certain cases of osteonecrosis, and adult sequelae of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Isolated intertrochanteric osteotomy is only occasionally indicated for the treatment of arthritis secondary to dysplasia. Rotational osteotomies of the pelvis have overtaken the role once historically played by intertrochanteric osteotomy in the treatment of dysplasia-related hip anomalies. Ideal candidates have prearthritic, activity-related pain associated with radiographic dysplasia. It is imperative that the hip joint be congruous, free of fixed subluxation, and located in the natural acetabulum. Surgical treatment of associated acetabular labral tears and/or detachments and impingement lesions can be done at the same time through antecedent hip arthroscopy (same anesthetic) or open arthrotomy. The direction and magnitude of correction need to be customized to fit the nature of the dysplasia. A standard method of correction likely is to result in unwanted iatrogenic retroversion in some cases. Intertrochanteric osteotomy now is used as a complement to rotational osteotomy for the indications outlined above. PMID:16331002

  17. The relationship between hip, knee and ankle muscle mechanical characteristics and gait transition speed.

    PubMed

    Ranisavljev, Igor; Ilic, Vladimir; Markovic, Srdjan; Soldatovic, Ivan; Stefanovic, Djordje; Jaric, Slobodan

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationship between mechanical characteristics of hip, knee and ankle extensor and flexor muscle groups and gait transition speed. The sample included 29 physically active male adults homogenized regarding their anthropometric dimensions. Isokinetic and isometric leg muscle mechanical characteristics were assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer, while individual walk-to-run (WRT) and run-to-walk transition speeds (RWT) were determined using the standard increment protocol. The relationship between transition speeds and mechanical variables scaled to body size was determined using Pearson correlation and stepwise linear regression. The highest correlations were found for isokinetic power of ankle dorsal flexors and WRT (r=.468, p<.01) and the power of hip extensors and RWT (r=.442, p<.05). These variables were also the best predictors of WRT and RWT revealing approximately 20% of explained variance. Under the isometric conditions, the maximal force and rate of force development of hip flexors and ankle plantar flexors were moderately related with WRT and RWT (ranged from r=.340 to .427). The only knee muscle mechanical variable that correlated with WRT was low velocity knee flexor torque (r=.366, p<.05). The results generally suggest that the muscle mechanical properties, such as the power of ankle dorsal flexors and hip extensors, influence values of WRT and RWT. PMID:25244181

  18. Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty: Literature review of variations in surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith P; Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    The direct anterior approach to the hip has been suggested to have several advantages compared to previously popular approaches through its use of an intra-muscular and intra-nervous interval between the tensor fasciae latae and sartorius muscles. Recent increased interest in tissue-sparing and minimally-invasive arthroplasty has given rise to a sharp increase in the utilization of direct anterior total hip arthroplasty. A number of variations of the procedure have been described and several authors have published their experiences and feedback to successfully accomplishing this procedure. Additionally, improved understanding of relevant soft tissue constraints and anatomic variants has provided improved margin of safety for patients. The procedure may be performed using specially-designed instruments and a fracture table, however many authors have also described equally efficacious performance using a regular table and standard arthroplasty tools. The capacity to utilize fluoroscopy intra-operatively for component positioning is a valuable asset to the approach and can be of particular benefit for surgeons gaining familiarity. Proper management of patient and limb positioning are vital to reducing risk of intra-operative complications. An understanding of its limitations and challenges are also critical to safe employment. This review summarizes the key features of the direct anterior approach for total hip arthroplasty as an aid to improving the understanding of this important and effective method for modern hip replacement surgeons. PMID:26807354

  19. A biomechanical comparison of composite femurs and cadaver femurs used in experiments on operated hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Basso, Trude; Klaksvik, Jomar; Syversen, Unni; Foss, Olav A

    2014-12-18

    Fourth generation composite femurs (4GCFs, models #3406 and #3403) simulate femurs of males <80 years with good bone quality. Since most hip fractures occur in old women with fragile bones, concern is raised regarding the use of standard 4GCFs in biomechanical experiments. In this study the stability of hip fracture fixations in 4GCFs was compared to human cadaver femurs (HCFs) selected to represent patients with hip fractures. Ten 4GCFs (Sawbones, Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc., Vashon, WA, USA) were compared to 24 HCFs from seven females and five males >60 years. Proximal femur anthropometric measurements were noted. Strain gauge rosettes were attached and femurs were mounted in a hip simulator applying a combined subject-specific axial load and torque. Baseline measurements of resistance to deformation were recorded. Standardized femoral neck fractures were surgically stabilized before the constructs were subjected to 20,000 load-cycles. An optical motion tracking system measured relative movements. Median (95% CI) head fragment migration was 0.8mm (0.4 to 1.1) in the 4GCF group versus 2.2mm (1.5 to 4.6) in the cadaver group (p=0.001). This difference in fracture stability could not be explained by observed differences in femoral anthropometry or potential overloading of 4GCFs. 4GCFs failed with fracture-patterns different from those observed in cadavers. To conclude, standard 4GCFs provide unrealistically stable bone-implant constructs and fail with fractures not observed in cadavers. Until a validated osteopenic or osteoporotic composite femur model is provided, standard 4GCFs should only be used when representing the biomechanical properties of young healthy femurs.

  20. [A new hip milling machine for preparation of the hip acetabulum for total hip prothesis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weigand, H

    1976-08-19

    The problemes of the exact preparation of the hip acetabulum for implantation of total hip prothesis have caused the development of several milling machines. Two sorts of construction predominate. Their disadvantages, especially the fact, that there is now mechanism, while is able to carry of the milled tissue, gave rise to construct a new milling machine. In cooperation with engineers of the branch mechanical engineering a new model was developed. The characteristic features are described and explained by pictures. The milling basket will be fastened on the ground plate by a quick fastener. In this way we get a hemisphere cavity, which is able to absorb all the milled tissue without any residue. A grasp will be connected with the drive shaft and guarantee an exact and rightangeled direction. The clinical tests have shown, that the new milling machine with the grasp especially is qualified for use in the osteoporotic senil bone too.

  1. [Greater trochanteric pain syndrome of the hip].

    PubMed

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Thein, Rafael

    2014-02-01

    Lateral pain of the hip with point tenderness at the Greater Trochanter is a common musculoskeletal complaint. It is frequently diagnosed as trochanteric bursitis; however, this term is inaccurate because of evident non-inflammatory pathologies, particularly of the abductor tendons of the hip. It is important to differentiate this extra-articular source from an intra-articular or a lower back source of pain. Imaging is useful in cases of trauma, prolonged pain or uncertain diagnosis. Non-operative treatment that involves modifying activities, physiotherapy, analgesics, steroid injections and shock wave therapy is usually helpful. Nevertheless, despite the above treatments, about one third of the patients suffer from chronic pain and disability. These patients may be candidates for operative intervention. Currently, there are endoscopic surgical techniques for local decompression, bursectomy and suture of torn tendons similar to surgery used in the shoulder. PMID:24716427

  2. An unusual pain in the hip

    PubMed Central

    Bangera, Sachin; Dunkow, Paul; Weerasinghe, Suboda; Murugesan, Senthil V.

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old previously healthy man presented with increasing right hip pain of 6 months duration. On examination he was found to have a hard mass in the right hip arising from the pelvic bone. Imaging studies were in keeping with a sarcoma arising from the right iliac bone. However, biopsy of this bony lesion confirmed this to be a metastatic adenocarcinoma rather than a primary bone malignancy. Further imaging and a subsequent colonoscopy revealed the primary to be a colonic adenocarcinoma. The unique and unusual nature of this case was the presentation as a solitary bony metastasis from a colonic primary. There is no previously documented report in the literature of such a rare presentation of a colonic adenocarcinoma as a solitary bony lesion mimicking a primary sarcoma in the absence of other signs or symptoms. PMID:27617105

  3. [Treatment of anemia in hip fracture surgery].

    PubMed

    García Pascual, E

    2015-06-01

    Repairing hip fractures is one of the most common surgical procedures and has greater morbidity and mortality. This procedure is also a process that involves a greater need for blood products. Numerous factors influence morbidity, mortality and the use of blood products: patient age, concomitant diseases and drug treatments that change hemostasis and hemorrhaging (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative), which are usually significant. On top of all this is the presence in a high percentage of cases of preoperative anemia, which can have one or more causes. It is therefore essential to establish an appropriate management of perioperative anemia and optimize the transfusion policy. The aim of this review is to briefly analyze the epidemiology of hip fractures as well as establish a basis for treating perioperative anemia and transfusion policies, proposing guidelines and recommendations for clinical management based on the most current studies.

  4. An unusual pain in the hip.

    PubMed

    Bangera, Sachin; Dunkow, Paul; Weerasinghe, Suboda; Murugesan, Senthil V

    2016-09-01

    A 68-year-old previously healthy man presented with increasing right hip pain of 6 months duration. On examination he was found to have a hard mass in the right hip arising from the pelvic bone. Imaging studies were in keeping with a sarcoma arising from the right iliac bone. However, biopsy of this bony lesion confirmed this to be a metastatic adenocarcinoma rather than a primary bone malignancy. Further imaging and a subsequent colonoscopy revealed the primary to be a colonic adenocarcinoma. The unique and unusual nature of this case was the presentation as a solitary bony metastasis from a colonic primary. There is no previously documented report in the literature of such a rare presentation of a colonic adenocarcinoma as a solitary bony lesion mimicking a primary sarcoma in the absence of other signs or symptoms. PMID:27617105

  5. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  6. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  7. Renal function after elective total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren; Petersen, Morten B

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an elective population of orthopedic patients undergoing primary total hip replacement, hypothesizing that chronic kidney disease predisposes to AKI. Patients and methods - This was a single-center, population-based, retrospective, registry-based cohort study involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013 ). Results - 3,416 patients were included (2,064 females (60%)). AKI (according to KDIGO criteria) was seen in 75 patients (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.7-2.7) in the course of primary total hip replacement. Of these, 26 had pre-existing CKD of class 3-5. Pre-existing CKD of class 3-5, indicating moderately to severely reduced kidney function, was seen in 374 individuals (11%). Interpretation - Development of acute kidney injury appears to be a substantial problem compared to other complications related to elective total hip arthroplasty, i.e. luxation and infection. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable. The clinical impact of acute kidney injury in an elective orthopedic population remains to be elucidated. PMID:26937782

  8. The Anterior Approach for Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Hochfelder, Jason P; Davidovitch, Roy I

    2016-03-01

    The anterior approach for total hip replacements has recently gained popularity. Some authors report faster recoveries and decreased dislocation rated with no increased risk of complications. However others claim no difference in outcomes when compared to other approaches yet an increase in complication rates. This paper provides a brief history of the approach, discusses various indications and contraindications, preoperative considerations, surgical techniques, and postoperative protocols. PMID:26977549

  9. The Epidemiology and Demographics of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Randall T.; Skopelja, Elaine N.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown. There are many insights, however, from epidemiologic/demographic information. A systematic medical literature review regarding DDH was performed. There is a predominance of left-sided (64.0%) and unilateral disease (63.4%). The incidence per 1000 live births ranges from 0.06 in Africans in Africa to 76.1 in Native Americans. There is significant variability in incidence within each racial group by geographic location. The incidence of clinical neonatal hip instability at birth ranges from 0.4 in Africans to 61.7 in Polish Caucasians. Predictors of DDH are breech presentation, positive family history, and gender (female). Children born premature, with low birth weights, or to multifetal pregnancies are somewhat protected from DDH. Certain HLA A, B, and D types demonstrate an increase in DDH. Chromosome 17q21 is strongly associated with DDH. Ligamentous laxity and abnormalities in collagen metabolism, estrogen metabolism, and pregnancy-associated pelvic instability are well-described associations with DDH. Many studies demonstrate an increase of DDH in the winter, both in the northern and southern hemispheres. Swaddling is strongly associated with DDH. Amniocentesis, premature labor, and massive radiation exposure may increase the risk of DDH. Associated conditions are congenital muscular torticollis and congenital foot deformities. The opposite hip is frequently abnormal when using rigorous radiographic assessments. The role of acetabular dysplasia and adult hip osteoarthritis is complex. Archeological studies demonstrate that the epidemiology of DDH may be changing. PMID:24977057

  10. Re-Admissions Following Hip Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hahnel, James; Burdekin, Hannah; Anand, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hip fractures in the elderly are a growing problem with a predicted incidence of 117,000 cases per year by 2016. Re-admission following a healthcare episode is an important outcome measure, which reflects non-fatal adverse events and indicates the natural history of disease. The purpose of this observational, multicentre audit was to examine rates and reasons for re-admission following hip fracture, to identify areas in the index admission and rehabilitation care that could be improved to prevent re-admission. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 535 patients (> 65 years old) in two district general hospitals in the UK who underwent hip fracture surgery were recruited into the study. RESULTS Of the study cohort, 72 patients (13.5%) died during their index admission and 88 (19.0%) of 463 patients were re-admitted once within 3 months. Causes of re-admission were attributed to medical (54.8%), failure to rehabilitate (23.8%), orthopaedic (19.0%) and surgical (2.4%) reasons. Infection was the most common (31.0%) reason for re-admission and arguably the most treatable. During the 3-month postoperative period, the mortality rate was 21.3%, increasing in those re-admitted to 35.1% representing the frailty of this group of patients. CONCLUSIONS High rates of re-admission are seen following discharge in elderly patients with hip fractures. Re-admitted patients have high mortality rates. Understanding causes of re-admission may help to reduce this burden. PMID:19558764

  11. Femoroacetabular impingement and osteoarthritis of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Charlie; Li, Linda; Forster, Bruce B.; Kopec, Jacek A.; Ratzlaff, Charles; Halai, Lalji; Cibere, Jolanda; Esdaile, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To outline the clinical presentation, physical examination findings, diagnostic criteria, and management options of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Sources of information PubMed was searched for relevant articles regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of FAI. Main message In recent years, FAI has been increasingly recognized as a potential precursor and an important contributor to hip pain in the adult population and idiopathic hip osteoarthritis later in life. Femoroacetabular impingement is a collection of bony morphologic abnormalities of the hip joint that result in abnormal contact during motion. Cam-type FAI relates to a non-spherical osseous prominence of the proximal femoral neck or head-neck junction. Pincer-type FAI relates to excessive acetabular coverage over the femoral head, which can occur owing to several morphologic variants. Patients with FAI present with chronic, deep, or aching anterior groin pain most commonly in the sitting position, or during or after activity. Patients might also experience occasional sharp pains during activity. A thorough history should be taken that includes incidence of trauma and exercise frequency. A physical examination should be performed that includes a full hip, low back, and abdominal examination to assess for alternate causes of anterior groin pain. Diagnosis of FAI should be confirmed with radiography. Femoroacetabular impingement can be managed conservatively with rest, modification of activities, medications, and physiotherapy, or it can be treated surgically. Conclusion Femoroacetabular impingement is an important cause of anterior groin pain. Early recognition and intervention by the primary care provider might be critical to alleviating morbidity and preventing FAI progression. PMID:26668284

  12. Quantitative local topological texture properties obtained from radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with pertrochanteric and transcervical hip fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Lutz, J.; Koerner, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.

    2009-02-01

    The incidence of osteoporosis and associated fractures becomes an increasingly relevant issue for the public health institutions of industrialized nations. Fractures of the hip represent the worst complication of osteoporosis with a significantly elevated rate of mortality. Prediction of fracture risk is a major focus of osteoporosis research and, over the years, has been approched from different angles. There exist two distinct subtypes of transcervical and pertrochanteric hip fracture that can be distinguished on the basis of the anatomical location of the injury. While the epidemiology of hip fractures has been well described, typically, little or no distinction is made between the subtypes. The object of this study was to determine whether local topological texture properties based on the Minkowski Functionals (MF) obtained from standard radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with hip fracture can be used to differentiate between the two types of fracture pattern. The texture features were extracted from standardized regions of interest (femoral head, neck, and pertrochanteric region) in clinical radiographs of the hip obtained from 90 post-menopausal women (69.8 +/- 7.9 yrs). 30 of the women had sustained pertrochanteric fractures, 30 had transcervical hip fractures and 30 were age-matched controls. We determined an optimized topological parameter MF2Dloc using an integrative filtering procedure based on a sliding-windows algorithm. Statistical relationship between the fracture type (pertrochanteric/transcervical) and the value of MF2Dloc was assessed by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. Depending on the anatomical location of the region of interest for texture analysis correct classification of tanscervial and pertrochanteric fractures ranged from AUC = 0.79 to 0.98. In conclusion, quantitative texture properties of trabecular bone extracted from radiographs of the hip can be used to identify patients with hip fracture and to distinguish

  13. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shon, Won Yong; Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  14. Friction measurement in a hip wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2016-05-01

    A torque measurement system was added to a widely used hip wear simulator, the biaxial rocking motion device. With the rotary transducer, the frictional torque about the drive axis of the biaxial rocking motion mechanism was measured. The principle of measuring the torque about the vertical axis above the prosthetic joint, used earlier in commercial biaxial rocking motion simulators, was shown to sense only a minor part of the total frictional torque. With the present method, the total frictional torque of the prosthetic hip was measured. This was shown to consist of the torques about the vertical axis above the joint and about the leaning axis. Femoral heads made from different materials were run against conventional and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups in serum lubrication. Regarding the femoral head material and the type of polyethylene, there were no categorical differences in frictional torque with the exception of zirconia heads, with which the lowest values were obtained. Diamond-like carbon coating of the CoCr femoral head did not reduce friction. The friction factor was found to always decrease with increasing load. High wear could increase the frictional torque by 75%. With the present system, friction can be continuously recorded during long wear tests, so the effect of wear on friction with different prosthetic hips can be evaluated.

  15. Mortality after total hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Berstock, J. R.; Beswick, A. D.; Lenguerrand, E.; Whitehouse, M. R.; Blom, A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Total hip replacement causes a short-term increase in the risk of mortality. It is important to quantify this and to identify modifiable risk factors so that the risk of post-operative mortality can be minimised. We performed a systematic review and critical evaluation of the current literature on the topic. We identified 32 studies published over the last 10 years which provide either 30-day or 90-day mortality data. We estimate the pooled incidence of mortality during the first 30 and 90 days following hip replacement to be 0.30% (95% CI 0.22 to 0.38) and 0.65% (95% CI 0.50 to 0.81), respectively. We found strong evidence of a temporal trend towards reducing mortality rates despite increasingly co-morbid patients. The risk factors for early mortality most commonly identified are increasing age, male gender and co-morbid conditions, particularly cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular complications appear to have overtaken fatal pulmonary emboli as the leading cause of death after hip replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:175–82. PMID:24894596

  16. Total hip arthroplasty revision in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gasbarra, Elena; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Celi, Monica; Rao, Cecilia; Feola, Maurizio; Cuozzo, Nicola; Tarantino, Umberto

    2013-10-01

    In the last years, the number of total hip arthroplasty is increased both in young patients and elderly with a poor bone quality due to extension of surgical indications. According to this trend, also revision surgery showed a growth of its number, especially in elderly patients, because of implant loosening, failed osseointegration of prosthetic components, errors in biomechanical restoration and infections. The aim of this study is to analyze life quality improvement through evaluation of articular functionality and postoperative pain, and to examine osseointegration of implant components with periprosthetic bone. During total hip arthroplasty revision, the orthopedic surgeon often has to face complex cases, especially in elderly patients with a preexisting status of poor bone quality and sarcopenia. In these cases, a correct planning and a surgical procedure well-executed are able to ensure a good outcome that led to pain relief and functional recovery. Furthermore anti-osteoporotic therapy surely represents a useful resource both in primary total hip arthroplasty and in revisions, mainly for elderly patients with a poor bone quality. PMID:24046034

  17. Congenital dislocation of the hip. A review.

    PubMed

    Sherk, H H; Pasquariello, P S; Watters, W C

    1981-08-01

    Congenital dislocation of the hip usually results from capsular stretching caused by fetal malposition and crouching late in the third trimester. Early recognition of hip dislocation or instability soon after birth permits prompt treatment. Ortolani's and Barlow's maneuvers, respectively, reduce into and displace from the acetabulum a femoral head that is insecurely contained therein. The diagnosis of CDH in the first month of life usually depends on these clinical components of the physical examination of the newborn, because similar device, in this age group can usually maintain the displaced hip in sufficient flexion and abduction to permit reduction and normal development. By 3 months of age, the nuclei of the pelvis and upper femur have ossified enough to permit radiologic diagnosis of CDH. Problems related to treatment increase as the child grows older. In infants up to 6 months of age, closed methods with a harness usually succeed. Beyond 6 months, the soft tissues shorten and prevent easy reduction. These patients almost always require pre-reduction traction. An adductor tenotomy also facilitates reduction and apparently lessens compressive forces on the femoral head, an important consideration in preventing avascular necrosis of the head. Children over 1 year old develop bony changes, such as excessive femoral valgus and anteversion and deformity of the acetabulum. Treatment in these patients requires realignment of bony deformities with femoral or pelvic osteotomies in addition to the measures noted previously. The gentleness and high success rate of early treatment make early diagnosis of CDH an important consideration in infants and newborns.

  18. Adherence to guidelines regarding total hip replacement for fractured neck of femur.

    PubMed

    Fishlock, A; Scarsbrook, C; Marsh, R

    2016-07-01

    Introduction In 2011 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published guidelines suggesting that clinicians offer total hip replacement (THR) to patients with displaced intracapsular hip fractures who could walk independently outside with no aids or one stick, who are not cognitively impaired and are ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade ≤2. They also stated that best practice is operating within 36 hours of presentation. This audit aimed to determine whether Scarborough Hospital was following these guidelines and compared the results with the national average. Methods Two years of data (January 2012 - December 2013) were collected retrospectively from Scarborough Hospital's hip fracture database on all patients presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture. Data were analysed to determine whether patients who had a THR fulfilled NICE criteria. Furthermore, patients with hemiarthroplasties who were eligible for THRs were identified. Finally, the time to surgery was calculated to examine whether patients receiving THRs waited longer than patients receiving hemiarthroplasties. Results In 2012, 48.6% of all eligible patients received a THR while in 2013 the figure was 55.9%. These percentages are much higher than the national average. However, 36 (53.7%) of the 67 patients who received a THR did not fulfil all the NICE criteria, mainly owing to high ASA grade. The mean time from presentation to theatre for THR was 8 hours and 37 minutes longer for THR patients than for hemiarthroplasty in 2012. This difference was reduced to 2 hours and 12 minutes in 2013. Conclusions Small general hospitals can meet and even exceed the standards regarding treatment strategies for hip factures. However, there is still room for improvement. Departmental training may be useful in achieving this aim. The anaesthetic team should be involved at the earliest opportunity, to help optimise patients preoperatively and determine whether patients listed for

  19. Current concept in dysplastic hip arthroplasty: Techniques for acetabular and femoral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bicanic, Goran; Barbaric, Katarina; Bohacek, Ivan; Aljinovic, Ana; Delimar, Domagoj

    2014-09-18

    Adult patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip develop secondary osteoarthritis and eventually end up with total hip arthroplasty (THA) at younger age. Because of altered anatomy of dysplastic hips, THA in these patients represents technically demanding procedure. Distorted anatomy of the acetabulum and proximal femur together with conjoined leg length discrepancy present major challenges during performing THA in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In addition, most patients are at younger age, therefore, soft tissue balance is of great importance (especially the need to preserve the continuity of abductors) to maximise postoperative functional result. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for THA in dysplastic hips, their advantages and disadvantages. For acetabular reconstruction following techniques are described: Standard metal augments (prefabricated), Custom made acetabular augments (3D printing), Roof reconstruction with vascularized fibula, Roof reconstruction with pedicled iliac graft, Roof reconstruction with autologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with homologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with auto/homologous spongious bone, Reinforcement ring with the hook in combination with autologous graft augmentation, Cranial positioning of the acetabulum, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with chisel, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with reaming, Cotyloplasty without spongioplasty. For femoral reconstruction following techniques were described: Distraction with external fixator, Femoral shortening through a modified lateral approach, Transtrochanteric osteotomies, Paavilainen osteotomy, Lesser trochanter osteotomy, Double-chevron osteotomy, Subtrochanteric osteotomies, Diaphyseal osteotomies, Distal femoral osteotomies. At the end we present author's treatment method of choice: for acetabulum we perform cotyloplasty leaving only paper-thin medial wall, which we break during acetabular

  20. A Community-Based Hip Fracture Registry: Population, Methods, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Inacio, Maria C S; Weiss, Jennifer M; Miric, Alex; Hunt, Jessica J; Zohman, Gary L; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fracture is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. A large integrated health care system developed a registry to characterize its current patient population with hip fractures. This report describes the population, methods used, and outcomes of patients registered during the initial three years (2009–2011). Methods: Cases of hip fracture recorded from January 2009 through December 2011 were ascertained using the Kaiser Permanente Hip Fracture Registry. The registry collects information on patient, procedure, surgeon, facility, and surgical outcomes. Outcomes monitored included length of stay, readmissions, mortality, revisions, surgical site infections, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, pressure ulcers, dislocations, and myocardial infarction. Results: The population (N = 12,562) was predominantly white (77.8%), women (68.6%), and older (71.6% aged ≥ 75 years), and 32% had at least 5 comorbidities. The average length of follow-up was 1.1 years (standard deviation = 0.9). The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (70.8%) and anemia (29.4%). Femoral neck fractures (54.6%) were the most common fracture type. Hemiarthroplasty was the most common procedure (33.1%). Most fractures were treated by medium-volume (10 to 29 cases per year) surgeons (68.4%) at high-volume (≥ 130 cases per year) facilities (63.0%). The 90-day readmission rate was 22.1%, and the mortality rate was 12.3%. The most common postoperative complications were pneumonia (11.4%) and pressure ulcers (2.9%). There were 2.2 revisions per 100 observation years. Conclusion: A hip fracture registry provides important information regarding patient characteristics, intraoperative practices, and postoperative outcomes, which can be analyzed, interpreted, and used to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26057682

  1. Rethinking Pedagogy in Urban Spaces: Implementing Hip-Hop Pedagogy in the Urban Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adjapong, Edmund S.; Emdin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A significant amount of research regarding Hip-Hop Based Education (HHBE) fails to provide insight on how to incorporate elements of Hip-Hop into daily teaching practices; rather Hip-Hop based educators focus mainly on incorporating Hip-Hop culture into curricula. This study explores the benefits of using two specific Hip-Hop pedagogical practices…

  2. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of hip secondary to low and high dislocated hips: A mid-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O’Dwyer, Sinead; Masterson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performing successful total hip replacement (THR) in dysplastic, subluxed, and dislocated hip is a challenging task. Here, we assessed midterm clinical and radiological outcomes of uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis (OA) of hip secondary to Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocated hips with a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of prospectively collected data was designed involving all consecutive patients who underwent uncemented THR for OA of hip secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip and Grade II or Grade III Hartofilakidis classification. Results: Thirty-two patients underwent 45 THR, with 23 Grade II (low dislocation) and 22 Grade III (high-dislocation) of Hartofilakidis classification. Thirteen patients had bilateral hip replacements, 19 patients had unilateral THR. There was highly statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative HHS and SF-36v2™ at each follow-up. Survivorship of original implant was 98.88% at a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. The mean improvement in leg length in this series was 3.6 cm (1.8-4.5, 95% confidence interval). No sciatic nerve or femoral nerve palsies were observed. Conclusions: Uncemented THR provides better function and quality of life. However, longer follow-up studies are needed to assess survivorship of uncemented THR in Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocations. PMID:27433063

  3. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  4. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  5. A Useful Anatomical Reference Guide for Stem Anteversion during Total Hip Arthroplasty in the Dysplastic Hip.

    PubMed

    Tsukeoka, Tadashi; Tsuneizumi, Yoshikazu; Lee, Tae Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography scans of 50 dysplastic hips were obtained and reconstructed using preoperative planning software for total hip arthroplasty. The anteversion of the stem implanted parallel to the line connecting the trochanteric fossa and the middle of the medial cortex of the femoral neck (T line) was measured. The cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm above the lesser trochanter were simulated. The mean difference of the anteversion of the stem using the T line and the native femoral anteversion was 2.7° (95% CI: 1.0°-4.5°) and 3.5° (95% CI: 1.5°-5.5°) at cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm respectively. An anteversion using a T line is compatible with native femoral anteversion even in developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:25873282

  6. The Influence of Hip Rotation on Femoral Offset Following Short Stem Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boese, Christoph K; Bredow, Jan; Ettinger, Max; Eysel, Peer; Thorey, Fritz; Lechler, Philipp; Budde, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Short stem total hip arthroplasty (THA) is thought to be an advantageous surgical option for young patients. Femoral offset has been identified as an important factor for clinical outcome of THA. However, little is known on functional implications of femoral offset after short stem THA. Importantly, hip rotation influences the projected femoral offset and may lead to significant underestimation. Therefore, a novel method to identify and account for hip rotation was applied to a prospectively enrolled series of 37 patients (48 radiographs) undergoing short stem THA. Repeated measurements were performed and intraobserver and interobserver reliability was assessed and femoral offset was corrected for rotation. Based on this study, rotation-correction of femoral offset is of highest relevance for the correct interpretation in future studies.

  7. Recent Patents and Designs on Hip Replacement Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  8. Arthroscopic capsule reconstruction in the hip using iliotibial band allograft.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Christiano A C; Sawyer, Gregory A; Fukui, Kiyokazu; Briggs, Karen K; Philippon, Marc J

    2015-02-01

    The hip capsule has been identified as an important static stabilizer of the hip joint. Despite the intrinsic bony stability of the hip socket, the capsule plays a key role in hip stability, particularly at the extremes of motion, and the iliofemoral ligament is the most important stabilizer in extension and external rotation. Patients who do not undergo capsular closure or plication may continue to complain of hip pain and dysfunction postoperatively, likely because of microinstability or muscle invagination into the capsular defect, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic resonance arthrography will identify the capsular defect. Seen primarily in the revision setting, capsular defects can cause recurrent stress at the chondrolabral junction. An attempt at secondary closure can be challenging because of capsular limb adherence to the surrounding soft tissues. Therefore reconstruction may be the only possible surgical solution for this problem. We describe our new surgical technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using iliotibial band allograft.

  9. Recent patents and designs on hip replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  10. Arthroscopic capsule reconstruction in the hip using iliotibial band allograft.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Christiano A C; Sawyer, Gregory A; Fukui, Kiyokazu; Briggs, Karen K; Philippon, Marc J

    2015-02-01

    The hip capsule has been identified as an important static stabilizer of the hip joint. Despite the intrinsic bony stability of the hip socket, the capsule plays a key role in hip stability, particularly at the extremes of motion, and the iliofemoral ligament is the most important stabilizer in extension and external rotation. Patients who do not undergo capsular closure or plication may continue to complain of hip pain and dysfunction postoperatively, likely because of microinstability or muscle invagination into the capsular defect, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic resonance arthrography will identify the capsular defect. Seen primarily in the revision setting, capsular defects can cause recurrent stress at the chondrolabral junction. An attempt at secondary closure can be challenging because of capsular limb adherence to the surrounding soft tissues. Therefore reconstruction may be the only possible surgical solution for this problem. We describe our new surgical technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using iliotibial band allograft. PMID:25973378

  11. Review for the generalist: evaluation of pediatric hip pain

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Kristin M

    2009-01-01

    Hip pathology may cause groin pain, referred thigh or knee pain, refusal to bear weight or altered gait in the absence of pain. A young child with an irritable hip poses a diagnostic challenge. Transient synovitis, one of the most common causes of hip pain in children, must be differentiated from septic arthritis. Hip pain may be caused by conditions unique to the growing pediatric skeleton including Perthes disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis and apophyseal avulsion fractures of the pelvis. Hip pain may also be referred from low back or pelvic pathology. Evaluation and management requires a thorough history and physical exam, and understanding of the pediatric skeleton. This article will review common causes of hip and pelvic musculoskeletal pain in the pediatric population. PMID:19450281

  12. History and physical examination of hip injuries in elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Hamedan Al Maqbali, Mohammed Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Hip fracture is the most common injury occurring to elderly people and is associated with restrictions of the activities of the patients themselves. The discovery of a hip fracture can be the beginning of a complex journey of care, from initial diagnosis, through operational procedures to rehabilitation. The patient's history and physical examination form the basis of the diagnosis and monitoring of elderly patients with hip problems and dictate the appropriate treatment strategy to be implemented. The aim of this study is to discuss the different diagnoses of hip pain in a case study of an elderly woman who initially complained of pain in her right knee following a fall at home. It shows that musculoskeletal physical examination determined the management of the hip fracture that was found to be present. In addition, the aim of this article is to review diagnostic tests such as radiographs and recommend appropriate management and treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients.

  13. Effectiveness of a multidisciplinary team approach to hip fracture management.

    PubMed

    Khasraghi, Fardin A; Christmas, Colleen; Lee, Eu Jin; Mears, Simon C; Wenz, James F

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary Hip Fracture Service in the treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients. Baseline information and hospital outcomes were compared for 510 patients over the age of 65 with hip fracture treated before and after the institution of the Hip Fracture Service. Data included basic demographic data, admission laboratory results, surgical information, number of comorbidities, mortality, medical complications, discharge information, time to surgery, and length of stay in hospital. The demographics of the two groups of patients were similar. Patients treated as part of the Hip Fracture Service had fewer medical complications (36% vs. 51%), more often had surgery within 24 hours (63% vs. 35%), and had shorter hospital stays (mean, 5.7 days vs. 8.1 days) than patients treated before the Hip Fracture Service. These findings provide the rationale for a prospective, randomized trial of the service.

  14. Repeat validation of a method to measure in vivo three dimensional hip kinematics using computed tomography and fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Mowrin; Alam, Md Jahangir; Pickering, Mark R; Ward, Thomas; Perriman, Diana; Scarvell, Jennie M; Smith, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty or THA is a surgical procedure for the relief of significant disabling pain caused by osteoarthritis or hip fracture. Knowledge of the 3D kinematics of the hip during specific functional activities is important for THA component design. In this paper we compare kinematic measurements obtained by a new 2D-3D registration algorithm with measurements provided by the gold standard roentgen stereo analysis (RSA). The study validates a promising method for investigating the kinematics of some pathologies, which involves fitting three dimensional patient specific 3D CT scans to dynamic fluoroscopic images of the hip during functional activities. This is the first study in which single plane fluoroscopy has been used for kinematic measurements of natural hip bones. The main focus of the study is on the out-of-plane translation and rotation movements which are difficult to measure precisely using a single plane approach. From our experimental results we found that the precision of our proposed approach compares favourably with that of the most recent dual plane fluoroscopy approach.

  15. Excellent results with cementless total hip arthroplasty and alumina-on-alumina pairing: minimum ten-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Alexander M.; Schmidt, Rainer; Holzwarth, Ulrich; Forst, Raimund

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic coupling is thought to be a durable alternative to metal- or alumina-on-polyethylene pairing. No evidence exists suggesting superior clinical and radiological results for hydroxyapatite-coated stems versus uncoated stems. The aim of this study is to report the performance of an alumina-on-alumina bearing cementless total hip arthroplasty and to compare stems with a tapered design with and without hydroxyapatite coating. We prospectively analysed the results of cementless tapered femoral stems (40 hydroxyapatite-coated versus 22 uncoated stems), a metal-backed fibre mesh hydroxyapatite-coated socket and alumina-on-alumina pairing. Of 75 hips studied, 62 were available for follow-up (mean of 10.5 years after surgery). The average Harris hip score was 90. Only one hydroxyapatite-coated stem was revised for aseptic loosening. One instance of non-progressive osteolysis was detected around a screw of a cup. All other components showed radiographic signs of stable ingrowth. Hydroxyapatite coating of the stem had no significant impact on the clinical or radiological results. Total hip arthroplasty with the presented implant and pairing provides a durable standard for all patients requiring hip joint replacement against which all newer generations of cementless implants should be judged. PMID:21079952

  16. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  17. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. RESULTS A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  18. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. Material/Methods A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. Results A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). Conclusions 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  19. Articular capsule repair in initial artificial hip replacement via anterolateral approach to the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B L; Wang, F; Tian, M B; Yin, W L; You, X Y; Li, D; Ma, L G; Xing, L Q

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore articular capsule repair in first artificial hip replacement (AHR) via anterolateral approach and its influence on postoperative dislocation. A total of 292 patients who received AHR via anterolateral approach and had the articular capsule repaired in People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou (Henan, China) from February 2008 to February 2014 were selected and divided into total hip replacement (THR) group (group A1) and artificial femoral head replacement (AFHR) group (group A2). Five hundred and five cases in the control group treated using the same approach but receiving no articular capsule repair were divided into THR group (group B1) and AFHR group (group B2). Condition of postoperative dislocation was compared between the two groups. All cases were followed up for 6 months to 5 years (average: 3.75 years); it was noted that the difference in average age, gender, disease constitution and follow-up time in the two groups was not significant (P>0.05). Moreover, groups A1 and B1 were found with 1 case of early hip joint dislocation (0.73%) and 13 cases of hip joint dislocation (5.24%) respectively post-operatively, and the comparison between the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.05). One case of hip joint dislocation (0.65%) was found in group A2 and 5 cases (1.95%) in group B2 in early post operation and the difference between two groups had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Neither the repair group nor the control group developed late-onset dislocation after the operation. Thus, we can state that articular capsule repair is feasible during the first AHR via anterolateral approach, which decreases the occurrence of early hip joint dislocation after operation and proves that repairing articular capsule during AFHR via anterolateral approach is unnecessary. PMID:27358130

  20. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-07-25

    BACKGROUND Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. RESULTS A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR.

  1. Effect of leg rotation on hip bone mineral density measurements.

    PubMed

    Lekamwasam, Sarath; Lenora, Robolge Sumith Janaka

    2003-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely used in the management of patients with osteoporosis. Factors, which are specific to machine or to operator, can influence the accuracy and precision of BMD estimations. We studied the effect of leg rotation by 10 degrees either internally or externally from the standard position in a group of 50 women (average age 54.9, SD = 11.1 yr) who were free of bone active diseases or medications. External rotation of leg by 10 degrees from the customary position increased the average BMD by 0.005, 0.003, and 0.036 g/cm2 in the femoral neck, trochanter, and Ward's area (p = 0.119, 0.309, and <0.001), respectively. Internal rotation of leg by 10 degrees from the customary position decreased the average BMD by 0.009, 0.005, and 0.006 g/cm2 in the femoral neck, trochanter, and Ward's area (p = <0.001, 0.008, and <0.001), respectively. The number of subjects qualified for the diagnosis of osteoporosis based on the T-scores (equal to or below -2.5) of the femoral neck and trochanter did not change significantly in three different positions (18% in the customary position and after the external rotation and 14% after the internal rotation). A significant change in the femoral neck BMD (defined as 2.77 x precision error) was seen in 12% of subjects after the internal rotation and 8% after the external rotation. Our data emphasize the need for proper positioning of the hip during DXA scanning. Malrotation of the hip can be an important confounding factor when interpreting serial BMD values.

  2. Comparison of friction and lubrication of different hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2000-01-01

    It is well documented that an important cause of osteolysis and subsequent loosening of replacement hip joints is polyethylene wear debris. To avoid this, interest has been renewed in metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic prostheses. Various workers have assessed the lubrication modes of different joints by measuring the friction at the bearing surfaces, using different lubricants. Measurements of friction factors of a series of hip prostheses were undertaken using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) fluids, silicone fluids, synovial fluid and different concentrations of bovine serum as the lubricant. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions of film thicknesses and lubrication modes. A strong correlation was observed between experiment and theory when employing CMC fluids or silicone fluids as the lubricant. Mixed lubrication was found to occur in the metal-on-metal (CoCrMo/CoCrMo) joints with all lubricants at a viscosity within the physiological range. This was also the case for the metal-on-plastic (CoCrMo/ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene) joints. The ceramic-on-ceramic (Al2O3/Al2O3) joints, however, exhibited full fluid film lubrication with the synthetic lubricants but mixed lubrication with the biological lubricants. Employing a biological fluid as the lubricant affected the friction to varying degrees when compared with the synthetic lubricants. In the case of the ceramic-on-ceramic joints it acted to increase the friction factor tenfold; however, for the metal-on-metal joints, biological fluids gave slightly lower friction than the synthetic lubricants did. This suggests that, when measuring friction and wear of artificial joints, a standard lubricant should be used.

  3. Contemporary Concepts in the Young Adult Hip Patient: Periacetabular Osteotomy for Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Coobs, Benjamin R; Xiong, Ao; Clohisy, John C

    2015-07-01

    The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy, as originally described by Dr. Reinhold Ganz, is an effective treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in the pre-arthritic young adult hip. This technique has experienced several recent modifications in an attempt to optimize the clinical outcomes of these patients. We will review the clinical presentation of acetabular dysplasia, indications for surgery, contemporary refinements in technique and clinical results following periacetabular osteotomy. In well-selected patients, this reconstructive osteotomy should be considered safe and effective in alleviating pain and improving hip function. PMID:25865812

  4. Investigation of association between hip morphology and prevalence of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Nan; Wang, Fu-You; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Gong, Xiao-Yuan; Zhou, Kai; Chen, Zhi; Wang, Duan; Zhou, Zong-Ke; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    The cause of hip osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear, morphologic abnormality of hip was thought to be a contributing factor to hip OA. The hypothesis was that there were subtle anatomical morphology differences of the hip between normal and OA subjects; the objective of this study was to explore these anatomical differences which are predisposing to hip OA based on CT 3D reconstruction. Ninety-three normal subjects (186 hips) and 66 mild-to-moderate hip OA subjects (132 hips) were recruited in this study. Three parameters of the head-neck relationship were assessed: translation, rotation and concavity. Translation was the potential translational movements of femoral head related to the neck’s axis. Rotation was described by the physeal scar to evaluate the rotation tendency of femoral head related to the neck at the head-neck junction. Concavity was used to assess the sphericity of the head as it joins the neck. The femoral neck anteversion angle and some parameters of the acetabulum: anteversion, inclination and CE angle were measured too. By comparison, it was found that OA subjects had less femoral head sphericity, head-neck junction concavity, acetabular and femoral neck anteversion angle; but greater acetabular coverage. These characteristics increased the risk of hip OA in OA subjects. PMID:27002423

  5. Palliative hip surgery in severe cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Boldingh, Eric J; Bouwhuis, Carola B; van der Heijden-Maessen, Hélène C M; Bos, Cees F; Lankhorst, Guustaaf J

    2014-01-01

    We performed a systematic review of the results of palliative hip surgery in severe cerebral palsy. Individuals with severe cerebral palsy frequently suffer from pain and other impairments because of dislocation or malformation of the hips. When preventive or reconstructive surgery fails, palliative intervention is performed. A number of salvage interventions have been described. We found articles on resection surgery of the femoral head, arthrodesis of the hip joint, and total hip replacement. The published literature does not clearly favor one procedure over the others. The resection arthroplasty technique developed by Castle is reported to yield the best results and fewer complications, and seems to eventually lead to a good outcome.

  6. Endoscopic treatment of snapping hips, iliotibial band, and iliopsoas tendon.

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri, Victor M; Camacho-Galindo, Javier

    2010-06-01

    Indications for endoscopic surgery of the hip have expanded recently. The technique has found a clear indication in the management of snapping hip syndromes, both external snapping hip and internal snapping hip. Even though the snapping hips (external and internal) share a common name, they are very different in origin. The external snapping hip is produced by the iliotibial band snapping over the prominence of the greater trochanter during flexion and extension. Indication for surgical treatment is painful snapping with failure of conservative treatment. The endoscopic technique is designed to release the iliotibial band producing a diamond shape defect on the iliotibial band lateral to the greater trochanter. The defect allows the greater trochanter to move freely without snapping. The greater trochanteric bursa is resected through the defect and the abductor tendons inspected. This procedure is performed without traction and usually only the peritrochanteric space is accessed. If necessary, hip arthroscopy can also be performed. There is limited literature regarding the results of endoscopic treatment for the external snapping hip syndrome, but early reports are encouraging. The internal snapping hip syndrome is produced by the iliopsoas tendon snapping over the iliopectineal eminence or the femoral head. The snapping phenomenon usually occurs with extension of the hip from a flexed position of more than 90 degree. Two different endoscopic techniques have been described to treat this condition. Iliopsoas tendon release at the level of the hip joint, with this technique the iliopsoas bursa is accessed through an anterior hip capsulotomy and is frequently referred to as a transcapsular release. The second technique is a release at the insertion of the iliopsoas tendon on the lesser trochanter, with this technique the iliospaos bursa is accessed directly. In every report the iliopsoas tendon release has been combined with arthroscopy of the hip joint. It has been

  7. Evaluation of the Hip: History and Physical Examination

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Examination of a painful hip is fairly concise and reliable at detecting the presence of a hip joint problem. Hip joint disorders often go undetected, leading to the development of secondary disorders. Using a thoughtful approach and methodical examination techniques, most hip joint problems can be detected and a proper treatment strategy can then be implemented based on an accurate diagnosis. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to present a systematic examination process that outlines important components in each of the evaluation areas of history and physical examination (including inspection, measurements, symptom localization, muscle strength, and special tests). PMID:21509142

  8. Assessment and treatment of hip pain in the adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Brian D

    2014-12-01

    Hip pain in the adolescent athlete is a common source of functional impairment and can limit athletic performance. In the past, many intra- and extra-articular hip abnormalities went unrecognized and were left untreated because of insufficient diagnostic imaging and limited surgical options. However, over the past 20 years, there has been a tremendous expansion research, and the understanding of the etiology of hip pain among such athletes has grown. Improvements in imaging modalities and technical innovations have led to greater diagnostic insights and creative new treatment strategies. This article explores the etiology and treatment of hip pain in the adolescent athlete. PMID:25439016

  9. Hip dysplasia and the performing arts: is there a correlation?

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert; O'Sullivan, Eilish; Edelstein, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Dancers frequently present with hip pain. The etiology of this pathology has not been clearly identified from an anatomical perspective. Structural variations including hip dysplasia and dynamic variables from the foot to the pelvis will be discussed. Understanding the etiology as a structural entity, neuromuscular entity or a combination of the two, allows for a successful rehabilitative process and a successful return to dance. This article describes the possible correlation between hip dysplasia and hip pain in the dancer, the relationship of dance postures to the kinematic chain and outlines possible treatment strategies for management.

  10. Hip arthroscopy versus open surgical dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dagang; Chen, Long; Wang, Guanglin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of hip arthroscopy versus open surgical dislocation for treating femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) through published clinical trials. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for relevant studies on hip arthroscopy and open surgical dislocation as treatment options for FAI. Results: Compared with open surgical dislocation, hip arthroscopy resulted in significantly higher Nonarthritic Hip Scores (NAHS) at 3- and 12-month follow-ups, a significant improvement in NAHS from preoperation to 3 months postoperation, and a significantly lower reoperation rate. Open surgical dislocation resulted in a significantly improved alpha angle by the Dunn view in patients with cam osteoplasty from preoperation to postoperation, compared with hip arthroscopy. This meta-analysis demonstrated no significant differences in the modified Harris Hip Score, Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living, or Hip Outcome Score-Sport Specific Subscale at 12 months of follow-up, or in complications (including nerve damage, wound infection, and wound dehiscence). Conclusion: Hip arthroscopy resulted in higher NAHS and lower reoperation rates, but had less improvement in alpha angle in patients with cam osteoplasty, than open surgical dislocation. PMID:27741133

  11. The role of arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy in the hip.

    PubMed

    Philippon, M J

    2001-10-01

    Arthroscopic thermal modification of collagen in the hip capsular tissue appears to be a treatment option for patients with hip instability. Traumatic hip instability is associated with frank dislocation or a subluxation, and labral tears. Atraumatic hip instability is associated with evidence of generalized ligament laxity. It can be associated with bone-collagen type disorders, including Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Down syndrome, arthrochalasis multiplex congenita, developmental dysplastic hip, and idiopathic type. As previously discussed by Bellabarba et al, capsular laxity may be the underlying cause of dynamic hip instability. The capsule is a fibrous, thick, and strong structure that encircles the proximal femur and the acetabulum. The capsule is thicker anteriorly than posteriorly, and consists of two sets of fibers, circular and longitudinal. The capsule ligaments play a very important role in hip stability. The hip joint capsule is reinforced by the iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments. It remains sensitive to stretch and serves as a mechanism for muscular feedback and pain. The iliofemoral ligament limits hyperextension and lateral rotation of the hip joint and is taut in full extension. Full extension of the hip exposes the capsule and ligaments to a twisting and shortening effect that forces the head onto the acetabulum. We are currently studying the effect of iliofemoral ligament deficiency and its relationship to instability. Many of the properties of synovial lubrication depend on contact with articular surfaces, and incongruency due to instability may have some functional role in distribution of synovial fluid, leading to stresses from weightbearing and eventually to rapid deterioration of the articular surfaces. The high-level athletes in this series include two professional baseball players, three professional golfers (PGA), one professional football player (NFL), one figure skater (Olympic gold medalist), one gymnast (Olympic level

  12. The role of hip arthroscopy in the elite athlete.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joseph; Barsoum, Wael; Puri, Lalit; Lee, Jo-ann; Murphy, Steven; Cooke, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Intraarticular hip disorders in the elite athlete are a relatively rare but serious potential consequence of high-level competition. Axial and torsional forces involving the hips of elite athletes place them at potentially higher risk for chondral injuries, labral injuries, or both. Ten patients (13 hips) had arthroscopy. Of the 10 patients, the average age was 24 years. Nine patients were men and one was a woman. Of the 13 (10 patients) arthroscopies done two cases were bilateral, and one patient had the same hip operated on twice. Seven of the patients were professional hockey players, one patient was a football player, one patient was a baseball player, and one patient was a golfer. All 13 hips (10 patients) had anterior labral tears, whereas two hips had anterior and posterior labral tears. Two hips had an average of four loose bodies, four had evidence of chondral lesions, and one had an anterior margin acetabular fracture. Twelve of 13 arthroscopies were successful; however, one patient had recurrent symptoms. There were no surgical complications. Hip arthroscopy is a safe and reproducible method to diagnose and treat intraarticular hip disorders in athletes, which facilitates earlier return to their respective sport.

  13. A reciprocal walking orthosis hip joint for young paediatric patients with a variety of pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Woolam, P J; Lomas, B; Stallard, J

    2001-04-01

    A growing trend in the use of reciprocal walking orthoses for infant paraplegic patients, and their application for control of the lower limbs in very young total body involved cerebral palsy patients, has created a need for smaller components. A prototype design of a hip joint has been produced which provides the following features: adjustable range of flexion/extension control; override on stops to permit sitting; high lateral rigidity; no lateral bearing play; very high rigidity in the sagittal plane; low friction bearings; high resistance to torque about the vertical axis. In addition a size envelope which is more in keeping with the dimensions of infant patients was an important objective. Comparisons were made of the computed structural properties of the prototype joint and existing routinely available standard orthotic hip joints. In each plane of loading the prototype joint had the highest identified structural property. The hinge-bearing material was tested in a representative joint with 200,000 cycles of typical loading. It was also field tested on adult orthoses over a minimum of a 12-month period with the most vigorous of walkers. In neither test did excessive play develop. The mechanical properties of the joint were established using tests advocated in the British Standard on testing lower limb orthosis knee joints. These showed the joint had structurally equivalent performance to a successful reciprocal walking orthosis hip joint, and that the mode of failure was essentially ductile in nature. Production development of the joint is now being undertaken.

  14. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  15. A reciprocal walking orthosis hip joint for young paediatric patients with a variety of pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Woolam, P J; Lomas, B; Stallard, J

    2001-04-01

    A growing trend in the use of reciprocal walking orthoses for infant paraplegic patients, and their application for control of the lower limbs in very young total body involved cerebral palsy patients, has created a need for smaller components. A prototype design of a hip joint has been produced which provides the following features: adjustable range of flexion/extension control; override on stops to permit sitting; high lateral rigidity; no lateral bearing play; very high rigidity in the sagittal plane; low friction bearings; high resistance to torque about the vertical axis. In addition a size envelope which is more in keeping with the dimensions of infant patients was an important objective. Comparisons were made of the computed structural properties of the prototype joint and existing routinely available standard orthotic hip joints. In each plane of loading the prototype joint had the highest identified structural property. The hinge-bearing material was tested in a representative joint with 200,000 cycles of typical loading. It was also field tested on adult orthoses over a minimum of a 12-month period with the most vigorous of walkers. In neither test did excessive play develop. The mechanical properties of the joint were established using tests advocated in the British Standard on testing lower limb orthosis knee joints. These showed the joint had structurally equivalent performance to a successful reciprocal walking orthosis hip joint, and that the mode of failure was essentially ductile in nature. Production development of the joint is now being undertaken. PMID:11411005

  16. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR.

  17. Quantitative measurement and analysis for detection and treatment planning of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Lu, Hongbing; Chen, Hanyong; Zhao, Li; Shi, Zhengxing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-02-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is a congenital hip joint malformation affecting the proximal femurs and acetabulum that are subluxatable, dislocatable, and dislocated. Conventionally, physicians made diagnoses and treatments only based on findings from two-dimensional (2D) images by manually calculating clinic parameters. However, anatomical complexity of the disease and the limitation of current standard procedures make accurate diagnosis quite difficultly. In this study, we developed a system that provides quantitative measurement of 3D clinical indexes based on computed tomography (CT) images. To extract bone structure from surrounding tissues more accurately, the system firstly segments the bone using a knowledge-based fuzzy clustering method, which is formulated by modifying the objective function of the standard fuzzy c-means algorithm with additive adaptation penalty. The second part of the system calculates automatically the clinical indexes, which are extended from 2D to 3D for accurate description of spatial relationship between femurs and acetabulum. To evaluate the system performance, experimental study based on 22 patients with unilateral or bilateral affected hip was performed. The results of 3D acetabulum index (AI) automatically provided by the system were validated by comparison with 2D results measured by surgeons manually. The correlation between the two results was found to be 0.622 (p<0.01).

  18. Undercarboxylated osteocalcin measured with a specific immunoassay predicts hip fracture in elderly women: the EPIDOS Study.

    PubMed

    Vergnaud, P; Garnero, P; Meunier, P J; Bréart, G; Kamihagi, K; Delmas, P D

    1997-03-01

    Increased levels of circulating undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC), measured indirectly with the hydroxyapatite (HAP) binding assay, have been shown to predict hip fracture risk in a small group of elderly institutionalized women. The aim of this study was to confirm these findings in a prospective cohort study (EPIDOS prospective study) of 7598 healthy, independently living women over 75 yr of age. One hundred and four women who sustained a hip fracture during a 22-month follow-up period were age matched with 255 controls who did not fracture. Baseline samples were collected before hip fracture for measurement of total OC and ucOC, assessed either with the HAP binding assay or directly with a new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This direct ELISA uses human recombinant noncarboxylated OC as a standard and two monoclonal antibodies, one of which was raised against the 14-30 Glu synthetic peptide. We found that the intra- and interassay variations are less than 11%, and this assay exhibits a 5% cross-reactivity with purified human bone OC, used as a source of carboxylated OC. ucOC levels measured with this ELISA correlated well with the HAP binding assay in the population of 359 elderly women (r = 0.82; P < 0.0001). We estimated the risk of hip fracture for women with levels of ucOC in the highest quartile of values for the 255 controls. We found that increased levels of ucOC measured by ELISA were associated with increased hip fracture risk with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.0), and the ELISA had a greater sensitivity than the HAP assay. In contrast, total OC was not associated with hip fracture risk. After adjustment for femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) and mobility status assessed by gait speed, ucOC still predicted hip fracture with an OR of 1.8 (1.0-3.0). Women with both femoral neck BMD in the lowest quartile and ucOC in the highest quartile were at higher risk of hip fracture, with an OR of 5.5 (2.7-11.2), than

  19. Measuring functional outcome after total hip replacement with subject-specific hip joint loading.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tim; Dendorfer, Sebastian; Dullien, Silvia; Grifka, Joachim; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Renkawitz, Tobias

    2012-12-01

    Total hip replacement is an often-performed orthopedic surgical procedure; the amount of procedures undertaken will increase since our life expectancy is growing. In order to optimize function, hip biomechanics should be restored to as near normal as possible. The goal of this pilot study was to determine whether or not it is feasible to compute the vectorial hip reaction force pathways on the head of the prosthesis and the force angles relative to the cup of the prosthesis that occur during gait in total hip replacement patients, serving as an objective measurement of the functional outcome following hip replacement. A three-dimensional gait analysis, measuring ground reaction forces and kinematics, was performed. The data retrieved from the gait analysis was used as the input for the musculoskeletal model to compute vectorial joint reaction forces for data processing. To evaluate the position and orientation of the joint reaction forces, the force path, as well as the force angles for the operated and non-operated joint, has been calculated during the stance phase of the specific leg. The force path for subject 2 on the non-operated side is only located in the posterior-lateral quarter, as is the force path for subject 1. In contrast to this subject, the force path for subject 2 at the operated hip joint can be found only within the anterior quarter of the head of the implant, where it is nearly equally distributed in the medio-lateral half of the prosthesis head. The force-inclination angles on the cup of subject 1, with respect to the plane of the socket face, indicates that the force vector is mainly positioned in the same quadrant when compared with subject 2 (in a cup-fixed coordinate system). The force-anteversion angle behaves similarly to the force-inclination angle, even when the effects are not as pronounced. The proposed methods in this article are aiming to define two functional outcomes of total hip replacement that are related to wear and rim

  20. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B; Dimitrov, Dimitar M; van Staden, Anton D; Oosthuizen, Gert A; Dicks, Leon M T

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research.

  1. The second hip fracture in osteoporotic patients: not only an orthopaedic matter

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Di Rollo, Federica; Bianchi, Maria Giulia; Dell’Omo, Dario; Guido, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Summary The second hip fracture indicates the fracture of the osteoporotic femoral neck which occurs in patients already operated on the opposite side. It is a growing problem, especially in Italy where the ageing rate of the population is one of the highest in the world. Only in recent years this issue has been discussed in the international literature about timing and the treatment methods as a consequence linked to the social costs, mortality, disability of this pathology. The aim of our study is the evaluation of the incidence of hip fractures in a sample of patients that already substained a surgical procedure for a proximal femour fracture. The evaluation was based on the time elapsed between the two fractures, the quality of life after the second fractural episode through a telephone questionnaire (EQ-5D), the incidence of mortality, the adhesion to the antifractural therapy and the comparison of the obtained data to the international standards. PMID:24133530

  2. Incorporating corrosion measurement in hip wear simulators: An added complication or a necessity?

    PubMed

    Neville, Anne; Hesketh, James; Beadling, Andrew R; Bryant, Michael G; Dowson, Duncan

    2016-05-01

    Corrosion is not routinely considered in the assessment of the degradation or the lifetime of total hip replacement bearing surfaces. Biomechanical simulations are becoming ever more complex and are taking into account motion cycles that represent activities beyond a simple walking gait at 1 Hz, marking a departure from the standard ISO BS 14242. However, the degradation is still very often referred to as wear, even though the material loss occurs due to a combination of tribological and corrosion processes and their interactions. This article evaluates how, by incorporating real-time corrosion measurements in total hip replacement simulations, pre-clinical evaluations and research studies can both yield much more information and accelerate the process towards improved implants. PMID:27160560

  3. Effects of compliance on trunk and hip integrative neuromuscular training on hip abductor strength in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Dai; Myer, Gregory D; Bush, Heather M; Hewett, Timothy E

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies demonstrate the link between reduced hip abductor strength and increased risk for knee injury such as patellofemoral pain syndrome in women athletes. Meta-analytic reports indicate that the efficacy of integrative neuromuscular training (INT) is associated with compliance to the prescribed programming. Thus, the purpose was to investigate the compliance effects of a trunk and hip-focused INT exercises on hip abductor strength in young women athletes. In a controlled laboratory study design, 21 high school women volleyball players (mean age = 15.6 ± 1.4 years, weight = 64.0 ± 7.4 kg, height = 171.5 ± 7.0 cm) completed isokinetic hip abductor strength testing in pre- and postintervention, which consisted of 5 phases of supervised progressive trunk and hip-focused INT exercises twice a week for 10 weeks. The compliance effects were analyzed based on the changed hip abductor strength values between pre- and postintervention and 3 different compliance groups using 1-way analysis of variance and Pearson's correlation coefficients. The participants in the high-compliance group demonstrated significant hip abductor peak torque increases compared with noncompliance group (p = 0.02), but not between moderate-compliance and noncompliance groups (p = 0.27). The moderate correlation coefficient value (r = 0.56) was recorded between the isokinetic hip abductor peak torque changes and the 3 compliance groups. Because of the observed significant effects and moderate linear association, the effectiveness of a trunk and hip-focused INT protocol to improve hip abduction strength seems dependent on compliance. Compliance of trunk and hip-focused INT is an important aspect of increasing hip abductor strength increase in young women athletes. PMID:24751656

  4. [Hip metallosis caused by wear of a TT-1 stem on a ceramic modular head hip prosthesis --case report].

    PubMed

    Blacha, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The author presents a case of metal stem cone wear caused by a ceramic head. During revision hip arthroplasty procedure a new modular ceramic head was implanted in combination with a stable cemented TT-1 stem. 13 months after surgery the hip became symptomatic and 20 months after the procedure total loosening of the cup was observed. Wear of the stem cone was visible. During the next revision procedure all hip prosthesis elements were removed, soft tissue debridement was performed and a new cemented prosthesis was implanted. One year post-op the hip is pain free.

  5. Normal anatomy and imaging of the hip: emphasis on impingement assessment.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Mary Kristen; Petersen, Brian; Strickland, Colin; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2013-07-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of normal hip anatomy and imaging techniques is essential in the evaluation and assessment of the patient with hip pain. This article reviews the osseous, soft tissue, and vascular components of the hip and the normal anatomical variants encountered in routine hip imaging. Basic and advanced hip imaging is discussed with particular emphasis on radiographic and computed tomography measurements and their utility in evaluating patients with developmental hip dysplasia and femoroacetabular impingement syndrome.

  6. Hip-Hop Is the Healer: Sense of Belonging and Diversity among Hip-Hop Collegians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulé, V. Thandi

    2016-01-01

    Sense of belonging is recognized as a factor contributing to persistence to graduation. Furthermore, interactional diversity is associated with learning and civic outcomes--touted higher education goals. Hip-hop culture, one of the most influential cultural creations of the mid-20th century, has succeeded in attracting devotees from diverse…

  7. Conservative Management of a Young Adult with Hip Arthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Kyle M.; Heiderscheit, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Case report Background Clinical practice guidelines regarding the conservative management of degenerative hip conditions in older adults routinely incorporate therapeutic exercise and manual therapy. However, the application of these recommendations to young, active adults is less clear. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of a young adult with advanced hip arthrosis using a multi-faceted rehabilitation program. Case Description A 28-year old female with severe left hip degeneration per diagnostic imaging was referred to physical therapy. Reduced hip range of motion and strength, sacroiliac joint asymmetries, and a modified Harris Hip Score of 76 were observed. She was seen for 12 visits over a 3-month period and treated with an individualized program including manual therapy, therapeutic exercise, and neuromuscular re-education. Outcome Substantial improvements were noted in pain, hip range of motion and strength and function (modified Harris Hip Score of 97). In addition, she discontinued the use of anti-inflammatory medications and returned to her prior level of activity. Improvements were maintained at a 3 month follow up, with symptom recurrence managed using a self mobilization technique to the left hip and massage to the left iliopsoas. Discussion Degenerative hip conditions are common among older adults but are relatively rare in the younger population. Although it is likely that this patient will experience a return of her symptoms and functional limitations as her hip disease progresses, the immediate improvements may delay the need for eventual surgical management. These outcomes suggest that physical therapy management should be considered in those with an early onset of degenerative hip disease and are consistent with results previously reported in the older population. Level of Evidence Therapy, Level 4 PMID:20026881

  8. Surgical hip dislocation for treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Milind M; Chaudhary, Ishani M; Vikas, KN; KoKo, Aung; Zaw, Than; Siddhartha, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cam femoroacetabular impingement is caused by a misshapen femoral head with a reduced head neck offset, commonly in the anterolateral quadrant. Friction in flexion, adduction and internal rotation causes limitation of the hip movements and pain progressively leading to labral and chondral damage and osteoarthritis. Surgical hip dislocation described by Ganz permits full exposure of the hip without damaging its blood supply. An osteochondroplasty removes the bump at the femoral head neck junction to recreate the offset for impingement free movement. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients underwent surgery with surgical hip dislocation for the treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement by open osteochondroplasty over last 6 years. Eight patients suffered from sequelae of avascular necrosis (AVN). Three had a painful dysplastic hip. Two had sequelae of Perthes disease. Three had combined cam and pincer impingement caused by retroversion of acetabulum. All patients were operated by the trochanteric flip osteotomy with attachments of gluteus medius and vastus lateralis, dissection was between the piriformis and gluteus minimus preserving the external rotators. Z-shaped capsular incision and dislocation of the hip was done in external rotation. Three cases also had subtrochanteric osteotomy. Two cases of AVN also had an intraarticular femoral head reshaping osteotomy. Results: Goals of treatment were achieved in all patients. No AVN was detected after a 6 month followup. There were no trochanteric nonunions. Hip range of motion improved in all and Harris hip score improved significantly in 15 of 16 cases. Mean alpha angle reduced from 86.13° (range 66°–108°) to 46.35° (range 39°–58°). Conclusion: Cam femoroacetabular Impingement causing pain and limitation of hip movements was treated by open osteochondroplasty after surgical hip dislocation. This reduced pain, improved hip motion and gave good to excellent results in the short term. PMID

  9. The pathogenesis and diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, C L; Remedios, A M

    1995-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common developmental problem affecting the canine population. Despite extensive research into the condition, many questions remain unanswered and numerous misconceptions are present among the general public. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the development of hip dysplasia, factors modifying its development, and current diagnostic techniques. A computerized literature search was conducted for the period of January 1983 to April 1985 using the MEDLINE and CAB databases, and the keywords hip dysplasia, hip, dog, and canine. Other articles, wherever possible original research articles, published before 1983 were also reviewed. Animals affected by hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but quickly develop subluxation of the femoral head. Degenerative joint disease follows. Hip dysplasia is a complex, inherited, polygenic trait. Selective breeding of only normal dogs with normal littermates, parents, and grandparents is the recommended method of reducing the incidence in the general population. Gene expression in affected individuals may be modified by a number of environmental factors. These factors do not cause hip dysplasia, but they alter manifestations of the trait and its severity. Nutrition is a major environmental factor. Excess energy consumption increases the frequency and severity of hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed dogs. Food intake should be regulated to maintain a slender figure with the ribs and dorsal vertebral spines easily palpable, but not visible. Excess dietary calcium and vitamin D contribute to hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed individuals and should be avoided. High dose vitamin C supplementation in growing puppies does not prevent hip dysplasia, and this practice should be discontinued.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7585436

  10. Prevalence of dementia in elderly patients with hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Yiannopoulou, Konstantina G; Anastasiou, Ioannis P; Ganetsos, Theodore K; Efthimiopoulos, Petros; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures occur commonly and are a cause of disability for older adults and lead to increased dependence and requirements for social support. Dementia is one of the possible risk factors for falling and hip fracture, a potential source for complications during surgery and during the postoperative period, difficulties in rehabilitation and a risk factor for hip fracture reccurence. However, in previous studies of hip fracture patients, cognitive status has not been formally assessed during the inpatient stay and diagnosis was based only on previous history. Additionally, no previous studies have compared prevalence of dementia between elderly patients with hip fracture and patients with other surgical pathology. Our aim was to define whether dementia was more prevalent in older subjects with hip fracture than in other elderly patients undergoing surgery. In this study, we prospectively assessed all patients aged 68 and older admitted to our hospital for hip fracture surgery during a one year period and compared them with age and gender matched patients attending other surgical departments. 80 hip fracture patients and 80 controls were assessed for dementia. Dementia was common in both groups, presumably reflecting the advanced mean age of both groups and cognitive deterioration due to hospitalization-status. Dementia was significantly higher in the hip fracture group (85%) compared to the control group (61.5%; p=0.002). Dementia is very common in older patients admitted for surgery to a general hospital and extremely common in those with hip fracture. It seems that dementia is under diagnosed in elderly hospitalised patients. Our data confirm that dementia is a major risk factor for hip fracture in the elderly.

  11. A Biomechanical Approach to Assessing Hip Fracture Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Bone loss in microgravity is well documented, but it is difficult to quantify how declines in bone mineral density (BMD) contribute to an astronaut's overall risk of fracture upon return. This study uses a biomechanical approach to assessing hip fracture risk, or Factor of Risk (Phi), which is defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expeditions 1-18 were included in this study (n=25), while crewmembers who flew twice (n=2) were treated as separate subjects. Bone strength was estimated based on an empirical relationship between areal BMD at the hip, as measured by DXA, and failure load, as determined by mechanical testing of cadaver femora. Fall load during a sideways fall was calculated from a previously developed biomechanical model, which takes into account body weight, height, gender, and soft tissue thickness overlying the lateral aspect of the hip that serves to attenuate the impact force. While no statistical analyses have been performed yet, preliminary results show that males in this population have a higher FOR than females, with a post- flight Phi of 0.87 and 0.36, respectively. FOR increases 5.1% from preflight to postflight, while only one subject crossed the fracture "threshold" of Phi = 1, for a total of 2 subjects with a postflight Phi > 1. These results suggest that men may be at greater risk for hip fracture due largely in part to their relatively thin soft tissue padding as compared to women, since soft tissue thickness has the highest correlation (R(exp 2)= .53) with FOR of all subject-specific parameters. Future work will investigate changes in FOR during recovery to see if baseline risk levels are restored upon return to 1-g activity. While dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most commonly used clinical measure of bone health, it fails to provide compartment-specific information that is useful in assessing changes to bone quality as a result of microgravity exposure. Peripheral

  12. Inequalities in use of total hip arthroplasty for hip fracture: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, David; Griffin, Xavier L; Costa, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) among individuals with a displaced intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck is based on national guidelines or if there are systematic inequalities. Design Observational cohort study using the National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD). Setting All hospitals that treat adults with hip fractures in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Participants Patients within the national database (all aged ≥60) who received operative treatment for a non-pathological displaced intracapsular hip fracture from 1 July 2011 to 31 April 2015. Main outcome measures Provision of THA to patients considered eligible under criteria published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Results 114 119 patients with hip fracture were included, 11 683 (10.2%) of whom underwent THA. Of those who satisfied the NICE criteria, 32% (6780)received a THA. Of patients who underwent THA, 42% (4903) did not satisfy the NICE criteria. A recursive partitioning algorithm found that the NICE eligibility criteria did not optimally explain which patients underwent THA. A model with superior explanatory power drew distinctions that are not supported by NICE, which were an age cut off at 76 and a different ambulation cut off. Among patients who satisfied the NICE eligibility, the use of THA was less likely with higher age (odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.87 to 0.88), worsening abbreviated mental test scores (0.49 (0.41 to 0.58) for normal cognition v borderline cognitive impairment)), worsening American Society of Anesthesiologists score (0.74, 0.66 to 0.84), male sex (0.85, 0.77 to 0.93), worsening ambulatory status (0.32, 0.28 to 0.35 for walking with a stick v independent ambulation), and fifths of worsening socioeconomic area deprivation (0.76 (0.66 to 0.88) for least v most deprived fifth). Patients receiving treatment during the working week were more likely to receive THA than at the

  13. Do we need hip-ankle radiographs to assess the coronal alignment and implant position after total knee replacement?

    PubMed Central

    Dargel, Jens; Oppermann, Johannes; Eysel, Peer; Penning, Lenhard

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Restoration of the coronal alignment of the knee is known to be one of the major criteria of a successful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It therefore appears to be mandatory to routinely assess the postoperative limb alignment using hip-ankle radiographs and to identify implants that may be at risk of premature failure. However, there is no clear consensus whether weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs or rather standardized a-p knee-radiographs should be used to assess implant position and coronal alignment after TKA. It is the aim of the present study to investigate if implant position and the mechanical alignment after TKA can reproducibly be assessed using standardized a-p knee-radiographs or rather if weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs are needed. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 100 postoperative weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs after conventional primary TKA. The true mechanical and anatomical femorotibial angle as well as coronal implant position (MPTA, LDFA) was assessed using the MediCAD software, which served as a control. The hip-ankle radiographs were then digitally cropped to 80%, 60% and 40% of the leg-length. In each cropped radiograph, tibial coronal implant position was assessed by referencing against the visible mid-shaft, whereas femoral implant position was referenced against the visible mid-shaft (anatomical axis) or against a surrogate mechanical axis, which was drawn perpendicular to the distal tangent of the femoral component. Each measurement was performed by three independent observers. The difference between the alignment parameters in the hip-ankle radiographs were statistically compared with the cropped radiographs and the inter-observer correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for each parameter. Results: The ICC for inter-observer agreement of measurement of the mechanical femorotibial angle was significantly higher in hip-ankle radiographs (.95) when compared with a radiograph cropped

  14. Return to Play Following Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon; Kuhn, Andrew; Draovitch, Pete; Bedi, Asheesh

    2016-10-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement may be particularly disabling to the high-demand athlete, especially those with significant cutting and pivoting requirements. If nonoperative treatment fails to adequately alleviate symptoms or sufficiently restore function in the athlete, hip arthroscopy can lead to improved pain, improved range of motion, and high rates of return to play with proper postoperative rehabilitation. The rate of return to previous level of competition is also high with accurate diagnosis and well-executed correction of deformity. A clear understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, management, and outcomes is essential for clinicians to optimally help patients to return to play.

  15. Hip Instability: Current Concepts and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guillaume D

    2016-07-01

    Instability of the hip can manifest in a wide range of settings, with presenting symptoms including subtle discomfort at end range of motion or more dramatic dislocation of the joint. It can result from traumatic injury with dislocation or subluxation; atraumatic capsular laxity; structural bony abnormality, such as acetabular dysplasia; and iatrogenic injury. Initial treatment of the concentrically reduced joint often begins with physical therapy to strengthen dynamic stabilizers and to allow time for resolution of acute symptoms. Surgical treatment is aimed at repairing injured soft tissue structures, including static stabilizers, and addressing underlying bony structural deficiencies. PMID:27343395

  16. [An endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint].

    PubMed

    Lapinskaia, V S; Gatiatulin, R R; Trubnikov, V I; Velichko, M V; Froliakin, T V; Kovalenko, A E; Froliakina, L A

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the anatomic and functional longevity of joints in young patients with coxarthrosis deformans under conditions of long-term unloading using a submersible distraction device is considered. A submersible endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint is described. Its functional capabilities as an unloading device were corroborated by experimental testing. Clinical examples illustrated with X-ray photographs demonstrate the possibility of long-term unloading of the injured joint and postponement of endoprosthesis replacement in young patients by 20-25 years. It is suggested to use the developed method for organ-sparing surgery in young working-age patients.

  17. Return to Play Following Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon; Kuhn, Andrew; Draovitch, Pete; Bedi, Asheesh

    2016-10-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement may be particularly disabling to the high-demand athlete, especially those with significant cutting and pivoting requirements. If nonoperative treatment fails to adequately alleviate symptoms or sufficiently restore function in the athlete, hip arthroscopy can lead to improved pain, improved range of motion, and high rates of return to play with proper postoperative rehabilitation. The rate of return to previous level of competition is also high with accurate diagnosis and well-executed correction of deformity. A clear understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, management, and outcomes is essential for clinicians to optimally help patients to return to play. PMID:27543404

  18. HIP-assisted CTE mismatch tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Zick, D.H.

    1996-12-31

    A novel tooling technique is described which allows diffusion bonding of components with excellent dimensional control. The technique makes use of the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the tooling and the bonded components. Unlike traditional CTE mismatch tooling, the new technique allows low tensile strength, low cost materials such as graphite or ceramics to be used as the major tooling structure. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is employed to clamp together the tooling through a surrounding metallic capsule. An example will be presented of how the technique was used to bond numerous patterned stainless steel plates into a block containing intricate interconnected passages.

  19. [An endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint].

    PubMed

    Lapinskaia, V S; Gatiatulin, R R; Trubnikov, V I; Velichko, M V; Froliakin, T V; Kovalenko, A E; Froliakina, L A

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the anatomic and functional longevity of joints in young patients with coxarthrosis deformans under conditions of long-term unloading using a submersible distraction device is considered. A submersible endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint is described. Its functional capabilities as an unloading device were corroborated by experimental testing. Clinical examples illustrated with X-ray photographs demonstrate the possibility of long-term unloading of the injured joint and postponement of endoprosthesis replacement in young patients by 20-25 years. It is suggested to use the developed method for organ-sparing surgery in young working-age patients. PMID:18688939

  20. The management of fractures of the hip.

    PubMed

    Wicker, P

    Proximal femoral fractures are a common reason for admission to orthopaedic units, and one which may become even more regular as the population ages. Despite this, newcomers to the orthopaedic arena, such as nursing students, may be confused when faced by different hip fractures and the treatments which may be offered. This article seeks to clarify some of these points by outlining the anatomy of the proximal femoral region, various common fractures, the treatments available to the surgeon and aspects of nursing care associated with the pre and post operative phases of the patient's care.

  1. Capsular Management in Hip Arthroscopy: An Anatomic, Biomechanical, and Technical Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Weber, Alexander E.; Levy, David M.; Bedi, Asheesh; Mather, Richard C.; Salata, Michael J.; Nho, Shane J.

    2016-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has become an increasingly utilized surgical technique for the treatment of the young, active patients with hip pain. The clinical outcomes of hip arthroscopy in this patient population have been largely successful; however, there is increasing interest in the contribution of hip capsule in postoperative clinical and functional outcomes. The structure and function of the normal hip capsule will be reviewed. Capsular contributions to hip stability will be discussed in the setting of hip arthroscopy with an emphasis on diagnosis-based considerations. Lastly, clinical outcomes following hip arthroscopy will be discussed as they relate to capsular management. PMID:26973840

  2. Semi-automated CT-based analysis of regional bone-density in contra lateral total hip replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Tamez-Pena, Jose; Crilly, Therese; Looney, John R.; O'Keefe, R.; Campbell, Debbie; Totterman, Saara M.

    2004-04-01

    Methods for quantifying hip prosthesis induced changes in the adjacent bone are of great interest to orthopedics. In this work, we present a semi-automated technique for measuring the differences in bone density between the prosthetic and contra lateral hips within a CT volumetric data set. In order to reliably compare the bone-density measurements between the prosthetic and the contra laterals hips, a standardized zoning was developed. Using a spherical model of the outer surface of the prosthetic cup, the superior volume of the acetabular region was subdivided into four distance zones: 0-1mm, 1-6mm, 6-11mm, and 11-16mm, respectively. Furthermore, these regions were divided into four positional zones: medial, lateral, anterior, and posterior. At the same time, the positional zones were divided into four angular regions 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees from the apex of the acetabular cup. The bone density is computed as the average density in Hounsfield unit (HU) measured from the CT scan using all the voxels within each of the 64 zones. Preliminary analysis has been completed on 3 subjects with total hip replacement. The zonal densities on the prosthetic hip and the contra lateral hip were computed and compared. Contrary to initial expectations, a paired t-test showed no statistical significance between the prosthetic and contra lateral bone-densities at any of the four distance zones. Further analysis with a larger sample subject is needed to detect differences in bone-density between the hips in the stress/weight bearing areas in the 15 to 30 degree regions. A method for reliably and consistently measuring the bone-density within standardized zones has been developed and applied on prosthetic and contra lateral hips. The average bone-density for each of the zones takes into account the entire volumetric data set within that region, which is a considerable improvement over the subjective, user driven region of interest estimate selected within one slice practiced in

  3. Morphometric study of the fetal development of the human hip joint: significance for congenital hip disease.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J. M.; Goldsmith, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Hip joints (280) from 140 human fetuses, obtained from abortions and deaths in the perinatal period, were studied. The fetuses ranged from 8.7 to 40 cm in crown-rump length and are believed to be between 12 and 42 weeks in age. The joints were dissected, morphology inspected, and measurements taken of the depth and diameter of the acetabulum, the diameter of the femoral head, length and width of the ligament of the head, the neck-shaft, and torsion angles of the proximal femur. Regression models were fitted to determine which would best predict the growth pattern. Multivariate analysis of variance showed no significant differences between males and females or between the right and left sides. Acetabular depth was shown to be the slowest-growing hip variable, increasing less than fourfold in the period studied. Acetabular indices less than 50 percent indicate a shallow socket at term. Femoral head and acetabular diameter demonstrated a strong relationship (r = 0.860) and in many joints the femoral head diameter exceeded that of the acetabulum. Considerable variability was demonstrated in both femoral angles. The femoral angles showed only low correlation with the other hip variables. These observations indicate that soft tissue structures about the joint must play an important role in neonatal joint stability. The explanation of greater female and left side involvement in congenital hip disease must lie in factors other than growth changes of hip dimensions. Neither angle appears to be a useful indicator of normal joint development. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 10 FIG. 11 FIG. 13 PMID:7342490

  4. The Epidemiology of Hip and Major Osteoporotic Fractures in a Dutch Population of Community-Dwelling Elderly: Implications for the Dutch FRAX® Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Klop, Corinne; Welsing, Paco M. J.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.; Elders, Petra J. M.; Overbeek, Jetty A.; van den Bergh, Joop P.; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; de Vries, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Incidence rates of non-hip major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) remain poorly characterized in the Netherlands. The Dutch FRAX® algorithm, which predicts 10-year probabilities of hip fracture and MOF (first of hip, humerus, forearm, clinical vertebral), therefore incorporates imputed MOF rates. Swedish incidence rate ratios for hip fracture to MOF (Malmo 1987–1996) were used to perform this imputation. However, equality of these ratios between countries is uncertain and recent evidence is scarce. Aims were to estimate incidence rates of hip fracture and MOF and to compare observed MOF rates to those predicted by the imputation method for the Netherlands. Methods Using hospitalisation and general practitioner records from the Dutch PHARMO Database Network (2002–2011) we calculated age-and-sex-specific and age-standardized incidence rates (IRs) of hip and other MOFs (humerus, forearm, clinical vertebral) and as used in FRAX®. Observed MOF rates were compared to those predicted among community-dwelling individuals ≥50 years by the standardized incidence ratio (SIR; 95% CI). Results Age-standardized IRs (per 10,000 person-years) of MOF among men and women ≥50 years were 25.9 and 77.0, respectively. These numbers were 9.3 and 24.0 for hip fracture. Among women 55–84 years, observed MOF rates were significantly higher than predicted (SIR ranged between 1.12–1.50, depending on age). In men, the imputation method performed reasonable. Conclusion Observed MOF incidence was higher than predicted for community-dwelling women over a wide age-range, while it agreed reasonable for men. As miscalibration may influence treatment decisions, there is a need for confirmation of results in another data source. Until then, the Dutch FRAX® output should be interpreted with caution. PMID:26633011

  5. The management of hip fracture in the older population. Joint position statement by Gruppo Italiano Ortogeriatria (GIOG).

    PubMed

    Pioli, Giulio; Barone, A; Mussi, C; Tafaro, L; Bellelli, G; Falaschi, P; Trabucchi, M; Paolisso, G

    2014-10-01

    This document is a Joint Position Statement by Gruppo Italiano di OrtoGeriatria (GIOG) supported by Società Italiana di Gerontologia e Geriatria (SIGG), and Associazione Italiana Psicogeriatria (AIP) on management of hip fracture older patients. Orthogeriatric care is at present the best model of care to improve results in older patients after hip fracture. The implementation of orthogeriatric model of care, based on the collaboration between orthopaedic surgeons and geriatricians, must take into account the local availability of resources and facilities and should be integrated into the local context. At the same time the programme must be based on the best available evidences and planned following accepted quality standards that ensure the efficacy of the intervention. The position paper focused on eight quality standards for the management of hip fracture older patients in orthogeriatric model of care. The GIOG promotes the development of a clinic database with the aim of obtaining a qualitative improvement in the management of hip fracture. PMID:24566982

  6. Christian Hip Hop as Pedagogy: A South African Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on interviews with creators of Christian hip hop music in South Africa, this article demonstrates that this genre of popular music and youth culture is utilised as a form of pedagogy to transmit religious beliefs and values to contemporary youth. The pedagogical aspects of hip hop have been recognised in research on the topic, but the…

  7. The Mayo Table Technique in Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Salas, Antonio Porthos; González-Campos, Mauricio; Salas-Pérez, Alfredo D'Artagnan; Aurelio González-Bazaldua, Jose Luis

    2016-06-01

    Hip distractor devices or hip fracture tables (HFTs) are vital to perform a reliable hip arthroscopy (HA) for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement, especially when labral tears, chondral-labral delaminations, ligamentum teres tears, and other intraarticular disorders are present. Adequate hip distractors were not available in the early days of HA; most of HFTs being used those days were rigid, cumbersome, and did not allow us to properly perform an arthroscopic dynamic impingement test to evaluate and assess the femoral head and its site of impingement. The mayo table technique was developed because of the lack of appropriate hip instrumentation and an HFT when the author (A.P.S.) started to perform HA. This easy technique allows the surgeon to control hip maximal range of motion and also to assess completely the cam deformity in the posterolateral, superolateral, anterior, and anteroinferior aspects. It also allows the surgeon to revise where the cam is impinging and afterward perform a complete bony resection and decompression. We strongly believe that with the mayo table technique HA can be performed simply and reliably in old rigid and cumbersome HFTs and also hip distractors that do not allow an adequate dynamic assessment of the hip with maximal range of motion. PMID:27656362

  8. Being Hip-Hop: Beyond Skills and Songs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I offer four principles relevant to hip-hop cultures (keep it real, flip the script, make some noise, and stay fresh) and explore how these principles might affect music classrooms. I argue that a music classroom that works to keep it real, flip the script, make some noise, and stay fresh might go beyond teaching hip-hop skills…

  9. Inferior hip dislocation after falling from height: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Ali Çağrı; Çabuk, Haluk; Büyükkurt, Cem Dinçay; Dedeoğlu, Süleyman Semih; İmren, Yunus; Gürbüz, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic inferior hip dislocation is the least common of all hip dislocations. Adult inferior hip dislocations usually occur after high-energy trauma, very few cases are reported without fracture. Presentation of case A 26-year-old female was brought to the emergency department with severe pain in the left hip, impaired posture and restricted movement following a fall from 15 m height. The hip joint was fixed in 90° flexion, 15° abduction, and 20° external rotation. No neurovascular impairment was determined. On radiologic examination, a left ischial type inferior hip dislocation was detected. Hemorrhagic shock which developed due to acute blood loss to thoracic and abdominal cavity and patient died at third hour after she was brought to the hospital. Discussion Traumatic hip dislocations have high morbidity and mortality rates due to multiple organ damage, primarily of the extremities, chest and abdomen. In the treatment of traumatic hip dislocation, closed reduction is recommended through muscle relaxation under general anesthesia or sedation. This procedure should be applied before any intervention for concomitant extremity injuries. A detailed evaluation on emergency presentation, a multi-disciplinary approach and early diagnosis with the rapid application of imaging methods could be life-saving for such patients. PMID:27058153

  10. Towards a Pedagogy of Hip Hop in Urban Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Thurman

    2011-01-01

    This article draws from a qualitative study often Black male K-12 teachers from the Hip Hop Generation who are closely connected to Hip Hop culture and have been effective in addressing the academic and social needs of Black boys. Through an analysis of their social, educational and cultural experiences, this article highlights three organizing…

  11. Hip Hop as Empowerment: Voices in El Alto, Bolivia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarifa, Ariana

    2012-01-01

    In response to neoliberal policies that have been in place since 1985, Bolivian young people have increasingly used hip hop music as a means of protest and to reclaim social and political participation. Hip hop in Latin America tells the story of the struggles that marginalized people have suffered, and speaks to the effects of international…

  12. Hip Hop Is Now: An Evolving Youth Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carl; Taylor, Virgil

    2007-01-01

    Emerging from Rap music, Hip Hop has become a lifestyle to many modern youth around the world. Embodying both creativity and controversy, Hip Hop mirrors the values, violence, and hypocrisy of modern culture. The authors dispel some of the simplistic views that surround this evolving youth movement embraced by millions of young people who are…

  13. Iliotibial band syndrome following hip arthroscopy: An unreported complication

    PubMed Central

    Seijas, Roberto; Sallent, Andrea; Galán, María; Alvarez-Diaz, Pedro; Ares, Oscar; Cugat, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip arthroscopy is considered a safe procedure, considering the relatively low rate of complications. Despite several complications have been described following this surgical procedure, the present event has not yet been described. The purpose of the present study is to report an unpublished complication following hip arthroscopy, after reviewing 162 hip arthroscopies and finding iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) in the knee during followup. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 162 hip arthroscopies performed between September 2007 and June 2011 was carried out, evaluating patients who presented ITBS during followup. Indication for hip arthroscopy was failure of conservative treatment in patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement. Results: During a minimum followup of 2 years, nine patients (5.5%) developed ITBS. All patients were diagnosed with ITBS within the first 45 postoperative days. Conservative treatment was successful in 6 patients while 3 had to undergo surgery. The increased internal rotation, synovitis and increased adduction of the hip can be attributed as predisposing factors to the development of ITBS. Conclusions: This is a newly described observation within followup of hip arthroscopy. These findings may help orthopedic surgeons when planning rehabilitation after hip arthroscopy, including stretching exercises to prevent this syndrome. PMID:27746490

  14. One step HIP canning of powder metallurgy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A single step is relied on in the canning process for hot isostatic pressing (HIP) powder metallurgy composites. The binders are totally removed while the HIP can of compatible refractory metal is sealed at high vacuum and temperature. This eliminates outgassing during hot isostatic pressing.

  15. [An older man with a painful hip after a fall].

    PubMed

    Wijers, O; Post, I C J H; Heetveld, M J

    2016-01-01

    A 94-year-old man presented to the Emergency Room after falling on his right hip. This hip was painful and a fracture was suspected. The X-rays showed an abnormal structure of the right femur but no fracture. The images were typical for Paget's disease. The patient was treated with bisphosphonates. PMID:27581865

  16. Framing Hip Hop: New Methodologies for New Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This article revisits the central impulse behind early advocacy for ethnographic approaches to hip hop--that critics should try as much as possible to limit their own certainties around what hip hop can and might mean. While ethnographic approaches can engender the kinds of personal dislocations that allow for this negotiation, they do not…

  17. [Dislocation-disassembly of bipolar hip arthroplasty--case report].

    PubMed

    Gagała, Jacek; Blacha, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bipolar hip arthroplasty dislocation is rare. A case of bipolar hip arthroplasty dislocation in patient treated because of femoral neck fracture was described. Patient had neurological problems. The arthroplasty was made with posterolateral approach. Disassembly of bipolar prosthesis occurred during closed reduction. Open reduction with bipolar head exchange was necessary. To avoid this complication reduction should be made in anesthesia with muscles relaxation.

  18. Chicano Hip-Hop as Interethnic Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Pancho

    2008-01-01

    The critical study of rap music and hip-hop culture has the potential to expand Americans understanding of race and culture in the United States. Hip-hop culture as a multiracial, multiethnic phenomenon reveals the ways in which race relations over the past thirty years have become increasingly complex. The theories and concepts that they use to…

  19. Toward Hip-Hop Pedagogies for Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Music education scholarship in the areas of popular, vernacular, and participatory musicianship has grown in the past decades; however, music education research concerned specifically with hip-hop has been relatively scarce. Because hip-hop music can differ tremendously from the traditional western genres with which many music educators are most…

  20. Hip-Hop, the "Obama Effect," and Urban Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emdin, Christopher; Lee, Okhee

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: With the ever increasing diversity of schools, and the persistent need to develop teaching strategies for the students who attend today's urban schools, hip-hop culture has been proposed to be a means through which urban youth can find success in school. As a result, studies of the role of hip-hop in urban education have grown…

  1. Framing and Reviewing Hip-Hop Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop has become relevant to the field of education because of its implications for understanding language, learning, identity, curriculum, and other areas. This integrative review provides historical context and cohesion for the burgeoning and discursive body of hip-hop scholarship by framing it according to three heuristic categories and…

  2. Surgical Management of Hip Problems in Myelomeningocele: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadi, Taghi; abdi, Reza; Bashi, Ramin Zargar; Aslani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with myelomeningocele (MMC) develop a wide variety of hip deformities such as muscle imbalance, contracture, subluxation, and dislocation. Various methods and indications have been introduced for treatment of muscle imbalances and other hip problems in patients with MMC but there is no study or meta-analysis to compare the results and complications. This review aims to find the most acceptable approach to hip problems in patients with MMC. Methods: MEDLINE was searched up to April 2015. All study designs that reported on the outcomes of hip problems in MMC were included. From 270 screened citations, 55 were strictly focused on hip problem in MMC were selected and reviewed. Results: Complex osseous and soft tissue reconstructive procedures to correct hip dysplasia and muscle balancing around the hip are rarely indicated for MMC patients without good quadriceps power. Conclusion: Over the years a consensus on the best algorithm for treatment of hip dislocation in myelomeningocele has been missing, however, muscular balancing with/out osseous procedure seems a reasonable approach especially in unilateral mid-lumbar MMC. PMID:27517062

  3. Standards not that standard.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Cristina; Tanner, Kristie; Dorado-Morales, Pedro; Villaescusa, Paula; Chugani, Divya; Frías, Alba; Segredo, Ernesto; Molero, Xavier; Fritschi, Marco; Morales, Lucas; Ramón, Daniel; Peña, Carlos; Peretó, Juli; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    There is a general assent on the key role of standards in Synthetic Biology. In two consecutive letters to this journal, suggestions on the assembly methods for the Registry of standard biological parts have been described. We fully agree with those authors on the need of a more flexible building strategy and we highlight in the present work two major functional challenges standardization efforts have to deal with: the need of both universal and orthogonal behaviors. We provide experimental data that clearly indicate that such engineering requirements should not be taken for granted in Synthetic Biology. PMID:26435739

  4. Effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bi-Hua; Chen, Pau-Chung; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ko-En; Chen, Vincent C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture. The database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance with medical records of more than 1,000,000 individuals was searched for patients who had hip fracture with or without depression from 1998 to 2009. Patients with the following conditions were excluded: hip fracture due to cancer or traffic accidents, hip fracture that occurred before the diagnosis of depression, and use of antidepressants before the diagnosis of depression. A matched cohort of 139,110 patients was investigated, including 27,822 (17,309 females; 10,513 males) with depression and 111,288 (69,236 females; 42,052 males) without depression (1:4 randomly matched with age, sex, and index date). Among these patients, 232 (158 females and 74 males) had both hip fracture and depression, and 690 (473 females and 217 males) had hip fracture only. The Cox proportional-hazards regression method was used to determine the effect of depression on hip fracture. The hazard ratio (HR) for each clinical parameter was calculated after adjusting for confounders including sex, age, Charlson comorbidity index, urbanization, osteoporosis, and antidepressants. Results showed that patients with major depressive disorder had a 61% higher incidence of hip fracture than those without depression (HR 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19–2.18, P = 0.002). The risk of hip fracture for patients with less severe depressive disorder (dysthymia or depressive disorder, not otherwise specified) was not statistically higher than that of patients with no depression (HR 1.10, 95% CI = 0.91–1.34, P = 0.327). Among the patients with depression, females had a 49% higher incidence for hip fracture than males (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.30–1.72, P < 0.001). The incidence of hip fracture also increased with age and Charlson comorbidity index scores. Analyses of both all (139,110) patients and only patients (27,822) with

  5. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty. PMID:23628567

  6. Patient-adapted treatment for prosthetic hip joint infection.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard P; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Borens, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Hip joint replacement is 1 of the most successful surgical procedures of the last century and the number of replacements implanted is steadily growing. An infected hip arthroplasty is a disaster, it leads to patient suffering, surgeon's frustration and significant costs to the health system. The treatment of an infected hip replacement is challenging, healing rates can be low, functional results poor with decreased patient satisfaction. However, if a patient-adapted treatment of infected hip joints is used a success rate of above 90% can be obtained.Patient-adapted treatment is based on 5 important concepts: teamwork; understanding the biofilm; diagnostic accuracy; correct definition and classification of PJI; and patient-tailored treatment.This review presents a patient-adapted treatment strategy to prosthetic hip infection. It incorporates the best aspects of the single and staged surgical strategies and promotes the short interval philosophy for the 2-stage approach. PMID:26044528

  7. Evolution of the human hip. Part 1: the osseous framework

    PubMed Central

    Hogervorst, Tom; Vereecke, Evie E.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive osseous adaptations of the lumbar spine, pelvis, hip and femur characterize the emergence of the human bipedal gait with its ‘double extension’ of the lumbar spine and hip. To accommodate lumbar lordosis, the pelvis was ‘compacted’, becoming wider and shorter, as compared with the non-human apes. The hip joint acquired a much more extended position, which can be seen in a broader evolutionary context of verticalization of limbs. When loaded in a predominantly vertical position, the femur can be built lighter and longer than when it is loaded more horizontally because bending moments are smaller. Extension of the hip joint together with elongation of the femur increases effective leg length, and hence stride length, which improves energy efficiency. At the hip joint itself, the shift of the hip’s default working range to a more extended position influences concavity at the head–neck junction and femoral neck anteversion. PMID:27011802

  8. [Biomechanical principles, indications and early results of bipolar hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Bednarek, A; Gagała, J; Blacha, J

    1998-01-01

    The authors present indications and early results of bipolar hip arthroplasty in 58 patients (46 females, 12 males) aged 38-84 (mean 65 years). Femoral neck fracture in 51 patients, femoral neck pseudoarthrosis in 3, pathological fracture of the femoral neck in 2 and early type of hip osteoarthritis constituted the indication for bipolar hip replacement. No infection or dislocation has occurred. Mean follow-up was 1.5 years (6-36 months). Revision of the replacement was necessary in one patient due to faulty size of chosen implant. Results in remaining patients were rated excellent to good (mean Harris Hip Score was 93 points) with great range of movement in the operated hip. No signs of acetabular cartilage deterioration or prosthetic protrusion was observed.

  9. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the

  10. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l. PMID:27615181

  11. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l.

  12. [Clinical evaluation tools of total hip arthroplasties].

    PubMed

    Hamadouche, M

    2006-10-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is one of the most efficient hip surgery procedures enabling improved function in the vast majority of operated patients. The major long-term complication is aseptic loosening due to an inflammatory response to particle wear debris coming from the bearings. Polyethylene is the key culprit. Currently two solutions are proposed: eliminating polyethylene from the prosthetic articulation or reducing material wear. This leads to the need for reliable tools for evaluating short-term results, predictive of long-term outcome. When the innovation concerns reduction of polyethylene wear, short-term wear should be measured with software methods or radiostereometry. If the innovation concerns improvement of polyethyleneless implants, then short-term migration should be measured with EBRA or radiostereometry. In addition, the long-term retrospective evaluation of large series of patients remains of major interest provided that it is performed with survival analysis. These different methods are detailed in this study, indicating the pros and cons for each solution. PMID:17088755

  13. Hip Fracture in the Elderly: A Re-Analysis of the EPIDOS Study with Causal Bayesian Networks

    PubMed Central

    Caillet, Pascal; Klemm, Sarah; Ducher, Michel; Aussem, Alexandre; Schott, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Hip fractures commonly result in permanent disability, institutionalization or death in elderly. Existing hip-fracture predicting tools are underused in clinical practice, partly due to their lack of intuitive interpretation. By use of a graphical layer, Bayesian network models could increase the attractiveness of fracture prediction tools. Our aim was to study the potential contribution of a causal Bayesian network in this clinical setting. A logistic regression was performed as a standard control approach to check the robustness of the causal Bayesian network approach. Setting EPIDOS is a multicenter study, conducted in an ambulatory care setting in five French cities between 1992 and 1996 and updated in 2010. The study included 7598 women aged 75 years or older, in which fractures were assessed quarterly during 4 years. A causal Bayesian network and a logistic regression were performed on EPIDOS data to describe major variables involved in hip fractures occurrences. Results Both models had similar association estimations and predictive performances. They detected gait speed and mineral bone density as variables the most involved in the fracture process. The causal Bayesian network showed that gait speed and bone mineral density were directly connected to fracture and seem to mediate the influence of all the other variables included in our model. The logistic regression approach detected multiple interactions involving psychotropic drug use, age and bone mineral density. Conclusion Both approaches retrieved similar variables as predictors of hip fractures. However, Bayesian network highlighted the whole web of relation between the variables involved in the analysis, suggesting a possible mechanism leading to hip fracture. According to the latter results, intervention focusing concomitantly on gait speed and bone mineral density may be necessary for an optimal prevention of hip fracture occurrence in elderly people. PMID:25822373

  14. Reliability of Goniometric and Trigonometric Techniques for Measuring Hip-Extension Range of Motion Using the Modified Thomas Test

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, C. Brent; Halls, Amanda; Difilippo, Nicole; Cottrell, G. Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Context: Goniometric assessment of hip-extension range of motion is a standard practice in clinical rehabilitation settings. A weakness of goniometric measures is that small errors in landmarking may result in substantial measurement error. A less commonly used protocol for measuring hip range of motion involves applying trigonometric principles to the length and vertical displacement of the upper part of the lower extremity to determine hip angle; however, the reliability of this measure has never been assessed using the modified Thomas test. Objective: To compare the intrarater and interrater reliability of goniometric (GON) and trigonometric (TRIG) techniques for assessing hip-extension range of motion during the modified Thomas test. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Institutional athletic therapy facility. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 22 individuals (12 men, 10 women; age range, 18–36 years) with no pathologic knee or back conditions. Main Outcome Measure(s): Hip-extension range of motion of each participant during a modified Thomas test was assessed by 2 examiners with both GON and TRIG techniques in a randomly selected order on 2 separate days. Results: The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) revealed that the reliability of the GON technique was low for both the intrarater (ICC = 0.51, 0.54) and interrater (ICC = 0.30, 0.65) comparisons, but the reliability of the TRIG technique was high for both intrarater (ICC = 0.90, 0.95) and interrater (ICC = 0.91, 0.94) comparisons. Single-factorial repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed no mean differences in scoring within or between examiners for either measurement protocol, whereas a difference was observed when comparing the TRIG and GON tests due to the differences in procedures used to identify landmarks. Conclusions: Using the TRIG technique to measure hip-extension range of motion during the modified Thomas test results in superior intrarater and interrater

  15. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  16. Sex differences in pelvic and hip flexibility in men and women matched for sit-and-reach score.

    PubMed

    Mier, Constance M; Shapiro, Belinda S

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test sex differences in sagittal plane thoracic (T), lumbar (L), and pelvic (P) angles measured during the sit-and-reach (SR) test and hip joint angle during a passive straight leg raise (SLR) test in men and women matched for SR scores. Thirty-five men and 35 women performed a standard SR and SLR test. Among the 70 subjects, 25 male and female pairs were identified using <5% difference in the SR score as the pairing criterion. Both SR and SLR tests were videotaped and subsequently analyzed using a computer software angle tool to measure T, L, and P angles during the SR test and hip joint angle during the SLR test. In paired men (M) and women (W), P angle (M: 96.6 ± 9.4° vs. W: 104.7 ± 12.4°) and hip joint angle (M: 87.1 ± 10.5° vs. W: 100.4 ± 12.1°) were lower and L angle (M: 26.3 ± 10.8° vs. W: 21.1 ± 7.6°) was greater in men. There was no difference in the T angle (53.3 ± 11.6° vs. 51.2 ± 11.4°) between men and women. Correlation coefficient indicated that the SR score was moderately associated with the P angle in both men (r = 0.82) and women (r = 0.83), whereas the traditional criterion measure for hip flexibility, SLR hip joint angle, demonstrated a relatively low correlation to SR scores in both men (r = 0.60) and women (r = 0.56). These data indicate that the SR score does not distinguish spine and pelvic flexibility differences in men and women and does not adequately assess hip flexibility.

  17. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-05-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  18. Treatment efficacy of etanercept and MTX combination therapy for ankylosing spondylitis hip joint lesion in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lian, Fan; Yang, Xiuyan; Liang, Liuqin; Xu, Hanshi; Zhan, Zhongping; Qiu, Qian; Ye, Yujin

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of etanercept and MTX (methotrexate) combination therapy in Chinese patients with ankylosing spondylitis hip joint lesion, the possible courses and maintenance protocol, altogether 97 ankylosing spondylitis patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria with hip joint lesion were enrolled in a 12-month trial treated with combined etanercept and MTX. All these patients were required to be poor responders to SSZ (Sulfasalazine) or MTX therapy for 6 consecutive months or the longer. Etanercept was administered subcutaneously twice a week at a fixed dosage of 25 mg for the first six months, followed by 25 mg once a week in patients with good control of both symptoms and radiological progression, or twice a week for another six months in patients with BASDAI > or = 4. Combined MTX was administered intravenously once a week at the dosage of 15 mg. Demographics, clinical and laboratory features, physical function and quality of life using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Harris hip score, and radiological assessment using the BASRI-hip index were recorded. Most patients achieved pain release at the end point of assessment. Significant improvement in Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) (P < 0.05), Bath AS Functional Activity Index (BASFI) (P < 0.05), and Harris hip score (P < 0.05) was demonstrated. Radiographic progression was recorded as no exacerbation or alleviated. Larger interval between two etanercept administrations would provide similar advantages to standard method and possibly less adverse events if MTX was combined. Etanercept and MTX combination therapy was beneficial to ankylosing spondylitis patients with hip joint lesion, and staged dosage deduction in the long term proved to be effective as well as adverse event preventing.

  19. Structural patterns of the proximal femur in relation to age and hip fracture risk in women.

    PubMed

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Harnish, Roy; Saeed, Isra; Streeper, Timothy; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Amin, Shreyasee; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Therneau, Terry M; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Melton, L Joseph; Keyak, Joyce H; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Khosla, Sundeep; Harris, Tamara B; Lang, Thomas F

    2013-11-01

    Fractures of the proximal femur are the most devastating outcome of osteoporosis. It is generally understood that age-related changes in hip structure confer increased risk, but there have been few explicit comparisons of such changes in healthy subjects to those with hip fracture. In this study, we used quantitative computed tomography and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to identify three-dimensional internal structural patterns of the proximal femur associated with age and with incident hip fracture. A population-based cohort of 349 women representing a broad age range (21-97years) was included in this study, along with a cohort of 222 older women (mean age 79±7years) with (n=74) and without (n=148) incident hip fracture. Images were spatially normalized to a standardized space, and age- and fracture-specific morphometric features were identified based on statistical maps of shape features described as local changes of bone volume. Morphometric features were visualized as maps of local contractions and expansions, and significance was displayed as Student's t-test statistical maps. Significant age-related changes included local expansions of regions low in volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and local contractions of regions high in vBMD. Some significant fracture-related features resembled an accentuated aging process, including local expansion of the superior aspect of the trabecular bone compartment in the femoral neck, with contraction of the adjoining cortical bone. However, other features were observed only in the comparison of hip fracture subjects with age-matched controls including focal contractions of the cortical bone at the superior aspect of the femoral neck, the lateral cortical bone just inferior to the greater trochanter, and the anterior intertrochanteric region. Results of this study support the idea that the spatial distribution of morphometric features is relevant to age-related changes in bone and independent to fracture risk. In women

  20. Common questions about developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan C; Runge, Melissa M; Nye, Nathaniel S

    2014-12-15

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is a common musculoskeletal condition in newborns. Infants with developmental dysplasia of the hip, whether treated or untreated, have a higher incidence of early-onset hip osteoarthritis in adulthood. Evidence to support universal screening by physical examination or ultrasonography is limited and often conflicting. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence that screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip prevents adverse outcomes. Physical examination screening is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America. These organizations recommend use of the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers to screen infants up to three months of age. Several recent studies support starting assessment for limited hip abduction at eight weeks of age, which is the most sensitive test for developmental dysplasia of the hip from this age on. Infants with overtly dislocated or dislocatable hips should be referred to an orthopedist on a priority basis at the time of diagnosis. Infants with equivocal hip examination findings at birth can be reexamined in two weeks. If there is subluxation or dislocation at the follow-up examination, referral should be made at that time. If the examination findings are still equivocal, the infant can undergo ultrasonography of the hips or be reexamined every few weeks through the first six weeks of life. Although equivocal findings commonly resolve spontaneously, infants with persistent equivocal findings of developmental dysplasia of the hip longer than six weeks should be evaluated by an orthopedist. Treatment generally involves flexion-abduction splinting. The benefits of treatment are unclear, and there are risks to treatment, most notably an increased occurrence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. PMID:25591184

  1. Bernese periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia: Surgical technique and indications

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    For young, active patients with healthy hip cartilage, pelvic osteotomy is a surgical option in to address hip pain and to improve mechanical loading conditions related to dysplasia. Hip dysplasia may lead to arthrosis at an early age due to poor coverage of the femoral head and abnormal loading of the joint articulation. In patients with symptomatic dysplasia and closed triradiate cartilage (generally over age 10), including adolescents and young adults (generally up to around age 40), the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a durable technique for addressing underlying structural deformity. The PAO involves a modified Smith-Petersen approach. Advantages of the Bernese osteotomy include preservation of the weight-bearing posterior column of the hemi-pelvis, preservation of the acetabular blood supply, maintenance of the hip abductor musculature, and the ability to effect powerful deformity correction about an ideal center of rotation. There is an increasing body of evidence that preservation of the native hip can be improved through pelvic osteotomy. In contrast to hip osteotomy and joint preservation, the role of total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients with correctable hip deformity remains controversial. Moreover, the durability of hip replacement in young patients is inherently limited. Pelvic osteotomy should be considered the preferred method to address correctable structural deformity of the hip in the young, active patient with developmental dysplasia. The Bernese PAO is technically demanding, yet offers reproducible results with good long-term survivorship in carefully selected patients with preserved cartilage and the ability to meet the demands of rehabilitation. PMID:27190755

  2. Are Hip-Specific Items Useful in a Quality of Life Questionnaire for Patients with Hip Fractures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Tsauo, Jau-Yih

    2009-01-01

    Researchers measure the significance of hip fracture by the patient's impairment. The patient's quality of life (QOL) is usually also substantially affected. However, there is no specific quality of life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with hip fractures. This study was designed to determine whether adding a new set of specific questions about…

  3. Protocol of plain radiographs, hip ultrasound, and triple phase bone scans in the evaluation of the painful pediatric hip

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.E.; Seibert, J.J.; Aronson, J.; Williamson, S.L.; Glasier, C.M.; Rodgers, A.B.; Corbitt, S.L.

    1988-04-01

    A useful protocol for the evaluation of hip pain in the pediatric patient, using a combination of plain radiographs, hip ultrasound (US), and triple phase radionuclide bone scans is presented. Patients with hip pain were initially evaluated by plain radiographs of the pelvis and hips. If no diagnosis was reached, the hips were studied for effusions by real-time hip ultrasonography. If an effusion was present, the joint was aspirated for diagnosis. If no effusion was present by US or if no diagnosis was reached by aspiration, triple phase radionuclide bone scans were performed. Fifty patients were evaluated by this prospective protocol, and the diagnosis was reached in 48 of the 50 cases (10 by plain radiographs, 16 by US, and aspiration of the joint, and 22 by triple phase bone scans). Hip effusions were found in 20 patients by US, with no false positives or false negatives. Previous studies for detecting effusions by US have emphasized absolute measurements of the capsular width, but we report a typical appearance of the hip capsule when fluid is present (a bulging convex capsule). When no effusion is present, the capsule is concave and parallels the long axis of the femoral neck.

  4. Hip Hop Culture's OGs: A Narrative Inquiry into the Intersection of Hip Hop Culture, Black Males and Their Schooling Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Ian P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a critical race lens, this narrative study employs a focus group design to explore the intersections between black males, hip hop culture and schooling experiences. To provide a sociocultural grounding, this study first reviews the research literature around hip hop culture.s sociocultural development and its impact as a culture force that…

  5. Hip-Hop Is My Passport! Using Hip-Hop and Digital Literacies to Understand Global Citizenship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Akesha Monique

    2013-01-01

    Hip-hop has exploded around the world among youth. It is not simply an American source of entertainment; it is a global cultural movement that provides a voice for youth worldwide who have not been able to express their "cultural world" through mainstream media. The emerging field of critical hip-hop pedagogy has produced little…

  6. Implant retention after acute and hematogenous periprosthetic hip and knee infections: Whom, when and how?

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios K; Soranoglou, Vasileios; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Poultsides, Lazaros A

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the hip and the knee are grossly classified as early post-operative, acute hematogenous and late chronic infections. Whereas two-stage exchange arthroplasty is the standard of care in North America for treating chronic infections, irrigation and debridement (I and D) with retention of implants has been used in an attempt to treat the other two types of PJIs. The rationale of this approach is that a PJI may be eradicated without the need of explanting the prostheses, as long as it has not transitioned into a chronic state. With the present paper, we review current evidence regarding the role of I and D with implant retention for treating PJIs of the hip and the knee. While a very wide range of success rates is reported in different studies, a short period of time between initiation of symptoms and intervention seems to play a prominent role with regards to a successful outcome. Moreover, pathogens of higher virulence and resistance to antibiotics are associated with a poorer result. Specific comorbidities have been also correlated with a less favorable outcome. Finally, one should proceed with serial I and Ds only under the condition that a predefined, aggressive protocol is applied. In conclusion, when treating a PJI of the hip or the knee, all the above factors should be considered in order to decide whether the patient is likely to benefit from this approach.

  7. Tribolayer Formation in a Metal-on-Metal (MoM) Hip Joint: An Electrochemical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, MT; Nagelli, C; Pourzal, R; Fischer, A; Laurent, MP; Jacobs, JJ; Wimmer, MA

    2013-01-01

    The demand for total hip replacement (THR) surgery is increasing in the younger population due to faster rehabilitation and more complete restoration of function. Up to 2009, metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joint bearings were a popular choice due to their design flexibility, post-operative stability and relatively low wear rates. The main wear mechanisms that occur along the bearing surface of MoM joints are tribochemical reactions that deposit a mixture of wear debris, metal ions and organic matrix of decomposed proteins known as a tribolayer. No in-depth electrochemical studies have been reported on the structure and characteristics of this tribolayer or about the parameters involved in its formation. In this study, we conducted an electrochemical investigation of different surfaces (bulk-like: control, nano-crystalline: new implant and tribolayer surface: retrieved implant) made out of two commonly used hip CoCrMo alloys (high-carbon and low-carbon). As per ASTM standard, cyclic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were conducted. The results obtained from electrochemical parameters for different surfaces clearly indicated a reduction in corrosion for the tribolayer surface (Icorr: 0.76 μA/cm2). Further, polarization resistance (Rp:2.39±0.60MΩ/cm2) and capacitance (Cdl:15.20±0.75 μF/cm2) indicated variation in corrosion kinetics for the tribolayer surface, that attributed to its structure and stability in a simulated body environment. PMID:24099949

  8. Implant retention after acute and hematogenous periprosthetic hip and knee infections: Whom, when and how?

    PubMed

    Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios K; Soranoglou, Vasileios; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Poultsides, Lazaros A

    2016-09-18

    Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the hip and the knee are grossly classified as early post-operative, acute hematogenous and late chronic infections. Whereas two-stage exchange arthroplasty is the standard of care in North America for treating chronic infections, irrigation and debridement (I and D) with retention of implants has been used in an attempt to treat the other two types of PJIs. The rationale of this approach is that a PJI may be eradicated without the need of explanting the prostheses, as long as it has not transitioned into a chronic state. With the present paper, we review current evidence regarding the role of I and D with implant retention for treating PJIs of the hip and the knee. While a very wide range of success rates is reported in different studies, a short period of time between initiation of symptoms and intervention seems to play a prominent role with regards to a successful outcome. Moreover, pathogens of higher virulence and resistance to antibiotics are associated with a poorer result. Specific comorbidities have been also correlated with a less favorable outcome. Finally, one should proceed with serial I and Ds only under the condition that a predefined, aggressive protocol is applied. In conclusion, when treating a PJI of the hip or the knee, all the above factors should be considered in order to decide whether the patient is likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:27672567

  9. Novel anthropomorphic hip phantom corrects systemic interscanner differences in proximal femoral vBMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaretti, S.; Carpenter, R. D.; Saeed, I.; Burghardt, A. J.; Yu, L.; Bruesewitz, M.; Khosla, S.; Lang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is increasingly used in osteoporosis studies to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone quality and strength. However, QCT is confronted by technical issues in the clinical research setting, such as potentially confounding effects of body size on vBMD measurements and lack of standard approaches to scanner cross-calibration, which affects measurements of vBMD in multicenter settings. In this study, we addressed systematic inter-scanner differences and subject-dependent body size errors using a novel anthropomorphic hip phantom, containing a calibration hip to estimate correction equations, and a contralateral test hip to assess the quality of the correction. We scanned this phantom on four different scanners and we applied phantom-derived corrections to in vivo images of 16 postmenopausal women scanned on two scanners. From the phantom study, we found that vBMD decreased with increasing phantom size in three of four scanners and that inter-scanner variations increased with increasing phantom size. In the in vivo study, we observed that inter-scanner corrections reduced systematic inter-scanner mean vBMD differences but that the inter-scanner precision error was still larger than expected from known intra-scanner precision measurements. In conclusion, inter-scanner corrections and body size influence should be considered when measuring vBMD from QCT images.

  10. Delirium detection and improved delirium management in older patients hospitalized for hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Todd, Kristine S; Barry, Jean; Hoppough, Susan; McConnell, Eleanor

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is a common and potentially devastating problem for older patients following hip fracture. Although early detection is recommended, description and evaluation of standardized approaches are scarce. The aims of this quality improvement project were to: (1) implement a clinical algorithm for improving delirium detection and management and (2) assess the impact of the clinical algorithm on length of stay, discharge disposition and patient satisfaction. The pilot study was implemented on an orthopedic unit to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical protocol for delirium detection and management to improve outcomes. Outcomes of 33 elderly post-operative hip fracture patients were compared to historical controls from the same unit. Delirium was detected in 18% of patients. Length of stay was reduced by 22% (P < .001), discharge disposition showed a 13% improvement (P = .17) and patient satisfaction scores showed a 15% (P = .15) improvement post-intervention. Implementation of a clinical algorithm to promote early detection and treatment of delirium in post-operative hip fracture patients is feasible and associated with improved outcomes.

  11. Implant retention after acute and hematogenous periprosthetic hip and knee infections: Whom, when and how?

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios K; Soranoglou, Vasileios; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Poultsides, Lazaros A

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the hip and the knee are grossly classified as early post-operative, acute hematogenous and late chronic infections. Whereas two-stage exchange arthroplasty is the standard of care in North America for treating chronic infections, irrigation and debridement (I and D) with retention of implants has been used in an attempt to treat the other two types of PJIs. The rationale of this approach is that a PJI may be eradicated without the need of explanting the prostheses, as long as it has not transitioned into a chronic state. With the present paper, we review current evidence regarding the role of I and D with implant retention for treating PJIs of the hip and the knee. While a very wide range of success rates is reported in different studies, a short period of time between initiation of symptoms and intervention seems to play a prominent role with regards to a successful outcome. Moreover, pathogens of higher virulence and resistance to antibiotics are associated with a poorer result. Specific comorbidities have been also correlated with a less favorable outcome. Finally, one should proceed with serial I and Ds only under the condition that a predefined, aggressive protocol is applied. In conclusion, when treating a PJI of the hip or the knee, all the above factors should be considered in order to decide whether the patient is likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:27672567

  12. Arthroscopy of the hip for patients with mild to moderate developmental dysplasia of the hip and femoroacetabular impingement: Outcomes following hip arthroscopy for treatment of chondrolabral damage.

    PubMed

    Fukui, K; Trindade, C A C; Briggs, K K; Philippon, M J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patient-reported outcomes of patients with mild to moderate developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) undergoing arthroscopy of the hip in the treatment of chondrolabral pathology. A total of 28 patients with a centre-edge angle between 15° and 19° were identified from an institutional database. Their mean age was 34 years (18 to 53), with 12 female and 16 male patients. All underwent labral treatment and concomitant correction of FAI. There were nine reoperations, with two patients requiring revision arthroscopy, two requiring periacetabular osteotomy and five needing total hip arthroplasty. Patients who required further major surgery were more likely to be older, male, and to have more severe DDH with a larger alpha angle and decreased joint space. At a mean follow-up of 42 months (24 to 89), the mean modified Harris hip score improved from 59 (20 to 98) to 82 (45 to 100; p < 0.001). The mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score improved from 30 (1 to 61) to 16 (0 to 43; p < 0.001). Median patient satisfaction was 9.0/10 (1 to 10). Patients reported excellent improvement in function following arthroscopy of the hip. This study shows that with proper patient selection, arthroscopy of the hip can be successful in the young patient with mild to moderate DDH and FAI. PMID:26430004

  13. Effects of Compliance on Trunk and Hip Integrative Neuromuscular Training on Hip Abductor Strength in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    SUGIMOTO, DAI; MYER, GREGORY D.; BUSH, HEATHER M.; HEWETT, TIMOTHY E.

    2014-01-01

    Sugimoto, D, Myer, GD, Bush, HM, and Hewett, TE. Effects of compliance on trunk and hip integrative neuromuscular training on hip abductor strength in female athletes. Recent studies demonstrate the link between reduced hip abductor strength and increased risk for knee injury such as patellofemoral pain syndrome in women athletes. Meta-analytic reports indicate that the efficacy of integrative neuromuscular training (INT) is associated with compliance to the prescribed programming. Thus, the purpose was to investigate the compliance effects of a trunk and hip–focused INT exercises on hip abductor strength in young women athletes. In a controlled laboratory study design, 21 high school women volleyball players (mean age = 15.6 ± 1.4 years, weight = 64.0 ± 7.4 kg, height = 171.5 ± 7.0 cm) completed isokinetic hip abductor strength testing in pre- and postintervention, which consisted of 5 phases of supervised progressive trunk and hip–focused INT exercises twice a week for 10 weeks. The compliance effects were analyzed based on the changed hip abductor strength values between pre- and postintervention and 3 different compliance groups using 1-way analysis of variance and Pearson’s correlation coefficients. The participants in the high-compliance group demonstrated significant hip abductor peak torque increases compared with noncompliance group (p = 0.02), but not between moderate-compliance and noncompliance groups (p = 0.27). The moderate correlation coefficient value (r = 0.56) was recorded between the isokinetic hip abductor peak torque changes and the 3 compliance groups. Because of the observed significant effects and moderate linear association, the effectiveness of a trunk and hip–focused INT protocol to improve hip abduction strength seems dependent on compliance. Compliance of trunk and hip–focused INT is an important aspect of increasing hip abductor strength increase in young women athletes. PMID:24751656

  14. Is prematurity a risk factor for developmental dysplasia of the hip? : a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Orak, M M; Onay, T; Gümüştaş, S A; Gürsoy, T; Muratlí, H H

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate prematurity as a risk factor for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). The hips of 221 infants (88 female, 133 male, mean age 31.11 weeks; standard deviation (sd) 2.51) who were born in the 34th week of gestation or earlier, and those of 246 infants (118 female, 128 male, mean age 40.22 weeks; sd 0.36) who were born in the 40th week of gestation, none of whom had risk factors for DDH, were compared using physical examination and ultrasound according to the technique of Graf, within one week, after the correction of gestational age to the 40th week after birth or one week since birth, respectively. Both hips of all infants were included in the study. Ortolani's and Barlow's tests and restricted abduction were accepted as positive findings on examination. There was a statistically significant difference between pre- and full-term infants, according to the incidence of mature and immature hips (p < 0.001). The difference in the proportion of infants with an α angle < 60° between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The incidence of pathological dysplasia (α angle < 50 º) was not significantly different in the two groups (p = 1.000). The Barlow sign was present in two (0.5%) pre-term infants and in 14 (2.8%) full-term infants. These results suggests that prematurity is not a predisposing factor for DDH. PMID:25922469

  15. The Inflammatory Phenotype in Failed Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Correlates with Blood Metal Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Paukkeri, Erja-Leena; Korhonen, Riku; Hämäläinen, Mari; Pesu, Marko; Eskelinen, Antti; Moilanen, Teemu; Moilanen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hip arthroplasty is the standard treatment of a painful hip destruction. The use of modern metal-on-metal (MOM) bearing surfaces gained popularity in total hip arthroplasties during the last decade. Recently, worrisome failures due to adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD), including pseudotumor response, have been widely reported. However, the pathogenesis of this reaction remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ARMD response by flow cytometry approach. Methods Sixteen patients with a failed Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) hip prosthesis were included in the study. Samples of pseudotumor tissues collected during revision surgery were degraded by enzyme digestion and cells were typed by flow cytometry. Whole blood chromium and cobalt concentrations were analyzed with mass spectrometry before revision surgery. Results Flow cytometry analysis showed that the peri-implant pseudotumor tissue expressed two principal phenotypes, namely macrophage-dominated and T-lymphocyte-dominated response; the average portions being 54% (macrophages) and 25% (T-lymphocytes) in macrophage-dominated inflammation and 20% (macrophages) and 54% (T-lymphocytes) in T-lymphocyte-dominated response. The percentages of B-lymphocytes and granulocytes were lower in both phenotypes. Interestingly, the levels of blood chromium and cobalt were significantly higher in patients with macrophage-dominated response. Conclusions The results suggest that the adverse tissue reactions induced by MOM wear particles contain heterogeneous pathogeneses and that the metal levels are an important factor in the determination of the inflammatory phenotype. The present results support the hypothesis that higher metal levels cause cytotoxicity and tissue injury and macrophages are recruited to clear the necrotic debris. On the other hand, the adverse response developed in association with lower metal levels is T-lymphocyte-dominated and is likely to reflect

  16. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders.

  17. The femoral head/neck offset and hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Beaulé, P E; Harvey, N; Zaragoza, E; Le Duff, M J; Dorey, F J

    2007-01-01

    Because the femoral head/neck junction is preserved in hip resurfacing, patients may be at greater risk of impingement, leading to abnormal wear patterns and pain. We assessed femoral head/neck offset in 63 hips undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and in 56 hips presenting with non-arthritic pain secondary to femoroacetabular impingement. Most hips undergoing resurfacing (57%; 36) had an offset ratio hips the mean offset ratio was 0.137 (0.04 to 0.23), with the offset ratio correlating negatively to an increasing alpha angle. An offset ratio or= 50.5 degrees. Most hips undergoing resurfacing have an abnormal femoral head/neck offset, which is best assessed in the sagittal plane. PMID:17259408

  18. Hip arthroplasty after treatment failure in intertrochanteric femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Gagała, Jacek; Blacha, Jan; Twaróg, Zbigniew

    2005-10-28

    Background. Treatment failure in intertrochanteric fractures of the femur leads to pain and limitations of limb function. Methods of treatment allowing for union in order to preserve the proximal femur are undertaken in younger patients. Older patients who have poor quality bone stock and bone loss in the proximal femur are treated with hip arthroplasty. The aim of our study was to perform a long-range follow-up on patients treated with hip arthroplasty after failure of peritrochanteric fracture treatment. Material and methods. We studied 10 patients (6 men and 4 women, average age 61 years) seen after treatment failure in peritrochanteric fractures during the period 1998 - 2003 in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Departament at the Skubiszewski Medical University of Lublin. Seven patients were treated with hemiarthroplasty, and three with total hip replacement. Three long femoral stems were used. Results. One patent died in the early postoperative period. There were two dislocations of hip replacements. An increase in Harris Hip Score was noted, from an average 25 points preoperatively to an average 85 points in long-term follow-up. There was one revision arthroplasty due to breakage of the ceramic cup and head of a Mittelmeier prosthesis. Conclusions. Patients treated with hip arthroplasty after treatment failures in peritrochanteric fractures of the femur can achieve a pain-free hip and good limb function.

  19. Hip and upper extremity kinematics in youth baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Holt, Taylor; Oliver, Gretchen D

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between dynamic hip rotational range of motion and upper extremity kinematics during baseball pitching. Thirty-one youth baseball pitchers (10.87 ± 0.92 years; 150.03 ± 5.48 cm; 44.83 ± 8.04 kg) participated. A strong correlation was found between stance hip rotation and scapular upward rotation at maximum shoulder external rotation (r = 0.531, P = 0.002) and at ball release (r = 0.536, P = 0.002). No statistically significant correlations were found between dynamic hip rotational range of motion and passive hip range of motion. Hip range of motion deficits can constrain pelvis rotation and limit energy generation in the lower extremities. Shoulder pathomechanics can then develop as greater responsibility is placed on the shoulder to generate the energy lost from the proximal segments, increasing risk of upper extremity injury. Additionally, it appears that passive seated measurements of hip range of motion may not accurately reflect the dynamic range of motion of the hips through the progression of the pitch cycle.

  20. Calibration Markers for Digital Templating in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boese, Christoph Kolja; Lechler, Philipp; Rose, Leonard; Dargel, Jens; Oppermann, Johannes; Eysel, Peer; Geiges, Hansjörg; Bredow, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Digital templating with external calibration markers is the standard method for planning total hip arthroplasty. We determined the geometrical basis of the magnification effect, compared magnification with external and internal calibration markers, and examined the influence on magnification of the position of the calibration markers, patient weight, and body mass index (BMI). A formula was derived to calculate magnification with internal and external calibration markers, informed by 100 digital radiographs of the pelvis. Intraclass correlations between the measured and calculated values and the strength of relationships between magnification, position and distance of calibration markers and height, weight, and BMI were sought. There was a weak correlation between magnification of internal and external calibration markers (r = 0.297–0.361; p < 0.01). Intraclass correlations were 0.882–1.000 (p = 0.000) for all parameters. There were also weak correlations between magnification of internal and external calibration markers and weight and BMI (r = 0.420, p = 0.000; r = 0.428, p = 0.000, respectively). The correlation between external and internal calibration markers was poor, indicating the need for more accurate calibration methods. While weight and BMI weakly correlated with the magnification of markers, future studies should examine this phenomenon in more detail. PMID:26168410

  1. Calibration Markers for Digital Templating in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boese, Christoph Kolja; Lechler, Philipp; Rose, Leonard; Dargel, Jens; Oppermann, Johannes; Eysel, Peer; Geiges, Hansjörg; Bredow, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Digital templating with external calibration markers is the standard method for planning total hip arthroplasty. We determined the geometrical basis of the magnification effect, compared magnification with external and internal calibration markers, and examined the influence on magnification of the position of the calibration markers, patient weight, and body mass index (BMI). A formula was derived to calculate magnification with internal and external calibration markers, informed by 100 digital radiographs of the pelvis. Intraclass correlations between the measured and calculated values and the strength of relationships between magnification, position and distance of calibration markers and height, weight, and BMI were sought. There was a weak correlation between magnification of internal and external calibration markers (r = 0.297-0.361; p < 0.01). Intraclass correlations were 0.882-1.000 (p = 0.000) for all parameters. There were also weak correlations between magnification of internal and external calibration markers and weight and BMI (r = 0.420, p = 0.000; r = 0.428, p = 0.000, respectively). The correlation between external and internal calibration markers was poor, indicating the need for more accurate calibration methods. While weight and BMI weakly correlated with the magnification of markers, future studies should examine this phenomenon in more detail.

  2. Let Me Blow Your Mind: Hip Hop Feminist Futures in Theory and Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Treva B.

    2015-01-01

    This essay brings together key theoretical interventions in hip-hop feminism to explore the continued, but undervalued, significance of hip-hop feminism in urban education. More specifically, the essay challenges narrow conceptualizations of the "hip hop subject" as Black and male by using hip-hop feminist theory to incorporate the lived…

  3. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint... replace a hip joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint... replace a hip joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint... replace a hip joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint... replace a hip joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint... replace a hip joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has...

  13. Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life: Hip-Hop Pedagogy and the Politics of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Marc Lamont

    2009-01-01

    For over a decade, educators have looked to capitalize on the appeal of hip-hop culture, sampling its language, techniques, and styles as a way of reaching out to students. But beyond a fashionable hipness, what does hip-hop have to offer our schools? In this revelatory new book, Marc Lamont Hill shows how a serious engagement with hip-hop culture…

  14. Compliance with external hip protectors in nursing homes in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Forsen, L; Sandvig, S; Schuller, A; Sogaard, A

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate compliance with hip protector use. Design: Observational prospective study. Setting: 19 nursing homes (1040 beds). Subjects: All residents during an 18 month period were included in this study. Intervention: Hip protectors were introduced as a regular part of health care service for all residents. Residents at high risk were encouraged to use hip protectors regularly. Each nursing home had a contact person. Main outcome measures: The percentage of residents accepting the hip protector offer, probability of continued use, reasons for terminating use, and percentage of falls with hip protector were evaluated. Results: Fifty five percent of the residents accepted the hip protector offer. The percentage increased by age, but showed no significant dependence on gender, profession of the contact person, or size of nursing home. The probability of continued use showed no significant dependence on age and gender. Nursing homes with a nurse as contact person showed 51% higher risk of residents terminating regular hip protector use than nursing homes with a physiotherapist as contact person (relative risk (RR) 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11 to 2.05, p = 0.008). The corresponding result for large (75–92 beds) compared with small (24–68 beds) nursing homes was RR = 1.44 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.02, p = 0.036). Seventy six percent of 2323 falls occurred while using hip protectors. Conclusion: The contact person and size of the nursing home seemed to be important factors for continued use of hip protectors while age and gender seemed to be less important. PMID:15583255

  15. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques.

    PubMed

    Runge, C F; Shupert, C L; Horak, F B; Zajac, F E

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  16. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  17. Recurrences of transient synovitis of the hip.

    PubMed Central

    Illingworth, C M

    1983-01-01

    Thirty six children with transient synovitis of the hip had a total of 80 recurrences, 69 of them personally observed, and 11 described by the mother. No features distinguished the initial attack of those who had a recurrence from that of the 18 children who have not so far had a recurrence. We analysed the total of 126 episodes. In 72 there was evidence of an associated infection from the history, clinical signs, and a raised antistreptolysin O titre or isolation of a pathogen from a throat swab. The prognosis is difficult to assess because the symptoms, signs, and special investigations are not specific. Recurrences can occur after many years without symptoms. PMID:6614977

  18. Air Force highly integrated photonics (HIP) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Merton A.; Schantz, Howard J.; Newcomer, Stephen O.; Whaley, Gregory J.

    2006-05-01

    This presentation will describe the Air Force Research Laboratory Highly Integrated Photonics Program (AF HIP) and its objective to integrate on a monolithic device, all of the optical components required to serve as a bus coupler in an all optical data communication network. This research and development program utilizes advanced technologies in silicon on insulator (SOI) and silica planar lightwave circuits (PLC) to design, develop, characterize, and demonstrate highly integrated photonic devices that can be transitioned into both current and emerging tactical platforms for the U.S. Air Force. This effort strives to overcome several existing constraints with respect to the integration and packaging aspects of the current generation of COTS optical devices. Monolithic integration (chips fabricated out of a single material system) remains the ultimate vision for integrated optics.

  19. The debris disc around HIP 17439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüppler, Christian; Löhne, Torsten; Krivov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme DUNES the debris disc around the K2 V star HIP 17439 was observed. In PACS images the disc emission is spatially clearly extended. A simultaneous analysis of photometric observations and radial brightness profiles from the resolved images provides valuable hints for the disc structure. In an analytical model we adopted power laws for the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust and tested two different scenarios: (1) a broad dust ring with a radial extent of about 200AU, (2) two independent dust rings separated by a gap of several tens of AU. Both models fit the spectral energy distribution and the radial profiles quite well. In case (1) the parameters found are consistent with dust stemming from an outer planetesimal belt at ~140AU and strong transport mechanisms that drag the particles inward. Model (2) would imply two planetesimal belts, producing a narrow inner and wider outer distribution of dust.

  20. [Exercise therapy in hip or knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Dekker, Joost; Peter, Wilfred; van der Leeden, Marike; Lems, Willem F

    2011-01-01

    "Exercise is medicine": exercise therapy reduces pain and activity limitations in osteoarthritis of the knee and is likely to have the same effects in osteoarthritis of the hip. Further research into exercise therapy is needed, since disease-modifying drugs are not available, pain medication can cause side effects, and surgical interventions are preferably applied in an advanced stage of disease. Classical exercise therapy is aimed at improving muscle strength, aerobic capacity, range of joint motion, and training of walking and activities of daily living. New modalities of targeted exercise therapy are currently being developed, aimed at the correction of low levels of activity and to correct instability of the knee. Weight loss, preferably combined with exercise therapy, reduces pain and activity limitations in osteoarthritis patients who are overweight. Modalities of exercise therapy adapted to comorbid conditions are currently being developed.