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Sample records for star study nct00237913

  1. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  2. Theoretical Study of White Dwarf Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, Ajit; Koetter, Ted; Rivera, Ruben; Diaz, Juan

    2015-04-01

    We continue our interest in the computational simulation of the astrophysical phenomena with a study of gravitationally-bound binary stars, composed of at least one white dwarf star. Of particular interest to astrophysicists are the conditions inside a white dwarf star in the time frame leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova, for an understanding of the massive stellar explosions. In addition, the studies of the evolution of white dwarfs could serve as promising probes of theories of gravitation. We developed FORTRAN computer programs to implement our models for white dwarfs and other stars. These codes allow for different sizes and masses of stars. Simulations were done in the mass interval from 0.1 to 2.0 solar masses. Our goal was to obtain both atmospheric and orbital parameters. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant observational data. The data are further analyzed to identify trends in terms of sizes and masses of stars. We hope to extend our computational studies to blue giant stars in the future. Research Supported by National Science Foundation.

  3. The Center for Star Formation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D.; Bell, K. R.; Laughlin, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Center for Star Formation Studies, a consortium of scientists from the Space Science Division at Ames and the Astronomy Departments of the University of California at Berkeley and Santa Cruz, conducts a coordinated program of theoretical research on star and planet formation. Under the directorship of D. Hollenbach (Ames), the Center supports postdoctoral fellows, senior visitors, and students; meets regularly at Ames to exchange ideas and to present informal seminars on current research; hosts visits of outside scientists; and conducts a week-long workshop on selected aspects of star and planet formation each summer.

  4. Infrared Studies of Low Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prusti, Timo

    1992-01-01

    My thesis consists of seven infrared studies of low mass star formation. One chapter describes an all sky survey of young stars in the IRAS Point Source Catalog (IPSC). Three chapters contain studies of the Chamaeleon I star forming region. Two chapters concern star formation in the Chamaeleon II molecular cloud. Finally, one chapter deals with star formation in B209, which is a globule in the Taurus clouds. I will summarize the results of these studies in the above mentioned four categories. Advanced statistical classification methods have been used to extract a set of 5962 young stellar object candidates from the IPSC. In the selection procedure clustering properties on the sky were used in addition to the usually explored IRAS colours. A performance analysis indicates that in low mass star forming regions 87% of these objects are indeed young stars. All IRAS catalogues (IPSC, IRAS Serendipitous Survey Catalog and IRAS Faint Source Survey) have been searched for young stars born in the Chamaeleon I molecular cloud. These studies have led to the discovery of the exciting source of Herbig-Haro objects 49 and 50. Ground-based near-infrared photometry has been obtained for a majority of Chamaeleon I members in order to construct spectral energy distributions. Bolometric luminosities have been estimated for 62 out of the 81 known members to construct a luminosity function (LF). A comparison of the LF with that of the ρ Ophiuchi infrared cluster suggests that star formation has evolved further in Chamaelon I. Young stars in the Chamaeleon II star forming region have been measured in the near infrared and IRAS data has been extracted in order to construct spectral energy distributions and luminosity estimates. An additional search based on the IRAS data has been performed to find new young stellar object candidates. The spatial distribution of young stars and candidate members shows that star formation is more widespread in Chamaelon II than in the well-studied

  5. Spectroscopic studies of very old hot stars. I - NGC 246 and its exciting star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The planetary nebula NGC 246 and its exciting stars were studied, using an image-tube spectrograph at the Cassegrain focus of a 36-inch telescope. Observations of the central star indicate that it has one of the most highly excited spectra known to optical astronomers. The only lines definitely present in the spectrum are lines of C IV and O VI, although lines of He II are probably present. Since nitrogen lines (in any ionization state) are absent, the stellar spectrum suggests that the star has experienced the triple-alpha process. Nebular observations were used to estimate the atmospheric properties of the exciting star by the Zanstra method. The results are found to correlate well with the spectral appearance of the star. Comparison of the properties of the star and surrounding nebula with Paczynski's evolutionary tracks for planetary nuclei suggests that the star is very near the point of exhaustion of its nuclear fuels.

  6. Gold-Star Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1983

    1983-01-01

    More than 50 starter ideas for social studies projects and units for the primary and intermediate grades are presented. These help develop children's skills in social studies, reading, handwriting, and language arts, and stir their interest in local history and government. Activities can be used for new projects or to enrich ongoing ones. (PP)

  7. Photometric and spectroscopic study of candidate Be stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KT, Paul; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Mathew, Blesson; Mennickent, Ronald E.; Sabogal, Beatriz

    2011-07-01

    Mennickent et al. (2002) presented a catalogue of 1056 Be star candidates in the Small Magellanic cloud (SMC) by studying light curve variation using OGLE II data base. They classified these Be star candidates of the SMC in four categories: Type 1 stars showing outbursts (139 stars); Type 2 stars showing sudden luminosity jumps (154 stars); Type 3 stars showing periodic or near periodic variations (78 stars); Type 4 stars showing light curves similar to Galactic Be stars (658 stars). They suggested that Type 4 could be Be stars. On the other hand, they suggested that Type-3 stars may not be linked to the Be star phenomenon at all.

  8. Paranal Instrumentation for Star Formation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wit, Willem-Jan

    2017-06-01

    We will present the capabilities for star formation studies of some appropriate current, and future instruments at ESO's Paranal Observatory. In particular, we will discuss results by means of the the mid-infrared imager and spectrograph VISIR, the soon to be re-installed and cross-dispersed, high resolution, near-IR spectrograph CRIRES, the extreme AO instrument SPHERE, and the spectro-interferometric instruments Gravity (K-band) and MATISSE (M-, L-, N-band).

  9. Analytical study of anisotropic compact star models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, B. V.

    2017-11-01

    A simple classification is given of the anisotropic relativistic star models, resembling the one of charged isotropic solutions. On the ground of this database, and taking into account the conditions for physically realistic star models, a method is proposed for generating all such solutions. It is based on the energy density and the radial pressure as seeding functions. Numerous relations between the realistic conditions are found and the need for a graphic proof is reduced just to one pair of inequalities. This general formalism is illustrated with an example of a class of solutions with linear equation of state and simple energy density. It is found that the solutions depend on three free constants and concrete examples are given. Some other popular models are studied with the same method.

  10. Wind study of B SGs stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcos, C.; Curé, M.; Kanaan, S.; Cidale, L. S.; Haucke, M.

    2014-10-01

    The estimation of the stellar and wind parameters of B SG stars, give us important information to understand their evolution. It is known from previous studies that the A type non-rotating (or slow rotator) SGs stars can have two types of solution: one fast and one slow. Here we study the two types of solutions for eight B SGs stars (HD41117, HD42087, HD79186, HD52382, HD80077, HD52382, HD75149, HD53138) using the hydrodynamics to calculate the velocity profile and using the modified version of FASTWIND to reproduce the H_{α} line profile. Finally, we compare these results with the β Law using FASTWIND and HDUST code. We obtained less mass loss values using FASTWIND than hydrodynamic ones (in a factor between 2-3). The Wind-Luminosity Relation agrees with Kudritzki et al. (1999) for the velocity profiles β type, but for the values found with hydrodynamics the relation has a negative slope. For the ratio v_{∞}/v_{esc}, we obtained as the v_{esc} increases the v_{∞} decreases, like it was found by Curé et al. (2011) for δ-slow solutions.

  11. A kinematic study of the Lupus star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Bertout, C.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the southern star-forming region located in Lupus that constitutes one of the richest associations of T Tauri stars. Based on the convergent point (CP) method combined with a k-NN analysis we identify 109 pre-main sequence stars in this region that define the Lupus association of comoving stars, and derive individual distances for all group members.

  12. A Comparative Study of the Guo Shoujing Star Catalogue and the Ulugh Beg Star Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    The Chinese Star Catalogue by Guo Shoujing (1231-1316) contained equatorial coordinates of 678 stars, more than doubled the number of stars in previous Chinese star catalogues. In the period 1420-1437, using astronomical instruments at Samarkand Observatory, Ulugh Beg (1394-1449) made independent observations and determined star positions of 1018 stars. An analysis of two star catalogues will show the observational techniques behind them and their accuracies. Both astronomers tried to increase accuracy of measurement by enlarging the astronomical instruments. The Chinese catalogue gives equatorial coordinates of stars. The coordinates were directly read off the armillary sphere, which was mounted equatorially mounted. Sun Xiaochun (1996) suggested that the data of the existent Guo Shoujing catalogue was actually observed around 1380, at the beginning of the Ming dynasty. The Ulugh Beg catalogue gives ecliptic coordinates of stars. Does this mean they were directly measured using an ecliptic instrument? Using Fourier analysis we discover a 3 arc minute systematic error in the declinations, which are derived from the ecliptic coordinates, suggesting the data might be first measured equatorially and then converted to ecliptic coordinates, following Ptolemaic tradition. The 3 arc minute systematic error was caused by the misalignment of the instrument's pole and celestial north pole. And the Our comparative study might throw some light on transmission of astronomical knowledge and techniques between China and Central Asia in medieval times.

  13. A study of B6 stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the spectra of zeta Draconis (B6 III), beta Sextantis (B6 V), and alpha Leonis (B7 V), was made from high dispersion spectrograms which cover the spectral region 3100 A to 6700 A and from OAO 2 spectral scans covering the spectral region 1100 A to 3600 A. Profiles, equivalent widths and central intensities of many lines in the spectrum of zeta Draconis are presented, as well as for the major lines of beta Sextantis. Alpha Leonis rotates too rapidly for these measurements to be made from high resolution spectrograms. Flux envelopes for zeta Draconis and alpha Leonis, from 1100 A to 6050 A, were derived from published spectrum scans and from new scans obtained with OAO 2. Estimates of the radii and masses of these single stars are presented.

  14. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour.

  15. Studies of the neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, S.; Nandi, R.

    2017-06-01

    The physics of the neutron star crust is highly relevant for many observable phenomena like the temperature evolution of accreting neutron stars or the evolution of supernovae. In order to investigate the structure and dynamics of the crust we perform extensive molecular-dynamics-type simulations of the nucleons in the crust including the neutralizing effect of the electron background. Simulations for a range of densities, temperatures and proton-to-neutron ratios have been performed. Results for the isospin dependence of the energy per particle and nucleonic correlation functions as obtained from the simulation runs are discussed.

  16. A Calibration Study of Variable Stars in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Howell, S.; Holberg, J.; Sherry, W.

    2010-01-01

    We describe our Cycle 1 Kepler Guest Observer program "A Calibration Study of Variable Stars in the Kepler Field". We will develop enhanced data products that will support and extend the broad science goals of the Kepler mission. Our primary objective is to produce astronomical-grade light curves for individual stars or ensembles of stars that will complement the detrended light curves produced by the Kepler data pipeline. Relying upon the planned calibration efforts of the Kepler Science Team, we will investigate the possibility of producing contiguous light curves which extend the planned current monthly time base differential light curves to at least a quarterly basis and possibly a time base covering the entire 3.5 year lifetime of the Kepler primary mission. This extended time base capability will support Kepler mission efforts to characterize the nature of the host stars of detected planetary candidates; in particular we will be able to gain better insight to the nature of brightness fluctuations over days to months which might be caused by chromospheric activity due to decades-long activity cycles of stars like the Sun. This calibration effort will place stars with detected transits in the context of the much larger sample of stars lacking transits. Our poster will show several Kepler Mission light curves of variable stars.

  17. Submillimeter studies of main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerman, B.; Becklin, E. E.

    1993-01-01

    JCMT maps of the 800-micron emission from Vega, Fomalhaut, and Beta Pictoris are interpreted to indicate that they are not ringed by large reservoirs of distant orbiting dust particles that are too cold to have been detected by IRAS. A search for 800-micron emission from stars in the Pleiades and Ursa Majoris open clusters is reported. In comparison with the mass of dust particles near T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars, the JCMT data indicate a decline in dust mass during the initial 3 x 10 exp 8 yr that a star spends on the main sequence that is at least as rapid as (time) exp -2. It is estimated that in the Kuiper belt the ratio of total mass carried by small particles to that carried by comets is orders of magnitude smaller than this ratio is 1 AU from the sun. If 800-micron opacities calculated by Pollack et al. (1993) are correct, then the particles with radii less than 100 microns that dominate the FIR fluxes measured by IRAS cannot entirely account for the measured 800-micron fluxes at Vega, Beta Pic, and Fomalhaut; larger particles must be present as well.

  18. STAR Follow-Up Studies, 1996-1997: The Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio (STAR) Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate-Bain, Helen; Boyd-Zaharias, Jayne; Cain, Van A.; Word, Elizabeth; Binkley, M. Edward

    The Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio (STAR) Project first investigated the effect of small class size on student achievement with over 6,000 Tennessee primary students in 1985 through 1989. The study found a consistent and significant benefit of small classes for all students, with the greatest advantages for minority, inner-city students from…

  19. A SNAP UV Spectroscopic Study of Star-Planet Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    We propose a SNAP spectroscopic program to survey G and K dwarf exoplanet host stars in the solar neighborhood to characterize the interaction of these stars with their orbiting planetary systems. Stellar and planetary fields may interact for close-in planets, resulting in enhanced stellar activity of the host star and potentially affecting the habitability of planets in the system. A recent study of low-mass stars (France et al. 2016) found evidence for star-planet interactions (SPI) between the stellar transition region/corona and the planets. This work showed a correlation between high-temperature (T_{form} > 10^{5} K) stellar emission lines (N V, C IV, and Si IV) and the ratio of planetary mass to the orbital semi-major axis, M_{plan}/a_{plan}. However, that work focused on a limited number of M and K stars. We propose to observe a large number of exoplanet hosting G and K dwarfs to expand the parameter space to a wider range of stellar mass and M_{plan}/a_{plan}. Given the combination of spectroscopic sensitivity and the rich suite of spectral diagnostics in the COS G130M band, this program can be carried out with 1800 second SNAP observations of G and K dwarf host stars within 50 pc.

  20. Theoretical studies of the RS Canum Venaticorum stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The activity in RS Canum Venaticorum (CVn) is investigated. Models for chromospheric structure are developed and the role of magnetic fields both in the photosphere as well as in the chromosphere and upper atmosphere are examined. T Tau stars are also studied from the same points of view. The properties of magnetic field loops are used to help understand the atmospheric structure in RS CVn stars. The concepts developed in the case of these stars appear to be applicable over a much broader region of the HR diagram. The absence of stable magnetic loops in the atmospheres of late type giant stars suggests that the atmospheres of RS CVn active components are qualitatively distinct from the solar atmosphere.

  1. High Resolution Studies of Mass Loss from Massive Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Richardson, Noel; Madura, Thomas; Post Russell, Christopher Michael; Teodoro, Mairan; Nichols, Joy S.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shenar, Tomer; Pablo, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    Mass loss from hot luminous single and binary stars has a significant, perhaps decisive, effect on their evolution. The combination of X-ray observations of hot shocked gas embedded in the stellar winds and high-resolution optical/UV spectra of the cooler mass in the outflow provides unique ways to study the unstable process by which massive stars lose mass both through continuous stellar winds and rare, impulsive, large-scale mass ejections. The ability to obtain coordinated observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) and the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and other X-ray observatories has allowed, for the first time, studies of resolved line emisssion over the temperature range of 104- 108K, and has provided observations to confront numerical dynamical models in three dimensions. Such observations advance our knowledge of mass-loss asymmetries, spatial and temporal variabilities, and the fundamental underlying physics of the hot shocked outflow, providing more realistic constraints on the amount of mass lost by different luminous stars in a variety of evolutionary stages. We discuss the impact that these joint observational studies have had on our understanding of dynamical mass outflows from massive stars, with particular emphasis on two important massive binaries, Delta Ori Aa, a linchpin of the mass luminosity relation for upper HRD main sequence stars, and the supermassive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae.

  2. Using Cosmic Telescopes to Study Dusty, Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walth, Gregory; Egami, Eiichi; Clément, Benjamin; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Rawle, Tim; Rex, Marie; Richard, Johan; Dessauges, Miroslava; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Stark, Daniel; Herschel Lensing Survey

    2016-06-01

    Dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs), characterized by their far-infrared (far-IR) emission, undergo the largest starbursts in the Universe, contributing to the majority of the cosmic star formation rate density at z = 1 - 4. These starbursts have important implications for galaxy evolution and feedback as these galaxies build up much of their stellar mass during this time and may experience strong stellar driven winds. For the first time the Herschel Space Observatory was able observe the full far-IR dust emission for a large population of high-redshift DSFGs. However, Herschel reaches the confusion limit quickly and only the brightest galaxies at redshifts z > 2 can be detected. With gravitational lensing, we are able to surpass the Herschel confusion limit and probe intrinsically less luminous and therefore more normal star-forming galaxies. With this goal in mind, we have conducted a large Herschel survey, the Herschel Lensing Survey, of the cores of almost 600 massive galaxy clusters, where the effects of gravitational lensing are the strongest. In this presentation I will discuss how using one of largest gravitational lenses enables the detailed study of star forming regions at high redshift by investigating a giant (D ~ 1 kpc) luminous star forming region in aDSFG at z=0.6. Next, I will discuss how using one of the brightest sources from our sample allows us to investigate the molecular gas and dust properties of a typical DSFG with a CO outflow at z~2. Finally, I will discuss ongoing work using the brightest DSFGs in our sample to detect rest-frame optical nebular emission lines, using near-infrared spectroscopy with Keck/MOSFIRE, LBT/LUCI, and Magellan/MMIRS, which reveal conditions of their ISM; specifically ionization, star formation, metallicity, AGN activity, and dust attenuation.

  3. VLBA Teams With Optical Interferometer to Study Star's Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    Two of the World's Largest Interferometric Facilities Team-up to Study a Red Giant Star Using ESO's VLTI on Cerro Paranal and the VLBA facility operated by NRAO, an international team of astronomers has made what is arguably the most detailed study of the environment of a pulsating red giant star. They performed, for the first time, a series of coordinated observations of three separate layers within the star's tenuous outer envelope: the molecular shell, the dust shell, and the maser shell, leading to significant progress in our understanding of the mechanism of how, before dying, evolved stars lose mass and return it to the interstellar medium. S Orionis (S Ori) belongs to the class of Mira-type variable stars. It is a solar-mass star that, as will be the fate of our Sun in 5 billion years, is nearing its gloomy end as a white dwarf. Mira stars are very large and lose huge amounts of matter. Every year, S Ori ejects as much as the equivalent of Earth's mass into the cosmos. ESO PR Photo 25a/07 ESO PR Photo 25a/07 Evolution of the Mira-type Star S Orionis "Because we are all stardust, studying the phases in the life of a star when processed matter is sent back to the interstellar medium to be used for the next generation of stars, planets... and humans, is very important," said Markus Wittkowski, lead author of the paper reporting the results. A star such as the Sun will lose between a third and half of its mass during the Mira phase. S Ori pulsates with a period of 420 days. In the course of its cycle, it changes its brightness by a factor of the order of 500, while its diameter varies by about 20%. Although such stars are enormous - they are typically larger than the current Sun by a factor of a few hundred, i.e. they encompass the orbit of the Earth around the Sun - they are also distant and to peer into their deep envelopes requires very high resolution. This can only be achieved with interferometric techniques. ESO PR Photo 25b/07 ESO PR Photo 25b/07

  4. An Undergraduate Research Experience on Studying Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, A.; Percy, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    We describe and evaluate a summer undergraduate research project and experience by one of us (AA), under the supervision of the other (JP). The aim of the project was to sample current approaches to analyzing variable star data, and topics related to the study of Mira variable stars and their astrophysical importance. This project was done through the Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) in astronomy at the University of Toronto. SURP allowed undergraduate students to explore and learn about many topics within astronomy and astrophysics, from instrumentation to cosmology. SURP introduced students to key skills which are essential for students hoping to pursue graduate studies in any scientific field. Variable stars proved to be an excellent topic for a research project. For beginners to independent research, it introduces key concepts in research such as critical thinking and problem solving, while illuminating previously learned topics in stellar physics. The focus of this summer project was to compare observations with structural and evolutionary models, including modelling the random walk behavior exhibited in the (O-C) diagrams of most Mira stars. We found that the random walk could be modelled by using random fluctuations of the period. This explanation agreed well with observations.

  5. iSTAR: The International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatge, Coty B.; Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the first steps taken in the International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning (iSTAR). The iSTAR Project is an attempt to look beyond traditional wisdom and practices in astronomy education, to discover the ways in which cognitive abilities and human culture interact to impact individuals’ understanding of and relationship to astronomy content knowledge. In contrast to many international studies that seek to rank nations by student performance on standardized tests, the iSTAR Project seeks to find ways that culture may unexpectedly enhance performance in astronomy. Using the Test of Astronomy Standards (TOAST) as a reasonable, initial proxy for the content knowledge a well educated person might know in astronomy, the iSTAR team then defined culture as a construct with five components: practices, traditional knowledge, historical and genealogical relationships, place-based knowledge, and language. Given the complexity of this construct, Stage 1 of the project focuses on the cultural component of language, and assumed that prior to the collection of data from students, the process of translating the TOAST could provide valuable expert-based information on the impact of language on astronomy knowledge. As such, the work began with a study of the translation process. For each of the languages used in the testing phase of the iSTAR protocol, a succession of translators and analysts were engaged, including two educated, non-astronomer native speakers, a native speaking astronomer, and a native speaking linguistics expert. Multiple translations were analyzed in order to make relevant meaning of differences in the translations, and provide commentary on the ways in which metaphor, idiom, cultural history are embedded in the language, providing potential advantages in the learning of astronomy. The first test languages were German, Hawaiian, and American Sign Language, and initial findings suggest that each of these languages provide specific advantages

  6. Studies of Disks Around the Sun and Other Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We are conducting research designed to enhance our understanding of the evolution and detectability of comet clouds and disks. This area holds promise for also improving our understanding of outer solar system formation, the bombardment history of the planets, the transport of volatiles and organics from the outer solar system to the inner planets, and to the ultimate fate of comet clouds around the Sun and other stars. According to 'standard' theory, both the Kuiper Disk and the Oort Cloud are (at least in part) natural products of the planetary accumulation stage of solar system formation. One expects such assemblages to be a common attribute of other solar systems. Therefore, searches for comet disks and clouds orbiting other stars offer a new method for inferring the presence of planetary systems. This two-element program consists modeling collisions in the Kuiper Disk and the dust disks around other stars. The modeling effort focuses on moving from our simple, first-generation, Kuiper disk collision rate model, to a time-dependent, second-generation model that incorporates physical collisions, velocity evolution, dynamical erosion, and various dust transport mechanisms. This second generation model will be used to study the evolution of surface mass density and the object-size spectrum in the disk. The observational effort focuses on obtaining submm/mm-wave flux density measurements of 25-30 IR excess stars in order to better constrain the masses, spatial extents and structure of their dust ensembles.

  7. The impact of IUE on binary star studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavec, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of IUE observations in the investigation of binary stars is discussed. The results of data analysis of several classes of binary systems are briefly reviewed including zeta Aurigae and VV Cephei stars, mu Sagittarii, epsilon Aurigae, beta Lyrae and the W Serpentis stars, symbiotic stars, and the Algols.

  8. Continued ultraviolet studies of some Be stars of later type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slettebak, A.

    1985-01-01

    Anomalous ionization (C IV and Si IV) is seen in IUE spectra of Be stars as late as B8, and occurs also in standard stars of similar spectral type. Asymmetrical lines suggesting mass loss are present in all the Be stars and several of the standard stars as well, with no obvious correlation with v sin i. Emission shoulders are present in the Mg II lines of two B5e stars but not in Be stars of later type. Again there is no correlation with v sin i. The A-F shell stars show rich Fe II absorption spectra in the ultraviolet, in one case with velocity structure.

  9. Hyperspectral Imagers for the Study of Massive Star Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissen, L.; Alarie, A.; Martin, T.; Spiomm/Sitelle Team

    2012-12-01

    We present two wide-field imaging Fourier transform spectrometers built by our team to study the interstellar medium around massive stars in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. SpIOMM, attached to the Mont Mégantic 1.6-m telescope, is capable of obtaining the visible spectrum of every source of light in a 12 arcminute field of view, with a spectral resolution ranging from R = 1 (wide-band image) to R = 25 000, resulting in about a million spectra with a spatial resolution of one arcsecond. SITELLE will be a similar instrument attached to the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, and will be in operation in early 2013. We illustrate SpIOMM's capabilities to study the interactions between massive stars and their environment.

  10. A Study of BO Lyn, a neglected HADS star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, J. H.; Villarreal, C.; Piña, D. S.; Rentería, A.; Guillen, J.; Soni, A. A.; Huepa, H.

    2016-10-01

    uvby-β photometry of the high amplitude δ Scuti (HADS) star BO Lyn allowed us to determine its physical characteristics. A secular period variation was established through the O-C of all the available times of maximum light and those newly acquired through CCD photometry. In the present study we have demonstrated that BO Lyn is pulsating with one stable varying period whose O-C residuals show a sinusoidal pattern compatible with a light-travel time effect.

  11. Multi-wavelength Accretion Studies of Cataclysmic Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppejans, Deanne

    2016-10-01

    Recent developments in the field of Cataclysmic Variable stars (CVs) have highlighted the need for large (more unbiased) samples of CVs with known properties, as well as the need for multi- wavelength studies to determine the accretion-outflow connection. In this thesis I have presented radio observations of non-magnetic CVs, proving them to be significant radio emitters. I have also presented optical follow-up studies of CVs, and developed an algorithm that automatically classifies these objects based on photometric data from large surveys. This was applied to the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey to produce a catalogue of accretion properties for 1031 CVs.

  12. Studies of Young, Star-forming Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan

    2017-08-01

    Disks of gas and dust around forming stars - circumstellar disks - last only a few million years. This is a very small fraction of the entire lifetime of Sun-like stars, several billion years. Nevertheless, by the time circumstellar disks dissipate stars complete building up their masses, giant planets finish accreting gas, and terrestrial bodies are nearly fully grown and ready for their final assembly to become planets. Understanding the evolution of circumstellar disks are thus crucial in many contexts. Using numerical simulations as the primary tool, my thesis has focused on the studies of various physical processes that can occur throughout the lifetime of circumstellar disks, from their formation to dispersal. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 emphasize the importance of early evolution, during which time a forming star-disk system obtains mass from its natal cloud: the infall phase. In Chapter 2 and 3, I have modeled episodic outbursts of accretion in protostellar systems resulting from disk instabilities - gravitational instability and magnetorotational instability. I showed that outbursts occur preferentially during the infall phase, because the mass addition provides more favorable conditions for gravitational instability to initiate the outburst cycle, and that forming stars build up a significant fraction of their masses through repeated short-lived, episodic outbursts. The infall phase can also be important for the formation of planets. Recent ALMA observations revealed sets of bright and dark rings in circumstellar disks of young, forming stars, potentially indicating early formation of planets. In Chapter 4, I showed that infall streams can create radial pressure bumps near the outer edge of the mass landing on the disk, from which vortices can form, collecting solid particles very efficiently to make initial seeds of planets. The next three chapters highlight the role of planets in setting the observational appearance and the evolution of circumstellar disks

  13. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  14. Simultaneous UV and optical study of O star winds and UV and optical covariability of O star winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous ultraviolet and optical observations of 10 bright O stars were organized in several observing campaigns lasting 3-6 days each. The observing campaigns included 12 observatories in the Northern hemisphere obtaining high resolution spectroscopy, photometry, and polarimetry, as well as 24-hour coverage with the IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) observatory. Over 600 high dispersion SWP spectra were acquired with IUE at both NASA and VILSPA for the completion of this work. The massive amount of data from these observing campaigns, both from IUE and the ground-based instruments, has been reduced and analyzed. The accompanying paper describes the data acquisition, analysis, and conclusions of the study performed. The most important results of this study are the strong confirmation of the ubiquitous variability of winds of O stars, and the critical correlation between rotation of the star and the wind variability as seen in the ultraviolet and optical spectral lines.

  15. X-ray study of bow shocks in runaway stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Becker, M.; del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.

    2017-11-01

    Massive runaway stars produce bow shocks through the interaction of their winds with the interstellar medium, with the prospect for particle acceleration by the shocks. These objects are consequently candidates for non-thermal emission. Our aim is to investigate the X-ray emission from these sources. We observed with XMM-Newton a sample of five bow shock runaways, which constitutes a significant improvement of the sample of bow shock runaways studied in X-rays so far. A careful analysis of the data did not reveal any X-ray emission related to the bow shocks. However, X-ray emission from the stars is detected, in agreement with the expected thermal emission from stellar winds. On the basis of background measurements we derive conservative upper limits between 0.3 and 10 keV on the bow shocks emission. Using a simple radiation model, these limits together with radio upper limits allow us to constrain some of the main physical quantities involved in the non-thermal emission processes, such as the magnetic field strength and the amount of incident infrared photons. The reasons likely responsible for the non-detection of non-thermal radiation are discussed. Finally, using energy budget arguments, we investigate the detectability of inverse Compton X-rays in a more extended sample of catalogued runaway star bow shocks. From our analysis we conclude that a clear identification of non-thermal X-rays from massive runaway bow shocks requires one order of magnitude (or higher) sensitivity improvement with respect to present observatories.

  16. Multiplicity study of young pre-main sequence stars in the Lupus star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Nikolaus; Mugrauer, Markus; Schmidt, Tobias O. B.; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Ginski, Christian

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted a high contrast imaging search for (sub)stellar companions among 63 young pre-main sequence stars in the Lupus star forming region, using the adaptive optics imager NACO at UT4 of the ESO Paranal observatory. We detected faint co-moving companions around our targets at angular separations between about 0.1 up to several arc seconds (binaries and triple systems). Some of these companions are in the sub stellar mass regime, according to their apparent near infrared photometry at the distance of the Lupus star forming region (about 140pc). We give a progress report to our long-term project, still in execution with the follow-up spectroscopy of detected substellar companion-candidates, and present some first results.

  17. Studies of Disks Around the Sun and Other Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1997-01-01

    This is a NASA Origins of Solar Systems research program, and this NASA Headquarters grant has now been transferred to a new grant at NASA GSFC (NAG5-4082). Thus the need for this 'Final Report' on a project that is not, in fact, complete. We are conducting research designed to enhance our understanding of the evolution and detectability of comet clouds and disks. This area holds promise for also improving our understanding of outer solar system formation, the bombardment history of the planets, the transport of volatiles and organics from the outer solar system to the inner planets, and to the ultimate fate of comet clouds around the Sun and other stars. According to "standard" theory, both the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud are (at least in part) natural products of the planetary accumulation stage of solar system formation. One expects such assemblages to be a common attribute of other solar systems. Our program consists of modeling collisions in the Kuiper Belt and the dust disks around other stars. The modeling effort focuses on moving from our simple, first-generation, Kuiper Belt collision rate model, to a time-dependent, second-generation model that incorporates physical collisions, velocity evolution, dynamical erosion, and various dust transport mechanisms. This second generation model is to be used to study the evolution of surface mass density and the object-size spectrum in the disk.

  18. High-resolution spectroscopic studies of ultra metal-poor stars found in the LAMOST survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haining; Aoki, Wako; Zhao, Gang; Honda, Satoshi; Christlieb, Norbert; Suda, Takuma

    2015-10-01

    We report on the observations of two ultra metal-poor (UMP) stars with [Fe/H] ˜ -4.0, including one new discovery. The two stars are studied in the on-going and quite efficient project to search for extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars with LAMOST and Subaru. Detailed abundances or upper limits of abundances have been derived for 15 elements from Li to Eu based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted in the Subaru Telescope. The abundance patterns of both UMP stars are consistent with the "normal population" among the low-metallicity stars. Both of the two program stars show carbon-enhancement without any excess of heavy neutron-capture elements, indicating that they belong to the subclass of (carbon-enhanced metal-poor) CEMP-no stars, as is the case of most UMP stars previously studied. The [Sr/Ba] ratios of both CEMP-no UMP stars are above [Sr/Ba] ˜ -0.4, suggesting the origin of the carbon-excess is not compatible with the mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch companion where the s-process has operated. Lithium abundance is measured in the newly discovered UMP star LAMOST J125346.09+075343.1, making it the second UMP turnoff star with Li detection. The Li abundance of LAMOST J125346.09+075343.1 is slightly lower than the values obtained for less metal-poor stars with similar temperatures, and provides a unique data point at [Fe/H] ˜ -4.2 to support the "meltdown" of the Li Spite plateau at extremely low metallicity. Comparison with the other two UMP and HMP (hyper metal-poor, with [Fe/H] < -5.0) turnoff stars suggests that the difference in lighter elements such as CNO and Na might cause notable difference in lithium abundances among CEMP-no stars.

  19. A Statistical Study on Double Neutron Star Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-yan; Zhang, Cheng-min; Wang, De-hua; Pan, Yuan-yue; Zhou, Zhu-wen

    2017-10-01

    By statistically analyzing the masses of twelve double neutron star (DNS) systems, it is concluded that the weighted mean value of DNS masses is (1.339±0.042) M⊙, where the weighted mean masses of the primary and companion stars are respectively (1.439±0.036) M⊙ and (1.239±0.020) M⊙. The mean value of the masses of primary stars is higher than that of companion stars, which indicates that the primary star may increase its mass by accretion, or the mass of its progenitor star is higher. Therefore, the physical process of supernova explosion through which the high-mass stars become NSs can be investigated hereby. Also it is found that the total masses of the DNSs span a narrow range of 2.5∼2.8 M⊙, implying that the companion stars might impact on the mass formation of DNSs. Moreover, the mass ratios of the DNSs (primaries to companions) approximate 1 (slightly larger than 1), indicating that the masses of the progenitors of primary stars are approximately equal to the masses of the progenitors of companion stars. By analyzing the distribution of the 12 DNSs in the surface magnetic field strength versus spin period (B-Ps) diagram, it is found that the surface magnetic field strength in the primary stars of the DNSs is ∼ 1010 Gs, and the spin period is ∼ 50 ms; while the two pulsars, i.e. PSR J1906+0746 and PSR J0737-3039B, are located in the region of normal pulsars in the B-Ps diagram, their surface magnetic field strength is ∼ 1012 Gs, suggesting that they might not be accelerated through accretion.

  20. A statistical spectropolarimetric study of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababakr, K. M.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2017-11-01

    We present H α linear spectropolarimetry of a large sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars. Together with newly obtained data for 17 objects, the sample contains 56 objects, the largest such sample to date. A change in linear polarization across the H α line is detected in 42 (75 per cent) objects, which confirms the previous finding that the circumstellar environment around these stars on small spatial scales has an asymmetric structure, which is typically identified with a disc. A second outcome of this research is that we confirm that Herbig Ae stars are similar to T Tauri stars in displaying a line polarization effect, while depolarization is more common among Herbig Be stars. This finding had been suggested previously to indicate that Herbig Ae stars form in the same manner than T Tauri stars through magnetospheric accretion. It appears that the transition between these two differing polarization line effects occurs around the B7-B8 spectral type. This would in turn not only suggest that Herbig Ae stars accrete in a similar fashion as lower mass stars, but also that this accretion mechanism switches to a different type of accretion for Herbig Be stars. We report that the magnitude of the line effect caused by electron scattering close to the stars does not exceed 2 per cent. Only a very weak correlation is found between the magnitude of the line effect and the spectral type or the strength of the H α line. This indicates that the detection of a line effect only relies on the geometry of the line-forming region and the geometry of the scattering electrons.

  1. Pharmacogenetics Studies in STAR*D: Strengths, Limitations, and Results

    PubMed Central

    Laje, Gonzalo; Perlis, Roy H.; Rush, A. John; McMahon, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support an important genetic contribution to the wide individual variation in therapeutic response to antidepressant medications. The Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study provided the largest cohort assembled to date of DNA from patients with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder, uniformly treated with citalopram and followed prospectively for up to 12 weeks. This pivotal study changed the face of pharmacogenetics research by increasing the sample size by an order of magnitude as well as by providing detailed prospective information about antidepressant response and tolerability. Several groups have identified markers in genes and tested the replication of previous findings of genes associated with outcome and side effects of antidepressant treatment. Variants in HTR2A, GRIK4, and KCNK2 were associated with citalopram treatment outcome. Replication was achieved in markers in the FKBP5 gene. Other findings in PDE11A and BDNF were not successfully replicated, and reports of potential confounders in previous associations with serotonin transporter variation (SLC6A4) were identified. Polymorphisms in pharmacokinetic genes involved in metabolism and transmembrane transport were also not associated with antidepressant response. Adverse events were also tested. Treatment-emergent suicidal ideation was associated with GRIK2, GRIA3, PAPLN, IL28RA, and CREB1. Sexual dysfunction was linked with variation in GRIN3A, GRIA1 GRIA3, and GRIK2. Reported and future findings of pharmacogenetics studies in STAR*D could help elucidate pathways involved in major depression and those pertinent to antidepressant outcome and side effects. Replication of these findings in independent samples could lead to the development of new treatments and to optimization of available treatments. PMID:19880459

  2. Theoretical studies of chromospheres and winds in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, L.

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheres of hot pre-main sequence stars are discussed along with FU Orionis winds, h alpha emission from M dwarfs, and envelopes of T Tauri stars. In addition, extended chromospheres of M supergiants and metal deficiency giants are considered.

  3. Studies of a Sample of Cpm-Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.

    1988-03-01

    A sample of CPM stars selected from the AGK2/3 is used to investigate the following points: (1) What is the distribution of mass ratios of binaries with wide separations?, and (2) what is the proportion of wide binaries among stars. The distribution previously derived from the visual binaries of the Bright Star Catalogue seem to be an acceptable solution to question (1). On the basis of this, the proportion of stars that have a companion with a separtion between 300 and 10000 AU is found to be about 13%. Another possibility is that the distribution of mass ratios is similar to the initial mass function derived by Miller and Scalo (1979) for stars lighter than the Sun. The proportion of wide binaries with mass ratios greater than 0.16 should then be around 17%.

  4. Using CETUS to study the first stars and first metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian; CETUS Team

    2018-01-01

    The nucleosynthetic signatures of the first stars and supernovae are imprinted in the compositions of the most metal-poor stars found today. Only a few tens of absorption lines are commonly found in the optical spectra of the second-generation stars, so only 5-10 elements are regularly detected. Many others (Be, B, Si, P, S, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) are expected to be present but are rarely detected, and the upper limits derived from their optical non-detections are often uninteresting. The UV part of the spectrum accessible to the high-resolution UV spectrograph on CETUS would enable all of these elements to be detected if present in the most metal-poor stars known. We illustrate some of the ground-breaking observations of these stars that could be made with this mission.

  5. A Numerical Study on the Streams of Star Debris after Tidal Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho Olachea, Priscila; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Law-Smith, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Lurking at the centers of most galaxies are gigantic star and gas devouring monsters. These monsters are supermassive black holes (SMBHs), some of which are larger than our solar system and ten billion times as massive as our own Sun. The vast majority of stars in the universe live for tens of billions of years, eventually dying from old age as the nuclearreactions that power them become progressively less effective. But for every ten thousand stars that die peacefully, one star will be brutally torn apart by the extreme tidal forces present as it passes near a SMBH. My recent work has been to develop computational tools necessary to study the fates of stars disrupted by SMBHs. In this research project I presentthe results of my numerical study aimed at understanding the streams of star debris that result after disruption.

  6. A spectroscopic study of field BHB star candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinman, T.; Castelli, F.; Cacciari, C.; Bragaglia, A.; Harmer, D.; Valdes, F.

    2000-12-01

    New spectroscopic observations are presented for a sample of thirty-one blue horizontal branch (BHB) star candidates that are sufficiently nearby to have reliable proper motions. Comments are given on a further twenty-five stars that have previously been suggested as BHB star candidates but which were not included in our sample. Moderately high-resolution spectra (lambda /Delta lambda ~ 15 000) of twenty five of our program stars were taken with the coudé feed spectrograph at Kitt Peak. Twelve of the program stars were also observed with the CAT spectrograph at ESO. Six of these program stars were observed from both hemispheres. IUE low-resolution spectra are available for most of our candidates and were used, in addition to other methods, in the determination of their Teff and reddening. A compilation of the visual photometry for these stars (including new photometry obtained at Kitt Peak) is also given. Abundances were obtained from these spectra using models computed by Castelli with an updated version of the ATLAS9 code (Kurucz 1993a). All thirty one candidates are halo stars. Of these, twenty eight are classified as BHB stars because: [(1)]they lie close to the ZAHB (in a similar position to the BHB stars in globular clusters) in the Teff versus log g plot. For all but one of these stars, far-UV data were available which were consistent with other data (Strömgren photometry, energy distributions, Hγ profiles) for deriving Teff and log g. [(2)]they have a distribution of km s-1i (<=40 km s-1) that is similar to that found for the BHB in globular clusters. Peterson et al. (1995) and Cohen & McCarthy (1997) have shown that the BHB stars in the globular clusters M13 and M92 have a higher km s-1i (<= 40 km s-1) than those in M3 and NGC 288 (<=20 km s-1). The mean deprojected rotational velocity (/line{v}) was calculated for both the two globular clusters and the nearby BHB star samples. A comparison of these suggests that both globular cluster km s-1i types are

  7. A New Photometric Study of Ap and Am Stars in the Infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.; Liu, J. Y.; Shan, H. G., E-mail: chenps@ynao.ac.cn

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, 426 well known confirmed Ap and Am stars are photometrically studied in the infrared. The 2MASS, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE ), and IRAS data are employed to make analyses. The results in this paper have shown that in the 1–3 μ m region over 90% Ap and Am stars have no or little infrared excesses, and infrared radiations in the near-infrared from these stars are probably dominated by the free–free emissions. It is also shown that in the 3–12 μ m region, the majority of Ap stars and Am stars have very similar behavior, i.e.,more » in the W 1– W 2 (3.4–4.6 μ m) region, over half of Ap and Am stars have clear infrared excesses, which are possibly due to the binarity, the multiplicity, and/or the debris disk, but in the W 2– W 3 (4.6–12 μ m) region they have no or little infrared excess. In addition, in the 12–22 μ m region, some of Ap stars and Am stars show the infrared excesses and infrared radiations for these Ap and Am stars are probably due to the free–free emissions. In addition, it is seen that the probability of being the binarity, the multiplicity and/or the debris disk for Am stars is much higher than that for Ap stars. Furthermore, it can be seen that, in general, no relations can be found between infrared colors and spectral types either for Ap stars or for Am stars.« less

  8. A Statistical Study of the Mass Distribution of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zheng; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Wang, De-Hua; Pan, Yuan-Yue; Lei, Ya-Juan

    2014-07-01

    By reviewing the methods of mass measurements of neutron stars in four different kinds of systems, i.e., the high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), double neutron star systems (DNSs) and neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binary systems, we have collected the orbital parameters of 40 systems. By using the boot-strap method and the Monte-Carlo method, we have rebuilt the likelihood probability curves of the measured masses of 46 neutron stars. The statistical analysis of the simulation results shows that the masses of neutron stars in the X-ray neutron star systems and those in the radio pulsar systems exhibit different distributions. Besides, the Bayes statistics of these four different kind systems yields the most-probable probability density distributions of these four kind systems to be (1.340 ± 0.230)M8, (1, 505 ± 0.125)M8,(1.335 ± 0.055)M8 and (1.495 ± 0.225)M8, respectively. It is noteworthy that the masses of neutron stars in the HMXB and DNS systems are smaller than those in the other two kind systems by approximately 0.16M8. This result is consistent with the theoretical model of the pulsar to be accelerated to the millisecond order of magnitude via accretion of approximately 0.2M8. If the HMXBs and LMXBs are respectively taken to be the precursors of the BNS and NS-WD systems, then the influence of the accretion effect on the masses of neutron stars in the HMXB systems should be exceedingly small. Their mass distributions should be very close to the initial one during the formation of neutron stars. As for the LMXB and NS-WD systems, they should have already under- gone the process of suffcient accretion, hence there arises rather large deviation from the initial mass distribution.

  9. Using delta Cep stars to study northern dwarf irregular galaxies of the Local Group .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gössl, C. A.; Snigula, J.; Hopp, U.

    Dwarf galaxies in the Local Group provide a unique astrophysical laboratory. Despite their proximity some of these systems still lack a reliable distance determination as well as studies of their stellar content and star formation history. We present first results of our survey of variable stars in a sample of six Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies. We describe observational strategies and data reduction, and discuss the lightcurves of newly found and rediscovered delta Cep stars in DDO 216, Leo A and GR8. Based on these data, we present newly derived independent Cepheid distances. Other variable stars found in our survey are discussed in a related article of this volume (Snigula et al.).

  10. Study of the region of star formation 2 Mon. The region of the cluster NGC 2244

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, N.G.

    1985-11-01

    This paper studies the distribution and density of the dust in the central part region of star formation 2 Mon in the young open star cluster NGC 2244. The ring of the cluster coincides with the ring emission of the Rosette nebula, and the nucleus of the cluster contains five O stars and is in the emission hole. On the basis of data from the author's catalog of B and V magnitudes and the spectra of O-B-A stars, and also data on UBV photometry and proper motions, it is concluded that there is no dust in the eastern half of the ring of maximal emission of the Rosette nebula.

  11. Photometric Studies of Stars in the Vicinity of Cyg OB7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikian, N. D.; Gomez, J.

    2017-12-01

    Results of BVRI photometric studies of 131 stars in the stellar association Cyg OB7 are presented. Observational data were obtained with the 2.6-m telescope at the Byurakan Observatory during 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2011 using the ByuFOSC-2 and SCORPIO spectral cameras. Observations made in 2007 on the 182-cm telescope (Asiago, Italy) at the Padova Astronomical Observatory with the AFOSC (Asiago Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera) detector system are also used. Variations with amplitudes ranging from 0m.2 to 2m.16 are detected in 42 of the stars. Variability is observed for the first time in 31 of the 42 stars. The brightness of 32 of the stars was essentially unchanged during the time of our measurements. All of the 42 variables lie very close to the T Tau type stars on a two-color diagram.

  12. Theoretical studies of the RS cannum venaticorum stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Four areas of research were investigated: chromospheric modelling; starspot modelling; supersonic transition locus (STL) crossing; and STL crossing and T Tauri phenomena. Relationships among these areas of research are presented. Stellar structure and mass ejection for these stars were examined along with chromospheric analysis.

  13. Methods of studying polarization of variable star radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    1973-01-01

    Polarized light from variable stars can be used to determine radiation intensity and wavelength. Various types of polarization analyzers are discussed (single-beam and double-beam) as well as their modes of use (continuous and discrete). Modulation of polarizers and determination of measurement accuracy are also covered.

  14. Asteroseismological study of massive ZZ Ceti stars with fully evolutionary models

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O.; Córsico, A. H.

    2013-12-10

    We present the first asteroseismological study for 42 massive ZZ Ceti stars based on a large set of fully evolutionary carbon-oxygen core DA white dwarf models characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. Our sample comprises all of the ZZ Ceti stars with spectroscopic stellar masses between 0.72 and 1.05 M {sub ☉} known to date. The asteroseismological analysis of a set of 42 stars enables study of the ensemble properties of the massive, pulsating white dwarf stars with carbon-oxygen cores, in particular the thickness of the hydrogen envelope and the stellarmore » mass. A significant fraction of stars in our sample have stellar mass that is high enough to crystallize at the effective temperatures of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, which enables us to study the effects of crystallization on the pulsation properties of these stars. Our results show that the phase diagram presented in Horowitz et al. seems to be a good representation of the crystallization process inside white dwarf stars, in agreement with the results from white dwarf luminosity function in globular clusters.« less

  15. An alternative method to study star cluster disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieles, M.; Bastian, N.

    2008-04-01

    Many embedded star clusters do not evolve into long-lived bound clusters. The most popular explanation for this “infant mortality” of young (few Myrs) clusters is the expulsion of natal gas by stellar winds and supernovae, which perturbs the clusters' potential and leaves up to 90% of them unbound. A cluster disruption model has recently been proposed in which this mass-independent disruption of clusters proceeds for another Gyr after gas expulsion. In this scenario, the survival chances of massive clusters are much smaller than in the traditional mass-dependent disruption models. The most common way to study cluster disruption is to use the cluster age distribution, which, however, can be heavily affected by incompleteness. To avoid this pitfall we introduce a new method of studying cluster disruption based on size-of-sample effects, namely the relation between the most massive cluster, M_max, and the age range sampled. Assuming that clusters are stochastically sampled from a power-law cluster initial mass function, with index -2 and that the cluster formation rate is constant, M_max scales with the age range sampled, such that the slope in a log(M_max) vs. log(age) plot is equal to unity. This slope decreases if mass-independent disruption is included. For 90% mass-independent cluster disruption per age dex, the predicted slope is zero. For the solar neighbourhood, SMC, LMC, M 33, and M 83, based on ages and masses taken from the literature, we find slopes consistent with the expected size-of-sample correlations for the first 100 Myr, hence ruling out the 90% mass-independent cluster disruption scenario. For M 51, however, the increase of log(M_max) with log(age) is slightly shallower and for the Antennae galaxies it is flat. This simple method shows that the formation and/or disruption of clusters in the Antennae must have been very different from that of the other galaxies studied here, so it should not be taken as a representative case.

  16. ISO Study of the Recombination Line Maser Star MWC 349

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum, C.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Quirrenbach, A.; Matthews, H. E.

    We present results from full wavelength range scans with both ISO spectrometers. All hydrogen recombination alpha--transitions in their bandpass, from Br alpha at 4.05mu to H15 alpha at 169.4mu, have been detected, along with the continuous emission of the hot circumstellar dust around this peculiar massive star and a wealth of other spectral features. While the alpha--lines n less than 6 are optically thick and thermalized, the higher n lines are amplified, and thus constitute infrared lasers. We present the first global view on the laser/maser phenomenon in this star and infer that the maximum line--integrated amplification (about a factor 30) occurs near n=19 (300mu). We also give a summary of the more than 150 spectral features detected by ISO which originate in several physically distinct circumstellar regions.

  17. Theoretical studies of chromospheres and winds in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, L.

    1986-01-01

    Propagation of pulsational waves through the atmosphere of the M supergiant alpha Ori was explored using a time dependent hydrodynamic code. Wind properties for three FU Orionis objects were determined using radiative transfer models based on optical line profiles. The effects of varying wind temperature while keeping the velocity steady were considered. Using the premise that FU Orionis eruptions result from massive accretions from a disk into a T Tauri star explains a variety of observational peculiarities of FU Orionis objects.

  18. Key issues review: numerical studies of turbulence in stars.

    PubMed

    David Arnett, W; Meakin, Casey

    2016-10-01

    Three major problems of single-star astrophysics are convection, magnetic fields and rotation. Numerical simulations of convection in stars now have sufficient resolution to be truly turbulent, with effective Reynolds numbers of [Formula: see text], and some turbulent boundary layers have been resolved. Implications of these developments are discussed for stellar structure, evolution and explosion as supernovae. Methods for three-dimensional (3D) simulations of stars are compared and discussed for 3D atmospheres, solar rotation, core-collapse and stellar boundary layers. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis of the numerical simulations has been shown to provide a novel and quantitative estimate of resolution errors. Present treatments of stellar boundaries require revision, even for early burning stages (e.g. for mixing regions during He-burning). As stellar core-collapse is approached, asymmetry and fluctuations grow, rendering spherically symmetric models of progenitors more unrealistic. Numerical resolution of several different types of three-dimensional (3D) stellar simulations are compared; it is suggested that core-collapse simulations may be under-resolved. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in explosions has a deep connection to convection, for which the abundance structure in supernova remnants may provide evidence.

  19. The study of Be stars with the CoRoT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diago, P. D.; Gutierrez-Soto, J.; Fabregat, J.; Suso, J.; COROT Be Team

    2011-11-01

    The CoRoT space mission, launched in December 2006, is a spacecraft devoted to the study of the stellar interiors and the exo-planet search. Concerning the seismology of the Be stars, the presence of pulsations in late-type Be stars is still a matter of controversy. It constitutes an important issue to establish the relationship between non-radial pulsations and the mass-loss mechanism in Be stars. In this field, the CoRoT satellite is providing data with an unprecedent quality and precision that is confirming non-radial pulsations in Be stars. The CoRoT Be Team is an international collaboration composed by members from France, Spain, Brazil and Belgium and is in charge of the exploitation and analysis of the Be stars data. In this work we present the highlighted results of the observed Be stars by CoRoT and the future prospects of the CoRoT Be Team. These results include the detection of the Be star HD 49 330 during an outburst phase and the measurement of the change in the oscillation spectrum during this rare event. These observations gave insight into the nature of the explosion. It will help to solve a question that has been pending for years: are oscillations the cause of the outbursts? Moreover, for the first time, the CoRoT satellite has detected simultaneously the rotational and the pulsational frequencies for the Be star HD 50 209, which constitutes a proof of the presence of pulsations in the Be stars. %J Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VI, Proceedings of the IX Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society (SEA), held in Madrid, September 13 - 17, 2010, Eds.: M. R. Zapatero Osorio, J. Gorgas, J. Maiz Apellaniz, J. R. Pardo, and A. Gil de Paz., p. 531-531

  20. Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogie, Keith; Crisuolo, Ed; Parise, Ron

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will describe the design, development, and testing of a system to collect telemetry, format it into UDP/IP packets, and deliver it to a ground test range using standard IP technologies over a TDRSS link. This presentation will discuss the goal of the STARS IP Formatter along with the overall design. It will also present performance results of the current version of the IP formatter. Finally, it will discuss key issues for supporting constant rate telemetry data delivery when using standard components such as PCI/104 processors, the Linux operating system, Internet Protocols, and synchronous serial interfaces.

  1. Theoretical Near-IR Spectra for Surface Abundance Studies of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Bouret, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present initial results of a study of abundance and mass loss properties of O-type stars based on theoretical near-IR spectra computed with state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere models. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a powerful tool to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio near-IR (1-5 micron) spectra of massive stars in different environments of local galaxies. Our goal is to analyze model near-IR spectra corresponding to those expected from NIRspec on JWST in order to map the wind properties and surface composition across the parameter range of 0 stars and to determine projected rotational velocities. As a massive star evolves, internal coupling, related mixing, and mass loss impact its intrinsic rotation rate. These three parameters form an intricate loop, where enhanced rotation leads to more mixing which in turn changes the mass loss rate, the latter thus affecting the rotation rate. Since the effects of rotation are expected to be much more pronounced at low metallicity, we pay special attention to models for massive stars in the the Small Magellanic Cloud. This galaxy provides a unique opportunity to probe stellar evolution, and the feedback of massive stars on galactic evol.ution in conditions similar to the epoch of maximal star formation. Plain-Language Abstract: We present initial results of a study of abundance and mass loss properties of massive stars based on theoretical near-infrared (1-5 micron) spectra computed with state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere models. This study is to prepare for observations by the James Webb Space Telescope.

  2. A theoretical study of alpha star populations in loaded nuclear emulsions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Farley, T.A.; Stieff, L.R.

    1954-01-01

    This theoretical study of the alpha star populations in loaded emulsions was undertaken in an effort to find a quantitative method for the analysis of less than microgram amounts of thorium in the presence of larger amounts of uranium. Analytical expressions for each type of star from each of the significantly contributing members of the uranium and thorium series as well as summation formulas for the whole series have been computed. The analysis for thorium may be made by determining the abundance of five-branched stars in a loaded nuclear emulsion and comparing of observed and predicted star populations. The comparison may also be used to check the half-lives of several members of the uranium and thorium series. ?? 1954.

  3. Rejuvenation of the Innocent Bystander: Results from a Pilot X-ray Study of Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, Fernando; Montez, Rodolfo; Green, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We present the results of a pilot study by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of X-ray emission from dwarf Carbon (dC) stars. Carbon stars were thought to be exclusively AGB stars but main sequence dwarfs showing carbon molecular bands appear to be the dominant variety. The existence of dC stars is surprising since dwarf stars cannot intrinsically produce carbon as an AGB star can. It is hypothesized that dC stars are polluted by an evolved companion star. Evidence of past pollution can appear in X-ray emission where increased coronal activity (“spin-up”) or mass accretion via a disk can be detected. Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory we detected X-ray photons in the vicinity of all the dC stars in our a pilot sample. For each detection we characterized the X-ray emission and compared to the emission expected from potential emission scenarios. Although the process that produces the X-ray emission from dC stars is presently unclear and our pilot sample is small, our results suggest that X-ray emission might be a universal characteristic of dC stars. Further examination of the X-ray emission plus future X-ray and multiwavelength observations will help us better understand the nature of these intriguing stars.

  4. Thermodynamics of star polymer solutions: A coarse-grained study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichetti, Roberto; Pelissetto, Andrea; Randisi, Ferdinando

    2017-06-01

    We consider a coarse-grained (CG) model with pairwise interactions, suitable to describe low-density solutions of star-branched polymers of functionality f. Each macromolecule is represented by a CG molecule with (f + 1) interaction sites, which captures the star topology. Potentials are obtained by requiring the CG model to reproduce a set of distribution functions computed in the microscopic model in the zero-density limit. Explicit results are given for f = 6, 12, and 40. We use the CG model to compute the osmotic equation of state of the solution for concentrations c such that Φp=c /c*≲1 , where c* is the overlap concentration. We also investigate in detail the phase diagram for f = 40, identifying the boundaries of the solid intermediate phase. Finally, we investigate how the polymer size changes with c. For Φp≲0.3 , polymers become harder as f increases at fixed reduced concentration c /c*. On the other hand, for Φp≳0.3 , polymers show the opposite behavior: At fixed Φp, the larger the value of f, the larger their size reduction is.

  5. Photometric studies of δ Scuti stars. I. IP Virginis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joner, Michael D.; Hintz, Eric G.; Collier, Matthew W.

    1998-01-01

    We report 15 new times of maximum light for the δ Scuti star IP Virginis (formerly known as SA 106‐1024). An analysis of all times of maximum light indicates that IP Vir has been decreasing in period at a constant rate of − days day−1. Evidence is also presented that IP Vir is a double‐mode variable with a period ratio of . This period ratio predicts a [Fe/H] value of −0.3. From photometric (uvbyβ) observations, we find a foreground reddening of .008 mag and a metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.05. It is shown that [Fe/H] = −0.3 is most likely the correct value. Intrinsic ‐ and c1‐values, plotted in a model atmosphere grid, indicate a mean effective temperature, K, and a mean surface gravity, . All of these physical parameters support Landolt's initial conclusion that IP Vir is an ordinary δ Sct star.

  6. An x-ray study of massive star forming regions with CHANDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2007-08-01

    Massive stars are characterized by powerful stellar winds, strong ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and consequently devastating supernovae explosions, which have a profound influence on their natal clouds and galaxy evolution. However, the formation and evolution of massive stars themselves and how their low-mass siblings are affected in the wind-swept and UV-radiation-dominated environment are not well understood. Much of the stellar populations inside of the massive star forming regions (MSFRs) are poorly studied in the optical and IR wavelengths because of observational challenges caused by large distance, high extinction, and heavy contamination from unrelated sources. Although it has long been recognized that X-rays open a new window to sample the young stellar populations residing in the MSFRs, the low angular resolution of previous generation X-ray telescopes has limited the outcome from such studies. The sensitive high spatial resolution X-ray observations enabled by the Chandra X- ray Observatory and the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) have significantly improved our ability to study the X-ray-emitting populations in the MSFRs in the last few years. In this thesis, I analyzed seven high spatial resolution Chandra /ACIS images of two massive star forming complexes, namely the NGC 6357 region hosting the 1 Myr old Pismis 24 cluster (Chapter 3) and the Rosette Complex including the 2 Myr old NGC 2244 cluster immersed in the Rosette Nebula (Chapter 4), embedded clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC; Chapter 5), and a triggered cluster NGC 2237 (Chapter 6). The X-ray sampled stars were studied in great details. The unique power of X-ray selection of young stellar cluster members yielded new knowledge in the stellar populations, the cluster structures, and the star formation histories. The census of cluster members is greatly improved in each region. A large fraction of the X-ray detections have optical or near-infrared (NIR) stellar counterparts

  7. Infrared Studies of the Variability and Mass Loss of Dusty Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2018-01-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase is one of the last phases of a star's life. AGB stars lose mass in an outflow in which dust condenses and is pushed away from the star. Extreme AGB stars are so named because their very red colors suggest very large amounts of dust, which in turn suggests extremely high mass loss rates. AGB stars also vary in brightness, and studies show that extreme AGB stars tend to have longer periods than other AGB stars and are more likely to be fundamental mode pulsators than other AGB stars. Extreme AGB stars are difficult to study, as their colors are so red due to their copious amounts of circumstellar dust that they are often not detected at optical wavelengths. Therefore, they must be observed at infrared wavelengths to explore their variability. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, my team and I have observed a sample of extreme AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) over Cycles 9 through 12 during the Warm Spitzer mission. For each cycle, we typically observed a set of extreme AGB stars at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns wavelength approximately monthly for most of a year. These observations reveal a wide range of variability properties. I present results from our analysis of the data obtained from these Spitzer variability programs, including light curve analyses and comparison to period-luminosity diagrams. Funding is acknowledged from JPL RSA # 1561703.

  8. Observational Studies of the Clearing Phase in Proto-Planetary Disks Surrounding Intermediate Mass Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed study of circumstellar gas associated with young, intermediate-mass stars has demonstrated that, far from being unique or an infrequently occurring phenomenon, beta Pic-like infall activity is routinely observed in stars younger than 10-50 Myr when the observer's line of sight lies within 15 degrees of the disk mid-plane. Detailed studies of 2 Herbig Ae/Be stars, AB Aur and HD 163296 demonstrate that enhanced infall episodes last 20-60 hours, comparable to the duration of similar episodes in beta Pictoris. The infall activity is consistent with detection of the comae of swarms of star-grazing bodies of asteroidal to cometary composition. Episodic fluctuations in the infall activity are clearly present by approximately 6 Myr, and may indicate the presence of massive planets within the disk. This study has therefore, directly contributed to NASA's Origins of Planetary Systems theme by identifying under what conditions extra-solar planetesimals can be remotely sensed, indicating that such bodies appear to be routinely detectable among young stars in the 1-10 Myr range, and suggesting that temporal studies of spectroscopic variability may provide a means of identifying those systems harboring massive planets. This study has resulted in 2 refereed review papers, 13 other refereed papers, and 17 conference papers.

  9. Identification of oxygen-rich evolved stars by maser surveys and statistical studies on infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Bosco H.-K.

    2013-10-01

    The post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) phase is a short episode in the life of a star with mass between 0.8 to 8 M⊙. It comes after the AGB phase, and before the planetary nebula phase. A rapid change in many physical properties of a star is suggested to happen in this phase, for example the onset of jets. However, a lot of details are still unknown. In this thesis, three major problems are addressed: insufficient samples of post-AGB stars, identification of post-AGB stars, and the true status of a special class of objects called the "water fountains (WFs)". WFs are evolved stars associated with high velocity collimated bipolar jets that can be traced by H2O maser emissions. For the first two problems, new searching criteria are introduced with two new maser surveys on oxygen-rich post-AGB stars. It is necessary to collect more samples of post-AGB stars for further studies. Nonetheless, there has been no systematic searching method because most of the post-AGB stars are dim in optical and near-infrared wavelengths, which increases the difficulty in identification. Maser thus becomes a good alternative tool. In the first survey which focused only on H2O masers, over 200 AGB or post-AGB star candidates have been selected and observed. Those candidates were mainly chosen by new colour criteria with the far-infrared AKARI data. In particular, four characteristic maser sources were found, and they are currently suggested as possible very young post-AGB stars. In the second survey, another 100 objects were observed in OH and/or H2O masers. Three possible high velocity objects were discovered, including a new rare member of WFs. The colour criteria are proved to be quite sensitive in distinguishing post-AGB stars from AGB stars or other types of objects, even though there are still some contamination from young stellar objects. A follow-up study shows that the Q-parameters are effective in isolating objects with spherical or aspherical envelopes, which are also

  10. The National Ignition Facility: Studying the Stars in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R

    2008-09-17

    The National Ignition Facility, to be completed in 2009, will be the highest energy laser ever built. The high temperatures and densities it will produce will enable a number of experiments in inertial confinement fusion and stockpile stewardship, as well as in nuclear astrophysics, X-ray astronomy, hydrodynamics, and planetary science. The National Ignition Facility, NIF (1), located at Lawrence Livermore National Lab, (LLNL) is expected to produce inertial confinement fusion (ICF) by delivering sufficient laser energy to compress and heat a millimeter-radius pellet of DT sufficiently to produce fusion to {sup 4}He+neutron and 17.6 MeV per reaction. NIF will be completed by March, 2009, at which time a National Ignition Campaign (2), NIC, a series of experiments to optimize the ICF parameters, will begin. Although NIF is a research facility, a successful NIC would have implications for future energy sources. In addition to the goal of ICF, NIF will support programs in stockpile stewardship. However, the conditions that NIF creates will simulate those inside stars and planets sufficiently closely to provide compelling motivation for experiments in basic high-energy-density (HED) science especially, for the first time, in nuclear astrophysics.

  11. Background and rationale for the sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression (STAR*D) study.

    PubMed

    Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A John; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Thase, Michael E; Sackeim, Harold A; Quitkin, Frederic M; Wisniewski, Steven; Lavori, Philip W; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F; Kupfer, David J

    2003-06-01

    Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) attempts to fill in major clinical information gaps and to evaluate the theoretical principles and clinical beliefs that currently guide pharmacotherapy of major depressive disorder. The study is conducted in representative participant groups and settings using clinical management tools that easily can be applied in daily practice. Outcomes include clinical outcomes and health care utilization and cost estimates. Research findings should be immediately applicable to, and easily implemented in, the daily primary and specialty care practices. This article provides the overall rationale for STAR*D and details the rationale for key design, measurement, and analytic features of the study.

  12. Theoretical studies of mass loss and shock phenomena in cool star envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee

    1988-01-01

    To show the difficulty of producing the blue-shifted emission of (O I) and (S II) from T Tauri stars directly in the stellar wind, an element of gas in a radially expanding stellar wind was followed as it cooled and recombined. Results indicate that T Tauri winds must be heated at large distances from the star to produce the (S II) emission. A shock between the wind and the disk is an attractive mechanism to produce this heating. When the theory is applied to a simple disk model, a number of predictions and implications are evident, for example, that some T Tauri stars eject mass near the equatorial plane. In a second study, spectral energy distributions of T Tauri stars were analyzed to place limits on the amount of accretion which might occur during the early phase of stellar evolution. The best match to H-alpha line profiles is for models in which the turbulent velocity dominates close to the star, while expansion dominates farther out. Such a model predicts, for instance, that a mass loss rate of 1/10,000,000 solar masses per year is required to account for the blue-shifted Na I absorption of some objects.

  13. Revisiting Caroline Furness's An Introduction to the Study of Variable Stars on its Centenary (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) A century and one month ago (October 1915) Dr. Caroline Ellen Furness (1869-1936), Director of the Vassar College Observatory, published An Introduction to the Study of Variable Stars. Issued in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Vassar College, the work was meant to fill a void in the literature, namely as both an introduction to the topic of variable stars and as a manual explaining how they should be observed and the resulting data analyzed. It was judged to be one of the hundred best books written by an American woman in the last hundred years at the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago. The book covers the relevant history of and background on types of variable stars, star charts, catalogs, and the magnitude scale, then describes observing techniques, including visual, photographic, and photoelectric photometry. The work finishes with a discussion of light curves and patterns of variability, with a special emphasis on eclipsing binaries and long period variables. Furness's work is a valuable snapshot of the state of astronomical knowledge, technology, and observing techniques from a century ago. This presentation will analyze both Furness's book and its reception in the scientific community, and draw parallels to current advice given to beginning variable star observers.

  14. Arm retraction dynamics of entangled star polymers: A forward flux sampling method study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Likhtman, Alexei E.; Wang, Zuowei

    2017-07-01

    The study of dynamics and rheology of well-entangled branched polymers remains a challenge for computer simulations due to the exponentially growing terminal relaxation times of these polymers with increasing molecular weights. We present an efficient simulation algorithm for studying the arm retraction dynamics of entangled star polymers by combining the coarse-grained slip-spring (SS) model with the forward flux sampling (FFS) method. This algorithm is first applied to simulate symmetric star polymers in the absence of constraint release (CR). The reaction coordinate for the FFS method is determined by finding good agreement of the simulation results on the terminal relaxation times of mildly entangled stars with those obtained from direct shooting SS model simulations with the relative difference between them less than 5%. The FFS simulations are then carried out for strongly entangled stars with arm lengths up to 16 entanglements that are far beyond the accessibility of brute force simulations in the non-CR condition. Apart from the terminal relaxation times, the same method can also be applied to generate the relaxation spectra of all entanglements along the arms which are desired for the development of quantitative theories of entangled branched polymers. Furthermore, we propose a numerical route to construct the experimentally measurable relaxation correlation functions by effectively linking the data stored at each interface during the FFS runs. The obtained star arm end-to-end vector relaxation functions Φ (t ) and the stress relaxation function G(t) are found to be in reasonably good agreement with standard SS simulation results in the terminal regime. Finally, we demonstrate that this simulation method can be conveniently extended to study the arm-retraction problem in entangled star polymer melts with CR by modifying the definition of the reaction coordinate, while the computational efficiency will depend on the particular slip-spring or slip

  15. A Comparative Observational Study of YSO Classification in Four Small Star-forming H ii Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sung-Ju; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju

    2017-08-10

    We have developed a new young stellar object (YSO) identification and classification technique using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. We compare this new technique with previous WISE YSO detection and classification methods that used either infrared colors or spectral energy distribution slopes. In this study, we also use the new technique to detect and examine the YSO population associated with four small H ii regions: KR 7, KR 81, KR 120, and KR 140. The relatively simple structure of these regions allows us to effectively use both spatial and temporal constraints to identify YSOs that are potential productsmore » of triggered star formation. We are also able to identify regions of active star formation around these H ii regions that are clearly not influenced by the H ii region expansion, and thus demonstrate that star formation is on-going on megayear timescales in some of these molecular clouds.« less

  16. A CO LINE AND INFRARED CONTINUUM STUDY OF THE ACTIVE STAR-FORMING COMPLEX W51

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Miju; Lee, Youngung; Choi, Minho; Bieging, John H.; Kulesa, Craig A.; Peters, William L.

    2010-09-15

    We present the results of an extensive observational study of the active star-forming complex W51 that was observed in the J = 2 - 1 transition of the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO molecules over a 1.{sup 0}25 x 1.{sup 0}00 region with the University of Arizona Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. We use a statistical equilibrium code to estimate physical properties of the molecular gas. We compare the molecular cloud morphology with the distribution of infrared (IR) and radio continuum sources and find associations between molecular clouds and young stellar objects (YSOs) listed in Spitzer IR catalogs. The ratios of CO lines associated with H II regions are different from the ratios outside the active star-forming regions. We present evidence of star formation triggered by the expansion of the H II regions and by cloud-cloud collisions. We estimate that about 1% of the cloud mass is currently in YSOs.

  17. A CO Line and Infrared Continuum Study of the Active Star-forming Complex W51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Miju; Bieging, John H.; Kulesa, Craig A.; Lee, Youngung; Choi, Minho; Peters, William L.

    2010-09-01

    We present the results of an extensive observational study of the active star-forming complex W51 that was observed in the J = 2 - 1 transition of the 12CO and 13CO molecules over a 1fdg25 × 1fdg00 region with the University of Arizona Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. We use a statistical equilibrium code to estimate physical properties of the molecular gas. We compare the molecular cloud morphology with the distribution of infrared (IR) and radio continuum sources and find associations between molecular clouds and young stellar objects (YSOs) listed in Spitzer IR catalogs. The ratios of CO lines associated with H II regions are different from the ratios outside the active star-forming regions. We present evidence of star formation triggered by the expansion of the H II regions and by cloud-cloud collisions. We estimate that about 1% of the cloud mass is currently in YSOs.

  18. Photometric studies of composite stellar systems. V - Infrared photometry of star clusters in the Magellanic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, S. E.; Aaronson, M.; Cohen, J. G.; Frogel, J. A.; Matthews, K.

    1983-03-01

    The results of an infrared photometric study of the integrated light of 84 clusters in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) are presented. These clusters span nearly the complete range of cluster ages in the Clouds. In contrast to uvgr and UBV cluster colors which vary smoothly with age, the infrared colors display wide variations among the Searle, Wilkinson, and Bagnuolo groups IV-VI, i.e., in the "intermediate age" domain of ˜1-8 × 109 yr. Very red J - K and H - K colors for these clusters are shown to be due to the presence of luminous (Mbol < -4) carbon stars which are absent in the youngest and oldest clusters, and which have no effect upon the visible colors. An analysis of the CO and H - K data shows that on average half of the bolometric luminosity for 20 intermediate-age clusters comes from carbon stars on the asymptotic giant branch. This analysis agrees well with the recent carbon star surveys of Aaronson and Mould, Frogel and Cohen, and Lloyd-Evans. The effects of luminous carbon stars upon the infrared colors of the parent clusters are strong enough that metal-poor, intermediate-age stellar populations may be detectable in the integrated light of more distant galaxies. There is no difference, on average, between the clusters of the LMC and the SMC in the proportion of the light at 2 μm (or bolometrically) due to luminous carbon stars. This result is in apparent contrast to that of the Blanco et al. surveys of the carbon and M star populations in the general fields of the two galaxies; these surveys have revealed a sharp rise in the C/M star ratio going from the LMC to the SMC. The explanation appears to lie in the incompleteness of the Blanco et al. surveys for warm M stars in metal-poor populations. Carbon stars do not appear to be present in clusters ≤ 1 × 109 yr old; the infrared colors of these young clusters are dominated by M giants and supergiants which display strong CO band absorption at 2.3 μm. This lack of carbon stars

  19. Statistical study of OB stars in NGC 6334 and NGC 6357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russeil, D.; Zavagno, A.; Adami, C.; Anderson, L. D.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Rodon, J. A.; Schneider, N.; Ilmane, A.; Murphy, K. J.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Star-forming complexes are large structures exhibiting massive star-formation at different stages of evolution, from dense cores to well-developed H ii regions. They are very interesting for the study of the formation and evolution of stars. NGC 6334 and NGC 6357 are two active and relatively nearby star-forming complexes. From the extinction map and the sub-mm cold dust emission, and because they have similar velocities, these regions are most likely connected. However, located in the direction of the Galactic center their radial velocity is not representative of their distance. An alternative is then to determine the distance of NGC 6334 and NGC 6357 from their stellar content. Aims: Our aim is to perform a census of O-B3 ionising stars in NGC 6334 and NGC 6357, to determine the extinction coefficient, and the distance of both regions. A census of O-B3 stars is an essential basis for estimating the statistical lifetime of the earliest massive star-forming phases. Methods: We performed a U, B, V, and R photometric survey of a large area covering NGC 6334 and NGC 6357 with the VIMOS (ESO-VLT) and the MOSAIC (CTIO) instruments. This allows us to have a complete census of O to B3 stars up to V = 22.6 mag. The OB stars are selected based on their U - B and B - V colors. The most robust extinction coefficient is determined from color - color plots before computing the distance of the OB stars. Results: We find a higher value than typical of the diffuse interstellar medium for RV of 3.53 ± 0.08 and 3.56 ± 0.15 for NGC 6357 and NGC 6334, respectively. Adopting these RV values, the distances of NGC 6357 and NGC 6334 are 1.9 ± 0.4 kpc and 1.7 ± 0.3 kpc. We conclude that, within the error bars, both regions are thus at the same distance of 1.75 kpc (weighted mean). We confirm that the value of RV is linked to the large dust grain content. In particular, we found that there are more very small grains in NGC 6357 than in NGC 6334, suggesting that NGC 6357 could

  20. A M2FS Spectroscopic Study of Low-mass Young Stars in Orion OB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleida, Catherine C.; Briceno, Cesar; Calvet, Nuria; Mateo, Mario L.; Hernandez, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Surveys of pre-main sequence stars in the ~4-10 Myr range provide a window into the decline of the accretion phase of stars and the formation of planets. Nearby star clusters and stellar associations allow for the study of these young stellar populations all the way down to the lowest mass members. One of the best examples of nearby 4-10 Myr old stellar populations is the Orion OB1 association. The CIDA Variability Survey of Orion OB1 (CVSO - Briceño et al. 2001) has used the variability properties of low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars to identify hundreds of K and M-type stellar members of the Orion OB1 association, a number of them displaying IR-excess emission and thought to be representative of more evolved disk-bearing young stars. Characterizing these young, low-mass objects using spectroscopy is integral to understanding the accretion phase in young stars. We present preliminary results of a spectroscopic survey of candidate and confirmed Orion OB1 low-mass members taken during November 2014 and February 2014 using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber Spectrograph (M2FS), a PI instrument on the Magellan Clay Telescope (PI: M. Matteo). Target fields located in the off-cloud regions of Orion were identified in the CVSO, and observed using the low and high-resolution modes of M2FS. Both low and high-resolution spectra are needed in order to confirm membership and derive masses, ages, kinematics and accretion properties. Initial analysis of these spectra reveal many new K and M-type members of the Orion OB1 association in these low extinction, off-cloud areas. These are the more evolved siblings of the youngest stars still embedded in the molecular clouds, like those in the Orion Nebula Cluster. With membership and spectroscopic indicators of accretion we are building the most comprehensive stellar census of this association, enabling us to derive a robust estimate of the fraction of young stars still accreting at a various ages, a key constraint for the end of

  1. Comparative histological and immunohistochemical study of sea star tube feet (Echinodermata, Asteroidea).

    PubMed

    Santos, Romana; Haesaerts, Delphine; Jangoux, Michel; Flammang, Patrick

    2005-03-01

    Adhesion in sea stars is the function of specialized structures, the tube feet or podia, which are the external appendages of the water-vascular system. Adhesive secretions allow asteroid tube feet to perform multiple functions. Indeed, according to the sea star species considered, the tube feet may be involved in locomotion, fixation, or burrowing. Different tube foot shapes usually correspond to this variety of function. In this study, we investigated the variability of the morphology of sea star tube feet as well as the variability of the composition of their adhesive secretions. This second aspect was addressed by a comparative immunohistochemical study using antibodies raised against the adhesive material of the forcipulatid Asterias rubens. The tube feet from 14 sea star species representing five orders and 10 families of the Class Asteroidea were examined. The histological study revealed three main tube foot morphotypes, i.e., knob-ending, simple disc-ending, and reinforced disc-ending. Analysis of the results suggests that tube foot morphology is influenced by species habitat, but within limits imposed by the evolutionary lineage. In immunohistochemistry, on the other hand, the results were very homogeneous. In every species investigated there was a very strong immunolabeling of the adhesive cells, independently of the taxon considered, of the tube foot morphotype or function, or of the species habitat. This indicates that the adhesives in all the species considered are closely related, probably sharing many identical molecules or, at least, many identical epitopes on their constituents.

  2. Near infrared photometric and optical spectroscopic study of 22 low mass star clusters embedded in nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:Among the star clusters in the Galaxy, those embedded in nebulae represent the youngest group, which has only recently been explored. The analysis of a sample of 22 candidate embedded stellar systems in reflection nebulae and/or HII environments is presented. Methods: We employed optical spectroscopic observations of stars in the directions of the clusters carried out at CASLEO (Argentina) together with near infrared photometry from the 2MASS catalogue. Our analysis is based on source surface density, colour-colour diagrams and on theoretical pre-main sequence isochrones. We take into account the field star contamination by carrying out a statistical subtraction. Results: The studied objects have the characteristics of low mass systems. We derive their fundamental parameters. Most of the cluster ages are younger than 2 Myr. The studied embedded stellar systems in reflection nebulae and/or HII region complexes do not have stars of spectral types earlier than B. The total stellar masses locked in the clusters are in the range 20-220 M⊙. They are found to be gravitationally unstable and are expected to dissolve in a timescale of a few Myr. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  3. A study of star formation by Hα emission of galaxies in the galaxy group NGC 4213

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maungkorn, Sakdawoot; Kriwattanawong, Wichean

    2017-09-01

    This research aims to study hydrogen alpha emission, corresponding to star formation of galaxies in the NGC 4213 group that has an average recession velocity of 6,821 km/s. The imaging observations with broad-band filters (B, V and RC) and narrow-band filters ([S II] and Red-continuum) were carried out from the 2.4-m reflecting telescope at Thai National Observatory (TNO). There are 11 sample galaxies in this study, consisting of 2 elliptical, 2 lenticular and 7 spiral galaxies. It was found that the late-type galaxies tend to be bluer than early-type galaxies, due to these galaxies consist of relatively high proportion of blue stars. Furthermore, the equivalent width of hydrogen alpha (EW(Hα)) tends to increase as a function of morphological type. This indicates that star formation in late-type galaxies taking place more than the early-type galaxies. Furthermore, a ratio of the star formation rate to galaxy mass also increases slightly with the galaxy type. This could be due to the interaction between galaxy-galaxy or tidal interaction occurring within the galaxy group.

  4. A comprehensive study of young B stars in NGC 2264 . I. Space photometry and asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwintz, K.; Moravveji, E.; Pápics, P. I.; Tkachenko, A.; Przybilla, N.; Nieva, M.-F.; Kuschnig, R.; Antoci, V.; Lorenz, D.; Themeßl, N.; Fossati, L.; Barnes, T. G.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Space photometric time series of the most massive members of the young open cluster NGC 2264 allow us to study their different sources of variability down to the millimagnitude level and permit a search for slowly pulsating B (SPB)-type pulsation among objects that are only a few million years old. Aims: Our goal is to conduct a homogeneous study of young B-type stars in the cluster NGC 2264 using photometric time series from space in combination with high-resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry obtained from the ground. The latter will be presented in a separate follow-up article. Methods: We performed frequency analyses for eleven B stars in the field of the young cluster NGC 2264 using photometric time series from the MOST, CoRoT, and Spitzer space telescopes and the routines Period04 and SigSpec. We employ the MESA stellar evolution code in combination with the oscillation code GYRE to identify the pulsation modes for two SPB stars that exhibit short period spacing series. Results: From our analysis we identify four objects that show SPB pulsations, five stars that show rotational modulation of their light curves caused by spots, one star that is identified to be a binary, and one object in the field of the cluster that is found to be a non-member Be star. In two SPB stars we detect a number of regularly spaced pulsation modes that are compatible with being members of a g-mode period series. Conclusions: Despite NGC 2264's young age, our analysis illustrates that its B-type members have already arrived on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS). Our asteroseismic analysis yields masses between 4 and 6 M⊙ and ages between 1 and 6 million years, which agree well to the overall cluster age. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Microsatellite Systems Canada Inc. (MSCI), formerly part of Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia

  5. Asteroseismology and mass loss in Be stars. Study with CoRoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diago, P. D.

    The general aim of this work is the study of Be stars with the CoRoT space mission. The mechanisms responsible of the production and dynamics of the circumstellar gas in Be stars are still not constrained. Observations of non-radial pulsation beating phenomena connected to outbursts point toward a relevance of pulsation, but this mechanism cannot be generalized. In this regard, the observation of classical Be stars with the high-precision CoRoT satellite is providing important keys to understand the physics of these objects and the nature of the Be phenomenon. In order to study the light variations of the selected stars we use photometric and spectroscopic observations. These observations allow us to extract frequencies, amplitudes and phases of these variations. As we will show, these light variations can be connected with pulsations on the stellar surface. For carrying out the frequency analysis we have developed a new code based on standard Fourier analysis. The point is that this code, called PASPER, allows the frequency analysis of large sets of light curves in an automatic mode. This Ph.D. thesis is arranged as follows: In the first three Chapters we describe the scientific framework of this project, giving a brief description on Asteroseismology, presenting the current status of Be stars, and describing the basics of the Fourier analysis and the rudiments of the time series analysis. At the early begin of this Ph.D. thesis, the CoRoT satellite was still on ground getting ready for the launch. In this context, we perform a search for short-period B and Be star variables in the low metallicity environment of the Magellanic Clouds. This study constitutes the Part I of this Ph.D. thesis. This Part has a double goal: i) to test the frequency analysis codes; and ii) to detect observationally beta Cephei and SPB-like B-type pulsators in low metallicity environments, actually not predicted by the pulsational theory and models. This constitutes the PartI. Part II is

  6. Photometric and spectroscopic study of low mass embedded star clusters in reflection nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2005-02-01

    An analysis of the candidate embedded stellar systems in the reflection nebulae vdBH-RN 26, vdBH-RN} 38, vdBH-RN} 53a, GGD 20, ESO 95-RN 18 and NGC 6595 is presented. Optical spectroscopic data from CASLEO (Argentina) in conjunction with near infrared photometry from the 2MASS Point Source Catalogue were employed. The analysis is based on source surface density, colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams together with theoretical pre-main sequence isochrones. We take into account the field population affecting the analysis by carrying out a statistical subtraction. The fundamental parameters for the stellar systems were derived. The resulting ages are in the range 1-4 Myr and the objects are dominated by pre-main sequence stars. The observed masses locked in the clusters are less than 25 M⊙. The studied systems have no stars of spectral types earlier than B, indicating that star clusters do not necessarily evolve through an HII region phase. The relatively small locked mass combined with the fact that they are not numerous in catalogues suggests that these low mass clusters are not important donors of stars to the field populations. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  7. X-rays as a new tool to study the winds of hot subdwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, S.; La Palombara, N.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, thanks to XMM-Newton and Chandra, it has been possible to detect X-ray emission from several hot subdwarf stars or place interesting upper limits. X-rays are observed from subdwarfs in binary systems, where they result from wind accretion onto a white dwarf or neutron star companion, as well as from single hot subdwarfs, in which X-rays are probably due to shock instabilities in the wind. In both cases, X-ray data provide useful information for our understanding of the weak radiation-driven winds of these low mass stars, which are difficult to study with the techniques and observations typically used for massive hot stars. After reviewing the properties of the X-ray emission from hot subdwarfs, we will report on the most recent results on the three X-ray brightest sdOs (HD 49798, BD +37 442, and BD +37 1977), discuss the implications of the non-detections of sdB+WD binaries, and present the prospects for future X-ray observations of hot subdwarfs.

  8. A SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH STUDY OF DEBRIS DISKS AROUND PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Beichman, C. A.; Carpenter, John M.; Bryden, Geoffrey

    2011-01-15

    Since giant planets scatter planetesimals within a few tidal radii of their orbits, the locations of existing planetesimal belts indicate regions where giant planet formation failed in bygone protostellar disks. Infrared observations of circumstellar dust produced by colliding planetesimals are therefore powerful probes of the formation histories of known planets. Here we present new Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectrophotometry of 111 solar-type stars, including 105 planet hosts. Our observations reveal 11 debris disks, including two previously undetected debris disks orbiting HD 108874 and HD 130322. Combining the 32 {mu}m spectrophotometry with previously published MIPS photometry, we find that the majority of debris disks around solar-type stars have temperatures in the range 60 {approx}< T{sub dust} {approx}< 100 K. Assuming a dust temperature T{sub dust} = 70 K, which is representative of the nine debris disks detected by both IRS and MIPS, debris rings surrounding Sun-like stars orbit between 15 and 240 AU depending on the mean particle size. Our observations imply that the planets detected by radial-velocity searches formed within 240 AU of their parent stars. If any of the debris disks studied here have mostly large, blackbody emitting grains, their companion giant planets must have formed in a narrow region between the ice line and 15 AU.

  9. Constraining phases of quark matter with studies of r-mode damping in compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rupak, Gautam; Jaikumar, Prashanth; California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, California 90840

    2010-11-15

    With the goal of constraining the phase of matter at high density, we study r-mode damping in the color-flavor-locked phase with kaon condensation (CFL-K0) and contrast it with the CFL phase. The mode frequencies in these phases are found to differ very slightly. While the bulk viscosity in either phase is only effective at damping the r-mode at temperatures T > or approx. 10{sup 11} K, the shear viscosity in the CFL-K0 phase is the only effective damping agent all the way down to temperatures T > or approx. 10{sup 8} K characteristic of cooling neutron stars. However, it cannotmore » keep the star from becoming unstable to gravitational wave emission for rotation frequencies {nu}{approx_equal}56-11 Hz at T{approx_equal}10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} K. Stars composed almost entirely of CFL or CFL-K0 matter are ruled out by observation of rapidly rotating neutron stars, indicating that dissipation at the quark-hadron interface or nuclear crust interface must play a key role in damping the instability.« less

  10. The Dunhuang Chinese sky: A comprehensive study of the oldest known star atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, Jean-Marc; Praderie, Françoise; Whitfield, Susan

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the star atlas included in the medieval Chinese manuscript Or.8210/S.3326 discovered in 1907 by the archaeologist Aurel Stein at the Silk Road town of Dunhuang and now housed in the British Library. Although partially studied by a few Chinese scholars, it has never been fully displayed and discussed in the Western world. This set of sky maps (12 hour-angle maps in quasi-cylindrical projection and a circumpolar map in azimuthal projection), displaying the full sky visible from the Northern Hemisphere, is up to now the oldest complete preserved star atlas known from any civilisation. It is also the earliest known pictorial representation of the quasi-totality of Chinese constellations. This paper describes the history of the physical object - a roll of thin paper drawn with ink. We analyse the stellar content of each map (1,339 stars, 257 asterisms) and the texts associated with the maps. We establish the precision with which the maps were drawn (1.5-4° for the brightest stars) and examine the type of projections used. We conclude that precise mathematical methods were used to produce the Atlas. We also discuss the dating of the manuscript and its possible author, and we confirm the date +649-684 (early Tang Dynasty) as most probable based on the available evidence. This is at variance with a prior estimate of around +940. Finally, we present a brief comparison with later sky maps, both from China and Europe.

  11. THE MILKY WAY PROJECT: A STATISTICAL STUDY OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION ASSOCIATED WITH INFRARED BUBBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrew, S.; Robitaille, T. P.; Simpson, R.

    2012-08-10

    The Milky Way Project citizen science initiative recently increased the number of known infrared bubbles in the inner Galactic plane by an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. We present a detailed statistical analysis of this data set with the Red MSX Source (RMS) catalog of massive young stellar sources to investigate the association of these bubbles with massive star formation. We particularly address the question of massive triggered star formation near infrared bubbles. We find a strong positional correlation of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and H II regions with Milky Way Project bubbles at separations of <2more » bubble radii. As bubble sizes increase, a statistically significant overdensity of massive young sources emerges in the region of the bubble rims, possibly indicating the occurrence of triggered star formation. Based on numbers of bubble-associated RMS sources, we find that 67% {+-} 3% of MYSOs and (ultra-)compact H II regions appear to be associated with a bubble. We estimate that approximately 22% {+-} 2% of massive young stars may have formed as a result of feedback from expanding H II regions. Using MYSO-bubble correlations, we serendipitously recovered the location of the recently discovered massive cluster Mercer 81, suggesting the potential of such analyses for discovery of heavily extincted distant clusters.« less

  12. Neurobehavioural assessment and diagnosis in disorders of consciousness: a preliminary study of the Sensory Tool to Assess Responsiveness (STAR).

    PubMed

    Stokes, Verity; Gunn, Sarah; Schouwenaars, Katie; Badwan, Derar

    2016-08-05

    The Sensory Tool to Assess Responsiveness (STAR) is an interdisciplinary neurobehavioural diagnostic tool for individuals with prolonged disorders of consciousness. It utilises current diagnostic criteria and is intended to improve upon the high misdiagnosis rate in this population. This study assesses the inter-rater reliability of the STAR and its diagnostic validity in comparison with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) and the Wessex Head Injury Matrix (WHIM). Participants were patients with severe acquired brain injury resulting in a disorder of consciousness, who were admitted to the Royal Leamington Spa Rehabilitation Hospital between 1999 and 2009. Patients underwent sensory stimulation sessions during their period of admission, which were recorded on video. Using this footage, patients were re-assessed for this study using the STAR, WHIM and CRS-R criteria. The STAR demonstrated "moderate" inter-rater reliability, "substantial" diagnostic agreement with the CRS-R, and "moderate" agreement with the WHIM. There were no significant differences between diagnoses assigned by the different assessments. The STAR demonstrated a good degree of inter-rater reliability in identification of diagnoses for patients with disorders of consciousness. The diagnostic outcomes of the STAR agreed at a good level with the CRS-R, moderately with the WHIM, and did not significantly differ from either. This demonstrates the reliability and validity of the STAR, showing its appropriateness for clinical use. Future longitudinal studies and research into the STAR's applicability in long-stay rehabilitation are indicated.

  13. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE S235 COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, L. K.; Luna, A.; Mayya, Y. D.; Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having A{sub V} > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position–velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH{sub 3} data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  14. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE S235 COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, L. K.; Luna, A.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having A{sub V} > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mmmore » continuum emission. The position–velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH{sub 3} data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.« less

  15. Diffractive bremsstrahlung at high-β ^\\star LHC. Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwastowski, Janusz J.; Czekierda, Sabina; Staszewski, Rafał; Trzebiński, Maciej

    2017-04-01

    Feasibility studies of the measurement of the exclusive diffractive bremsstrahlung cross-section in proton-proton scattering at the centre of mass energy of 13 TeV at the LHC are reported. Present studies were performed for the low luminosity LHC running with the betatron function value of 90 m using the ATLAS associated forward detectors ALFA and ZDC. A simplified approach to the event simulation and reconstruction is used. The background influence is also discussed.

  16. The Search For Low-Mass, Red Dwarf Eclipsing Binary Stars and the Photometric Study of Two New Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffey, James F.

    2010-01-01

    About 70% of the stars in the Galaxy are thought to be low-mass, red dwarfs. In addition, about half of the Galaxy's stars are believed to be members of binary systems. Logically, there should be many examples of red dwarf binaries, and some of these should exhibit eclipses. Eclipsing binary stars are important because they provide the most direct determination of a star's physical parameters, such as mass and radius. Yet, we do not find many eclipsing binary stars made up of low-mass, red dwarf stars. To date only a handful of systems have been discovered and studied. In an effort to increase the number of known cases, the All-Sky Automated Survey database was searched to determine candidate stars for follow up observations. I will discuss the photometric study of two red dwarf eclipsing binary systems found in this way. Three-color VRI photometry and preliminary theoretical models have been produced for these two systems to estimate most of the physical parameters of these stars, except for mass, which would also require radial velocity data. This work was funded by the NASA Missouri Space Grant Consortium.

  17. Near-infrared variability study of the central 2.3 × 2.3 arcmin2 of the Galactic Centre - II. Identification of RR Lyrae stars in the Milky Way nuclear star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Schödel, Rainer; Williams, Benjamin F.; Nogueras-Lara, Francisco; Gallego-Cano, Eulalia; Gallego-Calvente, Teresa; Wang, Q. Daniel; Rich, R. Michael; Morris, Mark R.; Do, Tuan; Ghez, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Because of strong and spatially highly variable interstellar extinction and extreme source crowding, the faint (K ≥ 15) stellar population in the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster is still poorly studied. RR Lyrae stars provide us with a tool to estimate the mass of the oldest, relative dim stellar population. Recently, we analysed HST/WFC3/IR observations of the central 2.3 × 2.3 arcmin2 of the Milky Way and found 21 variable stars with periods between 0.2 and 1 d. Here, we present a further comprehensive analysis of these stars. The period-luminosity relationship of RR Lyrae is used to derive their extinctions and distances. Using multiple approaches, we classify our sample as 4 RRc stars, 4 RRab stars, 3 RRab candidates and 10 binaries. Especially, the four RRab stars show sawtooth light curves and fall exactly on to the Oosterhoff I division in the Bailey diagram. Compared to the RRab stars reported by Minniti et al., our new RRab stars have higher extinction (AK > 1.8) and should be closer to the Galactic Centre. The extinction and distance of one RRab stars match those for the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster given in previous works. We perform simulations and find that after correcting for incompleteness, there could be not more than 40 RRab stars within the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster and in our field of view. Through comparing with the known globular clusters of the Milky Way, we estimate that if there exists an old, metal-poor (-1.5 < [Fe/H] < -1) stellar population in the Milky Way nuclear star cluster on a scale of 5 × 5 pc, then it contributes at most 4.7 × 105 M⊙, I.e. ˜18 per cent of the stellar mass.

  18. Validation of the German version of the STarT-Back Tool (STarT-G): a cohort study with patients from primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Sven; Krug, Katja; Hill, Jonathan C; Stock, Christian; Steinhaeuser, Jost; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Joos, Stefanie

    2015-11-11

    Current research emphasizes the high prevalence and costs of low back pain (LBP). The STarT Back Tool was designed to support primary care decision making for treatment by helping to determine the treatment prognosis of patients with non-specific low back pain. The German version is the STarT-G. The cross-cultural translation of the tool followed a structured and widely accepted process but to date it was only partially validated with a small sample. The aim of the study was to test the psychometric properties construct validity, discriminative ability, internal consistency and test-retest-reliability of the STarT-G and to compare them with values given for the original English version. A consecutive cohort study with a two-week retest was conducted among patients with non-specific LBP, aged 18 to 60 years, from primary care practices. Questionnaires were collected before the first consultation, and two weeks later by post, using the following reference standards: the Roland and Morris disability questionnaire, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Psychometric properties examined included the tool's discriminative abilities, whether the psychosocial subscale was one factor, internal consistency, item redundancy, test-retest reliability and floor and ceiling effects. There were 228 patients recruited with a mean age of 42.2 (SD 11.0) years, and 53 % were female. The areas under the curve (AUC) for discriminative ability ranged from 0.70 (STarT-G Subscale - Pain Catastrophizing Scale; CI95 0.63, 0.78) to 0.77 (STarT-G Total - Composite reference standard, CI95 0.60, 0.94). Factor loadings ranged from 0.49 to 0.74. Cronbach's alpha testing the internal consistency and redundancy for the total/subscale scores were α = 0.52/0.55 respectively. The STarT-G test-retest reliability Kappa values for the total/subscale scores were 0.67/0.68 respectively. No floor or ceiling effects were present. The

  19. Binaries, cluster dynamics and population studies of stars and stellar phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, Dany

    2005-10-01

    The effects of binaries on population studies of stars and stellar phenomena have been investigated over the past 3 decades by many research groups. Here we will focus mainly on the work that has been done recently in Brussels and we will consider the following topics: the effect of binaries on overall galactic chemical evolutionary models and on the rates of different types of supernova, the population of point-like X-ray sources where we distinguish the standard high mass X-ray binaries and the ULXs, a UFO-scenario for the formation of WR+OB binaries in dense star systems. Finally we critically discuss the possible effect of rotation on population studies.

  20. IRAS 21391 + 5802 - A study in intermediate mass star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilking, Bruce; Mundy, Lee; Mcmullin, Joseph; Hezel, Thomas; Keene, Jocelyn

    1993-01-01

    We present infrared and millimeter wavelength observations of the cold IRAS source 21391 + 5802 and its associated molecular core. Infrared observations at lambda = 3.5 microns reveal a heavily obscured, central point source which is coincident with a compact lambda = 2.7 mm continuum and C18O emission region. The source radiates about 310 solar luminosities, primarily at FIR wavelengths, suggesting that it is a young stellar object of intermediate mass. The steeply rising spectral energy distribution and the large fraction of the system mass residing in circumstellar material imply that IRAS 21391 + 5802 is in an early stage of evolution. The inferred dust temperature indicates a temperature gradient in the core. A comprehensive model for the surrounding core of dust and gas is devised to match the observed dust continuum emission and multitransition CS emission from this and previous studies. We find a r exp -1.5 +/- 0.2 density gradient consistent with that of a gravitationally evolved core and a total core mass of 380 solar masses. The observed dust emission is most consistent with a lambda exp -1.5 - lambda exp -2 dust emissivity law; for a lambda exp -2 law, the data are best fit by a mass opacity coefficient of 3.6 x 10 exp -3 sq cm/g at lambda = 1.25 mm.

  1. Studies of low-mass interacting binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainger, Paul P.

    1990-01-01

    have come into contact but are not yet/currently in thermal contact, exhibiting a temperature difference between the components. BXAnd like other B-type systems seems to be reaching this contact state for the first time, but the position of VW Boo is uncertain, and whilst evidence that it could be in the "broken contact" state predicted by the TRO Theory is far from conclusive, its lower orbital angular momentum clearly marks the system as worthy of further study. SS Ari and AG Vir exhibit light curves with unequal quadrature heights. Attempts to treat the higher quadrature as a region of "excess luminosity" due to an energy transfer "warm spot" does not however provide a good model of this phenomenon. Since invoking a dark starspot model also does not provide a good explanation for such systems, it may be that this form of light curve distortion is due to an entirely different form of distorting surface phenomenon. Like BX And, AG Vir appears to be just reaching contact for the first time, but like VW Boo, the slightly lower angular momentum of SS Ari warrants further study.

  2. Star atlas of Dzewueyhuan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. T.

    Based on star positions from the Chinese stellar catalog, the atlas of 340 stars near the celestial north pole region, Dzewueyhuan, is presented. The Chinese philosophy of naming stars is also described. This is the beginning of a study of this catalog.

  3. A near-infrared study of AGB and red giant stars in the Leo I dSph galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, E. V.; Gullieuszik, M.; Rizzi, L.; Girardi, L.; Marigo, P.; Saviane, I.

    2010-05-01

    A near-infrared imaging study of the evolved stellar populations in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo I is presented. Based on JHK observations obtained with the WFCAM wide-field array at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, we build a near-infrared photometric catalogue of red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in Leo I over a 13.5 arcmin2 area. The V - K colours of RGB stars, obtained by combining the new data with existing optical observations, allow us to derive a distribution of global metallicity [M/H] with average [M/H] = -1.51 (uncorrected) or [M/H] =-1.24 +/- 0.05(int) +/- 0.15(syst) after correction for the mean age of Leo I stars. This is consistent with the results from spectroscopy once stellar ages are taken into account. Using a near-infrared two-colour diagram, we discriminate between carbon- and oxygen-rich AGB stars and obtain a clean separation from Milky Way foreground stars. We reveal a concentration of C-type AGB stars relative to the red giant stars in the inner region of the galaxy, which implies a radial gradient in the intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) stellar populations. The numbers and luminosities of the observed carbon- and oxygen-rich AGB stars are compared with those predicted by evolutionary models including the thermally pulsing AGB phase, to provide new constraints to the models for low-metallicity stars. We find an excess in the predicted number of C stars fainter than the RGB tip, associated to a paucity of brighter ones. The number of O-rich AGB stars is roughly consistent with the models, yet their predicted luminosity function is extended to brighter luminosity. Although these discrepancies can be partly ascribed to significant uncertainties in the Leo I star formation history and incompleteness of the spectroscopic samples of C stars fainter than the RGB tip, it appears more likely that the adopted evolutionary models overestimate the C-star lifetime and underestimate their K-band luminosity.

  4. A Computational Study of Parabolic Encounters of Black Holes and Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holyoke, Linda; Schnetter, Erik

    2011-04-01

    There is still uncertainty regarding the progenitors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts (SGRB). One of the many proposed models is based on parabolic encounters between black holes and compact stars (such as neutron stars) within globular clusters. A recent Newtonian computational study supports this SGRB mechanism (Lee et al., ApJ 720, 953 (2010)). With the motivation that accuracy will increase when general relativity is taken into account, we present a study where we perform fully relativistic simulations. We compare results to the Newtonian study and assess the validity of the proposed mechanism. Our current results indicate a potential SGRB production; we observe formation of a neutron star accretion disk with a mass and estimated lifetime not inconsistent with the requirements for an SGRB. Future work will improve our initial setup generation, will follow the simulated system for a longer time, and will explore a larger set of initial parameters such as masses and spins to be able to estimate event rates.

  5. Structure of stable binary neutron star merger remnants: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastaun, W.; Ciolfi, R.; Giacomazzo, B.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study the merger of two neutron stars with a gravitational mass of 1.4 M⊙ each, employing the Shen-Horowitz-Teige equation of state. This equation of state is a corner case, allowing the formation of a stable neutron star with the given total baryonic mass of 3.03 M⊙. We investigate in unprecedented detail the structure of the remnant, in particular the mass distribution, the thermal structure, and the rotation profile. We also compute fluid trajectories both inside the remnant and those relevant for the formation of the disk. We find a peanut-shaped fluid flow inside the remnant following a strong m =2 perturbation. Moreover, the flow is locally compressive, causing the appearance of dynamic hot spots. Further, we introduce new diagnostic measures that are easy to implement in numeric simulations and that allow one to quantify mass and compactness of merger remnants in a well-defined way. As in previous studies of supra- and hypermassive stars, we find a remnant with a slowly rotating core and an outer envelope rotating at nearly Keplerian velocity. We compute a Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff star model which agrees well with that of the remnant in the core, while the latter possesses extensive outer layers rotating close to Kepler velocity. Finally, we extract the gravitational wave signal and discuss the detectability with modern observatories. This study has implications for the interpretation of gravitational wave detections from the postmerger phase and is relevant for short gamma-ray burst models.

  6. A star formation study of the ATLAS3D early-type galaxies with the AKARI all-sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokusho, T.; Kaneda, H.; Bureau, M.; Suzuki, T.; Murata, K.; Kondo, A.; Yamagishi, M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The star formation properties of early-type galaxies (ETGs) are currently the subject of considerable interest, particularly whether they differ from the star formation properties of gas-rich spirals. Aims: We perform a systematic study of star formation in a large sample of local ETGs with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and dust emission, focusing on the star formation rates (SFRs) and star formation efficiencies (SFEs) of the galaxies. Methods: Our sample is composed of the 260 ETGs from the ATLAS3D survey, from which we used the cold gas measurements (H I and CO). We estimated the SFRs from stellar, PAH, and dust fits to spectral energy distributions created from new AKARI measurements and with literature data from WISE and 2MASS. Results: The mid-infrared luminosities of non-CO-detected galaxies are well correlated with their stellar luminosities, showing that they trace (circum)stellar dust emission. CO-detected galaxies show an excess above these correlations, uncorrelated with their stellar luminosities, indicating that they likely contain PAHs and dust of interstellar origin. PAH and dust luminosities of CO-detected galaxies show tight correlations with their molecular gas masses; the derived current SFRs are typically 0.01-1M⊙ yr-1. These SFRs systematically decrease with stellar age at fixed stellar mass, while they correlate nearly linearly with stellar mass at fixed age. The majority of local ETGs follow the same star formation law as local star-forming galaxies and their current SFEs do not depend on either stellar mass or age. Conclusions: Our results clearly indicate that molecular gas is fueling current star formation in local ETGs, which appear to acquire this gas via mechanisms regulated primarily by stellar mass. The current SFEs of local ETGs are similar to those of local star-forming galaxies, indicating that their low SFRs are likely due to smaller cold gas fractions rather than a suppression of star formation.

  7. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    MAKISHIMA, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1–7) × 108 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states. PMID:27169348

  8. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makishima, K.

    2016-05-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1?7) × 10^8 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states.

  9. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1-7) × 10(8) T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states.

  10. A study of uniform stars using 1/d-expansions and numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, D. S.; Yu, T. C.

    2000-02-01

    We study a lattice model of an interacting uniform self-avoiding star polymer with f branches. A 1/d -expansion for the limiting reduced free energy is derived through order 1/d for general f and, for f = 3, to order 1/d 2 . The terms in the expansion are independent of f and agree term by term with the corresponding expansion for interacting self-avoiding walks. We also present a miscellany of numerical results obtained by more conventional series and Monte Carlo techniques. All our results, both past and present, support the conjecture that the limiting reduced free energies of f -stars, walks and polygons are identical for all values of the interaction parameter icons/Journals/Common/beta" ALT="beta" ALIGN="TOP"/> .

  11. Radio and infrared study of the star-forming region IRAS 20286+4105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Varsha; Das, S. R.; Tej, A.; Vig, S.; Ghosh, S. K.; Ojha, D. K.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we present a multiwavelength investigation of the star-forming complex IRAS 20286+4105, located in the Cygnus X region. Near-infrared K-band data are used to revisit the cluster/stellar group identified in previous studies. Radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz show the presence of a H II region possibly powered by a star of spectral type B0-B0.5. The cometary morphology of the ionized region is explained by invoking the bow-shock model, where the likely association with a nearby supernova remnant is also explored. A compact radio knot with a non-thermal spectral index is detected towards the centre of the cloud. Mid-infrared data from the Spitzer Legacy Survey of the Cygnus X region show the presence of six Class I young stellar objects inside the cloud. Thermal dust emission in this complex is modelled using Herschel far-infrared data to generate dust temperature and column density maps. Herschel images also show the presence of two clumps in this region, the masses of which are estimated to be ∼175 and 30 M⊙. The mass-radius relation and the surface density of the clumps mean that they do not qualify as massive star-forming sites. An overall picture of a runaway star ionizing the cloud and a triggered population of intermediate-mass, Class I sources located towards the cloud centre emerges from this multiwavelength study. Variation in the dust emissivity spectral index is shown to exist in this region and is seen to have an inverse relation with the dust temperature.

  12. A Study of Low-Metallicity Red Giant Stars in the Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Using APOGEE Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wanying; Simon, Joshua D.; APOGEE-2

    2017-01-01

    Studying the chemical evolution of stars in the Milky Way’s faint dwarf galaxy satellites can provide valuable insight into the formation of the Galaxy and its companions. Past chemical abundance studies of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy contain a maximum of sixteen stars, but large surveys such as APOGEE (Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment), which perform high-resolution spectroscopy (R ˜ 22,500) for hundreds of stars at a time, have the potential to vastly expand the amount of available stellar chemical abundance data and provide a more comprehensive view of the dSph’s chemical evolution. However, the APOGEE reduction and analysis pipelines were designed for high S/N observations of bright stars, and have not been tested in the lower S/N regime of dSph stars. We evaluate the performance of the APOGEE pipeline for low S/N spectra taken from faint, low-metallicity stars in the galaxy. We compare APOGEE metallicities against those found in literature, and examine the spectra for elemental absorption lines. We also attempt to constrain the population of binary stars in the dSph.

  13. StarBASE: Fighting and Tracing Geometry Changes by Applying Differential Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J. C.; Lauret, J.; Perevoztchikov, V.

    2011-12-01

    The STAR experiment has evolved significantly since it first began operation. Detector subsystems have been added, removed, and/or significantly modified between (and on occasion within) the 10 RHIC runs. Mistakes, oversimplifications and bugs in the geometry model have been discovered and addressed as simulations are confronted with ever-more-precise data. We therefore maintain over 30 distinct versions of the geometry in order to support simulation needs related to ongoing analysis, upgrade studies and historical reference. In order to help us understand the impact of geometry changes on detector response in our various simulation productions we have developed the StarBASE application within the VMC framework. StarBASE provides the capability to perform detailed comparisons of the material and medium properties between any version of our geometry and a baseline version. This allows us to perform regression tests between library releases, to ensure that changes to one part of the geometry do not have unintended consequences in another part of the geometry, and to help to quantify the impact of an evolving geometry on different physics measurements.

  14. Metropolitan Transportation Management Center : a case study : Houston TranStar maximizing safety and mobility for the public

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-10-01

    The following case study provides a snapshot of Houston's TranStar transportation management center. It follows the outline provided in the companion document, Metropolitan Transportation Management Center Concepts of Operation - A Cross Cutting Stud...

  15. A semi-analytic study of axial perturbations of ultra compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völkel, Sebastian H.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2017-06-01

    Compact object perturbations, at linear order, often lead in solving one or more coupled wave equations. The study of these equations was typically done by numerical or semi-analytical methods. The WKB method and the associated Bohr-Sommerfeld rule have proved extremely useful tools in the study of black-hole perturbations and the estimation of the related quasi-normal modes. Here we present an extension of the aforementioned semi-analytic methods in the study of perturbations of ultra-compact stars and gravastars.

  16. Understanding Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, John R.

    2011-10-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Stars in general; 3. Rotating variable stars; 4. Eclipsing variable stars; 5. Pulsating variable stars; 6. Cataclysmic variable stars; 7. Young variable stars; 8. Miscellaneous variable stars; 9. Applications of variable stars; 10. Epilogue; Appendices.

  17. An ultraviolet study of nearby luminous infrared galaxies: star formation histories and the role of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviraj, Sugata

    2009-04-01

    We employ ultraviolet (UV) and optical photometry, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveys, respectively, to study the star formation histories (SFHs) of 561 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs; LIR > 1011Lsolar) in the nearby (z < 0.2) Universe. Visual inspection of a subsample of galaxies with r < 16.8 and z < 0.1 (for which eyeball classification of galaxy morphologies is reliable) indicates that a small fraction (~4 per cent) have spheroidal or near-spheroidal morphologies and could be progenitors of elliptical galaxies. The remaining galaxies are morphologically late-type or ongoing mergers. 61 per cent of the LIRGs do not show signs of interactions (at the depth of the SDSS images), while the remaining objects are either interacting (~18 per cent) or show post-merger morphologies (~19 per cent). Notwithstanding the high obscuration in their stellar continua ( ~ 2.6 mag, assuming a Calzetti dust law), virtually all low-redshift LIRGs inhabit in the UV `blue cloud'. The average age of the underlying stellar populations in these objects is typically 5-9 Gyr, with a mean value of ~6.8 Gyr. Approximately 60 per cent of the LIRG population began their recent star formation (RSF) episode within the last Gyr, while the remaining objects began their RSF episodes 1 to 3 Gyr in the past. Up to 35 per cent of the stellar mass in the remnant forms in these episodes - the mean value is ~15 per cent. The (decay) time-scales of the star formation are typically approximately a few Gyr, indicating that the star formation rate does not decline significantly during the course of the burst. 14 per cent of the LIRG population host (type 2) active galactic nuclei (AGN), with a hint that the AGN fraction rises in interacting population (although low number statistics hamper a robust result). The AGN hosts show UV and optical colours that are redder than those of the normal (non-AGN) population. There is no evidence for a

  18. Study of Pre-Main Sequence Stars Born in LDN 1251

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eredics, M.; Kun, M.

    2003-01-01

    We observed the spectra of Hα emission stars in the molecular cloud L1251 using the CAFOS spectrograph on the 2.2 m telescope of Calar Alto Observatory. We found 7 pre-main sequence stars born in the cloud and determined their spectral and luminosity classes. These spectroscopic data, supplemented with near-infrared (JHK) magnitudes allowed us to place these stars in the HR diagram. This paper discusses the evolutionary status of star formation in LDN 1251.

  19. Charging and performance of the CubeSTAR satellite studied by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloch, Wojciech; Bekkeng, Tore André; Lindem, Torfinn

    2012-07-01

    A good understanding of spacecraft-plasma interaction is important for all space missions and experiments. The spacecraft potential is determined by the plasma, photoemission and other currents [1]. A charged object can significantly disturb the surrounding plasma, and lead to wake formation. The wake features, such as ion focusing, can influence the measurements of the plasma by the instruments onboard. A study of this problem using analytical models is difficult and can not account for all phenomena. This has encouraged use of numerical models for self-consistent studies of the plasma-object interactions on a detailed kinetic level [2][3]. With three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations [3][4], we address the spacecraft-plasma interaction in various plasma environments, and account for the self-consistent charging of the spacecraft by plasma and photoemission currents. As a specific case, we consider the interactions between plasma and a CubeSTAR satellite. CubeSTAR is a nano-satellite for the space weather studies being constructed in Norway, with the launch scheduled for year 2013. With a novel Langmuir probe system [5], it will measure the absolute electron densities with a high spatial resolution, allowing for studies of small scale plasma irregularities. We perform a systematic study of the role of the wakefield on the measurements with the Langmuir probes onboard the CubeSTAR for the plasma conditions relevant for the planned polar orbit. The simulation results are of relevance also for other spacecraft missions. [1] Whipple E C, Rep. Prog. Phys. 44, 1197 (1981). [2] Roussel J F and Berthelier J J, J. Geophys. Res. 109, A01104 (2004). [3] Yaroshenko V V et al., J. Geophys. Res. 116, A12218 (2011). [4] Miloch W J Kroll M and Block D 2010 Phys. Plasmas 17, 103703 (2010). [5] Bekkeng T A et al. Meas. Sci. Technol. 21, 085903 (2010).

  20. How Do Multiple-Star Systems Form? VLA Study Reveals "Smoking Gun"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Astronomers have used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to image a young, multiple-star system with unprecedented detail, yielding important clues about how such systems are formed. Most Sun-sized or larger stars in the Universe are not single, like our Sun, but are members of multiple-star systems. Astronomers have been divided on how such systems can form, producing competing theoretical models for this process. Multiple Star Formation Graphic Proposed Formation Process for L1551 IRS5 CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for page of graphics and full information The new VLA study produced a "smoking gun" supporting one of the competing models, said Jeremy Lim, of the Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan, whose study, done with Shigehisa Takakuwa of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, is published in the December 10 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. Ironically, their discovery of a third, previously-unknown, young star in the system may support a second theoretical model. "There may be more than one way to make a multiple-star system," Lim explained. The astronomers observed an object called L1551 IRS5, young, still-forming protostars enshrouded in a cloud of gas and dust, some 450 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Taurus. Invisible to optical telescopes because of the gas and dust, this object was discovered in 1976 by astronomers using infrared telescopes. A VLA study in 1998 showed two young stars orbiting each other, each surrounded by a disk of dust that may, in time, congeal into a system of planets. Lim and Takakuwa re-examined the system, using improved technical capabilities that greatly boosted the quality of their images. "In the earlier VLA study, only half of the VLA's 27 antennas had receivers that could collect the radio waves, at a frequency of 43 GigaHertz (GHz), coming from the dusty disks. When we re-observed this

  1. Design of the iSTAR International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatge, Coty B.; Slater, Stephanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Beginning in 2013, a small international collaborative of discipline-based astronomy education researchers began to build the foundation to start the International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning Project, known simply as iSTAR. The project was a direct result of the inability of existing large international investigations into the learning of science, such as the TIMSS and PISA studies, to provide actionable intelligence on either strengths or weaknesses of astronomy teaching across the world. This is not because those studies were flawed; rather, they focused on the general characteristics of teaching and learning across all sciences. Prior to the iSTAR effort, there has been no systematic effort to measure individual's conceptual astronomy understanding across the globe. The goal of studying a widely dispersed international sample is to identify cultural subpopulations that do not conform to our existing knowledge of student misconceptions, highlighting unexpected cultural or educational practices that hint at alternative, and perhaps more effective, means of instruction. As a first step, we are carefully translating the Test Of Astronomy STandards - TOAST multiple-choice assessment instrument and carefully attending to nuances that occur during the translation process as cultural clues to differences in the teaching and learning of astronomy. We are actively welcoming and seeking international partners in this work through the CAPERteam.com website and at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/iSTAR-Registration . This project is sponsored and managed by the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research in collaboration with members of the International Astronomical Union-Commission 46.

  2. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  3. A Submillimetre Study of Massive Star Formation Within the W51 Complex and Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Harriet Alice Louise

    Despite its importance the fundamental question of how massive stars form remains unanswered, with improvements to both models and observations having crucial roles to play. To quote Bate et al. (2003) computational models of star formation are limited because "conditions in molecular clouds are not sufficiently well understood to be able to select a representative sample of cloud cores for the initial conditions". It is this notion that motivates the study of the environments within Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) and Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), known sites of massive star formation, at the clump and core level. By studying large populations of these objects, it is possible to make conclusions based on global properties. With this in mind I study the dense molecular clumps within one of the most massive GMCs in the Galaxy: the W51 GMC. New observations of the W51 GMC in the 12CO, 13CO and C18O (3-2) transitions using the HARP instrument on the JCMT are presented. With the help of the clump finding algorithm CLUMPFIND a total of 1575 dense clumps are identified of which 1130 are associated with the W51 GMC, yielding a dense mass reservoir of 1.5 × 10^5 M contained within these clumps. Of these clumps only 1% by number are found to be super-critical, yielding a super-critical clump formation efficiency of 0.5%, below current SFE estimates of the region. This indicates star formation within the W51 GMC will diminish over time although evidence from the first search for molecular outflows presents the W51 GMC in an active light with a lower limit of 14 outflows. The distribution of the outflows within the region searched found them concentrated towards the W51A region. Having much smaller sizes and masses, obtaining global properties of clumps and cores within IRDCs required studying a large sample of these objects. To do this pre-existing data from the SCUBA Legacy Catalogue was utilised to study IRDCs within a catalogues based on 8 μm data. This data identified

  4. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  5. An Infrared Study of the Circumstellar Material Associated with the Carbon Star R Sculptoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, M. J.; Herter, T. L.; Maercker, M.; Lau, R. M.; Sloan, G. C.

    2018-01-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star R Sculptoris (R Scl) is one of the most extensively studied stars on the AGB. R Scl is a carbon star with a massive circumstellar shell (M shell ∼ 7.3 × 10‑3 M ⊙) that is thought to have been produced during a thermal pulse event ∼2200 years ago. To study the thermal dust emission associated with its circumstellar material, observations were taken with the Faint Object InfraRed CAMera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) at 19.7, 25.2, 31.5, 34.8, and 37.1 μm. Maps of the infrared emission at these wavelengths were used to study the morphology and temperature structure of the spatially extended dust emission. Using the radiative-transfer code DUSTY, and fitting the spatial profile of the emission, we find that a geometrically thin dust shell cannot reproduce the observed spatially resolved emission. Instead, a second dust component in addition to the shell is needed to reproduce the observed emission. This component, which lies interior to the dust shell, traces the circumstellar envelope of R Scl. It is best fit by a density profile with n ∝ r α , where α ={0.75}-0.25+0.45 and a dust mass of {M}d={9.0}-4.1+2.3× {10}-6 {M}ȯ . The strong departure from an r ‑2 law indicates that the mass-loss rate of R Scl has not been constant. This result is consistent with a slow decline in the post-pulse mass loss that has been inferred from observations of the molecular gas.

  6. 'Polaris, Mark Kummerfeldt's Star, and My Star.'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLure, John W.

    1984-01-01

    In most astronomy courses, descriptions of stars and constellations reveal the western European origins of the astronomers who named them. However, it is suggested that a study of non-western views be incorporated into astronomy curricula. Descriptions of various stars and constellations from different cultures and instructional strategies are…

  7. The SOLA Team: A Star Formation Project To Study the Soul of Lupus with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Saito, M.; Rodon, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2017-06-01

    The SOLA team is a multi-national and multi-wavelength collaboration composed by scientists with technical expertise in ALMA and in infrared and optical techniques. The aim of the team is to establish a low-mass star formation scenario based on the Lupus molecular clouds. In this talk I will present our unique catalog of pre-stellar and proto-stellar cores toward Lupus molecular clouds, the results on our latest studies in protoplanetary disks, as well as our ALMA Cycle 3 data aiming at testing the formation mechanism of sub-stellar objects in Lupus molecular clouds.

  8. Studies of low-mass star formation with the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D. J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Estimates are made of the far-infrared and submillimeter continuum and line emission from regions of low mass star formation. The intensity of this emission is compared with the sensitivity of the large deployable reflector (LDR), a large space telescope designed for this wavelength range. The proposed LDR is designed to probe the temperature, density, chemical structure, and the velocity field of the collapsing envelopes of these protostars. The LDR is also designed to study the accretion shocks on the cores and circumstellar disks of low-mass protostars, and to detect shock waves driven by protostellar winds.

  9. Study of a new central compact object: The neutron star in the supernova remnant G15.9+0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D.; Suleimanov, V.; Sasaki, M.; Santangelo, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present our study of the central point source CXOU J181852.0-150213 in the young Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G15.9+0.2 based on the recent ~90 ks Chandra observations. The point source was discovered in 2005 in shorter Chandra observations and was hypothesized to be a neutron star associated with the SNR. Our X-ray spectral analysis strongly supports the hypothesis of a thermally emitting neutron star associated with G15.9+0.2. We conclude that the object belongs to the class of young cooling low-magnetized neutron stars referred to as central compact objects (CCOs). We modeled the spectrum of the neutron star with a blackbody spectral function and with our hydrogen and carbon neutron star atmosphere models, assuming that the radiation is uniformly emitted by the entire stellar surface. Under this assumption, only the carbon atmosphere models yield a distance that is compatible with a source located in the Galaxy. In this respect, CXOU J181852.0-150213 is similar to two other well-studied CCOs, the neutron stars in Cas A and in HESS J1731-347, for which carbon atmosphere models were used to reconcile their emission with the known or estimated distances.

  10. Using NIRISS to study the formation and evolution of stars, disks, and planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Doug I.; JWST NIRISS GTO Team

    2017-06-01

    NIRISS on JWST is a powerful instrument for the study of star, disk, and planet formation and evolution. In this talk I will highlight the Wide Field Slitless Spectroscopy (WFSS) and Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) modes of NIRISS, along with lessons learned determining optimal observing strategies and project implementation in APT. The NIRISS WFSS mode uses a grism to provide modest resolution (R ~ 150) spectra of all sources within the observed field of view. Cold low-mass objects are distinct at NIRISS wavelengths (1.5 and 2.0 microns, in this case), and can be characterized through their speactra by their temperature and surface gravity sensitive molecular absorption features. Thus, WFSS observations will be an efficient way to locate and enumerate the young brown dwarfs and rogue planets in nearby star-forming regions. Alternatively, the NIRISS AMI mode offers the highest spatial resolution available on JWST at wavelengths greater than 2.5 micron, 70 - 400 mas, and modest inner working angle contrast, dm ~ 10, for individual bright sources. A significant advantage of observing from space is that, along with the phase closure, the interferometric phase amplitudes can also be recovered allowing some reconstruction of extended emission. Observations with AMI will be made of candidate and postulated planets forming within transition disks around young stars and for somewhat older planets in known extra-solar planetary systems. The AMI mode will also be used to study the zodiacal light in a bright debris disk system and to search for binary companions of Y dwarfs.

  11. The star-forming environment of an ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC4559: an optical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Cropper, Mark; Pakull, Manfred; Mushotzky, Richard; Wu, Kinwah

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the candidate optical counterparts and the stellar population in the star-forming complex around the bright ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in the western part of the spiral galaxy NGC4559, using the HST Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), XMM-Newton/Optical Monitor and ground-based data. We find that the ULX is located near a small group of OB stars, but is not associated with any massive young clusters nor with any extraordinary massive stars. The brightest point source in the Chandra error circle is consistent with a single blue supergiant (BSG) of mass ~20Msolar and age ~10 Myr. A few other stars are resolved inside the error circle: mostly BSGs and red supergiants (RSGs) with inferred masses ~10-15Msolar and ages ~20 Myr. This is consistent with the interpretation of this ULX as a black hole (BH) accreting from a high-mass donor star in its supergiant phase, with mass transfer occurring via Roche-lobe overflow. The observed optical colours and the blue-to-red supergiant ratio suggest a low metal abundance for the stellar population: 0.2 <~Z/Zsolar<~ 0.4 (using the Padua tracks), or 0.05 <~Z/Zsolar<~ 0.2 (using the Geneva tracks). The age of the star-forming complex is <~30 Myr. Hα images show that this star-forming region has a ring-like appearance. We propose that it is an expanding wave of star formation, triggered by an initial density perturbation, in a region where the gas was only marginally stable to gravitational collapse. We also suggest that the most likely trigger was a collision with a satellite dwarf galaxy going through the gas-rich outer disc of NGC4559 less than 30 Myr ago. The culprit could be the dwarf galaxy visible a few arcsec north-west of the complex. If this is the case, this system is a scaled-down version of the Cartwheel galaxy. The X-ray data favour a BH more massive (M > 50Msolar) than typical Milky Way BH candidates. The optical data favour a young BH originating in the recent episode of massive star formation

  12. Detailed abundance study of four s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aarle, E.; Van Winckel, H.; De Smedt, K.; Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The photospheric abundances of evolved solar-type stars of different metallicities serve as probes into stellar evolution theory. Aims: Stellar photospheres of post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars bear witness to the internal chemical enrichment processes, integrated over their entire stellar evolution. Here we study post-AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). With their known distances, these rare objects are ideal tracers of AGB nucleosynthesis and dredge-up phenomena. Methods: We used the UVES spectrograph mounted on the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory, to obtain high-resolution spectra with high signal-to-noise of a sample of four post-AGB stars. The objects display a spectral energy distribution that indicates the presence of circumstellar dust. We perform a detailed abundance analysis on the basis of these spectra. Results: All objects are C-rich, and strongly enhanced in s-process elements. We deduced abundances of heavy s-process elements for all stars in the sample, and even found an indication of the presence of Hg in the spectrum of one object. The metallicity of all stars except J053253.51-695915.1 is considerably lower than the average value that is observed for the LMC. The derived luminosities show that we witness the late evolution of low-mass stars with initial masses close to 1 M⊙. An exception is J053253.51-695915.1 and we argue that this object is likely a binary. Conclusions: We confirmed the correlation between the efficiency of the third-dredge up and the neutron exposure that is detected in Galactic post-AGB stars. The non-existence of a correlation between metallicity and neutron irradiation is also confirmed and expanded to smaller metallicities. We confirm the status of 21 μm stars as post-carbon stars. Current theoretical AGB models overestimate the observed C/O ratios and fail to reproduce the variety of s-process abundance patterns that is observed in otherwise very similar objects

  13. Strange Quark Star and Hybrid Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seog Lee, Kang

    In this talk I will summarize my old works on strange quark stars and hybrid neutron stars with quark core including strangeness as applications of the phase diagram of strange quark matter originally studied for the relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The first part is the extension of the study of quark star formation in the early universe to the strange quark star, and the second part is my unpublished old work on the hybrid neutron star with hadronic crust surrounding strange quark matter core. Emphasis is on the careful treatment of the mixed phase including strangeness, known as Glendenning's mixed phase, which was an application of the phase diagram of strange quark matter.

  14. Astronomy Education Research Observations from the iSTAR international Study of Astronomical Reasoning Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatge, C. B.; Slater, S. J.; Slater, T. F.; Schleigh, S.; McKinnon, D.

    2016-12-01

    Historically, an important part of the scientific research cycle is to situate any research project within the landscape of the existing scientific literature. In the field of discipline-based astronomy education research, grappling with the existing literature base has proven difficult because of the difficulty in obtaining research reports from around the world, particularly early ones. In order to better survey and efficiently utilize the wide and fractured range and domain of astronomy education research methods and results, the iSTAR international Study of Astronomical Reasoning database project was initiated. The project aims to host a living, online repository of dissertations, theses, journal articles, and grey literature resources to serve the world's discipline-based astronomy education research community. The first domain of research artifacts ingested into the iSTAR database were doctoral dissertations. To the authors' great surprise, nearly 300 astronomy education research dissertations were found from the last 100-years. Few, if any, of the literature reviews from recent astronomy education dissertations surveyed even come close to summarizing this many dissertations, most of which have not been published in traditional journals, as re-publishing one's dissertation research as a journal article was not a widespread custom in the education research community until recently. A survey of the iSTAR database dissertations reveals that the vast majority of work has been largely quantitative in nature until the last decade. We also observe that modern-era astronomy education research writings reaches as far back as 1923 and that the majority of dissertations come from the same eight institutions. Moreover, most of the astronomy education research work has been done covering learners' grasp of broad knowledge of astronomy rather than delving into specific learning targets, which has been more in vogue during the last two decades. The surprisingly wide breadth

  15. Observational Study of Morphological Changes in Medium-mass Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Sze-Ning

    2014-02-01

    Medium-mass (or intermediate-mass) stars refer to main sequence stars with masses ranging from 0.4 to 8 solar masses. These stars are believed to finally evolve into the central stars of planetary nebulae (PNe) and white dwarfs. One of the fascinating aspects of PNe is their diverse morphology. To understand the mechanisms of the morphological changes from spherical circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to those forming highly diversified PNe, it is necessary to investigate the true three-dimensional (3D) morphology of PNe from two-dimensional images, and the short transition phase in-between the two phases should also be explored. "Water Fountain" (WF) sources belong to transition phase objects; they are AGB or post-AGB stars with collimated jets traced by high velocity water maser emissions in their CSEs. This thesis comprises of four chapters. The results can be divided into two major parts. Chapter 1 is the introduction on the related fields with brief reviews of previous observational studies on PNe and the rapidly evolving transition phase objects. Basic theories necessary for understanding the next chapters were also described, including those explaining the commonly observed Hα emission in PNe, the formation of multipolar PNe, the maser emission and the role of shock in circumstellar materials. The first major part of the results, about the morphological classification of multipolar PNe, is presented in Chapter 2. At the beginning of the chapter, the problems on the previous classification methods were pointed out. Then a three-lobed model was introduced. By changing the combination of the orientations of the three pairs of lobes, simulations using the model produced statistical results in classification and quantified the errors of misidentification. Assuming that all PNe observed have the true structure of three lobes, due to projection effect, only 49% of them would be correctly classified. 46% and 5% of them would be

  16. R&D Studies of a Lead-Scintillating Fiber Calorimeter as a STAR Forward Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmuganathan, Prashanth; STAR Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    A forward upgrade of the STAR detector will achieve several physics goals. Examples are studying the internal structure of nucleons and nuclei through measurement of di-jets and Drell-Yan and improvements in the resolution of energy weighted event plane determination for study of more central and more peripheral events in heavy-ion collisions. The AGS E864 lead-scintillating fiber calorimeter cells ((10 cm) 2 × 117 cm) were repurposed by pixelizing their readout into a three by three array of (3 . 3 cm) 2 pixels. A prototype six by six array of these cells (324 pixels) was mounted on the west side of the STAR detector during Run14 and events from 3He+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV were recorded. The detector response was simulated by a GEANT model using HIJING particle production. Further tests of the pixelized cells were conducted at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. In this talk, we will present the calorimeter response in 3He+Au collisions using reconstructed π0 from clusters formed from energy deposition by π0 decay gammas. Energy resolution and shower shapes from pixelization are also discussed using test beam data and simulations.

  17. Precise Laboratory Measurement of LINR Frequencies Useful to Studies of Star and Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    In March 2002, we began a program in laboratory spectroscopy to provide accurate molecular line frequencies essential to studies of the motions and abundances in star-froming dense cores and planet-forming circumstellar disks. The CN radical is one of the most important tracers of dynamical motions in protoplanetary disks around low mass pre-main sequence stars. The millimeter-wave spectrum of CN consists of rotational transitions every 113 GHz which are split into many resolved hyperfine components. Very narrow and fairly bright lines of SiO in the ground vibrational state have been observed in regions where protostellar outflows interact with the cold ambient gas. In support of future astronomical observations in these regions, 10 successive rotational lines in the ground vibrational state of Si0 between 86 and 500 GHz, and two lines near 800 GHz were measured in the laboratory to an accuracy of a few kHz. A negative glow discharge spectrometer that will allow the determination of accurate line frequencies of molecular ions has been constructed. We are presently modifying the method for cooling the magnetic field enhanced (negative glow) discharge cell to 77 K.

  18. Planetary companions of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kamp, P.

    Developments in photographic astronomy related to the employment of instruments with a long focal length provide the possibility to conduct searches for perturbations in the proper motion of stars as a basis for the discovery of companions of stars in the immediate vicinity of the sun. The analysis of such perturbations can lead to the determination of the orbital elements for such components. Attention is given to a review of photographic studies conducted with the considered objectives, the discovery of approximately 30 perturbations in the case of stars located within a distance of less than 30 light years, the nature of the identified companions, general considerations concerning a study of planetary systems of other stars, 'star-planets' or dark dwarfs, and the latest results with respect to the planetary system of Barnard's Star.

  19. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  20. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  1. A preliminary study on the effects of star fruit consumption on antioxidant and lipid status in elderly Thai individuals.

    PubMed

    Leelarungrayub, Jirakrit; Yankai, Araya; Pinkaew, Decha; Puntumetakul, Rungthip; Laskin, James J; Bloomer, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this preliminary study were to evaluate the antioxidant and lipid status before and after star fruit juice consumption in healthy elderly subjects, and the vitamins in star fruit extracts. A preliminary designated protocol was performed in 27 elderly individuals with a mean (±SD) age of 69.5±5.3 years, by planning a 2-week control period before 4 weeks of consumption of star fruit twice daily. Oxidative stress parameters such as total antioxidant capacity, glutathione, malondialdehyde, protein hydroperoxide, multivitamins such as l-ascorbic acid (Vit C), retinoic acid (Vit A), and tocopherol (Vit E), and the lipid profile parameters such as cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) were analyzed. Moreover, Vit C, Vit A, and Vit E levels were evaluated in the star fruit extracts during the 4-week period. In the 2-week control period, all parameters showed no statistically significant difference; after 4 weeks of consumption, significant improvement in the antioxidant status was observed with increased total antioxidant capacity and reduced malondialdehyde and protein hydroperoxide levels, as well as significantly increased levels of Vit C and Vit A, when compared to the two-time evaluation during the baseline periods. However, glutathione and Vit E showed no statistical difference. In addition, the HDL-C level was higher and the LDL-C level was significantly lower when compared to both baseline periods. But the levels of triglyceride and cholesterol showed no difference. Vit C and Vit A were identified in small quantities in the star fruit extract. This preliminary study suggested that consumption of star fruit juice twice daily for 1 month improved the elderly people's antioxidant status and vitamins, as well as improved the lipoproteins related to Vit C and Vit A in the star fruit extract.

  2. A preliminary study on the effects of star fruit consumption on antioxidant and lipid status in elderly Thai individuals

    PubMed Central

    Leelarungrayub, Jirakrit; Yankai, Araya; Pinkaew, Decha; Puntumetakul, Rungthip; Laskin, James J; Bloomer, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this preliminary study were to evaluate the antioxidant and lipid status before and after star fruit juice consumption in healthy elderly subjects, and the vitamins in star fruit extracts. Methods A preliminary designated protocol was performed in 27 elderly individuals with a mean (±SD) age of 69.5±5.3 years, by planning a 2-week control period before 4 weeks of consumption of star fruit twice daily. Oxidative stress parameters such as total antioxidant capacity, glutathione, malondialdehyde, protein hydroperoxide, multivitamins such as l-ascorbic acid (Vit C), retinoic acid (Vit A), and tocopherol (Vit E), and the lipid profile parameters such as cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) were analyzed. Moreover, Vit C, Vit A, and Vit E levels were evaluated in the star fruit extracts during the 4-week period. Results In the 2-week control period, all parameters showed no statistically significant difference; after 4 weeks of consumption, significant improvement in the antioxidant status was observed with increased total antioxidant capacity and reduced malondialdehyde and protein hydroperoxide levels, as well as significantly increased levels of Vit C and Vit A, when compared to the two-time evaluation during the baseline periods. However, glutathione and Vit E showed no statistical difference. In addition, the HDL-C level was higher and the LDL-C level was significantly lower when compared to both baseline periods. But the levels of triglyceride and cholesterol showed no difference. Vit C and Vit A were identified in small quantities in the star fruit extract. Conclusion This preliminary study suggested that consumption of star fruit juice twice daily for 1 month improved the elderly people’s antioxidant status and vitamins, as well as improved the lipoproteins related to Vit C and Vit A in the star fruit extract. PMID:27621606

  3. A case study of the Galactic H II region M17 and environs: Implications for the galactic star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew Samuel

    2009-09-01

    Determinations of star formation rates (SFRs) in the Milky Way and other galaxies are fundamentally based on diffuse emission tracers of ionized gas that are sensitive only to massive OB stars. OB stars dominate the ionization of H II regions, yet they make up <1% of young stellar populations. The primary goal of this Thesis is to obtain a detailed census of the young stellar population associated with a bright Galactic HII region and to compare the resulting star formation history with global SFR tracers. The main SFR tracer considered is infrared continuum, since it can be used to derive SFRs in both the Galactic and extragalactic cases. I focus this study on M17, one of the nearest giant H II regions to the Sun ( d = 2.1 kpc). The giant molecular cloud associated with M17 is a significant star-forming structure on the Galactic scale, with a complicated star formation history. I report the discovery that M17 is located on the rim of a 20-pc diameter bubble outlining a ~5 Myr old H II region, suggesting that the formation of the M17 ionizing cluster may have been triggered by the expansion of the bubble. Several dozen intermediate-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) are distributed around the rim of the bubble, indicating even more recent triggered star formation. The star formation rate in the central ionizing cluster is SFR X ~ 0.01 [Special characters omitted.] yr -1 , derived from the observed X-ray luminosity function of the young stellar population. I conclude with comparisons between SFR X and the SFRs predicted for M17 by widely-used calibrations based on infrared and radio continuum emission. The results imply that current SFR determinations based on ionized gas tracers are uncertain by factors of ~2-3, due chiefly to large uncertainties in the masses and ionizing photon production rates of O stars and the need to correct for the high binary fractions observed among massive stars.

  4. Study of the QCD Phase Diagram using STAR at RHIC - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Gary

    2017-01-20

    This grant supported the MSU STAR Group from April 1, 1998 to October 31, 2016. Originally the MSU STAR Group consisted of the principal investigator (PI), a staff physicist, and one graduate student. Funds were provided for half the summer salary of the PI, the full salary of the staff physicist, and half the costs associated with one graduate student. The other half of the PI’s summer salary and graduate student costs was covered by NSCL. In addition, this grant provided funds for travel and workstations related to STAR. Starting in 2009, the MSU STAR Group replaced the staff physicistmore » with a postdoctoral scientist.« less

  5. Study of the QCD Phase Diagram using STAR at RHIC - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Gary

    2017-01-20

    This grant supported the MSU STAR Group from April 1, 1998 to October 31, 2016. Originally the MSU STAR Group consisted of the principal investigator (PI), a staff physicist, and one graduate student. Funds were provided for half the summer salary of the PI, the full salary of the staff physicist, and half the costs associated with one graduate student. The other half of the PI’s summer salary and graduate student costs was covered by NSCL. In addition, this grant provided funds for travel and workstations related to STAR. Starting in 2009, the MSU STAR Group replaced the staff physicist with a postdoctoral scientist.

  6. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-12-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. Thirty are cluster member galaxies, and nine are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates between 8 and 525 Msolar yr-1. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J-band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, consistent with several previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell Cardiel et al.; Crawford et al.). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars and, therefore, recent star formation. Using the Starburst99 model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2-219 Msolar yr-1 for the cooling flow sample. For two-thirds of this sample, it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV-inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well-populated XMM UV cluster archive, and a more extensive follow-up study is currently underway.

  7. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 solar mass per year. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar mass per year for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  8. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  9. A Study of π Aquarii during a Quasi-normal Star Phase: Refined Fundamental Parameters and Evidence for Binarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorkman, Karen S.; Miroshnichenko, Anatoly S.; McDavid, David; Pogrosheva, Tatiana M.

    2002-07-01

    We present the results of recent multicolor photometric and high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the bright Be star π Aqr. Observational data collected from the literature were used to study the star's variations over the last four decades. The star is identified with the IR sources F22227+0107 in the IRAS Faint Point Source Catalog and MSX5 G066.0066-44.7392 in the MSX Catalog. The variations in near-IR brightness of π Aqr are found to be among the largest reported for Be stars. Since 1996, the star has shown only weak signs of circumstellar emission, which has allowed us to refine the fundamental stellar parameters: AV=0.15 mag, Teff=24,000 K, logg=3.9, and MV=-2.95 mag. A weak emission component of the Hα line has been detected during the recent quasi-normal star phase. From analysis of the Hα line profiles, we find antiphased radial velocity variations of the emission component and the photospheric absorption, with a period of 84.1 days and semiamplitudes of 101.4 and 16.7 km s-1, respectively. This result suggests that π Aqr may be a binary system consisting of stars with masses of M1sin3i=12.4Msolar, M2sin3i=2.0Msolar. We also estimate the orbital inclination angle to be between 50° and 75°. We suggest that the photometric, spectroscopic, and polarimetric variations observed during the second half of the 20th century may be due to variable mass transfer between the binary components.

  10. Construction of the iSTAR international Study of Astronomical Reasoning Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, S. J.; Tatge, C. B.; Slater, T. F.; Bretones, P. S.; Schleigh, S.

    2016-12-01

    Perhaps more than any other science discipline-based education research field, the scholarly literature base describing and documenting astronomy education research is highly fragmented and widely dispersed across numerous journals. The resulting wide diversity of journals that publish astronomy education research presents an arduous challenge for scholars trying to best understand what work has been done and what work still needs to be done. Moreover, a vast amount of education research on the teaching and learning of astronomy exists in dissertations that were never published and even more exists in the realm of un-disseminated grey literature hosted in conference proceedings and society newsletters going back decades. With a few notable exceptions far less extensive than the current project, there has been no comprehensive repository for cataloging astronomy education research methods and results to date. In response, an international cadre of scholars coordinated by the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research are creating the underlying structure for an online database in order to conduct an international Study of Astronomy Reasoning, iSTAR, project. The online iSTAR database serves as an online host to bring together in one place digital copies of hard to locate journal articles, isolated dissertations and theses, and professional meeting contributions to extend the world's scholars abilities to more easily find and utilize a far broader collection of astronomy education research literature than has been previously available. Works are categorized by research method, nature of study-participants, educational learning venue studied, country and language of the study, and other fruitfully useful categories. Scholars wishing to add their own literature resources are encouraged to contribute to the online database located at istardatabase.org

  11. "Star Wars", Model Making, and Cultural Critique: A Case for Film Study in Art Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Films are multimodal, often memorable, and change one's way of thinking. Films provide narratives and visual metaphors that function as tools for one's imagination and learning. No other film has amplified this phenomenon in the United States more than the "Star Wars" Cycle. "Star Wars" exemplifies the multidimensionality of…

  12. A Study of the Generalizability of the System for Teaching and Learning Assessment and Review (STAR).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teddlie, Charles; And Others

    The results are provided of an initial analysis of the reliability (generalizability) of the System for Teaching and Learning Assessment and Review (STAR) as a comprehensive measure of classroom teaching and learning for making teacher certification decisions. The STAR contains 140 indicators of teacher effectiveness and student learning, which…

  13. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  14. A kinematic study and membership analysis of the Lupus star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Bertout, C.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: A precise determination of the distance to individual stars is required to reliably determine the fundamental parameters (mass and age) of young stellar objects. This paper is dedicated to investigating the kinematic properties of the Lupus moving group of young stars with the primary objective of deriving individual parallaxes for each group member. Methods: We identify those stars in the Lupus star-forming region that define the comoving association of young stars by utilizing our new and improved convergent point search method that allows us to derive the precise position of the convergent point of the comoving association from the stars' proper motions. We used published proper motion catalogs and searched the literature for radial velocities, which are needed to compute individual parallaxes. We supplemented the radial velocity data with new measurements from spectroscopic observations performed with the FEROS spectrograph mounted on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope at La Silla. Results: We identify a comoving group with 109 pre-main sequence stars and candidates that define the kinematic properties of the Lupus low-mass star-forming region. We derive individual parallaxes for stars with known radial velocity and tentative parallaxes for the remaining group members by assuming that all stars share the same space motion. The convergent point method, combined with the k-NN algorithm, makes it possible to distinguish the Lupus and Upper Centaurus Lupus stars from the adjacent Scorpius-Centaurus association. We find significant depth effects in this region and show that the classical T Tauri stars, located in the close vicinity of the Lupus molecular clouds, form a background population, while the weak-emission line T Tauri stars are dispersed not only in angular extent but also in depth. Conclusions: The newly derived individual parallaxes will be used in a forthcoming paper to refine the masses and ages of Lupus T Tauri stars, with the aim of better

  15. HST Snapshot Study of Variable Stars in Globular Clusters: Inner Region of NGC 6441

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Stetson, Peter B.; Catelan, Marcio; Sweigart, Allen V.; Layden, Andrew C.; Rich, R. Michael

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope snapshot program to survey the inner region of the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6441 for its variable stars. A total of 57 variable stars was found including 38 RR Lyrae stars, 6 Population II Cepheids, and 12 long period variables. Twenty-four of the RR Lyrae stars and all of the Population II Cepheids were previously undiscovered in ground-based surveys. Of the RR Lyrae stars observed in h s survey, 26 are pulsating in the fundamental mode with a mean period of 0.753 d and 12 are first-overtone mode pulsators with a mean period of 0.365 d. These values match up very well with those found in ground-based surveys. Combining all the available data for NGC 6441, we find mean periods of 0.759 d and 0.375 d for the RRab and RRc stars, respectively. We also find that the RR Lyrae in this survey are located in the same regions of a period-amplitude diagram as those found in ground-based surveys. The overall ratio of RRc to total RR Lyrae is 0.33. Although NGC 6441 is a metal-rich globular cluster and would, on that ground, be expected either to have few RR Lyrae stars, or to be an Oosterhoff type I system, its RR Lyrae more closely resemble those in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters. However, even compared to typical Oosterhoff type II systems, the mean period of its RRab stars is unusually long. We also derived I-band period-luminosity relations for the RR Lyrae stars. Of the six Population II Cepheids, five are of W Virginis type and one is a BL Herculis variable star. This makes NGC 6441, along with NGC 6388, the most metal-rich globular cluster known to contain these types of variable stars. Another variable, V118, may also be a Population II Cepheid given its long period and its separation in magnitude from the RR Lyrae stars. We examine the period-luminosity relation for these Population II Cepheids and compare it to those in other globular clusters and in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We argue that there does

  16. Re-grouping stars based on the chemical tagging technique: A case study of M67 and IC4651

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Soubiran, C.

    2016-12-01

    The chemical tagging technique proposed by te{2002ARA&A..40..487F} is based on the idea that stars formed from the same molecular cloud should share the same chemical signature. Thus, using only the chemical composition of stars we should be able to re-group the ones that once belonged to the same stellar aggregate. In te{2015A&A...577A..47B}, we tested the technique on open cluster stars using iSpec tep{2014A&A...569A.111B}, we demonstrated their chemical homogeneity but we found that the 14 studied elements lead to chemical signatures too similar to reliably distinguish stars from different clusters. This represents a challenge to the technique and a new question was open: Could the inclusion of other elements help to better distinguish stars from different aggregates? With an updated and improved version of iSpec, we derived abundances for 28 elements using spectra from HARPS, UVES and NARVAL archives for the open clusters M67 and IC4651, and we found that the chemical signatures of both clusters are very similar.

  17. Interstellar Medium and Star Formation Studies with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, P.; Vig, S.; Maheswar, G.; Kamath, U. S.; Tej, A.

    2016-12-01

    Stars and planetary systems are formed out of molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. Although the sequence of steps involved in star formation are generally known, a comprehensive theory which describes the details of the processes that drive formation of stars is still missing. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), with its unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution, will play a major role in filling these gaps in our understanding. In this article, we present a few science cases that the Indian star formation community is interested in pursuing with SKA, which include investigation of AU-sized structures in the neutral ISM, the origin of thermal and non-thermal radio jets from protostars and the accretion history of protostars, and formation of massive stars and their effect on the surrounding medium.

  18. A WISE Study of Star Formation in Canis Major and Target Selection for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Padgett, Deborah; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Sewilo, Marta M.

    2017-01-01

    With photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we searched for young stellar objects in a 100 square-degree field centered on the lightly studied Canis Major star-forming region. We found 144 candidates with mid-infrared excess primarily from envelope emission (Class I) and 335 with excess primarily from disk emission (Class II). Half of the candidates are spatially associated with a supernova remnant, suggesting a potential formation mechanism, but the ratio of Class I to Class II candidates, typically interpreted as a tracer of age, varies strongly around the remnant. Via a comparison to protostars characterized with the Herschel Space Observatory, we present new WISE criteria for the youngest (Class 0) protostars, finding seven candidates in Canis Major. We discuss the ability of the James Webb Space Telescope to spectroscopically determine the accretion properties of such protostars.

  19. Dynamical Studies of N-Body Gravity and Tidal Dissipation in the TRAPPIST-1 Star System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Kuettel, Donald H.; Stebler, Shane T.; Udrea, Bogdan

    2018-01-01

    To date, we have discovered a total of 2,729 planetary systems that contain more than 3,639 known exoplanets [1]. A majority of these are defined as compact systems, containing multiple exoplanets within 0.25 AU of the central star. It has been shown that tightly packed exoplanets avoid colliding due to long-term resonance-induced orbit stability [2]. However, due to extreme proximity, these planets experience intense gravitational forces from each other that are unprecedented within our own solar system, which makes the existence of exomoons doubtful. We present the results of an initial study evaluating dynamical stability of potential exomoons within such highly compact systems.This work is baselined around TRAPPIST-1, an ultra-cool dwarf star that hosts seven temperate terrestrial planets, three of which are in the habitable zone, orbiting within 0.06 AU [3]. N-body simulations place a grid of test particles varying semi-major axis, eccentricity, and inclination around the three habitable zone planets. We find that most exomoons with semi-major axes less than half the Hill sphere of their respective planet are stable over 10 kyrs, with several stable over 300 kyrs.However, in compact systems, tidal influences from other planets can compete with tidal effects from the primary planet, resulting in possible instabilities and massive amounts of tidal dissipation. We investigate these effects with a large grid search that incorporates exomoon radius, tidal quality factor and a range of planet rigidities. Results of simulations that combine n-body gravity effects with both planetary and satellite tides are presented and contrasted with n-body results. Finally, we examine long-term stability (> 1Myrs) of the stable subset of test particles from the n-body simulation with the addition of tidal dissipation, to determine if exomoons can survive around planets e, f, and g in the TRAPPIST-1 system.[1] Schneider (2017). The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia. http

  20. Spectroscopic Study of Extended Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxy NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Narae; Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lim, Sungsoon; Hodge, Paul W.; Kim, Sang Chul; Miller, Bryan; Weisz, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We present a spectroscopic study of the four extended star clusters (ESCs) in NGC 6822 based on the data obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini-South 8.1 m telescope. The radial velocities derived from the spectra range from -61.2 ± 20.4 km s-1 (for C1) to -115.34 ± 57.9 km s-1 (for C4) and, unlike the intermediate-age carbon stars, they do not display any sign of systematic rotation around NGC 6822. The ages and metallicities derived using the Lick indices show that the ESCs are old (>=8 Gyr) and metal poor ([Fe/H] <~ -1.5). NGC 6822 is found to have both metal poor ([Fe/H] ≈-2.0) and metal rich ([Fe/H] ≈-0.9) star clusters within 15' (2 kpc) from the center, whereas only metal poor clusters are observed in the outer halo with r >= 20'(2.6 kpc). The kinematics, old ages, and low metallicities of ESCs suggest that ESCs may have accreted into the halo of NGC 6822. Based on the velocity distribution of ESCs, we have determined the total mass and the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 6822: M_{N6822} = 7.5^{+4.5}_{-0.1} \\times 10^{9}\\ M_{\\odot } and (M/L)_{N6822} = 75^{+45}_{-1} (M/L)_{\\odot }. It shows that NGC 6822 is one of the most dark matter dominated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  1. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF KNOTS OF STAR FORMATION IN INTERACTING VERSUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Beverly J.; Olmsted, Susan; Jones, Keith; Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Struck, Curtis

    2016-03-15

    Interacting galaxies are known to have higher global rates of star formation on average than normal galaxies, relative to their stellar masses. Using UV and IR photometry combined with new and published Hα images, we have compared the star formation rates (SFRs) of ∼700 star forming complexes in 46 nearby interacting galaxy pairs with those of regions in 39 normal spiral galaxies. The interacting galaxies have proportionally more regions with high SFRs than the spirals. The most extreme regions in the interacting systems lie at the intersections of spiral/tidal structures, where gas is expected to pile up and trigger star formation. Published Hubble Space Telescope images show unusually large and luminous star clusters in the highest luminosity regions. The SFRs of the clumps correlate with measures of the dust attenuation, consistent with the idea that regions with more interstellar gas have more star formation. For the clumps with the highest SFRs, the apparent dust attenuation is consistent with the Calzetti starburst dust attenuation law. This suggests that the high luminosity regions are dominated by a central group of young stars surrounded by a shell of clumpy interstellar gas. In contrast, the lower luminosity clumps are bright in the UV relative to Hα, suggesting either a high differential attenuation between the ionized gas and the stars, or a post-starburst population bright in the UV but faded in Hα. The fraction of the global light of the galaxies in the clumps is higher on average for the interacting galaxies than for the spirals. Thus either star formation in interacting galaxies is “clumpier” on average, or the star forming regions in interacting galaxies are more luminous, dustier, or younger on average.

  2. Simulating method study on stray light noise out of sunlight baffle of star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyong; Song, Zhenfei; Li, Jingjin; Xu, Ershuai; Qin, Tianmu

    2015-10-01

    A frame of simulated star map needs to superimpose various types of background noise on it, among which the omissive refractive stray sunlight out of the sun baffle is one of the most important noise sources. For the real time simulation of star maps, the optimal scheme should be that sun stray light noise generation relies on mathematical model rather than the pre-generated noise frame base to be loaded. Firstly the formation mechanism of sun stray light noise out of star tracker baffle is introduced and its modeling method is given, the sun directional vector at the imaging time is converted to the unit vector coordinates in the star tracker body frame through a series of attitude transfer matrix, and continue to be projected on the extended imaging plane via the optics model, gray value of each pixel is assigned based on the distance between the sun projection point and the corresponding pixel. Then, based on a set of sun simulator experimental imaging data in different angles for the performance test of a certain baffle, the model coefficients are estimated through fitting method. Finally, the item of sun stray light noise simulated this way is superimposed on the basic pure simulated star map, so the similarity of the final outputted star map is further promoted in the electronic star simulator used in a certain institution. The scenarios simulated by this method, which depict the circumstance that the boresight of the star tracker is adjacent to sun vector, are convenient tools for the robustness test of star image centroiding algorithm or on-orbit real time flight simulation involving star light attitude determination.

  3. A study of the β Cephei star γ Pegasi: binarity, magnetic field, rotation, and pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkovskaya, V. V.; Plachinda, S. I.

    2007-07-01

    Aims:We provide observational material to study the magnetic field variability of the classical β Cep-type star γ Peg. Methods: The observations were carried out in the He I 6678 line in the course of 23 observing nights from 1997 to 2005 with using the Coudé spectrograph in spectropolarimetric mode at the Crimean 2.6 m telescope. The behavior of stellar wind was studied in the UV region using data from the IUE satellite (the INES database). Results: It is shown that the UV stellar wind exhibits a variability. A variation of the wind due to stellar pulsations has been detected. In the He I 6678 line, the abnormally blueshifted radial velocities (γ = -60.57 ± 0.29 km s-1) were detected during a single night in 2005. We do not confirm the 370.5-day orbital period. The most probable orbital period was estimated as P_orb = 6.81608 ± 0.00012 day. The ratio P_orb/P_puls = 44.92 appeared to be very close to integer. We have detected the presence of a weak magnetic field on the star. The longitudinal component of the field varies from -10 G to 30 G with the stellar rotation. The most probable rotational period is P_rot = 6.6538 ± 0.0016 days. Both the orbital and the rotational periods are integral multiples of the difference between them: P_orb/|P_orb - P_rot| = 42.002, and P_rot/|P_orb - P_rot| = 41.002. Variation in the longitudinal magnetic field during the pulsation period with an amplitude about 7 G was detected. The radial velocity data are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/469/1069

  4. Biorepositories for the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) and the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) has a serum and lymphocyte bank with specimens on more than 90% of the 33,000 women in the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) and Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR). They also have tumor blocks on the majority of the breast cancers that have occurred in women on these studies. |

  5. First Results from the iSTAR International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatge, Coty B.; Slater, Stephanie J.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Our best efforts in the United States to dramatically improve teaching and learning in astronomy courses has been less than satisfactory despite Herculean efforts. A possible solution is to expand our view beyond our own culture's borders and presumptions in order to bring our shortcomings in discipline-based astronomy education research to light. Before we can begin the process of international comparisons of student conceptual understanding, we need to better understand how different citizens of different countries position astronomy culturally. Under the banner of the International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning Project, iSTAR, we are now carefully observing how foreign experts in teaching astronomy and the science of astronomy translate the Test Of Astronomy STandards - TOAST multiple-choice assessment instrument to look for subtle clues revealed during the translation process. The TOAST is the widely used standard to evaluate students' gains in the United States' Astronomy classrooms. We hope that the process of translation itself will help us comprehend how other cultures think differently about astronomical concepts and eventually we are looking to obtain useful data of how other cultures develop their society's understanding of particular astronomy aspects where we may fall short. Several of the iSTAR Project's bilingual speakers are documenting their thoughts and insights as they translate the TOAST. The end-goal is to collect a comprehensible, well-defined, and logical translation in various languages that are culturally sensitive and linguistically accurate. This project is sponsored and managed by the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research at CAPERTeam.com in collaboration with members of the International Astronomical Union-Commission 46.

  6. AGE AND MASS STUDIES FOR YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN M31 FROM SEDS-FIT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Song; Ma Jun; Fan Zhou; Wu Zhenyu; Zhang Tianmeng; Zou Hu; Zhou Xu

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present photometry for young star clusters in M31, which are selected from Caldwell et al. These star clusters have been observed as part of the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) Multicolor Sky Survey from 1995 February to 2008 March. The BATC images including these star clusters are taken with 15 intermediate-band filters covering 3000-10000 A. Combined with photometry in the GALEX far- and near-ultraviolet, broadband UBV RI, SDSS ugriz, and infrared JHK{sub s} of Two Micron All Sky Survey, we obtain their accurate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 1538 to 20000 A. We derive these star clusters' ages and masses by comparing their SEDs with stellar population synthesis models. Our results are in good agreement with previous determinations. The mean value of age and mass of young clusters (<2 Gyr) is about 385 Myr and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }, respectively. There are two distinct peaks in the age distribution, a highest peak at age {approx}60 Myr and a secondary peak around 250 Myr, while the mass distribution shows a single peak around 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. A few young star clusters have two-body relaxation times greater than their ages, indicating that those clusters have not been well dynamically relaxed and therefore have not established the thermal equilibrium. There are several regions showing aggregations of young star clusters around the 10 kpc ring and the outer ring, indicating that the distribution of the young star clusters is well correlated with M31's star-forming regions. The young massive star clusters (age {<=}100 Myr and mass {>=}10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }) show apparent concentration around the ring splitting region, suggesting a recent passage of a satellite galaxy (M32) through M31 disk.

  7. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF KNOTS OF STAR FORMATION IN INTERACTING VERSUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Beverly J.; Olmsted, Susan; Jones, Keith

    2016-03-15

    Interacting galaxies are known to have higher global rates of star formation on average than normal galaxies, relative to their stellar masses. Using UV and IR photometry combined with new and published Hα images, we have compared the star formation rates (SFRs) of ∼700 star forming complexes in 46 nearby interacting galaxy pairs with those of regions in 39 normal spiral galaxies. The interacting galaxies have proportionally more regions with high SFRs than the spirals. The most extreme regions in the interacting systems lie at the intersections of spiral/tidal structures, where gas is expected to pile up and trigger starmore » formation. Published Hubble Space Telescope images show unusually large and luminous star clusters in the highest luminosity regions. The SFRs of the clumps correlate with measures of the dust attenuation, consistent with the idea that regions with more interstellar gas have more star formation. For the clumps with the highest SFRs, the apparent dust attenuation is consistent with the Calzetti starburst dust attenuation law. This suggests that the high luminosity regions are dominated by a central group of young stars surrounded by a shell of clumpy interstellar gas. In contrast, the lower luminosity clumps are bright in the UV relative to Hα, suggesting either a high differential attenuation between the ionized gas and the stars, or a post-starburst population bright in the UV but faded in Hα. The fraction of the global light of the galaxies in the clumps is higher on average for the interacting galaxies than for the spirals. Thus either star formation in interacting galaxies is “clumpier” on average, or the star forming regions in interacting galaxies are more luminous, dustier, or younger on average.« less

  8. Statistical studies of superflares on G-, K-, M- type stars from Kepler data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Honda, Satoshi; Notsu, Shota; Namekata, Kosuke; Ikuta, Kai; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-05-01

    Flares are thought to be sudden releases of magnetic energy stored around starspots. Recent space high-precision photometry shows “superflares”, 10-104 times more energetic than the largest solar flares, occur on many G, K, M-type stars (e.g., Maehara+2012 Nature). Harmful UV/X-ray radiation and high-energy particles such as protons are caused by such superflares. This may suggest that exoplanet host stars have severe effects on the physical and chemical evolution of exoplanetary atmospheres (cf. Segura+2010 Astrobiology, Takahashi+2016 ApJL).We here present statistical properties of superflares on G, K, M-type stars on the basis of our analyses of Kepler photometric data (Maehara+2012 Nature, Shibayama+2013 ApJS, Notsu+2013 ApJ, Canderaresi+2014 ApJ, Maehara+2015 EPS, Maehara+2017 PASJ). We found more than 5000 superflares on 800 G, K, M-type main-sequence stars, and the occurrence frequency (dN/dE) of superflares as a function of flare energy (E) shows the power-law distribution with the index of -1.8 -1.9. This power-law distribution is consistent with that of solar flares.Flare frequency increases as stellar temperature decreases. As for M-type stars, energy of the largest flares is smaller compared with G,K-type stars, but more frequent “hazardous” flares for the habitable planets since the habitable zone around M-type stars is much smaller compared with G, K-type stars.Rotation period and starspot coverage can be estimated from the quasi-periodic brightness variation of the superflare stars. The intensity of Ca II 8542 line of superflare stars, which is measured from spectroscopic observations with Subaru Telescope, has a well correlation with the brightness variation amplitude (Notsu+2015a&b PASJ).Flare frequency has a correlation with rotation period, and this suggests young rapidly-rotating stars (like “young Sun”) have more severe impacts of flares on the planetary atmosphere (cf. Airapetian+2016 ApJL). Flare energy and frequency also depends

  9. Identifying Young, Nearby Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Rich; Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, Ben; Bessell, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Young stars have certain characteristics, e.g., high atmospheric abundance of lithium and chromospheric activity, fast rotation, distinctive space motion and strong X-ray flux compared to that of older main sequence stars. We have selected a list of candidate young (<100Myr) and nearby (<60pc) stars based on their space motion and/or strong X-ray flux. To determine space motion of a star, one needs to know its coordinates (RA, DEC), proper motion, distance, and radial velocity. The Hipparcos and Tycho catalogues provide all this information except radial velocities. We anticipate eventually searching approx. 1000 nearby stars for signs of extreme youth. Future studies of the young stars so identified will help clarify the formation of planetary systems for times between 10 and 100 million years. Certainly, the final output of this study will be a very useful resource, especially for adaptive optics and space based searches for Jupiter-mass planets and dusty proto-planetary disks. We have begun spectroscopic observations in January, 2001 with the 2.3 m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in New South Wales, Australia. These spectra will be used to determine radial velocities and other youth indicators such as Li 6708A absorption strength and Hydrogen Balmer line intensity. Additional observations of southern hemisphere stars from SSO are scheduled in April and northern hemisphere observations will take place in May and July at the Lick Observatory of the University of California. AT SSO, to date, we have observed about 100 stars with a high resolution spectrometer (echelle) and about 50 stars with a medium spectral resolution spectrometer (the "DBS"). About 20% of these stars turn out to be young stars. Among these, two especially noteworthy stars appear to be the closest T-Tauri stars ever identified. Interestingly, these stars share the same space motions as that of a very famous star with a dusty circumstellar disk--beta Pictoris. This new finding better

  10. Class-Size Policy: The STAR Experiment and Related Class-Size Studies. NCPEA Policy Brief. Volume 1, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    This brief summarizes findings on class size from over 25 years of work on the Tennessee Student Teacher Achievement Ratio (STAR) randomized, longitudinal experiment, and other Class-Size Reduction (CSR) studies throughout the United States, Australia, Hong Kong, Sweden, Great Britain, and elsewhere. The brief concludes with recommendations. The…

  11. Feasibility Study of Utilizing Existing Infrared Array Cameras for Daylight Star Tracking on NASA's Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack (Technical Monitor); Fazio, Giovanni G.; Tolls, Volker

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of developing a daytime star tracker for ULDB flights using a commercially available off-the-shelf infrared array camera. This report describes the system used for ground-based tests, the observations, the test results, and gives recommendations for continued development.

  12. Rotating stars in relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-11-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f-modes and r-modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  13. Rotating stars in relativity.

    PubMed

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  14. A Photometric Study of GSC 01374-01131, a HADS Variable Star with an Eclipsing Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khruslov, A. V.; Kokumbaeva, R. I.; Kusakin, A. V.; Reva, I.

    2017-10-01

    We present the results of our new observations of GSC 01374-01131, a recently discovered high-amplitude delta Scuti (HADS) star for which, in 2013, we detected an eclipsing component of the light curve in the Catalina Surveys data. We acquired new CCD photometry in Johnson's B, V, and R bands for this star, improved the periods of the eclipses (P_e = 5.96857 days) and of the pulsation (P_p = 0.08494573 days) and other parameters of the light curves. GSC 01374-01131 is an eclipsing binary of the Algol type (EA); one of its components is a pulsating HADS star. Currently, GSC 01374-01131 has the lowest depth of the main eclipse (A_e = 0.13 mag) among all known HADS stars in eclipsing binary systems, comparable to the observed pulsation amplitude.

  15. Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. R.

    2011-05-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) are stars escaping the Milky Way with speeds best explained by a slingshot from the Galaxy's central massive black hole. 3-body exchange interactions explain both the existence of HVS and the S-stars orbiting the black hole today. I discuss the growing observational and theoretical support for this picture, and highlight recent surprises, such as the anisotropic spatial distribution of HVSs. The distribution of HVSs is linked to the nature and environment of the Galactic Center.

  16. Star Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    A COSMIC (Computer Software Management and Information Center) program known as Skymap Star Catalog and Data Base provides a very accurate star map. The data assists Perkin Elmer Corporation in designing an optical system of proper size and field of view, and confirms the design integrity of star sensors which are very accurate and represent a major advance in optical technology. Perkin Elmer is the prime contractor for the optical telescope assembly of NASA's space telescope.

  17. Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottam, J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars were discovered almost 40 years ago, and yet many of their most fundamental properties remain mysteries. There have been many attempts to measure the mass and radius of a neutron star and thereby constrain the equation of state of the dense nuclear matter at their cores. These have been complicated by unknown parameters such as the source distance and burning fractions. A clean, straightforward way to access the neutron star parameters is with high-resolution spectroscopy. I will present the results of searches for gravitationally red-shifted absorption lines from the neutron star atmosphere using XMM-Newton and Chandra.

  18. Dusty Beginnings of a Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-23

    Are brown dwarfs born like stars, as in this rendering, or do they form like planets orbiting another star? A study by researchers using data from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope has led to the preliminary conclusion that they are formed much like a star.

  19. Building Blocks of Dust and Large Organic Molecules: a Coordinated Laboratory and Astronomical Study of AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael C.; Gottlieb, Carl A.; Cernicharo, Jose

    2017-06-01

    The increased sensitivity and angular resolution of high-altitude ground-based interferometers in the sub-millimeter band has enabled the physics and chemistry of carbon- and oxygen-rich evolved stars to be re-examined at an unprecedented level of detail. Observations of rotational lines in the inner envelope - the region within a few stellar radii of the central star where the molecular seeds of dust are formed - allows one to critically assess models of dust growth. Interferometric observations of the outer envelope provide stringent tests of neutral and ionized molecule formation. All of the astronomical studies are crucially dependent on precise laboratory measurements of the rotational spectra of new species and of vibrationally excited levels of known molecules and their rare isotopic species. By means of a closely coordinated laboratory and astronomical program, a number of exotic species including the disilicon carbide SiCSi, titanium oxides TiO and TiO_2, and carbon chain anions ranging from CN^- to C_8H^- have recently been observed in evolved stars. This talk will provide overview of these findings, and how they impact current models of the ``chemical laboratories'' of evolved stars. Ongoing laboratory studies of small silicon-bearing molecules such as H_2SiO_2 and vibrationally excited SiC_2 will be highlighted.

  20. Which of Kepler's Stars Flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    The habitability of distant exoplanets is dependent upon many factors one of which is the activity of their host stars. To learn about which stars are most likely to flare, a recent study examines tens of thousands of stellar flares observed by Kepler.Need for a Broader SampleArtists rendering of a flaring dwarf star. [NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger]Most of our understanding of what causes a star to flare is based on observations of the only star near enough to examine in detail the Sun. But in learning from a sample size of one, a challenge arises: we must determine which conclusions are unique to the Sun (or Sun-like stars), and which apply to other stellar types as well.Based on observations and modeling, astronomers think that stellar flares result from the reconnection of magnetic field lines in a stars outer atmosphere, the corona. The magnetic activity is thought to be driven by a dynamo caused by motions in the stars convective zone.HR diagram of the Kepler stars, with flaring main-sequence (yellow), giant (red) and A-star (green) stars in the authors sample indicated. [Van Doorsselaere et al. 2017]To test whether these ideas are true generally, we need to understand what types of stars exhibit flares, and what stellar properties correlate with flaring activity. A team of scientists led by Tom Van Doorsselaere (KU Leuven, Belgium) has now used an enormous sample of flares observed by Kepler to explore these statistics.Intriguing TrendsVan Doorsselaere and collaborators used a new automated flare detection and characterization algorithm to search through the raw light curves from Quarter 15 of the Kepler mission, building a sample of 16,850 flares on 6,662 stars. They then used these to study the dependence of the flare occurrence rate, duration, energy, and amplitude on the stellar spectral type and rotation period.This large statistical study led the authors to several interesting conclusions, including:Flare star incidence rate as a a

  1. Pharmacogenomic study of side-effects for antidepressant treatment options in STAR*D

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. L.; Adkins, D. E.; Aberg, K.; Hettema, J. M.; McClay, J. L.; Souza, R. P.; van den Oord, E. J. C. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding individual differences in susceptibility to antidepressant therapy side-effects is essential to optimize the treatment of depression. Method We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to search for genetic variation affecting the susceptibility to side-effects. The analysis sample consisted of 1439 depression patients, successfully genotyped for 421K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Outcomes included four indicators of side-effects: general side-effect burden, sexual side-effects, dizziness and vision/hearing-related side-effects. Our criterion for genome-wide significance was a prespecified threshold ensuring that, on average, only 10% of the significant findings are false discoveries. Results Thirty-four SNPs satisfied this criterion. The top finding indicated that 10 SNPs in SACM1L mediated the effects of bupropion on sexual side-effects (p=4.98×10−7, q=0.023). Suggestive findings were also found for SNPs in MAGI2, DTWD1, WDFY4 and CHL1. Conclusions Although our findings require replication and functional validation, this study demonstrates the potential of GWAS to discover genes and pathways that could mediate adverse effects of antidepressant medication. PMID:22041458

  2. Pharmacogenomic study of side-effects for antidepressant treatment options in STAR*D.

    PubMed

    Clark, S L; Adkins, D E; Aberg, K; Hettema, J M; McClay, J L; Souza, R P; van den Oord, E J C G

    2012-06-01

    Understanding individual differences in susceptibility to antidepressant therapy side-effects is essential to optimize the treatment of depression. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to search for genetic variation affecting the susceptibility to side-effects. The analysis sample consisted of 1439 depression patients, successfully genotyped for 421K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Outcomes included four indicators of side-effects: general side-effect burden, sexual side-effects, dizziness and vision/hearing-related side-effects. Our criterion for genome-wide significance was a prespecified threshold ensuring that, on average, only 10% of the significant findings are false discoveries. Thirty-four SNPs satisfied this criterion. The top finding indicated that 10 SNPs in SACM1L mediated the effects of bupropion on sexual side-effects (p = 4.98 × 10(-7), q = 0.023). Suggestive findings were also found for SNPs in MAGI2, DTWD1, WDFY4 and CHL1. Although our findings require replication and functional validation, this study demonstrates the potential of GWAS to discover genes and pathways that could mediate adverse effects of antidepressant medication.

  3. Detailed homogeneous abundance studies of 14 Galactic s-process enriched post-AGB stars: In search of lead (Pb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Karakas, A. I.; Manick, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we systematically study the chemical abundances of Galactic and extragalactic post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. The goal at large is to provide improved observational constraints to the models of the complex interplay between the AGB s-process nucleosynthesis and the associated mixing processes. Aims: Lead (Pb) is the final product of the s-process nucleosynthesis and is predicted to have large overabundances with respect to other s-process elements in AGB stars of low metallicities. However, Pb abundance studies of s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds show a discrepancy between observed and predicted Pb abundances. The determined upper limits based on spectral studies are much lower than what is predicted. In this paper, we focus specifically on the Pb abundance of 14 Galactic s-process enhanced post-AGB stars to check whether the same discrepancy is present in the Galaxy as well. Among these 14 objects, two were not yet subject to a detailed abundance study in the literature. We apply the same method to obtain accurate abundances for the 12 others. Our homogeneous abundance results provide the input of detailed spectral synthesis computations in the spectral regions where Pb lines are located. Methods: We used high-resolution UVES and HERMES spectra for detailed spectral abundance studies of our sample of Galactic post-AGB stars. None of the sample stars display clear Pb lines, and we only deduced upper limits of the Pb abundance by using spectrum synthesis in the spectral ranges of the strongest Pb lines. Results: We do not find any clear evidence of Pb overabundances in our sample. The derived upper limits are strongly correlated with the effective temperature of the stars with increasing upper limits for increasing effective temperatures. We obtain stronger Pb constraints on the cooler objects. Moreover, we confirm the s-process enrichment and carbon enhancement of two

  4. Multiwavelength study of the low-luminosity outbursting young star HBC 722

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kóspál, Á.; Ábrahám, P.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Dunham, M. M.; García-Álvarez, D.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Kun, M.; Moór, A.; Farkas, A.; Hajdu, G.; Hodosán, G.; Kovács, T.; Kriskovics, L.; Marton, G.; Molnár, L.; Pál, A.; Sárneczky, K.; Sódor, Á.; Szakáts, R.; Szalai, T.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Szing, A.; Tóth, I.; Vida, K.; Vinkó, J.

    2016-11-01

    Context. HBC 722 (V2493 Cyg) is a young eruptive star in outburst since 2010. Spectroscopic evidence suggests that the source is an FU Orionis-type object, with an atypically low outburst luminosity. Aims: Because it was well characterized in the pre-outburst phase, HBC 722 is one of the few FUors from which we can learn about the physical changes and processes associated with the eruption, including the role of the circumstellar environment. Methods: We monitored the source in the BVRIJHKS bands from the ground and at 3.6 and 4.5 μm from space with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We analyzed the light curves and studied the evolving spectral energy distribution by fitting a series of steady accretion disk models at many epochs covering the outburst. We also analyzed the spectral properties of the source based on our new optical and infrared spectra, comparing our line inventory with those published in the literature for other epochs. We also mapped HBC 722 and its surroundings at millimeter wavelengths. Results: From the light-curve analysis we conclude that the first peak of the outburst in 2010 September was mainly due to an abrupt increase in the accretion rate in the innermost part of the system. This was followed after a few months by a long-term process, when the brightening of the source was mainly due to a gradual increase in the accretion rate and the emitting area. Our new observations show that the source is currently in a constant plateau phase. We found that the optical spectrum was similar in the first peak and following periods, but around the peak the continuum was bluer and the Hα profile changed significantly between 2012 and 2013. The source was not detected in the millimeter continuum, but we discovered a flattened molecular gas structure with a diameter of 1700 au and mass of 0.3 M⊙ centered on HBC 722. Conclusions: While the first brightness peak might be interpreted as a rapid fall of piled-up material from the inner disk onto the star, the

  5. Hubble Space Telescope study of resolved red giant stars in the outer halos of nearby dwarf starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryś, A.; Grocholski, A. J.; van der Marel, R. P.; Aloisi, A.; Annibali, F.

    2011-06-01

    Context. Central starbursts in galaxies are an extreme example of ongoing galaxy evolution. The outer parts of galaxies contain a fossil record of galaxy formation and evolution processes in the more distant past. The characterization of resolved stellar populations allows one a detailed study of these topics. Aims: We observed the outer parts of NGC 1569 and NGC 4449, two of the closest and strongest dwarf starburst galaxies in the local universe, to characterize their stellar density and populations, and obtain new insights into the structure, formation, and evolution of starburst galaxies and galaxy halos. Methods: We obtained HST/WFPC2 images between 5 and 8 scale radii from the center, along the intermediate and minor axes. We performed point-source photometry to determine color magnitude diagrams of I vs. V - I. We compared the results at different radii, including also our prior HST/ACS results for more centrally located fields. Results: We detect stars in the RGB and TP-AGB (carbon star) phases in all outer fields, but not younger stars such as those present at smaller radii. The RGB star density profile is well fit by either a de Vaucouleurs profile or a power-law profile, but has more stars at large radii than a single exponential. To within the uncertainties, there are no radial gradients in the RGB color or carbon-to-RGB-star ratio at large radii. Conclusions: The galaxies have faint outer stellar envelopes that are not tidally truncated within the range of radii addressed by our study. The density profiles suggest that these are not outward extensions of the inner disks, but are instead distinct stellar halos. This agrees with other work on galaxies of similar morphology. The presence of such halos is consistent with predictions of hierarchical galaxy formation scenarios. The halos consist of intermediate-age/old stars, confirming the results of other studies that have shown the starburst phenomenon to be very centrally concentrated. There is no

  6. A Theoretical Study of the Outer Layers of Eight Kepler F-stars: The Relevance of Ionization Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Ana; Lopes, Ilídio

    2017-07-01

    We have analyzed the theoretical model envelopes of eight Kepler F-stars by computing the phase shift of the acoustic waves, α (ω ), and its related function, β (ω ). The latter is shown to be a powerful probe of the external stellar layers since it is particularly sensitive to the partial ionization zones located in these upper layers. We found that these theoretical envelopes can be organized into two groups, each of which is characterized by a distinct β (ω ) shape that we show to reflect the differences related to the magnitudes of ionization processes. Since β (ω ) can also be determined from the experimental frequencies, we compared our theoretical results with the observable β (ω ). Using the function β (ω ), and with the purpose of quantifying the magnitude of the ionization processes occurring in the outer layers of these stars, we define two indexes, {{Δ }}{β }1 and {{Δ }}{β }2. These indexes allow us to connect the microphysics of the interior of the star with macroscopic observable characteristics. Motivated by the distinct magnetic activity behaviors of F-stars, we studied the relation between the star’s rotation period and these indexes. We found a trend, in the form of a power-law dependence, that favors the idea that ionization is acting as an underlying mechanism, which is crucial for understanding the relation between rotation and magnetism and even observational features such as the Kraft break.

  7. An optical spectroscopic study of T Tauri stars. I. Photospheric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, Gregory J.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2014-05-10

    Estimates of the mass and age of young stars from their location in the H-R diagram are limited by not only the typical observational uncertainties that apply to field stars, but also by large systematic uncertainties related to circumstellar phenomena. In this paper, we analyze flux-calibrated optical spectra to measure accurate spectral types and extinctions of 281 nearby T Tauri stars (TTSs). The primary advances in this paper are (1) the incorporation of a simplistic accretion continuum in optical spectral type and extinction measurements calculated over the full optical wavelength range and (2) the uniform analysis of a large sample of stars, many of which are well known and can serve as benchmarks. Comparisons between the non-accreting TTS photospheric templates and stellar photosphere models are used to derive conversions from spectral type to temperature. Differences between spectral types can be subtle and difficult to discern, especially when accounting for accretion and extinction. The spectral types measured here are mostly consistent with spectral types measured over the past decade. However, our new spectral types are one to two subclasses later than literature spectral types for the original members of the TW Hya Association (TWA) and are discrepant with literature values for some well-known members of the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Our extinction measurements are consistent with other optical extinction measurements but are typically 1 mag lower than near-IR measurements, likely the result of methodological differences and the presence of near-IR excesses in most CTTSs. As an illustration of the impact of accretion, spectral type, and extinction uncertainties on the H-R diagrams of young clusters, we find that the resulting luminosity spread of stars in the TWA is 15%-30%. The luminosity spread in the TWA and previously measured for binary stars in Taurus suggests that for a majority of stars, protostellar accretion rates are not large enough to

  8. Young Stars in IC 2118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Tim; Rebull, Luisa; Daou, Doris; Maranto, Tony; Roelofsen, Theresa; Sepulveda, Babs; Weehler, Cynthia

    2005-02-01

    IC 2118, the Witch Head Nebula (~210 parsecs), is region forming stars located near the supergiant star Rigel in the constellation Orion. Kun et al. (2004, A&A, 418, 89) have determined that IC 2118 is on the near side of the Orion-Eridanus Super Bubble and that stellar winds from the Orion OB1 association may be triggering new star formation in the nebula. We propose using IRAC and MIPS to reexamine a small dense region of this nebula where Kun et al. have spectroscopically identified three 2MASS sources as T Tauri stars embedded in the cloud. Previous all-sky surveys, including both IRAS and 2MASS, have included this region, but not to the resolution that Spitzer can provide, and there are few studies of this particular region in the literature. Our team proposes to use IRAC and MIPS observations to (1) investigate star formation, (2) look for likely cluster member stars with infrared excesses, and characterize this young star population by obtaining their colors and therefore estimates of masses and ages, (3) study the distribution of stars, their relationship to the ISM, and the possibilities of triggered star formation, (4) compare the young star population, distribution, and age to other similar sites of star formation, e.g., IC 1396 and (5) produce a dramatic image of the interstellar medium in the region surrounding IC 2118. Since this region is in the Orion constellation near the bright star Rigel, it provides additional appeal to students and the general public.

  9. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  10. Producing Runaway Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    How are the hypervelocity stars weve observed in our galaxy produced? A recent study suggests that these escapees could be accelerated by a massive black hole in the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud.A Black Hole SlingshotSince their discovery in 2005, weve observed dozens of candidate hypervelocity stars stars whose velocity in the rest frame of our galaxy exceeds the local escape velocity of the Milky Way. These stars present a huge puzzle: how did they attain these enormous velocities?One potential explanation is known as the Hills mechanism. In this process, a stellar binary is disrupted by a close encounter with a massive black hole (like those thought to reside at the center of every galaxy). One member of the binary is flung out of the system as a result of the close encounter, potentially reaching very large velocities.A star-forming region known as LHA 120-N 11, located within the LMC. Some binary star systems within the LMC might experience close encounters with a possible massive black hole at the LMCs center. [ESA/NASA/Hubble]Blame the LMC?Usually, discussions of the Hills mechanism assume that Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, is the object guilty of accelerating the hypervelocity stars weve observed. But what if the culprit isnt Sgr A*, but a massive black hole at the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the Milky Ways satellite galaxies?Though we dont yet have evidence of a massive black hole at the center of the LMC, the dwarf galaxy is large enough to potentially host one as large as 100,000 solar masses. Assuming that it does, two scientists at the University of Cambridge, Douglas Boubert and Wyn Evans, have now modeled how this black hole might tear apart binary star systems and fling hypervelocity stars around the Milky Way.Models for AccelerationBoubert and Evans determined that the LMCs hypothetical black hole could easily eject stars at ~100 km/s, which is the escape velocity of the

  11. A Study of Two Dwarf Irregular Galaxies with Asymmetrical Star Formation Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Gallardo, Samavarti; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Adamo, Angela; Cook, David O.; Oh, Se-Heon; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Kim, Hwihyun; Kahre, Lauren; Ubeda, Leonardo; Bright, Stacey N.; Ryon, Jenna E.; Fumagalli, Michele; Sacchi, Elena; Kennicutt, R. C.; Tosi, Monica; Dale, Daniel A.; Cignoni, Michele; Messa, Matteo; Grebel, Eva K.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Sabbi, Elena; Grasha, Kathryn; Gallagher, John S., III; Calzetti, Daniela; Lee, Janice C.

    2018-03-01

    Two dwarf irregular galaxies, DDO 187 and NGC 3738, exhibit a striking pattern of star formation: intense star formation is taking place in a large region occupying roughly half of the inner part of the optical galaxy. We use data on the H I distribution and kinematics and stellar images and colors to examine the properties of the environment in the high star formation rate (HSF) halves of the galaxies in comparison with the low star formation rate halves. We find that the pressure and gas density are higher on the HSF sides by 30%–70%. In addition we find in both galaxies that the H I velocity fields exhibit significant deviations from ordered rotation and there are large regions of high-velocity dispersion and multiple velocity components in the gas beyond the inner regions of the galaxies. The conditions in the HSF regions are likely the result of large-scale external processes affecting the internal environment of the galaxies and enabling the current star formation there.

  12. Precise Laboratory Measurement of Line Frequencies Useful to Studies of Star and Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.; Gottlieb, Carl A.

    2005-01-01

    In March 2002, we began a program in laboratory spectroscopy to provide accurate molecular line frequencies essential to studies of the motions and abundance in star-forming dense cores and planet-forming circumstellar disks. Summarized here is the progress that has been made in Year 3 of this grant. Work included measurement of 10 successive rotational lines in the ground vibrational state of SiO between 86 and 500 GHz, and two lines near 800 GHz to an accuracy of a few kHz; conducting pilot experiments on molecular ions in collision-free supersonic beams, including HCO+, N2H+, and H2D+; measurement of 22 lines of CN between 113 and 340 GHz; and setting up an experiment that would allow us to refine earlier measurements of the neutral species such as C3H2, CCS, H2CS, and SO by observing the very narrow sub-Doppler (Lamb dip) features in the millimeter-wave spectra of these species.

  13. A PANCHROMATIC STUDY OF BLAST COUNTERPARTS: TOTAL STAR FORMATION RATE, MORPHOLOGY, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FRACTION, AND STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Ade, Peter A. R.; Cortese, Luca; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo; Tucker, Carole; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Wiebe, Donald V.; Devlin, Mark J.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Viero, Marco P.

    2011-02-01

    We carry out a multi-wavelength study of individual galaxies detected by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) and identified at other wavelengths, using data spanning the radio to the ultraviolet (UV). We develop a Monte Carlo method to account for flux boosting, source blending, and correlations among bands, which we use to derive deboosted far-infrared (FIR) luminosities for our sample. We estimate total star-formation rates (SFRs) for BLAST counterparts with z {<=} 0.9 by combining their FIR and UV luminosities. Star formation is heavily obscured at L{sub FIR} {approx}> 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, z {approx}> 0.5, but the contribution from unobscured starlight cannot be neglected at L{sub FIR} {approx}< 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, z {approx}< 0.25. We assess that about 20% of the galaxies in our sample show indication of a type 1 active galactic nucleus, but their submillimeter emission is mainly due to star formation in the host galaxy. We compute stellar masses for a subset of 92 BLAST counterparts; these are relatively massive objects, with a median mass of {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, which seem to link the 24 {mu}m and Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) populations, in terms of both stellar mass and star formation activity. The bulk of the BLAST counterparts at z {approx}< 1 appears to be run-of-the-mill star-forming galaxies, typically spiral in shape, with intermediate stellar masses and practically constant specific SFRs. On the other hand, the high-z tail of the BLAST counterparts significantly overlaps with the SCUBA population, in terms of both SFRs and stellar masses, with observed trends of specific SFR that support strong evolution and downsizing.

  14. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  15. Unprecedented 16-Year Long Study Tracks Stars Orbiting Milky Way Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    Combining a double natural "magnifying glass" with the power of ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have scrutinised the inner parts of the disc around a supermassive black hole 10 billion light-years away. They were able to study the disc with a level of detail a thousand times better than that of the best telescopes in the world, providing the first observational confirmation of the prevalent theoretical models of such discs. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 47a/08 The Einstein Cross The team of astronomers from Europe and the US studied the "Einstein Cross", a famous cosmic mirage. This cross-shaped configuration consists of four images of a single very distant source. The multiple images are a result of gravitational lensing by a foreground galaxy, an effect that was predicted by Albert Einstein as a consequence of his theory of general relativity. The light source in the Einstein Cross is a quasar approximately ten billion light-years away, whereas the foreground lensing galaxy is ten times closer. The light from the quasar is bent in its path and magnified by the gravitational field of the lensing galaxy. This magnification effect, known as "macrolensing", in which a galaxy plays the role of a cosmic magnifying glass or a natural telescope, proves very useful in astronomy as it allows us to observe distant objects that would otherwise be too faint to explore using currently available telescopes. "The combination of this natural magnification with the use of a big telescope provides us with the sharpest details ever obtained," explains Frédéric Courbin, leader of the programme studying the Einstein Cross with ESO's Very Large Telescope. In addition to macrolensing by the galaxy, stars in the lensing galaxy act as secondary lenses to produce an additional magnification. This secondary magnification is based on the same principle as macrolensing, but on a smaller scale, and since stars are much smaller than galaxies, is known as "microlensing". As the stars are

  16. Preliminary study of the use of the STAR-100 computer for transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. D.; Jameson, A.

    1977-01-01

    An explicit method for solving the transonic small-disturbance potential equation is presented. This algorithm, which is suitable for the new vector-processor computers such as the CDC STAR-100, is compared to successive line over-relaxation (SLOR) on a simple test problem. The convergence rate of the explicit scheme is slower than that of SLOR, however, the efficiency of the explicit scheme on the STAR-100 computer is sufficient to overcome the slower convergence rate and allow an overall speedup compared to SLOR on the CYBER 175 computer.

  17. Studies of "Irregularity" in Pulsating Red Giants. III. Many More Stars, an Overview, and Some Conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Terziev, E.

    2011-06-01

    We have analyzed AAVSO visual observations of an additional 85 "irregular" (L-type) pulsating red giants, using Fourier and self-correlation analysis; see JAAVSO, 37, 71 (2009) and JAAVSO, 38, 161 (2010) for details of the methods and previous results. We have categorized the variability of each star (periodic/semiregular, irregular, or not significantly variable), and noted the presence of various spurious effects arising from the visual observing process. Finally, we have suggested which stars should be highest priority for further visual or photoelectric observation, and which could reasonably be dropped from the visual program, and why.

  18. Catch a Star!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education are launching today the 2007 edition of 'Catch a Star!', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its fifth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. Students are invited to 'become astronomers' and embark on a journey to explore the Universe. ESO PR Photo 42/06 The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star!' also includes an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. "'Catch a Star!' offers a unique opportunity for students to learn more about astronomy and about the methods scientists use to discover new things about the Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. In teams, students choose an astronomical topic to study and produce an in-depth report. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes or a telescope of the future can contribute to their investigations of the subject. As well as the top prize - a trip to one of ESO's observatory sites in Chile - visits to observatories in Germany, Austria and Spain, and many other prizes are also available to be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners chosen with the help of a public online vote. The first editions of 'Catch a Star!' have attracted several hundred entries from more than 25 countries worldwide. Previous winning entries have included "Star clusters and the structure of the Milky Way" (Budapest, Hungary), "Vega" (Acqui Terme, Italy) and "Venus

  19. STAR in CTO PCI: When is STAR not a star?

    PubMed

    Hira, Ravi S; Dean, Larry S

    2016-04-01

    Subintimal tracking and reentry (STAR) has been used as a bailout strategy and involves an uncontrolled dissection and recanalization into the distal lumen to reestablish vessel patency. In the current study, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow < 3 was the only variable which they found to be significantly associated with restenosis and reocclusion after stent placement. It may be reasonable to consider second generation drug eluting stent placement in patients receiving STAR that have TIMI 3 flow, however, this should only be done if there is no compromise of major side branches. If unsure, we recommend to perform balloon angioplasty without stenting. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A spectroscopic study of the open cluster NGC 6475 (M 7). Chemical abundances from stars in the range Teff = 4500-10 000 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanova, S.; Carraro, G.; Saviane, I.

    2009-09-01

    Aims: Clusters of stars are key objects for studying the dynamical and chemical evolution of the Galaxy and its neighbors, and are the most important laboratories to test the theory of stellar evolution. In particular, chemical composition is obtained from different kinds of stars (hot main-sequence stars, cool main-sequence stars, horizontal-branch stars, RGB stars) using different methodologies. Our first aim is to apply these methodologies to the stars of the open cluster NGC 6475 and, by obtaining a census of the most important elements, we will be able to test their consistency. Our second aim is to study the evolution of the surface chemical abundances as a function of the evolutionary phase of a star. We finally want to establish more robust fundamental parameters for this cluster. Methods: We selected high S/N high resolution spectra of 7 stars of the open cluster NGC 6475 from the ESO database covering the T_eff range 4500-10 000 K and of luminosity class V (dwarf) and III (giants). We determined the chemical abundances of several elements. For hot stars (T_eff>9000 K), we applied the Balmer line fitting method to obtain atmospheric parameters, while for cool stars (T_eff<6500 K), the abundance equilibrium of FeI/II lines. For the two groups of stars, the use of different line-lists was mandatory. LTE approximation together with NLTE correction for some elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg) were applied. The abundances of many elements were obtained by measuring of the equivalent width of spectral lines. For those ones having only blended lines (O, He), real spectra were compared to synthetic ones. Hyperfine structure was taken into account for V and Ba. Results: First of all, we showed that the two methodologies we used give abundances that agree within the errors. This implies that no appreciable relative systematic effects are present for the derived chemical content of cool and hot stars. On the other hand, giants stars show clear chemical peculiarities with

  1. Dense Axion Stars.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-16

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10^{-14}M_{⊙} if the axion mass is 10^{-4}  eV. We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10^{-20}M_{⊙} to about M_{⊙}. If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  2. Insights for Planetarium and Museum Educators Revealed by the iSTAR international Study of Astronomical Reasoning Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, T. F.; Tatge, C. B.; Ratcliff, M.; Slater, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Dedicated sky watchers through the centuries have long sought to find the best teaching methods to efficiently and effectively transfer vast amounts of accumulated star knowledge to the next generation of sky watchers. Although detailed maps specifying the names and locations of stars have been carefully displayed on spherical globes for thousands of years, it is the 1923 installation of a Zeiss-made, large, mechanical star projector in Munich that is often cited as the first modern projection planetarium for teaching astronomy. In the 1930's, impressive planetariums were installed Chicago, Los Angeles and New York, which then in turn served as a catalyst for additional planetarium construction. Planetarium construction increased rapidly in the United States due to federal funding to schools and museums through the 1958 US National Defense Education Act and the US went from one planetarium in 1930, to six in 1940, to about 100 in 1960, increasing to 200 in 1963, 450 by 1967—even before humans had landed on the Moon—and more than 1,000 by 1975. Today, nearly 3,000 permanent planetarium facilities are available to show the stars and heavenly motions to children and adults alike across the world, with perhaps another thousand portable planetariums adding to the available teaching venues. Simultaneous with their construction, discipline-based astronomy education have been trying to better understand, and ultimately improve, how people learn astronomy in the planetarium. A systematic analysis of planetarium education research articles, dissertations, and theses found in the recently constructed, community-wide, international Study of Astronomical Reasoning iSTAR database at istardatabase.org reveal that many of the systematic studies conducted in the 1960s and 1970s using domes served by servo-mechanical star projects have been reproduced again in recent decades in theaters using digital video projection showing nearly the same results: student-passive, information

  3. Constraints on Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars from Laboratory Studies of Presolar Graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Akande, O. W.; Croat, T. K.; Cowsik, R.

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation into the physical conditions in the mass outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars that are required for the formation of micron-sized presolar graphite grains, either with or without internal crystals of titanium carbide (TiC). In addition to providing detailed information about stellar nucleosynthesis, the structure and composition of presolar grains give unique information about the conditions of grain formation. In the present work we use laboratory observations of presolar graphite to gain insight into the physical conditions in circumstellar outflows from carbon AGB stars. The periodic pulsation of AGB stars enhances the gas density through shocks in the stellar atmosphere above the photosphere, promoting the condensation of dust grains. Copious mass outflow occurs largely because grains are coupled to the radiation field of the star, which accelerates them by radiation pressure; momentum is in turn transferred to gas molecules by collisions with grains. The dust/gas mixture is effectively a two-component fluid whose motion depends on atmospheric structure and which, in turn, influences that structure. In particular, the radiation pressure on the grains determines the velocity field of the outflow and thus the density distribution, while the density distribution itself determines the conditions of radiative transfer within the outflow and thus the effective radiation pressure.

  4. Long-term Doppler Shift and Line Profile Studies of Planetary Search Target Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    This grant supported attempts to develop a method for measuring the Doppler shifts of solar-type stars more accurately. The expense of future space borne telescopes to search for solar systems like our own makes it worth trying to improve the relatively inexpensive pre-flight reconnaissance by ground-based telescopes. The concepts developed under this grant contributed to the groundwork for such improvements. They were focused on how to distinguish between extrasolar planets and stellar activity (convection) cycles. To measure the Doppler shift (radial velocity; RV) of the center of mass of a star in the presence of changing convection in the star's photosphere, one can either measure the effect of convection separately from that of the star's motion and subtract its contribution to the apparent RV, or measure the RV in a way that is insensitive to convection. This grant supported investigations into both of these approaches. We explored the use of a Fabry-Perot Etalon HE interferometer and a multichannel Fourier Transform Spectrometer (mFTS), and finished making a 1.8-m telescope operational and potentially available for this work.

  5. An X-ray and Optical Spectroscopic Study of the Perplexing Star RZ Piscium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzi, Kristina Marie; Kastner, Joel H.; Melis, Carl; Zuckerman, Ben M.

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionary status of the "anti-flare" variable star RZ Psc is ambiguous; both pre- and post-main sequence models have been proposed. RZ Psc shows evidence for gaseous and dusty circumstellar material in the form of emission lines and an infrared excess; its space velocities suggest that it is young, but it does not appear to be a member of a known association of young stars. We report the results of X-ray observations of RZ Psc with XMM-Newton, as well as high-resolution optical spectroscopy of the star obtained at the Lick and Keck observatories. The XMM-Newton imaging spectroscopy establishes that RZ Psc is highly X-ray-luminous, while the optical spectroscopy confirms that the star is G-type and has low surface gravity. The nearly saturated stellar activity and X-ray plasma properties of RZ Psc are indicative of pre-main sequence status, but are also consistent with those of rapidly rotating first-ascent giants. The optical spectroscopy yields evidence for radial velocity variability, hinting at the possibility that RZ Psc is a spectroscopic binary system. Further observations of RZ Psc and its field are necessary to break the age degeneracy and to confirm its close binary status. This research is supported in part by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis program grant NNX16AG13G to RIT.

  6. A Study of Nonthermal X-Ray and Radio Emission from the O Star 9 Sgr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Drake, Stephen A.

    1999-01-01

    The observed X-ray and highly variable nonthermal radio emission from OB stars has eluded explanation for more than 18 years. The most favorable model of X-ray production in these stars (shocks) predicts both nonthermal radio and X-ray emission. The nonthermal X-ray emission should occur above 2 keV and the variability of this X-ray component should also be comparable to the observed radio variability. To test this scenario, we proposed an ASC/VLA monitoring program to observe the OB star, 9 Sgr, a well known nonthermal, variable radio source and a strong X-ray source. We requested 625 ks ASCA observations with a temporal spacing of approximately 4 days which corresponds to the time required for a density disturbance to propagate to the 6 cm radio free-free photosphere. The X-ray observations were coordinated with 5 multi-wavelength VLA observations. These observations represent the first systematic attempt to investigate the relationship between the X-ray and radio emission in OB stars.

  7. Detecting non-uniform period spacings in the Kepler photometry of γ Doradus stars: methodology and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Reeth, T.; Tkachenko, A.; Aerts, C.; Pápics, P. I.; Degroote, P.; Debosscher, J.; Zwintz, K.; Bloemen, S.; De Smedt, K.; Hrudkova, M.; Raskin, G.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The analysis of stellar oscillations is one of the most reliable ways to probe stellar interiors. Recent space missions such as Kepler have provided us with an opportunity to study these oscillations with unprecedented detail. For many multi-periodic pulsators such as γ Doradus stars, this led to the detection of dozens to hundreds of oscillation frequencies that could not be found from ground-based observations. Aims: We aim to detect non-uniform period spacings in the Fourier spectra of a sample of γ Doradus stars observed by Kepler. Such detection is complicated by both the large number of significant frequencies in the space photometry and by overlapping non-equidistant rotationally split multiplets. Methods: Guided by theoretical properties of gravity-mode oscillation of γ Doradus stars, we developed a period-spacing detection method and applied it to Kepler observations of a few stars, after having tested the performance from simulations. Results: The application of the technique resulted in the clear detection of non-uniform period spacing series for three out of the five treated Kepler targets. Disadvantages of the technique are also discussed, and include the disability to distinguish between different values of the spherical degree and azimuthal order of the oscillation modes without additional theoretical modelling. Conclusions: Despite the shortcomings, the method is shown to allow solid detections of period spacings for γ Doradus stars, which will allow future asteroseismic analyses of these stars. Based on data gathered with the NASA Discovery mission Kepler and the HERMES spectrograph, which is installed at the Mercator Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, and supported by the Fund for Scientific Research of Flanders (FWO), Belgium, the Research Council of KU Leuven, Belgium, the Fonds National de la

  8. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  9. Tabby's Star (Illustration)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-04

    This illustration depicts a hypothetical uneven ring of dust orbiting KIC 8462852, also known as Boyajian's Star or Tabby's Star. Astronomers have found the dimming of the star over long periods appears to be weaker at longer infrared wavelengths of light and stronger at shorter ultraviolet wavelengths. Such reddening is characteristic of dust particles and inconsistent with more fanciful "alien megastructure" concepts, which would evenly dim all wavelengths of light. By studying observations from NASA's Spitzer and Swift telescopes, as well as the Belgian AstroLAB IRIS observatory, the researchers have been able to better constrain the size of the dust particles. This places them within the range found in dust disks orbiting stars, and larger than the particles typically found in interstellar dust. The system is portrayed with a couple of comets, consistent with previous studies that have found evidence for cometary activity within the system. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22081

  10. Young Stars in IC 2118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Tim; Sepulveda, Babs; Maranto, Tony; Weehler, Cynthia; Roelofsen, Theresa; Rebull, Luisa

    2006-02-01

    IC 2118, the Witch Head Nebula (~210 parsecs), is a region of star formation located near the supergiant star Rigel in the constellation Orion. Last year, we observed the head of the nebula and approximately QUADRUPLED the number of young stars known here. We propose using IRAC and MIPS to continue our investigation by observing the densest part of the rest of the cloud. Our team proposes to use IRAC and MIPS observations to (1) investigate star formation, (2) look for likely cluster member stars with infrared excesses, and characterize this young star population by obtaining their colors and therefore estimates of masses and ages, (3) study the distribution of stars, their relationship to the ISM, and the possibilities of triggered star formation, (4) compare the young star population, distribution, and age to other similar sites of star formation, e.g., IC 1396 and (5) produce a dramatic image of the interstellar medium in the region surrounding IC 2118. Since this region is in the Orion constellation near the bright star Rigel, it provides additional appeal to students and the general public.

  11. STARS no star on Kauai

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    1993-04-01

    The island of Kuai, home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, is preparing for the first of a series of Star Wars rocket launches expected to begin early this year. The Strategic Defense Initiative plans 40 launches of the Stategic Target System (STARS) over a 10-year period. The focus of the tests appears to be weapons and sensors designed to combat multiple-warhead ICBMs, which will be banned under the START II Treaty that was signed in January. The focus of this article is to express the dubious value of testing the STARS at a time when their application will not be an anticipated problem.

  12. Studies of circumstellar shells in AGB stars by multifrequency (sub)mm-VLBI observations of maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, F.; Desmurs, J. F.; Bujarrabal, V.; Baudry, A.; de Vicente, P.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Alcolea, J.; Diaz-Pulido, A.; Gómez, M.

    2017-03-01

    VLBI observations of maser emission are a basic tool to study the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around evolved stars, mainly around AGB and post-AGB stars. The maser lines of water and silicon monoxide are particularly intense. They provide us with high spatial resolution data on the very inner CSEs around AGB stars, including the pulsating layers previous to grain formation and outer regions where the fast expansion characteristic of such envelopes is already present. The analysis of the pumping mechanism of SiO masers and of the physical conditions in the emitting clumps requires accurate maps of the various lines, which show different excitation requirements. A large observational effort is being done to obtain (quasi-)simultaneous multiline data at the highest spatial resolution, using VLBI techniques, which makes possible to compare the relative distribution of the maser lines. We present the state-of-the-art in the field, and discuss preliminary results of SiO masers observed with the Global Millimeter VLBI Array (GMVA) which provide a new view into the physics of these AGB envelopes. The participation of ALMA in these VLBI arrays will boost the study of these masers, at higher frequencies.

  13. Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies - Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott; Devinney, Edward J.

    2012-04-01

    Current and planned telescope systems (both on the ground and in space) as well as new technologies will be discussed with emphasis on their impact on the studies of binary star and exoplanet systems. Although no telescopes or space missions are primarily designed to study binary stars (what a pity!), several are available (or will be shortly) to study exoplanet systems. Nonetheless those telescopes and instruments can also be powerful tools for studying binary and variable stars. For example, early microlensing missions (mid-1990s) such as EROS, MACHO and OGLE were initially designed for probing dark matter in the halos of galaxies but, serendipitously, these programs turned out to be a bonanza for the studies of eclipsing binaries and variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Galactic Bulge. A more recent example of this kind of serendipity is the Kepler Mission. Although Kepler was designed to discover exoplanet transits (and so far has been very successful, returning many planetary candidates), Kepler is turning out to be a ``stealth'' stellar astrophysics mission returning fundamentally important and new information on eclipsing binaries, variable stars and, in particular, providing a treasure trove of data of all types of pulsating stars suitable for detailed Asteroseismology studies. With this in mind, current and planned telescopes and networks, new instruments and techniques (including interferometers) are discussed that can play important roles in our understanding of both binary star and exoplanet systems. Recent advances in detectors (e.g. laser frequency comb spectrographs), telescope networks (both small and large - e.g. Super-WASP, HAT-net, RoboNet, Las Combres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network), wide field (panoramic) telescope systems (e.g. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and Pan-Starrs), huge telescopes (e.g. the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the Overwhelming Large Telescope (OWL) and the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT

  14. Conformally symmetric relativistic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Farook; Maharaj, Sunil D.; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain; Chakraborty, Koushik

    2017-03-01

    We investigate whether compact stars having Tolman-like interior geometry admit conformal symmetry. Taking anisotropic pressure along the two principal directions within the compact object, we obtain physically relevant quantities such as transverse and radial pressure, density and redshift function. We study the equation of state (EOS) for the matter distribution inside the star. From the relation between pressure and density function of the constituent matter, we explore the nature and properties of the interior matter. The redshift function and compactness parameter are found to be physically reasonable. The matter inside the star satisfies the null, weak and strong energy conditions. Finally, we compare the masses and radii predicted from the model with corresponding values in some observed stars.

  15. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir,more » {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.« less

  16. Neutron Star Science with the NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J. K.

    2015-10-16

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), launched in June 2012, helped scientists obtain for the first time a sensitive high-­energy X-­ray map of the sky with extraordinary resolution. This pioneering telescope has aided in the understanding of how stars explode and neutron stars are born. LLNL is a founding member of the NuSTAR project, with key personnel on its optics and science team. We used NuSTAR to observe and analyze the observations of different neutron star classes identified in the last decade that are still poorly understood. These studies not only help to comprehend newly discovered astrophysical phenomena and emission processes for members of the neutron star family, but also expand the utility of such observations for addressing broader questions in astrophysics and other physics disciplines. For example, neutron stars provide an excellent laboratory to study exotic and extreme phenomena, such as the equation of state of the densest matter known, the behavior of matter in extreme magnetic fields, and the effects of general relativity. At the same time, knowing their accurate populations has profound implications for understanding the life cycle of massive stars, star collapse, and overall galactic evolution.

  17. A combined multiwavelength VLA/ALMA/Chandra study unveils the complex magnetosphere of the B-type star HR5907

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Oskinova, L. M.; Ignace, R.; Buemi, C. S.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Leone, F.; Phillips, N. M.; Agliozzo, C.; Todt, H.; Cerrigone, L.

    2018-01-01

    We present new radio/millimeter measurements of the hot magnetic star HR 5907 obtained with the VLA and ALMA interferometers. We find that HR 5907 is the most radio luminous early type star in the cm-mm band among those presently known. Its multi-wavelength radio light curves are strongly variable with an amplitude that increases with radio frequency. The radio emission can be explained by the populations of the non-thermal electrons accelerated in the current sheets on the outer border of the magnetosphere of this fast rotating magnetic star. We classify HR 5907 as another member of the growing class of strongly magnetic fast rotating hot stars where the gyro-synchrotron emission mechanism efficiently operates in their magnetospheres. The new radio observations of HR 5907 are combined with archival X-ray data to study the physical condition of its magnetosphere. The X-ray spectra of HR 5907 show tentative evidence for the presence of non-thermal spectral component. We suggest that non-thermal X-rays originate a stellar X-ray aurora due to streams of non-thermal electrons impacting on the stellar surface. Taking advantage of the relation between the spectral indices of the X-ray power-law spectrum and the non-thermal electron energy distributions, we perform 3-D modeling of the radio emission for HR 5907. The wavelength-dependent radio light-curves probe magnetospheric layers at different heights above the stellar surface. A detailed comparison between simulated and observed radio light-curves leads us to conclude that the stellar magnetic field of HR 5907 is likely non-dipolar, providing further indirect evidence of the complex magnetic field topology of HR 5907.

  18. High-Speed Bullet Ejections during the AGB to Planetary Nebula Transition: A Study of the Carbon Star V Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    2017-08-01

    The carbon star V Hya is experiencing heavy mass loss as it undergoes the transition from an AGB star to a planetary nebula (PN). This is possibly the earliest object known in this brief phase, which is so short that few nearby stars are likely to be caught in the act. Molecular observations reveal that a bipolar nebula has been established even at this early stage. Using STIS, we obtained high spatial-resolution long-slit optical spectra of V Hya spanning 3 epochs spaced apart by a year during each of two periods (2002-2004, 2011-2013). These data reveal high-velocity emission in [SII] lines from compact blobs located both on- and off-source, with the ejection axis executing a flip-flop, both in, and perpendicular to, the sky-plane. We have proposed a detailed model in which V Hya ejects high-speed (200-250 km/s) bullets once every 8.5 yr associated with periastron passage of a binary companion in an eccentric orbit with an 8.5 yr period. We suggest that the jet driver is an accretion disk (produced by gravitational capture of material from the primary) that is warped and precessing. Our model predicts the locations of previously ejected bullets in V Hya and future epochs at which new bullets will emerge. We now propose new STIS observations of these remarkable bullet ejections over two new epochs well separated from previous ones, to robustly test our model. The proposed observations will provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to look on as V Hya's circumstellar envelope is sculpted by these bullets. Our study will help solve the long-standing puzzle of how the spherical mass-loss envelopes of AGB stars evolve into bipolar and multipolar PNe.

  19. Structure-function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    SciTech Connect

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2013-09-27

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins.

  20. Star formation in the NGC 7129 region - A CO molecular-line and far-infrared continuum study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechis, K. P.; Harvey, P. M.; Campbell, M. F.; Hoffmann, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a joint radio/IR study of the region around NGC 7129, a reflection nebula seen against a large dark cloud. The results reported include high-angular-resolution (C-12)O and (C-13)O line measurements, high-angular-resolution observations in the range from 35 to 200 microns, and observations at 10 to 20 microns of selected objects in the nebula. Important constraints are placed on the total stellar luminosities, dust densities and temperatures, and heating and cooling processes occurring in the nebula. Specifically, it is found that: (1) the (C-13)O and dust column densities increase significantly from west to east across the nebula; (2) the (C-13)O column density in the vicinity of the two brightest visible stars decreases relative to the column density north and south of those stars; (3) kinetic temperature increases along the whole boundary of the nebulosity; and (4) the strongest far-IR source in NGC 7129 is coincident with the pre-main-sequence star LkH-alpha 234.

  1. Structure–function studies of STAR family Quaking proteins bound to their in vivo RNA target sites

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Marianna; Hafner, Markus; Teplov, Dmitri; Essig, Katharina; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Quaking (QKI) and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, GLD-1 (defective in germ line development), are evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins, which post-transcriptionally regulate target genes essential for developmental processes and myelination. We present X-ray structures of the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) domain, composed of Qua1, K homology (KH), and Qua2 motifs of QKI and GLD-1 bound to high-affinity in vivo RNA targets containing YUAAY RNA recognition elements (RREs). The KH and Qua2 motifs of the STAR domain synergize to specifically interact with bases and sugar-phosphate backbones of the bound RRE. Qua1-mediated homodimerization generates a scaffold that enables concurrent recognition of two RREs, thereby plausibly targeting tandem RREs present in many QKI-targeted transcripts. Structure-guided mutations reduced QKI RNA-binding affinity in vitro and in vivo, and expression of QKI mutants in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) significantly decreased the abundance of QKI target mRNAs. Overall, our studies define principles underlying RNA target selection by STAR homodimers and provide insights into the post-transcriptional regulatory function of mammalian QKI proteins. PMID:23630077

  2. A multifrequency study of star formation in the blue compact dwarf galaxy IZw 36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viallefond, F.; Thuan, T. X.

    1983-01-01

    Radio, near IR, optical, and UV observations of I Zw 36 = Mrk 209 = Haro 29 are reported. The H I distribution shows a core-halo structure, the core containing half of the mass and showing systematic motions; the halo is diffuse and contains several H I clumps. The visible star formation region is associated with the core but is shifted slightly with respect to the H I peak column density; and the virial mass is 5 to 7 times the H I mass. Star formation models with an initial mass function of slope 1.5 (the Salpeter value being 1.35) and a burst age or duration of a few million years fit well the optical spectrophotometric measurements. The data also suggest that the column density of molecular hydrogen in I Zw 36 is 6 + or - 3 times that of the neutral hydrogen, about the right amount to account for the virial mass.

  3. X-Shooter study of accretion in ρ-Ophiucus: very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, C. F.; Testi, L.; Natta, A.; Alcalá, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    We present new VLT/X-Shooter optical and near-infrared spectra of a sample of 17 candidate young low-mass stars and brown dwarfs located in the ρ-Ophiucus cluster. We derived the spectral type and extinction for all the targets, and then we determined their physical parameters. All the objects but one have M⋆≲0.6 M⊙, and eight have mass below or close to the hydrogen-burning limit. Using the intensity of various permitted emission lines present in their spectra, we determined the accretion luminosity and mass accretion rates (Ṁacc) for all the objects. When compared with previous works targeting the same sample, we find that, in general, these objects are not as strongly accreting as previously reported, and we suggest that the reason is our more accurate estimate of the photospheric parameters. We also compare our findings with recent works in other slightly older star-forming regions, such as Lupus, to investigate possible differences in the accretion properties, but we find that the accretion properties for our targets have the same dependence on the stellar and substellar parameters as in the other regions. This leads us to conclude that we do not find evidence for a different dependence of Ṁacc with M⋆ when comparing low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Moreover, we find a similar small (≲1 dex) scatter in the Ṁacc-M⋆ relation as in some of our recent works in other star-forming regions, and no significant differences in Ṁacc due to different ages or properties of the regions. The latter result suffers, however, from low statistics and sample selection biases in the current studies. The small scatter in the Ṁacc-M⋆ correlation confirms that mass accretion rate measurements in the literature based on uncertain photospheric parameters and single accretion indicators, such as the Hα width, can lead to a scatter that is unphysically large. Our studies show that only broadband spectroscopic surveys coupled with a detailed analysis of the

  4. Classification study of WISE infrared sources: identification of candidate asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Xun; Wang, Zhong-Xiang

    2013-03-01

    In the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky source catalog there are 76 million mid-infrared point sources that were detected in the first three WISE bands and have association with only one 2MASS near-IR source within 3″. We search for their identifications in the SIMBAD database and find 3.2 million identified sources. Based on these known sources, we establish three criteria for selecting candidate asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Galaxy, which are three defined zones in a color-color diagram, Galactic latitude |b| <= 20°, and “corrected" WISE third-band W3c <= 11. Applying these criteria to the WISE+2MASS sources, 1.37 million of them are selected. We analyze the WISE third-band W3 distribution of the selected sources, and further establish that W3<=8 is required in order to exclude a large fraction of normal stars from them. We therefore find 0.47 million candidate AGB stars in our Galaxy from the WISE source catalog. Using W3c, we estimate their distances and derive their Galactic distributions. The candidates are generally distributed around the Galactic center uniformly, with 68% (1-σ) of them within approximately 8 kpc. We discuss the idea that optical spectroscopy can be used to verify the C-rich AGB stars in our candidates, and thus a fraction of them (~10%) will be good targets for the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey that is planned to start in fall of 2012.

  5. Multi-wavelength study of triggered star formation around the mid-infrared bubble N14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.

    2013-02-01

    We present multi-wavelength analysis around the mid-infrared (MIR) bubble N14 to probe the signature of triggered star formation as well as the formation of new massive star(s) and/or cluster(s) at the borders of the bubble by the expansion of the H II region. Spitzer Infrared Array Camera ratio maps reveal that the bubble is traced by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission following an almost circular morphology except in the south-west direction towards the low molecular density environment. The observational signatures of the collected molecular and cold dust material have been found around the bubble. We have detected 418 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the selected region around the bubble N14. Interestingly, the detected YSO clusters are associated with the collected molecular and cold dust material at the borders of the bubble. One of the clusters is found with deeply embedded intermediate mass and massive Class I YSOs associated with one of the dense dust clumps in the east of the bubble N14. We do not find good agreement between the dynamical age of the H II region and the fragmentation time of the accumulated molecular materials to explain the possible `collect-and-collapse' process around the bubble N14. Therefore, we suggest the possibility of triggered star formation by compression of the pre-existing dense clumps by the shock wave and/or small-scale Jeans gravitational instabilities in the collected materials. We have also investigated 5 young massive embedded protostars (8-10 M⊙) and 15 intermediate mass (3-7 M⊙) Class I YSOs which are associated with the dust and molecular fragmented clumps at the borders of the bubble. We conclude that the expansion of the H II region is also leading to the formation of these intermediate and massive Class I YSOs around the bubble N14.

  6. Detecting outliers and learning complex structures with large spectroscopic surveys - a case study with APOGEE stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Itamar; Poznanski, Dovi; Baron, Dalya; Zasowski, Gail; Shahaf, Sahar

    2018-02-01

    In this work we apply and expand on a recently introduced outlier detection algorithm that is based on an unsupervised random forest. We use the algorithm to calculate a similarity measure for stellar spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). We show that the similarity measure traces non-trivial physical properties and contains information about complex structures in the data. We use it for visualization and clustering of the dataset, and discuss its ability to find groups of highly similar objects, including spectroscopic twins. Using the similarity matrix to search the dataset for objects allows us to find objects that are impossible to find using their best fitting model parameters. This includes extreme objects for which the models fail, and rare objects that are outside the scope of the model. We use the similarity measure to detect outliers in the dataset, and find a number of previously unknown Be-type stars, spectroscopic binaries, carbon rich stars, young stars, and a few that we cannot interpret. Our work further demonstrates the potential for scientific discovery when combining machine learning methods with modern survey data.

  7. Star formation properties in barred galaxies. III. Statistical study of bar-driven secular evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong; Cao, Chen E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges toward stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the different stages of the bar-driven physical process, while future work is needed because of the uncertainties.

  8. SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN FILAMENTS AND THE FIELD AT z ∼ 0.5: EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF ELECTRON DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Darvish, Behnam; Mobasher, Bahram; Hemmati, Shoubaneh

    2015-12-01

    We study the physical properties of a spectroscopic sample of 28 star-forming galaxies in a large filamentary structure in the COSMOS field at z ∼ 0.53, with spectroscopic data taken with the Keck/DEIMOS spectrograph, and compare them with a control sample of 30 field galaxies. We spectroscopically confirm the presence of a large galaxy filament (∼8 Mpc), along which five confirmed X-ray groups exist. We show that within the uncertainties, the ionization parameter, equivalent width (EW), EW versus specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relation, EW versus stellar mass relation, line-of-sight velocity dispersion, dynamical mass, and stellar-to-dynamical mass ratio are similar for filament andmore » field star-forming galaxies. However, we show that, on average, filament star-forming galaxies are more metal enriched (∼0.1–0.15 dex), possibly owing to the inflow of the already-enriched intrafilamentary gas into filament galaxies. Moreover, we show that electron densities are significantly lower (a factor of ∼17) in filament star-forming systems compared to those in the field, possibly because of a longer star-formation timescale for filament star-forming galaxies. Our results highlight the potential pre-processing role of galaxy filaments and intermediate-density environments on the evolution of galaxies, which has been highly underestimated.« less

  9. From dust to light: a study of star formation in NGC2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P. S.

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the star formation history of the young cluster NGC2264 using the unique observational capabilities of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The motivation to conduct this study stems from the fact that most stars are formed within clusters, so the formation and evolution of the latter will effect the stellar mass distribution in the field. Detailed observational studies of young stellar clusters are therefore crucial to provide necessary constraints for theoretical models of cloud and cluster formation and evolution. This study also addresses the evolution of circumstellar disks in NGC2264; empirical knowledge of protoplanetary disk evolution is required for the understanding of how planetary systems such as our own form. The first result obtained from this study was both completely new and unexpected. A dense region within NGC2264 was found to be teeming with bright 24 μm Class I protostars; these sources are embedded within dense submillimeter cores and are spatially distributed along dense filamentary fingers of gas and dust that radially converge on a B-type binary Class I source. This cluster of protostars was baptized the "Spokes cluster" and its analysis provided further insight into the role of thermal support during core formation, collapse and fragmentation. The nearest neighbor projected separation distribution of these Class I sources shows a characteristic spacing that is similar to the Jeans length for the region, indicating that the dusty filaments may have undergone thermal fragmentation. The submillimeter cores of the Spokes cluster were observed at 230GHz using the SubMillimeter Array (SMA) and the resulting high resolution (~1.3") continuum observations revealed a dense grouping of 7 Class 0 sources embedded within a particular core, D-MM1 (~20"x20"). The compact sources have masses ranging between 0.4M and 1.2M, and radii of ~600AU. The mean separation of the Class 0 sources within D-MM1 is considerably

  10. Measuring rotation periods of solar-like stars using TIGRE. A study of periodic CaII H+K S-index variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempelmann, A.; Mittag, M.; Gonzalez-Perez, J. N.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schröder, K. P.; Rauw, G.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The rotation period of a star is a key parameter both for the stellar dynamo that generates magnetic fields as well as for stellar differential rotation. Aims: We present the results from the first year of monitoring a sample of solar-like stars by the TIGRE facility in Guanajuato (Mexico), which will study rotation in solar analogs. Methods: TIGRE is an automatically operating 1.2 m telescope equipped with an Échelle spectrograph with a spectral resolution of 20 000, which covers a spectral range of between 3800 and 8800 Å. A main task is the monitoring the stellar activity of cool stars, mainly in the emission cores of the CaII H and K lines. We observed a number of stars with a sampling between 1-3 days over one year. Results: A total number of 95 stars were observed between August 1 2013 and July 31 2014, the total number of spectra taken for this program was appoximately 2700. For almost a third of the sample stars the number of observations was rather low (less than 20), mainly because of bad weather. Fifty-four stars show a periodic signal but often with low significance. Only 24 stars exhibit a significant period. We interpret these signals as stellar rotation. For about half of them the rotation periods were already previously known, in which case our period measurements are usually in good agreement with the literature values. Besides the periodic signals, trends are frequently observed in the time series. Conclusions: TIGRE is obviously able to detect stellar rotation periods in the CaII H+K emission cores when the time series contains a sufficient number of data points. However, this is frequently not achievable during the wet summer season in Guanajuato. Hence, future estimates of rotation periods will concentrate on stars that are observable during the winter season from October until April.

  11. Translating Science Into Service: Lessons Learned From the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) Study

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Norman

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this review is to summarize lessons learned from, and limitations of, the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial, focusing on measurement-based care. Data Sources: PubMed and MEDLINE were searched from 1980 through 2006 using terms such as depression, major depressive disorder, augmentation, switching, measurement-based care, and remission. Other relevant articles were identified by checking reference lists of the identified studies. Study Selection: A total of 60 studies were initially identified, which resulted in 34 studies used in this review. The salient criteria used for selection of studies centered on whether results had implications for clinical practice and provided lessons that could be learned and practically applied to real-life settings. Data Extraction: Data were extracted from the STAR*D trial and associated studies that were pertinent to everyday problems encountered by mental health professionals in the community: determination of whether the optimum strategy for a particular patient involves “augmentation” or “switching” of a patient's medication. Data Synthesis: Measurement-based care is essential in order to identify the two thirds of patients who do not achieve remission with the first treatment strategy. Timely changes in antidepressant therapy can improve outcomes. Conclusions: The STAR*D trial underscores the importance of measurement-based care in identifying patients who may not have achieved remission with an initial antidepressant, enabling alternative options such as augmentation or switching to be prescribed to meet this ultimate goal of therapy. PMID:17998951

  12. Optical and X-ray studies of chromospherically active stars: FR Cancri, HD 95559 and LO Pegasi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, J. C.; Singh, K. P.; Drake, S. A.; Sagar, R.

    2005-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of three chromospherically active stars, namely FR Cnc (= BD +16 degrees 1753), HD 95559 and LO Peg (=BD +22 degrees 4409), including newly obtained optical photometry, (for FR Cnc) low-resolution optical spectroscopy, as well as archival IR and X-ray observations. The BVR photometry carried out during the years 2001 - 2004 has found significant photometric variability to be present in all three stars. For FR Cnc, a photometric period 0.826685 +/- 0.000034 d has been established. The strong variation in the phase and amplitude of the FR Cnc light curves when folded on this period implies the presence of evolving and migrating spots or spot groups on its surface. Two independent spots with migration periods of 0.97 and 0.93 years respectively are inferred. The photometry of HD 95559 suggests the formation of a spot (group) during the interval of our observations. We infer the existence of two independent spots or groups in the photosphere of LO Peg, one of which has a migration period of 1.12 years. The optical spectroscopy of FR Cnc carried out during 2002-2003, reveals the presence of strong and variable Ca I1 H and K, H(sub beta) and H(sub alpha) emission features indicative of high level of chromospheric activity. The value of 5.3 for the ratio of the excess emission in H(sub alpha) to H(sub beta), EH(sub alpha)/EH(sub beta), suggests that the chromospheric emission may arise from an extended off-limb region. We have searched for the presence of color excesses in the near-IR JHK bands of these stars using 2MASS data, but none of them appear to have any significant color excess. We have also analyzed archival X-ray observations of HD 95559 and LO Peg carried out by with the ROSAT observatory. The best fit models to their X-ray spectra imply the presence of two coronal plasma components of differing temperatures and with sub-solar metal abundances. The inferred emission measures and temperatures of these systems are similar to

  13. Star Formation in the Filamentary Dark Cloud GF-9: a Multi-Wavelength Intra-Cloud Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardi, David Robert

    Filamentary dark clouds (FDCs) are a subclass of small molecular clouds containing small numbers of somewhat regularly spaced dense cores connected by lower density gas and dust. Most of the previous work performed on FDCs has concerned the star formation properties of individual dense cores within the FDCs and has not concerned the FDCs as entities of their own. As a result little is known about the general star formation properties of FDCs. The primary question addressed in this work is 'Within filamentary dark clouds, how does the star formation process within a core region compare to that within a filamentary region?' In order to address the above question, a multi-wavelength observational comparative study has been performed upon a representative dense core (hereafter, GF9-Core) and filamentary region (hereafter, GF9-Fila) within the FDC GF-9 (LDN 1082). At the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory, the core and filamentary region were observed in the rotational transitions of 12CO/ (J=1/to0),/ 13CO/ (J=1/to0)/ and/ CS/ (J=2/to1) covering a region of 10' x 8'. The temperature, density and kinematic structures of the two regions were deduced from the radio imaging spectroscopy data and were used to estimate the energy balance of the regions. We also obtained 70, 100, 135 and 200 μm images from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) covering approximately 12' x 9' which were used to investigate the temperature and density distributions of the dust within the two regions. Finally, at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory using the Aerospace Corporation NICMOS3 camera, the core and filament were imaged in the near-infrared broadband filters J, H, and K-short covering a slightly smaller region of 7' x 7'. The near-infrared survey data were used to search for embedded Class I and Class II protostars and to investigate the density distribution of the dust. We have found that the evolutionary processes of the core region and the filament region proceed along similar

  14. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  15. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    the models are necessarily quite uncertain (i.e., they are not well "constrained"). It is therefore imperative to enlarge the number of observables and this is possible with asteroseismology. Helioseismology has opened up the way. These observations severely constrain the possible models of the Sun's internal structure. But, depending on their mass and age, stars have very different internal structures, and may also harbour physical processes that are quite different from those in the Sun. Asteroseismological observations of stellar oscillations add crucial information that constrain the models of their inner structure, since the measured frequencies may be compared directly with those computed for the models. The observation of the full stellar disk allows to characterize certain (low degree) oscillation modes which penetrate deep inside the star and it is not necessary to resolve the stellar disk (as we can do for the Sun) in order to obtain useful seismological information. More stars to be observed Observations of bright solar-like stars are already planned with the CORALIE spectrograph. Even fainter stars can be observed with the HARPS spectrograph which will be installed on the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory at the end of 2002. It will be able to observe stars that are one hundred times fainter than those now reachable with CORALIE and with even better accuracy of the velocity measurements. While it will be mostly dedicated to the search of exoplanets, HARPS will be able to conduct an asteroseismological study of about 100 solar-like stars. More information The research reported in this Press Release is described in a scientific article ("P-mode observations on Alpha Cen A" by François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier) that has been accepted for publication as a Letter in the European journal "Astronomy & Astrophysics". Note [1]: Alpha Centauri was earlier known as Rigil Centauri , but that name is not much used because of the similarity with the name of the

  16. Chameleon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Singleton, Douglas

    2011-10-15

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field nonminimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and nonrelativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the nonminimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  17. Rainbow's stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garattini, Remo; Mandanici, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a growing interest in the equilibrium of compact astrophysical objects like white dwarf and neutron stars has been manifested. In particular, various modifications due to Planck-scale energy effects have been considered. In this paper we analyze the modification induced by gravity's rainbow on the equilibrium configurations described by the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equation. Our purpose is to explore the possibility that the rainbow Planck-scale deformation of space-time could support the existence of different compact stars.

  18. A comparative study of vitellogenesis in Echinodermata: Lessons from the sea star.

    PubMed

    Alqaisi, Khalid M; Lamare, Miles D; Grattan, Dave R; Damsteegt, Erin L; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Lokman, P Mark

    2016-08-01

    The provision of yolk precursor proteins to the oviparous egg is crucial for normal embryo development. In Echinodermata, a transferrin-like yolk component termed major yolk protein (MYP) is a major precursor protein in Echinoidea and Holothuroidea. In contrast, in Asteroidea a single vitellogenin (Vtg) was recently identified, but its role as primary yolk protein remains unclear. To resolve the apparent MYP-Vtg dichotomy in sea stars and to understand the dynamics of candidate yolk protein gene expression during the reproductive cycle, we investigated the molecular structures of sea star Vtg and MYP and quantified their transcript levels during oogenesis. By combining protein sequencing of the predominant proteins in ovulated eggs of Patiriella regularis with ovarian transcriptome sequencing and molecular cloning, we characterized two cDNAs encoding two bona fide Vtgs (PrVtg1 and PrVtg2) and a partial cDNA encoding MYP (PrMYP). PrMYP mRNA was found in low abundance in growing oocytes, possibly as maternal transcripts for translation after ovulation. In contrast, PrVtg transcripts, whose levels varied during the reproductive cycle, were not found in developing oocytes - rather, they were detected in ovarian follicle cells and pyloric caeca, indicating an extra-oocytic origin. Vtg accumulating in oocytes was stored in the form of cleaved products, which constituted the most abundant yolk polypeptides in ovulated sea star eggs; their levels decreased during early embryonic and larval development. Together, these traits are the hallmarks of a classical yolk protein - and hence, we contend that Vtg, and not MYP, is the main yolk protein in asteroids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiwavelength study of the high-latitude cloud L1642: chain of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Johanna

    2015-08-01

    L1642 is one of only two high Galactic latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds confirmed to have active star formation. We have mapped this cloud with Herschel as part of the Galactic Cold Cores project. We use multiwavelength observations to examine the properties of this cloud, especially the large-scale structure, dust properties, and compact sources at different stages of star formation. We present high-resolution far-infrared and submillimetre observations with the Herschel and AKARI satellites and millimetre observations with the AzTEC/ASTE telescope, which we combined with near- and mid-infrared data and millimetre Planck observations.The Herschel observations, combined with other data, show a sequence of objects from a cold clump to young stellar objects (YSOs) at different evolutionary stages. Source B-3 (2MASS J04351455-1414468) appears to be a YSO forming inside the L1642 cloud, instead of a foreground brown dwarf, as previously classified. Herschel data reveal striation in the diffuse dust emission around the cloud L1642. The western region shows striation towards the NE and has a steeper column density gradient on its southern side. The densest central region has a bow-shock like structure showing compression from the west and has a filamentary tail extending towards the east. The differences suggest that these may be spatially distinct structures, aligned only in projection. We derive values of the dust emission cross-section for different regions of the cloud. Modified black-body fits to the spectral energy distribution of Herschel and Planck data give emissivity spectral index β values 1.8-2.0 for the different regions. The compact sources have lower β values and show an anticorrelation between T and β. Markov chain Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate the strong anticorrelation between β and T errors and the importance of combining Herschel data with millimetre Planck data in constraining the dust properties. L1642 reveals a more complex structure and

  20. Molecular and Dusty Layers of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars Studied with the VLT Interferometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    R Cnc , and X Hya between 2004 and 2009. Some of these observations were aimed at performing a mid­infrared moni­ toring of AGB stars in order to...cycles (Figure 1). Using the AMBER instrument, we se - cured data of the Mira variables R Cnc , X Hya, W Vel, RW Vel, and RR Aql between 2008 and...From Karovicova et al. (2011). 10 12 14 U ni fo rm d is k d ia m et er (m as ) 16 18 20 22 R Cnc VLTI/AMBER E0-G0-H0 H2O 21002000 2200 Wavelength

  1. SOAP-T: a tool to study the light curve and radial velocity of a system with a transiting planet and a rotating spotted star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshagh, M.; Boisse, I.; Boué, G.; Montalto, M.; Santos, N. C.; Bonfils, X.; Haghighipour, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present an improved version of SOAP named "SOAP-T", which can generate the radial velocity variations and light curves for systems consisting of a rotating spotted star with a transiting planet. This tool can be used to study the anomalies inside transit light curves and the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, to better constrain the orbital configuration and properties of planetary systems and the active zones of their host stars. Tests of the code are presented to illustrate its performance and to validate its capability when compared with analytical models and real data. Finally, we apply SOAP-T to the active star, HAT-P-11, observed by the NASA Kepler space telescope and use this system to discuss the capability of this tool in analyzing light curves for the cases where the transiting planet overlaps with the star's spots. The tool's public interface is available at http://www.astro.up.pt/resources/soap-t/

  2. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  3. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-01-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  4. Morning Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-04

    Dawn on Saturn is greeted across the vastness of interplanetary space by the morning star, Venus, in this image from NASA Cassini spacecraft. Venus appears just off the edge of the planet directly above the white streak of Saturn G ring.

  5. Stars setting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-18

    ISS043E218074 (05/18/2015) --- This night view from the International Space Station on May 18, 2015 gives a view of brilliant city lights on the Earth’s surface shining beneath thousands of stars above. The thin line of Earth’s atmosphere can be seen with the green glow of aurora along the outer edge.

  6. Depression is not a consistent syndrome: An investigation of unique symptom patterns in the STAR*D study.

    PubMed

    Fried, Eiko I; Nesse, Randolph M

    2015-02-01

    The DSM-5 encompasses a wide range of symptoms for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Symptoms are commonly added up to sum-scores, and thresholds differentiate between healthy and depressed individuals. The underlying assumption is that all patients diagnosed with MDD have a similar condition, and that sum-scores accurately reflect the severity of this condition. To test this assumption, we examined the number of DSM-5 depression symptom patterns in the "Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression" (STAR*D) study. We investigated the number of unique symptom profiles reported by 3703 depressed outpatients at the beginning of the first treatment stage of STAR*D. Overall, we identified 1030 unique symptom profiles. Of these profiles, 864 profiles (83.9%) were endorsed by five or fewer subjects, and 501 profiles (48.6%) were endorsed by only one individual. The most common symptom profile exhibited a frequency of only 1.8%. Controlling for overall depression severity did not reduce the amount of observed heterogeneity. Symptoms were dichotomized to construct symptom profiles. Many subjects enrolled in STAR*D reported medical conditions for which prescribed medications may have affected symptom presentation. The substantial symptom variation among individuals who all qualify for one diagnosis calls into question the status of MDD as a specific consistent syndrome and offers a potential explanation for the difficulty in documenting treatment efficacy. We suggest that the analysis of individual symptoms, their patterns, and their causal associations will provide insights that could not be discovered in studies relying on only sum-scores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Detection of Nonthermal Radio Continuum Spokes and the Study of Star Formation in the Cartwheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayya, Y. D.; Bizyaev, D.; Romano, R.; Garcia-Barreto, J. A.; Vorobyov, E. I.

    2005-02-01

    New sensitive Very Large Array 20 cm continuum observations of the Cartwheel, the prototypical collisional ring galaxy, were carried out with the principal aim of tracing supernova remnants that are expected to lie in the wake of the expanding ring and in the ring itself. We detect predominantly nonthermal radio continuum emission from regions associated with 13 ring H II complexes. The emission interior to the ring is confined to structures that resemble spokes of the wheel. The spokes start near bright H II complexes and extend to around 6" (4 kpc) inward in the direction of the geometrical center of the ring. There is no apparent positional coincidence between the radio continuum and optical spokes. Radial distribution of intensity along the spokes suggests that the past star formation rate (SFR) in the Cartwheel was much lower than the current SFR. New Hα observations were used to revise the current SFR in the Cartwheel. The revised value is 18 Msolar yr-1 , which is a factor of 4 lower than the value reported previously but is in good agreement with the SFR estimated from far-infrared luminosity. About 30% of the observed 20 cm continuum nonthermal emission seems to originate in processes that are not related to star formation. Revised SFR in the Cartwheel is comparable to that in the rest of the ring galaxies.

  8. Observations of active chromosphere stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Africano, J. L.; Klimke, A.; Stencel, R. E.; Noah, P. V.; Bopp, B. W.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that spectroscopic signatures of stellar chromospheric activity are readily observable. The present study is concerned with new photometric and spectroscopic observations of active-chromosphere RS CVn, BY Dra, and FK Com stars. Attention is given to the first results of a synoptic monitoring program of many active chromosphere stars. During the time from 1980 to 1982, photometric and spectroscopic observations of 10 known or suspected active-chromosphere objects were made. The results regarding the individual stars are discussed. Seven stars observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) are all spectroscopic binaries.

  9. Period Changes in RRc Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Tan, P. J.

    2013-06-01

    We have used (O-C) analysis to study period changes in forty RRc stars in the GEOS (Groupe Européen d'Observation Stellaire) database of times of maximum of RR Lyrae stars. We find that many of the stars show approximately-linear period changes which are in agreement with the predictions of stellar evolution models. Other stars show period changes that are non-linear and/or larger than predicted by evolution models. Further long-term systematic, sustained observations may help to clarify the nature of the non-evolutionary changes.

  10. Children of currently depressed mothers: a STAR*D ancillary study.

    PubMed

    Pilowsky, Daniel J; Wickramaratne, Priya J; Rush, A John; Hughes, Carroll W; Garber, Judy; Malloy, Erin; King, Cheryl A; Cerda, Gabrielle; Sood, A Bela; Alpert, Jonathan E; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Talati, Ardesheer; Carlson, Marlene M; Liu, Harry Hong; Fava, Maurizio; Weissman, Myrna M

    2006-01-01

    To assess the current and lifetime prevalence of psychiatric disorders among children of currently depressed mothers and to assess the association of clinical features of maternal depression (i.e., severity, chronicity, and clinical features) with child psychopathology. Mothers were participants in the STAR*D (Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression) multisite trial, designed to compare effectiveness and acceptability of different treatment options for outpatients with non-psychotic major depressive disorder (MDD). Treatment-seeking mothers with a current DSM-IV diagnosis of MDD and with at least 1 child 7 to 17 years old were assessed during a major depressive episode (MDE). For each mother, 1 child was assessed (if a mother had more than 1 child, 1 was randomly selected). Maternal features assessed for this study were history of MDEs, severity of current MDE, comorbid conditions, depressive symptom features, and social functioning. Children were assessed for selected psychiatric diagnoses (Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version [K-SADS-PL]), psychopathologic symptoms and social functioning (Child Behavior Checklist), and global functioning (Children's Global Assessment Scale). Data were gathered from December 2001 to April 2004. A large proportion (72%) of mothers were severely depressed (17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score >/= 22). About a third (34%) of children had a current psychiatric disorder, including disruptive behavior (22%), anxiety (16%), and depressive (10%) disorders. Nearly half (45%) had a lifetime psychiatric disorder, including disruptive behavior (29%), anxiety (20%), and depressive (19%) disorders. Atypical depressive features in the mother were associated with a 3-fold increase in the odds of having a child with depressive (OR = 3.3 [95% CI = 1.2 to 9.5]; p = .02) or anxiety (OR = 2.6 [95% CI = 1.1 to 6.9]; p = .03) disorders. A history of maternal

  11. A New Pivot Algorithm for Star Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, Jakyoung; Yi, Yu; Kim, Yong Ha

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a star identification algorithm which utilizes pivot patterns instead of apparent magnitude information was developed. The new star identification algorithm consists of two steps of recognition process. In the first step, the brightest star in a sensor image is identified using the orientation of brightness between two stars as recognition information. In the second step, cell indexes are used as new recognition information to identify dimmer stars, which are derived from the brightest star already identified. If we use the cell index information, we can search over limited portion of the star catalogue database, which enables the faster identification of dimmer stars. The new pivot algorithm does not require calibrations on the apparent magnitude of a star but it shows robust characteristics on the errors of apparent magnitude compared to conventional pivot algorithms which require the apparent magnitude information.

  12. Boson Stars and Boson Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kulshreshtha, Usha; Kulshreshtha, Daya Shankar

    2018-03-01

    In this work we present a broad formalism for a study of the models of black holes, boson stars, boson shells and wormholes. The studies of boson stars and boson shells in a theory involving Scalar field, U(1) gauge field and a shelf interacting scalar potential coupled to gravity in the presence of a cosmological constant Λ are presented in details.

  13. Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Sander, Andreas; Todt, Helge

    Nearly 150 years ago, the French astronomers Charles Wolf and Georges Rayet described stars with very conspicuous spectra that are dominated by bright and broad emission lines. Meanwhile termed Wolf-Rayet Stars after their discoverers, those objects turned out to represent important stages in the life of massive stars. As the first conference in a long time that was specifically dedicated to Wolf-Rayet stars, an international workshop was held in Potsdam, Germany, from 1.-5. June 2015. About 100 participants, comprising most of the leading experts in the field as well as as many young scientists, gathered for one week of extensive scientific exchange and discussions. Considerable progress has been reported throughout, e.g. on finding such stars, modeling and analyzing their spectra, understanding their evolutionary context, and studying their circumstellar nebulae. While some major questions regarding Wolf-Rayet stars still remain open 150 years after their discovery, it is clear today that these objects are not just interesting stars as such, but also keystones in the evolution of galaxies. These proceedings summarize the talks and posters presented at the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet workshop. Moreover, they also include the questions, comments, and discussions emerging after each talk, thereby giving a rare overview not only about the research, but also about the current debates and unknowns in the field. The Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) included Alceste Bonanos (Athens), Paul Crowther (Sheffield), John Eldridge (Auckland), Wolf-Rainer Hamann (Potsdam, Chair), John Hillier (Pittsburgh), Claus Leitherer (Baltimore), Philip Massey (Flagstaff), George Meynet (Geneva), Tony Moffat (Montreal), Nicole St-Louis (Montreal), and Dany Vanbeveren (Brussels).

  14. A hybrid method for accurate star tracking using star sensor and gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiazhen; Yang, Lie; Zhang, Hao

    2017-10-01

    Star tracking is the primary operating mode of star sensors. To improve tracking accuracy and efficiency, a hybrid method using a star sensor and gyroscopes is proposed in this study. In this method, the dynamic conditions of an aircraft are determined first by the estimated angular acceleration. Under low dynamic conditions, the star sensor is used to measure the star vector and the vector difference method is adopted to estimate the current angular velocity. Under high dynamic conditions, the angular velocity is obtained by the calibrated gyros. The star position is predicted based on the estimated angular velocity and calibrated gyros using the star vector measurements. The results of the semi-physical experiment show that this hybrid method is accurate and feasible. In contrast with the star vector difference and gyro-assisted methods, the star position prediction result of the hybrid method is verified to be more accurate in two different cases under the given random noise of the star centroid.

  15. A hybrid method for accurate star tracking using star sensor and gyros.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiazhen; Yang, Lie; Zhang, Hao

    2017-10-01

    Star tracking is the primary operating mode of star sensors. To improve tracking accuracy and efficiency, a hybrid method using a star sensor and gyroscopes is proposed in this study. In this method, the dynamic conditions of an aircraft are determined first by the estimated angular acceleration. Under low dynamic conditions, the star sensor is used to measure the star vector and the vector difference method is adopted to estimate the current angular velocity. Under high dynamic conditions, the angular velocity is obtained by the calibrated gyros. The star position is predicted based on the estimated angular velocity and calibrated gyros using the star vector measurements. The results of the semi-physical experiment show that this hybrid method is accurate and feasible. In contrast with the star vector difference and gyro-assisted methods, the star position prediction result of the hybrid method is verified to be more accurate in two different cases under the given random noise of the star centroid.

  16. X-ray studies of coeval star samples. II - The Pleiades cluster as observed with the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal X-ray emission of the Pleiades stars is investigated, and maximum likelihood, integral X-ray luminosity functions are computed for Pleiades members in selected color-index ranges. A detailed search is conducted for long-term variability in the X-ray emission of those stars observed more than once. An overall comparison of the survey results with those of previous surveys confirms the ubiquity of X-ray emission in the Pleiades cluster stars and its higher rate of emission with respect to older stars. It is found that the X-ray emission from dA and early dF stars cannot be proven to be dissimilar to that of Hyades and field stars of the same spectral type. The Pleiades cluster members show a real rise of the X-ray luminosity from dA stars to early dF stars. X-ray emission for the young, solarlike Pleiades stars is about two orders of magnitude more intense than for the nearby solarlike stars.

  17. Validation study of the BetaStar plus lateral flow assay for detection of beta-lactam antibiotics in milk.

    PubMed

    Abouzied, Mohamed; Driksna, Dana; Walsh, Coilin; Sarzynski, Michael; Walsh, Aaron; Ankrapp, David; Klein, Frank; Rice, Jennifer; Mozola, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A validation study designed to meet the requirements of the AOAC Research Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine (FDA/CVM) was conducted for a receptor and antibody-based, immunochromatographic method (BetaStar Plus) for detection of beta-lactam antibiotic residues in raw, commingled bovine milk. The assay was found to detect amoxicillin, ampicillin, ceftiofur, cephapirin, cloxacillin, and penicillin G at levels below the FDA tolerance/safe levels, but above the maximum sensitivity thresholds established by the National Conference on Interstate Milk Shipments (NCIMS). Results of the part I (internal) and part II (independent laboratory) dose-response studies employing spiked samples were in close agreement. The test was able to detect all six drugs at the approximate 90/95% sensitivity levels when presented as incurred residues in milk collected from cows that had been treated with the specific drug. Selectivity of the assay was 100%, as no false-positive results were obtained in testing of 1031 control milk samples. Results of ruggedness experiments established the operating parameter tolerances for the BetaStar Plus assay. Results of cross-reactivity testing established that the assay detects certain other beta-lactam drugs (dicloxacillin and ticarcillin), but it does not cross-react with any of 30 drugs belonging to other classes. Abnormally high bacterial or somatic cell counts in raw milk produced no interference with the ability of the test to detect beta-lactams at tolerance/safe levels.

  18. A coordinated X-ray, optical, and microwave study of the flare star Proxima Centauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Linsky, J. L.; Slee, O. B.; Hearn, D. R.; Walker, A. R.; Rydgren, A. E.; Nicolson, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for a three-day coordinated observing program to monitor the flare star Proxima Centauri in the X-ray, optical, and radio spectrum. During this interval 30 optical flares and 12 possible radio bursts were observed. The SAS 3 X-ray satellite made no X-ray detections. An upper limit of 0.08 on the X-ray/optical luminosity ratio is derived for the brightest optical flare. The most sensitive of the radio telescopes failed to detect 6-cm emission during one major and three minor optical flares, and on this basis an upper limit on the flare radio emission (1 hundred-thousandth of the optimal luminosity) is derived.

  19. From hypernuclei to the Inner Core of Neutron Stars: A Quantum Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonardoni, D.; Pederiva, F.; Gandolfi, S.

    2014-08-01

    Auxiliary Field Diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations have been employed to revise the interaction beween A-hyperons and nucleons in hypernuclei. The scheme used to describe the interaction, inspired by the phenomenological Argonne-Urbana forces, is the ΛN + ΛNN potential firstly introduced by Bodmer, Usmani et al. Within this framework, we performed calculations on light and medium mass hypernuclei in order to assess the extent of the repulsive contribution of the three-body part. By tuning this contribution in order to reproduce the Λ separation energy in 5ΛHe and 17ΛO, experimental findings are reproduced over a wide range of masses. Calculations have then been extended to Λ-neutron matter in order to derive an analogous of the symmetry energy to be used in determining the equation of state of matter in the typical conditions found in the inner core of neutron stars.

  20. RR Lyrae stars - A theoretical study of Bailey type c variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubickyj, Olenka; Stothers, Richard B.

    1986-01-01

    New theoretical models of stars pulsating in the first overtone have been constructed to simulate RR Lyr variables of Bailey type c. Despite the use of different opacities, these new models agree very well with earlier models built by Christy and Stellingwerf. Quantitative comparisons using empirical light curves and velocity curves of metal-poor type c variables confirm the validity of the models. Masses of 0.55-0.65 solar mass and luminosities of 40-50 solar luminosities derived here for the type c variables, are consistent with previous results obtained for type ab variables. A Christy echo of the kind normally associated with fundamental-mode pulsators was detected in the interior velocity structure of one first-overtone model that happens to have a large velocity amplitude.

  1. Interferometric Studies of Dust Formation in the Red Supergiant Star S Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Jurgenson, C. A.; Ostrowski-Fukuda, T. A.

    2004-01-01

    Few methods are as effective as interferometry for probing the dust formation regions around evolved stars at high spatial scales. Using multi-epoch VLBA monitoring observations of 43 GHz SiO (v=1J=1-0) maser emission Ostrowski-Fukuda et al.(2003 AAS meeting 201 poster 115) found that the red supergiant S Persei exhibits clumpy and variable SiO maser spots in a broken elongated (elliptical) ring approximately 23 by 16 milli-arcsec with the semi-major axis oriented in the northeast-southwest (NE-SW) direction. Independent K band interferometry (PTI group Creech-Eakman and Thompson) obtained a limb darkened diameter for S Per of 5 mas similarly oriented. These facts combined suggest that the masers constitute a standing wave phenomenon associated with rapid particle formation at ~2 stellar radii. We present these results and a model for this phenomenon.

  2. Photometric Study of a Solar-Type X-Ray Binary Star 44 i Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nha, Il-Seong; Nha, Sarah L.

    1996-12-01

    A short orbital period solar-type binary star 44i Bootis (mv = 6m.1, Sp= G2V + G2V, P = 0d.2678) ) was observed in four passbands, BVRI, BVBVRIBBBBBBin 1994 at I.-S. Nha Observatory in Seoul. Altogether nine sets of complete light curves are made, out of which four curves show light variations of irregular fashion. The light variation of 44i Bootis is even in a single given night, which is more frequent than that known before. In addition, possible flares were also detected on two nights. A total of 36 times of the primary and secondary eclipses has been obtained, and the period varies in a slightly distorted parabola. With a collection of the most recent times of minima, the light elements for the linear form are made.

  3. Molecular structure and conformations of caramboxin, a natural neurotoxin from the star fruit: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichierri, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the molecular structure and conformations of caramboxin, a neurotoxin recently isolated from the star fruit Averroha carambola. Among the seven conformers that exist within an energy window of ∼16.0 kcal/mol, two of them are the most favored ones with an energy difference of less than 2.0 kcal/mol. The computed chemical shifts of these two low-energy conformers are in good agreement with the experimental values determined in deuterated dimethylsulfoxide thus confirming the 2D chemical structure assigned to the neurotoxin. A topological analysis of the theoretical electronic charge density of four caramboxin conformers reveals the existence of intramolecular CH⋯O/N interactions which, in addition to the classical OH⋯O/N H-bonding interactions, contribute to decrease the conformational freedom of the neurotoxin.

  4. Illuminating QCD and Nucleon Structure Through the Study of Hadrons Within Jets at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drachenberg, James; STAR Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The experiments of the RHIC spin program have provided critical insight into the spin structure of the nucleon, in particular shedding light on the roles played by gluon and sea-quark helicity. Over the last decade, theoretical and experimental engagement of transverse-spin phenomena have unlocked tantalizing opportunities for new insight into nucleon structure, e.g. with higher dimensions in partonic momentum space. STAR data collected in 2011 at √{ s} = 500 GeV and 2012 at 200 GeV reveal the first observations of transverse single-spin asymmetries in the azimuthal distributions of hadrons within jets from polarized proton collisions. These data combined with measurements from deep inelastic scattering and recent phenomenological breakthroughs may illuminate longstanding questions: Do factorization and universality extend to the transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) picture in proton+proton collisions, e.g. through the Collins mechanism? How do TMD functions evolve with changing kinematics?

  5. A Small-angle Study of the Solution Properties of Dendrimer-like Star Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A

    2001-03-22

    The solution properties of poly(e-caprolactone) dendritic polymers are investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. Comparisons of the scattering function in the intermediate region of the SANS patterns with molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the dendritic polymers are relatively extended in their conformation. We report a decay exponent, which scales as l/{nu}, of -1.2, which suggests a conformation more extended than star polymers, approaching the case of sea urchins. Guinier plots of SANS patterns yield radius of gyration measurements R{sub g} {approx} 30{angstrom}, which increase with generation number. Modeling the scattering profiles according to a ''blob'' model yields values of the random walk persistence length <{xi}{sub E}> {approx} 10{angstrom}, which decreases with increasing polymerization generation.

  6. Treatment outcome variation between depression symptom combinations in the STAR*D study.

    PubMed

    Olbert, Charles M; Rasmussen, Andrew; Gala, Gary J; Tupler, Larry A

    2016-09-01

    In response to recent documentation of symptom and subtype heterogeneity in major depressive disorder, we report on exploratory analyses of the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) clinical-trial data to further describe heterogeneity in depression and test the hypothesis that citalopram treatment-outcome patterns differ as a function of depression symptom combinations. Combinatorial algorithms, latent profile analysis, and repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance were employed to characterize heterogeneity and depression outcome-measure profile variability in the most prevalent symptom combinations with full data (26% of baseline and 13% of endpoint total sample). Descriptive results suggest that substantial heterogeneity and moderate coherence characterize major depressive disorder; as in previous analyses, pairs of individuals sharing no symptoms in common were observed. Exploratory latent profile analysis indicated that different patterns of treatment outcome data exist among STAR*D participants. A small but significant interaction effect of symptom combination×outcome measure profile was observed for clinician-rated but not self-reported symptom combinations. Factors moderating the generalizability of these findings include binary symptom measures, a short treatment period, and a smaller number of individuals per combination. These results provide evidence that citalopram treatment outcomes vary as a function of diagnostic combinations, thereby providing preliminary evidence that the substantial heterogeneity documented in depression symptom presentations may carry implications for prognosis and treatment outcome. At the level of descriptive phenomenology, these results appear to corroborate the claim that depression is not a homogenous syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A Spitzer study of the mass-loss and infrared variability properties of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebel, David

    The Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) is one of the most interesting, and least understood, phases of stellar evolution. The fate of approximately solar mass stars as they exhaust their nuclear fuel for the final time, these stars are also one of the universe's primary sources for many heavy elements, such as carbon and oxygen. We have assembled a sample of ˜30,000 AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with multi-wavelength data ranging from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared, and multi-epoch data spanning 5 years. This dataset allows us to probe the variability and mass-loss properties of AGB stars at population scales, a valuable contribution to studies of stellar evolution and the mass budget of the interstellar medium (ISM). We combine variability information from the MAssive Compact Halo Objects (MACHO; Alcock et al. 1997) microlensing survey with infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope legacy program Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE; Meixner et al. 2006) to determine the infrared period-magnitude relationships for three evolutionary classes of AGB stars at 8 different wavelengths. We find that the most evolved AGB stars are pulsating in the fundamental and first overtone, while less evolved stars are concentrated in higher-overtone modes. We show that the slope of the period-magnitude relationship becomes steeper for more evolved stars, at all wavelengths. Using a grid of radiative transfer models of circumstellar dust shells (GRAMS; Sargent et al. 2011; Srinivasan et al. 2011) and photometry in 12 bands ranging from the ultraviolet to the infrared, we calculated individual bolometric luminosities and dust mass-loss rates for each AGB star in the LMC. This allowed us to calculate the total dust injection to the interstellar medium from these stars via direct summation. We find that the total mass injection rate (gas and dust) from AGB stars into the ISM of the LMC is ˜5x10 --3 M⊙ yr--1, and that carbon-rich AGB stars and

  8. Strangeon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiguang; Xu, Renxin

    Stable micro-nucleus is 2-flavored (u and d), whereas stable macro-nucleus could be 3-flavored (u, d, and s) if the light flavor symmetry restores there. Nucleons are the constituent of a nucleus, while strangeons are named as the constituent of 3-flavored baryonic matter. Gravity-compressed baryonic object created after core-collapse supernova could be strangeon star if the energy scale (˜0.5 GeV) cannot be high enough for quark deconfinement and if there occurs 3-flavor symmetry restoration. Strangeon stars are explained here, including their formation and manifestation/identification. Much work, coupled with effective micro-model of strangeon matter, is needed to take advantage of the unique opportunities advanced facilities will provide.

  9. Condensate dark matter stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K. S.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by Mcrit ≈ 2(la/1fm)1/2(mχ/1 GeV)-3/2Modot and Rcrit ≈ 1.1 × 106(la/1 fm)1/2(mχ/1 GeV)-3/2 cm respectively, where la and mχ are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  10. A Study of Rovibrational H2O, OH, and CO emission from the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 250550

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiendecker, Harrison; Brittain, Sean; Jensen, Stanley; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.

    2018-01-01

    We present high-resolution spectroscopy (R∼75,000) of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 250550. The L-band spectroscopy was obtained with the infrared echelle spectrograph (iSHELL) from The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We will describe the performance of the instrument and compare the CO and OH emission and upper limit on H2O emission to other Herbig Ae/Be stars. Specifically, L-band observationsof the ro-vibrational OH emission from the disk surrounding HD 250550 is compared to emission properties of the sources studied by Brittain et al. (2016). The OH 2Π3/2 P4.5 (1+,1-) doublet and the P5.5 (1+) line are spectrally resolved and have the same spectral profile as the CO ro-vibrational lines indicating that they arise from the same emitting region of the disk. The relative fluxes of the ro-vibrational lines from CO indicate that the rotational temperature of the gas is 1060 ± 115 K. The relative fluxes of the ro-vibrational lines from OH are consistent with this temperature.

  11. The problem of the barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Nemec, J.; Proffitt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of barium stars and other cool stars with peculiar element abundances are reported. Those observations attempted to find hot white dwarf companions. Among six real barium stars studied, only Zeta Cap was found to have a white dwarf companion. Among seven mild, or marginal, barium stars studied, at least three were found to have hot subluminous companions. It is likely that all of them have white dwarf companions.

  12. A Star on Earth

    ScienceCinema

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2018-02-14

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  13. NuSTAR Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-30

    Yunjin Kim, NuSTAR project manager at the Jet Propulsion Laborartory (JPL), talks about NASA's Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuStar) during a briefing, Wednesday, May 30, 2012, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Imaging light in the high-energy, short-wavelength X-ray range, the telescope will aim to study how black holes form and evolve along with galaxies. The instrument, packed aboard an Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL rocket is set to launch from a plane in midair no earlier than June 13 from Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. Computational astrophysics: Pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. G.

    The field of computational astrophysics in pulsating star studies has grown considerably since the advent of the computer. Initially calculations were done on the IBM 704 with 32K of memory and now we use the CRAY YMP computers with considerably more memory. Our early studies were for models of pulsating stars using a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic code (SPEC) with radiation diffusion. The radiative transfer was treated in the equilibrium diffusion approximation and the hydrodynamics was done utilizing the approximation of artificial viscosity. The early calculations took many hours of 704 CPU time. Early in 1965 we decided to improve on the usual treatment of the radiative transfer used in our codes by utilizing the method of moments, the so-called variable Eddington approximation. In this approximation the material energy field is uncoupled from the radiation energy field and the angular dependence is introduced through the Eddington factor. A multigroup frequency dependent method may also be applied. The Eddington factor is determined by snapshots of the stars structure utilizing a y-line approximation. The full radiative transfer approximation appears necessary in order to understand the light curves for W Virginia stars and may be important for the light curves of RR Lyrae stars. A detailed radiative transfer method does not appear to be necessary for the understanding of Cepheid light curves. A recent improvement to our models for pulsating stars is in the use of an adaptive mesh scheme to resolve the sharp features in the nonlinear hydrodynamic structure. From these improved structures, better analysis of the radius, velocity, and light curves could be obtained.

  15. Theoretical studies of massive stars. II - Evolution of a 15 solar-mass star from carbon shell burning to iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, W. M.; Endal, A. S.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of a Population I star of 15 solar masses is described from the carbon shell burning stage to the formation and collapse of an iron core. An unusual aspect of the evolution is that neon ignition occurs off-center and neon burning propagates inward by a series of shell flashes. The extent of the core burning is generally smaller than the Chandrasekhar mass, so that most of the nuclear energy generation occurs in shell sources. Because of degeneracy and the influence of rapid convective mixing, these shell sources are unstable and the core goes through large excursions in temperature and density. The small core also causes the shell sources to converge into a narrow mass region slightly above the Chandrasekhar mass. Thus, the final nucleosynthesis yields are generally small, with silicon being most strongly enhanced with respect to solar system abundances.

  16. A home for old stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-14

    This image, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the globular cluster Terzan 1. Lying around 20 000 light-years from us in the constellation of Scorpius (The Scorpion), it is one of about 150 globular clusters belonging to our galaxy, the Milky Way. Typical globular clusters are collections of around a hundred thousand stars, held together by their mutual gravitational attraction in a spherical shape a few hundred light-years across. It is thought that every galaxy has a population of globular clusters. Some, like the Milky Way, have a few hundred, while giant elliptical galaxies can have several thousand. They contain some of the oldest stars in a galaxy, hence the reddish colours of the stars in this image — the bright blue ones are foreground stars, not part of the cluster. The ages of the stars in the globular cluster tell us that they were formed during the early stages of galaxy formation! Studying them can also help us to understand how galaxies formed. Terzan 1, like many globular clusters, is a source of X-rays. It is likely that these X-rays come from binary star systems that contain a dense neutron star and a normal star. The neutron star drags material from the companion star, causing a burst of X-ray emission. The system then enters a quiescent phase in which the neutron star cools, giving off X-ray emission with different characteristics, before enough material from the companion builds up to trigger another outburst.

  17. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei

    2012-05-20

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and kinematic temperature {approx}20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed towardmore » core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.« less

  18. The Effects of Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Variations on 26Al Production in Massive Stars: A Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliadis, Christian; Champagne, Art; Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the effects of thermonuclear reaction rate variations on 26Al production in massive stars. The dominant production sites in such events were recently investigated by using stellar model calculations: explosive neon-carbon burning, convective shell carbon burning, and convective core hydrogen burning. Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations are performed for each of these sites by adopting temperature-density-time profiles from recent stellar evolution models. For each profile, we individually multiplied the rates of all relevant reactions by factors of 10, 2, 0.5, and 0.1, and analyzed the resulting abundance changes of 26Al. In total, we performed ≈900 nuclear reaction network calculations. Our simulations are based on a next-generation nuclear physics library, called STARLIB, which contains a recent evaluation of Monte Carlo reaction rates. Particular attention is paid to quantifying the rate uncertainties of those reactions that most sensitively influence 26Al production. For stellar modelers our results indicate to what degree predictions of 26Al nucleosynthesis depend on currently uncertain nuclear physics input, while for nuclear experimentalists our results represent a guide for future measurements. We also investigate equilibration effects of 26Al. In all previous massive star investigations, either a single species or two species of 26Al were taken into account, depending on whether thermal equilibrium was achieved or not. These are two extreme assumptions, and in a hot stellar plasma the ground and isomeric states may communicate via γ-ray transitions involving higher-lying 26Al levels. We tabulate the results of our reaction rate sensitivity study for each of the three distinct massive star sites referred to above. It is found that several current reaction rate uncertainties influence the production of 26Al. Particularly important reactions are 26Al(n,p)26Mg, 25Mg(α,n)28Si, 24Mg(n,γ)25Mg, and 23Na(α,p)26Mg. These reactions

  19. Amphiphilic model conetworks based on cross-linked star copolymers of benzyl methacrylate and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate: synthesis, characterization, and DNA adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Demetra S; Georgiou, Theoni K; Patrickios, Costas S

    2006-12-01

    Six amphiphilic model conetworks of a new structure, that of cross-linked "in-out" star copolymers, were synthesized by the group transfer polymerization (GTP) of the hydrophobic monomer benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) and the ionizable hydrophilic monomer 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) in a one-pot preparation. The synthesis took place in tetrahydrofuran (THF) using tetrabutylammonium bibenzoate (TBABB) as the catalyst, 1-methoxy-1-(trimethylsiloxy)-2-methyl-propene (MTS) as the initiator, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker. Three heteroarm star-, two star block-, one statistical copolymer star-, and one homopolymer star-based networks were prepared. The synthesis of these star-based networks involved four to six steps, including the preparation of the linear (co)polymers, the "arm-first" and the "in-out" star copolymers, and finally the network. The precursors and the extractables were characterized using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy. The degrees of swelling (DSs) of all the networks were measured in THF, while the aqueous DSs were measured as a function of pH. The DSs at low pH were higher than those at neutral or high pH because of the protonation of the DMAEMA units and were found to be dependent on the structure of the network. The DSs in THF were higher than those in neutral water and were independent of the structure. Finally, DNA adsorption studies onto the networks indicated that the DNA binding was governed by electrostatics.

  20. Study of the impact of the post-MS evolution of the host star on the orbits of close-in planets. I. Sample definition and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. I.; Jenkins, J. S.; Rojo, P.; Melo, C. H. F.

    2011-12-01

    Context. To date, more than 30 planets have been discovered around giant stars, but only one of them has been found to be orbiting within 0.6 AU from the host star, in direct contrast to what is observed for FGK dwarfs. This result suggests that evolved stars destroy/engulf close-in planets during the red giant phase. Aims: We are conducting a radial velocity survey of 164 bright G and K giant stars in the southern hemisphere with the aim of studying the effect of the host star evolution on the inner structure of planetary systems. In this paper we present the spectroscopic atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, ξ, [Fe/H]) and the physical properties (mass, radius, evolutionary status) of the program stars. In addition, rotational velocities for all of our targets were derived. Methods: We used high resolution and high S/N spectra to measure the equivalent widths of many Fe i and Fe ii lines, which were used to derive the atmospheric parameters by imposing local thermodynamic and ionization equilibrium. The effective temperatures and metallicities were used, along with stellar evolutionary tracks to determine the physical properties and evolutionary status of each star. Results: We found that our targets are on average metal rich and they have masses between ~1.0 M⊙ and 3.5 M⊙. In addition, we found that 122 of our targets are ascending the RGB, while 42 of them are on the HB phase. Based on observations collected at La Silla - Paranal Observatory under programs ID's 085.C-0557 and 087.C.0476.Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/536/A71

  1. Performance studies of the Silicon Detectors in STAR towards microvertexing of rare decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    Heavy quarks (b and c) carrying hadron production as well as their elliptic flow can be used as a probe of the thermalization of the medium created in heavy ions collisions. Direct topological reconstruction of D, B mesons and λc baryon decays is then needed to obtain this precise measurement. To achieve this goal the silicon detectors of the STAR experiment are explored. These detectors, a Silicon Drift (SVT) 3-layer detector [1] and a Silicon Strip one-layer detector [2] provide tracking very near to the beam axis and allow us to search for heavy flavour with microvertexing methods. D^0 meson reconstruction including the silicon detectors in the tracking algorithm will be presented for the Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV, and physics opportunities will be discussed. [4pt] [1] R. Bellwied et al., Nucl. Inst. Methods A499 (2003) 640. [0pt] [2] L. Arnold et al., Nucl. Inst. and Methods A499 (2003) 652. )

  2. Trek to the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    "Star Trek", which was aired on television for three years, brought the creatures and conflicts of the "outer reaches" of space into our living rooms. Here its new episodes and reruns are analyzed by elementary students as part of a social studies/elementary science curriculum. (Author/RK)

  3. The Astounding Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Angela; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Studying about stellar constellations provides children with an opportunity to learn about ancient myths and mathematics at the same time. An interdisciplinary teaching unit combines information about myths associated with the zodiac signs and instructions for plotting the coordinates of stars. (PP)

  4. The Fate of Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    A rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron star is one possible outcome when two smaller neutron stars merge. [Casey Reed/Penn State University]When two neutron stars collide, the new object that they make can reveal information about the interior physics of neutron stars. New theoretical work explores what we should be seeing, and what it can teach us.Neutron Star or Black Hole?So far, the only systems from which weve detected gravitational waves are merging black holes. But other compact-object binaries exist and are expected to merge on observable timescales in particular, binary neutron stars. When two neutron stars merge, the resulting object falls into one of three categories:a stable neutron star,a black hole, ora supramassive neutron star, a large neutron star thats supported by its rotation but will eventually collapse to a black hole after it loses angular momentum.Histograms of the initial (left) and final (right) distributions of objects in the authors simulations, for five different equations of state. Most cases resulted primarily in the formation of neutron stars (NSs) or supramassive neutron stars (sNSs), not black holes (BHs). [Piro et al. 2017]Whether a binary-neutron-star merger results in another neutron star, a black hole, or a supramassive neutron star depends on the final mass of the remnant and what the correct equation of state is that describes the interiors of neutron stars a longstanding astrophysical puzzle.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Anthony Piro (Carnegie Observatories) estimated which of these outcomes we should expect for mergers of binary neutron stars. The teams results along with future observations of binary neutron stars may help us to eventually pin down the equation of state for neutron stars.Merger OutcomesPiro and collaborators used relativistic calculations of spinning and non-spinning neutron stars to estimate the mass range that neutron stars would have for several different realistic equations of

  5. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzyński (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzyński introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the

  6. Dark stars in Starobinsky's model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panotopoulos, Grigoris; Lopes, Ilídio

    2018-01-01

    In the present work we study non-rotating dark stars in f (R ) modified theory of gravity. In particular, we have considered bosonic self-interacting dark matter modeled inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate, while as far as the modified theory of gravity is concerned we have assumed Starobinsky's model R +a R2. We solve the generalized structure equations numerically, and we obtain the mass-to-ratio relation for several different values of the parameter a , and for two different dark matter equation-of-states. Our results show that the dark matter stars become more compact in the R-squared gravity compared to general relativity, while at the same time the highest star mass is slightly increased in the modified gravitational theory. The numerical value of the highest star mass for each case has been reported.

  7. Massive Stars in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Peters, Matthew; Wisniewski, John; Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, Benjamin; Lutz, Julie; Choi, Yumi; Sigut, Aaron

    2017-11-01

    Massive stars are intrinsically rare and therefore present a challenge to understand from a statistical perspective, especially within the Milky Way. We recently conducted follow-up observations to the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey that were designed to detect more than 10,000 emission line stars, including WRs, by targeting regions in M31 previously known to host large numbers of young, massive clusters and very young stellar populations. Because of the existing PHAT data, we are able to derive an effective temperature, bolarimetric luminosity, and extinction for each of our detected stars. We report on preliminary results of the massive star population of our dataset and discuss how our results compare to previous studies of massive stars in M31.

  8. Star formation around isolated T Tauri stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, W.; Pfau, W.; Henning, T.

    1996-02-01

    The authors want to present their search for young stellar objects around the two isolated T Tau stars TW Hya (Rucinski and Krautter 1983) and CoD -29°8887 (de la Reza et al. 1989). From the known spectroscopic features of these objects, TW Hya is to be classified as a classical T Tau star (CTTS), but it is not associated with a dark cloud region like all other known CTTSs. The same situation turns out for the weak-line T Tau star (WTTS) CoD -29°8887. One possible explanation for their isolated position is that they have formed from small dark clouds or globules, which were later destroyed. The authors carried out two ROSAT PSPC observations pointing at TW Hya and CoD -29°8887 and used a source detection procedure considering all the standard ROSAT energy bands to test this hypothesis. Spectroscopic follow-up observations were made for 24 possible T Tauri candidates, but there are no further low-mass young stellar objects in the vicinity of the two targets. The study shows that the objects are definitely not formed in a cluster at the positions of the objects.

  9. The Multiple Benefits of Class-Size Research: A Review of STAR's Legacy, Subsidiary and Ancillary Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.; And Others

    This review of research connected to Project Student Teacher Achievement Ratio (STAR) is a summary of the project's ongoing work in the form of a letter from researchers to a hypothetical colleague. Project STAR has investigated the effect on student achievement and development of small classes in the primary grades (K through 3). A research…

  10. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    strongly reinforce our current understanding of heavy element nucleosynthesis. But detecting the element Lead is not easy - the expected spectral lines of Lead in stellar spectra are relatively weak, and they are blended with many nearby absorption lines of other elements. Moreover, bona-fide, low-metallicity AGB stars appear to be extremely rare in the solar neighborhood . But if the necessary observations are so difficult, how is it then possible to probe nucleosynthesis in low-metallicity AGB stars? CH-stars in binary systems ESO PR Photo 26a/01 ESO PR Photo 26a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 350 x 400 pix - 232k] [Normal - JPEG: 700 x 800 pix - 616k] Caption : One of the three Lead stars, HD 196944 that was analyzed in the present research programme (at the center of the field). This star lies about 1600 light years away in the constellation Aquarius. At magnitude 9, it is not visible to the unaided eye, but easily seen through a small amateur telescope. Still, the detailed spectroscopic study reported in this Press release that revealed a high abundance of Lead in this star required a 4-m class telescope. This DSS-image are copyright by the UK SERC/PPARC (Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, formerly Science and Engineering Research Council), the Anglo-Australian Telescope Board and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA). The spikes seen in this photo are an optical effect in the telescope. In a determined effort in this direction, a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] decided to try to detect the presence of Lead in some "CH-stars" [4] that are located about 1600 light-years away, high above the main plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. Over-abundance of some heavy elements has been observed in some "CH-stars". But CH-stars are not very luminous and have not yet evolved to the AGB phase. Hence they are totally unable to produce heavy elements. So how can there be heavy elements in the CH-stars? This mystery was solved when it was realized

  11. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and photovoltaic fission fragment detector arrays for light-ion induced fission correlation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.; Jovanovic, I.

    2017-02-20

    Here, the Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE–E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution of 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.

  12. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and photovoltaic fission fragment detector arrays for light-ion induced fission correlation studies

    DOE PAGES

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.; ...

    2017-02-20

    Here, the Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE–E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution ofmore » 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.« less

  13. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and Photovoltaic Fission Fragment Detector Arrays for Light-Ion Induced Fission Correlation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.; Jovanovic, I.

    2017-05-01

    The Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE - E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution of 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.

  14. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    galaxy, another has been found in the nearby galaxy IC 1613, and five others are situated in the Magellanic Clouds. Astronomers have also detected the presence of HeII ions in a number of remote galaxies undergoing a phase of intense star formation ("starburst galaxies") and in the vicinity of ultraluminous X-ray sources in very distant galaxies. What is going on in those remote objects in the early Universe? Do we see the action of young and very hot stars or is something unknown going on? What can the existence of those hot nebulae in young galaxies tell about the evolution of our own Milky Way? Searching for the energy source We would like to know, but those distant nebulae are unfortunately too faint to be studied in any reasonable detail, even by means of the largest available telescopes. The only way forward is therefore to look closer at the nearest ones in the hope that they will provide clues about the processes leading to the observed high excitation and thus help to better understand their cousins in those distant galaxies. There appears to be three possible answers to the basic question about the nature of the energetic sources that heat these strange emission nebulae: * very fast particles: if there is in the area a fast-moving gas (more than 100 km/s), the shock created by the impact of this material is able to heat the ambient interstellar medium sufficiently to produce a HeII nebula. * ultraviolet emission from massive stars: according to the most recent model calculations, even the most massive O-type stars do not emit enough ultraviolet light to ionize a sufficient number of helium atoms in the surrounding nebula to produce a detectable HeII nebula. However, some of the hottest stars of the so-called Wolf-Rayet (W-R) type (that are the evolved descendants of O-stars) may produce enough high energy emission to completely ionize the helium atoms in their surroundings. * intense X-ray emission: close binary stars in which one component is a "compact

  15. Studies of the Long Secondary Periods in Pulsating Red Giants. II. Lower-Luminosity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Leung, H. W.

    2017-06-01

    We have used AAVSO visual and photoelectric V data, and the AAVSO time-series package VSTAR and the Lomb-Scargle time-series algorithm to determine improved pulsation periods, "long secondary periods" (LSPs), and their amplitudes in 51 shorter-period pulsating red giants in the AAVSO photoelectric photometry program, and in the AAVSO long-period variable (LPV) binocular program. As is well known, radial pulsation becomes detectable in red giants at about spectral type M0, with periods of about 20 days. We find that the LSP phenomenon is also first detectable at about M0. Pulsation and LSP amplitudes increase from near zero to about 0.1 at pulsation periods of 100 days. At longer periods, the pulsation amplitudes continue to increase, but the LSP amplitudes are generally between 0.1 and 0.2 on average. The ratios of LSP to pulsation period cluster around 5 and 10, presumably depending on whether the pulsation period is the fundamental or first overtone. The pulsation and LSP phase curves are generally close to sinusoidal, except when the amplitude is small, in which case they may be distorted by observational scatter or, in the case of the LSP amplitude, by the pulsational variability. As with longer-period stars, the LSP amplitude i ncreases and decreases by a factor of two or more, for unknown reasons, on a time scale of about 20 LSPs. The LSP phenomenon is thus present and similar in radially pulsating red giants of all periods. Its cause remains unknown.

  16. Upscaling Self-Sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR): Experimental Study of Scaling Relationships for Smouldering Combustion to Remediate Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsman, L.; Gerhard, J.; Torero, J.; Scholes, G.; Murray, C.

    2013-12-01

    Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR) is a relatively new remediation approach for soil contaminated with organic industrial liquids. This technology uses smouldering combustion, a controlled, self-sustaining burning reaction, to destroy nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and thereby render soil clean. While STAR has been proven at the bench scale, success at industrial scales requires the process to be scaled-up significantly. The objective of this study was to conduct an experimental investigation into how liquid smouldering combustion phenomena scale. A suite of detailed forward smouldering experiments were conducted in short (16 cm dia. x 22 cm high), intermediate (16 cm dia. x 127 cm high), and large (97 cm dia. x 300 cm high; a prototype ex-situ reactor) columns; this represents scaling of up to 530 times based on the volume treated. A range of fuels were investigated, with the majority of experiments conducted using crude oil sludge as well as canola oil as a non-toxic surrogate for hazardous contaminants. To provide directly comparable data sets and to isolate changes in the smouldering reaction which occurred solely due to scaling effects, sand grain size, contaminant type, contaminant concentration and air injection rates were controlled between the experimental scales. Several processes could not be controlled and were identified to be susceptible to changes in scale, including: mobility of the contaminant, heat losses, and buoyant flow effects. For each experiment, the propagation of the smouldering front was recorded using thermocouples and analyzed by way of temperature-time and temperature-distance plots. In combination with the measurement of continuous mass loss and gaseous emissions, these results were used to evaluate the fundamental differences in the way the reaction front propagates through the mixture of sand and fuel across the various scales. Key governing parameters were compared between the small, intermediate, and large

  17. An Observational Study of Blended Young Stellar Clusters in the Galactic Plane - Do Massive Stars form First?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Galarza, Rafael; Protopapas, Pavlos; Smith, Howard A.; Morales, Esteban

    2018-01-01

    From an observational point of view, the early life of massive stars is difficult to understand partly because star formation occurs in crowded clusters where individual stars often appear blended together in the beams of infrared telescopes. This renders the characterization of the physical properties of young embedded clusters via spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting a challenging task. Of particular relevance for the testing of star formation models is the question of whether the claimed universality of the IMF (references) is reflected in an equally universal integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF) of stars. In other words, is the set of all stellar masses in the galaxy sampled from a single universal IMF, or does the distribution of masses depend on the environment, making the IGIMF different from the canonical IMF? If the latter is true, how different are the two? We present a infrared SED analysis of ~70 Spitzer-selected, low mass ($<100~\\rm{M}_{\\odot}$), galactic blended clusters. For all of the clusters we obtain the most probable individual SED of each member and derive their physical properties, effectively deblending the confused emission from individual YSOs. Our algorithm incorporates a combined probabilistic model of the blended SEDs and the unresolved images in the long-wavelength end. We find that our results are compatible with competitive accretion in the central regions of young clusters, with the most massive stars forming early on in the process and less massive stars forming about 1Myr later. We also find evidence for a relationship between the total stellar mass of the cluster and the mass of the most massive member that favors optimal sampling in the cluster and disfavors random sampling for the canonical IMF, implying that star formation is self-regulated, and that the mass of the most massive star in a cluster depends on the available resources. The method presented here is easily adapted to future observations of

  18. A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS TO THE HIGH-REDSHIFT OVERPRODUCTION OF STARS IN MODELED DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    White, Catherine E.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Ferguson, Henry C.

    2015-02-01

    Both numerical hydrodynamic and semi-analytic cosmological models of galaxy formation struggle to match observed star formation histories of galaxies in low-mass halos (M {sub H} ≲ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}), predicting more star formation at high redshift and less star formation at low redshift than observed. The fundamental problem is that galaxies' gas accretion and star formation rates are too closely coupled in the models: the accretion rate largely drives the star formation rate. Observations point to gas accretion rates that outpace star formation at high redshift, resulting in a buildup of gas and a delay in star formationmore » until lower redshifts. We present three empirical adjustments of standard recipes in a semi-analytic model motivated by three physical scenarios that could cause this decoupling: (1) the mass-loading factors of outflows driven by stellar feedback may have a steeper dependence on halo mass at earlier times, (2) the efficiency of star formation may be lower in low-mass halos at high redshift, and (3) gas may not be able to accrete efficiently onto the disk in low-mass halos at high redshift. These new recipes, once tuned, better reproduce the evolution of f {sub *}≡ M {sub *}/M {sub H} as a function of halo mass as derived from abundance matching over redshifts z = 0 to 3, though they have different effects on cold gas fractions, star formation rates, and metallicities. Changes to gas accretion and stellar-driven winds are promising, while direct modification of the star formation timescale requires drastic measures that are not physically well motivated.« less

  19. A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS TO THE HIGH-REDSHIFT OVERPRODUCTION OF STARS IN MODELED DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    White, Catherine E.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Ferguson, Henry C.

    2015-02-01

    Both numerical hydrodynamic and semi-analytic cosmological models of galaxy formation struggle to match observed star formation histories of galaxies in low-mass halos (M {sub H} ≲ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}), predicting more star formation at high redshift and less star formation at low redshift than observed. The fundamental problem is that galaxies' gas accretion and star formation rates are too closely coupled in the models: the accretion rate largely drives the star formation rate. Observations point to gas accretion rates that outpace star formation at high redshift, resulting in a buildup of gas and a delay in star formation until lower redshifts. We present three empirical adjustments of standard recipes in a semi-analytic model motivated by three physical scenarios that could cause this decoupling: (1) the mass-loading factors of outflows driven by stellar feedback may have a steeper dependence on halo mass at earlier times, (2) the efficiency of star formation may be lower in low-mass halos at high redshift, and (3) gas may not be able to accrete efficiently onto the disk in low-mass halos at high redshift. These new recipes, once tuned, better reproduce the evolution of f {sub *}≡ M {sub *}/M {sub H} as a function of halo mass as derived from abundance matching over redshifts z = 0 to 3, though they have different effects on cold gas fractions, star formation rates, and metallicities. Changes to gas accretion and stellar-driven winds are promising, while direct modification of the star formation timescale requires drastic measures that are not physically well motivated.

  20. Exploring What Factors Mediate Treatment Effect: Example of the STarT Back Study High-Risk Intervention.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Gemma; Hill, Jonathan C; Main, Chris; Vowles, Kevin E; van der Windt, Daniëlle

    2016-11-01

    Interventions developed to improve disability outcomes for low back pain (LBP) often show only small effects. Mediation analysis was used to investigate what led to the effectiveness of the STarT Back trial, a large primary care-based trial that treated patients consulting with LBP according to their risk of a poor outcome. The high-risk subgroup, randomized to receive either psychologically-informed physiotherapy (n = 93) or current best care (n = 45), was investigated to explore pain-related distress and pain intensity as potential mediators of the relationship between treatment allocation and change in disability. Structural equation modeling was used to generate latent variables of pain-related distress and pain intensity from measures used to identify patients at high risk (fear-avoidance beliefs, depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing thoughts). Outcome was measured using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Change in pain-related distress and pain intensity were found to have a significant mediating effect of .25 (standardized estimate, bootstrapped 95% confidence interval, .09-.39) on the relationship between treatment group allocation and change in disability outcome. This study adds to the evidence base of treatment mediation studies in pain research and the role of distress in influencing disability outcome in those with complex LBP. Mediation analysis using structural equation modeling found that change in pain-related distress and pain intensity mediated treatment effect in the STarT Back trial. This type of analysis can be used to gain further insight into how interventions work, and lead to the design of more effective interventions in future. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The young star cluster population of M51 with LEGUS - I. A comprehensive study of cluster formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messa, M.; Adamo, A.; Östlin, G.; Calzetti, D.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Shabani, F.; Chandar, R.; Dale, D. A.; Dobbs, C. L.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Fumagalli, M.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Kim, H.; Smith, L. J.; Thilker, D. A.; Tosi, M.; Ubeda, L.; Walterbos, R.; Whitmore, B. C.; Fedorenko, K.; Mahadevan, S.; Andrews, J. E.; Bright, S. N.; Cook, D. O.; Kahre, L.; Nair, P.; Pellerin, A.; Ryon, J. E.; Ahmad, S. D.; Beale, L. P.; Brown, K.; Clarkson, D. A.; Guidarelli, G. C.; Parziale, R.; Turner, J.; Weber, M.

    2018-01-01

    Recently acquired WFC3 UV (F275W and F336W) imaging mosaics under the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), combined with archival ACS data of M51, are used to study the young star cluster (YSC) population of this interacting system. Our newly extracted source catalogue contains 2834 cluster candidates, morphologically classified to be compact and uniform in colour, for which ages, masses and extinction are derived. In this first work we study the main properties of the YSC population of the whole galaxy, considering a mass-limited sample. Both luminosity and mass functions follow a power-law shape with slope -2, but at high luminosities and masses a dearth of sources is observed. The analysis of the mass function suggests that it is best fitted by a Schechter function with slope -2 and a truncation mass at 1.00 ± 0.12 × 105 M⊙. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm this result and link the shape of the luminosity function to the presence of a truncation in the mass function. A mass limited age function analysis, between 10 and 200 Myr, suggests that the cluster population is undergoing only moderate disruption. We observe little variation in the shape of the mass function at masses above 1 × 104 M⊙ over this age range. The fraction of star formation happening in the form of bound clusters in M51 is ∼ 20 per cent in the age range 10-100 Myr and little variation is observed over the whole range from 1 to 200 Myr.

  2. Stars Just Got Bigger - A 300 Solar Mass Star Uncovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Using a combination of instruments on ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have discovered the most massive stars to date, one weighing at birth more than 300 times the mass of the Sun, or twice as much as the currently accepted limit of 150 solar masses. The existence of these monsters - millions of times more luminous than the Sun, losing weight through very powerful winds - may provide an answer to the question "how massive can stars be?" A team of astronomers led by Paul Crowther, Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Sheffield, has used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), as well as archival data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, to study two young clusters of stars, NGC 3603 and RMC 136a in detail. NGC 3603 is a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust, located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun (eso1005). RMC 136a (more often known as R136) is another cluster of young, massive and hot stars, which is located inside the Tarantula Nebula, in one of our neighbouring galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud, 165 000 light-years away (eso0613). The team found several stars with surface temperatures over 40 000 degrees, more than seven times hotter than our Sun, and a few tens of times larger and several million times brighter. Comparisons with models imply that several of these stars were born with masses in excess of 150 solar masses. The star R136a1, found in the R136 cluster, is the most massive star ever found, with a current mass of about 265 solar masses and with a birthweight of as much as 320 times that of the Sun. In NGC 3603, the astronomers could also directly measure the masses of two stars that belong to a double star system [1], as a validation of the models used. The stars A1, B and C in this cluster have estimated masses at birth above or close to 150 solar masses. Very massive stars produce very powerful outflows. "Unlike humans, these stars are born heavy and lose weight as

  3. Formation of runaway stars in a star-cluster potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Taeho; Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Perna, Rosalba

    2017-09-01

    We study the formation of runaway stars due to binary-binary (2+2) interactions in young star-forming clusters and/or associations. This is done using a combination of analytic methods and numerical simulations of 2+2 scattering interactions, both in isolation and in a homogeneous background potential. We focus on interactions that produce two single stars and a binary, and study the outcomes as a function of the depth of the background potential, within a range typical of cluster cores. As reference parameters for the observational properties, we use those observed for the system of runaway stars AE Aur and μ Col and binary ι Ori. We find that the outcome fractions have no appreciable dependence on the depth of the potential, and neither do the velocities of the ejected single stars. However, as the potential gets deeper and a larger fraction of binaries remain trapped, two binary populations emerge, with the escaped component having higher speeds and shorter semimajor axes than the trapped one. Additionally, we find that the relative angles between the ejected products are generally large. In particular, the angle between the ejected fastest star and the escaped binary is typically ≳120°-135°, with a peak at around 160°. However, as the potential gets deeper, the angle distribution becomes broader. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the interpretation of the properties of the runaway stars AE Aur and μ Col.

  4. A stellar census in globular clusters with MUSE: The contribution of rotation to cluster dynamics studied with 200 000 stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamann, S.; Husser, T.-O.; Dreizler, S.; Emsellem, E.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Martens, S.; Bacon, R.; den Brok, M.; Giesers, B.; Krajnović, D.; Roth, M. M.; Wendt, M.; Wisotzki, L.

    2018-02-01

    This is the first of a series of papers presenting the results from our survey of 25 Galactic globular clusters with the MUSE integral-field spectrograph. In combination with our dedicated algorithm for source deblending, MUSE provides unique multiplex capabilities in crowded stellar fields and allows us to acquire samples of up to 20 000 stars within the half-light radius of each cluster. The present paper focuses on the analysis of the internal dynamics of 22 out of the 25 clusters, using about 500 000 spectra of 200 000 individual stars. Thanks to the large stellar samples per cluster, we are able to perform a detailed analysis of the central rotation and dispersion fields using both radial profiles and two-dimensional maps. The velocity dispersion profiles we derive show a good general agreement with existing radial velocity studies but typically reach closer to the cluster centres. By comparison with proper motion data, we derive or update the dynamical distance estimates to 14 clusters. Compared to previous dynamical distance estimates for 47 Tuc, our value is in much better agreement with other methods. We further find significant (>3σ) rotation in the majority (13/22) of our clusters. Our analysis seems to confirm earlier findings of a link between rotation and the ellipticities of globular clusters. In addition, we find a correlation between the strengths of internal rotation and the relaxation times of the clusters, suggesting that the central rotation fields are relics of the cluster formation that are gradually dissipated via two-body relaxation.

  5. Star formation in the inner galaxy: A far-infrared and radio study of two H2 regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. F.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Werner, M. W.; Harvey, P. M.; Evans, N. J.; Brown, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Far-infrared and radio continuum maps have been made of the central 6' of the inner-galaxy HII regions G30.8-0.0 (in the W43 complex) and G25.4-0.2, along with radio and molecular line measurements at selected positions. The purpose of this study is an effort to understand star formation in the molecular ring at 5 kpc in galactic radius. Measurements at several far infrared wavelengths allow the dust temperature structures and total far infrared fluxes to be determined. Comparison of the radio and infrared maps shows a close relationship between the ionized gas and the infrared-emitting material. There is evidence that parts of G30.8 are substantially affected by extinction, even at far-infrared wavelengths. Using radio recombination line and CO line data for G25.4-0.2, the distance ambiguity for this source is resolved. The large distance previously ascribed to the entire complex is found to apply to only one of the two main components. The confusion in distance determination is found to result from an extraordinary near-superposition of two bright HII regions. Using the revised distances of 4.3 kpc for G25.4SE and 12 kpc for G25.4NW, it is found that the latter, which is apparently the fainter of the two sources, is actually the more luminous. The ratio of total luminosity to ionizing luminosity is very similar to that of HII regions in the solar circle. Assuming a coeval population of ionizing stars, a normal initial mass function is indicated.

  6. Initial Assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-Based Aerosol Retrieval: Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens

    2012-10-24

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) being developed for airborne measurements will offer retrievals of aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. In this study, we assess the expected accuracy of the 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval and its sensitivity to major sources of anticipated perturbations in the 4STAR measurements by adapting a theoretical approach previously developed for the AERONET measurements. The major anticipated perturbations are (1) an apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles associated with the necessarily compact design of the 4STAR and (2) and anmore » offset (i.e. uncertainty) of sky radiance calibration independent of scattering angle. The assessment is performed through application of the operational AERONET aerosol retrieval and constructed synthetic 4STAR-like data. Particular attention is given to the impact of these perturbations on the upwelling and downwelling broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing at the bottom and top of the atmosphere. The results from this study suggest that limitations in the accuracy of 4STAR-retrieved particle size distributions and scattering phase functions have diminished impact on the accuracy of retrieved bulk microphysical parameters, permitting quite accurate retrievals of properties including the effective radius (up to 10%, or 0.03), and the radiatively important optical properties, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 6%, or ±0.04). Also, the obtained results indicate that the uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol optical properties are quite small in the context of the calculated fluxes and direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 15%, or 3 Wm-2).« less

  7. The Sun: Our Nearest Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have in our celestial backyard, a prime example of a variable star. The Sun, long thought to be "perfect" and unvarying, began to reveal its cycles in the early 1600s as Galileo Galilei and Christoph Scheiner used a telescope to study sunspots. For the past four hundred years, scientists have accumulated data, showing a magnetic cycle that repeats, on average, every eleven (or twenty-two) years. In addition, modern satellites have shown that the energy output at radio and x-ray wavelengths also varies with this cycle. This talk will showcase the Sun as a star and discuss how solar studies may be used to understand other stars.

  8. Multi-wavelength studies of spectacular ram-pressure stripping of a galaxy. II. Star formation in the tail

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Masafumi; Gu, Liyi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo; Fujita, Yutaka; Akahori, Takuya; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2013-12-01

    With multiband photometric data in public archives, we detected four intracluster star-forming regions in the Virgo Cluster. Two of them were at a projected distance of 35 kpc from NGC 4388 and the other two were 66 kpc away. Our new spectroscopic observations revealed that their recessional velocities were comparable to the ram-pressure-stripped tail of NGC 4388 and confirmed the association. The stellar mass of the star-forming regions ranged from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 4.5} M {sub ☉} except for that of the faintest one, which was <10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The metallicity was comparable to a solar abundance and the age of the stars was ∼10{sup 6.8} yr. Their young stellar age meant that the star formation should have started after the gas was stripped from NGC 4388. This implied in situ condensation of the stripped gas. We also found that two star-forming regions were located near the leading edge of a filamentary dark cloud. The extinction of the filament was smaller than that derived from the Balmer decrement of the star-forming regions, implying that the dust in the filament would be locally dense around the star-forming regions.

  9. Case Study of Data Mining in Observational Astronomy: The Search for New OB Stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Cormac; Vink, Jorick; Kalari, Venu; Groh, Jose

    2018-01-01

    OB stars are the most luminous and massive stars, living short lives and exerting a disproportionate influence on their environments. They are key to understanding progenitors of gravitational wave sources and reionization of the early Universe. To detect new OB stars, we combine photometric catalog data with TLUSTY and ATLAS9 stellar atmospheres. This method is also believed to be sensitive to elusive “stripped” stars, thought to lose their hydrogen envelope through binary interaction.OB stars are intrinsically luminous, so complete populations are assumed for local group galaxies such as the Small Magellanic Cloud. Our findings challenge this, as we find 26 new OB candidates. Spectroscopy of 7 candidates shows a 100% detection rate. Most interestingly, 5 of our candidates are consistent with “stripped” stars.To date only 5 “stripped” candidates have been found serendipitously (e.g. HD 45166) as current methods are not sensitive to them. Our work doubles the sample of detected candidates, highlighting that our approach is the first to identify them in a targeted, systematic way. The finding of “stripped” stars could rewrite our understanding of the early Universe, offering an alternative hypothesis to Wolf-Rayet driven cosmic reionization.

  10. The Serpent Star-Forming Cloud Spawns Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-28

    Studied by astronomers, Serpens Cloud Core is one of the youngest collections of stars ever seen in our galaxy. This infrared image combines data from NASA Spitzer with shorter-wavelength observations from the Two Micron All Sky Survey.

  11. Ice Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Ice Stars - August 4th, 2002 Description: Like distant galaxies amid clouds of interstellar dust, chunks of sea ice drift through graceful swirls of grease ice in the frigid waters of Foxe Basin near Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic. Sea ice often begins as grease ice, a soupy slick of tiny ice crystals on the ocean's surface. As the temperature drops, grease ice thickens and coalesces into slabs of more solid ice. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  12. Study of the modifications needed for efficient operation of NASTRAN on the Control Data Corporation STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) computer program is operational on three series of third generation computers. The problem and difficulties involved in adapting NASTRAN to a fourth generation computer, namely, the Control Data STAR-100, are discussed. The salient features which distinguish Control Data STAR-100 from third generation computers are hardware vector processing capability and virtual memory. A feasible method is presented for transferring NASTRAN to Control Data STAR-100 system while retaining much of the machine-independent code. Basic matrix operations are noted for optimization for vector processing.

  13. Neutron stars, strange stars, and the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1992-11-02

    This article consists of three parts. In part one we review the present status of dense nuclear matter calculations, and introduce a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state which are derived for different assumptions about the physical behavior of dense matter (baryon population, pion condensation,.possible transition of baryon matter to quark matter). In part two we review recently performed non-rotating and rotating compact star calculations performed for these equations of state. The minimum stable rotational periods of compact stars, whose knowledge is of decisive importance for the interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars, axe determined. For this purpose two different limits on stable rotation are studied: rotation at the general relativistic Kepler period (below which mass shedding at the star`s equator sets in), and, secondly, rotation at the gravitational radiation-reaction instability (at which emission of gravitational waves set in which slows the star down). Part three of this article deals with the properties of hypothetical strange stars. Specifically we investigate the amount of nuclear solid crust that can be carried by a rotating strange star, and answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  14. Massive Stars and Star Clusters in the Era of JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Richard

    Massive stars lie at the center of the web of physical processes that has shaped the universe as we know it, governing the evolution of the interstellar medium of galaxies, producing a majority of the heavy elements, and thereby determining the evolution of galaxies. Massive stars are also important as signposts, since they produce most of the light and almost all the ionizing radiation in regions of active star formation. A significant fraction of all stars form in massive clusters, which will be observable throughout the visible universe with JWST. Their luminosities are so high that the pressure of their light on interstellar dust grains is likely the dominant feedback mechanism regulating their formation. While this process has been studied in the local Universe, much less attention has been focused on how it behaves at high redshift, where the dust abundance is much lower due to the overall lower abundance of heavy elements. The high redshift Universe also differs from the nearby one in that observations imply that high redshift star formation occurs at significantly higher densities than are typically found locally. We propose to simulate the formation of individual massive stars from the high redshift universe to the present day universe spanning metallicities ranging from 0.001 to 1.0 and column densities from 0.1to 30.0 g/cm2 focusing on how the process depends on both the dust abundance and on the density of the star-forming gas. These simulations will be among the first to treat the formation of Population II stars, which form in regions of low metallicity. Based on these results, we shall then simulate the formation of clusters of stars across also cosmic time, both of moderate mass, such as the Orion Nebula Cluster, and of high mass, such as the super star clusters seen in starburst galaxies. These state-of-the-art simulations will be carried out using our newly developed advanced techniques in our radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic AMR code ORION, for

  15. X-rays from the youngest stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  16. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    WDs, causing an overestimated surface gravity, and ultimately determine if these magnetic fields are likely developed through the star's own surface convection zone, or inherited from massive Ap/Bp progenitors. We discovered around 20 000 spectroscopic white dwarfs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), with a corresponding increase in relatively rare varieties of white dwarfs, including the massive ones (Kleinman et al. 2013, ApJS, 204, 5, Kepler et al. 2013, MNRAS, 439, 2934). The mass distributions of the hydrogen-rich (DA) measured from fitting the spectra with model atmospheres calculated using unidimensinal mixing lenght-theory (MLT) shows the average mass (as measured by the surface gravity) increases apparently below 13 000K for DAs (e.g. Bergeron et al. 1991, ApJ, 367, 253; Tremblay et al. 2011, ApJ, 730, 128; Kleinman et al. 2013). Only with the tridimensional (3D) convection calculations of Tremblay et al. 2011 (A&A, 531, L19) and 2013 (A&A, 552, 13; A&A, 557, 7; arXiv 1309.0886) the problem has finally been solved, but the effects of magnetic fields are not included yet in the mass determinations. Pulsating white dwarf stars are used to measure their interior and envelope properties through seismology, and together with the luminosity function of white dwarf stars in clusters and around the Sun are valuable tools for the study of high density physics, and the history of stellar formation.

  17. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  18. Pulsating stars harbouring planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, A.

    2013-04-01

    Why bother with asteroseismology while studying exoplanets? There are several answers to this question. Asteroseismology and exoplanetary sciences have much in common and the synergy between the two opens up new aspects in both fields. These fields and stellar activity, when taken together, allow maximum extraction of information from exoplanet space missions. Asteroseismology of the host star has already proved its value in a number of exoplanet systems by its unprecedented precision in determining stellar parameters. In addition, asteroseismology allows the possibility of discovering new exoplanets through time delay studies. The study of the interaction between exoplanets and their host stars opens new windows on various physical processes. In this review I will summarize past and current research in exoplanet asteroseismology and explore some guidelines for the future.

  19. The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna; Krumholz, Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. Previous theoretical and observational studies have concluded that the feedback associated with massive stars' radiation fields is the dominant mechanism regulating massive star and massive star cluster (MSC) formation. Therefore detailed simulation of the formation of massive stars and MSCs, which host hundreds to thousands of massive stars, requires an accurate treatment of radiation. For this purpose, we have developed a new, highly accurate hybrid radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform a suite of three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive stars and MSCs. For individual massive stellar systems, we simulate the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the massive stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of RT instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of the radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. RT instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. To model MSC formation, we simulate the collapse of a dense, turbulent, magnetized Mcl = 106 M⊙ molecular cloud. We find that the influence of the magnetic pressure and radiative feedback slows down star formation. Furthermore, we find that star formation is suppressed along dense filaments where the magnetic field is

  20. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  1. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  2. Instabilities of Relativistic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkotas, K. D.; Ruoff, J.

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments on the rotational instabilities of relativistic stars are reviewed. The article provides an account of the theory of stellar instabilities with emphasis on the rotational ones. Special attention is being paid to the study of these instabilities in the general relativistic regime. Issues such as the existence relativistic r-modes, the existence of a continuous spectrum and the CFS instability of the w-modes are discussed in the second half of the article.

  3. Another breed of "service" animals: STARS study findings about pet ownership and recovery from serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Wisdom, Jennifer P; Saedi, Goal Auzeen; Green, Carla A

    2009-07-01

    This study elucidates the role of pets in recovery processes among adults with serious mental illness. Data derive from interviews with 177 HMO members with serious mental illness (52.2% women, average age 48.8 years) in the Study of Transitions and Recovery Strategies (STARS). Interviews and questionnaires addressed factors affecting recovery processes and included questions about pet ownership. Data were analyzed using a modified grounded theory method to identify the roles pets play in the recovery process. Primary themes indicate pets assist individuals in recovery from serious mental illness by (a) providing empathy and "therapy"; (b) providing connections that can assist in redeveloping social avenues; (c) serving as "family" in the absence of or in addition to human family members; and (d) supporting self-efficacy and strengthening a sense of empowerment. Pets appear to provide more benefits than merely companionship. Participants' reports of pet-related contributions to their well-being provide impetus to conduct more formal research on the mechanisms by which pets contribute to recovery and to develop pet-based interventions.

  4. A Spitzer Study of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars. III. Dust Production and Gas Return in Local Group Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Skillman, Evan D.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Woodward, Charles E.

    2009-06-01

    We present the third and final part of a census of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in Local Group dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies. Papers I and II presented the results for WLM and IC 1613. Included here are Phoenix, LGS 3, DDO 210, Leo A, Pegasus dIrr, and Sextans A. Spitzer photometry at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 μm are presented, along with a more thorough treatment of background galaxy contamination than was presented in Papers I and II. We find that at least a small population of completely optically obscured AGB stars exists in each galaxy, regardless of the galaxy's metallicity, but that higher metallicity galaxies tend to harbor more stars with slight infrared excesses. The optical incompleteness increases for the redder AGB stars, in line with the expectation that some AGB stars are not detected in the optical due to large amounts of extinction associated with in situ dust production. Overall, there is an underrepresentation of 30%-40% in the optical AGB within the 1σ errors for all of the galaxies in our sample. This undetected population is large enough to affect star formation histories derived from optical color-magnitude diagrams. As measured from the [3.6] - [4.5] color excesses, we find average stellar mass-loss rates (MLRs) ranging from 3.1 × 10-7to6.6 × 10-6 M sun yr-1, and integrated galaxy MLRs ranging from 4.4 × 10-5to1.4 × 10-3 M sun yr-1. The integrated MLR is sufficient to sustain the current star formation rate in only LGS 3 and DDO 210, requiring either significant nondusty mass loss or gas accretion in Phoenix, Leo A, Pegasus dIrr, Sextans A, WLM, and IC 1613 if they are to maintain their status as gas-rich galaxies.

  5. A Vanishing Star Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    unsual star in question is designated NN Serpentis , or just NN Ser . As the name indicates, it is located in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent), about 12° north of the celestial equator. A double letter, here "NN", is used to denote variable stars [2]. It is a rather faint object of magnitude 17, about 25,000 times fainter than what can be perceived with the unaided eye. The distance is about 600 light-years (180 pc). In July 1988, Reinhold Häfner performed observations of NN Ser (at that time still known by its earlier name PG 1550+131 ) with the Danish 1.54-m telescope at La Silla. He was surprised, but also very pleased to discover that it underwent a very deep eclipse every 187 minutes. Within less than 2 minutes, the brightness dropped by a factor of more than 100 (5 magnitudes). During the next 9 minutes, the star completely disappeared from view - it was too faint to be observed with this telescope. It then again reappeared and the entire event was over after just 11 minutes. Why eclipses are so important for stellar studies An eclipse occurs when one of the stars in a binary stellar system moves in front of the other, as seen by the observer. The effect is similar to what happens during a solar eclipse when the Moon moves in front of the Sun. In both cases, the eclipse may be partial or total , depending on whether or not the eclipsed star (or the Sun) is completely hidden from view. The occurence of eclipses in stellar systems, as seen from the Earth, depends on the spatial orientation of the orbital plane and the sizes of the two stars. Two eclipses take place during one orbital revolution, but they may not both be observable. The physical properties of the two stars in a binary system (e.g., the sizes of the stars, the size and shape of the orbit, the distribution of the light on the surfaces of the stars, their temperatures etc.) can be determined from the measured "light-curve" of the system (a plot of brightness vrs. time). The stars are always

  6. X-rays and regions of star formation: a combined ROSAT-HRI/near-to-mid IR study of the rho Oph dark cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosso, N.; Montmerle, T.; Bontemps, S.; André, P.; Feigelson, E. D.

    2000-07-01

    We have obtained two deep exposures of the rho Oph cloud core region with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager. The improved position accuracy (1arcsec -6arcsec ) with respect to previous recent X-ray observations (ROSAT PSPC, and ASCA ) allows us to remove positional ambiguities for the detected sources. We also cross-correlate the X-ray positions with IR sources found in the ISOCAM survey of the same region at 6.7 and 14.3 mu m, in addition to sources (optical and IR) known from ground-based observations, which are young stars (T Tauri stars, with and without circumstellar disks, and protostars). We thus obtain the best-studied sample of X-ray emitting stars in a star-forming region (63 X-ray sources detected, and 55 identified). We find that there is no statistically significant difference between the X-ray luminosity functions of HRI-detected Class II and Class III sources, i.e., T Tauri stars with and without disks, confirming that the contribution of these disks to X-ray emission (for instance by magnetic reconnection between the star and the disk), or to X-ray absorption, must be small. X-ray variability of T Tauri stars can be studied by comparing the HRI data with the previously obtained PSPC data, but also using the fact that some HRI observations were done at different epochs. The resulting statistics show that most of the sources are variable, and that their variability is consistent with a solar-like (hence magnetic) flare origin. We use the information given both by the ISO CAM survey and by our HRI deep exposure to study the T Tauri star population of the rho Oph dense cores. We confirm that essentially all Class II and Class III sources (embedded T Tauri stars) are X-ray emitters, and that a strong correlation exists between their X-ray luminosity, LX, and their stellar luminosity, Lstar, with LX/Lstar ~ 10-4. Most of the new ISO CAM Class II sources are not detected, however, which we explain by the fact that their X-ray luminosities ``predicted'' on

  7. Superfluid Fermi atomic gas as a quantum simulator for the study of the neutron-star equation of state in the low-density region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, Pieter; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Inotani, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Akira; Ohashi, Yoji

    2018-01-01

    We propose a theoretical idea to use an ultracold Fermi gas as a quantum simulator for the study of the low-density region of a neutron-star interior. Our idea is different from the standard quantum simulator that heads for perfect replication of another system, such as the Hubbard model discussed in high-Tc cuprates. Instead, we use the similarity between two systems and theoretically make up for the difference between them. That is, (1) we first show that the strong-coupling theory developed by Nozières and Schmitt-Rink (NSR) can quantitatively explain the recent experiment on the equation of state (EoS) in a 6Li superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) unitary limit far below the superfluid phase-transition temperature Tc. This region is considered to be very similar to the low-density region (crust regime) of a neutron star (where a nearly unitary s -wave neutron superfluid is expected). (2) We then theoretically compensate the difference that, while the effective range reff is negligibly small in a superfluid 6Li Fermi gas, it cannot be ignored (reff=2.7 fm) in a neutron star, by extending the NSR theory to include effects of reff. The calculated EoS when reff=2.7 fm is shown to agree well with the previous neutron-star EoS in the low-density region predicted in nuclear physics. Our idea indicates that an ultracold atomic gas may more flexibly be used as a quantum simulator for the study of other complicated quantum many-body systems, when we use not only the experimental high tunability, but also the recent theoretical development in this field. Since it is difficult to directly observe a neutron-star interior, our idea would provide a useful approach to the exploration for this mysterious astronomical object.

  8. Stellar Populations in Compact Galaxy Groups: a Multi-wavelength Study of HCGs 16, 22, and 42, Their Star Clusters, and Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Maybhate, A.; Charlton, J. C.; Fedotov, K.; Durrell, P. R.; Mulchaey, J. S.; English, J.; Desjardins, T. D.; Gallagher, S. C.; Walker, L. M.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of three compact galaxy groups, Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 16, 22, and 42, which describe a sequence in terms of gas richness, from space- (Swift, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Spitzer) and ground-based (Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory) imaging and spectroscopy.We study various signs of past interactions including a faint, dusty tidal feature about HCG 16A, which we tentatively age-date at <1 Gyr. This represents the possible detection of a tidal feature at the end of its phase of optical observability. Our HST images also resolve what were thought to be double nuclei in HCG 16C and D into multiple, distinct sources, likely to be star clusters. Beyond our phenomenological treatment, we focus primarily on contrasting the stellar populations across these three groups. The star clusters show a remarkable intermediate-age population in HCG 22, and identify the time at which star formation was quenched in HCG 42. We also search for dwarf galaxies at accordant redshifts. The inclusion of 33 members and 27 "associates" (possible members) radically changes group dynamical masses, which in turn may affect previous evolutionary classifications. The extended membership paints a picture of relative isolation in HCGs 16 and 22, but shows HCG 42 to be part of a larger structure, following a dichotomy expected from recent studies. We conclude that (1) star cluster populations provide an excellent metric of evolutionary state, as they can age-date the past epochs of star formation; and (2) the extended dwarf galaxy population must be considered in assessing the dynamical state of a compact group.

  9. Asteroseismology of Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Santosh; Joshi, Yogesh C.

    2015-03-01

    The success of helioseismology is due to its capability of measuring p-mode oscillations in the Sun. This allows us to extract information on the internal structure and rotation of the Sun from the surface to the core. Similarly, asteroseismology is the study of the internal structure of the stars as derived from stellar oscillations. In this review we highlight the progress in the observational asteroseismology, including some basic theoretical aspects. In particular, we discuss our contributions to asteroseismology through the study of chemically peculiar stars under the `Nainital-Cape Survey' project being conducted at ARIES, Nainital, since 1999. This survey aims to detect new rapidly-pulsating Ap (roAp) stars in the northern hemisphere. We also discuss the contribution of ARIES towards the asteroseismic study of the compact pulsating variables. We comment on the future prospects of our project in the light of the new optical 3.6-m telescope to be installed at Devasthal (ARIES). Finally, we present a preliminary optical design of the high-speed imaging photometers for this telescope.

  10. Quantum Collapse in Quark Stars?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Martinez, A.; Perez Rojas, H.; Mosquera Cuesta, H. J.

    2006-06-19

    Quark matter is expected to exist in the interior of compact stellar objects as neutron stars or even the more exotic strange stars. Bare strange quark stars and (normal) strange quark-matter stars, those possessing a baryon (electron-supported) crust, are hypothesized as good candidates to explain the properties of a set of peculiar stellar sources. In this presentation, we modify the MIT Bag Model by including the electromagnetic interaction. We also show that this version of the MIT model implies the anisotropy of the Bag pressure due to the presence of the magnetic field. The equations of state of degenerate quarks gases are studied in the presence of ultra strong magnetic fields. The behavior of a system made-up of quarks having (or not) anomalous magnetic moment is reviewed. A structural instability is found, which is related to the anisotropic nature of the pressures in this highly magnetized matter.

  11. Cracking on anisotropic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, A. M.; Sulaksono, A.

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of cracking of a local anisotropic neutron star (NS) due to small density fluctuations. It is assumed that the neutron star core consists of leptons, nucleons and hyperons. The relativistic mean field model is used to describe the core of equation of state (EOS). For the crust, we use the EOS introduced by Miyatsu et al. [1]. Furthermore, two models are used to describe pressure anisotropic in neutron star matter. One is proposed by Doneva-Yazadjiev (DY) [2] and the other is proposed by Herrera-Barreto (HB) [3]. The anisotropic parameter of DY and HB models are adjusted in order the predicted maximum mass compatible to the mass of PSR J1614-2230 [4] and PSR J0348+0432 [5]. We have found that cracking can potentially present in the region close to the neutron star surface. The instability due cracking is quite sensitive to the NS mass and anisotropic parameter used.

  12. Mechanism of mRNA-STAR domain interaction: Molecular dynamics simulations of Mammalian Quaking STAR protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Anirudh, C R

    2017-10-03

    STAR proteins are evolutionary conserved mRNA-binding proteins that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression at all stages of RNA metabolism. These proteins possess conserved STAR domain that recognizes identical RNA regulatory elements as YUAAY. Recently reported crystal structures show that STAR domain is composed of N-terminal QUA1, K-homology domain (KH) and C-terminal QUA2, and mRNA binding is mediated by KH-QUA2 domain. Here, we present simulation studies done to investigate binding of mRNA to STAR protein, mammalian Quaking protein (QKI). We carried out conventional MD simulations of STAR domain in presence and absence of mRNA, and studied the impact of mRNA on the stability, dynamics and underlying allosteric mechanism of STAR domain. Our unbiased simulations results show that presence of mRNA stabilizes the overall STAR domain by reducing the structural deviations, correlating the 'within-domain' motions, and maintaining the native contacts information. Absence of mRNA not only influenced the essential modes of motion of STAR domain, but also affected the connectivity of networks within STAR domain. We further explored the dissociation of mRNA from STAR domain using umbrella sampling simulations, and the results suggest that mRNA binding to STAR domain occurs in multi-step: first conformational selection of mRNA backbone conformations, followed by induced fit mechanism as nucleobases interact with STAR domain.

  13. Statistical Studies of Solar White-light Flares and Comparisons with Superflares on Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namekata, Kosuke; Sakaue, Takahito; Watanabe, Kyoko; Asai, Ayumi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Yuta; Notsu, Shota; Honda, Satoshi; Ishii, Takako T.; Ikuta, Kai; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-12-01

    Recently, many superflares on solar-type stars have been discovered as white-light flares (WLFs). The statistical study found a correlation between their energies (E) and durations (τ): τ \\propto {E}0.39, similar to those of solar hard/soft X-ray flares, τ \\propto {E}0.2{--0.33}. This indicates a universal mechanism of energy release on solar and stellar flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection. We here carried out statistical research on 50 solar WLFs observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/HMI and examined the correlation between the energies and durations. As a result, the E–τ relation on solar WLFs (τ \\propto {E}0.38) is quite similar to that on stellar superflares (τ \\propto {E}0.39). However, the durations of stellar superflares are one order of magnitude shorter than those expected from solar WLFs. We present the following two interpretations for the discrepancy: (1) in solar flares, the cooling timescale of WLFs may be longer than the reconnection one, and the decay time of solar WLFs can be elongated by the cooling effect; (2) the distribution can be understood by applying a scaling law (τ \\propto {E}1/3{B}-5/3) derived from the magnetic reconnection theory. In the latter case, the observed superflares are expected to have 2–4 times stronger magnetic field strength than solar flares.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS star-forming galaxies multi-wavelength study (Izotov+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Guseva, N. G.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2014-03-01

    We studied a large sample of ~14000 dwarf star-forming galaxies with strong emission lines. These low-metallicity galaxies with oxygen abundances of 12+logO/H~7.4-8.5 are selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and distributed in the redshift range of z~0-0.6. We modelled spectral energy distributions (SED) of all galaxies, which were based on the SDSS spectra in the visible range of 0.38μm-0.92μm and included both the stellar and ionised gas emission. These SEDs were extrapolated to the UV and mid-infrared ranges to cover the wavelength range of 0.1μm-22μm. The SDSS spectroscopic data were supplemented by photometric data from the GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, and NVSS all-sky surveys. Using these data, we derived global characteristics of the galaxies, such as their element abundances, luminosities, and stellar masses. (2 data files).

  15. RNAV STAR Procedural Adherence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Bryan L.; Stewart, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Flight crews and air traffic controllers have reported many safety concerns regarding area navigation standard terminal arrival routes (RNAV STARs). However, our information sources to quantify these issues are limited to subjective reporting and time consuming case-by-case investigations. This work is a preliminary study into the objective performance of instrument procedures and provides a framework to track procedural concepts and assess design functionality. We created a tool and analysis methods for gauging aircraft adherence as it relates to RNAV STARs. This information is vital for comprehensive understanding of how our air traffic behaves. In this exploratory archival study, we mined the performance of 24 major US airports over the preceding three years. Overlaying radar track data on top of RNAV STAR routes provided a comparison between aircraft flight paths and the waypoint positions and altitude restrictions. NASA Ames Supercomputing resources were utilized to perform the data mining and processing. We assessed STARs by lateral transition path (full-lateral), vertical restrictions (full-lateralfull-vertical), and skipped waypoints (skips). In addition, we graphed aircraft altitudes relative to the altitude restrictions and their occurrence rates. Full-lateral adherence was generally greater than Full-lateralfull-vertical, but the difference between the rates was not always consistent. Full-lateralfull-vertical adherence medians of the 2016 procedures ranged from 0 in KDEN (Denver) to 21 in KMEM (Memphis). Waypoint skips ranged from 0 to nearly 100 for specific waypoints. Altitudes restrictions were sometimes missed by systematic amounts in 1000 ft. increments from the restriction, creating multi-modal distributions. Other times, altitude misses looked to be more normally distributed around the restriction. This tool may aid in providing acceptability metrics as well as risk assessment information.

  16. Study of the sub-AU disk of the Herbig B[e] star HD 85567 with near-infrared interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, J.; Kraus, S.; Kreplin, A.; Weigelt, G.; Fossat, E.; Massi, F.; Perraut, K.; Vakili, F.

    2014-09-01

    Context. The structure of the inner disk of Herbig Be stars is not well understood. The continuum disks of several Herbig Be stars have inner radii that are smaller than predicted by models of irradiated disks with optically thin holes. Aims: We study the size of the inner disk of the Herbig B[e] star HD 85567 and compare the model radii with the radius suggested by the size-luminosity relation. Methods: The object was observed with the AMBER instrument of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. We obtained K-band visibilities and closure phases. These measurements are interpreted with geometric models and temperature-gradient models. Results: Using several types of geometric star-disk and star-disk-halo models, we derived inner ring-fit radii in the K band that are in the range of 0.8-1.6 AU. Additional temperature-gradient modeling resulted in an extended disk with an inner radius of 0.67+0.51-0.21 AU, a high inner temperature of 2200+750-350 K, and a disk inclination of 53+15-11 °. Conclusions: The derived geometric ring-fit radii are approximately 3-5 times smaller than that predicted by the size-luminosity relation. The small geometric and temperature-gradient radii suggest optically thick gaseous material that absorbs stellar radiation inside the dust disk. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program IDs 080.C-0541(C), 082.C-0893(A), 084.C-0848(B).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. The binarity of Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with Adaptive Optics and spectroscopy. A study of the triple system TY CrA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corporon, Patrice

    1998-03-01

    Multiplicity is a major issue in stellar astrophysics. Firstly, any stellar formation theory must explain the large abundance of multiple systems among Main Sequence and young low-mass T Tauri stars. Secondly, binary studies allow the direct determination of physical parameters. In the case of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars, the binarity status is not well known; furthermore, direct mass determination are required to test stellar evolution models for these young intermediate mass objects. The first part of the thesis presents the results of a systematic search for HAeBe binaries in both hemispheres. Two complementary techniques were used to cover a large range of orbital period P: high angular resolution imaging with Adaptive Optics (AO) (binary separation ρ between 0.12'' and few arcseconds, i.e. P ≅ many years), and high resolution visible spectroscopy to study short orbital period (P ≅few hours to few months). Among the 68 HAeBe stars observed with ADONIS--ESO and PUEO--CFH AO instruments, 30 binaries (18 discovered) have been detected. 42 HAeBe stars have been surveyed with the CES--ESO and 'ELODIE, AURéLIE--OHP spectrographs. Radial velocity variations were found in 7 targets (4 are new spectroscopic binaries, 3 d. < P < 166 d.). In addition, the 7Li 6 708 Å absorption line (absent feature in simple HAeBe stars spectra) indicates the presence of a cooler companion in 6 HAeBe spectrum binaries, 4 of which are new detections. The observed visual binary frequency for HAeBe stars is of the order of 50%. For short period spectroscopic binaries (P < 100 days), the observed frequency is about 10%. Considering observational bias effects, these estimates are regarded as lower limits for the true HAeBe binary frequency. Based on our multi-color AO images, spectral types of twenty-two visual companions have been determined. A trend is found such that companions of Ae stars are low-mass T Tauri stars (spectral type K--M), while companions of Be stars are intermediate

  18. Approximate universal relations for neutron stars and quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-04-01

    Neutron stars and quark stars are ideal laboratories to study fundamental physics at supra nuclear densities and strong gravitational fields. Astrophysical observables, however, depend strongly on the star's internal structure, which is currently unknown due to uncertainties in the equation of state. Universal relations, however, exist among certain stellar observables that do not depend sensitively on the star's internal structure. One such set of relations is between the star's moment of inertia (I), its tidal Love number (Love) and its quadrupole moment (Q), the so-called I-Love-Q relations. Similar relations hold among the star's multipole moments, which resemble the well-known black hole no-hair theorems. Universal relations break degeneracies among astrophysical observables, leading to a variety of applications: (i) X-ray measurements of the nuclear matter equation of state, (ii) gravitational wave measurements of the intrinsic spin of inspiraling compact objects, and (iii) gravitational and astrophysical tests of General Relativity that are independent of the equation of state. We here review how the universal relations come about and all the applications that have been devised to date.

  19. Neutron stars, strange stars, and the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1992-11-02

    This article consists of three parts. In part one we review the present status of dense nuclear matter calculations, and introduce a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state which are derived for different assumptions about the physical behavior of dense matter (baryon population, pion condensation,.possible transition of baryon matter to quark matter). In part two we review recently performed non-rotating and rotating compact star calculations performed for these equations of state. The minimum stable rotational periods of compact stars, whose knowledge is of decisive importance for the interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars, axe determined. For this purpose two different limits on stable rotation are studied: rotation at the general relativistic Kepler period (below which mass shedding at the star's equator sets in), and, secondly, rotation at the gravitational radiation-reaction instability (at which emission of gravitational waves set in which slows the star down). Part three of this article deals with the properties of hypothetical strange stars. Specifically we investigate the amount of nuclear solid crust that can be carried by a rotating strange star, and answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  20. The Stars behind the Curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    ESO is releasing a magnificent VLT image of the giant stellar nursery surrounding NGC 3603, in which stars are continuously being born. Embedded in this scenic nebula is one of the most luminous and most compact clusters of young, massive stars in our Milky Way, which therefore serves as an excellent "local" analogue of very active star-forming regions in other galaxies. The cluster also hosts the most massive star to be "weighed" so far. NGC 3603 is a starburst region: a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust. Located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun, it is the closest region of this kind known in our galaxy, providing astronomers with a local test bed for studying intense star formation processes, very common in other galaxies, but hard to observe in detail because of their great distance from us. The nebula owes its shape to the intense light and winds coming from the young, massive stars which lift the curtains of gas and clouds revealing a multitude of glowing suns. The central cluster of stars inside NGC 3603 harbours thousands of stars of all sorts (eso9946): the majority have masses similar to or less than that of our Sun, but most spectacular are several of the very massive stars that are close to the end of their lives. Several blue supergiant stars crowd into a volume of less than a cubic light-year, along with three so-called Wolf-Rayet stars - extremely bright and massive stars that are ejecting vast amounts of material before finishing off in glorious explosions known as supernovae. Using another recent set of observations performed with the SINFONI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have confirmed that one of these stars is about 120 times more massive than our Sun, standing out as the most massive star known so far in the Milky Way [1]. The clouds of NGC 3603 provide us with a family picture of stars in different stages of their life, with gaseous structures that are

  1. Probing Gas and Dust around B[e] Stars at the Highest Angular Resolution: A Decade of Interferometric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilland, A.

    2017-02-01

    Long-baseline interferometry is the one and only technique offering the sub-milliarcsecond resolution needed to spatially resolve the close environment of stars. Since the construction of modern facilities such as the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) in Chile, and the Center for High Resolution Array (CHARA) in California, it became a key technique to probe massive stars and their often complex circumstellar environments. The more recent generation of instruments even combines the power of interferometry and spectroscopy allowing to put more constraints on chemical, physical, and dynamical properties of circumstellar gas and dust. Here I briefly present the technique and the current generation of instruments, I review the main results obtained in the last decade on B[e] stars, and, I present the upcoming second generation of instruments at VLTI and the current plan to upgrade CHARA.

  2. Dying to be famous: retrospective cohort study of rock and pop star mortality and its association with adverse childhood experiences.

    PubMed

    Bellis, Mark A; Hughes, Karen; Sharples, Olivia; Hennell, Tom; Hardcastle, Katherine A

    2012-01-01

    Rock and pop fame is associated with risk taking, substance use and premature mortality. We examine relationships between fame and premature mortality and test how such relationships vary with type of performer (eg, solo or band member) and nationality and whether cause of death is linked with prefame (adverse childhood) experiences. A retrospective cohort analysis based on biographical data. An actuarial methodology compares postfame mortality to matched general populations. Cox survival and logistic regression techniques examine risk and protective factors for survival and links between adverse childhood experiences and cause of death, respectively. North America and Europe. 1489 rock and pop stars reaching fame between 1956 and 2006. Stars' postfame mortality relative to age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched populations (USA and UK); variations in survival with performer type, and in cause of mortality with exposure to adverse childhood experiences. Rock/pop star mortality increases relative to the general population with time since fame. Increases are greater in North American stars and those with solo careers. Relative mortality begins to recover 25 years after fame in European but not North American stars. Those reaching fame from 1980 onwards have better survival rates. For deceased stars, cause of death was more likely to be substance use or risk-related in those with more adverse childhood experiences. Relationships between fame and mortality vary with performers' characteristics. Adverse experiences in early life may leave some predisposed to health-damaging behaviours, with fame and extreme wealth providing greater opportunities to engage in risk-taking. Millions of youths wish to emulate their icons. It is important they recognise that substance use and risk-taking may be rooted in childhood adversity rather than seeing them as symbols of success.

  3. RNAV STAR Procedural Adherence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Michael J.; Matthews, Bryan L.

    2017-01-01

    In this exploratory archival study we mined the performance of 24 major US airports area navigation standard terminal arrival routes (RNAV STARs) over the preceding three years. Overlaying radar track data on top of RNAV STAR routes provided a comparison between aircraft flight paths and the waypoint positions and altitude restrictions. NASA Ames Supercomputing resources were utilized to perform the data mining and processing. We investigated STARs by lateral transition path (full-lateral), vertical restrictions (full-lateral/full-vertical), and skipped waypoints (skips). In addition, we graphed altitudes and their frequencies of occurrence for altitude restrictions. Full-lateral compliance was generally greater than Full-lateral/full-vertical, but the delta between the rates was not always consistent. Full-lateral/full-vertical usage medians of the 2016 procedures ranged from 0 in KDEN (Denver) to 21 in KMEM (Memphis). Waypoint skips ranged from 0 to nearly 100 for specific waypoints. Altitudes restrictions were sometimes missed by systemic amounts in 1000 ft. increments from the restriction, creating multi-modal distributions. Other times, altitude misses looked to be more normally distributed around the restriction. This work is a preliminary investigation into the objective performance of instrument procedures and provides a framework to track how procedural concepts and design intervention function. In addition, this tool may aid in providing acceptability metrics as well as risk assessment information.

  4. Another Possibility for Boyajian's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    The unusual light curve of the star KIC 8462852, also known as Tabbys star or Boyajians star, has puzzled us since its discovery last year. A new study now explores whether the stars missing flux is due to internal blockage rather than something outside of the star.Mysterious DipsMost explanations for the flux dips of Boyajians star rely on external factors, like this illustrated swarm of comets. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Boyajians star shows unusual episodes of dimming in its light curve by as much as 20%, each lasting a few to tens of days and separated by periods of typically hundreds of days. In addition, archival observations show that it has gradually faded by roughly 15% over the span of the last hundred years. What could be causing both the sporadic flux dips and the long-term fading of this odd star?Explanations thus far have varied from mundane to extreme. Alien megastructures, pieces of smashed planets or comets orbiting the star, and intervening interstellar medium have all been proposed as possible explanations but these require some object external to the star. A new study by researcher Peter Foukal proposes an alternative: what if the source of the flux obstruction is the star itself?Analogy to the SunDecades ago, researchers discovered that our own stars total flux isnt as constant as we thought. When magnetic dark spots on the Suns surface block the heat transport, the Suns luminosity dips slightly. The diverted heat is redistributed in the Suns interior, becoming stored as a very small global heating and expansion of the convective envelope. When the blocking starspot is removed, the Sun appears slightly brighter than it did originally. Its luminosity then gradually relaxes, decaying back to its original value.Model of a stars flux after a 1,000-km starspot is inserted at time t = 0 and removed at time t = ts at a depth of 10,000 km in the convective zone. The stars luminosity dips, then becomes brighter than originally, and then gradually decays. [Foukal

  5. Social Support, Activities, and Recovery from Serious Mental Illness: STARS Study Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hendryx, Michael; Green, Carla A.; Perrin, Nancy A.

    2008-01-01

    Research on the role of social support in recovery from severe mental illness is limited and even more limited is research on the potential effects of participating in various activities. This study explores these relationships by analyzing baseline data from a 153-participant subsample in the Study of Transitions and Recovery Strategies. Higher scores on the Recovery Assessment Scale were related to both social support/network size and engagement in more activities. The particular nature of the activities (more/less social, more/less physically active, inside/outside the home) was not important, rather, activities of any type were related to recovery. Furthermore, engagement in activities was more important as levels of social support declined. The results suggest that both social support and activities may promote recovery, and that for persons with poor social support, engagement in a variety of individualized activities may be particularly beneficial. PMID:19011972

  6. A methodology for studying physical and dynamical properties of multiple stars. Application to the system of red dwarfs Gl 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docobo, J. A.; Tamazian, V. S.; Balega, Y. Y.; Andrade, M.; Schertl, D.; Weigelt, G.; Campo, P.; Palacios, M.

    2008-01-01

    Aims:The main aim of this study is the elaboration of a methodology for studying physical and dynamical properties of multiple stars and its application to the hierarchical triple system Gl 22. A careful evaluation of the components' masses and a study of the system's overall stability and long-term dynamical evolution were also pursued. Methods: New NIR speckle interferometric observations with the 6 m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia) in the K' photometric band have been carried out. We have made use of the method for orbit calculation reported by Docobo (1985). Results: An original methodology was elaborated and applied to evaluate the most probable elements of the outer orbit. Due to the almost definitive orbit of the inner pair, which just covered a full revolution, the motion of B relative to MCA has been carefully calculated. The position of MCA was estimated on the basis of differential photometry and empirical mass-luminosity relationships. A weak sinusoidal pattern in the apparent motion of the component B was noticed. Conclusions: Our methodology was successfully applied to the triple system Gl 22. The newly calculated outer orbit exhibits a moderate eccentricity (e = 0.29), which differs from the previously known circular solutions. Both orbits are coplanar and co-revolving. This already known suggestion is now based on a much larger set of observational data, including a significant number of speckle measurements. Gl 22 is most likely a dynamically stable system, at least on the time scale of 10 Myr. The sinusoidal pattern in the motion of the B component could be caused by a fourth, unseen, very low-mass object with a mass of 0.015~M⊙ (16 MJ) on a circular orbit around B with a period of ~15 yr and semimajor axis 0.35 arcsec.

  7. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the

  8. Interstellar filaments and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies of the nearest star-forming clouds of the Galaxy at submillimeter wavelengths with the Herschel Space Observatory have provided us with unprecedented images of the initial conditions and early phases of the star formation process. The Herschel images reveal an intricate network of filamentary structure in every interstellar cloud. These filaments all exhibit remarkably similar widths - about a tenth of a parsec - but only the densest ones contain prestellar cores, the seeds of future stars. The Herschel results favor a scenario in which interstellar filaments and prestellar cores represent two key steps in the star formation process: first turbulence stirs up the gas, giving rise to a universal web-like structure in the interstellar medium, then gravity takes over and controls the further fragmentation of filaments into prestellar cores and ultimately protostars. This scenario provides new insight into the origin of stellar masses and the star formation efficiency in the dense molecular gas of galaxies. Despite an apparent complexity, global star formation may be governed by relatively simple universal laws from filament to galactic scales.

  9. Kinematics of Hα Emitting Stars in Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilango, Megha; Ilango, Anita; Damon, Gabriel; Prichard, Laura; Guhathakurta, Puragra; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Studying emission line stars helps improve our understanding of stellar evolution, types of stars, and their environments. In this study, we analyzed stars exhibiting Hα emission (Hα stars) in the Andromeda Galaxy. We used a combination of spectroscopic and photometric diagnostic methods to remove a population of foreground Milky Way (MW) star contaminants from our data set. The Hα stars were selected from a sample of 5295 spectra from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda’s Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey and accompanying photometric data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. Velocities of two classes of Hα stars, main sequence (MS) stars and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, were analyzed through a novel Age-Velocity Difference Correlation (AVDC) method, which utilizes line-of-sight velocity differences (LOSVDs) in order to estimate the age of a rare stellar population. Histograms, weighted means, and weighted standard deviations of the LOSVDs were used to conclude that MS stars are more kinematically coherent than AGB stars, and that Hα stars are kinematically comparable and thus close in age to their non-Hα counterparts. With these results, it can definitively be inferred that mass loss is important in two stages of stellar evolution: massive MS and intermediate mass AGB. We hypothesized that this mass loss could either occur as a normal part of MS and AGB evolution, or that it could be emitted by only a subpopulation of MS and AGB stars throughout their life cycle. Our use of the novel AVDC method sets a precedent for the use of similar methods in predicting the ages of rare stellar subgroups.This research was supported by NASA and the National Science Foundation. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program at UC Santa Cruz.

  10. A line identification study of the IUE SWP high dispersion spectrum of the UV-bright star Barnard 29 of Messier 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Cacciari, C.; Leckrone, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    A line identification study was performed of the coaddition of three SWP high dispersion IUE exposures of the UV-bright star Barnard 29 of Messier 13. One of these images took two IUE shifts. The previous study by de Boer and Savage (1983) was extended and stellar lines of C I, C II, C III, C IV, N I, N III, O I, O III, O IV,Al III, Si II, Si III, Si IV, P III, S II, and S III and interstellar lines of C I, C II, C IV, N I, N III, N IV, N V, O I, Al II, Al III, Si II, Si IV, S II, and Fe II were found. These lines are the strongest expected lines in a hot Population II star. Apparent intensity minima corresponding to interstellar features are noted, especially those matching a high velocity cloud found by de Boer and Savage.

  11. Statistical study of day and night hourly patterns of columnar aerosol properties using sun and star photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Lyamani, H.; Smirnov, A.; O´Neill, N. T.; Veselovskii, I.; Whiteman, D. N.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2016-10-01

    This work focuses on the statistical analysis of day and night hourly pattern of columnar aerosol properties. To that end, we use the large database of star-photometry measurements at the University of Granada station (37.16°N, 3.60°W, 680 m a.s.l; South-East of Spain) for nighttime characterization, and co-located AERONET measurements for the daytime. The aerosol properties studied are the aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom parameter (α(440-870)), aerosol optical depths of fine (AODfine) and coarse mode (AODcoarse) through the Spectral Deconvolution Algorithm (SDA). Microphysical properties are calculated by inverting AOD spectra and include the effective radius (reff) and volume concentration (V) of the total size distribution, and also the effective radius of the fine mode (rfine). The initial analysis for the different air masses that reach the study area reveals that generally day and night values of AOD and α(440-870) are not different statistically. Nighttime values of AODfine, reff and rfine do however, present larger values. The influence of North African air masses is remarkable both during the day and night, with high particle loads and low values of the Angstrom parameters and also with large contribution of coarse particles as AODcoarse and reff values are almost the double than for other air masses. The analyses of day-to-night hourly values reveal an increase in AOD, AODfine and AODcoarse during the day and a decrease during the night. Such a pattern could be explained by the different emission rates, accumulation, aging and deposition of particles. Changes in particle radius are also observed as part of the day-tonight particle evolution process, being rfine variations important mainly at daytime while for reff variations are more important at nighttime. Results of day-to-night evolution were found to be independent of air mass origin, and seem to be mainly associated with local processes.

  12. Pulsating star research and the Gaia revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, Laurent; Clementini, Gisella; Guy, Leanne P.; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Glass, Florian; Audard, Marc; Holl, Berry; Charnas, Jonathan; Cuypers, Jan; Ridder, Joris De; Evans, Dafydd W.; de Fombelle, Gregory Jevardat; Lanzafame, Alessandro; Lecoeur-Taibi, Isabelle; Mowlavi, Nami; Nienartowicz, Krzysztof; Riello, Marco; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Sarro, Luis; Süveges, Maria

    2017-09-01

    In this article we present an overview of the ESA Gaia mission and of the unprecedented impact that Gaia will have on the field of variable star research. We summarise the contents and impact of the first Gaia data release on the description of variability phenomena, with particular emphasis on pulsating star research. The Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution, although limited to 2.1 million stars, has been used in many studies related to pulsating stars. Furthermore a set of 3,194 Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars with their times series have been released. Finally we present the plans for the ongoing study of variable phenomena with Gaia and highlight some of the possible impacts of the second data release on variable, and specifically, pulsating stars.

  13. X-shooter study of accretion in Chamaeleon I. II. A steeper increase of accretion with stellar mass for very low-mass stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, C. F.; Testi, L.; Herczeg, G. J.; Pascucci, I.; Alcalá, J. M.; Natta, A.; Antoniucci, S.; Fedele, D.; Mulders, G. D.; Henning, T.; Mohanty, S.; Prusti, T.; Rigliaco, E.

    2017-08-01

    The dependence of the mass accretion rate on the stellar properties is a key constraint for star formation and disk evolution studies. Here we present a study of a sample of stars in the Chamaeleon I star-forming region carried out using spectra taken with the ESO VLT/X-shooter spectrograph. The sample is nearly complete down to stellar masses (M⋆) 0.1 M⊙ for the young stars still harboring a disk in this region. We derive the stellar and accretion parameters using a self-consistent method to fit the broadband flux-calibrated medium resolution spectrum. The correlation between accretion luminosity to stellar luminosity, and of mass accretion rate to stellar mass in the logarithmic plane yields slopes of 1.9 ± 0.1 and 2.3 ± 0.3, respectively. These slopes and the accretion rates are consistent with previous results in various star-forming regions and with different theoretical frameworks. However, we find that a broken power-law fit, with a steeper slope for stellar luminosity lower than 0.45 L⊙ and for stellar masses lower than 0.3 M⊙ is slightly preferred according to different statistical tests, but the single power-law model is not excluded. The steeper relation for lower mass stars can be interpreted as a faster evolution in the past for accretion in disks around these objects, or as different accretion regimes in different stellar mass ranges. Finally, we find two regions on the mass accretion versus stellar mass plane that are empty of objects: one region at high mass accretion rates and low stellar masses, which is related to the steeper dependence of the two parameters we derived. The second region is located just above the observational limits imposed by chromospheric emission, at M⋆ 0.3 - 0.4 M⊙. These are typical masses where photoevaporation is known to be effective. The mass accretion rates of this region are 10-10M⊙/yr, which is compatible with the value expected for photoevaporation to rapidly dissipate the inner disk. This work is

  14. Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars with RXTE Cycle 4 Observations: III: TOO Observations of Atoll Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-9244 provided funds for the research projects 'ASM-Triggered TOO Observations of Kilohertz Oscillations in Five Atoll Sources' and 'Further Measurements of the Kilohertz Oscillations in 4U 1705-44' approved under the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Guest Observer Program Cycle 4 and funded under the 1999 NASA Astrophysics Data Program. The principal investigator of the observing time proposals was Dr. E. C. Ford (U. of Amsterdam). The grant was funded for one year beginning 3/15/2000. The original ADP proposal was submitted by Prof. Jan van Paradijs, who passed away in 1999 before the funds were distributed. Prof. Wilham S. Padesas administered the grant during the period of performance. In spite of a wealth of observational data on the kHz QPO in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), the interpretation of this phenomenon is currently uncertain because the pairs of kHz QPO peaks and the oscillations seen in some Type I X-ray bursts are almost, but not quite, connected by a simple beat frequency relation. Further systematic studies of systems with known QPOs are required in order to better understand the phenomenon. The proposals were intended to contribute to a solution to this confusion by observing the sources as they vary over a wide range of X-ray flux. RXTE target-of-opportunity observations of six transient atoll sources, 4U 0614+09, KS 1732-260, Ser X-1, 4U 1702-42, 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1705-44 were to be performed at various flux levels based on ASM measurements.

  15. The accelerating pace of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Spencer; Chang, Philip

    2018-03-01

    We study the temporal and spatial distribution of star formation rates in four well-studied star-forming regions in local molecular clouds (MCs): Taurus, Perseus, ρ Ophiuchi, and Orion A. Using published mass and age estimates for young stellar objects in each system, we show that the rate of star formation over the last 10 Myr has been accelerating and is (roughly) consistent with a t2 power law. This is in line with previous studies of the star formation history of MCs and with recent theoretical studies. We further study the clustering of star formation in the Orion nebula cluster. We examine the distribution of young stellar objects as a function of their age by computing an effective half-light radius for these young stars subdivided into age bins. We show that the distribution of young stellar objects is broadly consistent with the star formation being entirely localized within the central region. We also find a slow radial expansion of the newly formed stars at a velocity of v = 0.17 km s-1, which is roughly the sound speed of the cold molecular gas. This strongly suggests the dense structures that form stars persist much longer than the local dynamical time. We argue that this structure is quasi-static in nature and is likely the result of the density profile approaching an attractor solution as suggested by recent analytic and numerical analysis.

  16. Galaxy Evolution Explorer Spies Band of Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-20

    Globular star cluster NGC 362, in a false-color image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Virginia The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's ultraviolet eyes have captured a globular star cluster, called NGC 362, in our own Milky Way galaxy. In this new image, the cluster appears next to stars from a more distant neighboring galaxy, known as the Small Magellanic Cloud. "This image is so interesting because it allows a study of the final stages of evolution of low-mass stars in NGC 362, as well as the history of star formation in the Small Magellanic Cloud," said Ricardo Schiavon of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Globular clusters are densely packed bunches of old stars scattered in galaxies throughout the universe. NGC 362, located 30,000 light-years away, can be spotted as the dense collection of mostly yellow-tinted stars surrounding a large white-yellow spot toward the top-right of this image. The white spot is actually the core of the cluster, which is made up of stars so closely packed together that the Galaxy Evolution Explorer cannot see them individually. The light blue dots surrounding the cluster core are called extreme horizontal branch stars. These stars used to be very similar to our sun and are nearing the end of their lives. They are very hot, with temperatures reaching up to about four times that of the surface of our sun (25,000 Kelvin or 45,500 degrees Fahrenheit). A star like our sun spends most of its life fusing hydrogen atoms in its core into helium. When the star runs out of hydrogen in its core, its outer envelope will expand. The star then becomes a red giant, which burns hydrogen in a shell surrounding its inner core. Throughout its life as a red giant, the star loses a lot of mass, then begins to burn helium at its core. Some stars will have lost so much mass at the end of this process, up to 85 percent of their envelopes, that most of the envelope is gone. What is left is a very hot

  17. IRAS colors of exoplanets host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, J. D., Jr.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2003-08-01

    Since the pioneering discovery of a planet orbiting the low-mass subgiant star 51 Pegasi (51 Peg) by Mayor and Queloz (1995, Nature, 378 355), there are now in the literature some 110 stars with planets. Among the most exciting and enigmatic properties of stars harboring such planets are those concerning the planet eccentricity distribution of the orbits and the fact the stars with planets appear to be very metal rich when compared with dwarf stars in the solar neighborhood. In this study we present, for the first time, the IRAS color-color diagrams for the hosting planets stars listed in the IRAS data basis. The major goal of this work is to check for any infrared particularity between planet host stars and a volume limited sample of stars without any known giant planets. As a first result we have found a clear trend for two particular infrared behaviors: a subsample of planet hosting stars with strong IR features paralleling most of the stars without any known giant planets and a subsample of planet host stars with no significant IR features located at the same IRAS color-color diagram where stars with shells are expected. The evolutionary status of the sample as well as the individual masses have been determined using the HIPPARCOS trigonometric parallax measurements and evolutionary tracks computed from the Toulouse-Geneva code for stellar masses between 1 and 4 M¤ and for metallicity consistent with solar-type subgiant stars as do Nascimento et al 2000, A&A 357, 931.

  18. RR Lyrae stars in NGC 6362

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolec, R.; Moskalik, P.; Kałużny, J.; Pych, W.; Różyczka, M.; Thompson, I. B.

    2017-05-01

    We present the analysis of the top-quality photometry of RR Lyrae stars in the globular cluster NGC 6362, gathered over 11 observing seasons by the Cluster AgeS Experiment (CASE) project. 16 stars are fundamental mode pulsators (RRab stars) and 16 are first overtone pulsators (RRc stars). In two stars, previously identified as RRab, V3 and V34, we detect additional periodicity identified as radial first overtone mode. Lower than usual period ratios (0.730 and 0.728), dominant pulsation in the radial fundamental mode and presence of a long-period modulation indicate that these two variables are not classical RRd stars, but are new members of the recently identified class of anomalous RRd variables. In a significant fraction of RRc stars, 63 per cent, we detect additional shorter period variability in the (0.60, 0.65)P1 range. This form of double-periodic pulsation must be common in first overtone RR Lyr stars, as space observations indicate. The incidence rate we find in NGC 6362 is the highest in ground-based observations reported so far. We study the properties of these stars in detail; in particular, we confirm that in the colour-magnitude diagram, this group is adjacent to the interface between RRab and RRc stars, as first reported in the analysis of M3 observations by Jurcsik et al. The incidence rate of the Blazhko effect is also very high: we observe it in 69 per cent of RRab stars and in 19 per cent of RRc stars. Rare, double-periodic modulation is reported in one RRab and in one RRc star. Finally, we discuss V37 - a peculiar variable in which we detect two close high-amplitude periodicities and modulation. Its previous classification as RRc must be treated as tentative.

  19. AgSTAR Accomplishments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Showcases AgSTAR's accomplishments reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the agriculture sector. Through outreach, education, training, and other tools, AgSTAR continues to help evaluate, construct, and maintain anaerobic digesters on livestock farms.

  20. Assembly Line of Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-06

    This image from NASA Herschel, in the constellation of Vulpecula, shows an entire assembly line of newborn stars. The diffuse glow reveals the widespread cold reservoir of raw material that our Milky Way galaxy has in stock for building stars.

  1. Another Death Star?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    Although Mimas holds the unofficial designation of Death Star moon, Tethys is seen here also vaguely resembling the space station from Star Wars. Apparently, Tethys doesnt want Mimas to have all the fun!

  2. Massive Star Makes Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    The giant star Zeta Ophiuchi, a young, large and hot star located around 370 light-years away, is having a hocking effect on the surrounding dust clouds in this infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  3. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

  4. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  5. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  6. Sloshing Star Goes Supernova

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-19

    NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.

  7. Star formation: Cosmic feast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Low-mass stars form through a process known as disk accretion, eating up material that orbits in a disk around them. It turns out that the same mechanism also describes the formation of more massive stars.

  8. Star formation: Cosmic feast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2017-03-01

    Low-mass stars form through a process known as disk accretion, eating up material that orbits in a disk around them. It turns out that the same mechanism also describes the formation of more massive stars.

  9. William Herschel during the 1780-1810 era: A natural historian studies "maturation" of stars over immeasurable time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Woody

    2015-01-01

    (A) William Herschel (1738-1822) considered himself a natural historian, different only from the usual natural historians in that his focus was on stars and nebulae rather than plants, animals, and minerals. In this regard, he developed ideas concerning changes over very long times, inferred from his catalogues of 2500 star clusters and nebulae. By assuming that all the observed types of star clusters and morphologies of nebulae represented different stages in the formation of stars and clusters under the action of gravity, Herschel argued for a sequence of "maturation," or evolution as we would call it. He could put no definite time scale on these dynamic processes, but inspired by contemporary geologists such as James Hutton and John Michell (yes, he was a geologist, too!), he felt that the time scales must be very long. In further support, he photometrically estimated that the very faintest stars that he could see in his giant 40-ft telescope were about two million light-years distant. Herschel's findings on the structure and age of the Milky Way system, his "construction of the heavens," were also influenced by geological notions of the formation and subsequent warping of strata over long times, and the geologists' attempts to uncover the interior and distant past of the Earth. (B) Herschel was a very successful professional musician for two decades, primarily in the fashionable resort city of Bath, England. And then he discovered Uranus in 1781 at age 43, an event that catapulted him into celebrity and allowed him immediately to transform himself into a full-time astronomer. He composed over twenty symphonies, many concertos, and a large number of organ and choral works. During this session, a chorus of University of Washington students will present a short concert featuring Herschel's most popular composition, a novelty number called "The Eccho Catch," as well as contemporary pieces with astronomical themes by other composers.

  10. A Magellan MIKE and Spitzer MIPS Study of 1.5-1.0 M sun Stars in Scorpius-Centaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christine H.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Bitner, Martin A.; Pecaut, Mark; Su, Kate Y. L.; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2011-09-01

    We obtained Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 μm and 70 μm observations of 182 nearby, Hipparcos F- and G-type common proper motion single and binary systems in the nearest OB association, Scorpius-Centaurus. We also obtained Magellan/MIKE R ~ 50,000 visual spectra at 3500-10500 Å for 181 candidate ScoCen stars in single and binary systems. Combining our MIPS observations with those of other ScoCen stars in the literature, we estimate 24 μm F+G-type disk fractions of 9/27 (33% ± 11%), 21/67 (31% ± 7%), and 25/71 (35% ± 7%) for Upper Scorpius (~10 Myr), Upper Centaurus Lupus (~15 Myr), and Lower Centaurus Crux (~17 Myr), respectively. We confirm previous IRAS and MIPS excess detections and present new discoveries of 41 protoplanetary and debris disk systems, with fractional infrared luminosities ranging from L IR/L * = 10-5 to 10-2 and grain temperatures ranging from T gr = 40-300 K. We searched for an increase in 24 μm excess at an age of 15-20 Myr, consistent with the onset of debris production predicted by coagulation N-body simulations of outer planetary systems. We found such an increase around 1.5 M sun stars but discovered a decrease in the 24 μm excess around 1.0 M sun stars. We additionally discovered that the 24 μm excess around 1.0 M sun stars is larger than predicted by self-stirred models. Finally, we found a weak anti-correlation between fractional infrared luminosity (L IR/L *) and chromospheric activity (R'HK), that may be the result of differences in stellar properties, such as mass, luminosity, and/or winds.

  11. Asteroseismic study on cluster distance moduli for red giant branch stars in NGC 6791 and NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.; Li, Y.; Hekker, S., E-mail: wutao@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: ly@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: hekker@mps.mpg.de

    2014-05-01

    Stellar distance is an important basic parameter in stellar astrophysics. Stars in a cluster are thought to be formed coevally from the same interstellar cloud of gas and dust; therefore, they are expected to have common properties. These common properties strengthen our ability to constrain theoretical models and/or to determine fundamental parameters, such as stellar mass, metal fraction, and distance, when tested against an ensemble of cluster stars. Here we derive a new relation based on solar-like oscillations, photometric observations, and the theory of stellar structure and evolution of red giant branch stars to determine cluster distance moduli through themore » global oscillation parameters Δν and ν{sub max} and photometric data V. The values of Δν and ν{sub max} are derived from Kepler observations. At the same time, it is used to interpret the trends between V and Δν. From the analyses of this newly derived relation and observational data of NGC 6791 and NGC 6819, we devise a method in which all stars in a cluster are regarded as one entity to determine the cluster distance modulus. This approach fully reflects the characteristic of member stars in a cluster as a natural sample. From this method we derive true distance moduli of 13.09 ± 0.10 mag for NGC 6791 and 11.88 ± 0.14 mag for NGC 6819. Additionally, we find that the distance modulus only slightly depends on the metallicity [Fe/H] in the new relation. A change of 0.1 dex in [Fe/H] will lead to a change of 0.06 mag in the distance modulus.« less

  12. Ethno-botanical study of the African star apple (Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don) in the Southern Benin (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Houessou, Laurent G; Lougbegnon, Toussaint O; Gbesso, François G H; Anagonou, Lisette E S; Sinsin, Brice

    2012-10-09

    In addition to plant species biology and ecology, understanding the folk knowledge systems related to the use of plant species and how this knowledge system influences the conservation of plant species is an important issue in the implementation of sustainable strategies of biodiversity conservation programs. This study aimed at providing information on the use and local knowledge variation on Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don a multipurpose tree species widely used in southern Benin. Data was collected through 210 structured interviews. Informants were randomly selected from ten villages. The fidelity level and use value of different plant parts of C. albidum were estimated. The variation in ethnobotanical knowledge was assessed by comparing the use value between ethnic, gender and age groups. In order to assess the use pattern of the different plant parts in folk medicine, a correspondence analysis was carried out on the frequency citation of plant parts. Four categories of use (food, medicine, firewood and timber) were recorded for C. albidum. With respect to the different plant parts, the fleshy pulp of the African star apple fruit showed high consensus degree as food among the informants. Fifteen diseases were reported to be treated by the different parts of C. albidum in the region. Correspondence analysis revealed the specificity of each part in disease treatment. There was no significant difference among ethnic groups regarding the ethno-botanical use value of C. albidum. However, significant difference existed between genders and among age groups regarding the knowledge of the medical properties of this species. C. albidum is well integrated in the traditional agroforestry system of the southern Benin. Despite its multipurpose character, this species remains underutilized in the region. Considering the current threat of habitat degradation, action is needed in order to ensure the long term survival of the species and local communities' livelihoods.

  13. Patient behaviors associated with optimum glycemic outcomes with sensor-augmented pump therapy: insights from the STAR 3 study.

    PubMed

    Tanenberg, Robert J; Welsh, John B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to identify patient behaviors that led to optimum glycemic outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) who transitioned from multiple daily injections (MDI) therapy to sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy. Sensor-augmented pump Therapy for A1C Reduction (STAR 3), a randomized controlled trial, assigned 485 suboptimally controlled T1DM subjects to either MDI therapy (n = 241) or SAP therapy (n = 244). We categorized subjects in the latter group according to age at enrollment and glycated hemoglobin (A1C) value after using the SAP system for 12 months. Pairwise comparisons of how the pump features were used between SAP subjects with the highest and lowest end-of-study A1C values were made via t tests. Larger decreases in A1C values were significantly correlated with increasing sensor use in both the adult and pediatric age groups. Subjects in the low-A1C cohorts of both pediatric and adult age groups gave themselves smaller and more frequent boluses and used the Bolus Wizard bolus estimation calculator more frequently than subjects in age-matched high-A1C cohorts. Children in the low-A1C cohort used less insulin than children in the high-A1C cohort. There was no additional hypoglycemia in either the adult or pediatric low-A1C cohorts versus their high-A1C counterparts. Both adult and pediatric patients with T1DM on SAP who use CGM sensors more often will have a greater decrease in their A1C values than those who do not demonstrate these behaviors. Routine use of CGM may lead to smaller and more frequent bolus dosing, enabling this population to safely reach their A1C goals.

  14. Ethno-botanical study of the African star apple (Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don) in the Southern Benin (West Africa)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to plant species biology and ecology, understanding the folk knowledge systems related to the use of plant species and how this knowledge system influences the conservation of plant species is an important issue in the implementation of sustainable strategies of biodiversity conservation programs. This study aimed at providing information on the use and local knowledge variation on Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don a multipurpose tree species widely used in southern Benin. Methods Data was collected through 210 structured interviews. Informants were randomly selected from ten villages. The fidelity level and use value of different plant parts of C. albidum were estimated. The variation in ethnobotanical knowledge was assessed by comparing the use value between ethnic, gender and age groups. In order to assess the use pattern of the different plant parts in folk medicine, a correspondence analysis was carried out on the frequency citation of plant parts. Results Four categories of use (food, medicine, firewood and timber) were recorded for C. albidum. With respect to the different plant parts, the fleshy pulp of the African star apple fruit showed high consensus degree as food among the informants. Fifteen diseases were reported to be treated by the different parts of C. albidum in the region. Correspondence analysis revealed the specificity of each part in disease treatment. There was no significant difference among ethnic groups regarding the ethno-botanical use value of C. albidum. However, significant difference existed between genders and among age groups regarding the knowledge of the medical properties of this species. Conclusions C. albidum is well integrated in the traditional agroforestry system of the southern Benin. Despite its multipurpose character, this species remains underutilized in the region. Considering the current threat of habitat degradation, action is needed in order to ensure the long term survival of the species and local

  15. Instabilities in Interacting Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Andrych, K. D.; Antoniuk, K. A.; Baklanov, A. V.; Beringer, P.; Breus, V. V.; Burwitz, V.; Chinarova, L. L.; Chochol, D.; Cook, L. M.; Cook, M.; Dubovský, P.; Godlowski, W.; Hegedüs, T.; Hoňková, K.; Hric, L.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Juryšek, J.; Kim, C.-H.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Kudashkina, L. S.; Kusakin, A. V.; Marsakova, V. I.; Mason, P. A.; Mašek, M.; Mishevskiy, N.; Nelson, R. H.; Oksanen, A.; Parimucha, S.; Park, J.-W.; Petrík, K.; Quiñones, C.; Reinsch, K.; Robertson, J. W.; Sergey, I. M.; Szpanko, M.; Tkachenko, M. G.; Tkachuk, L. G.; Traulsen, I.; Tremko, J.; Tsehmeystrenko, V. S.; Yoon, J.-N.; Zola, S.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    2017-07-01

    The types of instability in the interacting binary stars are briefly reviewed. The project “Inter-Longitude Astronomy” is a series of smaller projects on concrete stars or groups of stars. It has no special funds, and is supported from resources and grants of participating organizations, when informal working groups are created. This “ILA” project is in some kind similar and complementary to other projects like WET, CBA, UkrVO, VSOLJ, BRNO, MEDUZA, AstroStatistics, where many of us collaborate. Totally we studied 1900+ variable stars of different types, including newly discovered variables. The characteristic timescale is from seconds to decades and (extrapolating) even more. The monitoring of the first star of our sample AM Her was initiated by Prof. V.P. Tsesevich (1907-1983). Since more than 358 ADS papers were published. In this short review, we present some highlights of our photometric and photo-polarimetric monitoring and mathematical modeling of interacting binary stars of different types: classical (AM Her, QQ Vul, V808 Aur = CSS 081231:071126+440405, FL Cet), asynchronous (BY Cam, V1432 Aql), intermediate (V405 Aql, BG CMi, MU Cam, V1343 Her, FO Aqr, AO Psc, RXJ 2123, 2133, 0636, 0704) polars and magnetic dwarf novae (DO Dra) with 25 timescales corresponding to different physical mechanisms and their combinations (part “Polar”); negative and positive superhumpers in nova-like (TT Ari, MV Lyr, V603 Aql, V795 Her) and many dwarf novae stars (“Superhumper”); eclipsing “non-magnetic” cataclysmic variables(BH Lyn, DW UMa, EM Cyg; PX And); symbiotic systems (“Symbiosis”); super-soft sources (SSS, QR And); spotted (and not spotted) eclipsing variables with (and without) evidence for a current mass transfer (“Eclipser”) with a special emphasis on systems with a direct impact of the stream into the gainer star's atmosphere, which we propose to call “Impactor” (short from “Extreme Direct Impactor”), or V361 Lyr-type stars. Other

  16. Novel loci for major depression identified by genome-wide association study of STAR*D and meta-analysis of three studies

    PubMed Central

    Shyn, SI; Shi, J; Kraft, JB; Potash, JB; Knowles, JA; Weissman, MM; Garriock, HA; Yokoyama, JS; McGrath, PJ; Peters, EJ; Scheftner, WA; Coryell, W; Lawson, WB; Jancic, D; Gejman, PV; Sanders, AR; Holmans, P; Slager, SL; Levinson, DF; Hamilton, SP

    2009-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of major depressive disorder (MDD) in 1,221 cases from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study and 1,636 screened controls. No genome-wide evidence for association was detected. We also carried out a meta-analysis of three European-ancestry MDD GWAS datasets: STAR*D, Genetics of Recurrent Early-Onset Depression (GenRED) and the publicly-available Genetic Association Information Network MDD dataset (GAIN-MDD). These datasets, totaling 3,957 cases and 3,428 controls, were genotyped using four different platforms (Affymetrix 6.0, 5.0 and 500K, and Perlegen). For each of 2.4 million HapMap II SNPs, using genotyped data where available and imputed data otherwise, single-SNP association tests were carried out in each sample with correction for ancestry-informative principal components. The strongest evidence for association in the meta-analysis was observed for intronic SNPs in ATP6V1B2 (P = 6.78 × 10−7), SP4 (P = 7.68 × 10−7) and GRM7 (P = 1.11 × 10−6). Additional exploratory analyses were carried out for a narrower phenotype (recurrent MDD with onset before age 31, N = 2,191 cases), and separately for males and females. Several of the best findings were supported primarily by evidence from narrow cases or from either males or females. Based on previous biological evidence, we consider GRM7 a strong MDD candidate gene. Larger samples will be required to determine whether any common SNPs are significantly associated with MDD. PMID:20038947

  17. Star Formation in IC 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, W.

    2008-12-01

    A review of work on the small, compact, nearby young cluster IC 348 is given. This region is particularly important because it is well surveyed at a variety of wavelengths and intermediate in nature between dense clusters and loose associations. Its earliest type star is B5 and it contains a few hundred stellar members as well as some brown dwarfs, protostars, Herbig-Haro objects and starless sub-mm cores. The total mass of its components is ˜90 M_⊙, most of which is in the form of pre-main sequence stars. Perhaps the biggest challenge to work on the cluster is the relatively high and variable extinction (A_v=3D1-7 mag). Studies to date have provided particularly valuable insights into the initial mass function, disk lifetimes, stellar rotation properties, X-ray properties, outflows and substructure of the cluster. Results on the stellar component include the following: 1) the initial mass function matches that for field stars in the stellar and brown dwarf regimes, 2) the fraction of stars with disks is probably normal for the cluster's age, 3) the rotation properties match those of the Orion Nebula Cluster and are significantly different, in the sense of slower rotation, than NGC 2264, 4) the X-ray properties of the stars appear normal for T Tauri stars. There is a ridge of high extinction that lies ˜10 arcmin (0.9 pc in projection) to the southwest of IC 348 and contains about a dozen Class 0 and I protostars as well as some Herbig Haro objects and sub-mm cores. This region, which also contains the "Flying Ghost Nebula" and the well-studied object HH 211, clearly signals that star formation in this part of the Perseus dark clouds is not yet finished. An extensive kinematical study involving both proper motions and radial velocities for the 400 members of the cluster would be most desirable.

  18. Carbon Nanotubes' Effect on Mitochondrial Oxygen Flux Dynamics: Polarography Experimental Study and Machine Learning Models using Star Graph Trace Invariants of Raman Spectra.

    PubMed

    González-Durruthy, Michael; Monserrat, Jose M; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Casañola-Martín, Gerardo M; Barreiro Sorrivas, José María; Paraíso-Medina, Sergio; Maojo, Víctor; González-Díaz, Humberto; Pazos, Alejandro; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2017-11-11

    This study presents the impact of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on mitochondrial oxygen mass flux (Jm) under three experimental conditions. New experimental results and a new methodology are reported for the first time and they are based on CNT Raman spectra star graph transform (spectral moments) and perturbation theory. The experimental measures of Jm showed that no tested CNT family can inhibit the oxygen consumption profiles of mitochondria. The best model for the prediction of Jm for other CNTs was provided by random forest using eight features, obtaining test R-squared (R²) of 0.863 and test root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.0461. The results demonstrate the capability of encoding CNT information into spectral moments of the Raman star graphs (SG) transform with a potential applicability as predictive tools in nanotechnology and material risk assessments.

  19. Study Stars - Morehead Planetarium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-05-07

    S65-29652 (7 May 1965) --- Astronauts James A. McDivitt (right) and Edward H. White II are shown at the Morehead Planetarium in North Carolina, checking out celestial navigation equipment as part of their training for the Gemini-Titan 4 mission. The NASA Headquarters alternative photo number is 65-H-277.

  20. Star Formation Rate Maps of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Frances H.; Pooley, David

    2018-01-01

    A key component of many extragalactic studies is the correlation of a galaxy’s overall star formation rate with a particular type of astronomical object (like supernovae or luminous X-ray sources). While these correlations have allowed for considerable progress in understanding the nature, formation, and diversity of these objects, the overall star formation rate is a rather blunt instrument. Star formation is not uniform across a galaxy, and maps of local star formation rates can be made. A well calibrated method by Leroy et al. (2007) employs a weighted combination of far ultraviolet (FUV) data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Telescope (GALEX) and 24-micron data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have applied this method to archival images of several nearby galaxy as part of an ongoing effort to build a star formation rate atlas of thousands of nearby galaxies. We present results for some of the most active star forming galaxies we have analyzed so far.

  1. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  2. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-08

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it.

  3. Close encounters of black holes, stars, and gas in galactic nuclei: A study of the observational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovic, Tamara

    out with a modified version of the parallel tree SPH code Gadget . The heating, cooling, and radiative processes have been evaluated for three different physical scenarios, where the gas is approximated as a black body, a hydrogen-helium gas or a solar metallicity gas. The calculation of the spectrum of the solar- metallicity scenario is carried out with the photoionization code Cloudy . We investigate gravitationally bound, sub-parsec, intermediate phase binaries which are assumed to have gone through dynamical friction phase and scattering due to stars but have not yet entered the gravitational radiation phase. The results from the first set of calculations, carried out for a co-planar binary and co-rotating gas disk around the more massive black hole, suggest that both emission sources, associated with the accreting black holes, lit up after the accretion on the two black holes becomes significant. Periodical outbursts in the X-ray light curve are pronounced and can serve as a fingerprint for this type of binaries. In the case of counter-rotating binaries, the activity of the system at any given time is most likely determined by its orbit and evolutionary phase. The H[alpha] emission-line profiles also offer strong indications of a binary presence and may be used as a criterion for selecting MBHB candidates for further monitoring from existing archival data. The orbital period and mass ratio of a binary, and in some cases individual black hole masses and parameters of the binary orbit, could be determined from the H [alpha] light curves and profiles of carefully monitored candidates. At the sub-parsec orbital separations considered here (~0.01 pc) the interactions with the gas are still the dominant mechanism for dissipation of orbital angular momentum. These interactions could significantly expedite the binary merger if they persist at the same level over many orbits. Although systems with the orbital periods studied here are not within the frequency band of the

  4. Unexplained Brightening of Unusual Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    compact objects), both high- and low-luminosity X-ray sources , and cataclysmic variables (double stars whose light `flickers'). The kinds and numbers of these objects in cluster cores constrain the complex and as yet incompletely understood formation channels, most of which involve encounters with binaries. Many of the above exotic objects are strong emitters of ultraviolet light. The globular cluster 47 Tucanae 47 Tucanae is an impressive globular cluster that is visible with the naked eye from the southern hemisphere. It is one of the closest (distance 15,000 lightyears) and heaviest (total mass about 1 million solar masses) in our Galaxy. It contains about 1 million stars and the member stars have been intensively studied for decades. The observed structure of 47 Tucanae indicates that it is now approaching its ultimate fate during a core collapse phase. There are five known low-luminosity X-ray sources in the core of this cluster, eleven millisecond pulsars, many blue stragglers, and a centrally concentrated population of eclipsing binary stars. The observations support the idea that the population of primordial binaries in this cluster has been heavily modified by stellar encounters. The HST observations In late 1996, the group of astronomers obtained time to observe the central area of 47 Tucanae with the Hubble Space Telescope and the second Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC2). During a period of more than 4 hours, a total of 15 CCD exposures were obtained through an ultraviolet filter (transmission near 3000 A), showing the thousands of individual stars in this densely populated region. Caption to ESO PR Photo 03/97 [GIF, 57k] When inspecting this material, it immediately became clear that one of the stars had undergone a substantial brightening in the course of these observations. In fact, its brightness increased by as much as 2.1 magnitudes, that is a factor of seven, in less than one hour; see the photos that accompany this Press Release. By the end of

  5. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. III. Density and Magnetically Regulated Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Christie, Duncan

    2017-06-01

    We study giant molecular cloud (GMC) collisions and their ability to trigger star cluster formation. We further develop our three-dimensional magnetized, turbulent, colliding GMC simulations by implementing star formation subgrid models. Two such models are explored: (1) “Density-Regulated,” i.e., fixed efficiency per free-fall time above a set density threshold and (2) “Magnetically Regulated,” i.e., fixed efficiency per free-fall time in regions that are magnetically supercritical. Variations of parameters associated with these models are also explored. In the non-colliding simulations, the overall level of star formation is sensitive to model parameter choices that relate to effective density thresholds. In the GMCmore » collision simulations, the final star formation rates and efficiencies are relatively independent of these parameters. Between the non-colliding and colliding cases, we compare the morphologies of the resulting star clusters, properties of star-forming gas, time evolution of the star formation rate (SFR), spatial clustering of the stars, and resulting kinematics of the stars in comparison to the natal gas. We find that typical collisions, by creating larger amounts of dense gas, trigger earlier and enhanced star formation, resulting in 10 times higher SFRs and efficiencies. The star clusters formed from GMC collisions show greater spatial substructure and more disturbed kinematics.« less

  6. Superflares on solar-type stars.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Hiroyuki; Shibayama, Takuya; Notsu, Shota; Notsu, Yuta; Nagao, Takashi; Kusaba, Satoshi; Honda, Satoshi; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2012-05-16

    Solar flares are caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy stored near sunspots. They release 10(29) to 10(32) ergs of energy on a timescale of hours. Similar flares have been observed on many stars, with larger 'superflares' seen on a variety of stars, some of which are rapidly rotating and some of which are of ordinary solar type. The small number of superflares observed on solar-type stars has hitherto precluded a detailed study of them. Here we report observations of 365 superflares, including some from slowly rotating solar-type stars, from about 83,000 stars observed over 120 days. Quasi-periodic brightness modulations observed in the solar-type stars suggest that they have much larger starspots than does the Sun. The maximum energy of the flare is not correlated with the stellar rotation period, but the data suggest that superflares occur more frequently on rapidly rotating stars. It has been proposed that hot Jupiters may be important in the generation of superflares on solar-type stars, but none have been discovered around the stars that we have studied, indicating that hot Jupiters associated with superflares are rare.

  7. The properties of low-metallicity massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramper, F.

    2014-11-01

    My thesis has two main topics: the study of low-metallicity massive stars, and the study of the suspected final stage of massive stars from a certain initial mass range, the WO stars. All the data that has been used in this thesis has been obtained with the X-Shooter spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope. As the formation of massive stars was favored in the metal-free early universe, the properties and evolution of low-metallicity massive stars gives insight in the influence of these stars in the young universe. I have quantitatively analyzed six O-type stars in the low-metallicity dwarf galaxies IC1613, WLM and NGC3109. These stars appear to have surprisingly strong winds, and do not agree with theoretical predictions. The analysis of four more O stars confirms this finding. The low-metallicity temperature scale, recent star formation history of the galaxies and the evolutionary state of the O stars are also discussed. The enigmatic WO stars are very rare (only 9 are known), and are thought to represent the final stage of some of the most massive stars. The spectra of most of these stars have never been modeled in detailed using expanding atmosphere codes. I have modeled the spectrum of the low-metallicity WO star DR1 and find abundances comparable to carbon Wolf-Rayet stars, but a much higher stellar temperature. The study of the other known single WO stars (5 in total) shows that most of them show very high carbon and oxygen abundances, and have less then 40% of helium left (by mass). The found stellar abundances will be used to constrain the initial masses of the stars and their evolutionary path. They are also used to constrain the illusive carbon to oxygen thermonuclear reaction rate.

  8. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    1998-06-01

    Because of the information they can yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are one of the more possible sources of detectable gravitational waves, rotating relativistic stars have been receiving significant attention in recent years. We review the latest theoretical and numerical methods for modeling rotating relativistic stars, including stars with a strong magnetic field and hot proto-neutron stars. We also review nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in rotating stars and summarize the latest developments regarding the gravitational wave-driven (CFS) instability in both polar and axial quasi-normal modes.

  9. Numerical and experimental study on the dynamic behavior of a sea-star tension leg platform against regular waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaiee, M. M.; Ketabdari, M. J.; Ahmadi, A.; Ardakani, H. Alemi

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes an experimental work on a 1: 100 scaled model of a miniature sea-star tension leg platform (TLP) in a wave flume. Two different numerical models are developed: finite element model (FEM) based on the Morison equation and boundary element model (BEM) based on a 3D diffraction/radiation theory. The developed codes are used to calculate hydrodynamic forces and related coefficients. The nonlinear hull/tendon coupled dynamic equation of a mini seastar TLP is solved by using a modified Euler method (MEM). The results of numerical modeling of the motion response behavior of the platform in different degrees of freedom are compared with experimental data. This comparison shows good agreement between the results. Furthermore, this modeling reveals that the first-order diffraction method and quasi-static tendon modeling are sufficient in general for the hydrodynamic analysis of the sea-star TLP.

  10. Destruction of a Magnetized Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    What happens when a magnetized star is torn apart by the tidal forces of a supermassive black hole, in a violent process known as a tidal disruption event? Two scientists have broken new ground by simulating the disruption of stars with magnetic fields for the first time.The magnetic field configuration during a simulation of the partial disruption of a star. Top left: pre-disruption star. Bottom left: matter begins to re-accrete onto the surviving core after the partial disruption. Right: vortices form in the core as high-angular-momentum debris continues to accrete, winding up and amplifying the field. [Adapted from Guillochon McCourt 2017]What About Magnetic Fields?Magnetic fields are expected to exist in the majority of stars. Though these fields dont dominate the energy budget of a star the magnetic pressure is a million times weaker than the gas pressure in the Suns interior, for example they are the drivers of interesting activity, like the prominences and flares of our Sun.Given this, we can wonder what role stars magnetic fields might play when the stars are torn apart in tidal disruption events. Do the fields change what we observe? Are they dispersed during the disruption, or can they be amplified? Might they even be responsible for launching jets of matter from the black hole after the disruption?Star vs. Black HoleIn a recent study, James Guillochon (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and Michael McCourt (Hubble Fellow at UC Santa Barbara) have tackled these questions by performing the first simulations of tidal disruptions of stars that include magnetic fields.In their simulations, Guillochon and McCourt evolve a solar-mass star that passes close to a million-solar-mass black hole. Their simulations explore different magnetic field configurations for the star, and they consider both what happens when the star barely grazes the black hole and is only partially disrupted, as well as what happens when the black hole tears the star apart

  11. Helium Detonations on Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingale, M.; Timmes, F. X.; Fryxell, B.; Lamb, D. Q.; Olson, K.; Calder, A. C.; Dursi, L. J.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; MacNeice, P.; Tufo, H. M.

    2001-03-01

    We present the results of a numerical study of helium detonations on the surfaces of neutron stars. We describe two-dimensional simulations of the evolution of a detonation as it breaks through the accreted envelope of the neutron star and propagates laterally through the accreted material. The detonation front propagates laterally at nearly the Chapman-Jouguet velocity, v=1.3×109 cm s-1. A series of surface waves propagate across the pool of hot ash behind the detonation front with the same speed, matching the speed expected from shallow water wave theory. The entire envelope oscillates in the gravitational potential well of the neutron star with a period of ~50 μs. The photosphere reaches an estimated height of 10 km above the surface of the neutron star. Our study confirms that such a detonation can insure the spread of burning over the entire neutron star surface on a timescale consistent with burst rise times. We analyze the sensitivity of the results to the spatial resolution and the assumed initial conditions. We conclude by presenting a comparison of this model to type I X-ray bursts.

  12. A SPITZER MIPS STUDY OF 2.5-2.0 M{sub Sun} STARS IN SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Christine H.; Bitner, Martin; Pecaut, Mark

    2012-09-10

    We have obtained Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m observations of 215 nearby, Hipparcos B- and A-type common proper-motion single and binary systems in the nearest OB association, Scorpius-Centaurus. Combining our MIPS observations with those of other ScoCen stars in the literature, we estimate 24 {mu}m B+A-type disk fractions of 17/67 (25{sup +6}{sub -5}%), 36/131 (27{sup +4}{sub -4}%), and 23/95 (24{sup +5}{sub -4}%) for Upper Scorpius ({approx}11 Myr), Upper Centaurus Lupus ({approx}15 Myr), and Lower Centaurus Crux ({approx}17 Myr), respectively, somewhat smaller disk fractions than previously obtained for F- and G-type members.more » We confirm previous IRAS excess detections and present new discoveries of 51 protoplanetary and debris disk systems, with fractional infrared luminosities ranging from L{sub IR}/L{sub *} = 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -2} and grain temperatures ranging from T{sub gr} = 40 to 300 K. In addition, we confirm that the 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m excesses (or fractional infrared luminosities) around B+A-type stars are smaller than those measured toward F+G-type stars and hypothesize that the observed disk property dependence on stellar mass may be the result of a higher stellar companion fraction around B- and A-type stars at 10-200 AU. Finally, we note that the majority of the ScoCen 24 {mu}m excess sources also possess 12 {mu}m excess, indicating that Earth-like planets may be forming via collisions in the terrestrial planet zone at {approx}10-100 Myr.« less

  13. Study of the sign change of the Sivers function from STAR collaboration W/Z production data

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; D’Alesio, U.; Murgia, F.; Prokudin, A.

    2017-04-10

    Here, recent data on the transverse single spin asymmetry $A_N$ measured by the STAR Collaboration for $p ↑\\, p \\to W^\\pm/Z^0 \\, X$ reactions at RHIC allow the first investigation of the Sivers function in Drell-Yan processes and of its expected sign change with respect to SIDIS processes. A critical assessment of the significance of the data is attempted.

  14. A Spitzer MIPS Study of 2.5-2.0 M ⊙ Stars in Scorpius-Centaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christine H.; Pecaut, Mark; Mamajek, Eric E.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Bitner, Martin

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 μm and 70 μm observations of 215 nearby, Hipparcos B- and A-type common proper-motion single and binary systems in the nearest OB association, Scorpius-Centaurus. Combining our MIPS observations with those of other ScoCen stars in the literature, we estimate 24 μm B+A-type disk fractions of 17/67 (25+6 - 5%), 36/131 (27+4 - 4%), and 23/95 (24+5 - 4%) for Upper Scorpius (~11 Myr), Upper Centaurus Lupus (~15 Myr), and Lower Centaurus Crux (~17 Myr), respectively, somewhat smaller disk fractions than previously obtained for F- and G-type members. We confirm previous IRAS excess detections and present new discoveries of 51 protoplanetary and debris disk systems, with fractional infrared luminosities ranging from L IR/L * = 10-6 to 10-2 and grain temperatures ranging from T gr = 40 to 300 K. In addition, we confirm that the 24 μm and 70 μm excesses (or fractional infrared luminosities) around B+A-type stars are smaller than those measured toward F+G-type stars and hypothesize that the observed disk property dependence on stellar mass may be the result of a higher stellar companion fraction around B- and A-type stars at 10-200 AU. Finally, we note that the majority of the ScoCen 24 μm excess sources also possess 12 μm excess, indicating that Earth-like planets may be forming via collisions in the terrestrial planet zone at ~10-100 Myr.

  15. Study of the sign change of the Sivers function from STAR collaboration W/Z production data

    DOE PAGES

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; D’Alesio, U.; ...

    2017-04-10

    Here, recent data on the transverse single spin asymmetrymore » $$A_N$$ measured by the STAR Collaboration for $$p ↑\\, p \\to W^\\pm/Z^0 \\, X$$ reactions at RHIC allow the first investigation of the Sivers function in Drell-Yan processes and of its expected sign change with respect to SIDIS processes. A critical assessment of the significance of the data is attempted.« less

  16. A Star Close Encounter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-03

    The potential planet-forming disk (or "protoplanetary disk") of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. At up to 100 times the mass of sun-like stars, O stars are the most massive and energetic stars in the universe. The O star can be seen to the right of the image, as the large orange spot with the white center. To the left, the comet-like structure is actually a neighboring solar system that is being destroyed by the O star's powerful winds and intense ultraviolet light. In a process called "photoevaporation," immense output from the O star heats up the nearby protoplanetary disk so much that gas and dust boil off, and the disk can no longer hold together. Photon (or light) blasts from the O star then strip the potential planet-forming disk off its neighbor star by blowing away evaporated material. This effect is illustrated in the smaller system's comet-like structure. The system is located about 2,450 light-years away in the star-forming cloud IC 1396. The image was taken with Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer instrument at 24 microns. The picture is a pseudo-color stretch representing intensity. Yellow and white represent hot areas, whereas purple and blue represent relatively cooler, fainter regions.

  17. A Star's Close Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    The potential planet-forming disk (or 'protoplanetary disk') of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. At up to 100 times the mass of sun-like stars, O stars are the most massive and energetic stars in the universe.

    The O star can be seen to the right of the image, as the large orange spot with the white center. To the left, the comet-like structure is actually a neighboring solar system that is being destroyed by the O star's powerful winds and intense ultraviolet light.

    In a process called 'photoevaporation,' immense output from the O star heats up the nearby protoplanetary disk so much that gas and dust boil off, and the disk can no longer hold together. Photon (or light) blasts from the O star then strip the potential planet-forming disk off its neighbor star by blowing away evaporated material. This effect is illustrated in the smaller system's comet-like structure.

    The system is located about 2,450 light-years away in the star-forming cloud IC 1396. The image was taken with Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer instrument at 24 microns. The picture is a pseudo-color stretch representing intensity. Yellow and white represent hot areas, whereas purple and blue represent relatively cooler, fainter regions.

  18. Spectrophotometry of Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, David

    2017-06-01

    Symbiotic stars are fascinating objects - complex binary systems comprising a cool red giant star and a small hot object, often a white dwarf, both embedded in a nebula formed by a wind from the giant star. UV radiation from the hot star ionises the nebula producing a range of emission lines. These objects have composite spectra with contributions from both stars plus the nebula and these spectra can change on many timescales. Being moderately bright, they lend themselves well to amateur spectroscopy. This paper describes the symbiotic star phenomenon, shows how spectrophotometry can be used to extract astrophysically useful information about the nature of these systems, and gives results for three symbiotic stars based on the author's observations.

  19. Evolution of variable stars

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.A.

    1986-08-01

    Throughout the domain of the H R diagram lie groupings of stars whose luminosity varies with time. These variable stars can be classified based on their observed properties into distinct types such as ..beta.. Cephei stars, delta Cephei stars, and Miras, as well as many other categories. The underlying mechanism for the variability is generally felt to be due to four different causes: geometric effects, rotation, eruptive processes, and pulsation. In this review the focus will be on pulsation variables and how the theory of stellar evolution can be used to explain how the various regions of variability on the H R diagram are populated. To this end a generalized discussion of the evolutionary behavior of a massive star, an intermediate mass star, and a low mass star will be presented. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  1. Hot Massive Stars: The Impact of HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Paul A.

    We review the contribution of Hubble Space Telescope to the study of hot, luminous stars. Optical and IR imaging have permitted spatially resolved observations of young, massive clusters within Local Group galaxies, such as R136, NGC 3603 and Arches, revealing unprecedented concentrations of very massive O stars. UV spectroscopy of field OB stars in the Magellanic Clouds have provided suitable templates for interpretation of metal-poor star-forming galaxies at high-redshift. Spectacular imaging provides the detailed structure of ejecta nebulae from individual stars, including the Homunculus associated with η Carinae and M1-67, associated with a Wolf-Rayet star. HST has permitted individual massive stars to be spatially resolved in giant HII regions located beyond the Local Group, such as NGC 604, plus individual clusters, dominated by the light of massive stars within starburst galaxies at larger distances, such as NGC 3125. UV spectroscopy of young, massive clusters in the extremely metal-poor HII galaxy I Zw 18 include signatures of large numbers of Wolf-Rayet stars.

  2. Star Formation in Merging Galaxies Using FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Hung, Chao-Ling; Naiman, Jill; Moreno, Jorge; Hopkins, Philip

    2018-01-01

    Galaxy interactions and mergers are efficient mechanisms to birth stars at rates that are significantly higher than found in our Milky Way galaxy. The Kennicut-Schmidt (KS) relation is an empirical relationship between the star-forming rate and gas surface densities of galaxies (Schmidt 1959; Kennicutt 1998). Although most galaxies follow the KS relation, the high levels of star formation in galaxy mergers places them outside of this otherwise tight relationship. The goal of this research is to analyze the gas content and star formation of simulated merging galaxies. Our work utilizes the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high-resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star-forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. In this work, we have noticed a significant increase in the star formation rate at first and second passage, when the two black holes of each galaxy approach one other. Next, we will analyze spatially resolved star-forming regions over the course of the interacting system. Then, we can study when and how the rates that gas converts into stars deviate from the standard KS. These analyses will provide important insights into the physical mechanisms that regulate star formation of normal and merging galaxies and valuable theoretical predictions that can be used to compare with current and future observations from ALMA or the James Webb Space Telescope.

  3. ACTH Action on StAR Biology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) produced by the anterior pituitary stimulates glucocorticoid synthesis by the adrenal cortex. The first step in glucocorticoid synthesis is the delivery of cholesterol to the mitochondrial matrix where the first enzymatic reaction in the steroid hormone biosynthetic pathway occurs. A key response of adrenal cells to ACTH is activation of the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. PKA activation results in an acute increase in expression and function of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein (StAR). StAR plays an essential role in steroidogenesis- it controls the hormone-dependent movement of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membranes. Currently StAR's mechanism of action remains a major unanswered question in the field. However, some insight may be gained from understanding the mechanism(s) controlling the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of StAR at S194/195 (mouse/human StAR), a modification that is required for function. This mini-review provides a background on StAR's biology with a focus on StAR phosphorylation. The model for StAR translation and phosphorylation at the outer mitochondrial membrane, the location for StAR function, is presented to highlight a unifying theme emerging from diverse studies.

  4. ACTH Action on StAR Biology

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) produced by the anterior pituitary stimulates glucocorticoid synthesis by the adrenal cortex. The first step in glucocorticoid synthesis is the delivery of cholesterol to the mitochondrial matrix where the first enzymatic reaction in the steroid hormone biosynthetic pathway occurs. A key response of adrenal cells to ACTH is activation of the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. PKA activation results in an acute increase in expression and function of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein (StAR). StAR plays an essential role in steroidogenesis- it controls the hormone-dependent movement of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membranes. Currently StAR's mechanism of action remains a major unanswered question in the field. However, some insight may be gained from understanding the mechanism(s) controlling the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of StAR at S194/195 (mouse/human StAR), a modification that is required for function. This mini-review provides a background on StAR's biology with a focus on StAR phosphorylation. The model for StAR translation and phosphorylation at the outer mitochondrial membrane, the location for StAR function, is presented to highlight a unifying theme emerging from diverse studies. PMID:27999527

  5. Nonuniversal star formation efficiency in turbulent ISM

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Vadim A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-29

    Here, we present a study of a star formation prescription in which star formation efficiency depends on local gas density and turbulent velocity dispersion, as suggested by direct simulations of SF in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We test the model using a simulation of an isolated Milky Way-sized galaxy with a self-consistent treatment of turbulence on unresolved scales. We show that this prescription predicts a wide variation of local star formation efficiency per free-fall time, $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff} \\sim 0.1 - 10\\%$, and gas depletion time, $t_{\\rm dep} \\sim 0.1 - 10$ Gyr. In addition, it predicts an effective density threshold for star formation due to suppression of $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ in warm diffuse gas stabilized by thermal pressure. We show that the model predicts star formation rates in agreement with observations from the scales of individual star-forming regions to the kiloparsec scales. This agreement is non-trivial, as the model was not tuned in any way and the predicted star formation rates on all scales are determined by the distribution of the GMC-scale densities and turbulent velocities $\\sigma$ in the cold gas within the galaxy, which is shaped by galactic dynamics. The broad agreement of the star formation prescription calibrated in the GMC-scale simulations with observations, both gives credence to such simulations and promises to put star formation modeling in galaxy formation simulations on a much firmer theoretical footing.

  6. Dissipation of circumstellar disks of Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabogal, B. E.; Ubaque, K. Y.; García-Varela, A.; álvarez, M.; Salas, L.

    2017-07-01

    Studies of L-band spectra of Be stars are useful to set constraints to the models of formation and evolution mechanisms of the circumstellar disks around these stars. Because few such studies have been performed, more of them are needed to confirm the characteristics reported about the optical depth and evolution of these disks. In this work, we studied new L-band spectra of 7 bright galactic Be stars that were obtained by using CID-InSb spectrograph at the 2.1-m telescope at OAN/UNAM San Pedro Martir Observatory, Baja California, Mexico. We used these data to locate these stars, and the Be stars previously studied in the IR, on a flux ratio diagram (log Hu14/Pfγ vs log Hu14/Brα). We found that 28 Cyg has moved significantly along this diagram implying strong changes of its disk from optically thick to an optically thin one between 2001 and 2014. On the base of the absence of emission lines in the spectra, the circumstellar disks of θ CrB and 66 Oph have been almost totally dissipated. These three stars have decaying circumstellar disks. The other stars: γ Cas, φ Per, 28 Tau and o Her have optically thin disks, that have been almost stable in time. It will be important monitoring these and other Be stars in the L-band to observe the changes on their circumstellar disks, and to observe also in this band, the building-up stars, i.e. stars that create a new disk, or that change it from a very tenuous one to an optically thick circumstellar disk. Our spectra contribute to enlarge the infrared spectroscopic database of Be stars.

  7. Dynamical ejections of massive stars from young star clusters under diverse initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungkyung; Kroupa, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects that initial conditions of star clusters and their massive star population have on dynamical ejections of massive stars from star clusters up to an age of 3 Myr. We use a large set of direct N-body calculations for moderately massive star clusters (Mecl ≈ 103.5 M⊙). We vary the initial conditions of the calculations, such as the initial half-mass radius of the clusters, initial binary populations for massive stars and initial mass segregation. We find that the initial density is the most influential parameter for the ejection fraction of the massive systems. The clusters with an initial half-mass radius rh(0) of 0.1 (0.3) pc can eject up to 50% (30)% of their O-star systems on average, while initially larger (rh(0) = 0.8 pc) clusters, that is, lower density clusters, eject hardly any OB stars (at most ≈ 4.5%). When the binaries are composed of two stars of similar mass, the ejections are most effective. Most of the models show that the average ejection fraction decreases with decreasing stellar mass. For clusters that are efficient at ejecting O stars, the mass function of the ejected stars is top-heavy compared to the given initial mass function (IMF), while the mass function of stars that remain in the cluster becomes slightly steeper (top-light) than the IMF. The top-light mass functions of stars in 3 Myr old clusters in our N-body models agree well with the mean mass function of young intermediate-mass clusters in M 31, as reported previously. This implies that the IMF of the observed young clusters is the canonical IMF. We show that the multiplicity fraction of the ejected massive stars can be as high as ≈ 60%, that massive high-order multiple systems can be dynamically ejected, and that high-order multiples become common especially in the cluster. We also discuss binary populations of the ejected massive systems. Clusters that are initially not mass-segregated begin ejecting massive stars after a time delay that is caused by mass

  8. Study on the Ancient Star Map Carved on the Stone in DPR Korea: Present Status and Prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Kim, Kyong Chol; Jong, Sok; Ji, Kwang Nam

    2015-08-01

    Korean Dolmens are the most distinctive and impressive megalithic monuments in Korean history. It has been known that Korean dolmens are typical funerary monuments of the New Stone Age and Bronze Age.We have searched and analyzed some Korean dolmens in astronomical aspects. Korean dolmen consists of two foundation stones, two dammed stones and one cover stone. Two foundation stones were put up on both sides and two small stones were dammed right and left so as to make a room for grave. Then tens of ton stone was covered on them. For example, one of the cover stones of Korean dolmens is 6.3m in length, 4m in width and 70cm in thickness. And the height of this dolmen is about 1.75m.More than twenty thousand dolmens are scattered around the Korean peninsula. Especially the Taedong River basin including Pyongyang that was a capital of Ancient Korea is the birthplace and centre of dolmens in our country, where about fourteen thousand dolmens are distributed. This region is of the highest density in terms of the distribution of dolmen and has every different kind of dolmens. Korean dolmen was very popular from BC.3000 to BC.2000 and began to disappear in the late BC.2000.It is interesting that we have found dolmens with star map on the cover stone. We found two hundred dolmens with various star atlas-like patterns of cup-marks. We analyzed the star maps on the cover stones of some dolmens and identified the constellations such as Big Dipper, Aquila, Cygnus, Draco and so on.It is thought that ancestor carved stars in the sky at that time on the cover stone of Korean dolmens, archaeological stone tombs. We also consider that Korean Dolmen is one of the oldest stone monuments relative to astronomy.We assume that there are many unidentified dolmens with star map on the cover stone and also many unexcavated dolmens in northern part of Korean peninsula yet, which are expected to arouse the great interest of astronomers and archaeologists.

  9. Studying Star Formation in the Central Molecular Zone using 22 GHz Water and 6.7 GHz Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; SWAG

    2016-01-01

    The inner 400 pc of our Galaxy, or the so-called the central molecular zone (CMZ), has a unique environment with a large mass of dense, warm molecular gas. One of the premier questions is how star formation (SF) differs in this unique environment from elsewhere in the Galaxy. We intend to address this issue by identifying improved numbers and locations of early sites of SF. We have conducted high resolution surveys of the CMZ, looking for early SF indicators such as 22 GHz water and 6.7 GHz methanol masers. We present the initial water maser results from the SWAG survey and methanol results from the first full VLA survey of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the CMZ. These surveys span beyond the inner 1.2ο x 0.5ο of the Galaxy, including Sgr B through Sgr C. The improved spatial and spectral resolutions (~26" and 2 km s-1) and sensitivity (RMS ~10 mJy beam-1) of our ATCA observations have allowed us to identify over 140 water maser candidates in the SWAG survey. This is a factor of 3 more than detected from prior surveys of the CMZ. The preliminary distribution of these candidates appears to be uniform along Galactic longitude. Should this distribution persist for water masers associated with star formation (as opposed to those produced by evolved stars), then this result would imply a more uniform distribution of recent SF activity in the CMZ. Prior works have shown that 2/3 of the molecular gas mass is located at positive Galactic longitudes, and young stellar objects (YSOs) identified by IR SEDs are located predominantly at negative Galactic longitudes. A combination of these results can provide insight on the evolution of SF within the CMZ. We are currently comparing the water maser positions to other catalogs (ex. OH/IR stars) in order to distinguish between the mechanisms producing these masers. We are also currently working on determining the distribution of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. These masers do not contain the same ambiguity as water masers as to their source

  10. Physics in Strong Magnetic Fields Near Neutron Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the behaviors of particles and energies in the magnetic fields of neutron stars. Different types of possible research using neutron stars as a laboratory for the study of strong magnetic fields are proposed. (CW)

  11. STAR Graduate and GRO Undergraduate Fellowship Recipient List

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's STAR graduate fellowship program supports masters and doctoral candidates in environmental studies. Each year, students in the United States compete for STAR fellowships through a rigorous review process.

  12. The Michigan Binary Star Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi P.

    2007-07-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, William J. Hussey and Robert G. Aitken, both at Lick Observatory, began a systematic search for unrecorded binary stars with the aid of the 12" and 36" refracting telescopes at Lick Observatory. Aitken's work (and book on binary stars) are well known, Hussey's contributions less so. In 1905 Hussey, a Michigan engineering graduate, returned to direct the Ann Arbor astronomy program, and immediately he began to design new instrumentation for the study of binary stars and to train potential observers. For a time, he spent six months a year at the La Plata Observatory, where he discovered a number of new pairs and decided upon a major southern hemisphere campaign. He spent a decade obtaining the lenses for a large refractor, through the vicissitudes of war and depression. Finally, he obtained a site in South Africa, a 26" refractor, and a small corps of observers, but he died in London en route to fulfill his dream. His right hand man, Richard Rossiter, established the observatory and spent the next thirty years discovering and measuring binary stars: his personal total is a record for the field. This talk is an account of the methods, results, and utility of the extraordinary binary star factory in the veldt.

  13. Observing Sun-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Petrus C.; White, Russel J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sun represents only one realization of the many possibilities for stellar dynamos. In order to fully understand the physics of solar and stellar magnetism we need to study in full detail the magnetic cycles of stars that are very much like the Sun . To do this we need a telescope that can resolve the disks of nearby solar type stars. Georgia State's University Center for High Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) array is a diffraction limited interferometer with a baseline of over 300 m, located on Mount Wilson. It is the highest resolution telescope in the visible and infrared currently in operation. CHARA has resolved the disks of larger stars and observed starspots. We will describe an ongoing observing program for nearby Sun-like stars to determine with great accuracy the basic parameters of these stars and the presence of starspots on their surfaces. Combined with the decades long observations of Mount Wilson and Lowell Observatories of stellar cycles the data obtained will act as a powerful constraint on solar and stellar dynamo models and simulations.

  14. Candidate X-Ray-emitting OB Stars in MYStIX Massive Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Busk, Heather A.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Kuhn, Michael A.

    2017-03-01

    Massive O-type and early B-type (OB) stars in the nearby Galaxy remain incompletely cataloged due to high extinction, bright visible and infrared nebular emission in H II regions, and high field star contamination. These difficulties are alleviated by restricting the search to stars with X-ray emission. Using the X-ray point sources from the Massive Young Star-forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-Rays (MYStIX) survey of OB-dominated regions, we identify 98 MYStIX candidate OB (MOBc) stars by fitting their 1-8 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with reddened stellar atmosphere models. We identify 27 additional MOBc stars based on JHK S photometry of X-ray stars lacking SED fitting. These candidate OB stars indicate that the current census of stars earlier than B1, taken across the 18 MYStIX regions studied, is less than 50% complete. We also fit the SEDs of 239 previously published OB stars to measure interstellar extinction and bolometric luminosities, revealing six candidate massive binary systems and five candidate O-type (super)giants. As expected, candidate OB stars have systematically higher extinction than previously published OB stars. Notable results for individual regions include identification of the OB population of a recently discovered massive cluster in NGC 6357, an older OB association in the M17 complex, and new massive luminous O stars near the Trifid Nebula. In several relatively poorly studied regions (RCW 38, NGC 6334, NGC 6357, Trifid, and NGC 3576), the OB populations may increase by factors of ≳ 2.

  15. Stellar Ideas: Exploring Students' Understanding of Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agan, Lori

    2004-01-01

    In this study, high school and first-year undergraduate students were asked about their understanding of stars. The hypothesis guiding this research posits that high school students who have taken a semester-long astronomy course will have an understanding of stars most related to scientific knowledge, compared with high school students enrolled…

  16. Implementing STAR: Sensible Technology Assessment/Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.; Herman, Joan L.

    A plan for evaluating the Apple Classroom of Tomorrow (ACOT) is presented, which implements the model for Sensible Technology Assessment/Research (STAR). STAR involves interactive participation in the evaluation study by ACOT participants, collateral university researchers, and University of California (Los Angeles) staff to develop a credible,…

  17. Teaching through Trade Books: Seeing Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royce, Christine Anne

    2008-01-01

    The winter months are a great time to make observations of several familiar constellations. While there is no scientific reason to "know" the constellations--they are simply imaginative pictures imposed on stars--studying constellations can help students connect with culture in a fun way and develop the awareness that stars are different in…

  18. The Origin of Nonradiative Heating/momentum in Hot Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B. (Editor); Michalitsianos, A. G. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The origin of nonradiative heating and momentum in the atmospheres of stars is studied. The similarities and differences between what occurs in the hot stars and what occurs in cool stars are emphasized. Key points in the theory are reviewed. Areas requiring new study are indicated.

  19. Statistical studies in stellar rotation 2: A method of analyzing rotational coupling in double stars and an introduction to its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacca, P. L.

    1971-01-01

    The correlation between the equatorial velocities of the components of double stars is studied from a statistical standpoint. A theory of rotational correlation is developed and discussed with regard to its applicability to existing observations. The theory is then applied to a sample of visual binaries which are the least studied for rotational coupling. Consideration of eclipsing systems and spectroscopic binaries is limited to show how the degrees of freedom in the spin parallelism problem can be reduced. The analysis lends support to the existence of synchronism in closely spaced binaries.

  20. THE GALEX NEARBY YOUNG-STAR SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zuckerman, B.

    2013-09-10

    We describe a method that exploits data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) ultraviolet and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Two Micron All Sky Survey infrared source catalogs, combined with proper motions and empirical pre-main sequence isochrones, to identify candidate nearby, young, low-mass stars. Applying our method across the full GALEX-covered sky, we identify 2031 mostly M-type stars that, for an assumed age of 10 (100) Myr, all lie within {approx}150 ({approx}90) pc of Earth. The distribution of M spectral subclasses among these {approx}2000 candidate young stars peaks sharply in the range M3-M4; these subtypes constitute 50% of the sample,more » consistent with studies of the M star population in the immediate solar neighborhood. We focus on a subset of 58 of these candidate young M stars in the vicinity of the Tucana-Horologium association. Only 20 of these 58 candidates were detected in the ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey-reflecting the greater sensitivity of GALEX for the purposes of identifying active nearby, young stars, particularly for stars of type M4 and later. Based on statistical analysis of the kinematics and/or spectroscopic followup of these 58 M stars, we find that 50% (29 stars) indeed have properties consistent with Tuc-Hor membership, while 12 are potential new members of the Columba association, and 2 may be AB Dor moving group members. Hence, {approx}75% of our initial subsample of 58 candidates are likely members of young (age {approx} 10-40 Myr) stellar moving groups within 100 pc, verifying that the stellar color- and kinematics-based selection algorithms described here can be used to efficiently isolate nearby, young, low-mass objects from among the field star population. Future studies will focus on characterizing additional subsamples selected from among this list of candidate nearby, young M stars.« less

  1. THE CLASSIFICATION OF KEPLER B-STAR VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Bernard J.; Jackiewicz, Jason; McKeever, Jean E-mail: jasonj@nmsu.edu

    2012-04-15

    The light curves of 252 B-star candidates in the Kepler database are analyzed in a similar fashion to that done by Balona et al. to further characterize B-star variability, increase the sample of variable B stars for future study, and to identify stars whose power spectra include particularly interesting features such as frequency groupings. Stars are classified as either constant light emitters, {beta} Cep stars, slowly pulsating B stars (SPBs), hybrid pulsators, binaries or stars whose light curves are dominated by rotation (Bin/Rot), hot subdwarfs, or white dwarfs. One-hundred stars in our sample were found to be either light constants or to be variable at a level of less than 0.02 mmag. We increase the number of candidate B-star variables found in the Kepler database by Balona et al. in the following fashion: {beta} Cep stars from 0 to 10, SPBs from eight to 54, hybrid pulsators from seven to 21, and Bin/Rot stars from 23 to 82. For comparison purposes, approximately 51 SPBs and six hybrids had been known prior to 2007. The number of {beta} Cep stars known prior to 2004 was 93. A secondary result of this study is the identification of an additional 11 pulsating white dwarf candidates, four of which possess frequency groupings.

  2. Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David

    2017-10-01

    In this brief invited review, I will attempt to summarise some of the key areas of interest in the study of central stars of planetary nebulae which (probably) will not be covered by other speakers' proceedings. The main focus will, inevitably, be on the subject of multiplicity, with special emphasis on recent results regarding triple central star systems as well as wide binaries which avoid a common-envelope phase. Furthermore, in light of the upcoming release of Kepler's Campaign 11 data, I will discuss a few of the prospects from that data including the unique possibility to detect merger products.

  3. Magnetic cycles at different ages of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, K.; Kővári, Zs.; Petrovay, K.; Soon, W.; Baliunas, S.; Kolláth, Z.; Vida, K.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We study the different patterns of interannual magnetic variability in stars on or near the lower main sequence, approximately solar-type (G-K dwarf) stars in time series of 36 yr from the Mount Wilson Observatory Ca II H&K survey. Our main aim is to search for correlations between cycles, activity measures, and ages. Methods: Time-frequency analysis has been used to discern and reveal patterns and morphology of stellar activity cycles, including multiple and changing cycles, in the datasets. Both the results from short-term Fourier transform and its refinement using the Choi-Williams distribution, with better frequency resolution, are presented in this study. Rotational periods of the stars were derived using multifrequency Fourier analysis. Results: We found at least one activity cycle on 28 of the 29 stars we studied. Twelve stars, with longer rotational periods (39.7 ± 6.0 days), have simple smooth cycles, and the remaining stars, with much faster rotation (18.1 ± 12.2 days) on average, show complex and sometimes vigorously changing multiple cycles. The cycles are longer and quite uniform in the first group (9.7 ± 1.9 yr), while they are generally shorter and vary more strongly in the second group (7.6 ± 4.9). The clear age division between stars with smooth and complex cycles follows the known separation between the older and younger stars at around 2 to 3 Gyr of age.

  4. College Students' Preinstructional Ideas about Stars and Star Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Janelle M.; Prather, Edward E.; Johnson, Bruce; Slater, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    This study (Note 1) investigated the beliefs about stars that students hold when they enter an undergraduate introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors. Students' preinstructional ideas were investigated through the use of several student-supplied-response (SSR) surveys, which asked students to describe their ideas about topics such as…

  5. NuSTAR Study of Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy G21.5-0.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nynka, Melania; Hailey, Charles J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; An, Hongjun; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR high-energy X-ray observations of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN)/supernova remnant G21.5-0.9. We detect integrated emission from the nebula up to approx. 40 keV, and resolve individual spatial features over a broad X-ray band for the first time. The morphology seen by NuSTAR agrees well with that seen by XMM-Newton and Chandra below 10 keV. At high energies, NuSTAR clearly detects non-thermal emission up to approx. 20 keV that extends along the eastern and northern rim of the supernova shell. The broadband images clearly demonstrate that X-ray emission from the North Spur and Eastern Limb results predominantly from non-thermal processes. We detect a break in the spatially integrated X-ray spectrum at approx. 9 keV that cannot be reproduced by current spectral energy distribution models, implying either a more complex electron injection spectrum or an additional process such as diffusion compared to what has been considered in previous work. We use spatially resolved maps to derive an energy-dependent cooling length scale, E(sup m) is directly proportional to L(E) with m = -0.21 plus or minus 0.01. We find this to be inconsistent with the model for the morphological evolution with energy described by Kennel & Coroniti. This value, along with the observed steepening in power-law index between radio and X-ray, can be quantitatively explained as an energy-loss spectral break in the simple scaling model of Reynolds, assuming particle advection dominates over diffusion. This interpretation requires a substantial departure from spherical magnetohydrodynamic, magnetic-flux-conserving outflow, most plausibly in the form of turbulent magnetic-field amplification.

  6. Weighing Ultra-Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    Large Ground-Based Telescopes and Hubble Team-Up to Perform First Direct Brown Dwarf Mass Measurement [1] Summary Using ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal and a suite of ground- and space-based telescopes in a four-year long study, an international team of astronomers has measured for the first time the mass of an ultra-cool star and its companion brown dwarf. The two stars form a binary system and orbit each other in about 10 years. The team obtained high-resolution near-infrared images; on the ground, they defeated the blurring effect of the terrestrial atmosphere by means of adaptive optics techniques. By precisely determining the orbit projected on the sky, the astronomers were able to measure the total mass of the stars. Additional data and comparison with stellar models then yield the mass of each of the components. The heavier of the two stars has a mass around 8.5% of the mass of the Sun and its brown dwarf companion is even lighter, only 6% of the solar mass. Both objects are relatively young with an age of about 500-1,000 million years. These observations represent a decisive step towards the still missing calibration of stellar evolution models for very-low mass stars. PR Photo 19a/04: Orbit of the ultra-cool stars in 2MASSW J0746425+2000321. PR Photo 19b/04: Animated Gif of the orbital motion. Telephone number star Even though astronomers have found several hundreds of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, the fundamental properties of these extreme objects, such as masses and surface temperatures, are still not well known. Within the cosmic zoo, these ultra-cool stars represent a class of "intermediate" objects between giant planets - like Jupiter - and "normal" stars less massive than our Sun, and to understand them well is therefore crucial to the field of stellar astrophysics. The problem with these ultra-cool stars is that contrary to normal stars that burn hydrogen in their central core, no unique relation exists between the luminosity of the

  7. New Emission Stars in B Cyg OB7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikian, N. D.; Karapetian, A. A.; Gomez, J.

    2016-12-01

    This is a continuation of a search for and study of emission objects in known dark clouds and star formation regions. New results are presented from a search for emission stars in the region of Cyg OB7 where 36 new emission stars have been discovered previously. The current observations were made adjacent to previously studied regions in the vicinity of the object HH 448. 26 new emission stars were found in three small regions with a combined area of 0.11 sq. deg. On an (H-K)-(J-H) two-color diagram these stars lie among the classical T Tau stars (CTTS) and T Tau stars with weak lines (WTTS). A strong change in brightness was recorded for one of the emission stars.

  8. Radial Velocity Monitoring of Kepler Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Isaacson, Howard; Hambleton, Kelly; Thompson, Susan E.; Prša, Andrej; Kurtz, Donald W.; Howard, Andrew W.; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity-period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  9. A Sparkling Spray of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    intriguing region is an ideal laboratory for studying how stars form. The entire area shown here is just a small part of a vast cloud of molecular gas that is in the process of forming the next generation of stars. Besides the feast of objects in this picture there are many interesting objects hidden behind the murk of the nebulosity. In the region between the tip of the Cone Nebula and the brightest star at the top of the picture there are several stellar birthing grounds where young stars are forming. There is even evidence of the intense stellar winds from these youthful embryos blasting out from the hidden stars in the making. This picture of NGC 2264, including the Christmas Tree Cluster, was created from images taken with the Wide Field Imager (WFI), a specialised astronomical camera attached to the 2.2-metre Max-Planck Society/ESO telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. Located nearly 2400 m above sea level, in the mountains of the Atacama Desert, ESO's La Silla enjoys some of the clearest and darkest skies on the whole planet, making the site ideally suited for studying the farthest depths of the Universe. To make this image, the WFI stared at the cluster for more than ten hours through a series of specialist filters to build up a full colour image of the billowing clouds of fluorescing hydrogen gas.

  10. Recovery Ship Freedom Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, is towing a barge containing the third Space Shuttle Super Lightweight External Tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT was slated for use to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October 1998. This first time towing arrangement, part of a cost saving plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks were manufactured. The barge was transported up Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tug boat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allowed NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies showed a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications would be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, also underwent deck strengthening enhancements and had the necessary towing wench installed.

  11. Activity in F stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Sidney C.; Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Simon, Theodore

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of He I 5876 A and IUE measurements of chromospheric and transition region lines in a large sample of F-type stars are presented. The data show that activity is detectable in nearly all early F-type stars and differs in several of its characteristics from that typically seen in cooler stars with slow rotation and fully developed convective zones. The onset of activity occurs near B-V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type F0 and T(eff) = 7300 K. There is no correlation between the level of activity and the abundances of lithium and beryllium in F stars hotter than T(eff) = 6600 K. All but one of the stars in the 6600-7300 K temperature interval are active. The levels of activity in these stars are independent of Rossby number.

  12. Age-Defying Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    An age-defying star called IRAS 19312+1950 exhibits features characteristic of a very young star and a very old star. The object stands out as extremely bright inside a large, chemically rich cloud of material, as shown in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. IRAS 19312+1950 is the bright red star in the center of this image. A NASA-led team of scientists thinks the star -- which is about 10 times as massive as our sun and emits about 20,000 times as much energy -- is a newly forming protostar. That was a big surprise, because the region had not been known as a stellar nursery before. But the presence of a nearby interstellar bubble, which indicates the presence of a recently formed massive star, also supports this idea. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20914

  13. A GMOS-N IFU study of the central H II region in the blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 4449: kinematics, nebular metallicity and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Nimisha; James, Bethan L.; Irwin, Mike J.

    2017-10-01

    We use integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations from the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph North (GMOS-N) to study the central H II region in a nearby blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy NGC 4449. The IFS data enable us to explore the variation of physical and chemical conditions of the star-forming region and the surrounding gas on spatial scales as small as 5.5 pc. Our kinematical analysis shows possible signatures of shock ionization and shell structures in the surroundings of the star-forming region. The metallicity maps of the region, created using direct Te and indirect strong line methods (R23, O3N2 and N2), do not show any chemical variation. From the integrated spectrum of the central H II region, we find a metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.88 ± 0.14 ({˜ }0.15^{+0.06}_{-0.04} Z⊙) using the direct method. Comparing the central H II region metallicity derived here with those of H II regions throughout this galaxy from previous studies, we find evidence of increasing metallicity with distance from the central nucleus. Such chemical inhomogeneities can be due to several mechanisms, including gas loss via supernova blowout, galactic winds or metal-poor gas accretion. However, we find that the localized area of decreased metallicity aligns spatially with the peak of star-forming activity in the galaxy, suggesting that gas accretion may be at play here. Spatially resolved IFS data for the entire galaxy are required to confirm the metallicity inhomogeneity found in this study and determine its possible cause.

  14. Digital Imaging Star Camera

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    critical for space-flight mission on small spacecraft, such as CubeSats , that cannot afford the mass, power or cost of traditional star trackers but...or cost of traditional star trackers but require better pointing knowledge than current small satellite technologies can provide. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...SEP 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Digital Imaging Star Camera 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  15. Nagyszombat and the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsoldos, E.

    Péter Pázmány, founder of the University of Nagyszombat, considered stars in terms inherited from medieval times. The theses, connected to the university graduation, soon left this definition, and imagined stars as made from sublunar elements. The 1753 decree of the Empress Maria Theresia ordered university professors to publish textbooks. These textbooks, together with the theses showed a definite improvement, defining stars according to contemporary knowledge.

  16. Formation of the first stars.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ~10(6) M⊙ and collapsing at redshifts z ≈ 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ~2018, and for 'stellar archaeology', which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae.

  17. Binary Systems Within Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, Ernst; Stütz, Christian; Baumann, Bernhard

    2012-04-01

    WEBDA (http://www.univie.ac.at/webda) is a site devoted to observational data of stellar clusters in the Milky Way and the Small Magellanic Cloud. It is intended to provide a reliable presentation of the available data and knowledge about these objects. The success of WEBDA is documented by its worldwide usage and the related acknowledgements in the literature: more than 650 refereed publications within the last twelve years acknowledged its use. It collects all published data for stars in open clusters that may be useful either to determine membership, or to study the stellar content and properties of the clusters. The database content includes astrometric data in the form of coordinates, rectangular positions, and proper motions, photometric data in the major systems in which star clusters have been observed, but also spectroscopic data like spectral classification, radial velocities, and rotational velocities. It also contains miscellaneous types of supplementary data like membership probabilities, orbital elements of spectroscopic binaries, and periods for different kinds of variable stars as well as an extensive bibliography. Several powerful tools help to plot, query and extract the data, which can be directly retrieved via http. At the time of writing, about four million individual measurements have been included in the database. The Star Clusters Young & Old Newsletter (SCYON), a bi-monthly newsletter devoted to star cluster research with about 600 subscribers, is hosted in parallel with the database. We present the current and upcoming new interface and tools, which are needed to visualize and analyze the increasing amount of data from all-sky surveys, and deeper investigations of binary systems, low mass dwarfs, as well as planet-hosting stars.

  18. Lightweight Double Neutron Star Found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    More than forty years after the first discovery of a double neutron star, we still havent found many others but a new survey is working to change that.The Hunt for PairsThe observed shift in the Hulse-Taylor binarys orbital period over time as it loses energy to gravitational-wave emission. [Weisberg Taylor, 2004]In 1974, Russell Hulse and Joseph Taylor discovered the first double neutron star: two compact objects locked in a close orbit about each other. Hulse and Taylors measurements of this binarys decaying orbit over subsequent years led to a Nobel prize and the first clear evidence of gravitational waves carrying energy and angular momentum away from massive binaries.Forty years later, we have since confirmed the existence of gravitational waves directly with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). Nonetheless, finding and studying pre-merger neutron-star binaries remains a top priority. Observing such systems before they merge reveals crucial information about late-stage stellar evolution, binary interactions, and the types of gravitational-wave signals we expect to find with current and future observatories.Since the Hulse-Taylor binary, weve found a total of 16 additional double neutron-star systems which represents only a tiny fraction of the more than 2,600 pulsars currently known. Recently, however, a large number of pulsar surveys are turning their eyes toward the sky, with a focus on finding more double neutron stars and at least one of them has had success.The pulse profile for PSR J1411+2551 at 327 MHz. [Martinez et al. 2017]A Low-Mass DoubleConducted with the 1,000-foot Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey has enabled the recent discovery of dozens of pulsars and transients. Among them, as reported by Jose Martinez (Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy) and coauthors in a recent publication, is PSR J1411+2551: a new double neutron star with one of the lowest masses ever measured

  19. Star-Catalog Data Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotlieb, D.; Mclaughlin, S.

    1982-01-01

    SKYMAP is collection of computer programs and utility software for creating and maintaining master star catalog and hierarchical set of derivative star catalogs. Developed to provide accurate stellar position and magnitude information for attitude-determination and analysis systems utilizing star sensor observations. Current master star catalog includes all documented stars with blue or visual magnitudes brighter than magnitude 9.0

  20. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  1. Strangeon and Strangeon Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyu, Lai; Renxin, Xu

    2017-06-01

    The nature of pulsar-like compact stars is essentially a central question of the fundamental strong interaction (explained in quantum chromo-dynamics) at low energy scale, the solution of which still remains a challenge though tremendous efforts have been tried. This kind of compact objects could actually be strange quark stars if strange quark matter in bulk may constitute the true ground state of the strong-interaction matter rather than 56Fe (the so-called Witten’s conjecture). From astrophysical points of view, however, it is proposed that strange cluster matter could be absolutely stable and thus those compact stars could be strange cluster stars in fact. This proposal could be regarded as a general Witten’s conjecture: strange matter in bulk could be absolutely stable, in which quarks are either free (for strange quark matter) or localized (for strange cluster matter). Strange cluster with three-light-flavor symmetry is renamed strangeon, being coined by combining “strange nucleon” for the sake of simplicity. A strangeon star can then be thought as a 3-flavored gigantic nucleus, and strangeons are its constituent as an analogy of nucleons which are the constituent of a normal (micro) nucleus. The observational consequences of strangeon stars show that different manifestations of pulsarlike compact stars could be understood in the regime of strangeon stars, and we are expecting more evidence for strangeon star by advanced facilities (e.g., FAST, SKA, and eXTP).

  2. Cooling of dense stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.

    1974-01-01

    Some recent work on thermal properties of dense stars is described. It is now generally believed that pulsars are rotating, magnetic neutron stars (Gold, 1968). Moreover, theoretical considerations and some observational evidence (such as the speed-ups of the Crab and Vela pulsars) suggest the presence of superfluids in neutron stars. In the earlier cooling calculations the effect of magnetic fields and superfluidity was not taken into account. In the recent work, emphasis was placed on the effect of these new factors, which were expected to reduce cooling rates significantly. The new outcome may prove valuable for the understanding of pulsar and X-ray star problems.

  3. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  4. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts canmore » set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.« less

  5. Combinations of 148 navigation stars and the star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R.

    1980-01-01

    The angular separation of all star combinations for 148 nav star on the onboard software for space transportation system-3 flight and following missions is presented as well as the separation of each pair that satisfies the viewing constraints of using both star trackers simultaneously. Tables show (1) shuttle star catalog 1980 star position in M 1950 coordinates; (2) two star combination of 148 nav stars; and (3) summary of two star-combinations of the star tracker 5 deg filter. These 148 stars present 10,875 combinations. For the star tracker filters of plus or minus 5 deg, there are 875 combinations. Formalhaut (nav star 26) has the best number of combinations, which is 33.

  6. Nonradial oscillation modes of compact stars with a crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Cesar Vásquez; Hall, Zack B.; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2017-12-01

    Oscillation modes of isolated compact stars can, in principle, be a fingerprint of the equation of state (EoS) of dense matter. We study the non-radial high-frequency l =2 spheroidal modes of neutron stars and strange quark stars, adopting a two-component model (core and crust) for these two types of stars. Using perturbed fluid equations in the relativistic Cowling approximation, we explore the effect of a strangelet or hadronic crust on the oscillation modes of strange stars. The results differ from the case of neutron stars with a crust. In comparison to fluid-only configurations, we find that a solid crust on top of a neutron star increases the p -mode frequency slightly with little effect on the f -mode frequency, whereas for strange stars, a strangelet crust on top of a quark core significantly increases the f -mode frequency with little effect on the p -mode frequency.

  7. Spectral Types of Field and Cluster O-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bergh, Sidney

    2004-10-01

    The recent catalog of spectral types of Galactic O-type stars by Maíz-Apellániz et al. is used to study the differences between the frequencies of various subtypes of O-type stars in the field, in OB associations, and among runaway stars. At a high level of statistical significance, the data show that O stars in clusters and associations have earlier types (and, hence, presumably larger masses or younger ages) than those that are situated in the general field. Furthermore, it is found that the distribution of spectral subtypes among runaway O stars is indistinguishable from that among field stars and differs significantly from that of the O-type stars that are situated in clusters and associations. The difference is in the sense that runaway O stars, on average, have later subtypes than do those that are still located in clusters and associations.

  8. A young star takes centre stage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-02

    With its helical appearance resembling a snail’s shell, this reflection nebula seems to spiral out from a luminous central star in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. The star in the centre, known as V1331 Cyg and located in the dark cloud LDN 981 — or, more commonly, Lynds 981 — had previously been defined as a T Tauri star. A T Tauri is a young star — or Young Stellar Object — that is starting to contract to become a main sequence star similar to the Sun. What makes V1331Cyg special is the fact that we look almost exactly at one of its poles. Usually, the view of a young star is obscured by the dust from the circumstellar disc and the envelope that surround it. However, with V1331Cyg we are actually looking in the exact direction of a jet driven by the star that is clearing the dust and giving us this magnificent view. This view provides an almost undisturbed view of the star and its immediate surroundings allowing astronomers to study it in greater detail and look for features that might suggest the formation of a verylow-mass object in the outer circumstellar disc.

  9. Spectropolarimetry of Giant stars: Probing the influence of magnetic field on evolved stars Spectropolarimetry of Giant stars: Probing the influence of magnetic field on evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Jefferson; Castro, Matthieu; Petit, Pascal; do Nascimento, José-Dias, Jr.

    2015-08-01

    It is know that lithium is element easily destroyed in stellar interior, the existence of lithium rich stars means a great challenge in stellar evolution. In this context our observations ravels the serendipitous discovery of an unusually high lithium abundance star. This is a K0III HD 150050, which has strong deepening on lithium line (6707.8 Å) this means lithium abundance of 2.81 0.2 dex, therefore this star belong a rare group called super Li-Rich stars. A possible source of the non-standard episodes required to produce Li-rich stars were identified in magneto-thermohaline mixing accounted by models of extra-mixing induced by magnetic buoyancy. However to better understand this is necessary more observational data. In last three decades several studies has showed that late type red giant stars presents a remarkable modifications in these outer atmosphere layers when they become late type star in HR diagram. These changes are founded through X-ray, Ultraviolet, and Chromospheric activity analyses, and then we can establish the called “Dividing lines”. We made spectropalarimetric observations with ESPaDOnS@CFHT to achieve two main objectives: analyze the influence of magnetic field in the Li-rich giant stars, and understand how works the magnetic field in late type giants and supergiants across the “dividing line”.

  10. The Multiplicity of Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Debra J.

    2004-01-01

    The most massive stars drastically reconfigure their surroundings via their strong stellar winds and powerful ionizing radiation. With this mass fueling their large luminosities, these stars are frequently used as standard candles in distance determination, and as tracers of stellar evolution in different regions and epochs. In their dieing burst, some of the once massive stars will enter a Wolf-Rayet (WR) phase lasting approx.10% of the stellar lifetime. This phase is particularly useful for study because these stars have strong spectroscopic signatures that allow them to be easily identified at great distances. But how accurate are these identifications? Increasingly, the relatively nearby stars we once assumed to be single are revealing themselves to be binary or multiple. New techniques, such as high-resolution imaging and interferometry, are changing our knowledge of these objects. I will discuss recent results in the literature and how this affects the binary distribution of WR stars. I will also discuss the implications of binary vs. single star evolution on evolution through the WR phase. Finally, I will discuss the implications of these revised numbers on both massive stellar evolution itself, and the impact that this has on the role of WR stars as calibrators.

  11. Low-mass star and planet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    Low-mass star and planet formation is reviewed through a brief comparison of the results of cosmogonical models with observations ranging from studies of star-forming regions to searches for planetary companions to low-mass stars. Five key phases are described, starting from the dense, interstellar cloud cores that form low-mass stars, through the protostellar collapse and fragmentation phase, to the formation of a protostellar object accreting gas from the surrounding protostellar disk and cloud envelope. Descriptions are given for the phase where planets are formed in the protostellar disk, and the dissipation of the bulk of the protostellar disk and the appearance of an optically visible, premain-sequence star.

  12. Relativistic Axions from Collapsing Bose Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levkov, D. G.; Panin, A. G.; Tkachev, I. I.

    2017-01-01

    The substructures of light bosonic (axionlike) dark matter may condense into compact Bose stars. We study the collapse of critical-mass stars caused by attractive self-interaction of the axionlike particles and find that these processes proceed in an unexpected universal way. First, nonlinear self-similar evolution (called "wave collapse" in condensed matter physics) forces the particles to fall into the star center. Second, interactions in the dense center create an outgoing stream of mildly relativistic particles which carries away an essential part of the star mass. The collapse stops when the star remnant is no longer able to support the self-similar infall feeding the collisions. We shortly discuss possible astrophysical and cosmological implications of these phenomena.

  13. The population of highly magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. O.; Dexheimer, V.; Franzon, B.; Schramm, S.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we study the effects of strong magnetic field configurations on the population of neutron stars. The stellar matter is described within a relativistic mean field formalism which considers many-body force contributions in the scalar couplings. We choose the parametrization of the model that reproduces nuclear matter properties at saturation and also describes massive hyperon stars. Hadronic matter is modeled at zero temperature, in beta-equilibrium, charge neutral and populated by the baryonic octet, electrons and muons. Magnetic effects are taken into account in the structure of stars by the solution of the Einstein-Maxwell equations with the assumption of a poloidal magnetic field distribution. Our results show that magnetic neutron stars are populated essencialy by nucleons and leptons, due to the fact that strong magnetic fields decrease the central density of stars and, hence, supress the appearance of exotic particles.

  14. Star formation in the Magellanic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frogel, Jay A.

    1987-01-01

    Because of their proximity, the Magellanic Clouds provide the opportunity to conduct a detailed study of the history and current state of star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies. There is considerable evidence that star formation in the Clouds was and is proceeding in a manner different from that found in a typical well-ordered spiral galaxy. Star formation in both Clouds appears to have undergone a number of relatively intense bursts. There exist a number of similarities and differences in the current state of star formation in the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way. Examination of Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) sources with ground based telescopes allows identification of highly evolved massive stars with circumstellar shells as well as several types of compact emission line objects.

  15. "Wonderful" Star Reveals its Hot Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    For the first time an X-ray image of a pair of interacting stars has been made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The ability to distinguish between the interacting stars - one a highly evolved giant star and the other likely a white dwarf - allowed a team of scientists to observe an X-ray outburst from the giant star and find evidence that a bridge of hot matter is streaming between the two stars. "Before this observation it was assumed that all the X-rays came from a hot disk surrounding a white dwarf, so the detection of an X-ray outburst from the giant star came as a surprise," said Margarita Karovska of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., and lead author article in the latest Astrophysical Journal Letters describing this work. An ultraviolet image made by the Hubble Space Telescope was a key to identifying the location of the X-ray outburst with the giant star. X-ray studies of this system, called Mira AB, may also provide better understanding of interactions between other binary systems consisting of a "normal" star and a collapsed star such as a white dwarf, black hole or a neutron star, where the stellar objects and gas flow cannot be distinguished in an image. HST Ultraviolet Image of Mira HST Ultraviolet Image of Mira The separation of the X-rays from the giant star and the white dwarf was made possible by the superb angular resolution of Chandra, and the relative proximity of the star system at about 420 light years from Earth. The stars in Mira AB are about 6.5 billion miles apart, or almost twice the distance of Pluto from the Sun. Mira A (Mira) was named "The Wonderful" star in the 17th century because its brightness was observed to wax and wane over a period of about 330 days. Because it is in the advanced, red giant phase of a star's life, it has swollen to about 600 times that of the Sun and it is pulsating. Mira A is now approaching the stage where its nuclear fuel supply will be exhausted, and it will collapse

  16. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    University of British Columbia in Vancouver. The processor, named, appropriately, the Pulsar Spigot, was built in a collaboration between the NRAO and the California Institute of Technology. The processor, which generates almost 100 GigaBytes of data per hour, allowed the astronomers to gather and analyze radio waves over a wide range of frequencies (1650-2250 MegaHertz), adding to the sensitivity of their system. Eight more observations between July and November of 2004 discovered seven additional pulsars in Terzan 5. In addition, the astronomers' data show evidence for several more pulsars that still need to be confirmed. Future studies of the pulsars in Terzan 5 will help scientists understand the nature of the cluster and the complex interactions of the stars at its dense core. Also, several of the pulsars offer a rich yield of new scientific information. The scientists suspect that one pulsar, which shows strange eclipses of its radio emission, has recently traded its original binary companion for another, and two others have white-dwarf companions that they believe may have been produced by the collision of a neutron star and a red-giant star. Subtle effects seen in these two systems can be explained by Einstein's general relativistic theory of gravity, and indicate that the neutron stars are more massive than some theories allow. The material in a neutron star is as dense as that in an atomic nucleus, so that fact has implications for nuclear physics as well as astrophysics. "Finding all these pulsars has been extremely exciting, but the excitement really has just begun," Ransom said. "Now we can start to use them as a rich and valuable cosmic laboratory," he added. In addition to Ransom, Hessels and Stairs, the research team included Paulo Freire of Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, Fernando Camilo of Columbia University, Victoria Kaspi of McGill University, and David Kaplan of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a

  17. The role of low-mass star clusters in massive star formation. The Orion Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, M. V.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Jimenez-Serra, I.; Rodriguez-Franco, A.

    2013-06-01

    To distinguish between the different theories proposed to explain massive star formation, it is crucial to establish the distribution, the extinction, and the density of low-mass stars in massive star-forming regions. We analyze deep X-ray observations of the Orion massive star-forming region using the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) catalog. We studied the stellar distribution as a function of extinction, with cells of 0.03 pc x 0.03 pc, the typical size of protostellar cores. We derived stellar density maps and calculated cluster stellar densities. We found that low-mass stars cluster toward the three massive star-forming regions: the Trapezium Cluster (TC), the Orion Hot Core (OHC), and OMC1-S. We derived low-mass stellar densities of 10^5 stars pc^-3 in the TC and OMC1-S, and of 10^6 stars pc^-3 in the OHC. The close association between the low-mass star clusters with massive star cradles supports the role of these clusters in the formation of massive stars. The X-ray observations show for the first time in the TC that low-mass stars with intermediate extinction are clustered toward the position of the most massive star, which is surrounded by a ring of non-extincted low-mass stars. This "envelope-core" structure is also supported by infrared and optical observations. Our analysis suggests that at least two basic ingredients are needed in massive star formation: the presence of dense gas and a cluster of low-mass stars. The scenario that better explains our findings assumes high fragmentation in the parental core, accretion at subcore scales that forms a low-mass stellar cluster, and subsequent competitive accretion. Finally, although coalescence does not seem a common mechanism for building up massive stars, we show that a single stellar merger may have occurred in the evolution of the OHC cluster, favored by the presence of disks, binaries, and gas accretion.

  18. Charged boson stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Ph.; van der Bij, J. J.

    1989-08-01

    We study the static spherically symmetric gravitational equilibria of scalars coupled to a U(1) gauge field and with a possible 1/2λ(φ*φ)2 self-interaction. We solve numerically the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon equations for non-singular and asymptotically flat solutions. Static solutions only exist for e2/4πstar increases with the gauge coupling constant as (ecrit-e)-1/2 for a charge close to the critical charge. We study the behaviour of the solutions as a function of the node number of the scalar field and as a function of the self-coupling λ.

  19. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  20. Merging strangeon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Yun-Wei; Zhou, En-Ping; Li, Yun-Yang; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2018-02-01

    The state of supranuclear matter in compact stars remains puzzling, and it is argued that pulsars could be strangeon stars. What would happen if binary strangeon stars merge? This kind of merger could result in the formation of a hyper-massive strangeon star, accompanied by bursts of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation (and even a strangeon kilonova explained in the paper). The tidal polarizability of binary strangeon stars is different from that of binary neutron stars, because a strangeon star is self-bound on the surface by the fundamental strong force while a neutron star by the gravity, and their equations of state are different. Our calculation shows that the tidal polarizability of merging binary strangeon stars is favored by GW170817. Three kinds of kilonovae (i.e., of neutron, quark and strangeon) are discussed, and the light curve of the kilonova AT 2017 gfo following GW170817 could be explained by considering the decaying strangeon nuggets and remnant star spin-down. Additionally, the energy ejected to the fireball around the nascent remnant strangeon star, being manifested as a gamma-ray burst, is calculated. It is found that, after a prompt burst, an X-ray plateau could follow in a timescale of 102 ‑ 103 s. Certainly, the results could be tested also by further observational synergies between gravitational wave detectors (e.g., Advanced LIGO) and X-ray telescopes (e.g., the Chinese HXMT satellite and eXTP mission), and especially if the detected gravitational wave form is checked by peculiar equations of state provided by the numerical relativistical simulation.

  1. Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-04-01

    Berkeley -- In a galaxy far, far away, a massive star suffered a nasty double whammy. On Oct. 20, 2004, Japanese amateur astronomer Koichi Itagaki saw the star let loose an outburst so bright that it was initially mistaken for a supernova. The star survived, but for only two years. On Oct. 11, 2006, professional and amateur astronomers witnessed the star actually blowing itself to smithereens as Supernova 2006jc. Swift UVOT Image Swift UVOT Image (Credit: NASA / Swift / S.Immler) "We have never observed a stellar outburst and then later seen the star explode," says University of California, Berkeley, astronomer Ryan Foley. His group studied the event with ground-based telescopes, including the 10-meter (32.8-foot) W. M. Keck telescopes in Hawaii. Narrow helium spectral lines showed that the supernova's blast wave ran into a slow-moving shell of material, presumably the progenitor's outer layers ejected just two years earlier. If the spectral lines had been caused by the supernova's fast-moving blast wave, the lines would have been much broader. artistic rendering This artistic rendering depicts two years in the life of a massive blue supergiant star, which burped and spewed a shell of gas, then, two years later, exploded. When the supernova slammed into the shell of gas, X-rays were produced. (Credit: NASA/Sonoma State Univ./A.Simonnet) Another group, led by Stefan Immler of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., monitored SN 2006jc with NASA's Swift satellite and Chandra X-ray Observatory. By observing how the supernova brightened in X-rays, a result of the blast wave slamming into the outburst ejecta, they could measure the amount of gas blown off in the 2004 outburst: about 0.01 solar mass, the equivalent of about 10 Jupiters. "The beautiful aspect of our SN 2006jc observations is that although they were obtained in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, in the optical and in X-rays, they lead to the same conclusions," says Immler. "This

  2. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  3. A broadband X-ray study of the Geminga pulsar with NuSTAR And XMM-Newton

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Kaya; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Halpern, Jules P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first hard X-ray detection of the Geminga pulsar above 10 keV using a 150 ks observation with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observatory. The double-peaked pulse profile of non-thermal emission seen in the soft X-ray band persists at higher energies. Broadband phase-integrated spectra over the 0.2-20 keV band with NuSTAR and archival XMM-Newton data do not fit to a conventional two-component model of a blackbody plus power law, but instead exhibit spectral hardening above ∼5 keV. We find that two spectral models fit the data well: (1) a blackbody (kT {sub 1} ∼ 42 eV)more » with a broken power law (Γ{sub 1} ∼ 2.0, Γ{sub 2} ∼ 1.4 and E {sub break} ∼ 3.4 keV) and (2) two blackbody components (kT {sub 1} ∼ 44 eV and kT {sub 2} ∼ 195 eV) with a power-law component (Γ ∼ 1.7). In both cases, the extrapolation of the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the thermal component is consistent with the UV data, while the non-thermal component overpredicts the near-infrared data, requiring a spectral flattening at E ∼ 0.05-0.5 keV. While strong phase variation of the power-law index is present below ∼5 keV, our phase-resolved spectroscopy with NuSTAR indicates that another hard non-thermal component with Γ ∼ 1.3 emerges above ∼5 keV. The spectral hardening in non-thermal X-ray emission as well as spectral flattening between the optical and X-ray bands argue against the conjecture that a single power law may account for multi-wavelength non-thermal spectra of middle-aged pulsars.« less

  4. A broadband X-ray study of the Geminga pulsar with NuSTAR And XMM-Newton

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Kaya; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Halpern, Jules P.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hailey, Charles J.; Dufour, Francois; Kaspi, Victoria M.; An, Hongjun; Bachetti, Matteo; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first hard X-ray detection of the Geminga pulsar above 10 keV using a 150 ks observation with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observatory. The double-peaked pulse profile of non-thermal emission seen in the soft X-ray band persists at higher energies. Broadband phase-integrated spectra over the 0.2-20 keV band with NuSTAR and archival XMM-Newton data do not fit to a conventional two-component model of a blackbody plus power law, but instead exhibit spectral hardening above ∼5 keV. We find that two spectral models fit the data well: (1) a blackbody (kT {sub 1} ∼ 42 eV) with a broken power law (Γ{sub 1} ∼ 2.0, Γ{sub 2} ∼ 1.4 and E {sub break} ∼ 3.4 keV) and (2) two blackbody components (kT {sub 1} ∼ 44 eV and kT {sub 2} ∼ 195 eV) with a power-law component (Γ ∼ 1.7). In both cases, the extrapolation of the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the thermal component is consistent with the UV data, while the non-thermal component overpredicts the near-infrared data, requiring a spectral flattening at E ∼ 0.05-0.5 keV. While strong phase variation of the power-law index is present below ∼5 keV, our phase-resolved spectroscopy with NuSTAR indicates that another hard non-thermal component with Γ ∼ 1.3 emerges above ∼5 keV. The spectral hardening in non-thermal X-ray emission as well as spectral flattening between the optical and X-ray bands argue against the conjecture that a single power law may account for multi-wavelength non-thermal spectra of middle-aged pulsars.

  5. Molecular gas heating mechanisms, and star formation feedback in merger/starbursts: NGC 6240 and Arp 193 as case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Xilouris, E. M.

    2014-06-20

    We used the SPIRE/FTS instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory to obtain the Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) of CO from J = 4-3 to J = 13-12 of Arp 193 and NGC 6240, two classical merger/starbursts selected from our molecular line survey of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (L {sub IR} ≥ 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}). The high-J CO SLEDs are then combined with ground-based low-J CO, {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, CS line data and used to probe the thermal and dynamical states of their large molecular gas reservoirs. We find the two CO SLEDs strongly diverging frommore » J = 4-3 onward, with NGC 6240 having a much higher CO line excitation than Arp 193, despite their similar low-J CO SLEDs and L {sub FIR}/L {sub CO,} {sub 1} {sub –0}, L {sub HCN}/L {sub CO} (J = 1-0) ratios (proxies of star formation efficiency and dense gas mass fraction). In Arp 193, one of the three most extreme starbursts in the local universe, the molecular SLEDs indicate a small amount (∼5%-15%) of dense gas (n ≥ 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}) unlike NGC 6240 where most of the molecular gas (∼60%-70%) is dense (n ∼ (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5}) cm{sup –3}). Strong star-formation feedback can drive this disparity in their dense gas mass fractions, and also induce extreme thermal and dynamical states for the molecular gas. In NGC 6240, and to a lesser degree in Arp 193, we find large molecular gas masses whose thermal states cannot be maintained by FUV photons from Photon-Dominated Regions. We argue that this may happen often in metal-rich merger/starbursts, strongly altering the initial conditions of star formation. ALMA can now directly probe these conditions across cosmic epoch, and even probe their deeply dust-enshrouded outcome, the stellar initial mass function averaged over galactic evolution.« less

  6. Nucleosynthesis in Strange Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulucci, Laura; Horvath, Jorge E.; Benvenuto, Omar

    The possible existence of deconfined matter in the cores of neutron stars has been studied for over three decades without a firm indication either for or against this proposition. Analysis mostly rely on the comparison of mass-radius curves obtained for different compositions with observational data on the mass of the most massive objects of this kind accurately determined. Nevertheless, there are other possibilities for indirectly studying the internal composition of this class of compact objects, e.g, analyzing cooling behavior, X-ray bursts, supernova’s neutrinos. We present calculations on the expected nucleosynthesis spectra for the strange star-strange star merger scenario as means to test the strange quark matter hypothesis and its realization inside such objects. This would result very different from the typical r-process nucleosynthesis expected in neutron star mergers since the high temperature deconfinement of strange matter would produce large amounts of neutrons and protons and the mass buildup would proceed in a Big-Bang nucleosynthesis like scenario. The neutron to proton ratio would allow to reach the iron peak only, a very different prediction from the standard scenario. The resultant light curve indicate it may be compatible with that of a kilonova depending on the specific details of the ejecta.

  7. Star Trek in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes specific educational programs for using the Star Trek TV program from kindergarten through college. For each grade level lesson plans, ideas for incorporating Star Trek into future classes, and reports of specific programs utilizing Star Trek are provided. (SL)

  8. Observations of FK Comae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations on the FK Comae stars are described. FK Com, UZ Lib and HD 199178 are compared and related as a group of stars. The crucial observational tests of the proposed evolutionary status of these stars are noted.

  9. Stars Brewing in Cygnus X

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-10

    A bubbling cauldron of star birth is highlighted in this image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. Massive stars have blown bubbles, or cavities, in the dust and gas -- a violent process that triggers both the death and birth of stars.

  10. Cooking up the First Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-10

    Scientists are simulating how the very first stars in our universe were born. The stars we see today formed out of collapsing clouds of gas and dust. In the very early universe, however, the stars had fewer ingredients available.

  11. Nearby regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Cunningham, Nathaniel; Moeckel, Nickolas; Smith, Nathan

    Observations of the nearest regions of massive star formation such as Orion are reviewed. Early-type stars in the local OB associations, as well as their superbubbles and supershells provide a fossil record of massive star birth in the Solar vicinity over about the last 40 Myr. This record shows that most massive stars are born from dense, high-pressure, hot cores which spawn transient clusters that dissipate into the field soon after formation. A large fraction (15 to 30%) of massive stars are high-velocity runaways moving at more than 20 km s^{-1}. High-mass stars have a larger companion fraction than their lower-mass siblings. The Orion star forming complex contains the nearest site of on-going massive star formation. Studies of the Orion Nebula and the dense molecular cloud core located immediately behind the HII region provide our sharpest view of massive star birth. This region has formed a hierarchy of clusters within clusters. The Trapezium, OMC-1S, and OMC-1 regions represent three closely spaced sub-clusters within the more extended Orion Nebula Cluster. The oldest of these sub-clusters, which consists of the Trapezium stars, has completely emerged from its natal core. The OMC-1S and OMC-1 regions, are still highly embedded and forming clusters of additional moderate and high mass stars. Over a dozen YSOs embedded in OMC-1S are driving jets and outflows, many of which are injecting energy and momentum into the Orion Nebula. Recent proper motion measurements indicate that the Becklin-Neugebauer object is a high-velocity star moving away from the OMC1 core with a velocity of 30 km s^{-1}, making it the youngest high-velocity star known. Source I may be moving in the opposite direction with a velocity of about 12 km s^{-1}. The projected separation between source I and BN was less than few hundred AU about 500 years ago. The spectacular bipolar molecular outflow and system of shock-excited H_2 fingers emerging from OMC-1 has a dynamical age of about 1100

  12. Hydrogen-bond landscapes, geometry and energetics of squaric acid and its mono- and dianions: a Cambridge Structural Database, IsoStar and computational study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Wood, Peter A; Bardwell, David A

    2013-10-01

    As part of a programme of work to extend central-group coverage in the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre's (CCDC) IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions, we have studied the hydrogen-bonding abilities of squaric acid (H2SQ) and its mono- and dianions (HSQ(-) and SQ(2-)) using the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) along with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations for a range of hydrogen-bonded dimers. The -OH and -C=O groups of H2SQ, HSQ(-) and SQ(2-) are potent donors and acceptors, as indicated by their hydrogen-bond geometries in available crystal structures in the CSD, and by the attractive energies calculated for their dimers with acetone and methanol, which were used as model acceptors and donors. The two anions have sufficient examples in the CSD for their addition as new central groups in IsoStar. It is also shown that charge- and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds involving H2SQ and HSQ(-) are similar in strength to those made by carboxylate COO(-) acceptors, while hydrogen bonds made by the dianion SQ(2-) are somewhat stronger. The study reinforces the value of squaric acid and its anions as cocrystal formers and their actual and potential importance as isosteric replacements for carboxylic acid and carboxylate functions.

  13. Science Through ARts (STAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph; Petersen, Ruth; Williams, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is an educational initiative designed to teach students through a multidisciplinary approach to learning. This presentation describes the STAR pilot project, which will use Mars exploration as the topic to be integrated. Schools from the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and possibly eastern Europe are expected to participate in the pilot project.

  14. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  15. Science through ARts (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Marycay; Kolecki, Joseph C.; Miller, Allan; Petersen, Ruth; Terrell, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is a free, international, cross-curricular program thematically aligned with "The Vision for Space Exploration," a framework of goals and objectives published by NASA in February 2004. Through the STAR program, students in grades 5 through 12 are encouraged to apply their knowledge in creative ways as they approach a…

  16. Party with the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaine, Lloyd

    1997-01-01

    Describes a Star Party which involves comparing the different colors of the stars, demonstrating how astronomers measure the sky with degrees, determining the cardinal direction, discussing numerous stories that ancient civilizations gave to constellations, exercising science process skills, and using science instruments. (JRH)

  17. Star System Bonanza Illustration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-27

    This illustration shows the unusual orbit of planet Kepler-413b around a close pair of orange and red dwarf stars. The planet 66-day orbit is tilted 2.5 degrees with respect to the plane of the binary stars orbit.

  18. Dusty Dead Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-29

    A composite image from NASA Chandra and Spitzer space telescopes shows the dusty remains of a collapsed star, a supernova remnant called G54.1+0.3. The white source at the center is a dead star called a pulsar.

  19. ENERGY STAR Certified Telephones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Telephony (cordless telephones and VoIP telephones) that are effective as of October 1, 2014. A detailed listing of key efficiency criteria are available at http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=phones.pr_crit_phones

  20. Observing Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  1. Rotating hybrid compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayvazyan, N. S.; Colucci, G.; Rischke, D. H.; Sedrakian, A.

    2013-11-01

    Starting from equations of state of nucleonic and color-superconducting quark matter and assuming a first-order phase transition between these, we construct an equation of state of stellar matter, which contains three phases: a nucleonic phase, as well as two-flavor and three-flavor color-superconducting phases of quarks. Static sequences of the corresponding hybrid stars include massive members with masses of ~2 M⊙ and radii in the range of 13 ≤ R ≤ 16 km. We investigate the integral parameters of rapidly rotating stars and obtain evolutionary sequences that correspond to constant rest-mass stars spinning down by electromagnetic and gravitational radiation. Physically new transitional sequences are revealed that are distinguished by a phase transition from nucleonic to color-superconducting matter for some configurations that are located between the static and Keplerian limits. The snapshots of internal structure of the star, displaying the growth or shrinkage of superconducting volume as the star's spin changes, are displayed for constant rest mass stars. We further obtain evolutionary sequences of rotating supramassive compact stars and construct pre-collapse models that can be used as initial data to simulate a collapse of color-superconducting hybrid stars to a black hole.

  2. Low-energy antikaon-nuclei interactions studies by AMADEUS: from QCD with strangeness to neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscicchia, K.; Curceanu, C.; Cargnelli, M.; Del Grande, R.; Fabbietti, L.; Marton, J.; Scordo, A.; Sirghi, D.; Tucakovic, I.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Wycech, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Mandaglio, G.; Martini, M.; Moskal, P.

    2018-01-01

    The AMADEUS collaboration aims to provide unique quality results from K- hadronic interactions in light nuclear targets, in order to solve fundamental open questions in the non-perturbative strangeness QCD sector, like the controversial nature of the Λ(1405) state, the yield of hyperon formation below threshold, the yield and shape of multi-nucleon K- absorption, processes which are intimately connected to the possible existence of exotic antikaon multi-nucleon clusters and to the role of strangeness in neutron stars. AMADEUS takes advantage of the DAΦNE collider, which provides a unique source of monochromatic low-momentum kaons and exploits the KLOE detector as an active target, in order to obtain excellent acceptance and resolution data for K- nuclear capture on H, 4He, 9Be and 12C, both at-rest and in-flight.

  3. The first X-ray study of NGC 2243, one of the most metal-poor Galactic open star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen

    2016-09-01

    We propose to observe one of the most metal-poor Galactic open clusters, NGC 2243, to make a census of its X-ray sources down to Lx=1e30 erg/s. The goal is to investigate the observed dichotomy in X-ray emissivity (0.3-7 keV) of old low-density star clusters: per unit mass, old open clusters are about 10x more luminous than globular clusters of similar mass and low central density. A fundamental difference between these cluster types is their metallicity, with open clusters typically being 10x more metal-rich than globular clusters. With [Fe/H]=-0.5 and an age of 4 Gyr, NGC 2243 is key to understanding the so far unstudied effect of metallicity on the X-ray emissivity of low-density clusters. Chandra's sharp PSF provides the sensitivity that is crucial for such a survey of faint sources.

  4. Seeing Stars Like Never Before: A Multi-Year Interferometric Imaging Study of Red Supergiants in the H-Band.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ryan P.; Baron, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    As some of the largest stars, red supergiants (RSG) are ideal candidates for interferometric imaging. 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) models suggest that RSG have large convection cells with lifetimes on the order of 1000s of days. Many imaging projects have hinted at the existence of these features but, until recently, we have lacked the angular resolution to directly compare models to observations. In this presentation, we discuss early results from a multi-year survey of red supergiants using the Michigan InfraRed Combinber (MIRC) on the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA Array), which has a maximum baseline of 330 m. We will present H-band images of RSG spanning several years developed using a new machine learning based image reconstruction tool for interferometric data. We will also present fundamental parameters for the targets, and discuss the implications of these results on 1D model atmospheres and 3D RHD models of RSG.

  5. StereoTactic radiotherapy for wet Age-Related macular degeneration (STAR): study protocol for a randomised controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Neffendorf, James E; Desai, Riti; Wang, Yanzhong; Kelly, Joanna; Murphy, Caroline; Reeves, Barnaby C; Chakravarthy, Usha; Wordsworth, Sarah; Lewis, Cornelius; Peacock, Janet; Uddin, Shahir; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Jackson, Timothy L

    2016-11-24

    The standard of care for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) involves ongoing intravitreal injections of anti-angiogenic drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The most commonly used anti-VEGF drugs are ranibizumab, bevacizumab and aflibercept. The main objective of the STAR trial is to determine if stereotactic radiotherapy can reduce the number of anti-VEGF injections that patients with nAMD require. STAR is a multicentre, double-masked, randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial. It evaluates a new device (manufactured by Oraya, Newark, CA, USA) designed to deliver stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) to nAMD lesions. The trial enrols participants with chronic, active nAMD. Participants receive a single SRT treatment (16 Gy or sham) with a concomitant baseline intravitreal injection of 0.5 mg ranibizumab. Thereafter, they attend every month for 24 months, and ranibizumab is administered at the visit if retreatment criteria are met. The primary outcome is the number of pro re nata ranibizumab injections during the first 24 months. Secondary outcomes include visual acuity, lesion morphology, quality of life and safety. Additional visits occur at 36 and 48 months to inspect for radiation retinopathy. The target sample size of 411 participants (randomised 2:1 in favour of radiation) is designed to detect a reduction of 2.5 injections against ranibizumab monotherapy, at 90% power, and a significance level (alpha) of 0.025 (one-sided two-sample t test). This gives 97% power to detect non-inferiority of visual acuity at a five-letter margin. The primary analyses will be by intention to treat. The safety and efficacy outcomes will help determine the role of SRT in the management of chronic, active nAMD. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number: ISRCTN12884465. Registered on 28 November 2014. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02243878 . Registered on 17 September 2014.

  6. Direct Distance Estimation applied to Eclipsing Binaries in Star Clusters:Case Study of DS Andromedae in NGC 752

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, Eugene F.; Schiller, Stephen Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Eclipsing binaries (EB) with well-calibrated photometry and precisely measured double-lined radial velocities are candidate standard candles when analyzed with a version of the Wilson-Devinney (WD) light curve modeling program that includes the direct distance estimation (DDE) algorithm. In the DDE procedure, distance is determined as a system parameter, thus avoiding the assumption of stellar sphericity and yielding a well-determined standard error for distance. The method therefore provides a powerful way to calibrate the distances of other objects in any aggregate that contains suitable EB's. DDE has been successfully applied to nearby systems and to a small number of EB's in open clusters. Previously we reported on one of the systems in our Binaries-in-Clusters program, HD27130 = V818 Tau, that had been analyzed with earlier versions of the WD program (see 1987 AJ 93, 1471; 1988 AJ 95, 1466; and 1995 AJ 109, 359 for examples). Results from those early solutions were entered as starting parameters in the current work with the WD 2013 version.Here we report several series of ongoing modeling experiments on a 1.01-d period, early type EB in the intermediate age cluster NGC 752. In one series, ranges of interstellar extinction and hotter star temperature were assumed, and in another series both component temperatures were adjusted. Consistent parameter sets, including distance, confirm DDE's advantages, essentially limited only by knowledge of interstellar extinction, which is small for DS And. Uncertainties in the bandpass calibration constants (flux in standard units from a zero magnitude star) are much less important because derived distance scales (inversely) only with the calibration's square root. This work was enabled by the unstinting help of Bob Wilson. We acknowledge earlier support for the Binaries-in-Clusters program from NSERC of Canada, and the Research Grants Committee and Department of Physics & Astronomy of the University of Calgary.

  7. Spitzer Mapping of Molecular Hydrogen Pure Rotational Lines in NGC 1333: A Detailed Study of Feedback in Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Sébastien; Bergin, Edwin A.; Neufeld, David A.; Green, Joel D.; Watson, Dan M.; Harwit, Martin O.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Melnick, Gary J.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Tolls, Volker; Werner, Michael W.; Willacy, Karen; Yuan, Yuan

    2009-06-01

    We present mid-infrared spectral maps of the NGC 1333 star-forming region, obtained with the infrared spectrometer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. Eight pure H2 rotational lines, from S(0) to S(7), are detected and mapped. The H2 emission appears to be associated with the warm gas shocked by the multiple outflows present in the region. A comparison between the observed intensities and the predictions of detailed shock models indicates that the emission arises in both slow (12-24 km s-1) and fast (36-53 km s-1) C-type shocks with an initial ortho-to-para ratio (opr) lsim1. The present H2 opr exhibits a large degree of spatial variations. In the postshocked gas, it is usually about 2, i.e., close to the equilibrium value (~3). However, around at least two outflows, we observe a region with a much lower (~0.5) opr. This region probably corresponds to gas which has been heated up recently by the passage of a shock front, but whose ortho-to-para has not reached equilibrium yet. This, together with the low initial opr needed to reproduce the observed emission, provide strong evidence that H2 is mostly in para form in cold molecular clouds. The H2 lines are found to contribute to 25%-50% of the total outflow luminosity, and thus can be used to ascertain the importance of star formation feedback on the natal cloud. From these lines, we determine the outflow mass loss rate and, indirectly, the stellar infall rate, the outflow momentum and the kinetic energy injected into the cloud over the embedded phase. The latter is found to exceed the binding energy of individual cores, suggesting that outflows could be the main mechanism for core disruption.

  8. The role of low-mass star clusters in massive star formation. The Orion case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Rodríguez-Franco, A.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Different theories have been proposed to explain the formation of massive stars: two are based on accretion processes (monolithic core accretion and competitive accretion), and another on coalescence of low- and intermediate-mass stars. To distinguish between these theories, it is crucial to establish the distribution, the extinction, and the density of young low-mass stars in massive star-forming regions. X-ray observations can penetrate the very obscured cradles of massive stars, directly sampling the distribution of the population of pre-main sequence (PMS) low-mass stars in these regions. Aims: Our aim is to analyze deep X-ray observations of the Orion massive star-forming region using the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) catalog, to reveal the distribution of the population and clustering of PMS low-mass stars, and to study their possible role in massive star formation. Methods: We studied the distribution of PMS low-mass stars with X-ray emission in Orion as a function of extinction with two different methods: a spatial gridding and a close-neigbors method with cells of ~0.03 × 0.03 pc2, the typical size of protostellar cores. We derived density maps of the stellar population and calculated cluster stellar densities. Results: Consistent with previous studies, we found that PMS low-mass stars cluster toward the three massive star-forming regions: the Trapezium cluster (TC), the Orion hot core (OHC), and the OMC1-S region. We derived PMS low-mass stellar densities of 105 stars pc-3 in the TC and OMC1-S, and of 106 stars pc-3 in the OHC. The close association between the low-mass star clusters with massive star cradles supports the role of these clusters in the formation of massive stars. The X-ray observations show for the first time in the TC that low-mass stars with intermediate extinction are clustered toward the position of the most massive star θ1 Ori C, which is surrounded by a ring of non-extincted PMS low-mass stars. This "envelope

  9. Young Star HD 141569

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-30

    This image shows the dusty disk of planetary material surrounding the young star HD 141569, located 380 light-years away from Earth. It was taken using the vortex coronagraph on the W.M. Keck Observatory. The vortex suppressed light from the star in the center, revealing light from the innermost ring of planetary material around the star (blue). The disk around the star, made of olivine particles, extends from 23 to 70 astronomical units from the star. By comparison, Uranus is over 19 astronomical units from our sun, and Neptune about 30 astronomical units. One astronomical unit is the distance between Earth and our sun. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21090

  10. Understanding the star-forming environment in stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiya

    The main goal of this thesis is to investigate the physical conditions of the star-forming environment in stellar clusters, especially for the formation of low-mass cluster members. Embedded, young, and intermediate-mass stellar clusters around Herbig Ae/Be stars are sampled. Mid- and near-infrared observations identifying young stars and millimeter interferometric observations probing dense molecular gas and dust continuum are presented. These observations are used to reveal the large-scale young stellar population around the vicinity where the sampled clusters form, probe the physical conditions of dense molecular clumps which are capable of forming individual low-mass cluster members, and examine the influence of the most massive star in the cluster on its siblings and natal cluster-forming cloud. This study shows that stars within the cluster tend to seem younger than those outside the cluster, suggesting a higher and continuous star-forming rate within the cluster than outside, or massive