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Sample records for star study nct00237913

  1. Studies of Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission with RHESSI and NCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher

    results of several phenomenological and quasi-thermal models. The fit results for the quasi-thermal models are poorer than those reported for fits in more narrow energy bands, and the fit parameters show significant dependence on the fit band. More sophisticated models and additional data are needed to determine the relevance of the photospheric emission. Polarimetric studies of GRBs are in their infancy, but they have the potential to distinguish GRB emission models and probe the structure of the relativistic jet. Observations to date have exploited the polarimetric signatures produced by Compton scattering in gamma-ray observatories. Since these instruments have poor spatial resolution and are not calibrated for polarimetric observations, only a few bright GRBs have been observed, each with significant systematic effects. In Chapters 5--8, I present development work for a balloon-borne Compton telescope, the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT), which is capable of measuring GRB polarization. NCT uses planar cross-strip germanium detectors for Compton imaging (200 keV--10 MeV) and polarimetry (200 keV--2 MeV). Chapter 5 describes NCT and its flight history. In Chapter 6, I discuss calibrations of the effective area of NCT during the 2009 New Mexico and 2010 Australia balloon campaigns. By placing radioactive sources of known activity throughout the NCT field of view, it is possible to determine the efficiency of the telescope. I compare these values to those derived from detailed Monte Carlo simulations. The values derived from the real data show a roughly constant deficit relative to those derived from the Monte Carlo simulations which may be related to known deficiencies in the lower-level event calibrations. Chapter 7 assesses NCT's polarimetric performance. I generated partially polarized beams throughout NCT's field of view by scattering photons off of a scintillator slab triggered in coincidence with the NCT detectors. The measured polarimetric modulation showed good

  2. How geoarchaeology and landscape archaeology contribute to niche construction theory (NCT).

    PubMed

    Kluiving, Sjoerd J

    In this paper a review is given of examples of geoarchaeological and landscape archaeological research from four locations throughout Europe. Case-studies from the North Sea coastal zone in the Netherlands and the Eastern Mediterranean are presented to illustrate the potential contribution of geoarchaeology and landscape archaeology to niche construction theory (NCT) studies. Typical landscapes as coast lines, lake shores and rivers as example of small and large scale use of the natural landscape and/or topography are discussed with implications for NCT, mainly over the Holocene period. Through environmental reconstruction, we provide relative dates for starting points when humans (a) were altering their own selective environment as an inceptive change, or (b) responded to a (deteriorated) selective environment in a counteractive change. Geoarchaeology and landscape archaeology valuable contribution to NCT studies is the focus of the disciplines on landscape gradients. NCT phase transitions from inceptive to counteractive changes are proposed as useful alternative in the debate about the onset of the Anthropocene.

  3. NCT and Culture-Conscious Developmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing-Wilson, Deborah; Pelaprat, Etienne; Rosero, Ivan; Vadeboncoeur, Jennifer; Packer, Martin; Cole, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The authors share the belief that there is great potential for developmental science in bringing the ideas of Niche Construction Theory (NCT), as developed in evolutionary biology, into conversation with Vygotskian-inspired theories such as cultural-historical and activity theories, distributed cognition, and embodied cognition, although from…

  4. Observational studies of roAp stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, M.

    2014-11-01

    Rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars are high-overtone, low-degree p-mode pulsators that are also chemically peculiar magnetic A stars. Until recently the classical asteroseismic analysis i.e. frequency analysis, of these stars was based on ground and space photometric observations. Significant progress was achieved through access to uninterrupted, ultra-high-precision data from MOST, COROT and Kepler satellites. Over the last ten years the study of roAp stars has been altered drastically from an observational point of view through studies of time-resolved, high-resolution spectra. Their unusual pulsational characteristics, caused by an interplay between the short vertical lengths of the pulsation waves and strong stratification of chemical elements, allow us to examine the upper roAp atmosphere in more detail than is possible for any star except the Sun. In this paper I review the results of recent studies of the pulsations of roAp stars.

  5. Theoretical Study of White Dwarf Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, Ajit; Koetter, Ted; Rivera, Ruben; Diaz, Juan

    2015-04-01

    We continue our interest in the computational simulation of the astrophysical phenomena with a study of gravitationally-bound binary stars, composed of at least one white dwarf star. Of particular interest to astrophysicists are the conditions inside a white dwarf star in the time frame leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova, for an understanding of the massive stellar explosions. In addition, the studies of the evolution of white dwarfs could serve as promising probes of theories of gravitation. We developed FORTRAN computer programs to implement our models for white dwarfs and other stars. These codes allow for different sizes and masses of stars. Simulations were done in the mass interval from 0.1 to 2.0 solar masses. Our goal was to obtain both atmospheric and orbital parameters. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant observational data. The data are further analyzed to identify trends in terms of sizes and masses of stars. We hope to extend our computational studies to blue giant stars in the future. Research Supported by National Science Foundation.

  6. Study of pulsations of chemically peculiar a stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly oscillating chemically peculiar A stars (roAp) pulsate in high-overtone, low degree p-modes and form a sub-group of chemically peculiar magnetic A stars (Ap). Until recently, the classical asteroseismic research, i.e., frequency analysis, of these stars was based on photometric observations both ground-based and space-based. Significant progress has been achieved by obtaining uninterrupted, ultra-high precision data from the MOST, COROT, and Kepler satellites. Over the last ten years, a real breakthrough was achieved in the study of roAp stars due to the time-resolved, high spectral resolution spectroscopic observations. Unusual pulsational characteristics of these stars, caused by the interaction between propagating pulsationwaves and strong stratification of chemical elements, provide an opportunity to study the upper roAp star atmosphere in more detail than is possible for any star but the Sun, using spectroscopic data. In this paper the results of recent pulsation studies of these stars are reviewed.

  7. High-Precision Studies of Compact Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Steven

    2014-10-01

    This book, which is a reworked and updated version of Steven Bloemen's original PhD thesis, reports on several high-precision studies of compact variable stars. Its strength lies in the large variety of observational, theoretical and instrumentation techniques that are presented and used and paves the way towards new and detailed asteroseismic applications of single and binary subdwarf stars. Close binary stars are studied using high cadence spectroscopic datasets collected with state of the art electron multiplying CCDs and analysed using Doppler tomography visualization techniques. The work touches upon instrumentation, presenting the calibration of a new fast, multi-colour camera installed at the Mercator Telescope on La Palma. The thesis also includes theoretical work on the computation of the temperature range in which stellar oscillations can be driven in subdwarf B-stars. Finally, the highlight of the thesis is the measurement of velocities of stars using only photometric data from NASA's Kepler satellite. Doppler beaming causes stars to appear slightly brighter when they move towards us in their orbits, and this subtle effect can be seen in Kepler's brightness measurements. The thesis presents the first validation of such velocity measurements using independent spectroscopic measurements. Since the detection and validation of this Doppler beaming effect, it has been used in tens of studies to detect and characterize binary star systems, which are key calibrators in stellar astronomy.

  8. Development and validation of a prognostic model using blood biomarker information for prediction of survival of non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation or radiotherapy alone (NCT00181519, NCT00573040, and NCT00572325).

    PubMed

    Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Aerts, Hugo; Yu, Shipeng; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Menheere, Paul; Hilvo, Mika; van der Weide, Hiska; Rao, Bharat; Lambin, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Currently, prediction of survival for non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiotherapy is mainly based on clinical factors. The hypothesis of this prospective study was that blood biomarkers related to hypoxia, inflammation, and tumor load would have an added prognostic value for predicting survival. Clinical data and blood samples were collected prospectively (NCT00181519, NCT00573040, and NCT00572325) from 106 inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer patients (Stages I-IIIB), treated with curative intent with radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. Blood biomarkers, including lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX, interleukin (IL) 6, IL-8, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and cytokeratin fragment 21-1, were measured. A multivariate model, built on a large patient population (N = 322) and externally validated, was used as a baseline model. An extended model was created by selecting additional biomarkers. The model's performance was expressed as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic and assessed by use of leave-one-out cross validation as well as a validation cohort (n = 52). The baseline model consisted of gender, World Health Organization performance status, forced expiratory volume, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume and yielded an AUC of 0.72. The extended model included two additional blood biomarkers (CEA and IL-6) and resulted in a leave-one-out AUC of 0.81. The performance of the extended model was significantly better than the clinical model (p = 0.004). The AUC on the validation cohort was 0.66 and 0.76, respectively. The performance of the prognostic model for survival improved markedly by adding two blood biomarkers: CEA and IL-6. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Center for Star Formation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D.; Bell, K. R.; Laughlin, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Center for Star Formation Studies, a consortium of scientists from the Space Science Division at Ames and the Astronomy Departments of the University of California at Berkeley and Santa Cruz, conducts a coordinated program of theoretical research on star and planet formation. Under the directorship of D. Hollenbach (Ames), the Center supports postdoctoral fellows, senior visitors, and students; meets regularly at Ames to exchange ideas and to present informal seminars on current research; hosts visits of outside scientists; and conducts a week-long workshop on selected aspects of star and planet formation each summer.

  10. Study of exoplanets host stars with VEGA/CHARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.; Mourard, D.; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Perraut, Karine; Tallon-Bosc, I.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the understanding of extrasolar systems, the study of host stars is a fundamental point. We need to understand the link between them and the presence of companions, i.e. what makes a star becoming a host star. In this perspective, we used the instrument called VEGA, situated at Mount Wilson (California) on the CHARA array to perform optical interferometric measurements. Interferometry at visible wavelengths allows reaching very high spatial frequencies well adapted for very small (less than 1 millisecond of arc) angular diameters. Therefore, we can access limb darkening measurements which is one of the very few directly measurable constraints on the structure of the atmosphere of a star. From this we can derive stars fundamental parameters. A precise measurement within spectral lines is also a very powerful tool to study the temperature and density structure of the atmosphere of distant stars. Besides, the detection of exoplanets is also related to this method. Combined with the radial velocity method and the transit method, one can study the atmosphere of exoplanets and learn more about their internal structure. We started a large program of observations made of 40 stars hosting exoplanets and observable by VEGA/CHARA. We will measure their limb darkened diameters and derive their parameters. We also aim at better understanding stellar noise sources like spots, and study surface brightness relationships.

  11. Polarization and studies of evolved star mass loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin; Srinivasan, Sundar; Riebel, David; Meixner, Margaret

    2012-05-01

    Polarization studies of astronomical dust have proven very useful in constraining its properties. Such studies are used to constrain the spatial arrangement, shape, composition, and optical properties of astronomical dust grains. Here we explore possible connections between astronomical polarization observations to our studies of mass loss from evolved stars. We are studying evolved star mass loss in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by using photometry from the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE; PI: M. Meixner) Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy program. We use the radiative transfer program 2Dust to create our Grid of Red supergiant and Asymptotic giant branch ModelS (GRAMS), in order to model this mass loss. To model emission of polarized light from evolved stars, however, we appeal to other radiative transfer codes. We probe how polarization observations might be used to constrain the dust shell and dust grain properties of the samples of evolved stars we are studying.

  12. Quantitative Study of Blue Stars in NGC 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, N.; Herrero, A.; Urbaneja, M. A.; García, M.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Bresolin, F.; Pietrzynski, G.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Gieren, W.

    2012-12-01

    Massive blue stars are the rarest in number compared with other stars; however, they are the main engines in the chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies in the Universe. They are also among the brightest stars, making it possible to be observed (and hence studied) beyond the edges of the Milky Way. In the case of the galaxy NGC 55 (1.9 Mpc), presented in this work, it has been not only possible to provide the first census of massive blue stars, but also perform a fully characterization of these stars, including the stellar parameters, the chemical abundances, and information about their evolutionary stages. Even so, that permitted to derive important properties of the host galaxy. This challenging study is based on an objective and fast automatic technique built upon a new state-of-the-art FASTWIND atmosphere model grid. Both the tool and the grid were specially developed for this project.

  13. LIADA's Double Star Section: Studies Of Visual Double Star By Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rica, F. M.; Benavides, R.; Masa, E.; Ling, J.

    2007-08-01

    LIADA's Double Star Section has as main goal to perform measures of relative astrometry of neglected and unconfirmed wide pairs, as well as to determine the astrophysical properties for their components and classify them, according to their nature, as phyisical, common origin, common proper motion or optical pairs. BVIJHK photometry, relative astrometry and kinematical data in addition to other astrophysical parameters, were obtained from literature to characterize the components and the stellar systems. VizieR, Simbad. Aladin and the "services abstract" tools were used from the website of Centre De Données Stellaires de Strasbourg (CDS). USNO catalogs (USNO-B1.0 and UCAC-2) in addition to ESA catalogs (Tycho-2 and HIPPARCOS) were often used. Spectral types, luminosity classes, absolute magnitudes, photometric distances were determined by using several tables, two colours and reduced proper motion diagrams. Astrophysical properties were corrected by reddening by using several maps. CCD cameras, micrometric eyepieces, photographic plates from Digitalized Sky Survey (DSS) and other surveys were used to perform our astrometric measures. According to their nature double stars are classified by using several professional criteria. Since 2001 LIADA has studied about 500 visual double stars, has discovered about 150 true binaries and several candidates to be white dwarfs, subdwarfs and nearby stars. Several orbits have been calculated. Our results were published in national and international journals such as Journal of Double Star Observations (JDSO), in Information Circulars edited by Commision 26 of IAU and our measures were included in WDS catalog. LIADA publish a circular twice a year with our results.

  14. A Photometric Study of Three Eclipsing Binary Stars (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, A.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) As part of a program to study eclipsing binary stars that exhibit the O'Connell Effect (OCE) we are observing a selection of binary stars in a long term study. The OCE is a difference in maximum light across the ligthcurve possibly cause by starspots. We observed for 7 nights at McDonald Observatory using the 30-inch telescope in July 2015, and used the same telescope remotely for a total of 20 additional nights in August, October, December, and January. We will present lightcurves for three stars from this study, characterize the OCE for these stars, and present our model results for the physical parameters of the star making up each of these systems.

  15. Studying RR Lyrae Stars in M4 with K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Drury, Jason; Moskalik, Pawel

    2017-01-01

    Observations by Kepler/K2 have revolutionized the study of RR Lyrae stars by allowing the detection of new phenomena, such as low amplitude additional modes and period doubling, which had not previously been seen from the ground. During its campaign 2, K2 observed the globular cluster M4, providing the first opportunity to study a sizeable group of RR Lyrae stars that belong to a single population; the other RR Lyrae stars that have been observed from space are field stars in the galactic halo and thus belong to an assortment of populations. We present the results of our study of the RR Lyrae variables in M4 from K2 photometry. We have identified additional, low amplitude pulsation modes in the two observed RRc stars. In three RRab stars we have found the Blazhko effect with periods of 16.6 days, 22.4 days, and 44.5 days.

  16. Studies of Evolved Star Mass Loss: GRAMS Modeling of Red Supergiant and Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, S.; Riebel, D.; Boyer, M.; Meixner, M.

    2012-01-01

    As proposed in our NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) proposal, my colleagues and I are studying mass loss from evolved stars. Such stars lose their own mass in their dying stages, and in their expelled winds they form stardust. To model mass loss from these evolved stars, my colleagues and I have constructed GRAMS: the Grid of Red supergiant and Asymptotic giant branch star ModelS. These GRAMS radiative transfer models are fit to optical through mid-infrared photometry of red supergiant (RSG) stars and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. I will discuss our current studies of mass loss from AGB and RSG stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), fitting GRAMS models to the photometry of SMC evolved star candidates identified from the SAGE-SMC (PI: K. Gordon) Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy survey. This work will be briefly compared to similar work we have done for the LMC. I will also discuss Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) studies of the dust produced by AGB and RSG stars in the LMC. BAS is grateful for support from the NASA-ADAP grant NNX11AB06G.

  17. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  18. Lucky imaging multiplicity studies of exoplanet host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2014-03-01

    The multiplicity of stars is an important parameter in order to understand star and planet formation. In the past decades extrasolar planets have been discovered around more than 600 stars with the radial velocity and transit techniques. Many of these systems present extreme cases of massive planetary objects at very close separations to their primary stars. To explain the configurations of such systems is hence a continued challenge in the development of formation theories. It will be very interesting to determine if there are significant differences between planets in single and multiple star systems. In our ongoing study we use high resolution imaging techniques to clarify the multiplicity status of nearby (within 250 pc) planet host stars. For targets on the northern hemisphere we employ the lucky imaging instrument Astralux at the 2.2 m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory. The lucky imaging approach consists of taking several thousand short images with integration times shorter than the speckle coherence time, to sample the speckle variations during the observation window. We then only choose the so called "lucky shots" with a very high Strehl ratio in one of the speckles, to shift and add, resulting in a final image with the highest possible Strehl ratio and therefore highest possible angular resolution. We will present recent results of our study at the Calar Alto Observatory, as well as observations undertaken with the RTK camera at the 20 cm guiding telescope in our own observatory in Großschwabhausen.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of star/linear and star/star blends with chemically identical monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakis, P. E.; Avgeropoulos, A.; Freire, J. J.; Kosmas, M.; Vlahos, C.

    2007-11-01

    The effects of chain size and architectural asymmetry on the miscibility of blends with chemically identical monomers, differing only in their molecular weight and architecture, are studied via Monte Carlo simulation by using the bond fluctuation model. Namely, we consider blends composed of linear/linear, star/linear and star/star chains. We found that linear/linear blends are more miscible than the corresponding star/star mixtures. In star/linear blends, the increase in the volume fraction of the star chains increases the miscibility. For both star/linear and star/star blends, the miscibility decreases with the increase in star functionality. When we increase the molecular weight of linear chains of star/linear mixtures the miscibility decreases. Our findings are compared with recent analytical and experimental results.

  20. A window on first-stars models from studies of dwarf galaxies and galactic halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, Aparna

    2018-06-01

    Dwarf galaxies dominate the local universe by number and are predicted to be even more dominant at early times, with many having large star formation rates per unit mass. The cosmological role of dwarf galaxies in the metal enrichment and the reionization of the universe is an important but unresolved problem at present. Nearby low-mass galaxies are much more accessible observationally for detailed study and may be local analogs of the types of galaxies that hosted the first-light sources relevant for reionization. I will share recent results on UV studies of the escaping radiation from nearby low-mass starforming galaxies, as well as the tantalizing similarities in element abundance patterns between local dwarf galaxies and the latest data compilations on extremely metal-poor stars in galactic halos. I will highlight trends of interest in a variety of individual elements at values of [Fe/H] between -7 and -3, including alpha-elements, elements originating mostly in intermediate-mass stars, lithium, titanium, and r-process elements. These trends constrain not only models of the first stars and their supernovae, but provide a window into the physical conditions in early galaxies and when metal-free star formation may have ceased in the early universe.This work was supported by the University of San Francisco Faculty Development Fund, and NSF grant AST-1637339. We thank the Aspen Center for Physics, where some of this work was conducted, and which is supported by National Science Foundation grant PHY-1607611.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of Wolf-Rayet stars. III - The WC subclass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, A. V.; Conti, P. S.; Massey, P.

    1986-01-01

    Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars, which are the descendants of massive O-type stars, can be subdivided into three groups depending on their spectral appearance. These groups include the nitrogen class (WN), the carbon class (WC), and the oxygen class (WO). The present paper is concerned with the WC stars. The assignment of WC subtypes has been based on visual inspections of photographic plates. One of the aims of this study is related to the quantification of the visual estimates. The measured ratios of equivalent widths and the FWHM of the 4650 A line for Galactic and LMC stars are presented, and the reclassification of some stars is proposed on this basis. In particular, it is shown that the majority of the LMC WC stars should logically be classified WC4 instead of WC5. Comments on individual stars are provided, and terminal velocities are discussed. It is attempted to give a complete overview of the most important spectroscopic features of the WC stars in the optical region.

  2. A multiwavelength study of young stars in the Elephant Trunk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Martí, B.; Bayo, A.; Morales Calderón, M.; Barrado, D.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a multiwavelength study of young stars in IC 1396A, ``the Elephant Trunk Nebula''. Our targets are selected combining optical, near-infrared and mid-infrared photometry. Near-infrared and optical spectroscopy are used to confirm their youth and to derive spectral types for these objects, showing that they are early to mid-M stars, and that our sample includes some of the lowest-mass objects reported so far in the region. The photometric and spectroscopic information is used to construct the spectral energy distributions and to study the properties of the stars (mass, age, accretion, disks, spatial location). The implications for the triggered star formation picture are discussed.

  3. VLBA Scientists Study Birth of Sunlike Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    , by measuring the Doppler shift in the wavelength of these emissions, astronomers can determine the speed at which the gas is moving. In an object known as S106FIR, 2,000 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus, a team of Japanese and U.S. VLBA observers led by Ray Furuya, a graduate student from Japan's Nobeyama Radio Observatory, has tracked the motion of material outward in the jet. This object, embedded in a dense cloud of molecular gas, the material from which the star is forming, shows maser spots moving in two directions as the jets emerge from both poles of the accretion disk. "The water masers are the only way we can detect the outflow from this young star," Furuya said. The VLBA observations can discern details as small as half the distance from the Earth to the Sun. "We can see outflow on scales the size of our Solar System. We think this object is one of the youngest protostars known," Furuya said. In another object, dubbed IRAS 16293-2422, in the constellation Ophiuchus, astronomers believe the water masers clearly show the outflowing jets of a young star and may be tracing the accretion disk as well. The young star is one of a pair of stars in a binary system some 500 light-years distant. The water-vapor masers are seen around only one of the pair, however. "In this system, we see outflow in the jet and also an elliptical ring of masers that may be part of the accretion disk," said Wootten, leader of the team observing this object. "The VLBA is showing us details as small as the size of Mercury's orbit around the Sun, a great help in understanding the physics going on there," Wootten said. A team composed largely of astronomers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA, also used the VLBA to study water masers in a young stellar object 2,500 light-years away in Cepheus. This team sees maser spots moving in opposite directions away from the young star on scales of ten times the diameter of the solar system, presumably

  4. An x-ray study of massive star forming regions with CHANDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2007-08-01

    Massive stars are characterized by powerful stellar winds, strong ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and consequently devastating supernovae explosions, which have a profound influence on their natal clouds and galaxy evolution. However, the formation and evolution of massive stars themselves and how their low-mass siblings are affected in the wind-swept and UV-radiation-dominated environment are not well understood. Much of the stellar populations inside of the massive star forming regions (MSFRs) are poorly studied in the optical and IR wavelengths because of observational challenges caused by large distance, high extinction, and heavy contamination from unrelated sources. Although it has long been recognized that X-rays open a new window to sample the young stellar populations residing in the MSFRs, the low angular resolution of previous generation X-ray telescopes has limited the outcome from such studies. The sensitive high spatial resolution X-ray observations enabled by the Chandra X- ray Observatory and the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) have significantly improved our ability to study the X-ray-emitting populations in the MSFRs in the last few years. In this thesis, I analyzed seven high spatial resolution Chandra /ACIS images of two massive star forming complexes, namely the NGC 6357 region hosting the 1 Myr old Pismis 24 cluster (Chapter 3) and the Rosette Complex including the 2 Myr old NGC 2244 cluster immersed in the Rosette Nebula (Chapter 4), embedded clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC; Chapter 5), and a triggered cluster NGC 2237 (Chapter 6). The X-ray sampled stars were studied in great details. The unique power of X-ray selection of young stellar cluster members yielded new knowledge in the stellar populations, the cluster structures, and the star formation histories. The census of cluster members is greatly improved in each region. A large fraction of the X-ray detections have optical or near-infrared (NIR) stellar counterparts

  5. Observational studies of regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Heather Danielle Blythe

    2013-03-01

    Massive stars have a profound influence on their surroundings. However, relatively little is known about their formation. The study of massive star formation is hindered by a lack of observational evidence, primarily due to difficulties observing massive stars at early stages in their development. The Red MSX Source survey (RMS survey) is a valuable tool with which to address these issues. Near-infrared H- and K-band spectra were taken for 247 candidate massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), selected from the RMS survey. 195 (∼80%) of the targets are YSOs, of which 131 are massive YSOs (LBOL>5E3L⊙, M>8 M⊙). This is the largest spectroscopic study of massive YSOs to date. This study covers minimally obscured objects right through to very red, dusty sources. Almost all YSOs show some evidence for emission lines, though there is a wide variety of observed properties, with HI, H2 Fe II, and CO among the most commonly observed lines. Evidence for disks and outflows was frequently seen. Comparisons of Brγ and H2 emission with low mass YSOs suggest that the emission mechanism for these lines is the same for low-, intermediate-, and high-mass YSOs, i.e. high-mass YSOs appear to resemble scaled-up versions of low-mass YSOs. It was found that the YSOs form an evolutionary sequence, based on their spectra, consistent with the existing theoretical models. Type I YSOs have strong H2 emission, no ionized lines, and are redder than the other two subtypes. As such, these are considered to be the youngest sources. The Type III sources are bluest, and therefore considered to be the oldest subtype. They have strong H I lines and fluorescent Fe II 1.6878 μm emission. They may also have weak H2 emission. Type III sources may even be beginning to form a mini-H II region. XSHOOTER data from 10 Herbig Be stars were analysed. The evidence suggests that winds and disks are common among Herbig stars, as they are among their main sequence classical Be star counterparts. Line

  6. WNL Stars - the Most Massive Stars in the Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnurr, Olivier; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; St-Louis, Nicole; Skalkowski, Gwenael; Niemela, Virpi; Shara, Michael M.

    2001-08-01

    We propose to carry out an intensive and complete time-dependent spectroscopic study of all 47 known WNL stars in the LMC, an ideal laboratory to study the effect of lower ambient metallicity, Z, on stellar evolution. WNL stars are luminous, cooler WR stars of the nitrogen sequence. This will allow us to: 1) determine the binary frequency. The Roche-lobe overflow (RLOF) mechanism in close binaries is predicted to be responsible for the formation of a significant fraction of WR stars in low Z environments such as the LMC. 2) determine the masses. Since some of these stars (denoted WNL(h) or WNLh) are supposed to be hydrogen-burning and thus main-sequence stellar objects of the highest luminosity, they may be the most massive stars known. 3) study wind-wind collision (WWC) effects in WR+O binaries involving very luminous WNL stars with strong winds. Interesting in itself as a high-energy phenomenon, WWC is in competition with conservative RLOF (i.e. mass transfer to the secondary star), and therefore has to be taken into account in this context.

  7. WNLh Stars - The Most Massive Stars in the Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnurr, Olivier; St-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Foellmi, Cedric

    2002-08-01

    We propose to conclude our intensive and complete time-dependent spectroscopic study of all 47 known WNL stars in the LMC, an ideal laboratory to study the effect of lower ambient metallicity, Z, on stellar evolution. WNL stars are luminous, cooler WR stars of the nitrogen sequence. This will allow us to: 1) determine the binary frequency. The Roche-lobe overflow (RLOF) mechanism in close binaries is predicted to be responsible for the formation of a significant fraction of WR stars in low Z environments such as the LMC. 2) determine the masses. Since some of these stars (denoted WNL(h) or WNLh) are supposed to be hydrogen-burning and thus main-sequence stellar objects of the highest luminosity, they may be the most massive stars known. 3) study wind-wind collision (WWC) effects in WR+O binaries involving very luminous WNL stars with strong winds. Interesting in itself as a high-energy phenomenon, WWC is in competition with conservative RLOF (i.e. mass transfer to the secondary star), and therefore has to be taken into account in this context.

  8. An Undergraduate Research Experience on Studying Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, A.; Percy, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    We describe and evaluate a summer undergraduate research project and experience by one of us (AA), under the supervision of the other (JP). The aim of the project was to sample current approaches to analyzing variable star data, and topics related to the study of Mira variable stars and their astrophysical importance. This project was done through the Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) in astronomy at the University of Toronto. SURP allowed undergraduate students to explore and learn about many topics within astronomy and astrophysics, from instrumentation to cosmology. SURP introduced students to key skills which are essential for students hoping to pursue graduate studies in any scientific field. Variable stars proved to be an excellent topic for a research project. For beginners to independent research, it introduces key concepts in research such as critical thinking and problem solving, while illuminating previously learned topics in stellar physics. The focus of this summer project was to compare observations with structural and evolutionary models, including modelling the random walk behavior exhibited in the (O-C) diagrams of most Mira stars. We found that the random walk could be modelled by using random fluctuations of the period. This explanation agreed well with observations.

  9. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour.

  10. Theoretical Near-IR Spectra for Surface Abundance Studies of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Bouret, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present initial results of a study of abundance and mass loss properties of O-type stars based on theoretical near-IR spectra computed with state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere models. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a powerful tool to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio near-IR (1-5 micron) spectra of massive stars in different environments of local galaxies. Our goal is to analyze model near-IR spectra corresponding to those expected from NIRspec on JWST in order to map the wind properties and surface composition across the parameter range of 0 stars and to determine projected rotational velocities. As a massive star evolves, internal coupling, related mixing, and mass loss impact its intrinsic rotation rate. These three parameters form an intricate loop, where enhanced rotation leads to more mixing which in turn changes the mass loss rate, the latter thus affecting the rotation rate. Since the effects of rotation are expected to be much more pronounced at low metallicity, we pay special attention to models for massive stars in the the Small Magellanic Cloud. This galaxy provides a unique opportunity to probe stellar evolution, and the feedback of massive stars on galactic evol.ution in conditions similar to the epoch of maximal star formation. Plain-Language Abstract: We present initial results of a study of abundance and mass loss properties of massive stars based on theoretical near-infrared (1-5 micron) spectra computed with state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere models. This study is to prepare for observations by the James Webb Space Telescope.

  11. The impact of IUE on binary star studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavec, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of IUE observations in the investigation of binary stars is discussed. The results of data analysis of several classes of binary systems are briefly reviewed including zeta Aurigae and VV Cephei stars, mu Sagittarii, epsilon Aurigae, beta Lyrae and the W Serpentis stars, symbiotic stars, and the Algols.

  12. A Numerical Study on the Streams of Star Debris after Tidal Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho Olachea, Priscila; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Law-Smith, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Lurking at the centers of most galaxies are gigantic star and gas devouring monsters. These monsters are supermassive black holes (SMBHs), some of which are larger than our solar system and ten billion times as massive as our own Sun. The vast majority of stars in the universe live for tens of billions of years, eventually dying from old age as the nuclearreactions that power them become progressively less effective. But for every ten thousand stars that die peacefully, one star will be brutally torn apart by the extreme tidal forces present as it passes near a SMBH. My recent work has been to develop computational tools necessary to study the fates of stars disrupted by SMBHs. In this research project I presentthe results of my numerical study aimed at understanding the streams of star debris that result after disruption.

  13. Study the performance of star sensor influenced by space radiation damage of image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Li, Yudong; Wen, Lin; Guo, Qi; Zhang, Xingyao

    2018-03-01

    Star sensor is an essential component of spacecraft attitude control system. Spatial radiation can cause star sensor performance degradation, abnormal work, attitude measurement accuracy and reliability reduction. Many studies have already been dedicated to the radiation effect on Charge-Coupled Device(CCD) image sensor, but fewer studies focus on the radiation effect of star sensor. The innovation of this paper is to study the radiation effects from the device level to the system level. The influence of the degradation of CCD image sensor radiation sensitive parameters on the performance parameters of star sensor is studied in this paper. The correlation among the radiation effect of proton, the non-uniformity noise of CCD image sensor and the performance parameter of star sensor is analyzed. This paper establishes a foundation for the study of error prediction and correction technology of star sensor on-orbit attitude measurement, and provides some theoretical basis for the design of high performance star sensor.

  14. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  15. High Resolution Studies of Mass Loss from Massive Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Richardson, Noel; Madura, Thomas; Post Russell, Christopher Michael; Teodoro, Mairan; Nichols, Joy S.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shenar, Tomer; Pablo, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    Mass loss from hot luminous single and binary stars has a significant, perhaps decisive, effect on their evolution. The combination of X-ray observations of hot shocked gas embedded in the stellar winds and high-resolution optical/UV spectra of the cooler mass in the outflow provides unique ways to study the unstable process by which massive stars lose mass both through continuous stellar winds and rare, impulsive, large-scale mass ejections. The ability to obtain coordinated observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) and the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and other X-ray observatories has allowed, for the first time, studies of resolved line emisssion over the temperature range of 104- 108K, and has provided observations to confront numerical dynamical models in three dimensions. Such observations advance our knowledge of mass-loss asymmetries, spatial and temporal variabilities, and the fundamental underlying physics of the hot shocked outflow, providing more realistic constraints on the amount of mass lost by different luminous stars in a variety of evolutionary stages. We discuss the impact that these joint observational studies have had on our understanding of dynamical mass outflows from massive stars, with particular emphasis on two important massive binaries, Delta Ori Aa, a linchpin of the mass luminosity relation for upper HRD main sequence stars, and the supermassive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae.

  16. iSTAR: The International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatge, Coty B.; Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the first steps taken in the International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning (iSTAR). The iSTAR Project is an attempt to look beyond traditional wisdom and practices in astronomy education, to discover the ways in which cognitive abilities and human culture interact to impact individuals’ understanding of and relationship to astronomy content knowledge. In contrast to many international studies that seek to rank nations by student performance on standardized tests, the iSTAR Project seeks to find ways that culture may unexpectedly enhance performance in astronomy. Using the Test of Astronomy Standards (TOAST) as a reasonable, initial proxy for the content knowledge a well educated person might know in astronomy, the iSTAR team then defined culture as a construct with five components: practices, traditional knowledge, historical and genealogical relationships, place-based knowledge, and language. Given the complexity of this construct, Stage 1 of the project focuses on the cultural component of language, and assumed that prior to the collection of data from students, the process of translating the TOAST could provide valuable expert-based information on the impact of language on astronomy knowledge. As such, the work began with a study of the translation process. For each of the languages used in the testing phase of the iSTAR protocol, a succession of translators and analysts were engaged, including two educated, non-astronomer native speakers, a native speaking astronomer, and a native speaking linguistics expert. Multiple translations were analyzed in order to make relevant meaning of differences in the translations, and provide commentary on the ways in which metaphor, idiom, cultural history are embedded in the language, providing potential advantages in the learning of astronomy. The first test languages were German, Hawaiian, and American Sign Language, and initial findings suggest that each of these languages provide specific advantages

  17. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  18. A New Photometric Study of Ap and Am Stars in the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. S.; Liu, J. Y.; Shan, H. G.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, 426 well known confirmed Ap and Am stars are photometrically studied in the infrared. The 2MASS, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), and IRAS data are employed to make analyses. The results in this paper have shown that in the 1-3 μm region over 90% Ap and Am stars have no or little infrared excesses, and infrared radiations in the near-infrared from these stars are probably dominated by the free-free emissions. It is also shown that in the 3-12 μm region, the majority of Ap stars and Am stars have very similar behavior, I.e., in the W1-W2 (3.4-4.6 μm) region, over half of Ap and Am stars have clear infrared excesses, which are possibly due to the binarity, the multiplicity, and/or the debris disk, but in the W2-W3 (4.6-12 μm) region they have no or little infrared excess. In addition, in the 12-22 μm region, some of Ap stars and Am stars show the infrared excesses and infrared radiations for these Ap and Am stars are probably due to the free-free emissions. In addition, it is seen that the probability of being the binarity, the multiplicity and/or the debris disk for Am stars is much higher than that for Ap stars. Furthermore, it can be seen that, in general, no relations can be found between infrared colors and spectral types either for Ap stars or for Am stars.

  19. Star & Planet Formation Studies and Opportunities with SOFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kimberly Ennico

    2018-01-01

    Star formation, the most fundamental process in the universe, is linked to planet formation and thus to the origin and evolution of life. We have a general outline of how planets and stars form, yet unraveling the details of the physics and chemistry continues to challenge us. The infrared and submillimeter part of the spectrum hold the most promise for studying the beginnings of star formation. The observational landscape recently shaped by Spitzer, Herschel and ALMA, continues to challenge our current theories. SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, equipped with state-of-the-art infrared instrumentation to a vantage point at 45,000 feet (13.7 kilometers) flight altitude that is above 99.9 percent of the Earth's water vapor, enables observations in the infrared through terahertz frequencies not possible from the ground. SOFIA is a community observatory, about to start its sixth annual observing cycle. My talk will focus on recent results in advancing star and planet formation processes using SOFIA's imaging and polarimetric capabilities, and the upcoming science enabled by the 3rd generation instrument High-Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectrometer (HIRMES) to be commissioned in 2019. I will show how mid-infrared imaging is used to test massive star formation theories, how far-infrared polarimetry on sub-parsec scales is directly testing the role of magnetic fields in molecular clouds, and how velocity-resolved high-resolution spectroscopy will push forward our understanding of proto-planetary disk science. I will also summarize upcoming opportunities with the SOFIA observatory. For the latest news about your flying observatory, see https://sofia.usra.edu/.

  20. Photometric Studies of Stars in the Vicinity of Cyg OB7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikian, N. D.; Gomez, J.

    2017-12-01

    Results of BVRI photometric studies of 131 stars in the stellar association Cyg OB7 are presented. Observational data were obtained with the 2.6-m telescope at the Byurakan Observatory during 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2011 using the ByuFOSC-2 and SCORPIO spectral cameras. Observations made in 2007 on the 182-cm telescope (Asiago, Italy) at the Padova Astronomical Observatory with the AFOSC (Asiago Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera) detector system are also used. Variations with amplitudes ranging from 0m.2 to 2m.16 are detected in 42 of the stars. Variability is observed for the first time in 31 of the 42 stars. The brightness of 32 of the stars was essentially unchanged during the time of our measurements. All of the 42 variables lie very close to the T Tau type stars on a two-color diagram.

  1. A New Photometric Study of Ap and Am Stars in the Infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.; Liu, J. Y.; Shan, H. G., E-mail: chenps@ynao.ac.cn

    In this paper, 426 well known confirmed Ap and Am stars are photometrically studied in the infrared. The 2MASS, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE ), and IRAS data are employed to make analyses. The results in this paper have shown that in the 1–3 μ m region over 90% Ap and Am stars have no or little infrared excesses, and infrared radiations in the near-infrared from these stars are probably dominated by the free–free emissions. It is also shown that in the 3–12 μ m region, the majority of Ap stars and Am stars have very similar behavior, i.e.,more » in the W 1– W 2 (3.4–4.6 μ m) region, over half of Ap and Am stars have clear infrared excesses, which are possibly due to the binarity, the multiplicity, and/or the debris disk, but in the W 2– W 3 (4.6–12 μ m) region they have no or little infrared excess. In addition, in the 12–22 μ m region, some of Ap stars and Am stars show the infrared excesses and infrared radiations for these Ap and Am stars are probably due to the free–free emissions. In addition, it is seen that the probability of being the binarity, the multiplicity and/or the debris disk for Am stars is much higher than that for Ap stars. Furthermore, it can be seen that, in general, no relations can be found between infrared colors and spectral types either for Ap stars or for Am stars.« less

  2. A NEAR-INFRARED STUDY OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION RCW 34

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Walt, D. J.; De Villiers, H. M.; Czanik, R. J.

    2012-07-15

    We report the results of a near-infrared imaging study of a 7.8 Multiplication-Sign 7.8 arcmin{sup 2} region centered on the 6.7 GHz methanol maser associated with the RCW 34 star-forming region using the 1.4 m IRSF telescope at Sutherland. A total of 1283 objects were detected simultaneously in J, H, and K for an exposure time of 10,800 s. The J - H, H - K two-color diagram revealed a strong concentration of more than 700 objects with colors similar to what is expected of reddened classical T Tauri stars. The distribution of the objects on the K versus Jmore » - K color-magnitude diagram is also suggestive that a significant fraction of the 1283 objects is made up of lower mass pre-main-sequence stars. We also present the luminosity function for the subset of about 700 pre-main-sequence stars and show that it suggests ongoing star formation activity for about 10{sup 7} years. An examination of the spatial distribution of the pre-main-sequence stars shows that the fainter (older) part of the population is more dispersed over the observed region and the brighter (younger) subset is more concentrated around the position of the O8.5V star. This suggests that the physical effects of the O8.5V star and the two early B-type stars on the remainder of the cloud out of which they formed could have played a role in the onset of the more recent episode of star formation in RCW 34.« less

  3. Structure and rheology of star polymers in confined geometries: a mesoscopic simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feiwo; Goujon, Florent; Mendonça, Ana C F; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2015-11-28

    Mesoscopic simulations of star polymer melts adsorbed onto solid surfaces are performed using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. A set of parameters is developed to study the low functionality star polymers under shear. The use of a new bond-angle potential between the arms of the star creates more rigid chains and discriminates between different functionalities at equilibrium, but still allows the polymers to deform appropriately under shear. The rheology of the polymer melts is studied by calculating the kinetic friction and viscosity and there is good agreement with experimental properties of these systems. The study is completed with predictive simulations of star polymer solutions in an athermal solvent.

  4. Star-triangle and star-star relations in statistical mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, R.J.

    1997-01-20

    The homogeneous three-layer Zamolodchikov model is equivalent to a four-state model on the checkerboard lattice which closely resembles the four-state critical Potts model, but with some of its Boltzmann weights negated. Here the author shows that it satisfies a star-to-reverse-star (or simply star-star) relation, even though they know of no star-triangle relation for this model. For any nearest-neighbor checkerboard model, they show that this star-star relation is sufficient to ensure that the decimated model (where half the spins have been summed over) satisfies a twisted Yang-Baxter relation. This ensures that the transfer matrices of the original model commute in pairs,more » which is an adequate condition for solvability.« less

  5. VLBA Teams With Optical Interferometer to Study Star's Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    Two of the World's Largest Interferometric Facilities Team-up to Study a Red Giant Star Using ESO's VLTI on Cerro Paranal and the VLBA facility operated by NRAO, an international team of astronomers has made what is arguably the most detailed study of the environment of a pulsating red giant star. They performed, for the first time, a series of coordinated observations of three separate layers within the star's tenuous outer envelope: the molecular shell, the dust shell, and the maser shell, leading to significant progress in our understanding of the mechanism of how, before dying, evolved stars lose mass and return it to the interstellar medium. S Orionis (S Ori) belongs to the class of Mira-type variable stars. It is a solar-mass star that, as will be the fate of our Sun in 5 billion years, is nearing its gloomy end as a white dwarf. Mira stars are very large and lose huge amounts of matter. Every year, S Ori ejects as much as the equivalent of Earth's mass into the cosmos. ESO PR Photo 25a/07 ESO PR Photo 25a/07 Evolution of the Mira-type Star S Orionis "Because we are all stardust, studying the phases in the life of a star when processed matter is sent back to the interstellar medium to be used for the next generation of stars, planets... and humans, is very important," said Markus Wittkowski, lead author of the paper reporting the results. A star such as the Sun will lose between a third and half of its mass during the Mira phase. S Ori pulsates with a period of 420 days. In the course of its cycle, it changes its brightness by a factor of the order of 500, while its diameter varies by about 20%. Although such stars are enormous - they are typically larger than the current Sun by a factor of a few hundred, i.e. they encompass the orbit of the Earth around the Sun - they are also distant and to peer into their deep envelopes requires very high resolution. This can only be achieved with interferometric techniques. ESO PR Photo 25b/07 ESO PR Photo 25b/07

  6. A statistical spectropolarimetric study of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababakr, K. M.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2017-11-01

    We present H α linear spectropolarimetry of a large sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars. Together with newly obtained data for 17 objects, the sample contains 56 objects, the largest such sample to date. A change in linear polarization across the H α line is detected in 42 (75 per cent) objects, which confirms the previous finding that the circumstellar environment around these stars on small spatial scales has an asymmetric structure, which is typically identified with a disc. A second outcome of this research is that we confirm that Herbig Ae stars are similar to T Tauri stars in displaying a line polarization effect, while depolarization is more common among Herbig Be stars. This finding had been suggested previously to indicate that Herbig Ae stars form in the same manner than T Tauri stars through magnetospheric accretion. It appears that the transition between these two differing polarization line effects occurs around the B7-B8 spectral type. This would in turn not only suggest that Herbig Ae stars accrete in a similar fashion as lower mass stars, but also that this accretion mechanism switches to a different type of accretion for Herbig Be stars. We report that the magnitude of the line effect caused by electron scattering close to the stars does not exceed 2 per cent. Only a very weak correlation is found between the magnitude of the line effect and the spectral type or the strength of the H α line. This indicates that the detection of a line effect only relies on the geometry of the line-forming region and the geometry of the scattering electrons.

  7. AMR Studies of Star Formation: Simulations and Simulated Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, Stella; McKee, C. F.; Klein, R. I.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular clouds are typically observed to be approximately virialized with gravitational and turbulent energy in balance, yielding a star formation rate of a few percent. The origin and characteristics of the observed supersonic turbulence are poorly understood, and without continued energy injection the turbulence is predicted to decay within a cloud dynamical time. Recent observations and analytic work have suggested a strong connection between the initial stellar mass function, the core mass function, and turbulence characteristics. The role of magnetic fields in determining core lifetimes, shapes, and kinematic properties remains hotly debated. Simulations are a formidable tool for studying the complex process of star formation and addressing these puzzles. I present my results modeling low-mass star formation using the ORION adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code. I investigate the properties of forming cores and protostars in simulations in which the turbulence is driven to maintain virial balance and where it is allowed to decay. I will discuss simulated observations of cores in dust emission and in molecular tracers and compare to observations of local star-forming clouds. I will also present results from ORION cluster simulations including flux-limited diffusion radiative transfer and show that radiative feedback, even from low-mass stars, has a significant effect on core fragmentation, disk properties, and the IMF. Finally, I will discuss the new simulation frontier of AMR multigroup radiative transfer.

  8. Study of the star catalogue (epoch AD 1396.0) recorded in ancient Korean astronomical almanac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Junhyeok; Lee, Yong Bok; Lee, Yong-Sam

    2015-11-01

    The study of old star catalogues provides important astrometric data. Most of the researches based on the old star catalogues were manuscript published in Europe and from Arabic/Islam. However, the old star catalogues published in East Asia did not get attention. Therefore, among the East Asian star catalogues we focus on a particular catalogue recorded in a Korean almanac. Its catalogue contains 277 stars that are positioned in a region within 10° of the ecliptic plane. The stars in the catalogue were identified using the modern Hipparcos catalogue. We identified 274 among 277 stars, which is a rate of 98.9 per cent. The catalogue records the epoch of the stars' positions as AD 1396.0. However, by using all of the identified stars we found that the initial epoch of the catalogue is AD 1363.1 ± 3.2. In conclusion, the star catalogue was compiled and edited from various older star catalogues. We assume a correlation with the Almagest by Ptolemaios. This study presents newly analysed results from the historically important astronomical data discovered in East Asia. Therefore, this star catalogue will become important data for comparison with the star catalogues published in Europe and from Arabic/Islam.

  9. STAR Follow-Up Studies, 1996-1997: The Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio (STAR) Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate-Bain, Helen; Boyd-Zaharias, Jayne; Cain, Van A.; Word, Elizabeth; Binkley, M. Edward

    The Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio (STAR) Project first investigated the effect of small class size on student achievement with over 6,000 Tennessee primary students in 1985 through 1989. The study found a consistent and significant benefit of small classes for all students, with the greatest advantages for minority, inner-city students from…

  10. A photometric study of Be stars located in the seismology fields of COROT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Fabregat, J.; Suso, J.; Lanzara, M.; Garrido, R.; Hubert, A.-M.; Floquet, M.

    2007-12-01

    Context: In preparation for the COROT mission, an exhaustive photometric study of Be stars located in the seismology fields of the mission has been performed. The very precise and long-time-spanned photometric observations gathered by the COROT satellite will give important clues on the origin of the Be phenomenon. Aims: The aim of this work is to find short-period variable Be stars located in the seismology fields of COROT, and to study and characterise their pulsational properties. Methods: Light curves obtained at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada, together with data from Hipparcos and ASAS-3 for a total of 84 Be stars, were analysed in order to search for short-term variations. We applied standard Fourier techniques and non-linear least-square fitting to the time series. Results: We found 7 multiperiodic, 21 mono-periodic and 26 non-variable Be stars. Short-term variability was detected in 74% of early-type Be stars and in 31% of mid- to late-type Be stars. We show that non-radial pulsations are more frequent among Be stars than in slow-rotating B stars of the same spectral range. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Simultaneous UV and optical study of O star winds and UV and optical covariability of O star winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous ultraviolet and optical observations of 10 bright O stars were organized in several observing campaigns lasting 3-6 days each. The observing campaigns included 12 observatories in the Northern hemisphere obtaining high resolution spectroscopy, photometry, and polarimetry, as well as 24-hour coverage with the IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) observatory. Over 600 high dispersion SWP spectra were acquired with IUE at both NASA and VILSPA for the completion of this work. The massive amount of data from these observing campaigns, both from IUE and the ground-based instruments, has been reduced and analyzed. The accompanying paper describes the data acquisition, analysis, and conclusions of the study performed. The most important results of this study are the strong confirmation of the ubiquitous variability of winds of O stars, and the critical correlation between rotation of the star and the wind variability as seen in the ultraviolet and optical spectral lines.

  12. A new family of magnetic stars: the Am stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Petit, P.; Lignières, F.

    2016-12-01

    We presented the discovery of an ultra-weak field in three Am stars, β UMa, θ Leo, and Alhena, thanks to ultra-deep spectropolarimetric observations. Two of the three stars of this study shown peculiar magnetic signatures with prominent positive lobes like the one of Sirius A that are not expected in the standard theory of the Zeeman effect. Alhena, contrary to Sirius A, β UMa and θ Leo, show normal signatures. These detections of ultra-weak fields in Am stars suggest the existence of a new family of magnetic intermediate-mass stars: the Am stars. However the various shapes of the signatures required further observation to identify the physical processes at work in these stars. A preliminary explanation is based on microturbulence.

  13. A theoretical study of alpha star populations in loaded nuclear emulsions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Farley, T.A.; Stieff, L.R.

    1954-01-01

    This theoretical study of the alpha star populations in loaded emulsions was undertaken in an effort to find a quantitative method for the analysis of less than microgram amounts of thorium in the presence of larger amounts of uranium. Analytical expressions for each type of star from each of the significantly contributing members of the uranium and thorium series as well as summation formulas for the whole series have been computed. The analysis for thorium may be made by determining the abundance of five-branched stars in a loaded nuclear emulsion and comparing of observed and predicted star populations. The comparison may also be used to check the half-lives of several members of the uranium and thorium series. ?? 1954.

  14. Design and application of star map simulation system for star sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Shen, Weimin; Zhu, Xifang; Chen, Yuheng; Xu, Qinquan

    2013-12-01

    Modern star sensors are powerful to measure attitude automatically which assure a perfect performance of spacecrafts. They achieve very accurate attitudes by applying algorithms to process star maps obtained by the star camera mounted on them. Therefore, star maps play an important role in designing star cameras and developing procession algorithms. Furthermore, star maps supply significant supports to exam the performance of star sensors completely before their launch. However, it is not always convenient to supply abundant star maps by taking pictures of the sky. Thus, star map simulation with the aid of computer attracts a lot of interests by virtue of its low price and good convenience. A method to simulate star maps by programming and extending the function of the optical design program ZEMAX is proposed. The star map simulation system is established. Firstly, based on analyzing the working procedures of star sensors to measure attitudes and the basic method to design optical system by ZEMAX, the principle of simulating star sensor imaging is given out in detail. The theory about adding false stars and noises, and outputting maps is discussed and the corresponding approaches are proposed. Then, by external programming, the star map simulation program is designed and produced. Its user interference and operation are introduced. Applications of star map simulation method in evaluating optical system, star image extraction algorithm and star identification algorithm, and calibrating system errors are presented completely. It was proved that the proposed simulation method provides magnificent supports to the study on star sensors, and improves the performance of star sensors efficiently.

  15. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and kinematic temperature {approx}20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed towardmore » core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.« less

  16. Binary star orbits from speckle interferometry. 5: A combined speckle/spectroscopic study of the O star binary 15 Monocerotis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gies, Douglas R.; Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Mcalister, Harold A.; Frazin, Richard A.; Hahula, Michael E.; Penny, Laura R.; Thaller, Michelle L.; Fullerton, Alexander W.; Shara, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a speckle binary companion to the O7 V (f) star 15 Monocerotis. A study of published radial velocities in conjunction with new measurements from Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and IUE suggests that the star is also a spectroscopic binary with a period of 25 years and a large eccentricity. Thus, 15 Mon is the first O star to bridge the gap between the spectroscopic and visual separation regimes. We have used the star's membership in the cluster NGC 2264 together with the cluster distance to derive masses of 34 and 19 solar mass for the primary and secondary, respectively. Several of the He I line profiles display a broad shallow component which we associate with the secondary, and we estimate the secondary's classification to be O9.5 Vn. The new orbit leads to several important predictions that can be tested over the next few years.

  17. Externally fed star formation: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Motahareh; Stahler, Steven W.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate, through a series of numerical calculations, the evolution of dense cores that are accreting external gas up to and beyond the point of star formation. Our model clouds are spherical, unmagnetized configurations with fixed outer boundaries, across which gas enters subsonically. When we start with any near-equilibrium state, we find that the cloud's internal velocity also remains subsonic for an extended period, in agreement with observations. However, the velocity becomes supersonic shortly before the star forms. Consequently, the accretion rate building up the protostar is much greater than the benchmark value c_s^3/G, where cs is the sound speed in the dense core. This accretion spike would generate a higher luminosity than those seen in even the most embedded young stars. Moreover, we find that the region of supersonic infall surrounding the protostar races out to engulf much of the cloud, again in violation of the observations, which show infall to be spatially confined. Similar problematic results have been obtained by all other hydrodynamic simulations to date, regardless of the specific infall geometry or boundary conditions adopted. Low-mass star formation is evidently a quasi-static process, in which cloud gas moves inward subsonically until the birth of the star itself. We speculate that magnetic tension in the cloud's deep interior helps restrain the infall prior to this event.

  18. Hidden Milky Way star clusters hosting Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtev, R.; Borissova, J.; Ivanov, V. D.; Georgiev, L.

    2009-05-01

    A noticeable fraction of the hidden young star clusters contain WR and O stars providing us with unique laboratories to study the evolution of these rare objects and their maternity places. We are reporting the reddening, the distance and age of two new members of the family of massive young Galactic clusters, hosting WR stars - Glimpse 23 and Glimpse 30.

  19. Implantable self-powered detector for on-line determination of neutron flux in patients during NCT treatment.

    PubMed

    Miller, M E; Mariani, L E; Gonçalves-Carralves, M L Sztejnberg; Skumanic, M; Thorp, S I

    2004-11-01

    A novel system to determine thermal neutron flux in real time during NCT treatments was developed in the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The system is based on a special self-powered detector that can be implanted in patients owing to its small size and biocompatibility. High voltage is not required to operate this kind of detectors, which is a considerable advantage in terms of medical uses. By choosing the appropriate materials, it was possible to obtain a prototype with thermal neutron sensitivity providing for an adequate signal level in typical NCT thermal fluxes. It was also possible to minimize gamma response in order to neglect its contribution.

  20. Accretion shocks in the laboratory: Design of an experiment to study star formation

    DOE PAGES

    Young, Rachel P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; ...

    2017-02-13

    Here, we present the design of a laboratory-astrophysics experiment to study magnetospheric accretion relevant to young, pre-main-sequence stars. Spectra of young stars show evidence of hotspots created when streams of accreting material impact the surface of the star and create shocks. The structures that form during this process are poorly understood, as the surfaces of young stars cannot be spatially resolved. Our experiment would create a scaled "accretion shock" at a major (several kJ) laser facility. The experiment drives a plasma jet (the "accretion stream") into a solid block (the "stellar surface"), in the presence of a parallel magnetic fieldmore » analogous to the star's local field.« less

  1. A multi-wavelength study of pre-main sequence stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, E. W.; Stelzer, B.; Neuhäuser, R.; Hillwig, T. C.; Durisen, R. H.; Menten, K. M.; Greimel, R.; Barwig, H.; Englhauser, J.; Robb, R. M.

    2000-05-01

    Although many lowmass pre-main sequence stars are strong X-ray sources, the origin of the X-ray emission is not well known. Since these objects are variable at all frequencies, simultaneous observations in X-rays and in other wavelengths are able to constrain the properties of the X-ray emitting regions. In this paper, we report quasi-simultaneous observations in X-rays, the optical, and the radio regime for classical and weak-line T Tauri stars from the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. We find that all detected T Tauri stars show significant night-to-night variations of the X-ray emission. For three of the stars, FM Tau and CW Tau, both classical T Tauri stars, and V773 Tau, a weak-line T Tauri star, the variations are especially large. From observations taken simultaneously, we also find that there is some correspondence between the strength of Hα and the X-ray brightness in V773 Tau. The lack of a strong correlation leads us to conclude that the X-ray emission of V773 Tau is not a superposition of flares. However, we suggest that a weak correlation occurs because chromospherically active regions and regions of strong X-ray emission are generally related. V773 Tau was detected at 8.46 GHz as a weakly circularly polarised but highly variable source. We also find that the X-ray emission and the equivalent width of Hα remained unchanged, while large variations of the flux density in the radio regime were observed. This clearly indicates that the emitting regions are different. Using optical spectroscopy we detected a flare in Hα and event which showed a flare-like light-curve of the continuum brightness in FM Tau. However, ROSAT did not observe the field at the times of these flares. Nevertheless, an interesting X-ray event was observed in V773 Tau, during which the flux increased for about 8 hours and then decreased back to the same level in 5 hours. We interpret this as a long-duration event similar to those seen on the sun and other active stars. In the

  2. Accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Pines, D

    1980-02-08

    During the past 8 years, extended temporal and broadband spectroscopic studies carried out by x-ray astronomical satellites have led to the identification of specific compact x-ray sources as accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars in close binary systems. Such sources provide a unique opportunity to study matter under extreme conditions not accessible in the terrestrial laboratory. Quantitative theoretical models have been developed which demonstrate that detailed studies of these sources will lead to a greatly increased understanding of dense and superdense hadron matter, hadron superfluidity, high-temperature plasma in superstrong magnetic fields, and physical processes in strong gravitational fields. Through a combination of theory and observation such studies will make possible the determination of the mass, radius, magnetic field, and structure of neutron stars and degenerate dwarf stars and the identification of further candidate black holes, and will contribute appreciably to our understanding of the physics of accretion by compact astronomical objects.

  3. A detailed study of lithium in 107 CHEPS dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, Ya. V.; Jenkins, J. S.; Ivanyuk, O. M.; Jones, H. R. A.; Kaminsky, B. M.; Lyubchik, Yu. P.; Yakovina, L. A.

    2018-03-01

    Context. We report results from lithium abundance determinations using high resolution spectral analysis of the 107 metal-rich stars from the Calan-Hertfordshire Extrasolar Planet Search programme. Aims: We aim to set out to understand the lithium distribution of the population of stars taken from this survey. Methods: The lithium abundance taking account of non-local thermodynamical equilibrium effects was determined from the fits to the Li I 6708 Å resonance doublet profiles in the observed spectra. Results: We find that a) fast rotators tend to have higher lithium abundances; b) log N(Li) is higher in more massive and hot stars; c) log N(Li) is higher in stars of lower log g; d) stars with the metallicities >0.25 dex do not show the lithium lines in their spectra; e) most of our planet hosts rotate slower; and f) a lower limit of lithium isotopic ratio is 7Li/6Li > 10 in the atmospheres of two stars with planets (SWP) and two non-SWP stars. Conclusions: Measurable lithium abundances were found in the atmospheres of 45 stars located at distances of 20-170 pc from the Sun, for the other 62 stars the upper limits of log N(Li) were computed. We found well defined dependences of lithium abundances on Teff, V sin i, and less pronounced for the log g. In case of V sin i we see two sequences of stars: with measurable lithium and with the upper limit of log N(Li). About 10% of our targets are known to host planets. Only two SWP have notable lithium abundances, so we found a lower proportion of stars with detectable Li among known planet hosts than among stars without planets. However, given the small sample size of our planet-host sample, our analysis does not show any statistically significant differences in the lithium abundance between SWP and stars without known planets.

  4. A hybrid method for accurate star tracking using star sensor and gyros.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiazhen; Yang, Lie; Zhang, Hao

    2017-10-01

    Star tracking is the primary operating mode of star sensors. To improve tracking accuracy and efficiency, a hybrid method using a star sensor and gyroscopes is proposed in this study. In this method, the dynamic conditions of an aircraft are determined first by the estimated angular acceleration. Under low dynamic conditions, the star sensor is used to measure the star vector and the vector difference method is adopted to estimate the current angular velocity. Under high dynamic conditions, the angular velocity is obtained by the calibrated gyros. The star position is predicted based on the estimated angular velocity and calibrated gyros using the star vector measurements. The results of the semi-physical experiment show that this hybrid method is accurate and feasible. In contrast with the star vector difference and gyro-assisted methods, the star position prediction result of the hybrid method is verified to be more accurate in two different cases under the given random noise of the star centroid.

  5. TOPoS: chemical study of extremely metal-poor stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Sbordone, L.; Bonifacio, P.; Cayrel, R.; Christlieb, N.; Clark, P.; François, P.; Glover, S.; Klessen, R.; Koch, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Monaco, L.; Plez, B.; Spite, F.; Spite, M.; Steffen, M.; Zaggia, S.

    The extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars hold in their atmospheres the fossil record of the chemical composition of the early phases of the Galactic evolution. The chemical analysis of such objects provides important constraints on these early phases. EMP stars are very rare objects; to dig them out, large amounts of data have to be processed. With an automatic procedure, we analysed objects with colours of Turn-Off stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to select a sample of good candidate EMP stars. In the latest years, we observed a sample of these candidates with X-Shooter and UVES, and we have an ongoing ESO large programme to use these spectrographs to observe EMP stars. I will report here the results on metallicity and Strontium abundance. Based on observations obtained at ESO Paranal Observatory, programme 189.D-0165(A)

  6. A Statistical Study on Neutron Star Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z.; Zhang, C. M.; Zhao, Y. H.; Wang, D. H.; Pan, Y. Y.; Lei, Y. J.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the measurement of neutron star masses in different population of binaries. Based on the collection of the orbital parameters of 40 systems (46 sources), we apply the boot-strap method together with the Monte Carlo method to reconstruct the likelihood curves for each source separately. The cumulative analysis of the simulation result shows that the neutron star masses in X-ray systems and radio systems obey different distributions, and no evidence for the bimodal distribution could be found. Employing the Bayesian statistical techniques, we find that the most likely distributions for the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), double neutron star (DNS) systems, and neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binary systems are (1.340±0.230) M_{⊙}, (1.505±0.125) M_{⊙}, (1.335±0.055) M_{⊙}, and (1.495±0.225) M_{⊙}, respectively. The statistical distribution has no significant deviation from the standard neutron star formation mechanism. It is noticed that the statistical results of the center masses of LMXBs and NS-WD systems are significantly higher than the other groups by about 0.16 M_{⊙}, which could be regarded as the evidence of accretion episodes. And if we regard the HMXBs and LMXBs as the progenitors of DNS and NS-WD systems, then we can draw the conclusion that the accretion effect must be very week during the evolution trajectory from HMXBs to DNS systems, and this could be the reason why the masses of DNS systems have such a narrow distribution.

  7. Hyperspectral Imagers for the Study of Massive Star Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissen, L.; Alarie, A.; Martin, T.; Spiomm/Sitelle Team

    2012-12-01

    We present two wide-field imaging Fourier transform spectrometers built by our team to study the interstellar medium around massive stars in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. SpIOMM, attached to the Mont Mégantic 1.6-m telescope, is capable of obtaining the visible spectrum of every source of light in a 12 arcminute field of view, with a spectral resolution ranging from R = 1 (wide-band image) to R = 25 000, resulting in about a million spectra with a spatial resolution of one arcsecond. SITELLE will be a similar instrument attached to the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, and will be in operation in early 2013. We illustrate SpIOMM's capabilities to study the interactions between massive stars and their environment.

  8. Induced Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    Overview: Induced Star Formation and Interactions Introduction Historical Background: First Hints Systematic Studies: Starbursts Interactions and Nuclear activity IRAS and Ultralumious starburst Galaxies The 1990's: HST, Supercomputers, and the Distant Universe Key Questions and Issues Organization of Lectures Star Formation Properties of Normal Galaxies Observational Techniques Results: Star Formation in Normal Galaxies Interpretation: Star Formation Histories Global Star Formation in interacting Galaxies A Gallery of Interactions and Mergers Star Formation Statistics: Guilt By Association Tests SFRs in Interacting vs Noninteracting Galaxies Kinematic Properties and Regulation of SFRs Induced Nuclear Activity and Star Formation Background: Nuclear Spectra and Classification Nuclear Star Formation and Starbursts Nuclear Star Formation and Interactions Induced AGN Activity: Statistics of Seyfert Galaxies Environments of Quasars Kinematic Clues to the Triggering of AGNs Infrared Luminous Galaxies and Starbursts Background: IR Luminous Galaxies and IRAS Infrared Luminosity Function and Spectra Infrared Structure and Morphology Interstellar Gas X-Ray Emission and Superwinds Optical, UV, and Near-Infrared Spectra Radio Continuum Emission Evidence for Interactions and Mergers The Power Source: Starbursts or Dusty AGNs? Spectral Diagnostics of Starbursts Evolutionary Synthesis Models Applications: Integrated Colors of Interacting Galaxies Applications: Hα Emission, Colors, and SFRs Applications: Spectral Modelling of Evolved Starbursts Infrared Starbursts and the IMF in starbursts Triggering and Regulation of Star Formation: The Problem Introduction: Star Formation as a Nonlinear Process The schmidt Law in Normal Galaxies Star Formation Regimes in Interacting Galaxies Summary Triggering and Regulation of Starbusts: Theoretical Ideas Gravitational Star Formation Thresholds Cloud Collision Models Radial Transport of Gas: Clues from Barred Galaxies Simulations of Starbursts

  9. A study of rotational velocity distribution of Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, C.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Emilio, M.

    2014-10-01

    Classical Be stars are rapid rotators of spectral type late O to early A and luminosity class V-III, which exhibit Balmer emission lines and often a near infrared excess originating in an equatorially concentrated circumstellar envelope, both produced by sporadic mass ejection episodes. The causes of the abnormal mass loss (the so-called Be phenomenon) are as yet unknown. In spite of their high vsin i, rapid rotation alone cannot explain the ejection episodes as most Be stars do not rotate at their critical rotation rates. In this work we present the distribution of vsin i of 261 Be's stars from BeSS (Be Star Spectra) database. We used two techniques, the Fourier method and the FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) method. For the analysis we made use of three absorption lines of Helium (4026r A, 4388 Å and 4471 Å). Stars with projected rotational velocities up to 300 km s^{-1} agree with the ones already published in the literature. 84 of our stars do not have the values of rotational velocity published. The majority of our sample are B1/B2 spectral type, whose have the greatest velocities.

  10. Optical studies of X-ray peculiar chromosphereically active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, J. C.

    2006-02-01

    A multiwavelength study of the late-type active stars, selected on the basis of their X-ray and radio luminosities is presented in this thesis. For FR Cnc, a photometric period 0.8267 +/- 0.0004 d has been established. The strong variation in the phase and amplitude of the FR Cnc light curves when folded on this period implies the presence of evolving and migrating spots or spot groups on its surface. A photometric period of 18.802 +/- 0.074 has been discovered in the star HD 81032. The shape and amplitude of the photometric light curves of FR Cnc, HD 81032, HD 95559 and LO Peg are observed to be changing from one epoch to another. The change in the amplitude is mainly due to a change in the minimum of the light curve, and this May be due to a change in the spot coverage. This indicates that photometric variability is due to the presence of dark spots on the surface of active star. Two groups of spots are identified for FR Cnc and LO Peg. The spots are found to migrate, and migration periods of 0.97 year and 0.93 year are determined from the 4 years of data. A migration period of 1.12 years for one group of spots in LO Peg is also determined. Formation of a new group of spots in the star HD 95559 was also seen during our observations. A single large group of spots is found to migrate, and a migration period of 7.32 +/- 0.04 years is determined for HD 81032. The stars FR Cnc, HD 81032, HD 160934 and LO Peg are seen to be redder at the light minimum and we interpret this is due to the relatively cooler temperature of the darker regions present in the visible hemisphere. We find the lack of color-brightness correlation in the star HD 95559 and this May be due to the presence of bright faculae and plages like regions accompanied by dark spots in any one component of the this binary system. The optical spectroscopy of FR Cnc and HD 81032 carried out during 2002-2003, reveals the presence of strong and variable Ca II H and K, Halpha and Hbeta emission features indicative

  11. Approximate universal relations for neutron stars and quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-04-01

    Neutron stars and quark stars are ideal laboratories to study fundamental physics at supra nuclear densities and strong gravitational fields. Astrophysical observables, however, depend strongly on the star's internal structure, which is currently unknown due to uncertainties in the equation of state. Universal relations, however, exist among certain stellar observables that do not depend sensitively on the star's internal structure. One such set of relations is between the star's moment of inertia (I), its tidal Love number (Love) and its quadrupole moment (Q), the so-called I-Love-Q relations. Similar relations hold among the star's multipole moments, which resemble the well-known black hole no-hair theorems. Universal relations break degeneracies among astrophysical observables, leading to a variety of applications: (i) X-ray measurements of the nuclear matter equation of state, (ii) gravitational wave measurements of the intrinsic spin of inspiraling compact objects, and (iii) gravitational and astrophysical tests of General Relativity that are independent of the equation of state. We here review how the universal relations come about and all the applications that have been devised to date.

  12. Dense Axion Stars.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-16

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10^{-14}M_{⊙} if the axion mass is 10^{-4}  eV. We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10^{-20}M_{⊙} to about M_{⊙}. If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  13. Star tracking method based on multiexposure imaging for intensified star trackers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenbo; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Guangjun

    2017-07-20

    The requirements for the dynamic performance of star trackers are rapidly increasing with the development of space exploration technologies. However, insufficient knowledge of the angular acceleration has largely decreased the performance of the existing star tracking methods, and star trackers may even fail to track under highly dynamic conditions. This study proposes a star tracking method based on multiexposure imaging for intensified star trackers. The accurate estimation model of the complete motion parameters, including the angular velocity and angular acceleration, is established according to the working characteristic of multiexposure imaging. The estimation of the complete motion parameters is utilized to generate the predictive star image accurately. Therefore, the correct matching and tracking between stars in the real and predictive star images can be reliably accomplished under highly dynamic conditions. Simulations with specific dynamic conditions are conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Experiments with real starry night sky observation are also conducted for further verification. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and shows excellent performance under highly dynamic conditions.

  14. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  15. Studies of Young, Star-forming Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan

    2017-08-01

    Disks of gas and dust around forming stars - circumstellar disks - last only a few million years. This is a very small fraction of the entire lifetime of Sun-like stars, several billion years. Nevertheless, by the time circumstellar disks dissipate stars complete building up their masses, giant planets finish accreting gas, and terrestrial bodies are nearly fully grown and ready for their final assembly to become planets. Understanding the evolution of circumstellar disks are thus crucial in many contexts. Using numerical simulations as the primary tool, my thesis has focused on the studies of various physical processes that can occur throughout the lifetime of circumstellar disks, from their formation to dispersal. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 emphasize the importance of early evolution, during which time a forming star-disk system obtains mass from its natal cloud: the infall phase. In Chapter 2 and 3, I have modeled episodic outbursts of accretion in protostellar systems resulting from disk instabilities - gravitational instability and magnetorotational instability. I showed that outbursts occur preferentially during the infall phase, because the mass addition provides more favorable conditions for gravitational instability to initiate the outburst cycle, and that forming stars build up a significant fraction of their masses through repeated short-lived, episodic outbursts. The infall phase can also be important for the formation of planets. Recent ALMA observations revealed sets of bright and dark rings in circumstellar disks of young, forming stars, potentially indicating early formation of planets. In Chapter 4, I showed that infall streams can create radial pressure bumps near the outer edge of the mass landing on the disk, from which vortices can form, collecting solid particles very efficiently to make initial seeds of planets. The next three chapters highlight the role of planets in setting the observational appearance and the evolution of circumstellar disks

  16. Prospects of the "WSO-UV" Project for Star Formation Study in Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, L. N.; Makarov, D. I.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work we consider the questions of star formation and evolution of nearby dwarf galaxies. We describe the method of star formation history determination based on multicolor photometry of resolved stars and models of color-magnitude diagrams of the galaxies. We present the results of star formation rate determination and its dependence on age and metallicity for dwarf irregular and dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the two nearby galaxy groups M81 and Cen A. Similar age of the last episode of star formation in the central part of the M81 group and also unusually high level of metal enrichment in the several galaxies of the Cen A group are mentioned. We pay special attention to the consideration of perspectives of star formation study in nearby dwarf galaxies with he new WSO-UV observatory.

  17. Combinations of 148 navigation stars and the star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R.

    1980-01-01

    The angular separation of all star combinations for 148 nav star on the onboard software for space transportation system-3 flight and following missions is presented as well as the separation of each pair that satisfies the viewing constraints of using both star trackers simultaneously. Tables show (1) shuttle star catalog 1980 star position in M 1950 coordinates; (2) two star combination of 148 nav stars; and (3) summary of two star-combinations of the star tracker 5 deg filter. These 148 stars present 10,875 combinations. For the star tracker filters of plus or minus 5 deg, there are 875 combinations. Formalhaut (nav star 26) has the best number of combinations, which is 33.

  18. Submillimeter studies of main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerman, B.; Becklin, E. E.

    1993-01-01

    JCMT maps of the 800-micron emission from Vega, Fomalhaut, and Beta Pictoris are interpreted to indicate that they are not ringed by large reservoirs of distant orbiting dust particles that are too cold to have been detected by IRAS. A search for 800-micron emission from stars in the Pleiades and Ursa Majoris open clusters is reported. In comparison with the mass of dust particles near T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars, the JCMT data indicate a decline in dust mass during the initial 3 x 10 exp 8 yr that a star spends on the main sequence that is at least as rapid as (time) exp -2. It is estimated that in the Kuiper belt the ratio of total mass carried by small particles to that carried by comets is orders of magnitude smaller than this ratio is 1 AU from the sun. If 800-micron opacities calculated by Pollack et al. (1993) are correct, then the particles with radii less than 100 microns that dominate the FIR fluxes measured by IRAS cannot entirely account for the measured 800-micron fluxes at Vega, Beta Pic, and Fomalhaut; larger particles must be present as well.

  19. Identifying Young, Nearby Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Rich; Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, Ben; Bessell, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Young stars have certain characteristics, e.g., high atmospheric abundance of lithium and chromospheric activity, fast rotation, distinctive space motion and strong X-ray flux compared to that of older main sequence stars. We have selected a list of candidate young (<100Myr) and nearby (<60pc) stars based on their space motion and/or strong X-ray flux. To determine space motion of a star, one needs to know its coordinates (RA, DEC), proper motion, distance, and radial velocity. The Hipparcos and Tycho catalogues provide all this information except radial velocities. We anticipate eventually searching approx. 1000 nearby stars for signs of extreme youth. Future studies of the young stars so identified will help clarify the formation of planetary systems for times between 10 and 100 million years. Certainly, the final output of this study will be a very useful resource, especially for adaptive optics and space based searches for Jupiter-mass planets and dusty proto-planetary disks. We have begun spectroscopic observations in January, 2001 with the 2.3 m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in New South Wales, Australia. These spectra will be used to determine radial velocities and other youth indicators such as Li 6708A absorption strength and Hydrogen Balmer line intensity. Additional observations of southern hemisphere stars from SSO are scheduled in April and northern hemisphere observations will take place in May and July at the Lick Observatory of the University of California. AT SSO, to date, we have observed about 100 stars with a high resolution spectrometer (echelle) and about 50 stars with a medium spectral resolution spectrometer (the "DBS"). About 20% of these stars turn out to be young stars. Among these, two especially noteworthy stars appear to be the closest T-Tauri stars ever identified. Interestingly, these stars share the same space motions as that of a very famous star with a dusty circumstellar disk--beta Pictoris. This new finding better

  20. What Determines Star Formation Rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Neal John

    2017-06-01

    The relations between star formation and gas have received renewed attention. We combine studies on scales ranging from local (within 0.5 kpc) to distant galaxies to assess what factors contribute to star formation. These include studies of star forming regions in the Milky Way, the LMC, nearby galaxies with spatially resolved star formation, and integrated galaxy studies. We test whether total molecular gas or dense gas provides the best predictor of star formation rate. The star formation ``efficiency," defined as star formation rate divided by mass, spreads over a large range when the mass refers to molecular gas; the standard deviation of the log of the efficiency decreases by a factor of three when the mass of relatively dense molecular gas is used rather than the mass of all the molecular gas. We suggest ways to further develop the concept of "dense gas" to incorporate other factors, such as turbulence.

  1. A near infrared speckle imaging study of T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghez, A. M.; Mccarthy, D. W., Jr.; Weinberger, A. J.; Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a speckle imaging survey of T Tauri stars suggest that most, if not all, young low mass stars have companions. Repeated observations of these young binary stars have revealed orbital motion in the closest pairs (less than or = 0.3 sec), providing that these systems are indeed gravitationally bound and providing the basis for mass estimates in the upcoming years. These mass estimates are necessary to distinguish between the various binary star formation mechanisms that have been proposed to date.

  2. Observational Studies of the Clearing Phase in Proto-Planetary Disks Surrounding Intermediate Mass Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed study of circumstellar gas associated with young, intermediate-mass stars has demonstrated that, far from being unique or an infrequently occurring phenomenon, beta Pic-like infall activity is routinely observed in stars younger than 10-50 Myr when the observer's line of sight lies within 15 degrees of the disk mid-plane. Detailed studies of 2 Herbig Ae/Be stars, AB Aur and HD 163296 demonstrate that enhanced infall episodes last 20-60 hours, comparable to the duration of similar episodes in beta Pictoris. The infall activity is consistent with detection of the comae of swarms of star-grazing bodies of asteroidal to cometary composition. Episodic fluctuations in the infall activity are clearly present by approximately 6 Myr, and may indicate the presence of massive planets within the disk. This study has therefore, directly contributed to NASA's Origins of Planetary Systems theme by identifying under what conditions extra-solar planetesimals can be remotely sensed, indicating that such bodies appear to be routinely detectable among young stars in the 1-10 Myr range, and suggesting that temporal studies of spectroscopic variability may provide a means of identifying those systems harboring massive planets. This study has resulted in 2 refereed review papers, 13 other refereed papers, and 17 conference papers.

  3. Highly-evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    The ways in which the IUE has proved useful in studying highly evolved stars are reviewed. The importance of high dispersion spectra for abundance analyses of the sd0 stars and for studies of the wind from the central star of NGC 6543 and the wind from the 0 type component of Vela X-1 is shown. Low dispersion spectra are used for absolute spectrophotometry of the dwarf nova, Ex Hya. Angular resolution is important for detecting and locating UV sources in globular clusters.

  4. Studies of Disks Around the Sun and Other Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We are conducting research designed to enhance our understanding of the evolution and detectability of comet clouds and disks. This area holds promise for also improving our understanding of outer solar system formation, the bombardment history of the planets, the transport of volatiles and organics from the outer solar system to the inner planets, and to the ultimate fate of comet clouds around the Sun and other stars. According to 'standard' theory, both the Kuiper Disk and the Oort Cloud are (at least in part) natural products of the planetary accumulation stage of solar system formation. One expects such assemblages to be a common attribute of other solar systems. Therefore, searches for comet disks and clouds orbiting other stars offer a new method for inferring the presence of planetary systems. This two-element program consists modeling collisions in the Kuiper Disk and the dust disks around other stars. The modeling effort focuses on moving from our simple, first-generation, Kuiper disk collision rate model, to a time-dependent, second-generation model that incorporates physical collisions, velocity evolution, dynamical erosion, and various dust transport mechanisms. This second generation model will be used to study the evolution of surface mass density and the object-size spectrum in the disk. The observational effort focuses on obtaining submm/mm-wave flux density measurements of 25-30 IR excess stars in order to better constrain the masses, spatial extents and structure of their dust ensembles.

  5. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  6. The Drifting Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  7. A robust star identification algorithm with star shortlisting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Deval Samirbhai; Chen, Shoushun; Low, Kay Soon

    2018-05-01

    A star tracker provides the most accurate attitude solution in terms of arc seconds compared to the other existing attitude sensors. When no prior attitude information is available, it operates in "Lost-In-Space (LIS)" mode. Star pattern recognition, also known as star identification algorithm, forms the most crucial part of a star tracker in the LIS mode. Recognition reliability and speed are the two most important parameters of a star pattern recognition technique. In this paper, a novel star identification algorithm with star ID shortlisting is proposed. Firstly, the star IDs are shortlisted based on worst-case patch mismatch, and later stars are identified in the image by an initial match confirmed with a running sequential angular match technique. The proposed idea is tested on 16,200 simulated star images having magnitude uncertainty, noise stars, positional deviation, and varying size of the field of view. The proposed idea is also benchmarked with the state-of-the-art star pattern recognition techniques. Finally, the real-time performance of the proposed technique is tested on the 3104 real star images captured by a star tracker SST-20S currently mounted on a satellite. The proposed technique can achieve an identification accuracy of 98% and takes only 8.2 ms for identification on real images. Simulation and real-time results depict that the proposed technique is highly robust and achieves a high speed of identification suitable for actual space applications.

  8. Focused Study of Thermonuclear Bursts on Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevez, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    X-ray bursters form a class of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries where accreted material from a donor star undergoes rapid thermonuclear burning in the surface layers of a neutron star. The flux released can temporarily exceed the Eddington limit and drive the photosphere to large radii. Such photospheric radius expansion bursts likely eject nuclear burning ashes into the interstellar medium, and may make possible the detection of photoionization edges. Indeed, theoretical models predict that absorption edges from 58Fe at 9.2 keV, 60Zn and 62Zn at 12.2 keV should be detectable by the future missions Simbol-X and NuSTAR. A positive detection would thus probe the nuclear burning as well as the gravitational redshift from the neutron star. Moreover, likely observations of atomic X-ray spectral components reflected from the inner accretion disk have been reported. The high spectral resolution capabilities of the focusing X-ray telescopes may therefore make possible to differentiate between the potential interpretations of the X-ray bursts spectral features.

  9. Which of Kepler's Stars Flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    The habitability of distant exoplanets is dependent upon many factors one of which is the activity of their host stars. To learn about which stars are most likely to flare, a recent study examines tens of thousands of stellar flares observed by Kepler.Need for a Broader SampleArtists rendering of a flaring dwarf star. [NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger]Most of our understanding of what causes a star to flare is based on observations of the only star near enough to examine in detail the Sun. But in learning from a sample size of one, a challenge arises: we must determine which conclusions are unique to the Sun (or Sun-like stars), and which apply to other stellar types as well.Based on observations and modeling, astronomers think that stellar flares result from the reconnection of magnetic field lines in a stars outer atmosphere, the corona. The magnetic activity is thought to be driven by a dynamo caused by motions in the stars convective zone.HR diagram of the Kepler stars, with flaring main-sequence (yellow), giant (red) and A-star (green) stars in the authors sample indicated. [Van Doorsselaere et al. 2017]To test whether these ideas are true generally, we need to understand what types of stars exhibit flares, and what stellar properties correlate with flaring activity. A team of scientists led by Tom Van Doorsselaere (KU Leuven, Belgium) has now used an enormous sample of flares observed by Kepler to explore these statistics.Intriguing TrendsVan Doorsselaere and collaborators used a new automated flare detection and characterization algorithm to search through the raw light curves from Quarter 15 of the Kepler mission, building a sample of 16,850 flares on 6,662 stars. They then used these to study the dependence of the flare occurrence rate, duration, energy, and amplitude on the stellar spectral type and rotation period.This large statistical study led the authors to several interesting conclusions, including:Flare star incidence rate as a a

  10. Asteroseismology and mass loss in Be stars. Study with CoRoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diago, P. D.

    The general aim of this work is the study of Be stars with the CoRoT space mission. The mechanisms responsible of the production and dynamics of the circumstellar gas in Be stars are still not constrained. Observations of non-radial pulsation beating phenomena connected to outbursts point toward a relevance of pulsation, but this mechanism cannot be generalized. In this regard, the observation of classical Be stars with the high-precision CoRoT satellite is providing important keys to understand the physics of these objects and the nature of the Be phenomenon. In order to study the light variations of the selected stars we use photometric and spectroscopic observations. These observations allow us to extract frequencies, amplitudes and phases of these variations. As we will show, these light variations can be connected with pulsations on the stellar surface. For carrying out the frequency analysis we have developed a new code based on standard Fourier analysis. The point is that this code, called PASPER, allows the frequency analysis of large sets of light curves in an automatic mode. This Ph.D. thesis is arranged as follows: In the first three Chapters we describe the scientific framework of this project, giving a brief description on Asteroseismology, presenting the current status of Be stars, and describing the basics of the Fourier analysis and the rudiments of the time series analysis. At the early begin of this Ph.D. thesis, the CoRoT satellite was still on ground getting ready for the launch. In this context, we perform a search for short-period B and Be star variables in the low metallicity environment of the Magellanic Clouds. This study constitutes the Part I of this Ph.D. thesis. This Part has a double goal: i) to test the frequency analysis codes; and ii) to detect observationally beta Cephei and SPB-like B-type pulsators in low metallicity environments, actually not predicted by the pulsational theory and models. This constitutes the PartI. Part II is

  11. A mid-IR study of the circumstellar environment of Herbig Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeff, A. P.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; van den Ancker, M. E.; Min, M.; Stap, F. A.; Pantin, E.; van Boekel, R.; Acke, B.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; de Koter, A.

    2012-02-01

    Context. The study of the formation of massive stars is complicated because of the short times scales, large distances, and obscuring natal clouds. There are observational and theoretical indications that the circumstellar environment of Herbig Be (HBe) stars is substantially different from that of their lower mass counterparts, the T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars. Aims: We map the spatial distribution and mineralogy of the warm circumstellar dust of a sample of HBe stars. We compare our results to a sample of less massive Herbig Ae stars. Methods: We used literature photometry to obtain optical extinctions and stellar parameters of the targets. We obtained N-band imaging and long-slit spectroscopic data with the VISIR instrument at the VLT and we analyzed these data. We performed photometry of the images and extracted spatial information. We corrected the spectra for extinction and performed mineralogical fits. We fitted Gaussian profiles to characterize the spatial extent of the spectra along the VISIR slit. Results: We find that the mid-infrared (IR) emission of the HBe stars is typically characterized by a circumstellar disk that efficiently reprocesses a substantial portion of the stellar flux. The mid-IR flux levels, the spatial compactness, and the dust composition are quite similar to those of the Herbig Ae stars. We find upper limits to the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) size of the mid-IR emission of ~500 AU. The main differences with the lower mass stars are the lower overall IR excess with a greater variety in shapes, the weaker PAH reprocessing power, and the lack of a silica-forsterite relation. The discrepancies between VISIR and IRAS photometry, the far-IR contributions and the large PAH sizes of HBe stars are attributed to natal clouds. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the Herbig Be disks are flatter than those around lower mass stars and they are likely truncated from the outside by photoevaporation. Based on observations collected at the

  12. Studies of the structure of massive hybrid stars within a modified NJL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Ming; Zhang, Jin-Li; Yan, Yan; Huang, Yong-Feng; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we use the equation of state based on a modification of the 2 +1 flavors Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model to study the quark matter of hybrid stars. For comparison, we utilize five EOSs of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model to describe the hadronic phase. With the three-window crossover interpolation approach, we try to construct relatively soft hybrid EOSs but find the maximum masses of hybrid stars do not differ much. The results are quite close to the 2 solar mass, which is consistent with the mass constraint of PSR J 0348 +0432 . Furthermore, it is noteworthy that the heaviest stable stars have central densities higher than that of the deconfinement transition, suggesting a pure quark core in the hybrid star.

  13. The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna; Krumholz, Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. Previous theoretical and observational studies have concluded that the feedback associated with massive stars' radiation fields is the dominant mechanism regulating massive star and massive star cluster (MSC) formation. Therefore detailed simulation of the formation of massive stars and MSCs, which host hundreds to thousands of massive stars, requires an accurate treatment of radiation. For this purpose, we have developed a new, highly accurate hybrid radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform a suite of three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive stars and MSCs. For individual massive stellar systems, we simulate the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the massive stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of RT instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of the radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. RT instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. To model MSC formation, we simulate the collapse of a dense, turbulent, magnetized Mcl = 106 M⊙ molecular cloud. We find that the influence of the magnetic pressure and radiative feedback slows down star formation. Furthermore, we find that star formation is suppressed along dense filaments where the magnetic field is

  14. A Statistical Study of the Mass Distribution of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zheng; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Wang, De-Hua; Pan, Yuan-Yue; Lei, Ya-Juan

    2014-07-01

    By reviewing the methods of mass measurements of neutron stars in four different kinds of systems, i.e., the high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), double neutron star systems (DNSs) and neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binary systems, we have collected the orbital parameters of 40 systems. By using the boot-strap method and the Monte-Carlo method, we have rebuilt the likelihood probability curves of the measured masses of 46 neutron stars. The statistical analysis of the simulation results shows that the masses of neutron stars in the X-ray neutron star systems and those in the radio pulsar systems exhibit different distributions. Besides, the Bayes statistics of these four different kind systems yields the most-probable probability density distributions of these four kind systems to be (1.340 ± 0.230)M8, (1, 505 ± 0.125)M8,(1.335 ± 0.055)M8 and (1.495 ± 0.225)M8, respectively. It is noteworthy that the masses of neutron stars in the HMXB and DNS systems are smaller than those in the other two kind systems by approximately 0.16M8. This result is consistent with the theoretical model of the pulsar to be accelerated to the millisecond order of magnitude via accretion of approximately 0.2M8. If the HMXBs and LMXBs are respectively taken to be the precursors of the BNS and NS-WD systems, then the influence of the accretion effect on the masses of neutron stars in the HMXB systems should be exceedingly small. Their mass distributions should be very close to the initial one during the formation of neutron stars. As for the LMXB and NS-WD systems, they should have already under- gone the process of suffcient accretion, hence there arises rather large deviation from the initial mass distribution.

  15. Star Formation Activity Beyond the Outer Arm. I. WISE -selected Candidate Star-forming Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Natsuko; Yasui, Chikako; Saito, Masao

    The outer Galaxy beyond the Outer Arm provides a good opportunity to study star formation in an environment significantly different from that in the solar neighborhood. However, star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy have never been comprehensively studied or cataloged because of the difficulties in detecting them at such large distances. We studied 33 known young star-forming regions associated with 13 molecular clouds at R {sub G} ≥ 13.5 kpc in the outer Galaxy with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE ) mid-infrared all-sky survey. From their color distribution, we developed a simple identification criterion of star-forming regions inmore » the outer Galaxy with the WISE color. We applied the criterion to all the WISE sources in the molecular clouds in the outer Galaxy at R {sub G} ≥ 13.5 kpc detected with the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) {sup 12}CO survey of the outer Galaxy, of which the survey region is 102.°49 ≤  l  ≤ 141.°54, −3.°03 ≤  b  ≤ 5.°41, and successfully identified 711 new candidate star-forming regions in 240 molecular clouds. The large number of samples enables us to perform the statistical study of star formation properties in the outer Galaxy for the first time. This study is crucial to investigate the fundamental star formation properties, including star formation rate, star formation efficiency, and initial mass function, in a primordial environment such as the early phase of the Galaxy formation.« less

  16. Mechanism of mRNA-STAR domain interaction: Molecular dynamics simulations of Mammalian Quaking STAR protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Anirudh, C R

    2017-10-03

    STAR proteins are evolutionary conserved mRNA-binding proteins that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression at all stages of RNA metabolism. These proteins possess conserved STAR domain that recognizes identical RNA regulatory elements as YUAAY. Recently reported crystal structures show that STAR domain is composed of N-terminal QUA1, K-homology domain (KH) and C-terminal QUA2, and mRNA binding is mediated by KH-QUA2 domain. Here, we present simulation studies done to investigate binding of mRNA to STAR protein, mammalian Quaking protein (QKI). We carried out conventional MD simulations of STAR domain in presence and absence of mRNA, and studied the impact of mRNA on the stability, dynamics and underlying allosteric mechanism of STAR domain. Our unbiased simulations results show that presence of mRNA stabilizes the overall STAR domain by reducing the structural deviations, correlating the 'within-domain' motions, and maintaining the native contacts information. Absence of mRNA not only influenced the essential modes of motion of STAR domain, but also affected the connectivity of networks within STAR domain. We further explored the dissociation of mRNA from STAR domain using umbrella sampling simulations, and the results suggest that mRNA binding to STAR domain occurs in multi-step: first conformational selection of mRNA backbone conformations, followed by induced fit mechanism as nucleobases interact with STAR domain.

  17. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  18. Rotating stars in relativity.

    PubMed

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  19. The Bulgarian Contribution to the Study of variable stars on observational data from the Kepler mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D. P.; Dimitrov, D. P.; Radeva, V. S.; Vasileva, D. L.; Atanasova, T. V.; Stateva, I. V.; Petrov, N. I.; Iliev, I. Kh.

    2018-02-01

    This review paper presents the results of investigations of variable stars obtained by Bulgarian astronomers based on observations of Kepler mission. The main contributions are: determination of orbits and global parameters of more than 100 binary stars; creation of the largest catalog of eccentric stars; identification of sixty new binaries with eccentricity over 0.5; discovery of 19 heartbeat stars; detailed investigation of the spot and flare activity of several binary stars; asteroseismic study of three pulsating stars; detection of deep transits of WD 1145+017 due to its disentangling planet system. The paper illustrates not only scientific significance but also educational and social impact of the work on these tasks.

  20. High Dispersion Line Profile Studies of TW HYA and Other Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1984-07-01

    We propose to extend our study of line profiles in T Tauri stars by obtaining a 16 hour SWP-HI spectrum of TW Hya and 6-8 hour LWP-HI spectra of TW Hya, AK Sco, CoD -35 10525 and CoD -33 10685. High dispersion spectra of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars provide unique information on line widths, shifts, and asymmetries, as well as evidence for mass outflow, circumstellar absorption, and diagnostics for the temperature structure of the outer atmosphere layers of these complex yet incredibly important objects. We have previously obtained and studied line profiles in RU Lupi and the prototype star T Tau. RU Lupi has line profiles that are dominated by the wind expansion, for example the MgII and FeII multiplet UV1 profiles are unique in that they have a classical P Cygni shape, whereas T Tau has more symmetric emission profiles indicative of a chromosphere and hotter layers not dominated by expansion. TW Hya is different from these two previously studied stars in that it may be the brightest known example of a post-T Tauri star, and hence less active and older than the other PMS stars. We intend to compare its line profiles with those of RU Lupi and T Tauri in order to understand the differences in the non-thermal mass motions, wind expansion, and thermal structures of these three very different T Tau stars. The requested LWPHI spectra are to obtain MgII and FeII multiplet UV1. profiles of 4 different T Tauri objects so as to infer the expansion and thermal structure in their chromospheric layers.

  1. Rejuvenation of the Innocent Bystander: Results from a Pilot X-ray Study of Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, Fernando; Montez, Rodolfo; Green, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We present the results of a pilot study by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of X-ray emission from dwarf Carbon (dC) stars. Carbon stars were thought to be exclusively AGB stars but main sequence dwarfs showing carbon molecular bands appear to be the dominant variety. The existence of dC stars is surprising since dwarf stars cannot intrinsically produce carbon as an AGB star can. It is hypothesized that dC stars are polluted by an evolved companion star. Evidence of past pollution can appear in X-ray emission where increased coronal activity (“spin-up”) or mass accretion via a disk can be detected. Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory we detected X-ray photons in the vicinity of all the dC stars in our a pilot sample. For each detection we characterized the X-ray emission and compared to the emission expected from potential emission scenarios. Although the process that produces the X-ray emission from dC stars is presently unclear and our pilot sample is small, our results suggest that X-ray emission might be a universal characteristic of dC stars. Further examination of the X-ray emission plus future X-ray and multiwavelength observations will help us better understand the nature of these intriguing stars.

  2. Using CETUS to study the first stars and first metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian; CETUS Team

    2018-01-01

    The nucleosynthetic signatures of the first stars and supernovae are imprinted in the compositions of the most metal-poor stars found today. Only a few tens of absorption lines are commonly found in the optical spectra of the second-generation stars, so only 5-10 elements are regularly detected. Many others (Be, B, Si, P, S, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) are expected to be present but are rarely detected, and the upper limits derived from their optical non-detections are often uninteresting. The UV part of the spectrum accessible to the high-resolution UV spectrograph on CETUS would enable all of these elements to be detected if present in the most metal-poor stars known. We illustrate some of the ground-breaking observations of these stars that could be made with this mission.

  3. The Evolutionary Status of Be Stars: Results from a Photometric Study of Southern Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSwain, M. Virginia; Gies, Douglas R.

    2005-11-01

    Be stars are a class of rapidly rotating B stars with circumstellar disks that cause Balmer and other line emission. There are three possible reasons for the rapid rotation of Be stars: they may have been born as rapid rotators, spun up by binary mass transfer, or spun up during the main-sequence (MS) evolution of B stars. To test the various formation scenarios, we have conducted a photometric survey of 55 open clusters in the southern sky. Of these, five clusters are probably not physically associated groups and our results for two other clusters are not reliable, but we identify 52 definite Be stars and an additional 129 Be candidates in the remaining clusters. We use our results to examine the age and evolutionary dependence of the Be phenomenon. We find an overall increase in the fraction of Be stars with age until 100 Myr, and Be stars are most common among the brightest, most massive B-type stars above the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS). We show that a spin-up phase at the terminal-age main sequence (TAMS) cannot produce the observed distribution of Be stars, but up to 73% of the Be stars detected may have been spun-up by binary mass transfer. Most of the remaining Be stars were likely rapid rotators at birth. Previous studies have suggested that low metallicity and high cluster density may also favor Be star formation. Our results indicate a possible increase in the fraction of Be stars with increasing cluster distance from the Galactic center (in environments of decreasing metallicity). However, the trend is not significant and could be ruled out due to the intrinsic scatter in our data. We also find no relationship between the fraction of Be stars and cluster density.

  4. Pulsation in Chemically Peculiar Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, M.

    2015-04-01

    Chemically peculiar stars offer the opportunity to study the interaction of strong magnetic fields, rotation, and pulsation. The rapidly oscillating chemically peculiar A stars (roAp) are a subgroup of the chemically peculiar magnetic A stars. They are high-overtone, low-degree p-mode pulsators. Until recently, the classical asteroseismic analysis, i.e., frequency analysis, of these stars was based on ground and space photometric observations. Significant progress was achieved through the access to the uninterrupted, ultra-high-precision data from the MOST, COROT, and Kepler satellites. Over the last ten years, the studies of roAp stars have been altered drastically from the observational point of view through the usage of time-resolved, high-resolution spectra. Their unusual pulsation characteristics, caused by the interplay between short vertical lengths of pulsation waves and strong stratification of chemical elements, allow us to examine the upper roAp atmosphere in more detail than is possible for any star except the Sun. In this paper a review of the results of recent studies of the pulsations of roAp stars is presented.

  5. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  6. How Do Multiple-Star Systems Form? VLA Study Reveals "Smoking Gun"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Astronomers have used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to image a young, multiple-star system with unprecedented detail, yielding important clues about how such systems are formed. Most Sun-sized or larger stars in the Universe are not single, like our Sun, but are members of multiple-star systems. Astronomers have been divided on how such systems can form, producing competing theoretical models for this process. Multiple Star Formation Graphic Proposed Formation Process for L1551 IRS5 CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for page of graphics and full information The new VLA study produced a "smoking gun" supporting one of the competing models, said Jeremy Lim, of the Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan, whose study, done with Shigehisa Takakuwa of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, is published in the December 10 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. Ironically, their discovery of a third, previously-unknown, young star in the system may support a second theoretical model. "There may be more than one way to make a multiple-star system," Lim explained. The astronomers observed an object called L1551 IRS5, young, still-forming protostars enshrouded in a cloud of gas and dust, some 450 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Taurus. Invisible to optical telescopes because of the gas and dust, this object was discovered in 1976 by astronomers using infrared telescopes. A VLA study in 1998 showed two young stars orbiting each other, each surrounded by a disk of dust that may, in time, congeal into a system of planets. Lim and Takakuwa re-examined the system, using improved technical capabilities that greatly boosted the quality of their images. "In the earlier VLA study, only half of the VLA's 27 antennas had receivers that could collect the radio waves, at a frequency of 43 GigaHertz (GHz), coming from the dusty disks. When we re-observed this

  7. A Study of Magnetic CP Stars in Open Clusters and Associations with the 6-m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, I. I.; Semenko, E. A.; Yakunin, I. A.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.

    2017-06-01

    The study of magnetic CP stars in groups of different ages allows us to obtain data on the origin and evolution of large-scale magnetic fields. We selected 17 groups for observation with the 6-m telescope. Here we draw first conclusions from the study of the Orion OB1 association. Six new magnetic stars in it are added to those seventeen that had been known earlier, ten more CP stars were suspected to have fields. A complex structure of the magnetic field in the star HD 34736 has been found, which is indicative of its fossil origin.

  8. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  9. An unbiased study of debris discs around A-type stars with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thureau, N. D.; Greaves, J. S.; Matthews, B. C.; Kennedy, G.; Phillips, N.; Booth, M.; Duchêne, G.; Horner, J.; Rodriguez, D. R.; Sibthorpe, B.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Herschel DEBRIS (Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) survey brings us a unique perspective on the study of debris discs around main-sequence A-type stars. Bias-free by design, the survey offers a remarkable data set with which to investigate the cold disc properties. The statistical analysis of the 100 and 160 μm data for 86 main-sequence A stars yields a lower than previously found debris disc rate. Considering better than 3σ excess sources, we find a detection rate ≥24 ± 5 per cent at 100 μm which is similar to the debris disc rate around main-sequence F/G/K-spectral type stars. While the 100 and 160 μm excesses slowly decline with time, debris discs with large excesses are found around some of the oldest A stars in our sample, evidence that the debris phenomenon can survive throughout the length of the main sequence (˜1 Gyr). Debris discs are predominantly detected around the youngest and hottest stars in our sample. Stellar properties such as metallicity are found to have no effect on the debris disc incidence. Debris discs are found around A stars in single systems and multiple systems at similar rates. While tight and wide binaries (<1 and >100 au, respectively) host debris discs with a similar frequency and global properties, no intermediate separation debris systems were detected in our sample.

  10. The most luminous stars.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, R M; Davidson, K

    1984-01-20

    Stars with individual luminosities more than a million times that of the sun are now being studied in a variety of contexts. Observational and theoretical ideas about the most luminous stars have changed greatly in the past few years. They can be observed spectroscopically even in nearby galaxies. They are not very stable; some have had violent outbursts in which large amounts of mass were lost. Because of their instabilities, these stars do not evolve to become red superglants as less luminous stars do. Theoretical scenarios for the evolution of these most massive stars depend on the effects of turbulence and mixing combined with high radition densities.

  11. Arm retraction dynamics of entangled star polymers: A forward flux sampling method study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Likhtman, Alexei E.; Wang, Zuowei

    2017-07-01

    The study of dynamics and rheology of well-entangled branched polymers remains a challenge for computer simulations due to the exponentially growing terminal relaxation times of these polymers with increasing molecular weights. We present an efficient simulation algorithm for studying the arm retraction dynamics of entangled star polymers by combining the coarse-grained slip-spring (SS) model with the forward flux sampling (FFS) method. This algorithm is first applied to simulate symmetric star polymers in the absence of constraint release (CR). The reaction coordinate for the FFS method is determined by finding good agreement of the simulation results on the terminal relaxation times of mildly entangled stars with those obtained from direct shooting SS model simulations with the relative difference between them less than 5%. The FFS simulations are then carried out for strongly entangled stars with arm lengths up to 16 entanglements that are far beyond the accessibility of brute force simulations in the non-CR condition. Apart from the terminal relaxation times, the same method can also be applied to generate the relaxation spectra of all entanglements along the arms which are desired for the development of quantitative theories of entangled branched polymers. Furthermore, we propose a numerical route to construct the experimentally measurable relaxation correlation functions by effectively linking the data stored at each interface during the FFS runs. The obtained star arm end-to-end vector relaxation functions Φ (t ) and the stress relaxation function G(t) are found to be in reasonably good agreement with standard SS simulation results in the terminal regime. Finally, we demonstrate that this simulation method can be conveniently extended to study the arm-retraction problem in entangled star polymer melts with CR by modifying the definition of the reaction coordinate, while the computational efficiency will depend on the particular slip-spring or slip

  12. Massive Stars and Star Clusters in the Era of JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Richard

    Massive stars lie at the center of the web of physical processes that has shaped the universe as we know it, governing the evolution of the interstellar medium of galaxies, producing a majority of the heavy elements, and thereby determining the evolution of galaxies. Massive stars are also important as signposts, since they produce most of the light and almost all the ionizing radiation in regions of active star formation. A significant fraction of all stars form in massive clusters, which will be observable throughout the visible universe with JWST. Their luminosities are so high that the pressure of their light on interstellar dust grains is likely the dominant feedback mechanism regulating their formation. While this process has been studied in the local Universe, much less attention has been focused on how it behaves at high redshift, where the dust abundance is much lower due to the overall lower abundance of heavy elements. The high redshift Universe also differs from the nearby one in that observations imply that high redshift star formation occurs at significantly higher densities than are typically found locally. We propose to simulate the formation of individual massive stars from the high redshift universe to the present day universe spanning metallicities ranging from 0.001 to 1.0 and column densities from 0.1to 30.0 g/cm2 focusing on how the process depends on both the dust abundance and on the density of the star-forming gas. These simulations will be among the first to treat the formation of Population II stars, which form in regions of low metallicity. Based on these results, we shall then simulate the formation of clusters of stars across also cosmic time, both of moderate mass, such as the Orion Nebula Cluster, and of high mass, such as the super star clusters seen in starburst galaxies. These state-of-the-art simulations will be carried out using our newly developed advanced techniques in our radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic AMR code ORION, for

  13. Cataclysmic Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellier, Coel

    2001-01-01

    Cataclysmic variable stars are the most variable stars in the night sky, fluctuating in brightness continually on timescales from seconds to hours to weeks to years. The changes can be recorded using amateur telescopes, yet are also the subject of intensive study by professional astronomers. That study has led to an understanding of cataclysmic variables as binary stars, orbiting so closely that material transfers from one star to the other. The resulting process of accretion is one of the most important in astrophysics. This book presents the first account of cataclysmic variables at an introductory level. Assuming no previous knowledge of the field, it explains the basic principles underlying the variability, while providing an extensive compilation of cataclysmic variable light curves. Aimed at amateur astronomers, undergraduates, and researchers, the main text is accessible to those with no mathematical background, while supplementary boxes present technical details and equations.

  14. A brightness-referenced star identification algorithm for APS star trackers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Jingnan; Liu, Ning

    2014-10-08

    Star trackers are currently the most accurate spacecraft attitude sensors. As a result, they are widely used in remote sensing satellites. Since traditional charge-coupled device (CCD)-based star trackers have a limited sensitivity range and dynamic range, the matching process for a star tracker is typically not very sensitive to star brightness. For active pixel sensor (APS) star trackers, the intensity of an imaged star is valuable information that can be used in star identification process. In this paper an improved brightness referenced star identification algorithm is presented. This algorithm utilizes the k-vector search theory and adds imaged stars' intensities to narrow the search scope and therefore increase the efficiency of the matching process. Based on different imaging conditions (slew, bright bodies, etc.) the developed matching algorithm operates in one of two identification modes: a three-star mode, and a four-star mode. If the reference bright stars (the stars brighter than three magnitude) show up, the algorithm runs the three-star mode and efficiency is further improved. The proposed method was compared with other two distinctive methods the pyramid and geometric voting methods. All three methods were tested with simulation data and actual in orbit data from the APS star tracker of ZY-3. Using a catalog composed of 1500 stars, the results show that without false stars the efficiency of this new method is 4~5 times that of the pyramid method and 35~37 times that of the geometric method.

  15. A Study Of Anomalous Stars and Binary Populations Within Open Clusters: Tests Of Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Braden, Ella; Latham, David W.

    2008-08-01

    ``Anomalous'' stars, such as blue stragglers and more recently sub- subgiants, have been an enduring challenge for stellar evolution theory. Recently it has become clear that in star clusters these systems are closely linked to the binary star populations. Furthermore, through advances in N-body modeling, we have come to realize that stellar dynamical processes play a central role in the formation of such anomalous stars. Indeed, these stars trace the interface between the classical fields of stellar evolution and stellar dynamics. We propose a thesis study to directly probe this interface through high-precision radial-velocity measurements of the anomalous stars and the binary populations in four open clusters. We have selected NGC 188 (7 Gyr), M67 (NGC 2682; 4 Gyr), NGC 6819 (2.4 Gyr), and M35 (NGC 2168; 150 Myr), as these span a wide range in age, are rich enough to provide statistically significant conclusions, and already have an extensive base of kinematic, spectroscopic, and photometric observations from the WIYN Open Cluster Study. Our proposed observations will define the spectroscopic hard binary populations (fraction, frequency distributions of orbital parameters, mass ratios) for orbital periods approaching the hard-soft boundary. These observations will also provide a comprehensive survey for anomalous stars, including secure establishment of their cluster membership. These data will allow us to perform the first detailed comparison to predictions from open cluster simulations of the binary populations among normal and anomalous stars, and thereby to constrain the evolutionary paths from one to the other.

  16. A Study Of Anomalous Stars and Binary Populations Within Open Clusters: Tests Of Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Gosnell, Natalie; Latham, David W.

    2009-02-01

    ``Anomalous'' stars, such as blue stragglers and more recently sub- subgiants, have been an enduring challenge for stellar evolution theory. Recently it has become clear that in star clusters these systems are closely linked to the binary star populations. Furthermore, through advances in N-body modeling, we have come to realize that stellar dynamical processes play a central role in the formation of such anomalous stars. Indeed, these stars trace the interface between the classical fields of stellar evolution and stellar dynamics. We propose a thesis study to directly probe this interface through high-precision radial-velocity measurements of the anomalous stars and the binary populations in four open clusters. We have selected NGC 188 (7 Gyr), M67 (NGC 2682; 4 Gyr), NGC 6819 (2.4 Gyr), and M35 (NGC 2168; 150 Myr), as these span a wide range in age, are rich enough to provide statistically significant conclusions, and already have an extensive base of kinematic, spectroscopic, and photometric observations from the WIYN Open Cluster Study. Our proposed observations will define the spectroscopic hard binary populations (fraction, frequency distributions of orbital parameters, mass ratios) for orbital periods approaching the hard-soft boundary. These observations will also provide a comprehensive survey for anomalous stars, including secure establishment of their cluster membership. These data will allow us to perform the first detailed comparison to predictions from open cluster simulations of the binary populations among normal and anomalous stars, and thereby to constrain the evolutionary paths from one to the other.

  17. A Study Of Anomalous Stars and Binary Populations Within Open Clusters: Tests Of Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Braden, Ella; Latham, David W.

    2008-02-01

    ``Anomalous'' stars, such as blue stragglers and more recently sub- subgiants, have been an enduring challenge for stellar evolution theory. Recently it has become clear that in star clusters these systems are closely linked to the binary star populations. Furthermore, through advances in N-body modeling, we have come to realize that stellar dynamical processes play a central role in the formation of such anomalous stars. Indeed, these stars trace the interface between the classical fields of stellar evolution and stellar dynamics. We propose a thesis study to directly probe this interface through high-precision radial-velocity measurements of the anomalous stars and the binary populations in four open clusters. We have selected NGC 188 (7 Gyr), M67 (NGC 2682; 4 Gyr), NGC 6819 (2.4 Gyr), and M35 (NGC 2168; 150 Myr), as these span a wide range in age, are rich enough to provide statistically significant conclusions, and already have an extensive base of kinematic, spectroscopic, and photometric observations from the WIYN Open Cluster Study. Our proposed observations will define the spectroscopic hard binary populations (fraction, frequency distributions of orbital parameters, mass ratios) for orbital periods approaching the hard-soft boundary. These observations will also provide a comprehensive survey for anomalous stars, including secure establishment of their cluster membership. These data will allow us to perform the first detailed comparison to predictions from open cluster simulations of the binary populations among normal and anomalous stars, and thereby to constrain the evolutionary paths from one to the other.

  18. Toward the first stars: hints from the CEMP-no stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choplin, A.

    2017-12-01

    CEMP-no stars are iron-deficient, carbon-rich stars, with no or little s- and r-elements. Because of their very low iron content, they are often considered to be closely linked to the first stars. Their origin is still a matter of debate. Understanding their formation could provide very valuable information on the first stars, early nucleosynthesis, early galactic chemical evolution and first supernovae. The most explored formation scenario for CEMP-no stars suggests that CEMP-no stars formed from the ejecta (wind and/or supernova) of a massive source star, that lived before the CEMP-no star. Here we discuss models of fast rotating massive source stars with and without triggering a late mixing event just before the end of the life of the source star. We find that without this late mixing event, the bulk of observed CEMP-no stars cannot be reproduced by our models. On the opposite, the bulk is reproductible if adding the late mixing event in the source star models.

  19. Star Formation in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    M16 (the Eagle Nebula) is a striking star forming region, with a complex morphology of gas and dust sculpted by the massive stars in NGC 6611. Detailed studies of the famous ``elephant trunks'' dramatically increased our understanding of the massive star feedback into the parent molecular cloud. A rich young stellar population (2-3 Myr) has been identified, from massive O-stars down to substellar masses. Deep into the remnant molecular material, embedded protostars, Herbig-Haro objects and maser sources bear evidence of ongoing star formation in the nebula, possibly triggered by the massive cluster members. M 16 is a excellent template for the study of star formation under the hostile environment created by massive O-stars. This review aims at providing an observational overview not only of the young stellar population but also of the gas remnant of the star formation process.

  20. A Brightness-Referenced Star Identification Algorithm for APS Star Trackers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Jingnan; Liu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Star trackers are currently the most accurate spacecraft attitude sensors. As a result, they are widely used in remote sensing satellites. Since traditional charge-coupled device (CCD)-based star trackers have a limited sensitivity range and dynamic range, the matching process for a star tracker is typically not very sensitive to star brightness. For active pixel sensor (APS) star trackers, the intensity of an imaged star is valuable information that can be used in star identification process. In this paper an improved brightness referenced star identification algorithm is presented. This algorithm utilizes the k-vector search theory and adds imaged stars' intensities to narrow the search scope and therefore increase the efficiency of the matching process. Based on different imaging conditions (slew, bright bodies, etc.) the developed matching algorithm operates in one of two identification modes: a three-star mode, and a four-star mode. If the reference bright stars (the stars brighter than three magnitude) show up, the algorithm runs the three-star mode and efficiency is further improved. The proposed method was compared with other two distinctive methods the pyramid and geometric voting methods. All three methods were tested with simulation data and actual in orbit data from the APS star tracker of ZY-3. Using a catalog composed of 1500 stars, the results show that without false stars the efficiency of this new method is 4∼5 times that of the pyramid method and 35∼37 times that of the geometric method. PMID:25299950

  1. The SUNBIRD survey: characterizing the super star cluster populations of intensely star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamanakoto, Zara; Väisänen, Petri

    2017-03-01

    Super star clusters (SSCs) represent the youngest and most massive form of known gravitationally bound star clusters in the Universe. They are born abundantly in environments that trigger strong and violent star formation. We investigate the properties of these massive SSCs in a sample of 42 nearby starbursts and luminous infrared galaxies. The targets form the sample of the SUperNovae and starBursts in the InfraReD (SUNBIRD) survey that were imaged using near-infrared (NIR) K-band adaptive optics mounted on the Gemini/NIRI and the VLT/NaCo instruments. Results from i) the fitted power-laws to the SSC K-band luminosity functions, ii) the NIR brightest star cluster magnitude - star formation rate (SFR) relation and iii) the star cluster age and mass distributions have shown the importance of studying SSC host galaxies with high SFR levels to determine the role of the galactic environments in the star cluster formation, evolution and disruption mechanisms.

  2. Deriving physical parameters of unresolved star clusters. V. M 31 PHAT star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meulenaer, P.; Stonkutė, R.; Vansevičius, V.

    2017-06-01

    Context. This study is the fifth of a series that investigates the degeneracy and stochasticity problems present in the determination of physical parameters such as age, mass, extinction, and metallicity of partially resolved or unresolved star cluster populations in external galaxies when using HST broad-band photometry. Aims: In this work we aim to derive parameters of star clusters using models with fixed and free metallicity based on the HST WFC3+ACS photometric system. The method is applied to derive parameters of a subsample of 1363 star clusters in the Andromeda galaxy observed with the HST. Methods: Following Paper III, we derive the star cluster parameters using a large grid of stochastic models that are compared to the six observed integrated broad-band WFC3+ACS magnitudes of star clusters. Results: We show that the age, mass, and extinction of the M 31 star clusters, derived assuming fixed solar metallicity, are in agreement with previous studies. We also demonstrate the ability of the WFC3+ACS photometric system to derive metallicity of star clusters older than 1 Gyr. We show that the metallicity derived using broad-band photometry of 36 massive M 31 star clusters is in good agreement with the metallicity derived using spectroscopy. Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/602/A112

  3. The accelerating pace of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Spencer; Chang, Philip

    2018-03-01

    We study the temporal and spatial distribution of star formation rates in four well-studied star-forming regions in local molecular clouds (MCs): Taurus, Perseus, ρ Ophiuchi, and Orion A. Using published mass and age estimates for young stellar objects in each system, we show that the rate of star formation over the last 10 Myr has been accelerating and is (roughly) consistent with a t2 power law. This is in line with previous studies of the star formation history of MCs and with recent theoretical studies. We further study the clustering of star formation in the Orion nebula cluster. We examine the distribution of young stellar objects as a function of their age by computing an effective half-light radius for these young stars subdivided into age bins. We show that the distribution of young stellar objects is broadly consistent with the star formation being entirely localized within the central region. We also find a slow radial expansion of the newly formed stars at a velocity of v = 0.17 km s-1, which is roughly the sound speed of the cold molecular gas. This strongly suggests the dense structures that form stars persist much longer than the local dynamical time. We argue that this structure is quasi-static in nature and is likely the result of the density profile approaching an attractor solution as suggested by recent analytic and numerical analysis.

  4. Tabby's Star (Illustration)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-04

    This illustration depicts a hypothetical uneven ring of dust orbiting KIC 8462852, also known as Boyajian's Star or Tabby's Star. Astronomers have found the dimming of the star over long periods appears to be weaker at longer infrared wavelengths of light and stronger at shorter ultraviolet wavelengths. Such reddening is characteristic of dust particles and inconsistent with more fanciful "alien megastructure" concepts, which would evenly dim all wavelengths of light. By studying observations from NASA's Spitzer and Swift telescopes, as well as the Belgian AstroLAB IRIS observatory, the researchers have been able to better constrain the size of the dust particles. This places them within the range found in dust disks orbiting stars, and larger than the particles typically found in interstellar dust. The system is portrayed with a couple of comets, consistent with previous studies that have found evidence for cometary activity within the system. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22081

  5. Binaries, cluster dynamics and population studies of stars and stellar phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, Dany

    2005-10-01

    The effects of binaries on population studies of stars and stellar phenomena have been investigated over the past 3 decades by many research groups. Here we will focus mainly on the work that has been done recently in Brussels and we will consider the following topics: the effect of binaries on overall galactic chemical evolutionary models and on the rates of different types of supernova, the population of point-like X-ray sources where we distinguish the standard high mass X-ray binaries and the ULXs, a UFO-scenario for the formation of WR+OB binaries in dense star systems. Finally we critically discuss the possible effect of rotation on population studies.

  6. The problem of the barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Nemec, J.; Proffitt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of barium stars and other cool stars with peculiar element abundances are reported. Those observations attempted to find hot white dwarf companions. Among six real barium stars studied, only Zeta Cap was found to have a white dwarf companion. Among seven mild, or marginal, barium stars studied, at least three were found to have hot subluminous companions. It is likely that all of them have white dwarf companions.

  7. The Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR): Questions and Answers

    Cancer.gov

    Learn about the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) clinical trial, which is comparing the drug raloxifene (Evista®) with the drug tamoxifen (Nolvadex®) in reducing the incidence of breast cancer in at-risk postmenopausal women.

  8. Studies of neutron star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Thomas W. J.

    Neutron stars represent the endpoint in stellar evolution for stars with initial masses between ~3 and 8 solar masses. They are the densest non- singularities in the universe, cramming more than a solar mass of matter into a sphere with a radius of about 10 km. Such a large mass-to-radius ratio implies deep potential wells, so that when mass transfer is taking place ~10% of the rest-mass is liberated as gravitational binding energy, resulting in prodigious amounts of X-ray emission that contains valuable information on the physical characteristics in accreting binary systems. Much of my research in this dissertation focuses on the spectroscopic and timing properties of the canonical thermonuclear bursting source GS 1826-238. By measuring the relationship between the X-ray flux (which is assumed to trace the accretion rate onto the stellar surface) and the time intervals between subsequent bursts, I find that although the intervals usually decreased proportionately as the persistent flux increased, a few measurements of the flux-recurrence time relationship were significant outliers. Accompanying spectral and timing changes strongly suggest that the accretion disk extends down to smaller radial distances from the source during these atypical episodes. This result is important for understanding the nature of accretion flows around neutron stars because it indicates that accretion disks probably evaporate at some distance from the neutron star surface at lower accretion rates. I also contribute to our understanding of two newly discovered and heavily- absorbed pulsars (neutron stars with strong magnetic fields) by determining the orbital parameters of the systems through pulse timing analysis. Orbital phase- resolved spectroscopy of one source revealed evidence for an "accretion wake" trailing the pulsar through its orbit, showing that X-rays emanating from the surface can ionize the stellar wind in its vicinity. Finally, I develop an innovative application of dust

  9. Star centroiding error compensation for intensified star sensors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Xiong, Kun; Yu, Wenbo; Yan, Jinyun; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-12-26

    A star sensor provides high-precision attitude information by capturing a stellar image; however, the traditional star sensor has poor dynamic performance, which is attributed to its low sensitivity. Regarding the intensified star sensor, the image intensifier is utilized to improve the sensitivity, thereby further improving the dynamic performance of the star sensor. However, the introduction of image intensifier results in star centroiding accuracy decrease, further influencing the attitude measurement precision of the star sensor. A star centroiding error compensation method for intensified star sensors is proposed in this paper to reduce the influences. First, the imaging model of the intensified detector, which includes the deformation parameter of the optical fiber panel, is established based on the orthographic projection through the analysis of errors introduced by the image intensifier. Thereafter, the position errors at the target points based on the model are obtained by using the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) optimization method. Last, the nearest trigonometric interpolation method is presented to compensate for the arbitrary centroiding error of the image plane. Laboratory calibration result and night sky experiment result show that the compensation method effectively eliminates the error introduced by the image intensifier, thus remarkably improving the precision of the intensified star sensors.

  10. A Study of the Low Mass Binary Star Ross 614

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatewood, G.; Han, I.; Tangren, W.

    2001-12-01

    We have combined photograph, MAP, interferometric, and spectroscopic data to determine the orbital characteristics and masses of the Ross 614 binary star system. Attention was first drawn to the star by Frank E. Ross (1927, AJ 37, 193) who noticed its high proper motion in a comparison of new plates with those taken at the Yerkes Observatory by E.E. Barnard. The Binary nature of the star was recognized from accelerations in the star's proper motion (D. Reuyl 1936, AJ 55, 236) and the mass of the companion was first estimated by combining measurements of McCormick and Sproul plates with a separation measured by Walter Baade at the Hale 5-m reflector (S.L. Lippincott 1955, AJ 60, 379). In her paper Lippincott notes the companion's significance as defining the lower end of the observational main sequence. Fifty six years later the star still holds that honor. With a wealth of new data spanning more than 3 additional orbits, we find her value of 0.08 solar masses to be within our error of our value.

  11. Dusty Beginnings of a Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-23

    Are brown dwarfs born like stars, as in this rendering, or do they form like planets orbiting another star? A study by researchers using data from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope has led to the preliminary conclusion that they are formed much like a star.

  12. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  13. Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of the Properties of Dust in the Ejecta of Galactic Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Kastner, Joel; Meixner, Margaret; Riley, Allyssa

    2018-06-01

    We are conducting a series of infrared studies of large samples of mass-losing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to explore the relationship between the composition of evolved star ejecta and host galaxy metallicity. Our previous studies focused on mass loss from evolved stars in the relatively low-metallicity Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. In our present study, we analyze dust in the mass-losing envelopes of AGB stars in the Galaxy, with special focus on the ejecta of oxygen-rich (O-rich) AGB stars. We have constructed detailed dust opacity models of AGB stars in the Galaxy for which we have infrared spectra from, e.g., the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). This detailed modeling of dust features in IRS spectra informs our choice of dust properties to use in radiative transfer modeling of the broadband SEDs of Bulge AGB stars. We investigate the effects of dust grain composition, size, shape, etc. on the AGB stars' infrared spectra, studying both the silicate dust and the opacity source(s) commonly attributed to alumina (Al2O3). BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant 80NSSC17K0057.

  14. Producing Runaway Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    How are the hypervelocity stars weve observed in our galaxy produced? A recent study suggests that these escapees could be accelerated by a massive black hole in the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud.A Black Hole SlingshotSince their discovery in 2005, weve observed dozens of candidate hypervelocity stars stars whose velocity in the rest frame of our galaxy exceeds the local escape velocity of the Milky Way. These stars present a huge puzzle: how did they attain these enormous velocities?One potential explanation is known as the Hills mechanism. In this process, a stellar binary is disrupted by a close encounter with a massive black hole (like those thought to reside at the center of every galaxy). One member of the binary is flung out of the system as a result of the close encounter, potentially reaching very large velocities.A star-forming region known as LHA 120-N 11, located within the LMC. Some binary star systems within the LMC might experience close encounters with a possible massive black hole at the LMCs center. [ESA/NASA/Hubble]Blame the LMC?Usually, discussions of the Hills mechanism assume that Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, is the object guilty of accelerating the hypervelocity stars weve observed. But what if the culprit isnt Sgr A*, but a massive black hole at the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the Milky Ways satellite galaxies?Though we dont yet have evidence of a massive black hole at the center of the LMC, the dwarf galaxy is large enough to potentially host one as large as 100,000 solar masses. Assuming that it does, two scientists at the University of Cambridge, Douglas Boubert and Wyn Evans, have now modeled how this black hole might tear apart binary star systems and fling hypervelocity stars around the Milky Way.Models for AccelerationBoubert and Evans determined that the LMCs hypothetical black hole could easily eject stars at ~100 km/s, which is the escape velocity of the

  15. Design of the iSTAR International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatge, Coty B.; Slater, Stephanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Beginning in 2013, a small international collaborative of discipline-based astronomy education researchers began to build the foundation to start the International STudy on Astronomy Reasoning Project, known simply as iSTAR. The project was a direct result of the inability of existing large international investigations into the learning of science, such as the TIMSS and PISA studies, to provide actionable intelligence on either strengths or weaknesses of astronomy teaching across the world. This is not because those studies were flawed; rather, they focused on the general characteristics of teaching and learning across all sciences. Prior to the iSTAR effort, there has been no systematic effort to measure individual's conceptual astronomy understanding across the globe. The goal of studying a widely dispersed international sample is to identify cultural subpopulations that do not conform to our existing knowledge of student misconceptions, highlighting unexpected cultural or educational practices that hint at alternative, and perhaps more effective, means of instruction. As a first step, we are carefully translating the Test Of Astronomy STandards - TOAST multiple-choice assessment instrument and carefully attending to nuances that occur during the translation process as cultural clues to differences in the teaching and learning of astronomy. We are actively welcoming and seeking international partners in this work through the CAPERteam.com website and at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/iSTAR-Registration . This project is sponsored and managed by the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research in collaboration with members of the International Astronomical Union-Commission 46.

  16. Studies of star formation in isolated small dark clouds - II. A southern ammonia survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, T. L.; Hyland, A. R.; Robinson, G.; James, S. D.; Wright, C. M.

    1995-10-01

    A study of the set of small, southern molecular clouds (globules) compiled by Bourke, Hyland & Robinson has been undertaken, through radio observations of ammonia using the Parkes 64-m telescope. The aim of the study is to determine the physical characteristics of the globules, their role in the formation of low-mass stars, and the physical mechanism that triggers the star formation process, or stabilizes the globules against collapse. With this general aim in mind, the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of ammonia have been surveyed in order to determine the densities, temperatures and masses of the globules. Half of the globules have been detected in ammonia, but only 6 per cent of the detections are `strong' (T*_a>=0.35K). Comparing the globule properties with those of Benson & Myers for cores within complexes, we find that the globules are less opaque and less dense, and are less active sites of star formation. Other properties are comparable. The Vela cometary globules are detected more readily in ammonia than the more isolated globules, and are more active star formation sites. These results suggest that the dense core's environment, in particular the presence of either a large external mass or a significant stellar wind, plays an important role in initiating the star formation process.

  17. Toward faster and more accurate star sensors using recursive centroiding and star identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaan, Malak Anees

    The objective of this research is to study different novel developed techniques for spacecraft attitude determination methods using star tracker sensors. This dissertation addresses various issues on developing improved star tracker software, presents new approaches for better performance of star trackers, and considers applications to realize high precision attitude estimates. Star-sensors are often included in a spacecraft attitude-system instrument suite, where high accuracy pointing capability is required. Novel methods for image processing, camera parameters ground calibration, autonomous star pattern recognition, and recursive star identification are researched and implemented to achieve high accuracy and a high frame rate star tracker that can be used for many space missions. This dissertation presents the methods and algorithms implemented for the one Field of View 'FOV'Star NavI sensor that was tested aboard the STS-107 mission in spring 2003 and the two fields of view StarNavII sensor for the EO-3 spacecraft scheduled for launch in 2007. The results of this research enable advances in spacecraft attitude determination based upon real time star sensing and pattern recognition. Building upon recent developments in image processing, pattern recognition algorithms, focal plane detectors, electro-optics, and microprocessors, the star tracker concept utilized in this research has the following key objectives for spacecraft of the future: lower cost, lower mass and smaller volume, increased robustness to environment-induced aging and instrument response variations, increased adaptability and autonomy via recursive self-calibration and health-monitoring on-orbit. Many of these attributes are consequences of improved algorithms that are derived in this dissertation.

  18. Far-infrared properties of flare stars and dM stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Stencel, R. E.; Backman, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a search of the IRAS data base for flare stars and for a control sample of dM stars. At 12 microns, 70-80 percent of both samples have been detected. The K-12 colors of flare stars are significantly different from those of dM stars: for a given K magnitude, a flare star is about 70 percent brighter at 12 microns than a dM star. At 100 microns, 27 percent of the flare stars which are sources at 12 microns have been detected, while none of the comparable dM stars has been detected. Implications for microflaring are discussed.

  19. Gamma-ray bursts generated from phase transition of neutron stars to quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Yong-Feng; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of compact stars is believed to be able to produce various violent phenomena in our universe. In this paper, we discuss the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) might result from the phase transition of a neutron star to a quark star and calculate the energy released from the conversion. In our study, we utilize the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory to describe the hadronic phase of neutron stars, while an improved quasi-particle model is adopted to describe the quark phase of quark stars. With quark matter equation-of-state (EOS) more reliable than models used before, it is found that the energy released is of the order of 1052 erg, which confirms the validity of the phase transition model.

  20. Massive Stars in the SDSS-IV/APOGEE SURVEY. I. OB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Lopes, A.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Tapia, Mauricio; Chojnowski, Drew; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Borissova, Jura; Minniti, Dante; Covey, Kevin R.; Longa-Peña, Penélope; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Zamora, Olga; Nitschelm, Christian

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we make use of DR14 APOGEE spectroscopic data to study a sample of 92 known OB stars. We developed a near-infrared semi-empirical spectral classification method that was successfully used in case of four new exemplars, previously classified as later B-type stars. Our results agree well with those determined independently from ECHELLE optical spectra, being in line with the spectral types derived from the “canonical” MK blue optical system. This confirms that the APOGEE spectrograph can also be used as a powerful tool in surveys aiming to unveil and study a large number of moderately and highly obscured OB stars still hidden in the Galaxy.

  1. Star Formation in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Robert

    2009-07-01

    Star formation is a fundamental astrophysical process; it controls phenomena ranging from the evolution of galaxies and nucleosynthesis to the origins of planetary systems and abodes for life. The WFC3, optimized at both UV and IR wavelengths and equipped with an extensive array of narrow-band filters, brings unique capabilities to this area of study. The WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee {SOC} proposes an integrated program on star formation in the nearby universe which will fully exploit these new abilities. Our targets range from the well-resolved R136 in 30 Dor in the LMC {the nearest super star cluster} and M82 {the nearest starbursting galaxy} to about half a dozen other nearby galaxies that sample a wide range of star-formation rates and environments. Our program consists of broad-band multiwavelength imaging over the entire range from the UV to the near-IR, aimed at studying the ages and metallicities of stellar populations, revealing young stars that are still hidden by dust at optical wavelengths, and showing the integrated properties of star clusters. Narrow-band imaging of the same environments will allow us to measure star-formation rates, gas pressure, chemical abundances, extinction, and shock morphologies. The primary scientific issues to be addressed are: {1} What triggers star formation? {2} How do the properties of star-forming regions vary among different types of galaxies and environments of different gas densities and compositions? {3} How do these different environments affect the history of star formation? {4} Is the stellar initial mass function universal or determined by local conditions?

  2. Winds from stripped low-mass helium stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jorick S.

    2017-11-01

    We present mass-loss predictions from Monte Carlo radiative transfer models for helium (He) stars as a function of stellar mass, down to 2 M⊙. Our study includes both massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars and low-mass He stars that have lost their envelope through interaction with a companion. For these low-mass He stars we predict mass-loss rates that are an order of magnitude smaller than by extrapolation of empirical WR mass-loss rates. Our lower mass-loss rates make it harder for these elusive stripped stars to be discovered via line emission, and we should attempt to find these stars through alternative methods instead. Moreover, lower mass-loss rates make it less likely that low-mass He stars provide stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) of type Ibc. We express our mass-loss predictions as a function of L and Z and not as a function of the He abundance, as we do not consider this physically astute given our earlier work. The exponent of the M⊙ versus Z dependence is found to be 0.61, which is less steep than relationships derived from recent empirical atmospheric modelling. Our shallower exponent will make it more challenging to produce "heavy" black holes of order 40 M⊙, as recently discovered in the gravitational wave event GW 150914, making low metallicity for these types of events even more necessary.

  3. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  4. Infrared Studies of the Variability and Mass Loss of Dusty Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2018-01-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase is one of the last phases of a star's life. AGB stars lose mass in an outflow in which dust condenses and is pushed away from the star. Extreme AGB stars are so named because their very red colors suggest very large amounts of dust, which in turn suggests extremely high mass loss rates. AGB stars also vary in brightness, and studies show that extreme AGB stars tend to have longer periods than other AGB stars and are more likely to be fundamental mode pulsators than other AGB stars. Extreme AGB stars are difficult to study, as their colors are so red due to their copious amounts of circumstellar dust that they are often not detected at optical wavelengths. Therefore, they must be observed at infrared wavelengths to explore their variability. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, my team and I have observed a sample of extreme AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) over Cycles 9 through 12 during the Warm Spitzer mission. For each cycle, we typically observed a set of extreme AGB stars at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns wavelength approximately monthly for most of a year. These observations reveal a wide range of variability properties. I present results from our analysis of the data obtained from these Spitzer variability programs, including light curve analyses and comparison to period-luminosity diagrams. Funding is acknowledged from JPL RSA # 1561703.

  5. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  6. Star/Galaxy Separation in Hyper Suprime-Cam and Mapping the Milky Way with Star Counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmilla, Jose Antonio

    We study the problem of separating stars and galaxies in the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) multi-band imaging data at high galactic latitudes. We show that the current separation technique implemented in the HSC pipeline is unable to produce samples of stars with i 24 without a significant contamination from galaxies (> 50%). We study various methods for measuring extendedness in HSC with simulated and real data and find that there are a number of available techniques that give nearly optimal results; the extendedness measure HSC is currently using is among these. We develop a star/galaxy separation method for HSC based on the Extreme Deconvolution (XD) algorithm that uses colors and extendedness simultaneously, and show that with it we can generate samples of faint stars keeping contamination from galaxies under control to i ≤ 25. We apply our star/galaxy separation method to carry out a preliminary study of the structure of the Milky Way (MW) with main sequence (MS) stars using photometric parallax relations derived for the HSC photometric system. We show that it will be possible to generate a tomography of the MW stellar halo to galactocentric radii ˜ 100 kpc with ˜ 106 MS stars in the HSC Wide layer once the survey has been completed. We report two potential detections of the Sagittarius tidal stream with MS stars in the XMM and GAMA15 fields at ≈ 20 kpc and ≈ 40 kpc respectively.

  7. I-Love relations for incompressible stars and realistic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. K.; Chan, AtMa P. O.; Leung, P. T.

    2015-02-01

    In spite of the diversity in the equations of state of nuclear matter, the recently discovered I-Love-Q relations [Yagi and Yunes, Science 341, 365 (2013), 10.1126/science.1236462], which relate the moment of inertia, tidal Love number (deformability), and the spin-induced quadrupole moment of compact stars, hold for various kinds of realistic neutron stars and quark stars. While the physical origin of such universality is still a current issue, the observation that the I-Love-Q relations of incompressible stars can well approximate those of realistic compact stars hints at a new direction to approach the problem. In this paper, by establishing recursive post-Minkowskian expansion for the moment of inertia and the tidal deformability of incompressible stars, we analytically derive the I-Love relation for incompressible stars and show that the so-obtained formula can be used to accurately predict the behavior of realistic compact stars from the Newtonian limit to the maximum mass limit.

  8. The physics of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Lattimer, J M; Prakash, M

    2004-04-23

    Neutron stars are some of the densest manifestations of massive objects in the universe. They are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of dense matter physics and provide connections among nuclear physics, particle physics, and astrophysics. Neutron stars may exhibit conditions and phenomena not observed elsewhere, such as hyperon-dominated matter, deconfined quark matter, superfluidity and superconductivity with critical temperatures near 10(10) kelvin, opaqueness to neutrinos, and magnetic fields in excess of 10(13) Gauss. Here, we describe the formation, structure, internal composition, and evolution of neutron stars. Observations that include studies of pulsars in binary systems, thermal emission from isolated neutron stars, glitches from pulsars, and quasi-periodic oscillations from accreting neutron stars provide information about neutron star masses, radii, temperatures, ages, and internal compositions.

  9. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  10. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  11. A STUDY OF RO-VIBRATIONAL OH EMISSION FROM HERBIG Ae/Be STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Brittain, Sean D.; Reynolds, Nickalas; Najita, Joan R.

    2016-10-20

    We present a study of ro-vibrational OH and CO emission from 21 disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars. We find that the OH and CO luminosities are proportional over a wide range of stellar ultraviolet luminosities. The OH and CO line profiles are also similar, indicating that they arise from roughly the same radial region of the disk. The CO and OH emission are both correlated with the far-ultraviolet luminosity of the stars, while the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) luminosity is correlated with the longer wavelength ultraviolet luminosity of the stars. Although disk flaring affects the PAH luminosity, it is notmore » a factor in the luminosity of the OH and CO emission. These properties are consistent with models of UV-irradiated disk atmospheres. We also find that the transition disks in our sample, which have large optically thin inner regions, have lower OH and CO luminosities than non-transition disk sources with similar ultraviolet luminosities. This result, while tentative given the small sample size, is consistent with the interpretation that transition disks lack a gaseous disk close to the star.« less

  12. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. II. The NGC 6357 star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Kroupa, P.; Oh, S.

    2011-11-01

    Dynamical few-body encounters in the dense cores of young massive star clusters are responsible for the loss of a significant fraction of their massive stellar content. Some of the escaping (runaway) stars move through the ambient medium supersonically and can be revealed via detection of their bow shocks (visible in the infrared, optical or radio). In this paper, which is the second of a series of papers devoted to the search for OB stars running away from young ( ≲ several Myr) Galactic clusters and OB associations, we present the results of the search for bow shocks around the star-forming region NGC 6357. Using the archival data of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the preliminary data release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered seven bow shocks, whose geometry is consistent with the possibility that they are generated by stars expelled from the young (~1-2 Myr) star clusters, Pismis 24 and AH03 J1725-34.4, associated with NGC 6357. Two of the seven bow shocks are driven by the already known OB stars, HD 319881 and [N78] 34. Follow-up spectroscopy of three other bow-shock-producing stars showed that they are massive (O-type) stars as well, while the 2MASS photometry of the remaining two stars suggests that they could be B0 V stars, provided that both are located at the same distance as NGC 6357. Detection of numerous massive stars ejected from the very young clusters is consistent with the theoretical expectation that star clusters can effectively lose massive stars at the very beginning of their dynamical evolution (long before the second mechanism for production of runaway stars, based on a supernova explosion in a massive tight binary system, begins to operate) and lends strong support to the idea that probably all field OB stars have been dynamically ejected from their birth clusters. A by-product of our search for bow shocks around NGC 6357 is the detection of three circular

  13. Stellar Content and Star Formation in Young Clusters Influenced by Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, J.

    2014-09-01

    Star Formation (SF) in extreme environment is always challenging and can be significantly different from that in quiet environments. This study presents the comprehensive multi-wavelength (optical, NIR, MIR and radio) observational analysis of three Galactic starforming regions associated with H II regions/young clusters and located at > 2 kpc, which are found to be evolving under the influence of massive stars within their vicinity. The candidate massive stars, young stellar objects, their mass, age, age spread, the form of K-band Luminosity Function (KLF), Initial Mass Function (IMF) and a possible formation history of each region are studied. The major results on Sh2-252, an extended H II region that appears to be undergoing multiple episodes of SF, are highlighted. Our analysis shows that all the regions are undergoing complex SF activity and the new generation of stars in each region seem to be an outcome of the influence by the presence of massive stars within them. SF process in these regions are likely to be multi-fold and the results suggest that multiple modes of triggering mechanism and hierarchial modes of SF are a common phenomena within young clusters.

  14. Do All O Stars Form in Star Clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, C.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    The question whether or not massive stars can form in isolation or only in star clusters is of great importance for the theory of (massive) star formation as well as for the stellar initial mass function of whole galaxies (IGIMF-theory). While a seemingly easy question it is rather difficult to answer. Several physical processes (e.g. star-loss due to stellar dynamics or gas expulsion) and observational limitations (e.g. dust obscuration of young clusters, resolution) pose severe challenges to answer this question. In this contribution we will present the current arguments in favour and against the idea that all O stars form in clusters.

  15. VLA observations of dwarf M flare stars and magnetic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. F.; Lang, K. R.; Foster, P.

    1988-01-01

    The VLA has been used to search for 6 cm emission from 16 nearby dwarf M stars, leading to the detection of only one of them - Gliese 735. The dwarf M flare stars AD Leonis and YZ Canis Minoris were also monitored at 6 cm and 20 cm wavelength in order to study variability. Successive oppositely circularly polarized bursts were detected from AD Leo at 6 cm, suggesting the presence of magnetic fields of both magnetic polarities. An impulsive 20-cm burst from YZ CMi preceded slowly varying 6-cm emission. The VLA was also used, unsuccessfully, to search for 6-cm emission from 13 magnetic Ap stars, all of which exhibit kG magnetic fields. Although the Ap magnetic stars have strong dipolar magnetic fields, the failure to detect gyroresonant radiation suggests that these stars do not have hot, dense coronae. The quiescent microwave emission from GL 735 is probably due to nonthermal radiation, since unusually high (H = 50 kG or greater) surface magnetic fields are inferred under the assumption that the 6-cm radiation is the gyroresonant radiation of thermal electrons.

  16. Physics of primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    The study of primordial star formation has a history of nearly sixty years. It is generally thought that primordial stars are one of the key elements in a broad range of topics in astronomy and cosmology, from Galactic chemical evolution to the formation of super-massive blackholes. We review recent progress in the theory of primordial star formation. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation posits that the present-day rich structure of the Universe developed through gravitational amplification of tiny matter density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang. It has become possible to study primordial star formation rigorously within the framework of the standard cosmological model. We first lay out the key physical processes in a primordial gas. Then, we introduce recent developments in computer simulations. Finally, we discuss prospects for future observations of the first generation of stars.

  17. RR Lyrae Stars in M4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Moskalik, Pawel; Drury, Jason A.

    2017-10-01

    Observations by Kepler/K2 have revolutionized the study of RR Lyrae stars by allowing the detection of new phenomna, such as low amplitude additional modes and period doubling, which had not previously been seen from the ground. During campaign 2, K2 observed the globular cluster M4, providiing the first opportunity to study a sizeable group of RR Lyrae stars that belong to a single population; the other RR Lyrae stars that have been observed from space are field stars in the galactic halo and thus belong to an assortment of populations. In this poster we present the results of our study of the RR Lyrae variables in M4 from K2 photometry. We have identified additional, low amplitude pulsation modes in both observed RRc stars. In 3 RRab stars we have found the Blazhko effect with periods of 16.6d, 22.4d, and 44.5d.

  18. Bursting star formation and the overabundance of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodigfee, G.; Deloore, C.

    1985-01-01

    The ratio of the number of WR-stars to their OB progenitors appears to be significantly higher in some extragalactic systems than in our Galaxy. This overabundance of Wolf-Rayet-stars can be explained as a consequence of a recent burst of star formation. It is suggested that this burst is the manifestation of a long period nonlinear oscillation in the star formation process, produced by positive feedback effects between young stars and the interstellar medium. Star burst galaxies with large numbers of WR-stars must generate gamma - fluxes but due to the distance, all of them are beyond the reach of present-day ray detectors, except probably 30 Dor.

  19. Fallen star legends and traditional religion of Japan: an aspect of star lore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Japanese star lore is a complex mixture of animism, Buddhism, Shinto-ism, Confucianism and folk beliefs. Although some studies have been done on rituals concerning constellation developed in esoteric Buddhism (e.g. Journal Culture and Cosmos, Vol. 10 no 1 and 2), studies on other aspects of Japanese star lore are limited, in particular, to the English audience.In historic literatures, there often mentioned abnormal astronomical phenomena, such as, eclipse, meteors and comets. In this paper, I will discuss the possibility of reference to these astronomical phenomena in order to talk about some historical facts.In western part of Japan, there are Shinto shrines and Buddhistic temples that are said to be built as monuments of fallen stars. Usually fallen stars were divided into three, and a trio of shrines/temples are said to be the remnants of this phenomenon. Similar legends are found in Kudamatsu (that means "fallen pine=pine where stars fallen") of Yamaguchi Prefecture, Bisei-cho (that means "beautiful star") of Okayama Prefecture, Hoshida (that means "rice field or village of star") shrine of Osaka, and also Hoshida shrine of Nagoya.The purpose of this presentation is not to argue whether fallen star legend was truly astronomical phenomenon, such as, meteor or not. Instead, I will discuss why similar legends have been talked concerning the origin of particular shrines or temples. Citing Eliade who related gorge and alchemy producing spark to astronomical phenomena, I will disclose the possibility to relate these astronomical legends to the coming of the naturalized Japanese from Korean Peninsula who introducd forge to Japan abound 5 to 6 centuries.

  20. Stars Just Got Bigger - A 300 Solar Mass Star Uncovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Using a combination of instruments on ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have discovered the most massive stars to date, one weighing at birth more than 300 times the mass of the Sun, or twice as much as the currently accepted limit of 150 solar masses. The existence of these monsters - millions of times more luminous than the Sun, losing weight through very powerful winds - may provide an answer to the question "how massive can stars be?" A team of astronomers led by Paul Crowther, Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Sheffield, has used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), as well as archival data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, to study two young clusters of stars, NGC 3603 and RMC 136a in detail. NGC 3603 is a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust, located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun (eso1005). RMC 136a (more often known as R136) is another cluster of young, massive and hot stars, which is located inside the Tarantula Nebula, in one of our neighbouring galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud, 165 000 light-years away (eso0613). The team found several stars with surface temperatures over 40 000 degrees, more than seven times hotter than our Sun, and a few tens of times larger and several million times brighter. Comparisons with models imply that several of these stars were born with masses in excess of 150 solar masses. The star R136a1, found in the R136 cluster, is the most massive star ever found, with a current mass of about 265 solar masses and with a birthweight of as much as 320 times that of the Sun. In NGC 3603, the astronomers could also directly measure the masses of two stars that belong to a double star system [1], as a validation of the models used. The stars A1, B and C in this cluster have estimated masses at birth above or close to 150 solar masses. Very massive stars produce very powerful outflows. "Unlike humans, these stars are born heavy and lose weight as

  1. Mass loss from solar-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, L.

    1985-01-01

    The present picture of mass loss from solar-type (low-mass) stars is described, with special emphasis on winds from pre-main-sequence stars. Attention is given to winds from T Tauri stars and to angular momentum loss. Prospects are good for further advances in our understanding of the powerful mass loss observed from young stars; ultraviolet spectra obtainable with the Space Telescope should provide better estimates of mass loss rates and a clearer picture of physical conditions in the envelopes of these stars. To understand the mass ejection from old, slowly rotating main-sequence stars, we will have to study the sun.

  2. StereoTactic radiotherapy for wet Age-Related macular degeneration (STAR): study protocol for a randomised controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Neffendorf, James E; Desai, Riti; Wang, Yanzhong; Kelly, Joanna; Murphy, Caroline; Reeves, Barnaby C; Chakravarthy, Usha; Wordsworth, Sarah; Lewis, Cornelius; Peacock, Janet; Uddin, Shahir; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Jackson, Timothy L

    2016-11-24

    The standard of care for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) involves ongoing intravitreal injections of anti-angiogenic drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The most commonly used anti-VEGF drugs are ranibizumab, bevacizumab and aflibercept. The main objective of the STAR trial is to determine if stereotactic radiotherapy can reduce the number of anti-VEGF injections that patients with nAMD require. STAR is a multicentre, double-masked, randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial. It evaluates a new device (manufactured by Oraya, Newark, CA, USA) designed to deliver stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) to nAMD lesions. The trial enrols participants with chronic, active nAMD. Participants receive a single SRT treatment (16 Gy or sham) with a concomitant baseline intravitreal injection of 0.5 mg ranibizumab. Thereafter, they attend every month for 24 months, and ranibizumab is administered at the visit if retreatment criteria are met. The primary outcome is the number of pro re nata ranibizumab injections during the first 24 months. Secondary outcomes include visual acuity, lesion morphology, quality of life and safety. Additional visits occur at 36 and 48 months to inspect for radiation retinopathy. The target sample size of 411 participants (randomised 2:1 in favour of radiation) is designed to detect a reduction of 2.5 injections against ranibizumab monotherapy, at 90% power, and a significance level (alpha) of 0.025 (one-sided two-sample t test). This gives 97% power to detect non-inferiority of visual acuity at a five-letter margin. The primary analyses will be by intention to treat. The safety and efficacy outcomes will help determine the role of SRT in the management of chronic, active nAMD. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number: ISRCTN12884465. Registered on 28 November 2014. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02243878 . Registered on 17 September 2014.

  3. Radio and infrared properties of young stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panagia, Nino

    1987-01-01

    Observing young stars, or more appropriately, pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, in the infrared and at radio frequencies has the advantage over optical observation in that the heavy extinction associated with a star forming region is only a minor problem, so that the whole region can be studied thoroughly. Therefore, it means being able to: (1) search for stars and do statistical studies on the rate of star formation; (2) determine their luminosity, hence, to study luminosity functions and initial mass functions down to low masses; and (3) to study their spectra and, thus, to determine the prevailing conditions at and near the surface of a newly born star and its relations with the surrounding environment. The third point is of principal interest. The report limits itself to a consideration of the observations concerning the processes of outflows from, and accretion onto, PMS stars and the theory necessary to interpret them. Section 2 discusses the radiative processes relevant in stellar outflows. The main observational results are presented in Section 3. A discussion of the statistical properties of stellar winds from PMS stars are given in Section 4.

  4. Chemical Composition of Galactic Disk Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishenina, T. V.; Basak, N. Yu.; Gorbaneva, T. I.; Soubiran, C.; Kovtyukh, V. V.

    Abundances of Na, Al, Ca, in the stars of galactic disks are obtained. The separation of thin and stars on cinematic criterion was made early. The behavior of chemical element abundances with metallicity for studied stars was presented.

  5. Unusual Metals in Galactic Center Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-03-01

    Far from the galactic suburbs where the Sun resides, a cluster of stars in the nucleus of the Milky Way orbits a supermassive black hole. Can chemical abundance measurements help us understand the formation history of the galactic center nuclear star cluster?Studying Stellar PopulationsMetallicity distributions for stars in the inner two degrees of the Milky Way (blue) and the central parsec (orange). [Do et al. 2018]While many galaxies host nuclear star clusters, most are too distant for us to study in detail; only in the Milky Way can we resolve individual stars within one parsec of a supermassive black hole. The nucleus of our galaxy is an exotic and dangerous place, and its not yet clear how these stars came to be where they are were they siphoned off from other parts of the galaxy, or did they form in place, in an environment rocked by tidal forces?Studying the chemical abundances of stars provides a way to separate distinct stellar populations and discern when and where these stars formed. Previous studies using medium-resolution spectroscopy have revealed that many stars within the central parsec of our galaxy have very high metallicities possibly higher than any other region of the Milky Way. Can high-resolution spectroscopy tell us more about this unusual population of stars?Spectral Lines on DisplayTuan Do (University of California, Los Angeles, Galactic Center Group) and collaborators performed high-resolution spectroscopic observations of two late-type giant starslocated half a parsec from the Milky Ways supermassive black hole.Comparison of the observed spectra of the two galactic center stars (black) with synthetic spectra with low (blue) and high (orange) [Sc/Fe] values. Click to enlarge. [Do et al. 2018]In order to constrain the metallicities of these stars, Do and collaborators compared the observed spectra to a grid of synthetic spectra and used a spectral synthesis technique to determine the abundances of individual elements. They found that

  6. The evolution of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  7. A study of the gas-star formation relation over cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Gracia-Carpio, J.; Sternberg, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Shapiro, K.; Bolatto, A.; Bouché, N.; Bournaud, F.; Burkert, A.; Combes, F.; Comerford, J.; Cox, P.; Davis, M.; Schreiber, N. M. Förster; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Lutz, D.; Naab, T.; Neri, R.; Omont, A.; Shapley, A.; Weiner, B.

    2010-10-01

    We use the first systematic data sets of CO molecular line emission in z ~ 1-3 normal star-forming galaxies (SFGs) for a comparison of the dependence of galaxy-averaged star formation rates on molecular gas masses at low and high redshifts, and in different galactic environments. Although the current high-z samples are still small and biased towards the luminous and massive tail of the actively star-forming `main-sequence', a fairly clear picture is emerging. Independent of whether galaxy-integrated quantities or surface densities are considered, low- and high-z SFG populations appear to follow similar molecular gas-star formation relations with slopes 1.1 to 1.2, over three orders of magnitude in gas mass or surface density. The gas-depletion time-scale in these SFGs grows from 0.5 Gyr at z ~ 2 to 1.5 Gyr at z ~ 0. The average corresponds to a fairly low star formation efficiency of 2 per cent per dynamical time. Because star formation depletion times are significantly smaller than the Hubble time at all redshifts sampled, star formation rates and gas fractions are set by the balance between gas accretion from the halo and stellar feedback. In contrast, very luminous and ultraluminous, gas-rich major mergers at both low and high z produce on average four to 10 times more far-infrared luminosity per unit gas mass. We show that only some fraction of this difference can be explained by uncertainties in gas mass or luminosity estimators; much of it must be intrinsic. A possible explanation is a top-heavy stellar mass function in the merging systems but the most likely interpretation is that the star formation relation is driven by global dynamical effects. For a given mass, the more compact merger systems produce stars more rapidly because their gas clouds are more compressed with shorter dynamical times, so that they churn more quickly through the available gas reservoir than the typical normal disc galaxies. When the dependence on galactic dynamical time-scale is

  8. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  9. Identification of stars in a J1744.0 star catalogue Yixiangkaocheng

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S.-H.

    2012-05-01

    The stars in the Chinese star catalogue, Yixiangkaocheng, which were edited by the Jesuit astronomer Kögler in AD 1744 and published in AD 1756, are identified with their counterparts in the Hipparcos catalogue. The equinox of the catalogue is confirmed to be J1744.0. By considering the precession of equinox, proper motions and nutation, the star closest to the location of each star in Yixiangkaocheng, having a proper magnitude, is selected as the corresponding identified star. I identified 2848 stars and 13 nebulosities out of 3083 objects in Yixiangkaocheng, and so the identification rate reached 92.80 per cent. I find that the magnitude classification system in Yixiangkaocheng agrees with the modern magnitude system. The catalogue includes dim stars, whose visual magnitudes are larger than 7, but most of these stars have Flamsteed designations. I find that the stars whose declination is lower than -30° have relatively larger offsets and different systematic behaviour from other stars. This indicates that there might be two different sources of stars in Yixiangkaocheng. In particular, I find that μ1 Sco and γ1 Sgr approximately mark the boundary between two different source catalogues. The observer's location, as estimated from these facts, agrees with the latitude of Greenwich where Flamsteed made his observations. The positional offsets between the Yixiangkaocheng stars and the Hipparcos stars are 0.6 arcmin, which implies that the source catalogue of stars with δ > -30° must have come from telescopic observations. Nebulosities in Yixiangkaocheng are identified with a few double stars, o Cet (the variable star, Mira), the Andromeda galaxy, ω Cen and NGC6231. These entities are associated with listings in Halley's Catalogue of the Southern Stars of AD 1679 as well as Flamsteed's catalogue of AD 1690.

  10. Prospective, Multi-Centre, Single-Arm Study of Mechanical Thrombectomy using Solitaire FR in Acute Ischemic Stroke-STAR

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Vitor M; Gralla, Jan; Davalos, Antoni; Bonafé, Alain; Castaño, Carlos; Chapot, Rene; Liebeskind, David S; Nogueira, Raul G; Arnold, Marcel; Sztajzel, Roman; Liebig, Thomas; Goyal, Mayank; Besselmann, Michael; Moreno, Alfredo; Schroth, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mechanical thrombectomy using stent retriever devices have been advocated to increase revascularization in intracranial vessel occlusion. We present the results of a large prospective study on the use of the Solitaire FR in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods STAR was an international, multicenter, prospective, single-arm study of Solitaire FR thrombectomy in patients with large vessel anterior circulation strokes treated within 8 hours of symptom onset. Strict criteria for site selection were applied. The primary endpoint was the revascularization rate (3TICI 2b) of the occluded vessel as determined by an independent core lab. The secondary endpoint was the rate of good functional outcome (defined as 90-day modified Rankin scale (mRS) 0–2). Results A total of 202 patients were enrolled across 14 comprehensive stroke centers in Europe, Canada and Australia. The median age was 72 years, 60% were female patients. The median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was 17. Most proximal intracranial occlusion was the internal carotid artery in 18%, the middle cerebral artery in 82%. Successful revascularization was achieved in 79.2% of patients. Device and/or procedure related severe adverse events were found in 7.4%. Favorable neurological outcome was found in 57.9%. The mortality rate was 6.9%. Any intracranial hemorrhagic transformation was found in 18.8% of patients, 1.5% were symptomatic. Conclusions In this single arm study, treatment with the Solitaire™ FR device in intracranial anterior circulation occlusions results in high rates of revascularization, low risk of clinically relevant procedural complications, and good clinical outcomes in combination with low mortality at 90 days. Clinical Trial Registration This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01327989. PMID:23908066

  11. Search of massive star formation with COMICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yoshiko K.

    2004-04-01

    Mid-infrared observations is useful for studies of massive star formation. Especially COMICS offers powerful tools: imaging survey of the circumstellar structures of forming massive stars such as massive disks and cavity structures, mass estimate from spectroscopy of fine structure lines, and high dispersion spectroscopy to census gas motion around formed stars. COMICS will open the next generation infrared studies of massive star formation.

  12. Massive stars, disks, and clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeckel, Nickolas Barry

    The formation of an isolated massive star is inherently more complex than the relatively well-understood collapse of an isolated, low-mass star. The dense, clustered environment where massive stars are predominantly found further complicates the picture, and suggests that interactions with other stars may play an important role in the early life of these objects. In this thesis we present the results of numerical hydrodynamic experiments investigating interactions between a massive protostar and its lower-mass cluster siblings. We explore the impact of these interactions on the orientation of disks and outflows, which are potentially observable indications of encounters during the formation of a star. We show that these encounters efficiently form eccentric binary systems, and in clusters similar to Orion they occur frequently enough to contribute to the high multiplicity of massive stars. We suggest that the massive protostar in Cepheus A is currently undergoing a series of interactions, and present simulations tailored to that system. We also apply the numerical techniques used in the massive star investigations to a much lower-mass regime, the formation of planetary systems around Solar- mass stars. We perform a small number of illustrative planet-planet scattering experiments, which have been used to explain the eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets. We add the complication of a remnant gas disk, and show that this feature has the potential to stabilize the system against strong encounters between planets. We present preliminary simulations of Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a protoplanetary disk, and consider the impact of the flow on the disk properties as well as the impact of the disk on the accretion flow.

  13. Sage Studies Of The Mass Return From AGB And RSG Stars In The Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, S.; Meixner, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE; PI: M. Meixner) Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy project aims to further our understanding of the life cycle of matter in galaxies by studying this life cycle in our neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Combining SAGE mid-infrared photometry with that at shorter wavelengths from other catalogs, the spectral energy distribution (SED) for each of >25000 Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) and Red Supergiant (RSG) stars in the LMC has been assembled. To model mass loss from these stars, my colleagues and I have constructed the grid of RSG and AGB models (GRAMS) using the radiative transfer code 2Dust. I will discuss how GRAMS was constructed, and how we use it to determine the mass-loss rate for each evolved star studied, which gives the total mass-loss return to the LMC from AGB and RSG stars. In my talk, I show how this total mass-loss return is divided into oxygen-rich (O-rich) and carbon-rich (C-rich) dust using SED-fitting to identify O-rich versus C-rich AGB stars. Applications of this work to determining the mass return from evolved stars in other galaxies, including the Milky Way, will also be discussed.

  14. Multi-wavelength Morphological Study Of Star Forming Regions In Nearby Cluster-rich Lirgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilkin, Tatjana; Evans, A.; Mazzarella, J.; Surace, J.; Kim, D.; Howell, J.; Armus, L.; GOALS Team

    2009-05-01

    Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) are believed to play an important role in star formation history of the universe. Many LIRGs undergo intense bursts of star formation as a result of interaction/merger process. Given the dusty nature of LIRGs, it is necessary to probe Luminous Infrared Galaxies at multiple wavelengths. The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Hubble, Chandra and GALEX observatories and offers a unique opportunity to gain insights into the physical processes in these highly dust enshrouded systems. We examine a sample of 11 nearby (z < 0.03) cluster-rich (> 200 clusters as seen in HST ACS images) LIRG systems at various interaction stages. The combined HST ACS optical imaging, Spitzer IRAC 8 micron channel and GALEX near-UV imaging allows us to access the properties of visible and obscured star forming regions. We study the spatial distribution of star forming regions at these wavelengths, correlate locations of young stellar clusters with PAH and UV emission regions and trace changes with merger stage.

  15. Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Sander, Andreas; Todt, Helge

    Nearly 150 years ago, the French astronomers Charles Wolf and Georges Rayet described stars with very conspicuous spectra that are dominated by bright and broad emission lines. Meanwhile termed Wolf-Rayet Stars after their discoverers, those objects turned out to represent important stages in the life of massive stars. As the first conference in a long time that was specifically dedicated to Wolf-Rayet stars, an international workshop was held in Potsdam, Germany, from 1.-5. June 2015. About 100 participants, comprising most of the leading experts in the field as well as as many young scientists, gathered for one week of extensive scientific exchange and discussions. Considerable progress has been reported throughout, e.g. on finding such stars, modeling and analyzing their spectra, understanding their evolutionary context, and studying their circumstellar nebulae. While some major questions regarding Wolf-Rayet stars still remain open 150 years after their discovery, it is clear today that these objects are not just interesting stars as such, but also keystones in the evolution of galaxies. These proceedings summarize the talks and posters presented at the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet workshop. Moreover, they also include the questions, comments, and discussions emerging after each talk, thereby giving a rare overview not only about the research, but also about the current debates and unknowns in the field. The Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) included Alceste Bonanos (Athens), Paul Crowther (Sheffield), John Eldridge (Auckland), Wolf-Rainer Hamann (Potsdam, Chair), John Hillier (Pittsburgh), Claus Leitherer (Baltimore), Philip Massey (Flagstaff), George Meynet (Geneva), Tony Moffat (Montreal), Nicole St-Louis (Montreal), and Dany Vanbeveren (Brussels).

  16. Molecular line study of massive star-forming regions from the Red MSX Source survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Naiping; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we have selected a sample of massive star-forming regions from the Red MSX Source survey, in order to study star formation activities (mainly outflow and inflow signatures). We have focused on three molecular lines from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team Survey at 90 GHz: HCO+(1-0), H13CO+(1-0) and SiO(2-1). According to previous observations, our sources can be divided into two groups: nine massive young stellar object candidates (radio-quiet) and 10 H II regions (which have spherical or unresolved radio emissions). Outflow activities have been found in 11 sources, while only three show inflow signatures in all. The high outflow detection rate means that outflows are common in massive star-forming regions. The inflow detection rate was relatively low. We suggest that this was because of the beam dilution of the telescope. All three inflow candidates have outflow(s). The outward radiation and thermal pressure from the central massive star(s) do not seem to be strong enough to halt accretion in G345.0034-00.2240. Our simple model of G318.9480-00.1969 shows that it has an infall velocity of about 1.8 km s-1. The spectral energy distribution analysis agrees our sources are massive and intermediate-massive star formation regions.

  17. A Study of Chemical Composition of δ Scuti-Type Stars Based on the Observations with the BTA and RTT-150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, A. I.; Berdnikova, V. M.; Ivanova, D. V.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Shimanskaya, N. N.; Shimansky, V. V.; Balashova, M. O.

    2017-06-01

    The results of a study of a sample of δ Scuti-type stars obtained from the observations with the BTA and RTT-150 are presented. Based on photometric data, we measured and analyzed the fundamental parameters of all the studied stars. For eight stars (for two of them for the first time), the fundamental parameters of the atmospheres (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) and the chemical composition for 29 elements in the LTE-approximation are received using spectroscopic observations. The chemical composition analysis demonstrates both the solar abundances of chemical elements and the anomalies of chemical composition typical of Am stars in the studied sample of δ Scuti-type stars.

  18. Spectro-Interferometry Studies of Velocity-Related Phenomena at the Surface of Stars: Pulsation and Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mérand, Antoine; Patru, Fabien; Aufdenberg, Jason

    We illustrate here two applications of spectro-interferometry to the study of velocity fields at the surface of stars: pulsation and rotation. Stellar pulsation has been resolved spectroscopically for a long time, and interferometry has resolved stellar diameters variations due to pulsation. Combining the two provides unique insights to the study of Cepheids, in particular regarding the structure of the photosphere or investigating the infamous projection factor which biases distances measured by the Baade-Wesselink method. On the other hand, resolving the surface velocity field of rotating stars offers a unique opportunity to potentially study differential rotation in other cases than for the Sun. We also present the model we have implemented recently, as well as two applications to VLTI/AMBER Data: the pulsation of Cepheids and the rotation of intermediate mass main sequence stars.

  19. Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. S., III

    2014-09-01

    The Magellanic Clouds (MC) are prime locations for studies of star clusters covering a full range in age and mass. This contribution briefly reviews selected properties of Magellanic star clusters, by focusing first on young systems that show evidence for hierarchical star formation. The structures and chemical abundance patterns of older intermediate age star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are a second topic. These suggest a complex history has affected the chemical enrichment in the SMC and that low tidal stresses in the SMC foster star cluster survival.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of Wolf-Rayet stars with absorption lines. VIII - HD 193793

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, P. S.; Dupre, D. Roussel; Massey, P.; Rensing, M.

    1984-07-01

    The authors present absorption-line velocities for the O type star spanning over 16 years and emission-line velocities for the WC star covering 10 years. They find no periodicities in either of these sets of data. In particular, they are unable to confirm the claim of Lamontagne, Moffat, and Seggewiss that the two stars are in orbit about one another. Rather, it seems that a generic relationship between the two components has not been established and one is dealing with a situation in which two stars are in the same line of sight.

  1. Blurred Star Image Processing for Star Sensors under Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weina; Quan, Wei; Guo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The precision of star point location is significant to identify the star map and to acquire the aircraft attitude for star sensors. Under dynamic conditions, star images are not only corrupted by various noises, but also blurred due to the angular rate of the star sensor. According to different angular rates under dynamic conditions, a novel method is proposed in this article, which includes a denoising method based on adaptive wavelet threshold and a restoration method based on the large angular rate. The adaptive threshold is adopted for denoising the star image when the angular rate is in the dynamic range. Then, the mathematical model of motion blur is deduced so as to restore the blurred star map due to large angular rate. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, which is suitable for blurred star image processing and practical for attitude determination of satellites under dynamic conditions. PMID:22778666

  2. Near-infrared variability study of the central 2.3 × 2.3 arcmin2 of the Galactic Centre - II. Identification of RR Lyrae stars in the Milky Way nuclear star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Schödel, Rainer; Williams, Benjamin F.; Nogueras-Lara, Francisco; Gallego-Cano, Eulalia; Gallego-Calvente, Teresa; Wang, Q. Daniel; Rich, R. Michael; Morris, Mark R.; Do, Tuan; Ghez, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Because of strong and spatially highly variable interstellar extinction and extreme source crowding, the faint (K ≥ 15) stellar population in the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster is still poorly studied. RR Lyrae stars provide us with a tool to estimate the mass of the oldest, relative dim stellar population. Recently, we analysed HST/WFC3/IR observations of the central 2.3 × 2.3 arcmin2 of the Milky Way and found 21 variable stars with periods between 0.2 and 1 d. Here, we present a further comprehensive analysis of these stars. The period-luminosity relationship of RR Lyrae is used to derive their extinctions and distances. Using multiple approaches, we classify our sample as 4 RRc stars, 4 RRab stars, 3 RRab candidates and 10 binaries. Especially, the four RRab stars show sawtooth light curves and fall exactly on to the Oosterhoff I division in the Bailey diagram. Compared to the RRab stars reported by Minniti et al., our new RRab stars have higher extinction (AK > 1.8) and should be closer to the Galactic Centre. The extinction and distance of one RRab stars match those for the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster given in previous works. We perform simulations and find that after correcting for incompleteness, there could be not more than 40 RRab stars within the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster and in our field of view. Through comparing with the known globular clusters of the Milky Way, we estimate that if there exists an old, metal-poor (-1.5 < [Fe/H] < -1) stellar population in the Milky Way nuclear star cluster on a scale of 5 × 5 pc, then it contributes at most 4.7 × 105 M⊙, I.e. ˜18 per cent of the stellar mass.

  3. Another Possibility for Boyajian's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    The unusual light curve of the star KIC 8462852, also known as Tabbys star or Boyajians star, has puzzled us since its discovery last year. A new study now explores whether the stars missing flux is due to internal blockage rather than something outside of the star.Mysterious DipsMost explanations for the flux dips of Boyajians star rely on external factors, like this illustrated swarm of comets. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Boyajians star shows unusual episodes of dimming in its light curve by as much as 20%, each lasting a few to tens of days and separated by periods of typically hundreds of days. In addition, archival observations show that it has gradually faded by roughly 15% over the span of the last hundred years. What could be causing both the sporadic flux dips and the long-term fading of this odd star?Explanations thus far have varied from mundane to extreme. Alien megastructures, pieces of smashed planets or comets orbiting the star, and intervening interstellar medium have all been proposed as possible explanations but these require some object external to the star. A new study by researcher Peter Foukal proposes an alternative: what if the source of the flux obstruction is the star itself?Analogy to the SunDecades ago, researchers discovered that our own stars total flux isnt as constant as we thought. When magnetic dark spots on the Suns surface block the heat transport, the Suns luminosity dips slightly. The diverted heat is redistributed in the Suns interior, becoming stored as a very small global heating and expansion of the convective envelope. When the blocking starspot is removed, the Sun appears slightly brighter than it did originally. Its luminosity then gradually relaxes, decaying back to its original value.Model of a stars flux after a 1,000-km starspot is inserted at time t = 0 and removed at time t = ts at a depth of 10,000 km in the convective zone. The stars luminosity dips, then becomes brighter than originally, and then gradually decays. [Foukal

  4. Study of Molecular Clouds, Variable Stars and Related Topics at NUU and UBAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojaev, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The search of young PMS stars made by our team at Maidanak, Lulin and Beijing observatories, especially in NGC 6820/23 area, as well as monitoring of a sample of open clusters will be described and results will be presented. We consider physical conditions in different star forming regions, particularly in TDC and around Vul OB1, estimate SFE and SFR, energy balance and instability processes in these regions. We also reviewed all data on molecular clouds in the Galaxy and in other galaxies where the clouds were observed to prepare general catalog of molecular clouds, to study physical conditions, unsteadiness and possible star formation in them, the formation and evolution of molecular cloud systems, to analyze their role in formation of different types of galaxies and structural features therein.

  5. Reversal of diuretic-associated impaired glucose tolerance and new-onset diabetes: results of the STAR-LET study.

    PubMed

    Bakris, George; Molitch, Mark; Zhou, Qian; Sarafidis, Pantelis; Champion, Annette; Bacher, Peter; Sowers, James R

    2008-01-01

    Reversal of new-onset diabetes secondary to thiazide diuretic use remains questionable. STAR-LET was a 6-month extension of the Study of Trandolapril/Verapamil SR and Insulin Resistance (STAR), which assessed the effects of a fixed-dose renin-angiotensin system inhibitor (RASI)/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) combination on changes in 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results. STAR-LET explored whether the glycemic impact of HCTZ could be reversed by conversion to a RASI/verapamil combination. The primary outcome was change in 2-hour OGTT results. Fifty-one percent of the STAR patients were enrolled in STAR-LET. The 2-hour OGTT value (mmol/L) was unchanged from STAR baseline in the RASI/verapamil group (7.7+/-2.4 vs 8.1+/-3.3; P=.18) and improved in those who were switched from RASI/HCTZ to RASI/verapamil (8.5+/-3.0 vs 7.2+/-2.3; P<.001). This exploratory study suggests that the impairment in glycemic control seen with use of a thiazide diuretic combined with a RASI can be reversed by switching to a regimen that does not include a diuretic.

  6. Gravitational Interactions of White Dwarf Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, James; Robinson, Chloe; Ortiz, Bridget; Hira, Ajit

    2016-03-01

    In the light of the possible role of White Dwarf stars as progenitors of Type Ia supernovas, we present computational simulations of some astrophysical phenomena associated with a study of gravitationally-bound binary stars, composed of at least one white dwarf star. Of particular interest to astrophysicists are the conditions inside a white dwarf star in the time frame leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova, for an understanding of the massive stellar explosions. In addition, the studies of the evolution of white dwarfs could serve as promising probes of theories of gravitation. We developed FORTRAN computer programs to implement our models for white dwarfs and other stars. These codes allow for different sizes and masses of stars. Simulations were done in the mass interval from 0.1 to 2.5 solar masses. Our goal was to obtain both atmospheric and orbital parameters. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant observational data. The data are further analyzed to identify trends in terms of sizes and masses of stars. We will extend our computational studies to blue giant and red giant stars in the future. Funding from National Science Foundation.

  7. A home for old stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-14

    This image, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the globular cluster Terzan 1. Lying around 20 000 light-years from us in the constellation of Scorpius (The Scorpion), it is one of about 150 globular clusters belonging to our galaxy, the Milky Way. Typical globular clusters are collections of around a hundred thousand stars, held together by their mutual gravitational attraction in a spherical shape a few hundred light-years across. It is thought that every galaxy has a population of globular clusters. Some, like the Milky Way, have a few hundred, while giant elliptical galaxies can have several thousand. They contain some of the oldest stars in a galaxy, hence the reddish colours of the stars in this image — the bright blue ones are foreground stars, not part of the cluster. The ages of the stars in the globular cluster tell us that they were formed during the early stages of galaxy formation! Studying them can also help us to understand how galaxies formed. Terzan 1, like many globular clusters, is a source of X-rays. It is likely that these X-rays come from binary star systems that contain a dense neutron star and a normal star. The neutron star drags material from the companion star, causing a burst of X-ray emission. The system then enters a quiescent phase in which the neutron star cools, giving off X-ray emission with different characteristics, before enough material from the companion builds up to trigger another outburst.

  8. Companions and Environments of Low-Mass Stars: From Star-Forming Regions to the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Patience, Jenny; De Rosa, Robert J.; Bulger, Joanna; Rajan, Abhijith; Goodwin, Simon; Parker, Richard J.; McCarthy, Donald W.; Kulesa, Craig; van der Plas, Gerrit; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Jackson, Alan Patrick; Bryden, Geoffrey; Turner, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M.; Hales, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We present results from two studies probing the multiplicity and environmental properties of low-mass stars: (1) The MinMs (M-dwarfs in Multiples) Survey, a large, volume-limited survey of 245 field M-dwarfs within 15 pc, and (2) the TBOSS (Taurus Boundary of Stellar/Substellar) Survey, an ongoing study of disk properties for the lowest-mass members within the Taurus star-forming region. The MinMs Survey provides new measurements of the companion star fraction, separation distribution, and mass ratio distribution for the nearest K7-M6 dwarfs, utilizing a combination of high-resolution adaptive optics imaging and digitized widefield archival plates to cover an unprecedented separation range of ~1-10,000 AU. Within these data, we also identify companions below the stellar/brown dwarf boundary, enabling characterization of the substellar companion population to low-mass field stars. For the much younger population in Taurus, we present results from ALMA Band 7 continuum observations of low-mass stellar and substellar Class II objects, spanning spectral types from M4-M7.75. The sub-millimeter detections of these disks provide key estimates of the dust mass in small grains, which is then assessed within the context of region age, environment, and viability for planet formation. This young population also includes a number of interesting young binary systems. Covering both young (1-2 Myr) and old (>5 Gyr) populations of low-mass stars, the results from these studies provide benchmark measurements on the population statistics of low-mass field stars, and on the early protoplanetary environments of their younger M-star counterparts.

  9. Does Radiative Feedback by the First Stars Promote or Prevent Second Generation Star Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    We present a self-consistent study of formation of Pop III stars in the early stage of cosmic reionization. We study the effect of starlight from the first stars on the ability of other minihalos in their neighborhood to form additional stars. We show that the ionization front (I-front) is trapped by the neighboring minihalos, after it is transformed from R-type to D-type and preceded by a shock front. The fate of the core of nearby minihalos is mostly determined by the response of the core to this shock front, which leads to molecular cooling and collapse that, when compared to the same halo without external radiation, is (a) expedited, (b) delayed, (c) unaltered, or (d) reversed and prevented, depending upon the flux and halo mass and evolutionary stage. Roughly speaking, most halos that were destined to cool, collapse and form stars in the absence of external radiation are found to do so even when exposed to the first Pop III star in their neighborhood, while those that would not have done so are still not able to.

  10. The Fate of Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    A rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron star is one possible outcome when two smaller neutron stars merge. [Casey Reed/Penn State University]When two neutron stars collide, the new object that they make can reveal information about the interior physics of neutron stars. New theoretical work explores what we should be seeing, and what it can teach us.Neutron Star or Black Hole?So far, the only systems from which weve detected gravitational waves are merging black holes. But other compact-object binaries exist and are expected to merge on observable timescales in particular, binary neutron stars. When two neutron stars merge, the resulting object falls into one of three categories:a stable neutron star,a black hole, ora supramassive neutron star, a large neutron star thats supported by its rotation but will eventually collapse to a black hole after it loses angular momentum.Histograms of the initial (left) and final (right) distributions of objects in the authors simulations, for five different equations of state. Most cases resulted primarily in the formation of neutron stars (NSs) or supramassive neutron stars (sNSs), not black holes (BHs). [Piro et al. 2017]Whether a binary-neutron-star merger results in another neutron star, a black hole, or a supramassive neutron star depends on the final mass of the remnant and what the correct equation of state is that describes the interiors of neutron stars a longstanding astrophysical puzzle.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Anthony Piro (Carnegie Observatories) estimated which of these outcomes we should expect for mergers of binary neutron stars. The teams results along with future observations of binary neutron stars may help us to eventually pin down the equation of state for neutron stars.Merger OutcomesPiro and collaborators used relativistic calculations of spinning and non-spinning neutron stars to estimate the mass range that neutron stars would have for several different realistic equations of

  11. Pulsating star research and the Gaia revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, Laurent; Clementini, Gisella; Guy, Leanne P.; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Glass, Florian; Audard, Marc; Holl, Berry; Charnas, Jonathan; Cuypers, Jan; Ridder, Joris De; Evans, Dafydd W.; de Fombelle, Gregory Jevardat; Lanzafame, Alessandro; Lecoeur-Taibi, Isabelle; Mowlavi, Nami; Nienartowicz, Krzysztof; Riello, Marco; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Sarro, Luis; Süveges, Maria

    2017-09-01

    In this article we present an overview of the ESA Gaia mission and of the unprecedented impact that Gaia will have on the field of variable star research. We summarise the contents and impact of the first Gaia data release on the description of variability phenomena, with particular emphasis on pulsating star research. The Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution, although limited to 2.1 million stars, has been used in many studies related to pulsating stars. Furthermore a set of 3,194 Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars with their times series have been released. Finally we present the plans for the ongoing study of variable phenomena with Gaia and highlight some of the possible impacts of the second data release on variable, and specifically, pulsating stars.

  12. Massive Stars in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Peters, Matthew; Wisniewski, John; Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, Benjamin; Lutz, Julie; Choi, Yumi; Sigut, Aaron

    2017-11-01

    Massive stars are intrinsically rare and therefore present a challenge to understand from a statistical perspective, especially within the Milky Way. We recently conducted follow-up observations to the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey that were designed to detect more than 10,000 emission line stars, including WRs, by targeting regions in M31 previously known to host large numbers of young, massive clusters and very young stellar populations. Because of the existing PHAT data, we are able to derive an effective temperature, bolarimetric luminosity, and extinction for each of our detected stars. We report on preliminary results of the massive star population of our dataset and discuss how our results compare to previous studies of massive stars in M31.

  13. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  14. Dissipation of circumstellar disks of Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabogal, B. E.; Ubaque, K. Y.; García-Varela, A.; álvarez, M.; Salas, L.

    2017-07-01

    Studies of L-band spectra of Be stars are useful to set constraints to the models of formation and evolution mechanisms of the circumstellar disks around these stars. Because few such studies have been performed, more of them are needed to confirm the characteristics reported about the optical depth and evolution of these disks. In this work, we studied new L-band spectra of 7 bright galactic Be stars that were obtained by using CID-InSb spectrograph at the 2.1-m telescope at OAN/UNAM San Pedro Martir Observatory, Baja California, Mexico. We used these data to locate these stars, and the Be stars previously studied in the IR, on a flux ratio diagram (log Hu14/Pfγ vs log Hu14/Brα). We found that 28 Cyg has moved significantly along this diagram implying strong changes of its disk from optically thick to an optically thin one between 2001 and 2014. On the base of the absence of emission lines in the spectra, the circumstellar disks of θ CrB and 66 Oph have been almost totally dissipated. These three stars have decaying circumstellar disks. The other stars: γ Cas, φ Per, 28 Tau and o Her have optically thin disks, that have been almost stable in time. It will be important monitoring these and other Be stars in the L-band to observe the changes on their circumstellar disks, and to observe also in this band, the building-up stars, i.e. stars that create a new disk, or that change it from a very tenuous one to an optically thick circumstellar disk. Our spectra contribute to enlarge the infrared spectroscopic database of Be stars.

  15. Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, David C.; Conti, Peter S.

    1987-01-01

    The properties and evolutionary status of WR stars are examined, reviewing the results of recent observational and theoretical investigations. Topics discussed include spectral types and line strengths, magnitudes and colors, intrinsic variability, IR and radio observations, X-ray observations, the Galactic distribution of WR stars, WR stars in other galaxies, and WR binaries. Consideration is given to the inferred masses, composition, and stellar winds of WR stars; model atmospheres; WR stars and the Galactic environment; and WR stars as a phase of stellar evolution. Diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  16. Star-disk interaction in Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speights, Christa Marie

    2012-09-01

    The question of the mechanism of certain types of stars is important. Classical T Tauri (CTTS) stars accrete magnetospherically, and Herbig Ae/Be stars (higher-mass analogs to CTTS) are thought to also accrete magnetospherically, but the source of a kG magnetic field is unknown, since these stars have radiative interiors. For magnetospheric accretion, an equation has been derived (Hartmann, 2001) which relates the truncation radius, stellar radius, stellar mass, mass accretion rate and magnetic field strength. Currently the magnetic field of Herbig stars is known to be somewhere between 0.1 kG and 10 kG. One goal of this research is to further constrain the magnetic field. In order to do that, I use the magnetospheric accretion equation. For CTTS, all of the variables used in the equation can be measured, so I gather this data from the literature and test the equation and find that it is consistent. Then I apply the equation to Herbig Ae stars and find that the error introduced from using random inclinations is too large to lower the current upper limit of the magnetic field range. If Herbig Ae stars are higher-mass analogs to CTTS, then they should have a similar magnetic field distribution. I compare the calculated Herbig Ae magnetic field distribution to several typical magnetic field distributions using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and find that the data distribution does not match any of the distributions used. This means that Herbig Ae stars do not have well ordered kG fields like CTTS.

  17. Dead Star Warps Light of Red Star Artist Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-04

    This artist concept depicts an ultra-dense dead star, called a white dwarf, passing in front of a small red star. NASA planet-hunting Kepler was able to detect gravitational lensing by measuring a strangely subtle dip in the star brightness.

  18. The Evolution of Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S. Josephine

    1993-04-01

    -type stars (^13C-rich carbon stars) have been suggested to be transition objects between M-type stars and C-type stars. An optical spectroscopic study of these silicate carbon stars was performed at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) in Victoria in 1991. CCGCS 1653, CCGCS 4222, CCGCS 4923 and CCGCS 5848 have been confirmed to be J stars. CCGCS 1158 and CCGCS 4729 are provisionally identified as J stars. A preliminary spectral analysis has also been carried out. Model calculations are presented on the evolution from the visual carbon stars to infrared carbon stars, and on the evolution of infrared carbon stars. A new empirical opacity function for the SiC grain is derived based on the LRS spectra of a selected sample of infrared carbon stars. A two-shell model has been developed with an oxygen-rich detached shell and a newly-forming SiC dust shell. The energy distributions of ~110 transition objects which are late-stage visual carbon stars or early-stage infrared carbon stars are fitted with this Interrupted Mass Loss Model. Furthermore, the model tracks successfully explain the "C" shaped distribution of the transition objects in the IRAS 12 microns/25 microns/60 microns colour-colour diagram. The energy distributions of ~150 infrared carbon stars are also matched with a radiative transfer dust shell model using only SiC dust. The colour evolution of infrared carbon stars can be explained with a continuous increase in mass loss rate on the AGB. An evolutionary scenario of AGB stars is suggested. There is a branching of M-type and C-type stars on the AGB with each branch evolving independently to the planetary nebula stage. The initial mass of the star in the main sequence may be the factor that determines which branch the star will follow. (SECTION: Dissertation Abstracts)

  19. Study of isotropic compact stars in f(R,T,R_{μν}T^{μν}) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Waseem, Arfa

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate physical behavior and stability of compact stars filled with isotropic fluid in f(R,T,R_{μν}T^{μν}) gravity. We consider the static spherically symmetric spacetime and choose the simplest model of this gravity, i.e., R+α R_{μν}T^{μν} . To examine the basic features of compact stars like Her X-1, SAX J 1808.4-3658 and 4U 1820-30, we apply analytic solutions of Krori and Barua metric using the mass-radius relation. We study the behavior of effective energy density, pressure, equation of state parameter and energy conditions in the interior of compact stars. We also explore the stability criteria of compact stars via the speed of sound. It is concluded that all the energy conditions are satisfied and the compact stars are found to be stable at the boundary for this particular model.

  20. Young Star Clusters: Keys to Understanding Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, B.

    2012-12-01

    Young, coeval clusters of stars provide the perfect laboratory in which to test our understanding of how massive stars evolve. Early optical observations limited us to a handful of low-mass clusters within 1kpc. However, thanks to the recent progress in infrared astronomy, the Milky Way's population of young massive star clusters is now beginning to be revealed. Here, I will review the recent progress made in this field, what it has told us about the evolution of massive stars to supernova and beyond, the prospects for this field, and some issues that should be taken into account when interpreting the results.

  1. Photometry of Southern Hemisphere red dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, D.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for a photometric investigation of a spectroscopically selected sample of red dwarf stars in the Southern Hemisphere. Absolute magnitudes and distances for the stars are estimated from broadband red colors. Three stars which may be subluminous are identified, as are several stars which may be within 25 pc. The tangential velocity and velocity dispersion of the sample are similar to values found in other studies of nearby late-type stars.

  2. Nucleation Studies under the Conditions of Carbon-rich AGB Star Envelopes: TiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzer, A. B. C.; Wendt, M.; Chang, C.; Sülzle, D.

    2011-09-01

    Many studies of dust nucleation in winds of carbon-rich AGB stars consider primarily carbon as the dust forming material. But dust grains formed in such circumstellar envelopes are rather a mixture of several chemical elements such as titanium or silicon in addition to carbon, as verified by many investigations of pre-solar grains enclosed in meteorites, for example. In this contribution we focus on the study of the nucleation of titanium carbide particles from the gas phase. The necessary properties of molecular titanium carbide clusters have been estimated by the density functional approach, and the first implications for the homogeneous nucleation of TiC are studied for conditions representative of circumstellar dust shells around carbon-rich AGB stars.

  3. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  4. Stars For Citizens With Urban Star Parks and Lighting Specialists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, Valentin

    2015-08-01

    General contextOne hundred years ago, almost nobody imagine a life without stars every night even in the urban areas. Now, to see a starry sky is a special event for urban citizens.It is possible to see the stars even inside cities? Yes, but for that we need star parks and lighting specialists as partners.Educational aspectThe citizens must be able to identify the planets, constellations and other celestial objects in their urban residence. This is part of a basic education. The number of the people living in the urban area who never see the main constellations or important stars increase every year. We must do something for our urban community.What is an urban star park?An urban public park where we can see the main constellations can be considered an urban star park. There can be organized a lot of activities as practical lessons of astronomy, star parties, etc.Classification of the urban star parksA proposal for classification of the urban star parks taking in consideration the quality of the sky and the number of the city inhabitants:Two categories:- city star parks for cities with < 100.000 inhabitants- metropolis star parks for cities with > 100.000 inhabitantsFive levels of quality:- 1* level = can see stars of at least 1 magnitude with the naked eyes- 2* level = at least 2 mag- 3* level = at least 3 mag- 4* level= at least 4 mag- 5* level = at least 5 magThe urban star urban park structure and lighting systemA possible structure of a urban star park and sky-friend lighting including non-electric illumination are descripted.The International Commission on IlluminationA description of this structure which has as members national commissions from all over the world.Dark-sky activists - lighting specialistsNational Commissions on Illumination organize courses of lighting specialist. Dark-sky activists can become lighting specialists. The author shows his experience in this aspect as a recent lighting specialist and his cooperation with the Romanian National

  5. The Massive Star Content of Circumnuclear Star Clusters in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, A.; Chandar, R.; Leitherer, C.

    2011-06-01

    The circumnuclear starburst of M83 (NGC 5236), the nearest such example (4.6 Mpc), constitutes an ideal site for studying the massive star IMF at high metallicity (12+log[O/H]=9.1±0.2, Bresolin & Kennicutt 2002). We analyzed archival HST/STIS FUV imaging and spectroscopy of 13 circumnuclear star clusters in M83. We compared the observed spectra with two types of single stellar population (SSP) models; semi-empirical models, which are based on an empirical library of Galactic O and B stars observed with IUE (Robert et al. 1993), and theoretical models, which are based on a new theoretical UV library of hot massive stars described in Leitherer et al. (2010) and computed with WM-Basic (Pauldrach et al. 2001). The models were generated with Starburst99 (Leitherer & Chen 2009). We derived the reddenings, the ages, and the masses of the clusters from model fits to the FUV spectroscopy, as well as from optical HST/WFC3 photometry.

  6. Turbovelocity Stars: Kicks Resulting from the Tidal Disruption of Solitary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukian, Haik; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2013-07-01

    The centers of most known galaxies host supermassive black holes (SMBHs). In orbit around these black holes are a centrally concentrated distribution of stars, both in single and in binary systems. Occasionally, these stars are perturbed onto orbits that bring them close to the SMBH. If the star is in a binary system, the three-body interaction with the SMBH can lead to large changes in orbital energy, depositing one of the two stars on a tightly-bound orbit, and its companion into a hyperbolic orbit that may escape the galaxy. In this Letter, we show that the disruption of solitary stars can also lead to large positive increases in orbital energy. The kick velocity depends on the amount of mass the star loses at pericenter, but not on the ratio of black hole to stellar mass, and are at most the star's own escape velocity. We find that these kicks are usually too small to result in the ejection of stars from the Milky Way, but can eject the stars from the black hole's sphere of influence, reducing their probability of being disrupted again. We estimate that {\\mathord {\\sim }} 10^5 stars, {\\mathord {\\sim }} 1% of all stars within 10 pc of the galactic center, are likely to have had mass removed by the central black hole through tidal interaction, and speculate that these "turbovelocity" stars will at first be redder, but eventually bluer, and always brighter than their unharassed peers.

  7. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic Studies of Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Star and Red Supergiant Star Dust Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William T.; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of Oxygen-rich (O-rich) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We present an update of our investigation of differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  8. Role of stereoscopic imaging in the astronomical study of nearby stars and planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, David S.; Waste, Corby

    1997-05-01

    The development of stereoscopic imaging as a 3D spatial mapping tool for planetary science is now beginning to find greater usefulness in the study of stellar atmospheres and planetary systems in general. For the first time, telescopes and accompanying spectrometers have demonstrated the capacity to depict the gyrating motion of nearby stars so precisely as to derive the existence of closely orbiting Jovian-type planets, which are gravitationally influencing the motion of the parent star. Also for the first time, remote space borne telescopes, unhindered by atmospheric effects, are recording and tracking the rotational characteristics of our nearby star, the sun, so accurately as to reveal and identify in great detail the heightened turbulence of the sun's corona. In order to perform new forms of stereo imaging and 3D reconstruction with such large scale objects as stars and planets, within solar systems, a set of geometrical parameters must be observed, and are illustrated here. The behavior of nearby stars can be studied over time using an astrometric approach, making use of the earth's orbital path as a semi- yearly stereo base for the viewing telescope. As is often the case in this method, the resulting stereo angle becomes too narrow to afford a beneficial stereo view, given the star's distance and the general level of detected noise in the signal. With the advent, though, of new earth based and space borne interferometers, operating within various wavelengths including IR, the capability of detecting and assembling the full 3-dimensional axes of motion of nearby gyrating stars can be achieved. In addition, the coupling of large interferometers with combined data sets can provide large stereo bases and low signal noise to produce converging 3- dimensional stereo views of nearby planetary systems. Several groups of new astronomical stereo imaging data sets are presented, including 3D views of the sun taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, coincident

  9. Production of Star-Grazing and Star-Impacting Planetestimals via Orbital Migration of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quillen, A. C.; Holman, M.

    2000-01-01

    During the orbital migration of a giant extrasolar planet via ejection of planetesimals (as studied by Murray et al. in 1998), inner mean-motion resonances can be strong enough to cause planetesimals to graze or impact the star. We integrate numerically the motions of particles which pass through the 3:1 or 4:1 mean-motion resonances of a migrating Jupiter-mass planet. We find that many particles can be trapped in the 3:1 or 4:1 resonances and pumped to high enough eccentricities that they impact the star. This implies that for a planet migrating a substantial fraction of its semimajor axis, a fraction of its mass in planetesimals could impact the star. This process may be capable of enriching the metallicity of the star at a time when the star is no longer fully convective. Upon close approaches to the star, the surfaces of these planetesimals will be sublimated. Orbital migration should cause continuing production of evaporating bodies, suggesting that this process should be detectable with searches for transient absorption lines in young stars. The remainder of the particles will not impact the star but can be ejected subsequently by the planet as it migrates further inward. This allows the planet to migrate a substantial fraction of its initial semimajor axis by ejecting planetesimals.

  10. Weighing Ultra-Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    Large Ground-Based Telescopes and Hubble Team-Up to Perform First Direct Brown Dwarf Mass Measurement [1] Summary Using ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal and a suite of ground- and space-based telescopes in a four-year long study, an international team of astronomers has measured for the first time the mass of an ultra-cool star and its companion brown dwarf. The two stars form a binary system and orbit each other in about 10 years. The team obtained high-resolution near-infrared images; on the ground, they defeated the blurring effect of the terrestrial atmosphere by means of adaptive optics techniques. By precisely determining the orbit projected on the sky, the astronomers were able to measure the total mass of the stars. Additional data and comparison with stellar models then yield the mass of each of the components. The heavier of the two stars has a mass around 8.5% of the mass of the Sun and its brown dwarf companion is even lighter, only 6% of the solar mass. Both objects are relatively young with an age of about 500-1,000 million years. These observations represent a decisive step towards the still missing calibration of stellar evolution models for very-low mass stars. PR Photo 19a/04: Orbit of the ultra-cool stars in 2MASSW J0746425+2000321. PR Photo 19b/04: Animated Gif of the orbital motion. Telephone number star Even though astronomers have found several hundreds of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, the fundamental properties of these extreme objects, such as masses and surface temperatures, are still not well known. Within the cosmic zoo, these ultra-cool stars represent a class of "intermediate" objects between giant planets - like Jupiter - and "normal" stars less massive than our Sun, and to understand them well is therefore crucial to the field of stellar astrophysics. The problem with these ultra-cool stars is that contrary to normal stars that burn hydrogen in their central core, no unique relation exists between the luminosity of the

  11. Evaluation of computer usage in healthcare among private practitioners of NCT Delhi.

    PubMed

    Ganeshkumar, P; Arun Kumar, Sharma; Rajoura, O P

    2011-01-01

    1. To evaluate the usage and the knowledge of computers and Information and Communication Technology in health care delivery by private practitioners. 2. To understand the determinants of computer usage by them. A cross sectional study was conducted among the private practitioners practising in three districts of NCT of Delhi between November 2007 and December 2008 by stratified random sampling method, where knowledge and usage of computers in health care and determinants of usage of computer was evaluated in them by a pre-coded semi open ended questionnaire. About 77% of the practitioners reported to have a computer and had the accessibility to internet. Computer availability and internet accessibility was highest among super speciality practitioners. Practitioners who attended a computer course were 13.8 times [OR: 13.8 (7.3 - 25.8)] more likely to have installed an EHR in the clinic. Technical related issues were the major perceived barrier in installing a computer in the clinic. Practice speciality, previous attendance of a computer course, age of started using a computer influenced the knowledge about computers. Speciality of the practice, presence of a computer professional and gender were the determinants of usage of computer.

  12. Update On the Puzzling Boyajian's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Photometric time series for a neighboring star thats 25 NNW of Boyajians Star. No significant long-term dimming is seen which constrains the size of potential material obscuring Boyajians Star. [Wright et al. 2016/Benjamin Montet]Whats causing the mysterious light-curve dips of the so-called alien megastructure star, Boyajians Star? A recent study analyzes a variety of possible explanations to determine which ones are the most plausible.An Unusual Light CurveEarlier this year, astronomer Tabetha Boyajian reported on the unusual light curve of the star KIC 8462852. This star, now nicknamed Tabbys Star or Boyajians Star, showsunusual dips on day-long timescales that are too large to be explained by planet transits or similar phenomena.In addition to these short dips in luminosity, recent observations have also indicated that the star has faded by roughly 20% over the past hundred years. What could be causing both the short-term dips in the stars light and the long-term dimming over a century?Could the dimming be caused by an alien megastructure built by an extraterrestrial civilization? The authors find that a spherical structure is very unlikely. [Danielle Futselaar/SETI International]Alien Megastructures? Or Another Explanation?Boyajians Star was vaulted into the media spotlight when astronomer Jason Wright (Pennsylvania State University and University of California, Berkeley) proposed that its unusual light curve could potentially be explained by a surrounding megastructure built by an extraterrestrial civilization.Now Wright is back with co-author Steinn Sigurdsson (Pennsylvania State University). In a new study, Wright and Sigurdsson analyze an extensive list of explanations for the puzzling apparent behavior of Boyajians Star, based on our latest knowledge about this strange object.The Realm of PossibilitiesHere are just a few possible causes of Boyajians Stars dimming, as well as the authors assessment of their plausibility. For the full list, see the authors

  13. Cooling of Accretion-Heated Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnands, Rudy; Degenaar, Nathalie; Page, Dany

    2017-09-01

    We present a brief, observational review about the study of the cooling behaviour of accretion-heated neutron stars and the inferences about the neutron-star crust and core that have been obtained from these studies. Accretion of matter during outbursts can heat the crust out of thermal equilibrium with the core and after the accretion episodes are over, the crust will cool down until crust-core equilibrium is restored. We discuss the observed properties of the crust cooling sources and what has been learned about the physics of neutron-star crusts. We also briefly discuss those systems that have been observed long after their outbursts were over, i.e, during times when the crust and core are expected to be in thermal equilibrium. The surface temperature is then a direct probe for the core temperature. By comparing the expected temperatures based on estimates of the accretion history of the targets with the observed ones, the physics of neutron-star cores can be investigated. Finally, we discuss similar studies performed for strongly magnetized neutron stars in which the magnetic field might play an important role in the heating and cooling of the neutron stars.

  14. The Serpent Star-Forming Cloud Spawns Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-28

    Studied by astronomers, Serpens Cloud Core is one of the youngest collections of stars ever seen in our galaxy. This infrared image combines data from NASA Spitzer with shorter-wavelength observations from the Two Micron All Sky Survey.

  15. Aperture-free star formation rate of SDSS star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte Puertas, S.; Vilchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Kehrig, C.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.

    2017-03-01

    Large area surveys with a high number of galaxies observed have undoubtedly marked a milestone in the understanding of several properties of galaxies, such as star-formation history, morphology, and metallicity. However, in many cases, these surveys provide fluxes from fixed small apertures (e.g. fibre), which cover a scant fraction of the galaxy, compelling us to use aperture corrections to study the global properties of galaxies. In this work, we derive the current total star formation rate (SFR) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, using an empirically based aperture correction of the measured Hα flux for the first time, thus minimising the uncertainties associated with reduced apertures. All the Hα fluxes have been extinction-corrected using the Hα/ Hβ ratio free from aperture effects. The total SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies has been derived applying pure empirical Hα and Hα/ Hβ aperture corrections based on the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. We find that, on average, the aperture-corrected SFR is 0.65 dex higher than the SDSS fibre-based SFR. The relation between the SFR and stellar mass for SDSS star-forming galaxies (SFR-M⋆) has been obtained, together with its dependence on extinction and Hα equivalent width. We compare our results with those obtained in previous works and examine the behaviour of the derived SFR in six redshift bins, over the redshift range 0.005 ≤ z ≤ 0.22. The SFR-M⋆ sequence derived here is in agreement with selected observational studies based on integral field spectroscopy of individual galaxies as well as with the predictions of recent theoretical models of disc galaxies. A table of the aperture-corrected fluxes and SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies and related relevant data is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A71 Warning, no authors

  16. Neutron stars velocities and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paret, Daryel Manreza; Martinez, A. Perez; Ayala, Alejandro.; Piccinelli, G.; Sanchez, A.

    2018-01-01

    We study a model that explain neutron stars velocities due to the anisotropic emission of neutrinos. Strong magnetic fields present in neutron stars are the source of the anisotropy in the system. To compute the velocity of the neutron star we model its core as composed by strange quark matter and analice the properties of a magnetized quark gas at finite temperature and density. Specifically we have obtained the electron polarization and the specific heat of magnetized fermions as a functions of the temperature, chemical potential and magnetic field which allow us to study the velocity of the neutron star as a function of these parameters.

  17. Techniques for High-contrast Imaging in Multi-star Systems. II. Multi-star Wavefront Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirbu, D.; Thomas, S.; Belikov, R.; Bendek, E.

    2017-11-01

    Direct imaging of exoplanets represents a challenge for astronomical instrumentation due to the high-contrast ratio and small angular separation between the host star and the faint planet. Multi-star systems pose additional challenges for coronagraphic instruments due to the diffraction and aberration leakage caused by companion stars. Consequently, many scientifically valuable multi-star systems are excluded from direct imaging target lists for exoplanet surveys and characterization missions. Multi-star Wavefront Control (MSWC) is a technique that uses a coronagraphic instrument’s deformable mirror (DM) to create high-contrast regions in the focal plane in the presence of multiple stars. MSWC uses “non-redundant” modes on the DM to independently control speckles from each star in the dark zone. Our previous paper also introduced the Super-Nyquist wavefront control technique, which uses a diffraction grating to generate high-contrast regions beyond the Nyquist limit (nominal region correctable by the DM). These two techniques can be combined as MSWC-s to generate high-contrast regions for multi-star systems at wide (Super-Nyquist) angular separations, while MSWC-0 refers to close (Sub-Nyquist) angular separations. As a case study, a high-contrast wavefront control simulation that applies these techniques shows that the habitable region of the Alpha Centauri system can be imaged with a small aperture at 8× {10}-9 mean raw contrast in 10% broadband light in one-sided dark holes from 1.6-5.5 λ/D. Another case study using a larger 2.4 m aperture telescope such as the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope uses these techniques to image the habitable zone of Alpha Centauri at 3.2× {10}-9 mean raw contrast in monochromatic light.

  18. Study of the QCD Phase Diagram using STAR at RHIC - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Gary

    This grant supported the MSU STAR Group from April 1, 1998 to October 31, 2016. Originally the MSU STAR Group consisted of the principal investigator (PI), a staff physicist, and one graduate student. Funds were provided for half the summer salary of the PI, the full salary of the staff physicist, and half the costs associated with one graduate student. The other half of the PI’s summer salary and graduate student costs was covered by NSCL. In addition, this grant provided funds for travel and workstations related to STAR. Starting in 2009, the MSU STAR Group replaced the staff physicistmore » with a postdoctoral scientist.« less

  19. Effective star tracking method based on optical flow analysis for star trackers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; Wang, Xiaochu; Li, Jin; Wei, Minsong; You, Zheng

    2016-12-20

    Benefiting from rapid development of imaging sensor technology, modern optical technology, and a high-speed computing chip, the star tracker's accuracy, dynamic performance, and update rate have been greatly improved with low power consumption and miniature size. The star tracker is currently one of the most competitive attitude measurement sensors. However, due to restrictions of the optical imaging system, difficulties still exist in moving star spot detection and star tracking when in special motion conditions. An effective star tracking method based on optical flow analysis for star trackers is proposed in this paper. Spot-based optical flow, based on a gray gradient between two adjacent star images, is analyzed to distinguish the star spot region and obtain an accurate star spot position so that the star tracking can keep continuous under high dynamic conditions. The obtained star vectors and extended Kalman filter (EKF) are then combined to conduct an angular velocity estimation to ensure region prediction of the star spot; this can be combined with the optical flow analysis result. Experiment results show that the method proposed in this paper has advantages in conditions of large angular velocity and large angular acceleration, despite the presence of noise. Higher functional density and better performance can be achieved; thus, the star tracker can be more widely applied in small satellites, remote sensing, and other complex space missions.

  20. Statistical studies of superflares on G-, K-, M- type stars from Kepler data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Honda, Satoshi; Notsu, Shota; Namekata, Kosuke; Ikuta, Kai; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-05-01

    Flares are thought to be sudden releases of magnetic energy stored around starspots. Recent space high-precision photometry shows “superflares”, 10-104 times more energetic than the largest solar flares, occur on many G, K, M-type stars (e.g., Maehara+2012 Nature). Harmful UV/X-ray radiation and high-energy particles such as protons are caused by such superflares. This may suggest that exoplanet host stars have severe effects on the physical and chemical evolution of exoplanetary atmospheres (cf. Segura+2010 Astrobiology, Takahashi+2016 ApJL).We here present statistical properties of superflares on G, K, M-type stars on the basis of our analyses of Kepler photometric data (Maehara+2012 Nature, Shibayama+2013 ApJS, Notsu+2013 ApJ, Canderaresi+2014 ApJ, Maehara+2015 EPS, Maehara+2017 PASJ). We found more than 5000 superflares on 800 G, K, M-type main-sequence stars, and the occurrence frequency (dN/dE) of superflares as a function of flare energy (E) shows the power-law distribution with the index of -1.8 -1.9. This power-law distribution is consistent with that of solar flares.Flare frequency increases as stellar temperature decreases. As for M-type stars, energy of the largest flares is smaller compared with G,K-type stars, but more frequent “hazardous” flares for the habitable planets since the habitable zone around M-type stars is much smaller compared with G, K-type stars.Rotation period and starspot coverage can be estimated from the quasi-periodic brightness variation of the superflare stars. The intensity of Ca II 8542 line of superflare stars, which is measured from spectroscopic observations with Subaru Telescope, has a well correlation with the brightness variation amplitude (Notsu+2015a&b PASJ).Flare frequency has a correlation with rotation period, and this suggests young rapidly-rotating stars (like “young Sun”) have more severe impacts of flares on the planetary atmosphere (cf. Airapetian+2016 ApJL). Flare energy and frequency also depends

  1. Magnetically Sleepy Stars: An X-ray Survey of Candidate Stars in Extended Magnetic Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Steven

    2010-09-01

    The Sun occasionally slips into periods of extended magnetic quiescence where the normal magnetic cycle largely ceases (e.g., the Maunder minimum). Understanding these episodes is important for understanding non-linear magnetic dynamos and the Earth's radiation budget. We have developed a new method for determining which stars may be in the stellar analog of these magnetic minima. We propose to study five such stars with Chandra ACIS-S. Combined with archival spectra of more stars, we can 1) explore (by proxy) properties of the solar corona in a Maunder-like minimum, 2) determine what stellar properties affect this state, and 3) investigate the coronal product of the residual turbulent dynamo in a solar mass star.

  2. Neurobehavioural assessment and diagnosis in disorders of consciousness: a preliminary study of the Sensory Tool to Assess Responsiveness (STAR).

    PubMed

    Stokes, Verity; Gunn, Sarah; Schouwenaars, Katie; Badwan, Derar

    2018-09-01

    The Sensory Tool to Assess Responsiveness (STAR) is an interdisciplinary neurobehavioural diagnostic tool for individuals with prolonged disorders of consciousness. It utilises current diagnostic criteria and is intended to improve upon the high misdiagnosis rate in this population. This study assesses the inter-rater reliability of the STAR and its diagnostic validity in comparison with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) and the Wessex Head Injury Matrix (WHIM). Participants were patients with severe acquired brain injury resulting in a disorder of consciousness, who were admitted to the Royal Leamington Spa Rehabilitation Hospital between 1999 and 2009. Patients underwent sensory stimulation sessions during their period of admission, which were recorded on video. Using this footage, patients were re-assessed for this study using the STAR, WHIM and CRS-R criteria. The STAR demonstrated "moderate" inter-rater reliability, "substantial" diagnostic agreement with the CRS-R, and "moderate" agreement with the WHIM. There were no significant differences between diagnoses assigned by the different assessments. The STAR demonstrated a good degree of inter-rater reliability in identification of diagnoses for patients with disorders of consciousness. The diagnostic outcomes of the STAR agreed at a good level with the CRS-R, moderately with the WHIM, and did not significantly differ from either. This demonstrates the reliability and validity of the STAR, showing its appropriateness for clinical use. Future longitudinal studies and research into the STAR's applicability in long-stay rehabilitation are indicated.

  3. ACTH Action on StAR Biology

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) produced by the anterior pituitary stimulates glucocorticoid synthesis by the adrenal cortex. The first step in glucocorticoid synthesis is the delivery of cholesterol to the mitochondrial matrix where the first enzymatic reaction in the steroid hormone biosynthetic pathway occurs. A key response of adrenal cells to ACTH is activation of the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. PKA activation results in an acute increase in expression and function of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein (StAR). StAR plays an essential role in steroidogenesis- it controls the hormone-dependent movement of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membranes. Currently StAR's mechanism of action remains a major unanswered question in the field. However, some insight may be gained from understanding the mechanism(s) controlling the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of StAR at S194/195 (mouse/human StAR), a modification that is required for function. This mini-review provides a background on StAR's biology with a focus on StAR phosphorylation. The model for StAR translation and phosphorylation at the outer mitochondrial membrane, the location for StAR function, is presented to highlight a unifying theme emerging from diverse studies. PMID:27999527

  4. ACTH Action on StAR Biology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) produced by the anterior pituitary stimulates glucocorticoid synthesis by the adrenal cortex. The first step in glucocorticoid synthesis is the delivery of cholesterol to the mitochondrial matrix where the first enzymatic reaction in the steroid hormone biosynthetic pathway occurs. A key response of adrenal cells to ACTH is activation of the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. PKA activation results in an acute increase in expression and function of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein (StAR). StAR plays an essential role in steroidogenesis- it controls the hormone-dependent movement of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membranes. Currently StAR's mechanism of action remains a major unanswered question in the field. However, some insight may be gained from understanding the mechanism(s) controlling the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of StAR at S194/195 (mouse/human StAR), a modification that is required for function. This mini-review provides a background on StAR's biology with a focus on StAR phosphorylation. The model for StAR translation and phosphorylation at the outer mitochondrial membrane, the location for StAR function, is presented to highlight a unifying theme emerging from diverse studies.

  5. Managing the star performer.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Our culture seems to be endlessly fascinated with its stars in entertainment, athletics, politics, and business, and holds fast to the idea that extraordinary talent accounts for an individual's extraordinary performance. At first glance, managing a star performer in your medical practice may seem like it would be an easy task. However, there's much more to managing a star performer than many practice managers realize. The concern is how to keep the star performer happy and functioning at a high level without detriment to the rest of the medical practice team. This article offers tips for practice managers who manage star performers. It explores ways to keep the star performer motivated, while at the same time helping the star performer to meld into the existing medical practice team. This article suggests strategies for redefining the star performer's role, for holding the star performer accountable for his or her behavior, and for coaching the star performer. Finally, this article offers practical tips for keeping the star performer during trying times, for identifying and cultivating new star performers, and for managing medical practice prima donnas.

  6. Initial data for black hole-neutron star binaries, with rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacik, Nick; Foucart, Francois; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Muhlberger, Curran; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2016-11-01

    The coalescence of a neutron star with a black hole is a primary science target of ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Constraining or measuring the neutron star spin directly from gravitational wave observations requires knowledge of the dependence of the emission properties of these systems on the neutron star spin. This paper lays foundations for this task, by developing a numerical method to construct initial data for black hole-neutron star binaries with arbitrary spin on the neutron star. We demonstrate the robustness of the code by constructing initial-data sets in large regions of the parameter space. In addition to varying the neutron star spin-magnitude and spin-direction, we also explore neutron star compactness, mass-ratio, black hole spin, and black hole spin-direction. Specifically, we are able to construct initial data sets with neutron stars spinning near centrifugal break-up, and with black hole spins as large as {S}{BH}/{M}{BH}2=0.99.

  7. Subdwarf B Stars: Tracers Of Binary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Rueda, L.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Marsh, T. R.

    2007-08-01

    Subdwarf B stars are a superb stellar population to study binary evolution. In 2001, Maxted et al. (MNRAS, 326, 1391) found that 21 out of the 36 subdwarf B stars they studied were in short period binaries. These observations inspired new theoretical work that suggests that up to 90 per cent of subdwarf B stars are in binary systems with the remaining apparently single stars being the product of merging pairs. This high binary fraction added to the fact that they are detached binaries that have not changed significantly since they came out of the common envelope, make subdwarf B stars a perfect population to study binary evolution. By comparing the observed orbital period distribution of subdwarf B stars with that obtained from population synthesis calculations we can determine fundamental parameters of binary evolution such as the common envelope ejection efficiency. Here we give an overview of the fraction of short period binaries found from different surveys as well as the most up to date orbital period distribution determined observationally. We also present results from a recent search for subdwarf B stars in long period binaries.

  8. Chromospheric activity of cool giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiman-Cameron, T. Y.

    1986-01-01

    During the seventh year of IUE twenty-six spectra of seventeen cool giant stars ranging in spectral type from K3 thru M6 were obtained. Together with spectra of fifteen stars observed during the sixth year of IUE, these low-resolution spectra have been used to: (1) examine chromospheric activity in the program stars and late type giants in general, and (2) evaluate the extent to which nonradiative heating affects the upper levels of cool giant photospheres. The stars observed in this study all have well determined TiO band strengths, angular diameters (determined from lunar occulations), bolometric fluxes, and effective temperatures. Chromospheric activity can therefore be related to effective temperatures providing a clearer picture of activity among cool giant stars than previously available. The stars observed are listed.

  9. Merging strangeon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Yun-Wei; Zhou, En-Ping; Li, Yun-Yang; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2018-02-01

    The state of supranuclear matter in compact stars remains puzzling, and it is argued that pulsars could be strangeon stars. What would happen if binary strangeon stars merge? This kind of merger could result in the formation of a hyper-massive strangeon star, accompanied by bursts of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation (and even a strangeon kilonova explained in the paper). The tidal polarizability of binary strangeon stars is different from that of binary neutron stars, because a strangeon star is self-bound on the surface by the fundamental strong force while a neutron star by the gravity, and their equations of state are different. Our calculation shows that the tidal polarizability of merging binary strangeon stars is favored by GW170817. Three kinds of kilonovae (i.e., of neutron, quark and strangeon) are discussed, and the light curve of the kilonova AT 2017 gfo following GW170817 could be explained by considering the decaying strangeon nuggets and remnant star spin-down. Additionally, the energy ejected to the fireball around the nascent remnant strangeon star, being manifested as a gamma-ray burst, is calculated. It is found that, after a prompt burst, an X-ray plateau could follow in a timescale of 102 ‑ 103 s. Certainly, the results could be tested also by further observational synergies between gravitational wave detectors (e.g., Advanced LIGO) and X-ray telescopes (e.g., the Chinese HXMT satellite and eXTP mission), and especially if the detected gravitational wave form is checked by peculiar equations of state provided by the numerical relativistical simulation.

  10. Dark stars in Starobinsky's model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panotopoulos, Grigoris; Lopes, Ilídio

    2018-01-01

    In the present work we study non-rotating dark stars in f (R ) modified theory of gravity. In particular, we have considered bosonic self-interacting dark matter modeled inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate, while as far as the modified theory of gravity is concerned we have assumed Starobinsky's model R +a R2. We solve the generalized structure equations numerically, and we obtain the mass-to-ratio relation for several different values of the parameter a , and for two different dark matter equation-of-states. Our results show that the dark matter stars become more compact in the R-squared gravity compared to general relativity, while at the same time the highest star mass is slightly increased in the modified gravitational theory. The numerical value of the highest star mass for each case has been reported.

  11. Kinematics of Hα Emitting Stars in Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilango, Megha; Ilango, Anita; Damon, Gabriel; Prichard, Laura; Guhathakurta, Puragra; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Studying emission line stars helps improve our understanding of stellar evolution, types of stars, and their environments. In this study, we analyzed stars exhibiting Hα emission (Hα stars) in the Andromeda Galaxy. We used a combination of spectroscopic and photometric diagnostic methods to remove a population of foreground Milky Way (MW) star contaminants from our data set. The Hα stars were selected from a sample of 5295 spectra from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda’s Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey and accompanying photometric data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. Velocities of two classes of Hα stars, main sequence (MS) stars and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, were analyzed through a novel Age-Velocity Difference Correlation (AVDC) method, which utilizes line-of-sight velocity differences (LOSVDs) in order to estimate the age of a rare stellar population. Histograms, weighted means, and weighted standard deviations of the LOSVDs were used to conclude that MS stars are more kinematically coherent than AGB stars, and that Hα stars are kinematically comparable and thus close in age to their non-Hα counterparts. With these results, it can definitively be inferred that mass loss is important in two stages of stellar evolution: massive MS and intermediate mass AGB. We hypothesized that this mass loss could either occur as a normal part of MS and AGB evolution, or that it could be emitted by only a subpopulation of MS and AGB stars throughout their life cycle. Our use of the novel AVDC method sets a precedent for the use of similar methods in predicting the ages of rare stellar subgroups.This research was supported by NASA and the National Science Foundation. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program at UC Santa Cruz.

  12. False star detection and isolation during star tracking based on improved chi-square tests.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Niu, Yanxiong; Lu, Jiazhen; Yang, Yanqiang; Su, Guohua

    2017-08-01

    The star sensor is a precise attitude measurement device for a spacecraft. Star tracking is the main and key working mode for a star sensor. However, during star tracking, false stars become an inevitable interference for star sensor applications, which may result in declined measurement accuracy. A false star detection and isolation algorithm in star tracking based on improved chi-square tests is proposed in this paper. Two estimations are established based on a Kalman filter and a priori information, respectively. The false star detection is operated through adopting the global state chi-square test in a Kalman filter. The false star isolation is achieved using a local state chi-square test. Semi-physical experiments under different trajectories with various false stars are designed for verification. Experiment results show that various false stars can be detected and isolated from navigation stars during star tracking, and the attitude measurement accuracy is hardly influenced by false stars. The proposed algorithm is proved to have an excellent performance in terms of speed, stability, and robustness.

  13. Does radiative feedback by the first stars promote or prevent second generation star formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2007-03-01

    We study the effect of starlight from the first stars on the ability of other minihaloes in their neighbourhood to form additional stars. The first stars in the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) universe are believed to have formed in minihaloes of total mass ~105-6 Msolar at redshifts z >~ 20, when molecular hydrogen (H2) formed and cooled the dense gas at their centres, leading to gravitational collapse. Simulations suggest that the Population III (Pop III) stars thus formed were massive (~100 Msolar) and luminous enough in ionizing radiation to cause an ionization front (I-front) to sweep outward, through their host minihalo and beyond, into the intergalactic medium. Our previous work suggested that this I-front was trapped when it encountered other, nearby minihaloes, and that it failed to penetrate the dense gas at their centres within the lifetime of the Pop III stars (<~3 Myr). The question of what the dynamical consequences were for these target minihaloes, of their exposure to the ionizing and dissociating starlight from the Pop III star requires further study, however. Towards this end, we have performed a series of detailed, one-dimensional (1D), radiation-hydrodynamical simulations to answer the question of whether star formation in these surrounding minihaloes was triggered or suppressed by radiation from the first stars. We have varied the distance to the source (and, hence, the flux) and the mass and evolutionary stage of the target haloes to quantify this effect. We find (1) trapping of the I-front and its transformation from R-type to D-type, preceded by a shock front; (2) photoevaporation of the ionized gas (i.e. all gas originally located outside the trapping radius); (3) formation of an H2 precursor shell which leads the I-front, stimulated by partial photoionization; and (4) the shock-induced formation of H2 in the minihalo neutral core when the shock speeds up and partially ionizes the gas. The fate of the neutral core is mostly determined by the

  14. Star Formation in low mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Vihang

    2018-01-01

    Our current hierarchical view of the universe asserts that the large galaxies we see today grew via mergers of numerous smaller galaxies. As evidenced by recent literature, the collective impact of these low mass galaxies on the universe is more substantial than previously thought. Studying the growth and evolution of these low mass galaxies is critical to our understanding of the universe as a whole. Star formation is one of the most important ongoing processes in galaxies. Forming stars is fundamental to the growth of a galaxy. One of the main goals of my thesis is to analyze the star formation in these low mass galaxies at different redshifts.Using the Hubble UltraViolet Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF), I investigate the star formation in galaxies at the peak of the cosmic star formation history using the ultraviolet (UV) light as a star formation indicator. Particularly, I measure the UV luminosity function (LF) to probe the volume-averaged star formation properties of galaxies at these redshifts. The depth of the UVUDF is ideal for a direct measurement of the faint end slope of the UV LF. This redshift range also provides a unique opportunity to directly compare UV to the "gold standard" of star formation indicators, namely the Hα nebular emission line. A joint analysis of the UV and Hα LFs suggests that, on average, the star formation histories in low mass galaxies (~109 M⊙) are more bursty compared to their higher mass counterparts at these redshifts.Complementary to the analysis of the average star formation properties of the bulk galaxy population, I investigate the details of star formation in some very bursty galaxies at lower redshifts selected from Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime Cam (SPLASH). Using a broadband color-excess selection technique, I identify a sample of low redshift galaxies with bright nebular emission lines in the Subaru-XMM Deep Field (SXDF) from the SPLASH-SXDF catalog. These galaxies are highly star forming and have

  15. An Exoplanet Spinning Up Its Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    We know that the large masses of stars govern the orbits of the planets that circle them but a large, close-in planet can also influence the rotation of its host star. A recently discovered, unusual hot Jupiter may be causing its star to spin faster than it should.Exotic PlanetsHot Jupiters are gas giants of roughly Jupiters size that orbit close in to their host stars. Though these planets are easy to detect their large sizes and frequent transits mean surveys have a good chance of catching them we havent found many of them, suggesting that planetary systems containing hot Jupiters are fairly unusual.The period-folded light curve of HATS-18, revealing the transit of the hot Jupiter HATS-18b. The period is P=0.8378 days. [Penev et al. 2016]Studying this exotic population of planets, however, can help us to better understand how gas giants form and evolve in planetary systems. New observations of hot Jupiters may also reveal how stars and close-in planets interact through radiation, gravity, and magnetic fields.The recent discovery of a transiting hot Jupiter a little over 2000 light-years away therefore presents an exciting opportunity!A Speeding GiantThe discovery of HATS-18b, a planet of roughly 2 times Jupiters mass and 1.3 times its radius, was announced in a study led by Kaloyan Penev (Princeton University). The planet was discovered using the HATSouth transit survey network, which includes instruments in Chile, Namibia, and Australia, and follow-up photometry and spectroscopy was conducted at a variety of ground-based observatories.HATS-18bs properties are particularly unusual: this hot Jupiter is zipping around its host star which is very similar to the Sun at the incredible pace of one orbit every 0.84 days. HATS-18bs orbit is more than 20 times closer to its host star than Mercurys is to the Sun, bringing it so close it nearly grazes the stars surface!Size of the planetary orbit relative to the stellar radius as a function of the stellar rotation period

  16. X-ray insights into star and planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    Although stars and planets form in cold environments, X-rays are produced in abundance by young stars. This review examines the implications of stellar X-rays for star and planet formation studies, highlighting the contributions of NASA’s (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Chandra X-ray Observatory. Seven topics are covered: X-rays from protostellar outflow shocks, X-rays from the youngest protostars, the stellar initial mass function, the structure of young stellar clusters, the fate of massive stellar winds, X-ray irradiation of protoplanetary disks, and X-ray flare effects on ancient meteorites. Chandra observations of star-forming regions often show dramatic star clusters, powerful magnetic reconnection flares, and parsec-scale diffuse plasma. X-ray selected samples of premain sequence stars significantly advance studies of star cluster formation, the stellar initial mass function, triggered star-formation processes, and protoplanetary disk evolution. Although X-rays themselves may not play a critical role in the physics of star formation, they likely have important effects on protoplanetary disks by heating and ionizing disk gases. PMID:20404197

  17. X-ray insights into star and planet formation.

    PubMed

    Feigelson, Eric D

    2010-04-20

    Although stars and planets form in cold environments, X-rays are produced in abundance by young stars. This review examines the implications of stellar X-rays for star and planet formation studies, highlighting the contributions of NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Chandra X-ray Observatory. Seven topics are covered: X-rays from protostellar outflow shocks, X-rays from the youngest protostars, the stellar initial mass function, the structure of young stellar clusters, the fate of massive stellar winds, X-ray irradiation of protoplanetary disks, and X-ray flare effects on ancient meteorites. Chandra observations of star-forming regions often show dramatic star clusters, powerful magnetic reconnection flares, and parsec-scale diffuse plasma. X-ray selected samples of premain sequence stars significantly advance studies of star cluster formation, the stellar initial mass function, triggered star-formation processes, and protoplanetary disk evolution. Although X-rays themselves may not play a critical role in the physics of star formation, they likely have important effects on protoplanetary disks by heating and ionizing disk gases.

  18. THE PREVALENCE AND IMPACT OF WOLF–RAYET STARS IN EMERGING MASSIVE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy

    We investigate Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point inmore » the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.{sup 4} We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ∼50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.« less

  19. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  20. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  1. Connecting the Cosmic Star Formation Rate with the Local Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribel, Carolina; Miranda, Oswaldo D.; Williams Vilas-Boas, José

    2017-11-01

    We present a model that unifies the cosmic star formation rate (CSFR), obtained through the hierarchical structure formation scenario, with the (Galactic) local star formation rate (SFR). It is possible to use the SFR to generate a CSFR mapping through the density probability distribution functions commonly used to study the role of turbulence in the star-forming regions of the Galaxy. We obtain a consistent mapping from redshift z˜ 20 up to the present (z = 0). Our results show that the turbulence exhibits a dual character, providing high values for the star formation efficiency (< \\varepsilon > ˜ 0.32) in the redshift interval z˜ 3.5{--}20 and reducing its value to < \\varepsilon > =0.021 at z = 0. The value of the Mach number ({{ M }}{crit}), from which < \\varepsilon > rapidly decreases, is dependent on both the polytropic index (Γ) and the minimum density contrast of the gas. We also derive Larson’s first law associated with the velocity dispersion (< {V}{rms}> ) in the local star formation regions. Our model shows good agreement with Larson’s law in the ˜ 10{--}50 {pc} range, providing typical temperatures {T}0˜ 10{--}80 {{K}} for the gas associated with star formation. As a consequence, dark matter halos of great mass could contain a number of halos of much smaller mass, and be able to form structures similar to globular clusters. Thus, Larson’s law emerges as a result of the very formation of large-scale structures, which in turn would allow the formation of galactic systems, including our Galaxy.

  2. A Search for Low Mass Stars and Substellar Companions and A Study of Circumbinary Gas and Dust Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David R.

    2011-01-01

    We have searched for nearby low-mass stars and brown dwarfs and have studied the planet-forming environment of binary stars. We have carried out a search for young, low-mass stars in nearby stellar associations using X-ray and UV source catalogs. We discovered a new technique to identify 10-100 Myr-old low-mass stars within 100 pc of the Earth using GALEX-optical/near-IR data. We present candidate young stars found by applying this new method in the 10 Myr old TW Hydrae and Scorpius-Centaurus associations. In addition, we have searched for the coolest brown dwarf class: Y-dwarfs, expected to appear at temperatures <500 K. Using wide-field near infrared imaging with ground (CTIO, Palomar, KPNO) and space (Spitzer, AKARI) observatories, we have looked for companions to nearby, old (2 Gyr or older), high proper motion white dwarfs. We present results for Southern Hemisphere white dwarfs. Additionally, we have characterized how likely planet formation occurs in binary star systems. While 20% of planets have been discovered around one member of a binary system, these binaries have semi-major axes larger than 20 AU. We have performed an AO and spectroscopic search for binary stars among a sample of known debris disk stars, which allows us to indirectly study planet formation and evolution in binary systems. As a case study, we examined the gas and dust present in the circumbinary disk around V4046 Sagittarii, a 2.4-day spectroscopic binary. Our results demonstrate it is unlikely that planets can form in binaries with stellar semi-major axes of 10s of AU. This research has been funded by a NASA ADA grant to UCLA and RIT.

  3. How star women build portable skills.

    PubMed

    Groysberg, Boris

    2008-02-01

    In May 2004, with the war for talent in high gear, Groysberg and colleagues from Harvard Business School wrote in these pages about the risks of hiring star performers away from competitors. After studying the fortunes of more than 1,000 star stock analysts, they found that when a star switched companies, not only did his performance plunge, so did the effectiveness of the group he joined and the market value of his new company. But further analysis of the data reveals that it's not that simple. In fact, one group of analysts reliably maintained star rankings even after changing employers: women. Unlike their male counterparts, female stars who switched firms performed just as well, in the aggregate, as those who stayed put. The 189 star women in the sample (18% of the star analysts studied) achieved a higher rank after switching firms than the men did. Why the discrepancy? First, says the author, the best female analysts appear to have built their franchises on portable, external relationships with clients and the companies they covered, rather than on relationships rooted within their firms. By contrast, male analysts built up greater firm- and team-specific human capital by investing more in the internal networks and unique capabilities and resources of their own companies. Second, women took greater care when assessing a prospective new employer. In this article, Groysberg explores the reasons behind the star women's portable performance.

  4. A spectroscopy study of nearby late-type stars, possible members of stellar kinematic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Martínez-Arnáiz, R. M.; Eiroa, C.; Montes, D.; Montesinos, B.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Nearby late-type stars are excellent targets for seeking young objects in stellar associations and moving groups. The origin of these structures is still misunderstood, and lists of moving group members often change with time and also from author to author. Most members of these groups have been identified by means of kinematic criteria, leading to an important contamination of previous lists by old field stars. Aims: We attempt to identify unambiguous moving group members among a sample of nearby-late type stars by studying their kinematics, lithium abundance, chromospheric activity, and other age-related properties. Methods: High-resolution echelle spectra (R ~ 57 000) of a sample of nearby late-type stars are used to derive accurate radial velocities that are combined with the precise Hipparcos parallaxes and proper motions to compute galactic-spatial velocity components. Stars are classified as possible members of the classical moving groups according to their kinematics. The spectra are also used to study several age-related properties for young late-type stars, i.e., the equivalent width of the lithium Li i 6707.8 Å line or the R'HK index. Additional information like X-ray fluxes from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey or the presence of debris discs is also taken into account. The different age estimators are compared and the moving group membership of the kinematically selected candidates are discussed. Results: From a total list of 405 nearby stars, 102 have been classified as moving group candidates according to their kinematics. i.e., only ~25.2% of the sample. The number reduces when age estimates are considered, and only 26 moving group candidates (25.5% of the 102 candidates) have ages in agreement with the star having the same age as an MG member. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andaluc

  5. Climbing the Ladder of Star Formation Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Adam

    2012-10-01

    While much is understood about isolated star formation, the opposite is true for star formation in clusters of both low and high mass. In particular the mechanisms by which many coevally formed stars affect their parent cloud environment remains poorly characterized. Fundamental questions such as interplay between multiple outflows, ionization fronts and turbulence are just beginning to be fully articulated. Distinguishing between the nature of feedback in clusters of different mass is also critical. In high mass clusters O stars are expected to dominate energetics while in low mass clusters multiple collimated outflows may represent the dominant feedback mechanism. Thus the issue of feedback modalities in clusters of different masses represents one of the major challenges to the next generation of star formation studies. In this proposal we seek to carry forward a focused theoretical study of feedback in both low and high-mass cluster environments with direct connections to observations. Using a state-of-the-art Adaptive Mesh Refinement MHD multi-physics code {developed by our group} we propose two computational studies: {1} multiple, interacting outflows and their role in altering the properties of a parent low mass cluster {2} Poorly collimated outburst/outflows from massive star{s} and their effect on high mass cluster star forming environments. In both cases we will use initial conditions derived from high-resolution AMR MHD simulations of cloud/cluster formation. Synthetic observations derived from the simulations {in a variety of emission lines from ions to atoms to molecules} will allow for direct contact with HST and other star formation databases.

  6. B- and A-Type Stars in the Taurus-Auriga Star-Forming Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), t Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  7. Probing Minor-merger-driven Star Formation In Early-type Galaxies Using Spatially-resolved Spectro-photometric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviraj, Sugata; Crockett, M.; Silk, J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Whitmore, B.; Windhorst, R.; Cappellari, M.; Bureau, M.; Davies, R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies that leverage the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum have revealed widespread recent star formation in early-type galaxies (ETGs), traditionally considered to be old, passively-evolving systems. This recent star formation builds 20% of the ETG stellar mass after z 1, driven by repeated minor mergers between ETGs and small, gas-rich satellites. We demonstrate how spatially-resolved studies, using a combination of high-resolution UV-optical imaging and integral-field spectroscopy (IFS), is a powerful tool to quantify the assembly history of individual ETGs and elucidate the poorly-understood minor-merger process. Using a combination of WFC3 UV-optical (2500-8200 angstroms) imaging and IFS from the SAURON project of the ETG NGC 4150, we show that this galaxy experienced a merger with mass ratio 1:15 around 0.9 Gyr ago, which formed 3% of its stellar mass and a young kinematically-decoupled core. A UV-optical analysis of its globular cluster system shows that the bulk of the stars locked up in these clusters likely formed 6-7 Gyrs in the past. We introduce a new HST-WFC3 programme, approved in Cycle 19, which will leverage similar UV-optical imaging of a representative sample of nearby ETGs from SAURON to study the recent star formation and its drivers in unprecedented detail and put definitive constraints on minor-merger-driven star formation in massive galaxies at late epochs.

  8. Evolved stars in the Local Group galaxies - II. AGB, RSG stars and dust production in IC10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Ventura, P.; Limongi, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Marini, E.; Rossi, C.

    2018-06-01

    We study the evolved stellar population of the Local Group galaxy IC10, with the aim of characterizing the individual sources observed and to derive global information on the galaxy, primarily the star formation history and the dust production rate. To this aim, we use evolutionary sequences of low- and intermediate-mass (M < 8 M⊙) stars, evolved through the asymptotic giant branch phase, with the inclusion of the description of dust formation. We also use models of higher mass stars. From the analysis of the distribution of stars in the observational planes obtained with IR bands, we find that the reddening and distance of IC10 are E(B - V) = 1.85 mag and d = 0.77 Mpc, respectively. The evolved stellar population is dominated by carbon stars, that account for 40% of the sources brighter than the tip of the red giant branch. Most of these stars descend from ˜1.1 - 1.3 M⊙ progenitors, formed during the major epoch of star formation, which occurred ˜2.5 Gyr ago. The presence of a significant number of bright stars indicates that IC10 has been site of significant star formation in recent epochs and currently hosts a group of massive stars in the core helium-burning phase. Dust production in this galaxy is largely dominated by carbon stars; the overall dust production rate estimated is 7 × 10-6 M⊙/yr.

  9. Understand B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    When observations of B stars made from space are added to observations made from the ground and the total body of observational information is confronted with theoretical expectations about B stars, it is clear that nonthermal phenomena occur in the atmospheres of B stars. The nature of these phenomena and what they imply about the physical state of a B star and how a B star evolves are examined using knowledge of the spectrum of a B star as a key to obtaining an understanding of what a B star is like. Three approaches to modeling stellar structure (atmospheres) are considered, the characteristic properties of a mantle, and B stars and evolution are discussed.

  10. Substellar Companions to weak-line TTauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, W.; Alcala, J. M.; Covino, E.; Frink, S.

    1997-05-01

    Weak-line TTauri stars, contrary to classical TTauri stars, no longer possess massive circumstellar disks. In weak-line TTauri stars, the circumstellar matter was either accreted onto the TTauri star or has been redistributed. Disk instabilities in the outer disk might result in the formation of brown dwarfs and giant planets. Based on photometric and spectroscopic studies of ROSAT sources, we have selected an initial sample of 200 weak-line TTauri stars in the Chamaeleon T association and the Scorpius Centaurus OB association. In the course of follow-up observations we identified visual and spectroscopic binary stars and excluded them from our final list, as the complex dynamics and gravitational interaction in binary systems might aggravate or even completely inhibit the formation of planets (depending on physical separation of the binary components and their mass-ratio). The membership of individual stars to the associations was established from proper motion studies and radial velocity surveys. Our final sample consists of 70 single weak-line TTauri stars. We have initiated a program to spatially RESOLVE young brown dwarfs and young giant planets as companions to single weak-line TTauri stars using adaptive optics at the ESO 3.6m telescope and HST/NICMOS. In this poster we describe the observing strategy and present first results of our adaptive optics observations.

  11. By Draconis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    An optical spectroscopic survey of dK-M stars has resulted in the discovery of several new H-alpha emission objects. Available optical data suggest these stars have a level of chromospheric activity midway between active BY Dra stars and quiet dM's. These "marginal" BY Dra stars are single objects that have rotation velocities slightly higher than that of quiet field stars but below that of active flare/BY Dra objects. The marginal BY Dra stars provide us with a class of objects rotating very near a "trigger velocity" (believed to be 5 km/s) which appears to divide active flare/BY Dra stars from quiet dM's. UV data on Mg II emission fluxes and strength of transition region features such as C IV will serve to fix activity levels in the marginal objects and determine chromosphere and transition-region heating rates. Simultaneous optical magnetic field measures will be used to explore the connection between fieldstrength/filling-factor and atmospheric heating. Comparison of these data with published information on active and quiet dM stars will yield information on the character of the stellar dynamo as it makes a transition from "low" to "high" activity.

  12. A study on making a Honsang using the star catalogue from 『Seong Gyeong』

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Seon Young; Kim, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Yong Sam

    2016-01-01

    The first record of Honsang (Celestial globe) was found in 『Sejong Sillok』 in Korea. Since then, there were records that Honsang was restored during the reign of King Jungjong and King Myungjong, and then restored again in the reign of King Seonjo. The only existing Honsang was made by Yi Hwang (1501-1570) in the 16th century for education of his followers. After then, Hong Dae Yong's (1731-1783) Honsangui, which was made in 18th century, had been passed down only through the literature. The constellations in Honsang and the scale system of each ring changed after 17th century when Western science began to affect Joseon dynasty. Since that time, the constellations, realized on Honsang globe, changed from constellations in the old method to ones in the new method. Furthermore, the scale system of rings on Honsang was changed from 365.25 Do, Jucheondo (Celestial globe circumference), to 360°. In this study, Honsang with constellations in the new method was made using star catalogue from 『Seong Gyeong』 published in 1861, which represented the constellations in the new method of Joseon dynasty. In order to realized the constellations from the star catalogue in 『Seong Gyeong』 on Honsang globe, the plane star chart and circular star chart of the area near the South and North Poles were drawn using spherical trigonometry. Using these star charts, the constellations in whole sky including stars near the South Pole were realized on Honsang globe. Also, equatorial coordinates and ecliptic coordinates were realized on Honsang globe simultaneously, and scales of Honsang's rings were marked as 360°.

  13. Atoms, Stars, and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1991-09-01

    1. Introducing stars and nebulae; 2. Stellar rainbows; 3. Atoms and molecules; 4. The climate in a stellar atmosphere; 5. Analysing the stars; 6. Dwarfs, giants, and supergiants; 7. What makes a star shine?; 8. The youth and middle age of a common star; 9. Wind, dust and pulsations; 10. A star's last hurray?; 11. The interstellar medium and gaseous nebulae; 12. Uncommon stars and their sometimes violent behaviour; 13. High energy astronomy.

  14. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF KNOTS OF STAR FORMATION IN INTERACTING VERSUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Beverly J.; Olmsted, Susan; Jones, Keith

    2016-03-15

    Interacting galaxies are known to have higher global rates of star formation on average than normal galaxies, relative to their stellar masses. Using UV and IR photometry combined with new and published Hα images, we have compared the star formation rates (SFRs) of ∼700 star forming complexes in 46 nearby interacting galaxy pairs with those of regions in 39 normal spiral galaxies. The interacting galaxies have proportionally more regions with high SFRs than the spirals. The most extreme regions in the interacting systems lie at the intersections of spiral/tidal structures, where gas is expected to pile up and trigger starmore » formation. Published Hubble Space Telescope images show unusually large and luminous star clusters in the highest luminosity regions. The SFRs of the clumps correlate with measures of the dust attenuation, consistent with the idea that regions with more interstellar gas have more star formation. For the clumps with the highest SFRs, the apparent dust attenuation is consistent with the Calzetti starburst dust attenuation law. This suggests that the high luminosity regions are dominated by a central group of young stars surrounded by a shell of clumpy interstellar gas. In contrast, the lower luminosity clumps are bright in the UV relative to Hα, suggesting either a high differential attenuation between the ionized gas and the stars, or a post-starburst population bright in the UV but faded in Hα. The fraction of the global light of the galaxies in the clumps is higher on average for the interacting galaxies than for the spirals. Thus either star formation in interacting galaxies is “clumpier” on average, or the star forming regions in interacting galaxies are more luminous, dustier, or younger on average.« less

  15. SNR-shock impact on star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Dincel, B.

    2016-06-01

    While stars form out of cores of molecular clouds due to gravitational collapse of the clouds, external pressure caused by shock waves of stellar winds or supernovae are believed to be responsible for triggering star formation. However, since massive stars evolve fast and their supernova remnants (SNRs) can only be observed up to an age of around 10^5 years, SNRs found near star-forming regions have most likely resulted from the same generation of stars as the young stellar objects (YSOs). Shock waves of these SNRs might show interaction with the existing YSOs and change their nature. We study YSO candidates in Galactic SNRs CTB 109, IC 443 and HB21, which are known to show interaction with molecular clouds and have associated infrared emission. By photometric and spectroscopic studies of YSOs in the optical and the near-infrared, we aim to find clear observational evidences for an interaction of SNR-shocks with YSOs.

  16. A Study of Two Dwarf Irregular Galaxies with Asymmetrical Star Formation Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Gallardo, Samavarti; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Adamo, Angela; Cook, David O.; Oh, Se-Heon; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Kim, Hwihyun; Kahre, Lauren; Ubeda, Leonardo; Bright, Stacey N.; Ryon, Jenna E.; Fumagalli, Michele; Sacchi, Elena; Kennicutt, R. C.; Tosi, Monica; Dale, Daniel A.; Cignoni, Michele; Messa, Matteo; Grebel, Eva K.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Sabbi, Elena; Grasha, Kathryn; Gallagher, John S., III; Calzetti, Daniela; Lee, Janice C.

    2018-03-01

    Two dwarf irregular galaxies, DDO 187 and NGC 3738, exhibit a striking pattern of star formation: intense star formation is taking place in a large region occupying roughly half of the inner part of the optical galaxy. We use data on the H I distribution and kinematics and stellar images and colors to examine the properties of the environment in the high star formation rate (HSF) halves of the galaxies in comparison with the low star formation rate halves. We find that the pressure and gas density are higher on the HSF sides by 30%–70%. In addition we find in both galaxies that the H I velocity fields exhibit significant deviations from ordered rotation and there are large regions of high-velocity dispersion and multiple velocity components in the gas beyond the inner regions of the galaxies. The conditions in the HSF regions are likely the result of large-scale external processes affecting the internal environment of the galaxies and enabling the current star formation there.

  17. A study of star formation by Hα emission of galaxies in the galaxy group NGC 4213

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maungkorn, Sakdawoot; Kriwattanawong, Wichean

    2017-09-01

    This research aims to study hydrogen alpha emission, corresponding to star formation of galaxies in the NGC 4213 group that has an average recession velocity of 6,821 km/s. The imaging observations with broad-band filters (B, V and RC) and narrow-band filters ([S II] and Red-continuum) were carried out from the 2.4-m reflecting telescope at Thai National Observatory (TNO). There are 11 sample galaxies in this study, consisting of 2 elliptical, 2 lenticular and 7 spiral galaxies. It was found that the late-type galaxies tend to be bluer than early-type galaxies, due to these galaxies consist of relatively high proportion of blue stars. Furthermore, the equivalent width of hydrogen alpha (EW(Hα)) tends to increase as a function of morphological type. This indicates that star formation in late-type galaxies taking place more than the early-type galaxies. Furthermore, a ratio of the star formation rate to galaxy mass also increases slightly with the galaxy type. This could be due to the interaction between galaxy-galaxy or tidal interaction occurring within the galaxy group.

  18. NuSTAR Captures the Beat of a Dead Star Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-08

    The brightest pulsar detected to date is shown in this frame from an animation that flips back and forth between images captured by NASA NuSTAR. A pulsar is a type of neutron star, the leftover core of a star that exploded in a supernova.

  19. HST Snapshot Study of Variable Stars in Globular Clusters: Inner Region of NGC 6441

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Stetson, Peter B.; Catelan, Marcio; Sweigart, Allen V.; Layden, Andrew C.; Rich, R. Michael

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope snapshot program to survey the inner region of the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6441 for its variable stars. A total of 57 variable stars was found including 38 RR Lyrae stars, 6 Population II Cepheids, and 12 long period variables. Twenty-four of the RR Lyrae stars and all of the Population II Cepheids were previously undiscovered in ground-based surveys. Of the RR Lyrae stars observed in h s survey, 26 are pulsating in the fundamental mode with a mean period of 0.753 d and 12 are first-overtone mode pulsators with a mean period of 0.365 d. These values match up very well with those found in ground-based surveys. Combining all the available data for NGC 6441, we find mean periods of 0.759 d and 0.375 d for the RRab and RRc stars, respectively. We also find that the RR Lyrae in this survey are located in the same regions of a period-amplitude diagram as those found in ground-based surveys. The overall ratio of RRc to total RR Lyrae is 0.33. Although NGC 6441 is a metal-rich globular cluster and would, on that ground, be expected either to have few RR Lyrae stars, or to be an Oosterhoff type I system, its RR Lyrae more closely resemble those in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters. However, even compared to typical Oosterhoff type II systems, the mean period of its RRab stars is unusually long. We also derived I-band period-luminosity relations for the RR Lyrae stars. Of the six Population II Cepheids, five are of W Virginis type and one is a BL Herculis variable star. This makes NGC 6441, along with NGC 6388, the most metal-rich globular cluster known to contain these types of variable stars. Another variable, V118, may also be a Population II Cepheid given its long period and its separation in magnitude from the RR Lyrae stars. We examine the period-luminosity relation for these Population II Cepheids and compare it to those in other globular clusters and in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We argue that there does

  20. The Star Schools Distance-Learning Program: Results from the Mandated Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tushnet, Naida C.; And Others

    The Star Schools Assistance Program has been funding activities since 1988. It provides projects with seed money to develop distance learning programming and equip sites. In addition, Star Schools has served as a focal point for demonstrating innovative uses of technology to advance educational opportunity and improvement. This paper represents…

  1. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    MAKISHIMA, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1–7) × 108 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states. PMID:27169348

  2. X-ray diagnostics of massive star winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Ignace, R.; Huenemoerder, D. P.

    2017-11-01

    Observations with powerful X-ray telescopes, such as XMM-Newton and Chandra, significantly advance our understanding of massive stars. Nearly all early-type stars are X-ray sources. Studies of their X-ray emission provide important diagnostics of stellar winds. High-resolution X-ray spectra of O-type stars are well explained when stellar wind clumping is taking into account, providing further support to a modern picture of stellar winds as non-stationary, inhomogeneous outflows. X-ray variability is detected from such winds, on time scales likely associated with stellar rotation. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy indicates that the winds of late O-type stars are predominantly in a hot phase. Consequently, X-rays provide the best observational window to study these winds. X-ray spectroscopy of evolved, Wolf-Rayet type, stars allows to probe their powerful metal enhanced winds, while the mechanisms responsible for the X-ray emission of these stars are not yet understood.

  3. Star-formation rate in compact star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotova, I. Y.; Izotov, Y. I.

    2018-03-01

    We use the data for the Hβ emission-line, far-ultraviolet (FUV) and mid-infrared 22 μm continuum luminosities to estimate star formation rates < SFR > averaged over the galaxy lifetime for a sample of about 14000 bursting compact star-forming galaxies (CSFGs) selected from the Data Release 12 (DR12) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The average coefficient linking < SFR > and the star formation rate SFR0 derived from the Hβ luminosity at zero starburst age is found to be 0.04. We compare < SFR > s with some commonly used SFRs which are derived adopting a continuous star formation during a period of {˜} 100 Myr, and find that the latter ones are 2-3 times higher. It is shown that the relations between SFRs derived using a geometric mean of two star-formation indicators in the UV and IR ranges and reduced to zero starburst age have considerably lower dispersion compared to those with single star-formation indicators. We suggest that our relations for < SFR > determination are more appropriate for CSFGs because they take into account a proper temporal evolution of their luminosities. On the other hand, we show that commonly used SFR relations can be applied for approximate estimation within a factor of {˜} 2 of the < SFR > averaged over the lifetime of the bursting compact galaxy.

  4. Star Formation Studies with SOFIA and its Synergy with TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Buizer, James

    2014-07-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a modified Boeing 747 aircraft equipped with a 2.5m telescope that performs observations at high altitude from the optical to the sub-mm. The observatory just reached full operational capability in April of this year. Given that it is slated for a 20-year mission lifetime, SOFIA will overlap TMT by more than a decade. I will discuss the contrasting and complementary features of SOFIA and TMT in the context of star formation, discuss some of the early results from SOFIA in this field, and finish with a discussion of how TMT data can enhance and extended our understanding of star formation processes.[This talk could also be generalized to discuss more about synergies between SOFIA and TMT in a broader context (not just star formation), should the organizers prefer that.

  5. I-Love-Q: unexpected universal relations for neutron stars and quark stars.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2013-07-26

    Neutron stars and quark stars are not only characterized by their mass and radius but also by how fast they spin, through their moment of inertia, and how much they can be deformed, through their Love number and quadrupole moment. These depend sensitively on the star's internal structure and thus on unknown nuclear physics. We find universal relations between the moment of inertia, the Love number, and the quadrupole moment that are independent of the neutron and quark star's internal structure. These can be used to learn about neutron star deformability through observations of the moment of inertia, break degeneracies in gravitational wave detection to measure spin in binary inspirals, distinguish neutron stars from quark stars, and test general relativity in a nuclear structure-independent fashion.

  6. Pulsating Stars in the ASAS-3 Database. I. beta Cephei Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigulski, A.

    2005-06-01

    We present results of an analysis of the ASAS-3 data for short-period variables from the recently published catalog of over 38000 stars. Using the data available in the literature we verify the results of the automatic classification related to \\beta Cep pulsators. In particular, we find that 14 stars in the catalog can be classified unambiguously as new beta Cep stars. By means of periodogram analysis we derive the frequencies and amplitudes of the excited modes. The main modes in the new beta Cep stars have large semi-amplitudes, between 35 and 80 mmag. Up to four modes were found in some stars. Two (maybe three) new beta Cep stars are members of southern young open clusters: ASAS 164409-4719.1 belongs to NGC 6200, ASAS 164630-4701.2 is a member of Hogg 22, and ASAS 164939-4431.7 could be a member of NGC 6216. We also analyze the photometry of four known beta Cep stars in the ASAS-3 catalog, namely IL Vel, NSV 24078, V1449 Aql and SY Equ. Finally, we discuss the distribution of beta Cep stars in the Galaxy.

  7. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    Preface; SOC and LOC; Participants; Life at the conference; Conference photo; Session I. Population III and Metal-Free Star Formation: 1. Open questions in the study of population III star formation S. C. O. Glover, P. C. Clark, T. H. Greif, J. L. Johnson, V. Bromm, R. S. Klessen and A. Stacy; 2. Protostar formation in the early universe Naoki Yoshida; 3. Population III.1 stars: formation, feedback and evolution of the IMF Jonathan C. Tan; 4. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation T. H. Greif, D. R. G. Schleicher, J. L. Johnson, A.-K. Jappsen, R. S. Klessen, P. C. Clark, S. C. O. Glover, A. Stacy and V. Bromm; 5. Low-metallicity star formation: the characteristic mass and upper mass limit Kazuyuki Omukai; 6. Dark stars: dark matter in the first stars leads to a new phase of stellar evolution Katherine Freese, Douglas Spolyar, Anthony Aguirre, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo, J. A. Sellwood and Naoki Yoshida; 7. Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars F. Iocco, A. Bressan, E. Ripamonti, R. Schneider, A. Ferrara and P. Marigo; 8. Searching for Pop III stars and galaxies at high redshift Daniel Schaerer; 9. The search for population III stars Sperello di Serego Alighieri, Jaron Kurk, Benedetta Ciardi, Andrea Cimatti, Emanuele Daddi and Andrea Ferrara; 10. Observational search for population III stars in high-redshift galaxies Tohru Nagao; Session II. Metal Enrichment, Chemical Evolution, and Feedback: 11. Cosmic metal enrichment Andrea Ferrara; 12. Insights into the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation Henry Lee, Eric F. Bell and Rachel S. Somerville; 13. LSD and AMAZE: the mass-metallicity relation at z > 3 F. Mannucci and R. Maiolino; 14. Three modes of metal-enriched star formation at high redshift Britton D. Smith, Matthew J. Turk, Steinn Sigurdsson, Brian W. O'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 15. Primordial supernovae and the assembly of the first galaxies Daniel Whalen, Bob Van Veelen, Brian W. O

  8. Experiment D005: Star occultation navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, R. M.; Jorris, T. R.; Vallerie, E. M., III

    1971-01-01

    The usefulness of star occultation measurements for space navigation and the determination of a horizon density profile which could be used to update atmospheric models for horizon-based measurement systems were studied. The time of occultation of a known star by a celestial body, as seen by an orbiting observer, determines a cylinder of position, the axis of which is the line through the star and the body center, and the radius of which is equal to the occulting-body radius. The dimming percentage, with respect to the altitude of this grazing ray from the star to the observer, is a percentage altitude for occultation. That is, the star can be assumed to be occulted when it reaches a predetermined percentage of its unattenuated value. The procedure used was to measure this attenuation with respect to time to determine the usefulness of the measurements for autonomous space navigation. In this experiment, the crewmembers had to accomplish star acquisition, identification, calibration, and tracking. Instrumentation was required only for measurement of the relative intensity of the star as it set into the atmosphere.

  9. High School Students Watching Stars Evolve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; MacNeil, D.; Meema-Coleman, L.; Morenz, K.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) Some stars pulsate (vibrate). Their pulsation period depends primarily on their radius. The pulsation period changes if the radius changes, due to evolution, for instance. Even though the evolution is slow, the period change is measurable because it is cumulative. The observed time of maximum brightness (O) minus the calculated time (C), assuming that the period is constant, is plotted against time to produce an (O-C) diagram. If there is a uniform period change, this diagram will be a parabola, whose curvature - positive or negative - is proportional to the rate of period change. In this project, we study the period changes of RR Lyrae stars, old sun-like stars which are in the yellow giant phase, generating energy by thermonuclear fusion of helium into carbon. We chose 59 well-studied stars in the GEOS database, which consists of times of maximum measured by AAVSO and other observers. We included about a dozen RRc (first overtone pulsator) stars, since these have not been as well studied as the RRab (fundamental mode) stars because the maxima in their light curves are not as sharp. We will describe our results: about 2/3 of the stars showed parabolic (O-C) diagrams with period changes of up to 1.0 s/century, some with increasing periods and some with decreasing periods. The characteristic times for period changes (i.e. period divided by rate of change of period) were mostly 5-30 million years. These numbers are consistent with evolutionary models. Some stars showed too much scatter for analysis; we will discuss why. A few stars showed unusual (O-C) diagrams which cannot be explained simply by evolution. This project was carried out by coauthors MacNeil, Meema-Coleman, and Morenz, who were participants in the prestigious University of Toronto Mentorship Program, which enables outstanding senior high school students to participate in research at the university. We thank the AAVSO and other observers who made the measurements which were used in our

  10. High-Resolution Spectroscopic Study of Extremely Metal-Poor Star Candidates from the SkyMapper Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Heather R.; Keller, Stefan; Frebel, Anna; Casey, Andrew R.; Asplund, Martin; Bessell, Michael S.; Da Costa, Gary S.; Lind, Karin; Marino, Anna F.; Norris, John E.; Peña, José M.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tisserand, Patrick; Walsh, Jennifer M.; Yong, David; Yu, Qinsi

    2015-07-01

    The SkyMapper Southern Sky Survey is carrying out a search for the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy. It identifies candidates by way of its unique filter set which allows for estimation of stellar atmospheric parameters. The set includes a narrow filter centered on the Ca ii K 3933 Å line, enabling a robust estimate of stellar metallicity. Promising candidates are then confirmed with spectroscopy. We present the analysis of Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle high-resolution spectroscopy of 122 metal-poor stars found by SkyMapper in the first two years of commissioning observations. Forty-one stars have [{Fe}/{{H}}]≤slant -3.0. Nine have [{Fe}/{{H}}]≤slant -3.5, with three at [{Fe}/{{H}}]∼ -4. A 1D LTE abundance analysis of the elements Li, C, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, Sr, Ba, and Eu shows these stars have [X/Fe] ratios typical of other halo stars. One star with low [X/Fe] values appears to be “Fe-enhanced,” while another star has an extremely large [Sr/Ba] ratio: \\gt 2. Only one other star is known to have a comparable value. Seven stars are “CEMP-no” stars ([{{C}}/{Fe}]\\gt 0.7, [{Ba}/{Fe}]\\lt 0). 21 stars exhibit mild r-process element enhancements (0.3≤slant [{Eu}/{Fe}]\\lt 1.0), while four stars have [{Eu}/{Fe}]≥slant 1.0. These results demonstrate the ability to identify extremely metal-poor stars from SkyMapper photometry, pointing to increased sample sizes and a better characterization of the metal-poor tail of the halo metallicity distribution function in the future. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  11. Hydrodynamical processes in coalescing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    1994-01-01

    Coalescing neutron star binaries are considered to be the most promising sources of gravitational waves that could be detected by the planned laser-interferometer LIGO/VIRGO detectors. Extracting gravity wave signals from noisy data requires accurate theoretical waveforms in the frequency range 10-1000 Hz end detailed understanding of the dynamics of the binary orbits. We investigate the quasi-equilibrium and dynamical tidal interactions in coalescing binary stars, with particular focus on binary neutron stars. We develop a new formalism to study the equilibrium and dynamics of fluid stars in binary systems. The stars are modeled as compressible ellipsoids, and satisfy polytropic equation of state. The hydrodynamic equations are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations for the evolution of the principal axes and other global quantities. The equilibrium binary structure is determined by a set of algebraic equations. We consider both synchronized and nonsynchronized systems, obtaining the generalizations to compressible fluid of the classical results for the ellipsoidal binary configurations. Our method can be applied to a wide variety of astrophysical binary systems containing neutron stars, white dwarfs, main-sequence stars and planets. We find that both secular and dynamical instabilities can develop in close binaries. The quasi-static (secular) orbital evolution, as well as the dynamical evolution of binaries driven by viscous dissipation and gravitational radiation reaction are studied. The development of the dynamical instability accelerates the binary coalescence at small separation, leading to appreciable radial infall velocity near contact. We also study resonant excitations of g-mode oscillations in coalescing binary neutron stars. A resonance occurs when the frequency of the tidal driving force equals one of the intrinsic g-mode frequencies. Using realistic microscopic nuclear equations of state, we determine the g-modes in a cold neutron atar

  12. Massive Star Formation Viewed through Extragalactic-Tinted Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Sarah; Marengo, M.; Smith, H. A.; Allen, L.

    2014-01-01

    Massive Galactic star forming regions are the local analogs to the luminous star forming regions that dominate the emission from star forming galaxies. Their proximity to us enables the characterization of the full range of stellar masses that form in these more massive environments, improving our understanding of star formation tracers used in extragalactic studies. We have surveyed a sample of massive star forming regions with a range of morphologies and luminosities to probe the star formation activity in a variety of environments. We have used Spitzer IRAC and deep ground based J, H, Ks observations to characterize the Young Stellar Object (YSO) content of 6 massive star forming regions. These YSOs provide insight into the rate and efficiency of star formation within these regions, and enable comparison with nearby, low mass star forming regions as well as extreme cases of Galactic star formation including ‘mini-starburst’ regions. In addition, we have conducted an in-depth analysis of NGC 6334 to investigate how the star formation activity varies within an individual star forming region, using Herschel data in the far-infrared to probe the earliest stages of the ongoing star formation activity.

  13. A Multi-wavelength Study of Star Formation Activity in the S235 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Luna, A.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having AV > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated 12CO and 13CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position-velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H II region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH3 data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  14. A magnetic study of spotted UV Ceti flare stars and related late-type dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, S. S.

    1980-09-01

    A multichannel photoelectric Zeeman analyzer has been used to investigate the magnetic nature of the spotted UV Ceti flare stars. Magnetic observations were obtained on a sample of 19 program objects, of which 5 were currently spotted dKe-dMe stars, 7 were normal dK-dM stars, 7 were UV Ceti flare stars, and 1 was a possible post-T Tauri star. Contrary to most previously published observations and theoretical expectations, no magnetic fields were detected on any of these objects from either the absorption lines or the H-alpha emission line down to an observational uncertainty level of 100-160 gauss (standard deviation).

  15. Age-Defying Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    An age-defying star called IRAS 19312+1950 exhibits features characteristic of a very young star and a very old star. The object stands out as extremely bright inside a large, chemically rich cloud of material, as shown in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. IRAS 19312+1950 is the bright red star in the center of this image. A NASA-led team of scientists thinks the star -- which is about 10 times as massive as our sun and emits about 20,000 times as much energy -- is a newly forming protostar. That was a big surprise, because the region had not been known as a stellar nursery before. But the presence of a nearby interstellar bubble, which indicates the presence of a recently formed massive star, also supports this idea. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20914

  16. Neutron stars in supernova remnants and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V.

    We propose a new approach for studying the neutron star/supernova remnant associations, based on the idea that the supernova remnants can be products of an off-centered supernova explosion in a preexisting bubble created by the wind of a moving massive star. A cavity supernova explosion of a moving star results in a considerable offset of the neutron star birth-place from the geometrical center of the supernova remnant. Therefore: a) the high transverse velocities inferred for a number of neutron stars through their association with supernova remnants can be reduced; b) the proper motion vector of a neutron star should not necessarily point away from the geometrical center of the associated supernova remnant. Taking into account these two facts allow us to enlarge the circle of possible neutron star/supernova remnant associations, and could significantly affect the results of previous studies of associations. The possibilities of our approach are illustrated with some examples. We also show that the concept of an off-centered cavity supernova explosion could be used to explain the peculiar structures of a number of supernova remnants and for searches for stellar remnants possibly associated with them.

  17. Massive binary stars as a probe of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminki, Daniel C.

    2010-10-01

    Massive stars are among the largest and most influential objects we know of on a sub-galactic scale. Binary systems, composed of at least one of these stars, may be responsible for several types of phenomena, including type Ib/c supernovae, short and long gamma ray bursts, high-velocity runaway O and B-type stars, and the density of the parent star clusters. Our understanding of these stars has met with limited success, especially in the area of their formation. Current formation theories rely on the accumulated statistics of massive binary systems that are limited because of their sample size or the inhomogeneous environments from which the statistics are collected. The purpose of this work is to provide a higher-level analysis of close massive binary characteristics using the radial velocity information of 113 massive stars (B3 and earlier) and binary orbital properties for the 19 known close massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association. This work provides an analysis using the largest amount of massive star and binary information ever compiled for an O-star rich cluster like Cygnus OB2, and compliments other O-star binary studies such as NGC 6231, NGC 2244, and NGC 6611. I first report the discovery of 73 new O or B-type stars and 13 new massive binaries by this survey. This work involved the use of 75 successful nights of spectroscopic observation at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory in addition to observations obtained using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph at WIYN, the HIRES echelle spectrograph at KECK, and the Hamilton spectrograph at LICK. I use these data to estimate the spectrophotometric distance to the cluster and to measure the mean systemic velocity and the one-sided velocity dispersion of the cluster. Finally, I compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo models, the results of which indicate that the binary fraction of the cluster is 57 +/- 5% and that the indices for the power law distributions, describing the log of the periods, mass

  18. Global hot-star wind models for stars from Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, J.; Kubát, J.

    2018-04-01

    We provide mass-loss rate predictions for O stars from Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We calculate global (unified, hydrodynamic) model atmospheres of main sequence, giant, and supergiant stars for chemical composition corresponding to Magellanic Clouds. The models solve radiative transfer equation in comoving frame, kinetic equilibrium equations (also known as NLTE equations), and hydrodynamical equations from (quasi-)hydrostatic atmosphere to expanding stellar wind. The models allow us to predict wind density, velocity, and temperature (consequently also the terminal wind velocity and the mass-loss rate) just from basic global stellar parameters. As a result of their lower metallicity, the line radiative driving is weaker leading to lower wind mass-loss rates with respect to the Galactic stars. We provide a formula that fits the mass-loss rate predicted by our models as a function of stellar luminosity and metallicity. On average, the mass-loss rate scales with metallicity as Ṁ Z0.59. The predicted mass-loss rates are lower than mass-loss rates derived from Hα diagnostics and can be reconciled with observational results assuming clumping factor Cc = 9. On the other hand, the predicted mass-loss rates either agree or are slightly higher than the mass-loss rates derived from ultraviolet wind line profiles. The calculated P V ionization fractions also agree with values derived from observations for LMC stars with Teff ≤ 40 000 K. Taken together, our theoretical predictions provide reasonable models with consistent mass-loss rate determination, which can be used for quantitative study of stars from Magellanic Clouds.

  19. Techniques for High Contrast Imaging in Multi-Star Systems II: Multi-Star Wavefront Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirbu, D.; Thomas, S.; Belikov, R.

    2017-01-01

    Direct imaging of exoplanets represents a challenge for astronomical instrumentation due to the high-contrast ratio and small angular separation between the host star and the faint planet. Multi-star systems pose additional challenges for coronagraphic instruments because of the diffraction and aberration leakage introduced by the additional stars, and as a result are not planned to be on direct imaging target lists. Multi-star wavefront control (MSWC) is a technique that uses a coronagraphic instrument's deformable mirror (DM) to create high-contrast regions in the focal plane in the presence of multiple stars. Our previous paper introduced the Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control (SNWC) technique that uses a diffraction grating to enable the DM to generate high-contrast regions beyond the nominal controllable region. These two techniques can be combined to generate high-contrast regions for multi-star systems at any angular separations. As a case study, a high-contrast wavefront control (WC) simulation that applies these techniques shows that the habitable region of the Alpha Centauri system can be imaged reaching 8 times 10(exp -9) mean contrast in 10 percent broadband light in one-sided dark holes from 1.6-5.5 lambda (wavelength) divided by D (distance).

  20. Tiny Stars, Strong Fields: Exploring the Origin of Intense Magnetism in M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomre, Juri

    The M-type stars are becoming dominant targets in searches for Earth-like planets that could occupy their habitable zones. The low masses and luminosities of M-dwarf central stars make them very attractive for such exoplanetary hunts. The habitable zone of M dwarfs is close to the star due to their low luminosity. Thus possibly habitable planets will have short orbital periods, making their detection feasible both with the transit method (used by Kepler, K2 and soon with TESS) and with the radial velocity approaches. Yet habitability on a planet likely requires both solid surfaces and atmospheres, but also a favorable radiation environment. It is here that the M-dwarf central stars raise major theoretical puzzles, for many of them exhibit remarkably intense and frequent flaring, despite their modest intrinsic luminosities. The super-flares release their energy both in white light and in X-rays, and can be thousands of times brighter than the strongest solar flares. Such striking events must have magnetic origins, likely from fields built by convective dynamos operating in their interiors. Further, recent observations suggest that the surface of some M stars is carpeted with magnetic fields of 3 kG or more. Such field strengths are reminiscent of a sunspot, but here instead cover much of the stellar surface. With M stars now taking center stage in the search for Earthlike planets, it is crucial to begin to understand how convective dynamos may be able to build intense magnetic fields involved with super-flares and vast star spots, and how they depend upon the mass and rotation rate of these stars. We propose to use major 3-D MHD simulations with our Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code to study the coupling of turbulent convection, rotation, and magnetism within full spherical domains such as the interior of an M dwarf. This permits the exploration of the magnetic dynamos that must be responsible for the evolving magnetism and intense activity of many M dwarfs

  1. Winds from cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral observations of cool stars enable study of the presence and character of winds and the mass loss process in objects with effective temperatures, gravities, and atmospheric compositions which differ from that of the Sun. A wealth of recent spectroscopic measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer complement high resolution ground-based measures in the optical and infrared spectral regions. Such observations when combined with realistic semi-empirical atmospheric modeling allow us to estimate the physical conditions in the atmospheres and winds of many classes of cool stars. Line profiles support turbulent heating and mass motions. In low gravity stars, evidence is found for relatively fast (approximately 200 km s(exp -1)), warm winds with rapid acceleration occurring in the chromosphere. In some cases outflows commensurate with stellar escape velocities are present. Our current understanding of cool star winds will be reviewed including the implications of stellar observations for identification of atmospheric heating and acceleration processes.

  2. Planets Around Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolszczan, Alexander; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Anderson, Stuart B.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to continue investigations of neutron star planetary systems in an effort to describe and understand their origin, orbital dynamics, basic physical properties and their relationship to planets around normal stars. This research represents an important element of the process of constraining the physics of planet formation around various types of stars. The research goals of this project included long-term timing measurements of the planets pulsar, PSR B1257+12, to search for more planets around it and to study the dynamics of the whole system, and sensitive searches for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of old, rapidly spinning neutron stars with planetary systems. The instrumentation used in our project included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM), the 100-m Green Bank Telescope with the Berkeley- Caltech Pulsar Machine (BCPM), and the 100-m Effelsberg and 64-m Parkes telescopes equipped with the observatory supplied backend hardware.

  3. WR and LBV stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochiashvili, Nino; Beradze, Sophie; Kochiashvili, Ia; Natsvlishvili, Rezo; Vardosanidze, Manana

    Evolutionary scenarios of massive stars were revised in recent decades, after finding "unusual", blue progenitor of SN 1987A and after detecting the more massive stars than the accepted 120 M ⊙ maximum limit of stellar masses. A very important relation exists between WR and LBV stars. They represent the earlier, pre-SN evolutionary states of massive stars. WR and LBV stars and "classic" evolutionary scheme of the relation between the different type massive stars are discussed in this article. There also exist the newest evolutionary scenarios for low metallicity massive stars, which give us a different picture of their post main-sequence evolution. There is a rather good tradition of observations and investigations of massive stars at Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory. The authors discuss the new findings on the fate of P Cygni, the LBV star. These results on the reddening of the star and about its next possible outburst in the near future were obtained on the basis of UBV long-term electrophotometric observations of P Cygni by Eugene Kharadze and Nino Magalashvili. The observations were held in 1951-1983 at Abastumani Observatory using 33-cm and 48-cm reflectors.

  4. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  5. Activity in X-ray-selected late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takalo, Leo O.; Nousek, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    A spectroscopic study has been conducted of nine X-ray bright late-type stars selected from two Einstein X-ray surveys: the Columbia Astrophysical Laboratory Survey (five stars) and the CFA Medium Sensitivity Survey (MSS; four stars). Spectral classes were determined and radial and V sin(i) velocities were measured for the stars. Four of the Columbia Survey stars were found to be new RS CVn-type binaries. The fifth Columbia survey star was found to be an active G dwarf star without evidence for binarity. None of the four MSS stars were found to be either binaries or optically active stars. Activity in these stars was assessed by measuring the excess emission in H-alpha and the Ca II IRT (8498, 8542) lines in comparison with inactive stars of similar spectral types. A correlation was found between X-ray luminosity and V sin(i) and H-alpha line excess. The measured excess line emission in H-alpha was also correlated with V sin(i) but not with the IRT line excess.

  6. The Stars behind the Curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    ESO is releasing a magnificent VLT image of the giant stellar nursery surrounding NGC 3603, in which stars are continuously being born. Embedded in this scenic nebula is one of the most luminous and most compact clusters of young, massive stars in our Milky Way, which therefore serves as an excellent "local" analogue of very active star-forming regions in other galaxies. The cluster also hosts the most massive star to be "weighed" so far. NGC 3603 is a starburst region: a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust. Located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun, it is the closest region of this kind known in our galaxy, providing astronomers with a local test bed for studying intense star formation processes, very common in other galaxies, but hard to observe in detail because of their great distance from us. The nebula owes its shape to the intense light and winds coming from the young, massive stars which lift the curtains of gas and clouds revealing a multitude of glowing suns. The central cluster of stars inside NGC 3603 harbours thousands of stars of all sorts (eso9946): the majority have masses similar to or less than that of our Sun, but most spectacular are several of the very massive stars that are close to the end of their lives. Several blue supergiant stars crowd into a volume of less than a cubic light-year, along with three so-called Wolf-Rayet stars - extremely bright and massive stars that are ejecting vast amounts of material before finishing off in glorious explosions known as supernovae. Using another recent set of observations performed with the SINFONI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have confirmed that one of these stars is about 120 times more massive than our Sun, standing out as the most massive star known so far in the Milky Way [1]. The clouds of NGC 3603 provide us with a family picture of stars in different stages of their life, with gaseous structures that are

  7. Carbon Atmosphere Discovered On Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    without pulsations would require a tiny size, consistent only with exotic stars made of strange quark matter. "Our carbon veil solves one of the big questions about the neutron star in Cas A," said Craig Heinke. "People have been willing to consider some weird explanations, so it's a relief to discover a less peculiar solution." Unlike most astronomical objects, neutron stars are small enough to understand on a human scale. For example, neutron stars typically have a diameter of about 14 miles, only slightly longer than a half-marathon. The atmosphere of a neutron star is on an even smaller scale. The researchers calculate that the carbon atmosphere is only about 4 inches thick, because it has been compressed by a surface gravity that is 100 billion times stronger than on Earth. "For people who are used to hearing about immense sizes of things in space, it might be a surprise that we can study something so small," said Ho. "It's also funny to think that such a thin veil over this star played a key role in frustrating researchers." In Earth's time frame, the estimated age of the neutron star in Cas A is only several hundred years, making it about ten times younger than other neutron stars with detected surface emission. Therefore, the Cas A neutron star gives a unique window into the early life of a cooling neutron star. The carbon itself comes from a combination of material that has fallen back after the supernova, and nuclear reactions on the hot surface of the neutron star which convert hydrogen and helium into carbon. The X-ray spectrum and lack of pulsar activity suggest that the magnetic field on the surface of this neutron star is relatively weak. Similarly low magnetic fields are implied for several other young neutron stars by study of their weak X-ray pulsations. It is not known whether these neutron stars will have low magnetic fields for their entire lives, and never become radio pulsars, or whether processes in their interior will lead to the development of

  8. Spectrophotometry of Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, David

    2017-06-01

    Symbiotic stars are fascinating objects - complex binary systems comprising a cool red giant star and a small hot object, often a white dwarf, both embedded in a nebula formed by a wind from the giant star. UV radiation from the hot star ionises the nebula producing a range of emission lines. These objects have composite spectra with contributions from both stars plus the nebula and these spectra can change on many timescales. Being moderately bright, they lend themselves well to amateur spectroscopy. This paper describes the symbiotic star phenomenon, shows how spectrophotometry can be used to extract astrophysically useful information about the nature of these systems, and gives results for three symbiotic stars based on the author's observations.

  9. Gravitational Redshift of Deformed Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Alexis; Zubairi, Omair; Weber, Fridolin

    2015-04-01

    Non-rotating neutron stars are generally treated in theoretical studies as perfect spheres. Such a treatment, however, may not be correct if strong magnetic fields are present and/or the pressure of the matter in the cores of neutron stars is non-isotropic, leading to neutron stars which are deformed. In this work, we investigate the impact of deformation on the gravitational redshift of neutron stars in the framework of general relativity. Using a parameterized metric to model non-spherical mass distributions, we derive an expression for the gravitational redshift in terms of the mass, radius, and deformity of a neutron star. Numerical solutions for the redshifts of sequences of deformed neutron stars are presented and observational implications are pointed out. This research is funded by the NIH through the Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC), under Grant Number: 5T34GM008303-25 and through the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-1411708.

  10. A young star takes centre stage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-02

    With its helical appearance resembling a snail’s shell, this reflection nebula seems to spiral out from a luminous central star in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. The star in the centre, known as V1331 Cyg and located in the dark cloud LDN 981 — or, more commonly, Lynds 981 — had previously been defined as a T Tauri star. A T Tauri is a young star — or Young Stellar Object — that is starting to contract to become a main sequence star similar to the Sun. What makes V1331Cyg special is the fact that we look almost exactly at one of its poles. Usually, the view of a young star is obscured by the dust from the circumstellar disc and the envelope that surround it. However, with V1331Cyg we are actually looking in the exact direction of a jet driven by the star that is clearing the dust and giving us this magnificent view. This view provides an almost undisturbed view of the star and its immediate surroundings allowing astronomers to study it in greater detail and look for features that might suggest the formation of a verylow-mass object in the outer circumstellar disc.

  11. The Multiplicity of Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Debra J.

    2004-01-01

    The most massive stars drastically reconfigure their surroundings via their strong stellar winds and powerful ionizing radiation. With this mass fueling their large luminosities, these stars are frequently used as standard candles in distance determination, and as tracers of stellar evolution in different regions and epochs. In their dieing burst, some of the once massive stars will enter a Wolf-Rayet (WR) phase lasting approx.10% of the stellar lifetime. This phase is particularly useful for study because these stars have strong spectroscopic signatures that allow them to be easily identified at great distances. But how accurate are these identifications? Increasingly, the relatively nearby stars we once assumed to be single are revealing themselves to be binary or multiple. New techniques, such as high-resolution imaging and interferometry, are changing our knowledge of these objects. I will discuss recent results in the literature and how this affects the binary distribution of WR stars. I will also discuss the implications of binary vs. single star evolution on evolution through the WR phase. Finally, I will discuss the implications of these revised numbers on both massive stellar evolution itself, and the impact that this has on the role of WR stars as calibrators.

  12. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  13. Advancing Astronomical Instrumentation: an Adaptive Optics Kinematic Study of z 1 Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieda, Etsuko

    This thesis has a dual focus on improving ground-based astronomical instruments and an observational study of distant star-forming galaxies to study galaxy formation and evolution. Of fundamental importance to this work are adaptive optics (AO) technology and integral field spectrographs (IFSs), both of which offer powerful means of studying high redshift galaxies. First, I describe the design and development of an instrument to characterize the vertical atmospheric turbulence using the SLODAR (SLOpe Detection and Ranging) method. This instrument was used in a campaign at Ellesmere island ( 80 degN) nd determined that the site has half of the total turbulence residing in the ground layer (< 1 km), and that the median seeing at Ellesmere is comparable to the best worldwide observing sites. Secondly, I present the design and implementation of an experimental setup to evaluate a new grating designed for OSIRIS (OH-Suppressing Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph), an IFS at the Keck I telescope. I tested and installed a new grating in OSIRIS, and the improved sensitivity with the new grating is a factor of 1.83 between 1-2.4 um. Finally, taking direct advantage of the improved OSIRIS performance, I built-up the currently largest sample of z 1 star-forming galaxies taken with an IFS coupled with AO. I present the first results of IROCKS (Intermediate Redshift OSIRIS Chemo-Kinematic Survey), a spatially resolved Halpha survey containing sixteen z 1 and one z 1.5 star-forming galaxies. The Halpha kinematics and morphologies of these galaxies were investigated, including resolved star-forming clumps. These IROCKS results show that z 1 star-forming galaxies have elevated line-of-sight velocity dispersions (sigma_ave 60 km/s) compared to local galaxies yet have lower dispersions compared to their counterparts at higher redshift (z > 1.5). Four of the z 1 galaxies are well-fit to an inclined disk model, and the disk fraction is similar to high-z samples. The size

  14. Instabilities in Interacting Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Andrych, K. D.; Antoniuk, K. A.; Baklanov, A. V.; Beringer, P.; Breus, V. V.; Burwitz, V.; Chinarova, L. L.; Chochol, D.; Cook, L. M.; Cook, M.; Dubovský, P.; Godlowski, W.; Hegedüs, T.; Hoňková, K.; Hric, L.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Juryšek, J.; Kim, C.-H.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Kudashkina, L. S.; Kusakin, A. V.; Marsakova, V. I.; Mason, P. A.; Mašek, M.; Mishevskiy, N.; Nelson, R. H.; Oksanen, A.; Parimucha, S.; Park, J.-W.; Petrík, K.; Quiñones, C.; Reinsch, K.; Robertson, J. W.; Sergey, I. M.; Szpanko, M.; Tkachenko, M. G.; Tkachuk, L. G.; Traulsen, I.; Tremko, J.; Tsehmeystrenko, V. S.; Yoon, J.-N.; Zola, S.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    2017-07-01

    The types of instability in the interacting binary stars are briefly reviewed. The project “Inter-Longitude Astronomy” is a series of smaller projects on concrete stars or groups of stars. It has no special funds, and is supported from resources and grants of participating organizations, when informal working groups are created. This “ILA” project is in some kind similar and complementary to other projects like WET, CBA, UkrVO, VSOLJ, BRNO, MEDUZA, AstroStatistics, where many of us collaborate. Totally we studied 1900+ variable stars of different types, including newly discovered variables. The characteristic timescale is from seconds to decades and (extrapolating) even more. The monitoring of the first star of our sample AM Her was initiated by Prof. V.P. Tsesevich (1907-1983). Since more than 358 ADS papers were published. In this short review, we present some highlights of our photometric and photo-polarimetric monitoring and mathematical modeling of interacting binary stars of different types: classical (AM Her, QQ Vul, V808 Aur = CSS 081231:071126+440405, FL Cet), asynchronous (BY Cam, V1432 Aql), intermediate (V405 Aql, BG CMi, MU Cam, V1343 Her, FO Aqr, AO Psc, RXJ 2123, 2133, 0636, 0704) polars and magnetic dwarf novae (DO Dra) with 25 timescales corresponding to different physical mechanisms and their combinations (part “Polar”); negative and positive superhumpers in nova-like (TT Ari, MV Lyr, V603 Aql, V795 Her) and many dwarf novae stars (“Superhumper”); eclipsing “non-magnetic” cataclysmic variables(BH Lyn, DW UMa, EM Cyg; PX And); symbiotic systems (“Symbiosis”); super-soft sources (SSS, QR And); spotted (and not spotted) eclipsing variables with (and without) evidence for a current mass transfer (“Eclipser”) with a special emphasis on systems with a direct impact of the stream into the gainer star's atmosphere, which we propose to call “Impactor” (short from “Extreme Direct Impactor”), or V361 Lyr-type stars. Other

  15. Amazing journeys to the hearts of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sarbani

    2018-06-01

    In his seminal book on the structure of stars, Arthur Eddington had mourned that we will never be able to peer into the opaque layers of a star and see what is within. Little did he know that in less that 50 years we would find the means of doing just that by using seismic data of the Sun and other stars.In this talk I will share with you some of the results obtained though seismic studies of stars. I will begin with the story of helioseismology and the surprising results that we have obtained for the Sun. And next I will go on to other stars and what we have learned using data obtained by the Kepler mission and how discuss how these data are being used to study the structure and evolution of the Galaxy.

  16. A Star Close Encounter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-03

    The potential planet-forming disk (or "protoplanetary disk") of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. At up to 100 times the mass of sun-like stars, O stars are the most massive and energetic stars in the universe. The O star can be seen to the right of the image, as the large orange spot with the white center. To the left, the comet-like structure is actually a neighboring solar system that is being destroyed by the O star's powerful winds and intense ultraviolet light. In a process called "photoevaporation," immense output from the O star heats up the nearby protoplanetary disk so much that gas and dust boil off, and the disk can no longer hold together. Photon (or light) blasts from the O star then strip the potential planet-forming disk off its neighbor star by blowing away evaporated material. This effect is illustrated in the smaller system's comet-like structure. The system is located about 2,450 light-years away in the star-forming cloud IC 1396. The image was taken with Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer instrument at 24 microns. The picture is a pseudo-color stretch representing intensity. Yellow and white represent hot areas, whereas purple and blue represent relatively cooler, fainter regions.

  17. How bright planets became dim stars: planetary speculations in John Herschel's double star astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, S.

    2014-03-01

    Previous research on the origins of double star astronomy in the early nineteenth century emphasized the role mathematical methods and instrumentation played in motivating early observations of these objects. The work of the British astronomer John Herschel, however, shows that questions regarding the physical nature of double stars were also important. In particular, an analysis of John Herschel's early work on double stars illustrates the way in which speculations regarding these objects were shaped by assumptions of the properties of stars themselves. For Herschel, a major consideration in double star astronomy was distinguishing between types of double stars. Optical doubles were useful in determining parallax while binary doubles were not. In practice, classification of a specific double star pair into one of these categories was based on the assumption that stars were of approximately the same luminosity and thus differences in relative brightness between stars were caused by difference in distances. Such assumptions, though ultimately abandoned, would lead Herschel in the 1830s to advance the possibility that the dim companion stars in certain double star pairs were not stars at all but in fact planets.

  18. How bright planets became dim stars: planetary speculations in John Herschel's double star astronomy.

    PubMed

    Case, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Previous research on the origins of double star astronomy in the early nineteenth century emphasized the role mathematical methods and instrumentation played in motivating early observations of these objects. The work of the British astronomer John Herschel, however, shows that questions regarding the physical nature of double stars were also important. In particular, an analysis of John Herschel's early work on double stars illustrates the way in which speculations regarding these objects were shaped by assumptions of the properties of stars themselves. For Herschel, a major consideration in double star astronomy was distinguishing between types of double stars. Optical doubles were useful in determining parallax while binary doubles were not. In practice, classification of a specific double star pair into one of these categories was based on the assumption that stars were of approximately the same luminosity and thus differences in relative brightness between stars were caused by difference in distances. Such assumptions, though ultimately abandoned, would lead Herschel in the 1830s to advance the possibility that the dim companion stars in certain double star pairs were not stars at all but in fact planets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Key issues review: numerical studies of turbulence in stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, W. David; Meakin, Casey

    2016-10-01

    Three major problems of single-star astrophysics are convection, magnetic fields and rotation. Numerical simulations of convection in stars now have sufficient resolution to be truly turbulent, with effective Reynolds numbers of \\text{Re}>{{10}4} , and some turbulent boundary layers have been resolved. Implications of these developments are discussed for stellar structure, evolution and explosion as supernovae. Methods for three-dimensional (3D) simulations of stars are compared and discussed for 3D atmospheres, solar rotation, core-collapse and stellar boundary layers. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis of the numerical simulations has been shown to provide a novel and quantitative estimate of resolution errors. Present treatments of stellar boundaries require revision, even for early burning stages (e.g. for mixing regions during He-burning). As stellar core-collapse is approached, asymmetry and fluctuations grow, rendering spherically symmetric models of progenitors more unrealistic. Numerical resolution of several different types of three-dimensional (3D) stellar simulations are compared; it is suggested that core-collapse simulations may be under-resolved. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in explosions has a deep connection to convection, for which the abundance structure in supernova remnants may provide evidence.

  20. Nitrogen line spectroscopy of O-stars. II. Surface nitrogen abundances for O-stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero González, J. G.; Puls, J.; Najarro, F.; Brott, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Nitrogen is a key element for testing the impact of rotational mixing on evolutionary models of massive stars. Recent studies of the nitrogen surface abundance in B-type stars within the VLT-FLAMES survey of massive stars have challenged part of the corresponding predictions. To obtain a more complete picture of massive star evolution, and to allow for additional constraints, these studies need to be extended to O-stars. Aims: This is the second paper in a series aiming at the analysis of nitrogen abundances in O-type stars, to establish tighter constraints on the early evolution of massive stars. In this paper, we investigate the N ivλ4058 emission line formation, provide nitrogen abundances for a substantial O-star sample in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and compare our (preliminary) findings with recent predictions from stellar evolutionary models. Methods: Stellar and wind parameters of our sample stars were determined by line profile fitting of hydrogen, helium and nitrogen lines, exploiting the corresponding ionization equilibria. Synthetic spectra were calculated by means of the NLTE atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code fastwind, using a new nitrogen model atom. We derived nitrogen abundances for 20 O- and 5 B-stars by analyzing all nitrogen lines (from different ionization stages) present in the available optical spectra. Results: The dominating process responsible for emission at N ivλ4058 in O-stars is the strong depopulation of the lower level of the transition, which increases as a function of Ṁ. Unlike the N iii triplet emission, resonance lines do not play a role for typical mass-loss rates and below. We find (almost) no problem in fitting the nitrogen lines, in particular the "f" features. Only for some objects, where lines from N iii/N iv/N v are visible in parallel, we need to opt for a compromise solution. For five objects in the early B-/late O-star domain that have been previously analyzed by different methods and model atmospheres, we

  1. Phenotypic differences between male physicians, surgeons, and film stars: comparative study.

    PubMed

    Trilla, Antoni; Aymerich, Marta; Lacy, Antonio M; Bertran, Maria J

    2006-12-23

    To test the hypothesis that, on average, male surgeons are taller and better looking than male physicians, and to compare both sets of doctors with film stars who play doctors on screen. Comparative study. Typical university hospital in Spain, located in Barcelona and not in a sleepy backwater. Random sample of 12 surgeons and 12 physicians plus 4 external controls (film stars who play doctors), matched by age (50s) and sex (all male). An independent committee (all female) evaluated the "good looking score" (range 1-7). Height (cm) and points on the good looking score. Surgeons were significantly taller than physicians (mean height 179.4 v 172.6 cm; P=0.01). Controls had significantly higher good looking scores than surgeons (mean score 5.96 v 4.39; difference between means 1.57, 95% confidence interval 0.69 to 2.45; P=0.013) and physicians (5.96 v 3.65; 2.31, 1.58 to 3.04; P=0.003). Surgeons had significantly higher good looking scores than physicians (4.39 v 3.65; 0.74; 0.25 to 1.23; P=0.010). Male surgeons are taller and better looking than physicians, but film stars who play doctors on screen are better looking than both these groups of doctors. Whether these phenotypic differences are genetic or environmental is unclear.

  2. Seven new carbon-enhanced metal-poor RR Lyrae stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Catherine R.; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Kuehn, Charles

    2014-05-20

    We report estimated carbon-abundance ratios, [C/Fe], for seven newly discovered carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) RR Lyrae stars. These are well-studied RRab stars that had previously been selected as CEMP candidates based on low-resolution spectra. For this pilot study, we observed eight of these CEMP RR Lyrae candidates with the Wide Field Spectrograph on the ANU 2.3 m telescope. Prior to this study, only two CEMP RR Lyrae stars had been discovered: TY Gru and SDSS J1707+58. We compare our abundances to new theoretical models of the evolution of low-mass stars in binary systems. These simulations evolve the secondary stars, post accretionmore » from an asymptotic giant-branch (AGB) donor, all the way to the RR Lyrae stage. The abundances of CEMP RR Lyrae stars can be used as direct probes of the nature of the donor star, such as its mass, and the amount of material accreted onto the secondary. We find that the majority of the sample of CEMP RR Lyrae stars is consistent with AGB donor masses of around 1.5-2.0 M {sub ☉} and accretion masses of a few hundredths of a solar mass. Future high-resolution studies of these newly discovered CEMP RR Lyrae stars will help disentangle the effects of the proposed mixing processes that occur in such objects.« less

  3. Destruction of a Magnetized Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    What happens when a magnetized star is torn apart by the tidal forces of a supermassive black hole, in a violent process known as a tidal disruption event? Two scientists have broken new ground by simulating the disruption of stars with magnetic fields for the first time.The magnetic field configuration during a simulation of the partial disruption of a star. Top left: pre-disruption star. Bottom left: matter begins to re-accrete onto the surviving core after the partial disruption. Right: vortices form in the core as high-angular-momentum debris continues to accrete, winding up and amplifying the field. [Adapted from Guillochon McCourt 2017]What About Magnetic Fields?Magnetic fields are expected to exist in the majority of stars. Though these fields dont dominate the energy budget of a star the magnetic pressure is a million times weaker than the gas pressure in the Suns interior, for example they are the drivers of interesting activity, like the prominences and flares of our Sun.Given this, we can wonder what role stars magnetic fields might play when the stars are torn apart in tidal disruption events. Do the fields change what we observe? Are they dispersed during the disruption, or can they be amplified? Might they even be responsible for launching jets of matter from the black hole after the disruption?Star vs. Black HoleIn a recent study, James Guillochon (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and Michael McCourt (Hubble Fellow at UC Santa Barbara) have tackled these questions by performing the first simulations of tidal disruptions of stars that include magnetic fields.In their simulations, Guillochon and McCourt evolve a solar-mass star that passes close to a million-solar-mass black hole. Their simulations explore different magnetic field configurations for the star, and they consider both what happens when the star barely grazes the black hole and is only partially disrupted, as well as what happens when the black hole tears the star apart

  4. Morning Star Cycle Two: Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, L. V.

    Semi-structured telephone interviews were used to gather follow-up data on students who completed the 1977-1979 Morning Star cycle two program, a community-based Native teacher education program at the Blue Quills Native Education Centre leading to a Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Alberta. Of the 24 students who completed…

  5. Neutron star evolution and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R. I.; Edwards, B. C.; Haines, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors investigated the evolution and radiation characteristics of individual neutron stars and stellar systems. The work concentrated on phenomena where new techniques and observations are dramatically enlarging the understanding of stellar phenomena. Part of this project was a study of x-ray and gamma-ray emission from neutron stars and other compact objects. This effort included calculating the thermal x-ray emission from young neutron stars, deriving the radio and gamma-ray emission from active pulsars and modeling intense gamma-ray bursts in distant galaxies. They also measured periodic optical and infrared fluctuations from rotating neutron stars and search for high-energy TeV gamma rays from discrete celestial sources.

  6. Crystallization of the Pulsating White Dwarf Star, BPM 37093

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salois, Amee; Winget, D.

    2010-01-01

    BPM 37093 is unique among pulsating white dwarf stars because it is expected to have a highly crystallized interior. By understanding how this star is crystallizing, we gain a better understanding of extreme physics. Theoretical models of the evolution of white dwarf stars suggest that they crystallize from the inside out. The pulsations of the star, which we see as intensity variations, cannot penetrate this crystallized interior. Therefore, as the star crystallizes there is a smaller volume for the propagation of the pulsations and the pulsation periods are changed accordingly. We studied these changes in the periods of the pulsations of the star over ten weeks during the McDonald Observatory Research Experience for Undergraduates Program. By studying the changes in the pulsations periods of the star we can determine the mass fraction of the star that is crystallized. Comparing Fourier transforms of our observed light curves taken in 2004 and 2005 at CTIO with data taken in 1998 and 1999 by Kanaan et al. we hope to see the changes that have occurred in the star as well as determining a better approximation of the star's crystallized mass fraction.

  7. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    strongly reinforce our current understanding of heavy element nucleosynthesis. But detecting the element Lead is not easy - the expected spectral lines of Lead in stellar spectra are relatively weak, and they are blended with many nearby absorption lines of other elements. Moreover, bona-fide, low-metallicity AGB stars appear to be extremely rare in the solar neighborhood . But if the necessary observations are so difficult, how is it then possible to probe nucleosynthesis in low-metallicity AGB stars? CH-stars in binary systems ESO PR Photo 26a/01 ESO PR Photo 26a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 350 x 400 pix - 232k] [Normal - JPEG: 700 x 800 pix - 616k] Caption : One of the three Lead stars, HD 196944 that was analyzed in the present research programme (at the center of the field). This star lies about 1600 light years away in the constellation Aquarius. At magnitude 9, it is not visible to the unaided eye, but easily seen through a small amateur telescope. Still, the detailed spectroscopic study reported in this Press release that revealed a high abundance of Lead in this star required a 4-m class telescope. This DSS-image are copyright by the UK SERC/PPARC (Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, formerly Science and Engineering Research Council), the Anglo-Australian Telescope Board and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA). The spikes seen in this photo are an optical effect in the telescope. In a determined effort in this direction, a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] decided to try to detect the presence of Lead in some "CH-stars" [4] that are located about 1600 light-years away, high above the main plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. Over-abundance of some heavy elements has been observed in some "CH-stars". But CH-stars are not very luminous and have not yet evolved to the AGB phase. Hence they are totally unable to produce heavy elements. So how can there be heavy elements in the CH-stars? This mystery was solved when it was realized

  8. Einstein Observations of X-ray emission from A stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, L.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maxson, C. W.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.; Cash, W., Jr.; Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Results are reported from the combined CfA Stellar Survey of selected bright A stars and an Einstein Guest Observer program for Ap and Am stars. In an initial report of results from the CfA Stellar Surveys by Vaiana et al. (1981) it was noted that the spread in observed X-ray luminosities among the few A stars observed was quite large. The reasons for this large spread was studied by Pallavicini et al. (1981). It was found that the X-ray emission from normal stars is related very strongly to bolometric luminosity for early-type stars and to rotation rate for late-type stars. However, an exception to this rule has been the apparently anomalous behavior of A star X-ray emission, for which the large spread in luminosity showed no apparent correlation with either bolometric luminosity or stellar rotation rate. In the present study, it is shown that the level of emission from normal A stars agrees with the correlation observed for O and B stars.

  9. A study of extreme carbon stars. I - Silicon carbide emission features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.

    1984-01-01

    10-micron spectra of many extreme carbon stars reveal a prominent emission feature near 11 microns. This is compared with laboratory spectra of SiC grains. Two distinct types of features are found, perhaps indicative of different mechanisms of grain formation in different stars. Estimates are made of probable column densities and total masses of SiC in the circumstellar shells.

  10. Descendants of the first stars: the distinct chemical signature of second generation stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Tilman; Yoshida, Naoki; Magg, Mattis; Frebel, Anna; Glover, Simon C. O.; Gómez, Facundo A.; Griffen, Brendan; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Ji, Alexander P.; Klessen, Ralf S.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Tominaga, Nozomu

    2018-05-01

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars in the Milky Way (MW) allow us to infer the properties of their progenitors by comparing their chemical composition to the metal yields of the first supernovae. This method is most powerful when applied to mono-enriched stars, i.e. stars that formed from gas that was enriched by only one previous supernova. We present a novel diagnostic to identify this subclass of EMP stars. We model the first generations of star formation semi-analytically, based on dark matter halo merger trees that yield MW-like halos at the present day. Radiative and chemical feedback are included self-consistently and we trace all elements up to zinc. Mono-enriched stars account for only ˜1% of second generation stars in our fiducial model and we provide an analytical formula for this probability. We also present a novel analytical diagnostic to identify mono-enriched stars, based on the metal yields of the first supernovae. This new diagnostic allows us to derive our main results independently from the specific assumptions made regarding Pop III star formation, and we apply it to a set of observed EMP stars to demonstrate its strengths and limitations. Our results may provide selection criteria for current and future surveys and therefore contribute to a deeper understanding of EMP stars and their progenitors.

  11. NuSTAR Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-30

    Yunjin Kim, NuSTAR project manager at the Jet Propulsion Laborartory (JPL), talks about NASA's Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuStar) during a briefing, Wednesday, May 30, 2012, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Imaging light in the high-energy, short-wavelength X-ray range, the telescope will aim to study how black holes form and evolve along with galaxies. The instrument, packed aboard an Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL rocket is set to launch from a plane in midair no earlier than June 13 from Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  12. Study of the Outflow and Disk surrounding a Post-Outburst FU-Orionis Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellon, Samuel N.; Perez, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    PP 13 is a fan-shaped cometary nebula located in the constellation of Perseus and embedded in the L1473 dark cloud. At optical wavelengths this region is obscured by the surrounding dark cloud, while at infrared and longer wavelengths two northern objects (PP13Na & PP13Nb) and one southern object (PP13S) are revealed. In the past, the young stellar object inside PP13S, called PP13S*, experienced an FU-Orionis type outburst due to a massive accretion episode and is currently returning to its quiescent state. Studying the FU-Orionis phase is crucial to our understanding of how low mass stars form; it is theorized that all low-mass stars go through this outburst phase while they are forming. I used CARMA 3mm interferometric observations of the PP13 region to study the continuum and molecular line emissions from PP13. With these observations, I determined the source of the previously detected outflow and learned new information about the double star system PP13Na and PP13Nb. Although I was not able to detect the accretion disk in the gas emissions, I plan to use computer modeling to help provide constraints on the properties of PP13S* and its outflow.

  13. INTERRUPTED STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Aaron M.; Leigh, Nathan W. C., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu, E-mail: nleigh@amnh.org

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single–binary and binary–binarymore » scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%–40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.« less

  14. A comparative study of the effectiveness of "Star Show" vs. "Participatory Oriented Planetarium" lessons in a middle school Starlab setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platco, Nicholas L.., Jr.

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of "Star Show" and the "Participatory Oriented Planetarium" (POP) instructional programs in a middle school Starlab setting. The Star Show is a planetarium program that relies heavily on an audiovisual/lecture format to impart information, while the POP method of instruction is an inquiry, activity-based approach to teaching astronomy. All Star Show and POP lessons were conducted in a Starlab planetarium. This study examined the effectiveness of the two methods on the attainment of astronomy knowledge, changes in student attitudes toward astronomy, retention of knowledge, and gender differences. A pilot study (N = 69) was conducted at a middle school near King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. The main study (N = 295) was conducted at a middle school near Reading, Pennsylvania. All students were pretested and posttested in both studies. The testing instruments included a 60-question paper-and-pencil content test and a 22-item Likert-style science attitude test. The content test was judged to be valid and reliable by a panel of science educators. The attitude test is a field-tested attitude survey developed by Michael Zeilik. The topics included in the Star Show and POP lessons were seasons, moon phases, eclipses, stars, and constellations. The Star Show programs used in this study are professionally prepared planetarium programs from Jeff Bowen Productions. Several planetarium educators who have been involved with planetarium training workshops throughout the United States developed the POP lessons used in this study. The Star Show was clearly the more effective method for improving student knowledge in both the pilot and main studies. Both methods were equally effective for improving student attitudes toward astronomy. The POP method was the more effective method of instruction when retention of knowledge was examined four weeks after the treatments ended. Gender did not have any significant effect on this study

  15. Social stars: Modeling the interactive lives of stars in dense clusters and binary systems in the era of time domain astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Morgan Elowe

    This thesis uses computational modeling to study of phases of dramatic interaction that intersperse stellar lifetimes. In galactic centers stars trace dangerously wandering orbits dictated by the combined gravitational force of a central, supermassive black hole and all of the surrounding stars. In binary systems, stars' evolution -- which causes their radii to increase substantially -- can bring initially non-interacting systems into contact. Moments of strong stellar interaction transform stars, their subsequent evolution, and the stellar environments they inhabit. In tidal disruption events, a star is partially or completely destroyed as tidal forces from a supermassive black hole overwhelm the star's self gravity. A portion of the stellar debris falls back to the black hole powering a luminous flare as it accretes. This thesis studies the relative event rates and properties of tidal disruption events for stars across the stellar evolutionary spectrum. Tidal disruptions of giant stars occur with high specific frequency; these objects' extended envelopes make them vulnerable to disruption. More-compact white dwarf stars are tidally disrupted relatively rarely. Their transients are also of very different duration and luminosity. Giant star disruptions power accretion flares with timescales of tens to hundreds of years; white dwarf disruption flares take hours to days. White dwarf tidal interactions can additionally trigger thermonuclear burning and lead to transients with signatures similar to type I supernovae. In binary star systems, a phase of hydrodynamic interaction called a common envelope episode occurs when one star evolves to swallow its companion. Dragged by the surrounding gas, the companion star spirals through the envelope to tighter orbits. This thesis studies accretion and flow morphologies during this phase. Density gradients across the gravitationally-focussed material lead to a strong angular momentum barrier to accretion during common envelope

  16. The spectra of the chemically peculiar stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, M.

    The spectral properties of the chemically peculiar (CP) stars and the information which is obtainable from them are reviewed. The identification and classification of CP stars in the basis of their spectra is discussed with particular emphasis on the He-rich stars and CNO stars, and recent classification systems based on narrow-band photometry, low-resolution spectrometry or UV spectra are considered. Attention is given to continuum flux distributions, particularly the infrared excesses and UV deficiencies, and the stellar properties (effective temperature and gravity, line blocking, discontinuities, mass and radius) that may be derived from them, and to the magnetic field measurements and evidence for spotted element distributions that may be inferred from spectral surface composition analyses made using LTE model atmospheres are considered which involve both large sample of stars and individual stars, and statistical studies of rotation, magnetic braking and membership in binary systems and clusters are indicated. Finally, UV and X-ray evidence for chromospheres and coronas in some CP stars is noted.

  17. Dusty Mass Loss from Galactic Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Kastner, Joel H.

    2016-06-01

    We are probing how mass loss from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars depends upon their metallicity. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are evolved stars that eject large parts of their mass in outflows of dust and gas in the final stages of their lives. Our previous studies focused on mass loss from AGB stars in lower metallicity galaxies: the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). In our present study, we analyze AGB star mass loss in the Galaxy, with special attention to the Bulge, to investigate how mass loss differs in an overall higher metallicity environment. We construct radiative transfer models of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of stars in the Galaxy identified as AGB stars from infrared and optical surveys. Our Magellanic Cloud studies found that the AGB stars with the highest mass loss rates tended to have outflows with carbon-rich dust, and that overall more carbon-rich (C-rich) dust than oxygen-rich (O-rich) was produced by AGB stars in both LMC and SMC. Our radiative transfer models have enabled us to determine reliably the dust chemistry of the AGB star from the best-fit model. For our Galactic sample, we are investigating both the dust chemistries of the AGB stars and their mass-loss rates, to compare the balance of C-rich dust to O-rich dust between the Galactic bulge and the Magellanic Clouds. We are also constructing detailed dust opacity models of AGB stars in the Galaxy for which we have infrared spectra; e.g., from the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). This detailed dust modeling of spectra informs our choice of dust properties to use in radiative transfer modeling of SEDs of Galactic AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX15AF15G.

  18. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  19. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  20. Introduction to neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-01

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  1. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts canmore » set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.« less

  2. Charging and performance of the CubeSTAR satellite studied by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloch, Wojciech; Bekkeng, Tore André; Lindem, Torfinn

    2012-07-01

    A good understanding of spacecraft-plasma interaction is important for all space missions and experiments. The spacecraft potential is determined by the plasma, photoemission and other currents [1]. A charged object can significantly disturb the surrounding plasma, and lead to wake formation. The wake features, such as ion focusing, can influence the measurements of the plasma by the instruments onboard. A study of this problem using analytical models is difficult and can not account for all phenomena. This has encouraged use of numerical models for self-consistent studies of the plasma-object interactions on a detailed kinetic level [2][3]. With three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations [3][4], we address the spacecraft-plasma interaction in various plasma environments, and account for the self-consistent charging of the spacecraft by plasma and photoemission currents. As a specific case, we consider the interactions between plasma and a CubeSTAR satellite. CubeSTAR is a nano-satellite for the space weather studies being constructed in Norway, with the launch scheduled for year 2013. With a novel Langmuir probe system [5], it will measure the absolute electron densities with a high spatial resolution, allowing for studies of small scale plasma irregularities. We perform a systematic study of the role of the wakefield on the measurements with the Langmuir probes onboard the CubeSTAR for the plasma conditions relevant for the planned polar orbit. The simulation results are of relevance also for other spacecraft missions. [1] Whipple E C, Rep. Prog. Phys. 44, 1197 (1981). [2] Roussel J F and Berthelier J J, J. Geophys. Res. 109, A01104 (2004). [3] Yaroshenko V V et al., J. Geophys. Res. 116, A12218 (2011). [4] Miloch W J Kroll M and Block D 2010 Phys. Plasmas 17, 103703 (2010). [5] Bekkeng T A et al. Meas. Sci. Technol. 21, 085903 (2010).

  3. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkotas, Konstantinos

    2016-03-01

    Neutron stars are the densest objects in the present Universe, attaining physical conditions of matter that cannot be replicated on Earth. These unique and irreproducible laboratories allow us to study physics in some of its most extreme regimes. More importantly, however, neutron stars allow us to formulate a number of fundamental questions that explore, in an intricate manner, the boundaries of our understanding of physics and of the Universe. The multifaceted nature of neutron stars involves a delicate interplay among astrophysics, gravitational physics, and nuclear physics. The research in the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars is expected to flourish and thrive in the next decade. The imminent direct detection of gravitational waves will turn gravitational physics into an observational science, and will provide us with a unique opportunity to make major breakthroughs in gravitational physics, in particle and high-energy astrophysics. These waves, which represent a basic prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity but have yet to be detected directly, are produced in copious amounts, for instance, by tight binary neutron star and black hole systems, supernovae explosions, non-axisymmetric or unstable spinning neutron stars. The focus of the talk will be on the neutron star instabilities induced by rotation and the magnetic field. The conditions for the onset of these instabilities and their efficiency in gravitational waves will be presented. Finally, the dependence of the results and their impact on astrophysics and especially nuclear physics will be discussed.

  4. StarCAT: A Catalog of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Ultraviolet Echelle Spectra of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2010-03-01

    StarCAT is a catalog of high resolution ultraviolet spectra of objects classified as "stars," recorded by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) during its initial seven years of operations (1997-2004). StarCAT is based on 3184 echelle observations of 545 distinct targets, with a total exposure duration of 5.2 Ms. For many of the objects, broad ultraviolet coverage has been achieved by splicing echellegrams taken in two or more FUV (1150-1700 Å) and/or NUV (1600-3100 Å) settings. In cases of multiple pointings on conspicuously variable sources, spectra were separated into independent epochs. Otherwise, different epochs were combined to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). A post-facto correction to the calstis pipeline data sets compensated for subtle wavelength distortions identified in a previous study of the STIS calibration lamps. An internal "fluxing" procedure yielded coherent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for objects with broadly overlapping wavelength coverage. The best StarCAT material achieves 300 m s-1 internal velocity precision; absolute accuracy at the 1 km s-1 level; photometric accuracy of order 4%; and relative flux precision several times better (limited mainly by knowledge of SEDs of UV standard stars). While StarCAT represents a milestone in the large-scale post-processing of STIS echellegrams, a number of potential improvements in the underlying "final" pipeline are identified.

  5. The Origin of Nonradiative Heating/momentum in Hot Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B. (Editor); Michalitsianos, A. G. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The origin of nonradiative heating and momentum in the atmospheres of stars is studied. The similarities and differences between what occurs in the hot stars and what occurs in cool stars are emphasized. Key points in the theory are reviewed. Areas requiring new study are indicated.

  6. Magnetized anisotropic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelea, Cristian; Dariescu, Marina-Aura; Dariescu, Ciprian

    2018-05-01

    We extend a known solution-generating technique for isotropic fluids in order to construct more general models of anisotropic stars with poloidal magnetic fields. In particular, we discuss the magnetized versions of some well-known exact solutions describing anisotropic stars and dark energy stars, and we describe some of their properties.

  7. Changes in intraocular pressure values measured with noncontact tonometer (NCT), ocular response analyzer (ORA) and corvis scheimpflug technology tonometer (CST) in the early phase after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE).

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Su, Xiangjian; Liu, Xiu; Miao, Huamao; Fang, Xuejun; Zhou, Xingtao

    2016-11-18

    Corneal biomechanical properties are always compromised after corneal refractive surgeries thus leading to underestimated intraocular pressure (IOP) that complicates the management of IOP. We investigated the changes in postoperative baseline of IOP values measured with noncontact tonometer (NCT), ocular response analyzer (ORA) and corvis scheimpflug technology (CST) in the early phase after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE). Twenty-two eyes (-6.76 ± 1.39D) of 22 moderate and high myopes, (28.36 ± 7.14 years, 12 male and 10 female) were involved in this prospective study. IOP values were measured using a non-contact tomometer (NCT-IOP), an ocular response analyzer (corneal-compensated IOP, IOPcc and Goldmann-correlated IOP, IOPg) and a Corvis scheimpflug technology tonometer (CST-IOP) preoperatively, at 20 min and 24 h, postoperatively. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA), Pearson's correlation analysis and multiple linear regression models (stepwise) were performed. Cut-off P values were 0.05. Except for IOPcc, NCT-IOP, IOPg, and CST-IOP values significantly decreased after SMILE procedure (All P values <0.05). ΔCCT, as well as ΔMRSE and ΔKm, did not significantly correlated with ΔNCT-IOP, ΔIOPcc, ΔIOPg or ΔCST-IOP, (all P values >0.05). Multiple linear regression models (stepwise) showed that the practical post-operative IOP value was the main predictor of the theoretical post-operative NCT-IOP, IOPcc and IOPg values (all P values <0.001). The postoperative applanation time 1 (AT1) value (B = 8.079, t = 4.866, P < 0.001), preoperative central corneal thickness (CCT) value (B = 0.035, t = 2.732, P = 0.014) and postoperative peak distance (PD) value (B = 0.515, t = 2.176, P = 0.043) were the main predictors of the theoretical post-operative CST-IOP value. IOP values are underestimated when assessed after SMILE by using NCT-IOP, IOPg and CST-IOP. The practical postoperative IOPcc value

  8. INFRARED TWO-COLOR DIAGRAMS FOR AGB STARS, POST-AGB STARS, AND PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Kyung-Won, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr

    2015-08-01

    We present various infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) for asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, post-AGB stars, and Planetary Nebulae (PNe) and investigate possible evolutionary tracks. We use catalogs from the available literature for the sample of 4903 AGB stars (3373 O-rich; 1168 C-rich; 362 S-type), 660 post-AGB stars (326 post-AGB; 334 pre-PN), and 1510 PNe in our Galaxy. For each object in the catalog, we cross-identify the IRAS, AKARI, Midcourse Space Experiment, and 2MASS counterparts. The IR 2CDs can provide useful information about the structure and evolution of the dust envelopes as well as the central stars. To find possible evolutionarymore » tracks from AGB stars to PNe on the 2CDs, we investigate spectral evolution of post-AGB stars by making simple but reasonable assumptions on the evolution of the central star and dust shell. We perform radiative transfer model calculations for the detached dust shells around evolving central stars in the post-AGB phase. We find that the theoretical dust shell model tracks using dust opacity functions of amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon roughly coincide with the densely populated observed points of AGB stars, post-AGB stars, and PNe on various IR 2CDs. Even though some discrepancies are inevitable, the end points of the theoretical post-AGB model tracks generally converge in the region of the observed points of PNe on most 2CDs.« less

  9. A M2FS Spectroscopic Study of Low-mass Young Stars in Orion OB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleida, Catherine C.; Briceno, Cesar; Calvet, Nuria; Mateo, Mario L.; Hernandez, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Surveys of pre-main sequence stars in the ~4-10 Myr range provide a window into the decline of the accretion phase of stars and the formation of planets. Nearby star clusters and stellar associations allow for the study of these young stellar populations all the way down to the lowest mass members. One of the best examples of nearby 4-10 Myr old stellar populations is the Orion OB1 association. The CIDA Variability Survey of Orion OB1 (CVSO - Briceño et al. 2001) has used the variability properties of low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars to identify hundreds of K and M-type stellar members of the Orion OB1 association, a number of them displaying IR-excess emission and thought to be representative of more evolved disk-bearing young stars. Characterizing these young, low-mass objects using spectroscopy is integral to understanding the accretion phase in young stars. We present preliminary results of a spectroscopic survey of candidate and confirmed Orion OB1 low-mass members taken during November 2014 and February 2014 using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber Spectrograph (M2FS), a PI instrument on the Magellan Clay Telescope (PI: M. Matteo). Target fields located in the off-cloud regions of Orion were identified in the CVSO, and observed using the low and high-resolution modes of M2FS. Both low and high-resolution spectra are needed in order to confirm membership and derive masses, ages, kinematics and accretion properties. Initial analysis of these spectra reveal many new K and M-type members of the Orion OB1 association in these low extinction, off-cloud areas. These are the more evolved siblings of the youngest stars still embedded in the molecular clouds, like those in the Orion Nebula Cluster. With membership and spectroscopic indicators of accretion we are building the most comprehensive stellar census of this association, enabling us to derive a robust estimate of the fraction of young stars still accreting at a various ages, a key constraint for the end of

  10. Hubble Captures Bubbles And Baby Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Image release June 22, 2010 A spectacular new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image — one of the largest ever released of a star-forming region — highlights N11, part of a complex network of gas clouds and star clusters within our neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This region of energetic star formation is one of the most active in the nearby Universe. The Large Magellanic Cloud contains many bright bubbles of glowing gas. One of the largest and most spectacular has the name LHA 120-N 11, from its listing in a catalogue compiled by the American astronomer and astronaut Karl Henize in 1956, and is informally known as N11. Close up, the billowing pink clouds of glowing gas make N11 resemble a puffy swirl of fairground candy floss. From further away, its distinctive overall shape led some observers to nickname it the Bean Nebula. The dramatic and colourful features visible in the nebula are the telltale signs of star formation. N11 is a well-studied region that extends over 1000 light-years. It is the second largest star-forming region within the Large Magellanic Cloud and has produced some of the most massive stars known. It is the process of star formation that gives N11 its distinctive look. Three successive generations of stars, each of which formed further away from the centre of the nebula than the last, have created shells of gas and dust. These shells were blown away from the newborn stars in the turmoil of their energetic birth and early life, creating the ring shapes so prominent in this image. Beans are not the only terrestrial shapes to be found in this spectacular high resolution image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. In the upper left is the red bloom of nebula LHA 120-N 11A. Its rose-like petals of gas and dust are illuminated from within, thanks to the radiation from the massive hot stars at its centre. N11A is relatively compact and dense and is the site of the most recent burst of star development in the region. Other star

  11. Debris Disks Among the Shell Stars: Insights from Spitzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia; Teske, Johanna

    2008-01-01

    Shell stars are a class of early-type stars that show narrow absorption lines in their spectra that appear to arise from circumstellar class. This observationally defined class contains a variety of objects, including evolved stars and classical Be stars. However, some of the main sequence shell stars harbor debris disks and younger protoplanetary disks, though this aspect of the class has been largely overlooked. We surveyed a set of main sequence stars for cool dust using Spitzer MIPS and found four additional systems with IR excesses at both 24 and 70 microns. This indicates that the stars have both circumstellar gas and dust, and are likely to be edge-on debris disks. Our estimate of the disk fraction among nearby main sequence shell stars is 48% +/- 14%. We discuss here the nature of the shell stars and present preliminary results from ground-based optical spectra of the survey target stars. We will also outline our planned studies aimed at further characterization of the shell star class.

  12. Variable Stars with the Kepler Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Szabó, R.; Plachy, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has revolutionized our knowledge about exoplanets and stars and is continuing to do so in the K2 mission. The exquisite photometric precision, together with the long, uninterrupted observations opened up a new way to investigate the structure and evolution of stars. Asteroseismology, the study of stellar oscillations, allowed us to investigate solar-like stars, and to peer into the insides of red giants and massive stars. But many discoveries have been made about classical variable stars, too, ranging from pulsators like Cepheids and RR Lyraes to eclipsing binary stars and cataclysmic variables, and even supernovae. In this review, which is far from an exhaustive summary of all results obtained with Kepler, we collected some of the most interesting discoveries, and ponder on the role for amateur observers in this golden era of stellar astrophysics.

  13. Study of a new central compact object: The neutron star in the supernova remnant G15.9+0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D.; Suleimanov, V.; Sasaki, M.; Santangelo, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present our study of the central point source CXOU J181852.0-150213 in the young Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G15.9+0.2 based on the recent ~90 ks Chandra observations. The point source was discovered in 2005 in shorter Chandra observations and was hypothesized to be a neutron star associated with the SNR. Our X-ray spectral analysis strongly supports the hypothesis of a thermally emitting neutron star associated with G15.9+0.2. We conclude that the object belongs to the class of young cooling low-magnetized neutron stars referred to as central compact objects (CCOs). We modeled the spectrum of the neutron star with a blackbody spectral function and with our hydrogen and carbon neutron star atmosphere models, assuming that the radiation is uniformly emitted by the entire stellar surface. Under this assumption, only the carbon atmosphere models yield a distance that is compatible with a source located in the Galaxy. In this respect, CXOU J181852.0-150213 is similar to two other well-studied CCOs, the neutron stars in Cas A and in HESS J1731-347, for which carbon atmosphere models were used to reconcile their emission with the known or estimated distances.

  14. Photometric and spectroscopic study of low mass embedded star clusters in reflection nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2005-02-01

    An analysis of the candidate embedded stellar systems in the reflection nebulae vdBH-RN 26, vdBH-RN} 38, vdBH-RN} 53a, GGD 20, ESO 95-RN 18 and NGC 6595 is presented. Optical spectroscopic data from CASLEO (Argentina) in conjunction with near infrared photometry from the 2MASS Point Source Catalogue were employed. The analysis is based on source surface density, colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams together with theoretical pre-main sequence isochrones. We take into account the field population affecting the analysis by carrying out a statistical subtraction. The fundamental parameters for the stellar systems were derived. The resulting ages are in the range 1-4 Myr and the objects are dominated by pre-main sequence stars. The observed masses locked in the clusters are less than 25 M⊙. The studied systems have no stars of spectral types earlier than B, indicating that star clusters do not necessarily evolve through an HII region phase. The relatively small locked mass combined with the fact that they are not numerous in catalogues suggests that these low mass clusters are not important donors of stars to the field populations. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  15. Wolf-Rayet stars as starting points or as endpoints of the evolution of massive stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Maeder, A.; Schmutz, W.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    The paper investigates the evidence for the two interpretations of Wolf-Rayet stars suggested in the literature: (1) massive premain-sequence stars with disks and (2) massive stars which have lost most of their H-rich layers in a stellar wind is investigated. The abundance determinations which are done in two different ways and which lead to different conclusions are discussed. The composition is solar, which would suggest interpretation (1), or the CNO abundances are strongly anomalous, which would suggest interpretation (2). Results from evolutionary calculations, stellar statistics, the existence of Ofpe/WN9 transition stars and W-R stars with evolved companions show overwhelming evidence that W-R stars are not premain-sequence stars but that they are in a late stage of evolution. Moreover, the fact that W-R stars are usually in clear regions of space, whereas massive premain-sequence stars are embedded in ultracompact H II regions also shows that W-R stars are not young premain-sequence stars.

  16. The Magnetic Properties of Galactic OB Stars from the Magnetism in Massive Stars Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Gregg A.; Grunhut, Jason; Petit, Veronique; Neiner, Coralie; Alecian, Evelyne; Landstreet, John; MiMeS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    The Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project represents the largest systematic survey of stellar magnetism ever undertaken. Comprising nearly 4500 high resolution polarised spectra of nearly 550 Galactic B and O-type stars, the MiMeS survey aims to address interesting and fundamental questions about the magnetism of hot, massive stars: How and when are massive star magnetic fields generated, and how do they evolve throughout stellar evolution? How do magnetic fields couple to and interact with the powerful winds of OB stars, and what are the consequences for the wind structure, momentum flux and energetics? What are the detailed physical mechanisms that lead to the anomalously slow rotation of many magnetic massive stars? What is the ultimate impact of stellar magnetic fields -- both direct and indirect -- on the evolution of massive stars? In this talk we report results from the analysis of the B-type stars observed within the MiMeS survey. The sample consists of over 450 stars ranging in spectral type from B9 to B0, and in evolutionary stage from the pre-main sequence to the post-main sequence. In addition to general statistical results concerning field incidence, strength and topology, we will elaborate our conclusions for subsamples of special interest, including the Herbig and classical Be stars, pulsating B stars and chemically peculiar B stars.

  17. Magnetic Stars After the Hayashi Phase. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    The properties of magnetic stars derived from observational data are analyzed. The degree of "magnetic" braking of parent protostars, which depends the magnetic field and mass, is studied. The conditions under which magnetic and "normal" nonmagnetic stars are separated, which appear to depend only on the rotational velocity of the protostars, are examined. The reasons for differences in the average magnitudes of the magnetic field in massive and low-mass magnetic stars are analyzed. The magnetic field structures of magnetic stars and their stability over time (rigidity of rotation) are examined.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Stimuli-Responsive Star-Like Polypept(o)ides: Introducing Biodegradable PeptoStars.

    PubMed

    Holm, Regina; Weber, Benjamin; Heller, Philipp; Klinker, Kristina; Westmeier, Dana; Docter, Dominic; Stauber, Roland H; Barz, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Star-like polymers are one of the smallest systems in the class of core crosslinked polymeric nanoparticles. This article reports on a versatile, straightforward synthesis of three-arm star-like polypept(o)ide (polysarcosine-block-polylysine) polymers, which are designed to be either stable or degradable at elevated levels of glutathione. Polypept(o)ides are a recently introduced class of polymers combining the stealth-like properties of the polypeptoid polysarcosine with the functionality of polypeptides, thus enabling the synthesis of materials completely based on endogenous amino acids. The star-like homo and block copolymers are synthesized by living nucleophilic ring opening polymerization of the corresponding N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs) yielding polymeric stars with precise control over the degree of polymerization (X n = 25, 50, 100), Poisson-like molecular weight distributions, and low dispersities (Đ = 1.06-1.15). Star-like polypept(o)ides display a hydrodynamic radius of 5 nm (μ 2 < 0.05) as determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). While star-like polysarcosines and polypept(o)ides based on disulfide containing initiators are stable in solution, degradation occurs at 100 × 10 -3 m glutathione concentration. The disulfide cleavage yields the respective polymeric arms, which possess Poisson-like molecular weight distributions and low dispersities (Đ = 1.05-1.12). Initial cellular uptake and toxicity studies reveal that PeptoStars are well tolerated by HeLa, HEK 293, and DC 2.4 cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A new method for determining which stars are near a star sensor field-of-view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Russell E., Jr.; Vedder, John D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method is described for determining which stars in a navigation star catalog are near a star sensor field of view (FOV). This method assumes that an estimate of spacecraft inertial attitude is known. Vector component ranges for the star sensor FOV are computed, so that stars whose vector components lie within these ranges are near the star sensor FOV. This method requires no presorting of the navigation star catalog, and is more efficient than tradition methods.

  20. Sizing up the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.

    For the main part of this dissertation, I have executed a survey of nearby, main sequence A, F, and G-type stars with the CHARA Array, successfully measuring the angular diameters of forty-four stars to better than 4% accuracy. The results of these observations also yield empirical determinations of stellar linear radii and effective temperatures for the stars observed. In addition, these CHARA-determined temperatures, radii, and luminosities are fit to Yonsei-Yale isochrones to constrain the masses and ages of the stars. These quantities are compared to the results found in Allende Prieto & Lambert (1999), Holmberg et al. (2007), and Takeda (2007), who indirectly determine these same properties by fitting models to observed photometry. I find that for most cases, the models underestimate the radius of the star by ~ 12%, while in turn they overestimate the effective temperature by ~ 1.5-4%, when compared to my directly measured values, with no apparent correlation to the star's metallicity or color index. These overestimated temperatures and underestimated radii in these works appear to cause an additional offset in the star's surface gravity measurements, which consequently yield higher masses and younger ages, in particular for stars with masses greater than ~ 1.3 [Special characters omitted.] . Alternatively, these quantities I measure are also compared to direct measurements from a large sample of eclipsing binary stars in Andersen (1991), and excellent agreement is seen within both data sets. Finally, a multi-parameter solution is found to fit color-temperature-metallicity values of the stars in this sample to provide a new calibration of the effective temperature scale for these types of stars. Published work in the field of stellar interferometry and optical spectroscopy of early-type stars are presented in Appendix D and E, respectively. INDEX WORDS: Interferometry, Infrared, Stellar Astronomy, Fundamental Properties, Effective Temperatures, Stellar Radii

  1. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzyński (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzyński introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the

  2. Symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of symbiotic star systems are discussed, based on a review of recent observational data. A model of a symbiotic star system is presented which illustrates how a cool red-giant star is embedded in a nebula whose atoms are ionized by the energetic radiation from its hot compact companion. UV outbursts from symbiotic systems are explained by two principal models: an accretion-disk-outburst model which describes how material expelled from the tenuous envelope of the red giant forms an inwardly-spiralling disk around the hot companion, and a thermonuclear-outburst model in which the companion is specifically a white dwarf which superheats the material expelled from the red giant to the point where thermonuclear reactions occur and radiation is emitted. It is suspected that the evolutionary course of binary systems is predetermined by the initial mass and angular momentum of the gas cloud within which binary stars are born. Since red giants and Mira variables are thought to be stars with a mass of one or two solar mass, it is believed that the original cloud from which a symbiotic system is formed can consist of no more than a few solar masses of gas.

  3. Be Stars in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Matthew L.; Wisniewski, John; Choi, Yumi; Williams, Ben; Lomax, Jamie; Bjorkman, Karen; Durbin, Meredith; Johnson, Lent Cliff; Lewis, Alexia; Lutz, Julie; Sigut, Aaron; Wallach, Aislynn; Dalcanton, Julianne

    2018-01-01

    We identify Be candidate stars in M31 using two-epoch F625W + F658N photometry from HST/ACS+WFC3 combined with the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) Catalog. Using the PHAT catalog allows us to extract stellar parameters such as surface temperature and gravity, thereby allowing us to identify the main sequence B type stars in the field of view. Be candidate stars are identified by comparing their HST narrow-band Hα excess magnitudes with that predicted by Kurucz spectra. We find 314 Be candidate stars out of 5699 B + Be candidate stars (5.51%) in our first epoch and 301 Be candidate stars out of 5769 B + Be candidate stars (5.22%) in our second epoch. Our Be fraction, while lower than that of the SMC, LMC, and MW, is possibly consistent with the fact the M31 has a higher metallicity than the other galaxies because Be fraction varies inversely with metallicity. We note that earlier spectral types have the largest Be fraction, and that the Be fraction strictly declines as the spectral type increases to later types. We then match our Be candidate stars with clusters, establishing that 39 of 314 are cluster stars in epoch one and 36 of 301 stars are cluster stars in epoch two. We assign ages, using the cluster age to characterize cluster Be candidate stars and star formation histories to characterize field Be candidate stars. Finally, we determine which Be candidate stars exhibited disk loss or disk growth between epochs, finding that, of the Be stars that did not show source confusion or low SNR in one of the epochs, 65 / 265 (24.5%) showed disk loss or renewal, while 200 / 265 (75.5%) showed only small changes in Hα excess. Our research provides context for the parameters of candidate Be stars in M31, which will be useful in further determining the nature of Be stars. This paper was supported by a grant from STScI via GO-13857.

  4. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  5. An Autonomous Star Identification Algorithm Based on One-Dimensional Vector Pattern for Star Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Liyan; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance the robustness and accelerate the recognition speed of star identification, an autonomous star identification algorithm for star sensors is proposed based on the one-dimensional vector pattern (one_DVP). In the proposed algorithm, the space geometry information of the observed stars is used to form the one-dimensional vector pattern of the observed star. The one-dimensional vector pattern of the same observed star remains unchanged when the stellar image rotates, so the problem of star identification is simplified as the comparison of the two feature vectors. The one-dimensional vector pattern is adopted to build the feature vector of the star pattern, which makes it possible to identify the observed stars robustly. The characteristics of the feature vector and the proposed search strategy for the matching pattern make it possible to achieve the recognition result as quickly as possible. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition accuracy and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the pyramid algorithm, the modified grid algorithm, and the LPT algorithm. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other three star identification algorithms. PMID:26198233

  6. An Autonomous Star Identification Algorithm Based on One-Dimensional Vector Pattern for Star Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liyan; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua

    2015-07-07

    In order to enhance the robustness and accelerate the recognition speed of star identification, an autonomous star identification algorithm for star sensors is proposed based on the one-dimensional vector pattern (one_DVP). In the proposed algorithm, the space geometry information of the observed stars is used to form the one-dimensional vector pattern of the observed star. The one-dimensional vector pattern of the same observed star remains unchanged when the stellar image rotates, so the problem of star identification is simplified as the comparison of the two feature vectors. The one-dimensional vector pattern is adopted to build the feature vector of the star pattern, which makes it possible to identify the observed stars robustly. The characteristics of the feature vector and the proposed search strategy for the matching pattern make it possible to achieve the recognition result as quickly as possible. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition accuracy and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the pyramid algorithm, the modified grid algorithm, and the LPT algorithm. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other three star identification algorithms.

  7. Neutrino Background from Population III Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iocco, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    Population III Stars (PopIII) are the first generation of stars formed from the collapse of the very first structures in the Universe. Their peculiar chemical composition (metal-free, resembling the Primordial Nucleosynthesis yields) affects their formation and evolution and makes them unusually big and hot stars. They are good candidates for the engines of Reionization of the Universe although their direct observation is extremely difficult. Here we summarize a study of their expected diffuse low-energy neutrino background flux at Earth.

  8. Star Tracker Performance Estimate with IMU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.; Swank, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    A software tool for estimating cross-boresight error of a star tracker combined with an inertial measurement unit (IMU) was developed to support trade studies for the Integrated Radio and Optical Communication project (iROC) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center. Typical laser communication systems, such as the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) and the Laser Communication Relay Demonstration (LCRD), use a beacon to locate ground stations. iROC is investigating the use of beaconless precision laser pointing to enable laser communication at Mars orbits and beyond. Precision attitude knowledge is essential to the iROC mission to enable high-speed steering of the optical link. The preliminary concept to achieve this precision attitude knowledge is to use star trackers combined with an IMU. The Star Tracker Accuracy (STAcc) software was developed to rapidly assess the capabilities of star tracker and IMU configurations. STAcc determines the overall cross-boresight error of a star tracker with an IMU given the characteristic parameters: quantum efficiency, aperture, apparent star magnitude, exposure time, field of view, photon spread, detector pixels, spacecraft slew rate, maximum stars used for quaternion estimation, and IMU angular random walk. This paper discusses the supporting theory used to construct STAcc, verification of the program and sample results.

  9. Aging jets from low-mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.; Chen, W. P.

    1994-01-01

    An extended faint optical jet is associated with the compact emission region plus faint star known as HH 55. HH 55 is located in the Lupus 2 cloud 2 min SW of the well studied T Tauri star RU Lupi. The HH 55 jet extends 55 sec N and 35 sec S in PA 160 deg. The HH 55 star is an emission line star of spectral type M3.5. Its image in the emission lines of H-alpha and (S II) is slightly elongated by 2 sec - 3 sec to the S but in continuum light is symmetrical and pointlike ((full width at half maximum) (FWHM) = 1.7 sec). The star and jet have several features in common with the star and jet known as Sz 102 = Th 28 in the nearby Lupus 3 cloud. We suggest that these objects are representative of the late evolutionary stage of the HH jet-outflow phenomenon and point out that such objects may be quite common although difficult to detect. With L(sub bol) approximately = 0.005 solar luminosity, and log T(sub e) approximately = 3.5, the HH 55 star is close to the main sequence and evolutionary tracks suggest an age of 3 x 10(exp 7) yr.

  10. Revisiting Caroline Furness's An Introduction to the Study of Variable Stars on its Centenary (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) A century and one month ago (October 1915) Dr. Caroline Ellen Furness (1869-1936), Director of the Vassar College Observatory, published An Introduction to the Study of Variable Stars. Issued in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Vassar College, the work was meant to fill a void in the literature, namely as both an introduction to the topic of variable stars and as a manual explaining how they should be observed and the resulting data analyzed. It was judged to be one of the hundred best books written by an American woman in the last hundred years at the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago. The book covers the relevant history of and background on types of variable stars, star charts, catalogs, and the magnitude scale, then describes observing techniques, including visual, photographic, and photoelectric photometry. The work finishes with a discussion of light curves and patterns of variability, with a special emphasis on eclipsing binaries and long period variables. Furness's work is a valuable snapshot of the state of astronomical knowledge, technology, and observing techniques from a century ago. This presentation will analyze both Furness's book and its reception in the scientific community, and draw parallels to current advice given to beginning variable star observers.

  11. Neutron stars: Observational diversity and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, S.

    2017-12-01

    Ever since the discovery of the Crab and Vela pulsars in their respective Supernova Remnants, our understanding of how neutron stars manifest themselves observationally has been dramatically shaped by the surge of discoveries and dedicated studies across the electromagnetic spectrum, particularly in the high-energy band. The growing diversity of neutron stars includes the highly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars) and the Central Compact Objects shining in X-rays and mostly lacking pulsar wind nebulae. These two subclasses of high-energy objects, however, seem to be characterized by anomalously high or anomalously low surface magnetic fields (thus dubbed as ‘magnetars’ and ‘anti-magnetars’, respectively), and have pulsar characteristic ages that are often much offset from their associated SNRs’ ages. In addition, some neutron stars act ‘schizophrenic’ in that they occasionally display properties that seem common to more than one of the defined subclasses. I review the growing diversity of neutron stars from an observational perspective, then highlight recent and on-going theoretical and observational work attempting to address this diversity, particularly in light of their magnetic field evolution, energy loss mechanisms, and supernova progenitors’ studies.

  12. Chemical Evolution of Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.

    2013-02-01

    Energy generation by nuclear fusion is the fundamental process that prevents stars from collapsing under their own gravity. Fusion in the core of a star converts hydrogen to heavier elements from helium to uranium. The signature of this nucleosynthesis is often visible in a single star only for a very short time, for example while the star is a red giant or, in massive stars, when it explodes. Contrarily, in a binary system nuclear-processed matter can captured by a secondary star which remains chemically polluted long after its more massive companion star has evolved and died. By probing old, low-mass stars we gain vital insight into the complex nucleosynthesis that occurred when our Galaxy was much younger than it is today. Stellar evolution itself is also affected by the presence of a companion star. Thermonuclear novae and type Ia supernovae result from mass transfer in binary stars, but big questions still surround the nature of their progenitors. Stars may even merge and one of the challenges for the future of stellar astrophysics is to quantitatively understand what happens in such extreme systems. Binary stars offer unique insights into stellar, galactic and extragalactic astrophysics through their plethora of exciting phenomena. Understanding the chemical evolution of binary stars is thus of high priority in modern astrophysics.

  13. Miras among C stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battinelli, P.; Demers, S.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Carbon stars are among the brightest intermediate-age stars. They are seen in nearly all galaxies of the Local Group. In the Milky Way they are members of the thin disk but over a hundred have been identified in the Galactic halo. Since the halo consists essentially of an old stellar population, these carbon stars warrant special attention. We believe that such stars are trespassers and belong to streams left over by disrupted dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Aims: By performing photometric monitoring we intend to identify Miras among the halo carbon stars. Methods: We obtained, over several semesters, K and J images centered on the carbon stars in order to determine their variation and periodicity. Results: We establish the variability for a number of stars and identify the Miras among them. We collect data from the literature on the Miras among various carbon star populations and show that the fraction of Miras among carbon stars is fairly constant. We demonstrate that such fractions for the halo and Sagittarius are biased because of the way targets are selected. We finally investigate the near-infrared color distribution of Miras and carbon stars. Based on observations made with the REM Telescope, INAF Chile.The observed K and J magnitudes are available only at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A100

  14. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  15. Observing Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  16. X-ray studies of coeval star samples. II - The Pleiades cluster as observed with the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal X-ray emission of the Pleiades stars is investigated, and maximum likelihood, integral X-ray luminosity functions are computed for Pleiades members in selected color-index ranges. A detailed search is conducted for long-term variability in the X-ray emission of those stars observed more than once. An overall comparison of the survey results with those of previous surveys confirms the ubiquity of X-ray emission in the Pleiades cluster stars and its higher rate of emission with respect to older stars. It is found that the X-ray emission from dA and early dF stars cannot be proven to be dissimilar to that of Hyades and field stars of the same spectral type. The Pleiades cluster members show a real rise of the X-ray luminosity from dA stars to early dF stars. X-ray emission for the young, solarlike Pleiades stars is about two orders of magnitude more intense than for the nearby solarlike stars.

  17. No evidence of disk destruction by OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richert, Alexander J. W.; Feigelson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the hostile environments observed in massive star forming regions are inhospitable to protoplanetary disks and therefore to the formation of planets. The Orion Proplyds show disk evaporation by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from Theta1 Orionis C (spectral type O6). In this work, we examine the spatial distributions of disk-bearing and non-disk bearing young stellar objects (YSOs) relative to OB stars in 17 massive star forming regions in the MYStIX (Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray) survey. Any tendency of disky YSOs, identified by their infrared excess, to avoid OB stars would reveal complete disk destruction.We consider a sample of MYStIX that includes 78 O3-O9 stars, 256 B stars, 5,606 disky YSOs, and 5,794 non-disky YSOs. For each OB star, we compare the cumulative distribution functions of distances to disky and non-disky YSOs. We find no significant avoidance of OB stars by disky YSOs. This result indicates that OB stars are not sufficiently EUV-luminous and long-lived to completely destroy a disk within its ordinary lifetime. We therefore conclude that massive star forming regions are not clearly hostile to the formation of planets.

  18. What drives the formation of massive stars and clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsendorf, Bram; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; Evans, Neal J., II; Rahman, Mubdi; Zinnecker, Hans; Nayak, Omnarayani; Bally, John; Jones, Olivia C.; Indebetouw, Remy

    2018-01-01

    Galaxy-wide surveys allow to study star formation in unprecedented ways. In this talk, I will discuss our analysis of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Milky Way, and illustrate how studying both the large and small scale structure of galaxies are critical in addressing the question: what drives the formation of massive stars and clusters?I will show that ‘turbulence-regulated’ star formation models do not reproduce massive star formation properties of GMCs in the LMC and Milky Way: this suggests that theory currently does not capture the full complexity of star formation on small scales. I will also report on the discovery of a massive star forming complex in the LMC, which in many ways manifests itself as an embedded twin of 30 Doradus: this may shed light on the formation of R136 and 'Super Star Clusters' in general. Finally, I will highlight what we can expect in the next years in the field of star formation with large-scale sky surveys, ALMA, and our JWST-GTO program.

  19. Differential rotation of stars with multiple transiting planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netto, Yuri; Valio, Adriana

    2017-10-01

    If a star hosts a planet in an orbit such that it eclipses the star periodically, can be estimated the rotation profile of this star. If planets in multiplanetary system occult different stellar areas, spots in more than one latitude of the stellar disc can be detected. The monitored study of theses starspots in different latitudes allow us to infer the rotation profile of the star. We use the model described in Silva (2003) to characterize the starspots of Kepler-210, an active star with two planets. Kepler-210 is a late K star with an estimated age of 350 +/- 50 Myrs, average rotation period of 12.33 days, mass of 0.63 M⊙ and radius of 0.69 R⊙. The planets that eclipses this star have radii of 0.0498 R s and 0.0635 R s with orbital periods of 2.4532 +/- 0.0007 days and 7.9725 +/- 0.0014 days, respectively, where R s is the star radius.

  20. Hyperfast pulsars as the remnants of massive stars ejected from young star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Gualandris, Alessia; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2008-04-01

    Recent proper motion and parallax measurements for the pulsar PSR B1508+55 indicate a transverse velocity of ~1100kms-1, which exceeds earlier measurements for any neutron star. The spin-down characteristics of PSR B1508+55 are typical for a non-recycled pulsar, which implies that the velocity of the pulsar cannot have originated from the second supernova disruption of a massive binary system. The high velocity of PSR B1508+55 can be accounted for by assuming that it received a kick at birth or that the neutron star was accelerated after its formation in the supernova explosion. We propose an explanation for the origin of hyperfast neutron stars based on the hypothesis that they could be the remnants of a symmetric supernova explosion of a high-velocity massive star which attained its peculiar velocity (similar to that of the pulsar) in the course of a strong dynamical three- or four-body encounter in the core of dense young star cluster. To check this hypothesis, we investigated three dynamical processes involving close encounters between: (i) two hard massive binaries, (ii) a hard binary and an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) and (iii) a single stars and a hard binary IMBH. We find that main-sequence O-type stars cannot be ejected from young massive star clusters with peculiar velocities high enough to explain the origin of hyperfast neutron stars, but lower mass main-sequence stars or the stripped helium cores of massive stars could be accelerated to hypervelocities. Our explanation for the origin of hyperfast pulsars requires a very dense stellar environment of the order of 106- 107starspc-3. Although such high densities may exist during the core collapse of young massive star clusters, we caution that they have never been observed.

  1. Four new planets around giant stars and the mass-metallicity correlation of planet-hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. I.; Jenkins, J. S.; Brahm, R.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Olivares E., F.; Melo, C. H. F.; Rojo, P.; Jordán, A.; Drass, H.; Butler, R. P.; Wang, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Exoplanet searches have revealed interesting correlations between the stellar properties and the occurrence rate of planets. In particular, different independent surveys have demonstrated that giant planets are preferentially found around metal-rich stars and that their fraction increases with the stellar mass. Aims: During the past six years we have conducted a radial velocity follow-up program of 166 giant stars to detect substellar companions and to characterize their orbital properties. Using this information, we aim to study the role of the stellar evolution in the orbital parameters of the companions and to unveil possible correlations between the stellar properties and the occurrence rate of giant planets. Methods: We took multi-epoch spectra using FEROS and CHIRON for all of our targets, from which we computed precision radial velocities and derived atmospheric and physical parameters. Additionally, velocities computed from UCLES spectra are presented here. By studying the periodic radial velocity signals, we detected the presence of several substellar companions. Results: We present four new planetary systems around the giant stars HIP 8541, HIP 74890, HIP 84056, and HIP 95124. Additionally, we study the correlation between the occurrence rate of giant planets with the stellar mass and metallicity of our targets. We find that giant planets are more frequent around metal-rich stars, reaching a peak in the detection of f = 16.7+15.5-5.9% around stars with [Fe/H] ~ 0.35 dex. Similarly, we observe a positive correlation of the planet occurrence rate with the stellar mass, between M⋆ ~ 1.0 and 2.1 M⊙, with a maximum of f = 13.0+10.1-4.2% at M⋆ = 2.1 M⊙. Conclusions: We conclude that giant planets are preferentially formed around metal-rich stars. In addition, we conclude that they are more efficiently formed around more massive stars, in the stellar mass range of ~1.0-2.1 M⊙. These observational results confirm previous findings for solar

  2. White Dwarfs in Star Clusters: The Initial-Final Mass Relation for Stars from 0.85 to 8 M$_\\odot$

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Kalirai, Jason; Tremblay, P.-E.; Ramírez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2018-01-01

    The spectroscopic study of white dwarfs provides both their mass, cooling age, and intrinsic photometric properties. For white dwarfs in the field of well-studied star clusters, this intrinsic photometry can be used to determine if they are members of that star cluster. Comparison of a member white dwarf's cooling age to its total cluster's age provides the evolutionary timescale of its progenitor star, and hence the mass. This is the initial-final mass relation (IFMR) for stars, which gives critical information on how a progenitor star evolves and loses mass throughout its lifetime, and how this changes with progenitor mass. Our work, for the first time, presents a uniform analysis of 85 white dwarf cluster members spanning from progenitor masses of 0.85 to 8 M$_\\odot$. Comparison of our work to theoretical IFMRs shows remarkable consistency in their shape but differences remain. We will discuss possible explanations for these differences, including the effects of stellar rotation.

  3. THE STAR FORMATION LAWS OF EDDINGTON-LIMITED STAR-FORMING DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Armour, J. N.; Indergaard, J., E-mail: david.ballantyne@physics.gatech.edu

    2013-03-10

    Two important avenues into understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies are the Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S) and Elmegreen-Silk (E-S) laws. These relations connect the surface densities of gas and star formation ({Sigma}{sub gas} and {Sigma}-dot{sub *}, respectively) in a galaxy. To elucidate the K-S and E-S laws for disks where {Sigma}{sub gas} {approx}> 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}, we compute 132 Eddington-limited star-forming disk models with radii spanning tens to hundreds of parsecs. The theoretically expected slopes ( Almost-Equal-To 1 for the K-S law and Almost-Equal-To 0.5 for the E-S relation) are relatively robust to spatial averaging over the disks.more » However, the star formation laws exhibit a strong dependence on opacity that separates the models by the dust-to-gas ratio that may lead to the appearance of a erroneously large slope. The total infrared luminosity (L{sub TIR}) and multiple carbon monoxide (CO) line intensities were computed for each model. While L{sub TIR} can yield an estimate of the average {Sigma}-dot{sub *} that is correct to within a factor of two, the velocity-integrated CO line intensity is a poor proxy for the average {Sigma}{sub gas} for these warm and dense disks, making the CO conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) all but useless. Thus, observationally derived K-S and E-S laws at these values of {Sigma}{sub gas} that uses any transition of CO will provide a poor measurement of the underlying star formation relation. Studies of the star formation laws of Eddington-limited disks will require a high-J transition of a high density molecular tracer, as well as a sample of galaxies with known metallicity estimates.« less

  4. Observational Study of Morphological Changes in Medium-mass Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Sze-Ning

    2014-02-01

    Medium-mass (or intermediate-mass) stars refer to main sequence stars with masses ranging from 0.4 to 8 solar masses. These stars are believed to finally evolve into the central stars of planetary nebulae (PNe) and white dwarfs. One of the fascinating aspects of PNe is their diverse morphology. To understand the mechanisms of the morphological changes from spherical circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to those forming highly diversified PNe, it is necessary to investigate the true three-dimensional (3D) morphology of PNe from two-dimensional images, and the short transition phase in-between the two phases should also be explored. "Water Fountain" (WF) sources belong to transition phase objects; they are AGB or post-AGB stars with collimated jets traced by high velocity water maser emissions in their CSEs. This thesis comprises of four chapters. The results can be divided into two major parts. Chapter 1 is the introduction on the related fields with brief reviews of previous observational studies on PNe and the rapidly evolving transition phase objects. Basic theories necessary for understanding the next chapters were also described, including those explaining the commonly observed Hα emission in PNe, the formation of multipolar PNe, the maser emission and the role of shock in circumstellar materials. The first major part of the results, about the morphological classification of multipolar PNe, is presented in Chapter 2. At the beginning of the chapter, the problems on the previous classification methods were pointed out. Then a three-lobed model was introduced. By changing the combination of the orientations of the three pairs of lobes, simulations using the model produced statistical results in classification and quantified the errors of misidentification. Assuming that all PNe observed have the true structure of three lobes, due to projection effect, only 49% of them would be correctly classified. 46% and 5% of them would be

  5. Theoretical studies of the RS cannum venaticorum stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Four areas of research were investigated: chromospheric modelling; starspot modelling; supersonic transition locus (STL) crossing; and STL crossing and T Tauri phenomena. Relationships among these areas of research are presented. Stellar structure and mass ejection for these stars were examined along with chromospheric analysis.

  6. Period04 FCAPT uvby Photometric Studies of Eight Magnetic CP Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Dukes, Robert J.

    2014-06-01

    We present Four College Automated Photometric Telescope (FCAPT) differential Stromgren uvby photometry of 8 magnetic CP (mCP) stars: HD 5797 (V551 Cas), HD 26792 (DH Cam), HD 27309 (56 Tau, V724 Tau), HD 49713 (V740 Mon), HD 74521 (49 Cnc, BI Cnc), HD 120198 (84 UMa, CR UMa), HD 171263 (QU Ser), and HD 215441 (GL Lac, Babcock's star). Our data sets are larger than those of most mCP stars in the literature. These are the first FCAPT observations of HD 5797, HD 26792, HD 49713, and HD 171263. Those for the remaining four stars substantially extend published FCAPT data. The FCAPT observed some stars for a longer time range and with greater accuracy than other optical region automated photometric telescopes.Our goals were to determine very accurate periods, the u, v, b, and y amplitudes, and if there were any long period periods. In addition we wanted to compare our results with those of magnetic field measurements to help interpret the light curves.We used the Period04 computer program to analyze the light curves. This program provides errors for the derived quantities as it fits the light curve. Our derived periods of 68.046 +/- 0.008 days for HD 5797, 3.80205 +/- 0.00006 days for HD 26792, 1.56889 +/- 0.000002 days for HD 27309, 2.13536 +/- 0.00002 days for HD 49713, 7.0505 +/- 0.0001 days for HD 74521, 1.38577 +/- 0.000004 days for HD 120198, 3.9974 +/- 0.0001days for HD 171263, and 9.487792 +/- 0.00005 days for HD 215441 are refinements of the best determinations in the literature.

  7. CEMP Stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thidemann Hansen, Terese

    2018-06-01

    Exploration of the metal-poor stellar halo population of the Milky Way over the past decades has revealed a large number of stars strongly enhanced in carbon (CEMP stars). However, these stars are not as commonly detected in the dwarf galaxy satellites of the Milky Way (MW). The present-day satellites are thought to be similar to systems from which the MW and in particular its halo was formed via hierarchical mergers. I will present the results of abundance analysis for new samples of extremely metal-poor stars in Sculptor and Carina exploring the fraction of CEMP stars at low metallicity in these systems. I will also present the detailed abundance analyses of six CEMP stars detected in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Five of these stars also show enhancement in slow neutron-capture elements and can thus be classified as CEMP-s stars, while the most metal-poor star with [Fe/H]=-2.5 shows no such enhancement and belongs to the CEMP-no class. The detection of CEMP stars in dwarf galaxies supports the hierarchical assembly of the MW halo and by providing a birth environment, can help to further constrain the formation of these stars.

  8. Heartbeat Stars Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-21

    This artist's concept depicts "heartbeat stars," which have been detected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope and others. The illustration shows two heartbeat stars swerving close to one another in their closest approach along their highly elongated orbits around one another. The mutual gravitation of the two stars would cause the stars themselves to become slightly ellipsoidal in shape. A third, more distant star in the system is shown in the upper left. Astronomers speculate that such unseen companions may exist in some of these heartbeat star systems, and could be responsible for maintaining these oddly stretched-out orbits. The overlaid curve depicts the inferred cyclic change in velocities in one such system, called KIC 9965691, looking something like the graph of an electrocardiogram (hence the name "heartbeat stars"). The solid points represent measurements made by the HIRES instrument at the W.M. Keck Observatory, and the curve is the best fit model for the motions of this system. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21075

  9. Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Paul A.; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Langer, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Almost since the beginning, massive stars and their resultant supernovae have played a crucial role in the Universe. These objects produce tremendous amounts of energy and new, heavy elements that enrich galaxies, encourage new stars to form and sculpt the shapes of galaxies that we see today. The end of millions of years of massive star evolution and the beginning of hundreds or thousands of years of supernova evolution are separated by a matter of a few seconds, in which some of the most extreme physics found in the Universe causes the explosive and terminal disruption of the star. Key questions remain unanswered in both the studies of how massive stars evolve and the behaviour of supernovae, and it appears the solutions may not lie on just one side of the explosion or the other or in just the domain of the stellar evolution or the supernova astrophysics communities. The need to view massive star evolution and supernovae as continuous phases in a single narrative motivated the Theo Murphy international scientific meeting ‘Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae’ at Chicheley Hall, UK, in June 2016, with the specific purpose of simultaneously addressing the scientific connections between theoretical and observational studies of massive stars and their supernovae, through engaging astronomers from both communities. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae’. PMID:28923995

  10. Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae.

    PubMed

    Maund, Justyn R; Crowther, Paul A; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Langer, Norbert

    2017-10-28

    Almost since the beginning, massive stars and their resultant supernovae have played a crucial role in the Universe. These objects produce tremendous amounts of energy and new, heavy elements that enrich galaxies, encourage new stars to form and sculpt the shapes of galaxies that we see today. The end of millions of years of massive star evolution and the beginning of hundreds or thousands of years of supernova evolution are separated by a matter of a few seconds, in which some of the most extreme physics found in the Universe causes the explosive and terminal disruption of the star. Key questions remain unanswered in both the studies of how massive stars evolve and the behaviour of supernovae, and it appears the solutions may not lie on just one side of the explosion or the other or in just the domain of the stellar evolution or the supernova astrophysics communities. The need to view massive star evolution and supernovae as continuous phases in a single narrative motivated the Theo Murphy international scientific meeting 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae' at Chicheley Hall, UK, in June 2016, with the specific purpose of simultaneously addressing the scientific connections between theoretical and observational studies of massive stars and their supernovae, through engaging astronomers from both communities.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. A Population Study of Wide-Separation Brown Dwarf Companions to Main Sequence Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Increased interest in infrared astronomy has opened the frontier to study cooler objects that shed significant light on the formation of planetary systems. Brown dwarf research provides a wealth of information useful for sorting through a myriad of proposed formation theories. Our study combines observational data from 2MASS with rigorous computer simulations to estimate the true population of long-range (greater than 1000 AU) brown dwarf companions in the solar neighborhood (less than 25 pc from Earth). Expanding on Gizis et al. (2001), we have found the margin of error in previous estimates to be significantly underestimated after we included orbit eccentricity, longitude of pericenter, angle of inclination, field star density, and primary and secondary luminosities as parameters influencing the companion systems in observational studies. We apply our simulation results to current L- and T-dwarf catalogs to provide updated estimates on the frequency of wide-separation brown dwarf companions to main sequence stars.

  12. A Search for Nitrogen-enhanced Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jennifer A.; Herwig, Falk; Beers, Timothy C.; Christlieb, Norbert

    2007-04-01

    Theoretical models of very metal-poor intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars predict a large overabundance of primary nitrogen. The very metal-poor, carbon-enhanced, s-process-rich stars, which are thought to be the polluted companions of now extinct AGB stars, provide direct tests of the predictions of these models. Recent studies of the carbon and nitrogen abundances in metal-poor stars have focused on the most carbon-rich stars, leading to a potential selection bias against stars that have been polluted by AGB stars that produced large amounts of nitrogen and hence have small [C/N] ratios. We call these stars nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor (NEMP) stars and define them as having [N/Fe]>+0.5 and [C/N]<-0.5. In this paper we report on the [C/N] abundances of a sample of 21 carbon-enhanced stars, all but three of which have [C/Fe]<+2.0. If NEMP stars were made as easily as carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, then we expected to find between two and seven NEMP stars. Instead, we found no NEMP stars in our sample. Therefore, this observational bias is not an important contributor to the apparent dearth of N-rich stars. Our [C/N] values are in the same range as values reported previously in the literature (-0.5 to +2.0), and all stars are in disagreement with the predicted [C/N] ratios for both low- and high-mass AGB stars. We suggest that the decrease in [C/N] from the low-mass AGB models is due to enhanced extramixing, while the lack of NEMP stars may be caused by unfavorable mass ratios in binaries or the difficulty of mass transfer in binary systems with large mass ratios. Based on observations obtained at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and Kitt Peak National Observatory, a division of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  13. Massive stars in their death throes.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, John J

    2008-12-13

    The study of the stars that explode as supernovae used to be a forensic study, working backwards from the remnants of the star. This changed in 1987 when the first progenitor star was identified in pre-explosion images. Currently, there are eight detected progenitors with another 21 non-detections, for which only a limit on the pre-explosion luminosity can be placed. This new avenue of supernova research has led to many interesting conclusions, most importantly that the progenitors of the most common supernovae, type IIP, are red supergiants, as theory has long predicted. However, no progenitors have been detected thus far for the hydrogen-free type Ib/c supernovae, which, given the expected progenitors, is an unlikely result. Also, observations have begun to show evidence that luminous blue variables, which are among the most massive stars, may directly explode as supernovae. These results contradict the current stellar evolution theory. This suggests that we may need to update our understanding.

  14. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud as testbed for massive star evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schootemeijer, A.; Langer, N.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The majority of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars represent the stripped cores of evolved massive stars who lost most of their hydrogen envelope. Wind stripping in single stars is expected to be inefficient in producing WR stars in metal-poor environments such as the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). While binary interaction can also produce WR stars at low metallicity, it is puzzling that the fraction of WR binaries appears to be about 40%, independent of the metallicity. Aim. We aim to use the recently determined physical properties of the twelve known SMC WR stars to explore their possible formation channels through comparisons with stellar models. Methods: We used the MESA stellar evolution code to construct two grids of stellar models with SMC metallicity. One of these consists of models of rapidly rotating single stars, which evolve in part or completely chemically homogeneously. In a second grid, we analyzed core helium burning stellar models assuming constant hydrogen and helium gradients in their envelopes. Results: We find that chemically homogeneous evolution is not able to account for the majority of the WR stars in the SMC. However, in particular the apparently single WR star SMC AB12, and the double WR system SMC AB5 (HD 5980) appear consistent with this channel. We further find a dichotomy in the envelope hydrogen gradients required to explain the observed temperatures of the SMC WR stars. Shallow gradients are found for the WR stars with O star companions, while much steeper hydrogen gradients are required to understand the group of hot apparently single WR stars. Conclusions: The derived shallow hydrogen gradients in the WR component of the WR+O star binaries are consistent with predictions from binary models where mass transfer occurs early, in agreement with their binary properties. Since the hydrogen profiles in evolutionary models of massive stars become steeper with time after the main sequence, we conclude that most of the hot (Teff > 60 k

  15. X-ray studies of coeval star samples. II. The Pleiades cluster as observed with the Einstein Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal X-ray emission of the Pleiades stars is investigated, and maximum likelihood, integral X-ray luminosity functions are computed for Pleiades members in selected color-index ranges. A detailed search is conducted for long-term variability in the X-ray emission of those stars observed more than once. An overall comparison of the survey results with those of previous surveys confirms the ubiquity of X-ray emission in the Pleiades cluster stars and its higher rate of emission with respect to older stars. It is found that the X-ray emission from dA and early dF stars cannot be proven to be dissimilar to that ofmore » Hyades and field stars of the same spectral type. The Pleiades cluster members show a real rise of the X-ray luminosity from dA stars to early dF stars. X-ray emission for the young, solarlike Pleiades stars is about two orders of magnitude more intense than for the nearby solarlike stars. 77 refs.« less

  16. MASSIVE STARS IN THE LOCAL GROUP: Implications for Stellar Evolution and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    The galaxies of the Local Group serve as important laboratories for understanding the physics of massive stars. Here I discuss what is involved in identifying various kinds of massive stars in nearby galaxies: the hydrogen-burning O-type stars and their evolved He-burning evolutionary descendants, the luminous blue variables, red supergiants, and Wolf-Rayet stars. Primarily I review what our knowledge of the massive star population in nearby galaxies has taught us about stellar evolution and star formation. I show that the current generation of stellar evolutionary models do well at matching some of the observed features and provide a look at the sort of new observational data that will provide a benchmark against which new models can be evaluated.

  17. Young Star Probably Ejected From Triple System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    , moving at about 6 miles per second. Then, between 1995 and 1998, it came within about 200 million miles (about two times the distance between the Sun and the Earth) of its companions. Following that encounter, it changed its path, moving away from its companion at about 12 miles per second, double its previous speed. "We clearly see that this star's orbit has changed dramatically after the encounter with its larger companions," said Luis Rodriguez. "By watching over the next five years or so, we should be able to tell if it will escape completely," he added. "We are very lucky to have been able to observe this event," said Loinard. Though studies with computer simulations long have shown that such close approaches and stellar ejections are likely, the time scales for these events in the real Universe are long -- thousands of years. The chance to study an actual ejection of a star from a multiple system can provide a critical test for the dynamical theories. If a young star is ejected from the system in which it was born, it would be cut off from the supply of gas and dust it needs to gain more mass, and thus its development would be abruptly halted. This process, the astronomers explain, could provide an explanation for the very-low-mass "failed stars" called brown dwarfs. "A brown dwarf could have had its growth stopped by being ejected from its parent system," Loinard said. The VLA observations were made at radio frequencies of 8 and 15 GHz. T Tauri, the "Northern" star in this system, is a famous variable star, discovered in October of 1852 by J.R. Hind, a London astronomer using a 7-inch diameter telescope. At its brightest, it is some 40 times brighter than when at its faintest. It has been studied extensively as a nearby example of a young stellar system. While readily accessible with a small telescope, it is not visible to the naked eye. The observed orbital changes took place in the southern components of the system, displaced from the visible star by about one

  18. Star Formation Studies in the SPICA/SAFARI Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibthorpe, Bruce; Goicoechea, Javier

    2013-07-01

    The Japanese JAXA SPICA space observatory, due for launch in 2022, will provide astronomers with a long awaited new window on the universe. Having a large cold telescope, cooled to only 6K above absolute zero, SPICA will provide a unique environment in which instruments are limited only by the cosmic background itself. A consortium of European and Canadian institutes has been established to design and implement the SpicA FAR infrared Instrument, SAFARI, an imaging FTS spectrometer designed to fully exploit this extremely low far infrared background environment provided by the SPICA observatory. With SAFARI it will be possible to obtain continuous spectra spanning 34 -\\ 210 um within an instantaneous 2'x2' field-of-view, at spectral resolutions of up to R = 2000 @ 100um (4000 @ 50um), within a single telescope pointing. This capability, coupled with the exquisite sensitivity provided by the cold SPICA telescope, makes SAFARI the ideal instrument to perform large area spectroscopic mapping surveys in the far-infrared. SPICA/SFARI will provide new insights into a range of astronomical sources. By obtaining spectra for large, statistically significant samples, we can obtain a fundamental understanding of their chemistry and physical processes, and thereby characterise and understand the nature of these sources. Moreover, with the high sensitivity of SAFARI, it will be possible to extend current far-infrared studies of star formation processes to nearby galaxies, thereby putting our current understanding in a wider, universal, context. This poster provides a description of the SAFARI instrument and its capabilities. A brief representative sample of the contribution SAFARI can make in the field of star formation studies is also given, and compared to similar observations made using the Herschel-PACS instrument.

  19. Olivier Chesneau's Work on Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagadec, E.

    2015-12-01

    During his too short career, Olivier Chesneau pioneered the study of the circumstellar environments of low mass evolved stars using very high angular resolution techniques. He applied state of the art high angular resolution techniques, such as optical interferometry and adaptive optics imaging, to the the study of a variety of objects, from AGB stars to Planetary Nebulae, via e.g. Born Again stars, RCB stars and Novae. I present here an overview of this work and most important results by focusing on the paths he followed and key encounters he made to reach these results. Olivier liked to work in teams and was very strong at linking people with complementary expertises to whom he would communicate his enthusiasm and sharp ideas. His legacy will live on through the many people he inspired.

  20. British variable star associations, 1848-1908

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toone, J.

    2010-06-01

    The study of variable stars lagged some distance behind solar system, positional (double star) and deep sky research until the middle part of the 19th century. Then, following F. W. A. Argelander's pioneering work in the 1840s, there was a striking increase in variable star research, particularly in Europe. The transformation was to such an extent that in the second half of the 19th century there were three attempts at forming variable star associations within Great Britain. The first in 1863 was the ASOVS, which never got off the ground. The second in 1883 was the LAS VSS, which was successfully launched but had somewhat limited achievements. The third launched in 1890 was the BAA VSS which was eventually both a resounding and lasting success. This paper is an outline history of these three associations up to a position of one hundred years ago (1908). [A summary version of this paper was presented at the joint meeting of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) and British Astronomical Association Variable Star Section (BAA VSS) held at Cambridge, UK, on 2008 April 11.

  1. Röntgen spheres around active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locci, Daniele; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Micela, Giuseppina; Ciaravella, Angela; Aresu, Giambattista

    2018-01-01

    X-rays are an important ingredient of the radiation environment of a variety of stars of different spectral types and age. We have modelled the X-ray transfer and energy deposition into a gas with solar composition, through an accurate description of the electron cascade following the history of the primary photoelectron energy deposition. We test and validate this description studying the possible formation of regions in which X-rays are the major ionization channel. Such regions, called Röntgen spheres may have considerable importance in the chemical and physical evolution of the gas embedding the emitting star. Around massive stars the concept of Röntgen sphere appears to be of limited use, as the formation of extended volumes with relevant levels of ionization is efficient just in a narrow range of gas volume densities. In clouds embedding low-mass pre-main-sequence stars significant volumes of gas are affected by ionization levels exceeding largely the cosmic-ray background ionization. In clusters arising in regions of vigorous star formation X-rays create an ionization network pervading densely the interstellar medium, and providing a natural feedback mechanism, which may affect planet and star formation processes.

  2. How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wollenberg, Katharina M. J.

    Metals from Population III (Pop III) supernovae led to the formation of less massive Pop II stars in the early universe, altering the course of evolution of primeval galaxies and cosmological reionization. There are a variety of scenarios in which heavy elements from the first supernovae were taken up into second-generation stars, but cosmological simulations only model them on the largest scales. We present small-scale, high-resolution simulations of the chemical enrichment of a primordial halo by a nearby supernova after partial evaporation by the progenitor star. We find that ejecta from the explosion crash into and mix violently with ablativemore » flows driven off the halo by the star, creating dense, enriched clumps capable of collapsing into Pop II stars. Metals may mix less efficiently with the partially exposed core of the halo, so it might form either Pop III or Pop II stars. Both Pop II and III stars may thus form after the collision if the ejecta do not strip all the gas from the halo. The partial evaporation of the halo prior to the explosion is crucial to its later enrichment by the supernova.« less

  3. How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wollenberg, Katharina M. J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2017-08-01

    Metals from Population III (Pop III) supernovae led to the formation of less massive Pop II stars in the early universe, altering the course of evolution of primeval galaxies and cosmological reionization. There are a variety of scenarios in which heavy elements from the first supernovae were taken up into second-generation stars, but cosmological simulations only model them on the largest scales. We present small-scale, high-resolution simulations of the chemical enrichment of a primordial halo by a nearby supernova after partial evaporation by the progenitor star. We find that ejecta from the explosion crash into and mix violently with ablative flows driven off the halo by the star, creating dense, enriched clumps capable of collapsing into Pop II stars. Metals may mix less efficiently with the partially exposed core of the halo, so it might form either Pop III or Pop II stars. Both Pop II and III stars may thus form after the collision if the ejecta do not strip all the gas from the halo. The partial evaporation of the halo prior to the explosion is crucial to its later enrichment by the supernova.

  4. A new interferometric study of four exoplanet host stars: θ Cygni, 14 Andromedae, υ Andromedae and 42 Draconis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.; Mourard, D.; Lagrange, A. M.; Perraut, K.; Boyajian, T.; Bério, Ph.; Nardetto, N.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Ridgway, S.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Since the discovery of the first exoplanet in 1995 around a solar-type star, the interest in exoplanetary systems has kept increasing. Studying exoplanet host stars is of the utmost importance to establish the link between the presence of exoplanets around various types of stars and to understand the respective evolution of stars and exoplanets. Aims: Using the limb-darkened diameter (LDD) obtained from interferometric data, we determine the fundamental parameters of four exoplanet host stars. We are particularly interested in the F4 main-sequence star, θ Cyg, for which Kepler has recently revealed solar-like oscillations that are unexpected for this type of star. Furthermore, recent photometric and spectroscopic measurements with SOPHIE and ELODIE (OHP) show evidence of a quasi-periodic radial velocity of ~150 days. Models of this periodic change in radial velocity predict either a complex planetary system orbiting the star, or a new and unidentified stellar pulsation mode. Methods: We performed interferometric observations of θ Cyg, 14 Andromedae, υ Andromedae and 42 Draconis for two years with VEGA/CHARA (Mount Wilson, California) in several three-telescope configurations. We measured accurate limb darkened diameters and derived their radius, mass and temperature using empirical laws. Results: We obtain new accurate fundamental parameters for stars 14 And, υ And and 42 Dra. We also obtained limb darkened diameters with a minimum precision of ~1.3%, leading to minimum planet masses of Msini = 5.33 ± 0.57, 0.62 ± 0.09 and 3.79 ± 0.29 MJup for 14 And b, υ And b and 42 Dra b, respectively. The interferometric measurements of θ Cyg show a significant diameter variability that remains unexplained up to now. We propose that the presence of these discrepancies in the interferometric data is caused either by an intrinsic variation of the star or an unknown close companion orbiting around it. Based on interferometric observations with the VEGA

  5. Star from the Lizard Constellation Photobombs Hubble Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    In space, being outshone is an occupational hazard. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image captures a galaxy named NGC 7250. Despite being remarkable in its own right — it has bright bursts of star formation and recorded supernova explosions— it blends into the background somewhat thanks to the gloriously bright star hogging the limelight next to it. The bright object seen in this Hubble image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy. Only this way can a normal star outshine an entire galaxy, consisting of billions of stars. Astronomers studying distant objects call these stars “foreground stars” and they are often not very happy about them, as their bright light is contaminating the faint light from the more distant and interesting objects they actually want to study. In this case, TYC 3203-450-1 is million times closer than NGC 7250, which lies more than 45 million light-years away from us. If the star were the same distance from us as NGC 7250, it would hardly be visible in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. The Dunhuang Chinese sky: A comprehensive study of the oldest known star atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, Jean-Marc; Praderie, Françoise; Whitfield, Susan

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the star atlas included in the medieval Chinese manuscript Or.8210/S.3326 discovered in 1907 by the archaeologist Aurel Stein at the Silk Road town of Dunhuang and now housed in the British Library. Although partially studied by a few Chinese scholars, it has never been fully displayed and discussed in the Western world. This set of sky maps (12 hour-angle maps in quasi-cylindrical projection and a circumpolar map in azimuthal projection), displaying the full sky visible from the Northern Hemisphere, is up to now the oldest complete preserved star atlas known from any civilisation. It is also the earliest known pictorial representation of the quasi-totality of Chinese constellations. This paper describes the history of the physical object - a roll of thin paper drawn with ink. We analyse the stellar content of each map (1,339 stars, 257 asterisms) and the texts associated with the maps. We establish the precision with which the maps were drawn (1.5-4° for the brightest stars) and examine the type of projections used. We conclude that precise mathematical methods were used to produce the Atlas. We also discuss the dating of the manuscript and its possible author, and we confirm the date +649-684 (early Tang Dynasty) as most probable based on the available evidence. This is at variance with a prior estimate of around +940. Finally, we present a brief comparison with later sky maps, both from China and Europe.

  7. RADIAL VELOCITY MONITORING OF KEPLER HEARTBEAT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Isaacson, Howard

    2016-09-20

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars inmore » order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity–period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories.« less

  8. Stellar Archaeology: New Science with Old Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The early chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Universe is vital to our understanding of a host of astrophysical phenomena. Since the most metal-poor Galactic stars are relics from the high-redshift Universe, they probe the chemical and dynamical conditions as the Milky Way began to form, the origin and evolution of the elements, and the physics of nucleosynthesis. They also provide constraints on the nature of the first stars, their associated supernovae and initial mass function, and early star and galaxy formation. I will present exemplary metal-poor stars with which these different topics can be addressed. Those are the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy ([Fe/H] < -5.0), and metal-poor stars with strong overabundances of heavy elements, in particular uranium and thorium, which can be used to radioactively date the stars to be 13 Gyr old. I will then transition to recent discoveries of metal-poor ([Fe/H] -3.0) stars in the least luminous dwarf satellites orbiting the Milky Way. Their stellar chemical signatures support the concept that small systems, analogous to the surviving dwarf galaxies, were the building blocks of the Milky Way's low-metallicity halo. This opens a new window for studying galaxy formation through stellar chemistry.

  9. X-ray stars observed in LAMOST spectral survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hong-peng; Zhang, Li-yun; Han, Xianming L.; Shi, Jianrong

    2018-05-01

    X-ray stars have been studied since the beginning of X-ray astronomy. Investigating and studying the chromospheric activity from X-ray stellar optical spectra is highly significant in providing insights into stellar magnetic activity. The big data of LAMOST survey provides an opportunity for researching stellar optical spectroscopic properties of X-ray stars. We inferred the physical properties of X-ray stellar sources from the analysis of LAMOST spectra. First, we cross-matched the X-ray stellar catalogue (12254 X-ray stars) from ARXA with LAMOST data release 3 (DR3), and obtained 984 good spectra from 713 X-ray sources. We then visually inspected and assigned spectral type to each spectrum and calculated the equivalent width (EW) of Hα line using the Hammer spectral typing facility. Based on the EW of Hα line, we found 203 spectra of 145 X-ray sources with Hα emission above the continuum. For these spectra we also measured the EWs of Hβ, Hγ, Hδ and Ca ii IRT lines of these spectra. After removing novae, planetary nebulae and OB-type stars, we found there are 127 X-ray late-type stars with Hα line emission. By using our spectra and results from the literature, we found 53 X-ray stars showing Hα variability; these objects are Classical T Tauri stars (CTTs), cataclysmic variables (CVs) or chromospheric activity stars. We also found 18 X-ray stars showing obvious emissions in the Ca ii IRT lines. Of the 18 X-ray stars, 16 are CTTs and 2 are CVs. Finally, we discussed the relationships between the EW of Hα line and X-ray flux.

  10. Statistical Properties of Galactic δ Scuti Stars: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.-W.; Protopapas, P.; Kim, D.-W.; Byun, Y.-I.

    2013-05-01

    We present statistical characteristics of 1578 δ Scuti stars including nearby field stars and cluster member stars within the Milky Way. We obtained 46% of these stars (718 stars) from work by Rodríguez and collected the remaining 54% of stars (860 stars) from other literature. We updated the entries with the latest information of sky coordinates, color, rotational velocity, spectral type, period, amplitude, and binarity. The majority of our sample is well characterized in terms of typical period range (0.02-0.25 days), pulsation amplitudes (<0.5 mag), and spectral types (A-F type). Given this list of δ Scuti stars, we examined relations between their physical properties (i.e., periods, amplitudes, spectral types, and rotational velocities) for field stars and cluster members, and confirmed that the correlations of properties are not significantly different from those reported in Rodríguez's work. All the δ Scuti stars are cross-matched with several X-ray and UV catalogs, resulting in 27 X-ray and 41 UV-only counterparts. These counterparts are interesting targets for further study because of their uniqueness in showing δ Scuti-type variability and X-ray/UV emission at the same time. The compiled catalog can be accessed through the Web interface http://stardb.yonsei.ac.kr/DeltaScuti.

  11. Observation and modelling of main-sequence star chromospheres - XIV. Rotation of dM1 stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdebine, E. R.

    2010-09-01

    We have measured v sin i for a selected sample of dM1-type stars. We give 114 measurements of v sin i for 88 different stars, and six upper detection limits. These are the first measurements of v sin i for most of the stars studied here. This represents the largest sample of v sin i measurements for M dwarfs at a given spectral type. For these measurements, we used four different spectrographs: HARPS (ESO), SOPHIE (OHP), ÉLODIE (OHP) and UVES (ESO). Two of these spectrographs (HARPS and SOPHIE) are particularly stable in wavelength since they were designed for exoplanet searches. We measured v sin i down to an accuracy of 0.3kms-1 for the highest resolution spectrographs and a detection limit of about 1kms-1. We show that this unprecedented accuracy for M dwarfs in our data set is possible because all the targets have the same spectral type. This is an advantage and it facilitates the determination of the narrowest line profiles for v sin i ~ 0. Although it is possible to derive the zero-point profiles using several spectral types at a time. These values were combined with other measurements taken from the literature. The total sample represents detected rotation for 100 stars (10 dM1e and 90 dM1 stars). We confirm our finding of Paper VII that the distribution of the projected rotation period is bimodal for dM1 stars with a much larger sample, i.e. there are two groups of stars: the fast rotators with P/sin i ~ 4.5d and the slow rotators with P/sin i ~ 14.4d. There is a gap between these two groups. We find that the distribution of stars as a function of P/sin i has two very abrupt cuts, below 10d and above 18d. There are very few stars observed out of this range 10-18d. We also observe that the distribution increases slightly from 18 to 10d. We find that the M1 subdwarfs (very low metallicity dwarfs) rotate with an average period of P/sin i ~ 7.2d, which is about twice faster as the main group of normal M1 dwarfs. We also find a correlation for P/sin i to

  12. Stars Too Old to be Trusted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    Analysing a set of stars in a globular cluster with ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers may have found the solution to a critical cosmological and stellar riddle. Until now, an embarrassing question was why the abundance of lithium produced in the Big Bang is a factor 2 to 3 times higher than the value measured in the atmospheres of old stars. The answer, the researchers say, lies in the fact that the abundances of elements measured in a star's atmosphere decrease with time. ESO PR Photo 30/06 ESO PR Photo 30/06 Globular cluster NGC 6397, with some of the FLAMES-UVES target stars highlighted "Such trends are predicted by models that take into account the diffusion of elements in a star", said Andreas Korn, lead-author of the paper reporting the results in this week's issue of the journal Nature [1,2]. "But an observational confirmation was lacking. That is, until now." Lithium is one of the very few elements to have been produced in the Big Bang. Once astronomers know the amount of ordinary matter present in the Universe [3], it is rather straightforward to derive how much lithium was created in the early Universe. Lithium can also be measured in the oldest, metal-poor stars, which formed from matter similar to the primordial material. But the cosmologically predicted value is too high to reconcile with the measurements made in the stars. Something is wrong, but what? Diffusive processes altering the relative abundances of elements in stars are well known to play a role in certain classes of stars. Under the force of gravity, heavy elements will tend to sink out of visibility into the star over the course of billions of years. "The effects of diffusion are expected to be more pronounced in old, very metal-poor stars", said Korn. "Given their greater age, diffusion has had more time to produce sizeable effects than in younger stars like the Sun." The astronomers thus set up an observational campaign to test these model predictions, studying a variety of stars in

  13. Photometry of Standard Stars and Open Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferies, Amanda; Frinchaboy, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Photometric CCD observations of open star clusters and standard stars were carried out at the McDonald Observatory in Fort Davis, Texas. This data was analyzed using aperture photometry algorithms (DAOPHOT II and ALLSTAR) and the IRAF software package. Color-magnitude diagrams of these clusters were produced, showing the evolution of each cluster along the main sequence.

  14. Making star teams out of star players.

    PubMed

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing.

  15. Study of Pulsations in the Atmosphere of the roAp star HD 137949

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, M.; Hareter, M.; Ryabchikova, T.; Wade, G.; Kochukhov, O.; Weiss, W. W.

    The roAp star HD 137949 (33 Lib) shows the most complex pulsational behaviour among all roAp stars. Mkrtichian et al. (2003) found nearly anti-phase pulsations of Nd II and Nd III lines, which they attribute to the presence of a pulsation node high in the atmosphere of HD 137949. This was confirmed by Kurtz at al. (2005), who also find that in some REE lines the main frequency, corresponding to 8.27 min, and its harmonic have almost equal RV amplitudes. Based on high accuracy observations Ryabchikova et al. (2007a) studied pulsational characteristics of the HD 137949 atmosphere in detail. In general, spectroscopy provides 3D resolution of modes and allows to search for the photometrically undetectable frequencies. The high-accuracy space photometry provides very high-precision measurements of detected pulsation frequencies and enables an accurate phasing of multi-site spectroscopic data. A combination of simultaneous spectroscopy and photometry represents the most sophisticated asteroseismic dataset for any roAp star. In 2009 the star HD 137949 became a target of an intense observing campaign that combined ground-based spectroscopy with space photometry, obtained with the MOST satellite. We collected 780 spectra using the ESPaDOnS spectrograph mounted on the 3.6 m CFHT telescope; 374 spectra were obtained with the FIES spectrograph mounted on the 2.56-m NOT to perform the time-resolved spectroscopy of HD 137949. In addition, we used 111 UVES spectra (2004) from the ESO archive to check the mode stability. The frequency analysis of the new radial velocity (RV) measurements confirmed the previously reported frequency pattern (two frequencies and the first harmonic of the main frequency), and revealed an additional frequency at 1.991 mHz. The new frequency solution fits perfectly the RV variations from the 2004 and 2009 observational sets providing a strong support for the p-mode stability in the roAp star HD 137949 for at least 5 years.

  16. Undercover Stars Among Exoplanet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    is only 16% larger than this giant planet! A Dense Star "Imagine that you add 95 times its own mass to Jupiter and nevertheless end up with a star that is only slightly larger", suggests Claudio Melo from ESO and member of the team of astronomers who made the study. "The object just shrinks to make room for the additional matter, becoming more and more dense." The density of such a star is more than 50 times the density of the Sun. "This result shows the existence of stars that look strikingly like planets, even from close by", emphasizes Frederic Pont of the Geneva Observatory (Switzerland). "Isn't it strange to imagine that even if we were to receive images from a future space probe approaching such an object at close range, it wouldn't be easy to discern whether it is a star or a planet?" As all stars, OGLE-TR-122b produces indeed energy in its interior by means of nuclear reactions. However, because of its low mass, this internal energy production is very small, especially compared to the energy produced by its solar-like companion star. Not less striking is the fact that exoplanets which are orbiting very close to their host star, the so-called "hot Jupiters", have radii which may be larger than the newly found star. The radius of exoplanet HD209458b, for example, is about 30% larger than that of Jupiter. It is thus substantially larger than OGLE-TR-122b! Masqueraders ESO PR Photo 06c/05 ESO PR Photo 06c/05 Comparison Between OGLE-TR-122b, Jupiter and the Sun [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 598 pix - 30k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1196 pix - 350k] [HiRes - JPEG: 5000 x 3344 pix - 2.2M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 06c/05 is a comparison between the newly found low-mass star OGLE-TR-122b and the Sun and Jupiter. OGLE-TR-122b, while still 96 times as massive as Jupiter, is only 16% larger than this giant planet. It weighs 1/11th the mass of the Sun and has 1/8th of its diameter. (credits: Sun image: SOHO/ESA; Jupiter: Cassini/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/ESA) This discovery also

  17. Neutron-capture Nucleosynthesis in the First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Sneden, Christopher

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that metal-poor stars enhanced in carbon but containing low levels of neutron-capture elements may have been among the first to incorporate the nucleosynthesis products of the first generation of stars. We have observed 16 stars with enhanced carbon or nitrogen using the MIKE Spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory and the Tull Spectrograph on the Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We present radial velocities, stellar parameters, and detailed abundance patterns for these stars. Strontium, yttrium, zirconium, barium, europium, ytterbium, and other heavy elements are detected. In four stars, these heavy elements appear to have originated in some form of r-process nucleosynthesis. In one star, a partial s-process origin is possible. The origin of the heavy elements in the rest of the sample cannot be determined unambiguously. The presence of elements heavier than the iron group offers further evidence that zero-metallicity rapidly rotating massive stars and pair instability supernovae did not contribute substantial amounts of neutron-capture elements to the regions where the stars in our sample formed. If the carbon- or nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor stars with low levels of neutron-capture elements were enriched by products of zero-metallicity supernovae only, then the presence of these heavy elements indicates that at least one form of neutron-capture reaction operated in some of the first stars. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  18. Strangeon and Strangeon Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyu, Lai; Renxin, Xu

    2017-06-01

    The nature of pulsar-like compact stars is essentially a central question of the fundamental strong interaction (explained in quantum chromo-dynamics) at low energy scale, the solution of which still remains a challenge though tremendous efforts have been tried. This kind of compact objects could actually be strange quark stars if strange quark matter in bulk may constitute the true ground state of the strong-interaction matter rather than 56Fe (the so-called Witten’s conjecture). From astrophysical points of view, however, it is proposed that strange cluster matter could be absolutely stable and thus those compact stars could be strange cluster stars in fact. This proposal could be regarded as a general Witten’s conjecture: strange matter in bulk could be absolutely stable, in which quarks are either free (for strange quark matter) or localized (for strange cluster matter). Strange cluster with three-light-flavor symmetry is renamed strangeon, being coined by combining “strange nucleon” for the sake of simplicity. A strangeon star can then be thought as a 3-flavored gigantic nucleus, and strangeons are its constituent as an analogy of nucleons which are the constituent of a normal (micro) nucleus. The observational consequences of strangeon stars show that different manifestations of pulsarlike compact stars could be understood in the regime of strangeon stars, and we are expecting more evidence for strangeon star by advanced facilities (e.g., FAST, SKA, and eXTP).

  19. Star Masses and Star-Planet Distances for Earth-like Habitability.

    PubMed

    Waltham, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents statistical estimates for the location and duration of habitable zones (HZs) around stars of different mass. The approach is based upon the assumption that Earth's location, and the Sun's mass, should not be highly atypical of inhabited planets. The results support climate-model-based estimates for the location of the Sun's HZ except models giving a present-day outer-edge beyond 1.64 AU. The statistical approach also demonstrates that there is a habitability issue for stars smaller than 0.65 solar masses since, otherwise, Earth would be an extremely atypical inhabited world. It is difficult to remove this anomaly using the assumption that poor habitability of planets orbiting low-mass stars results from unfavorable radiation regimes either before, or after, their stars enter the main sequence. However, the anomaly is well explained if poor habitability results from tidal locking of planets in the HZs of small stars. The expected host-star mass for planets with intelligent life then has a 95% confidence range of 0.78 M ⊙ < M < 1.04 M ⊙ , and the range for planets with at least simple life is 0.57 M ⊙  < M < 1.64 M ⊙ . Key Words: Habitability-Habitable zone-Anthropic-Red dwarfs-Initial mass function. Astrobiology 17, 61-77.

  20. Star Masses and Star-Planet Distances for Earth-like Habitability

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents statistical estimates for the location and duration of habitable zones (HZs) around stars of different mass. The approach is based upon the assumption that Earth's location, and the Sun's mass, should not be highly atypical of inhabited planets. The results support climate-model-based estimates for the location of the Sun's HZ except models giving a present-day outer-edge beyond 1.64 AU. The statistical approach also demonstrates that there is a habitability issue for stars smaller than 0.65 solar masses since, otherwise, Earth would be an extremely atypical inhabited world. It is difficult to remove this anomaly using the assumption that poor habitability of planets orbiting low-mass stars results from unfavorable radiation regimes either before, or after, their stars enter the main sequence. However, the anomaly is well explained if poor habitability results from tidal locking of planets in the HZs of small stars. The expected host-star mass for planets with intelligent life then has a 95% confidence range of 0.78 M⊙ < M < 1.04 M⊙, and the range for planets with at least simple life is 0.57 M⊙ < M < 1.64 M⊙. Key Words: Habitability—Habitable zone—Anthropic—Red dwarfs—Initial mass function. Astrobiology 17, 61–77. PMID:28103107

  1. Collisions in Compact Star Clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    The high stellar densities in young compact star clusters, such as the star cluster R136 in the 30 Doradus region, may lead to a large number of stellar collisions. Such collisions were recently found to be much more frequent than previous estimates. The number of collisions scales with the number of stars for clusters with the same initial relaxation time. These collisions take place in a few million years. The collision products may finally collapse into massive black holes. The fraction of the total mass in the star cluster which ends up in a single massive object scales with the total mass of the cluster and its relaxation time. This mass fraction is rather constant, within a factor two or so. Wild extrapolation from the relatively small masses of the studied systems to the cores of galactic nuclei may indicate that the massive black holes in these systems have formed in a similar way.

  2. Cracking on anisotropic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, A. M.; Sulaksono, A.

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of cracking of a local anisotropic neutron star (NS) due to small density fluctuations. It is assumed that the neutron star core consists of leptons, nucleons and hyperons. The relativistic mean field model is used to describe the core of equation of state (EOS). For the crust, we use the EOS introduced by Miyatsu et al. [1]. Furthermore, two models are used to describe pressure anisotropic in neutron star matter. One is proposed by Doneva-Yazadjiev (DY) [2] and the other is proposed by Herrera-Barreto (HB) [3]. The anisotropic parameter of DY and HB models are adjusted in order the predicted maximum mass compatible to the mass of PSR J1614-2230 [4] and PSR J0348+0432 [5]. We have found that cracking can potentially present in the region close to the neutron star surface. The instability due cracking is quite sensitive to the NS mass and anisotropic parameter used.

  3. Gravitational radiation from rapidly rotating nascent neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Dong; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1995-01-01

    We study the secular evolution and gravitational wave signature of a newly formed, rapidly rotating neutron star. The neutron star may arise from core collapse in a massive star or from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf. After a brief dynamical phase, the nascent neutron star settles into an axisymmetric, secularly unstable state. Gravitational radiation drives the star to a nonaxisymmetric, stationary equilibrium configuration via the bar-mode instability. The emitted quasi-periodic gravitational waves have a unique signature: the wave frequency sweeps downward from a few hundred Hertz to zero, while the wave amplitude increase from zero to a maximum and then decays back to zero. Such a wave signal could detected by broadband gravitational wave interferometers currently being constructed. We also characterize two other types of gravitational wave signals that could arise in principle from a rapidly rotating, secularly unstable neutron star: a high-frequency (f greater than or approximately = 1000 Hz) wave which increases the pattern-speed of the star, and a wave that actually increases the angular momentum of the star.

  4. Gemini Spectroscopic Survey of Young Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael; Kobulnicky, Henry

    2018-01-01

    The majority of stars form in embedded clusters. Current research into star formation has focused on either high-mass star-forming regions or low-mass star-forming regions. We present the results from a Gemini spectroscopic survey of young intermediate-mass star-forming regions. These are star forming regions selected to produce stars up to but not exceeding 8 solar masses. We obtained spectra of these regions with GNIRS on Gemini North and Flamingos-2 on Gemini South. We also combine this with near-infrared imaging from 2MASS, UKIDSS, and VVV to study the stellar content.

  5. Four new Delta Scuti stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Four new Delta Scuti stars are reported. Power, modified into amplitude, spectra, and light curves are used to determine periodicities. A complete frequency analysis is not performed due to the lack of a sufficient time base in the data. These new variables help verify the many predictions that Delta Scuti stars probably exist in prolific numbers as small amplitude variables. Two of these stars, HR 4344 and HD 107513, are possibly Am stars. If so, they are among the minority of variable stars which are also Am stars.

  6. Network formation and gelation in telechelic star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadgaonkar, Indrajit; Chatterji, Apratim

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the efficiency of gelation and network formation in telechelic star polymer melt, where the tips of polymer arms are dipoles while the rest of the monomers are uncharged. Our work is motivated by the experimental observations [A. Kulkarni et al., Macromolecules 48, 6580 (2015)] in which rheological studies of telechelic star polymers of poly-(L-lactide), a bio-degradable polymer, showed a drastic increase in elastic properties (up to 2000 times) compared to corresponding star polymers without the telechelic arm ends. In contrast to previous studies, we avoid using effective attractive Lennard-Jones potentials or dipolar potentials to model telechelic interactions. Instead we use explicit Coulomb positive and negative charges at the tip of polymer-arms of our bead-spring model of star polymers. By our simulations we show that the dipoles at the tip of star arms aggregate together to form clusters of dipoles. Each cluster has contributions from several stars, and in turn each star contributes to several clusters. Thus the entire polymer melt forms a connected network. Network forming tendencies decrease with a decrease of the value of the effective charge constituting the dipole: this can be experimentally realized by choosing a different ionomer for the star tip. We systematically varied the value of dipole charges, the fraction of star-arms with dipoles at the tip, and the length of the arms. The choice of explicit charges in our calculations enables us to make better quantitative predictions about the onset of gelation; moreover we get qualitatively distinct results about structural organization of dipoles within a dipole-cluster.

  7. Network formation and gelation in telechelic star polymers.

    PubMed

    Wadgaonkar, Indrajit; Chatterji, Apratim

    2017-02-28

    We investigate the efficiency of gelation and network formation in telechelic star polymer melt, where the tips of polymer arms are dipoles while the rest of the monomers are uncharged. Our work is motivated by the experimental observations [A. Kulkarni et al., Macromolecules 48, 6580 (2015)] in which rheological studies of telechelic star polymers of poly-(L-lactide), a bio-degradable polymer, showed a drastic increase in elastic properties (up to 2000 times) compared to corresponding star polymers without the telechelic arm ends. In contrast to previous studies, we avoid using effective attractive Lennard-Jones potentials or dipolar potentials to model telechelic interactions. Instead we use explicit Coulomb positive and negative charges at the tip of polymer-arms of our bead-spring model of star polymers. By our simulations we show that the dipoles at the tip of star arms aggregate together to form clusters of dipoles. Each cluster has contributions from several stars, and in turn each star contributes to several clusters. Thus the entire polymer melt forms a connected network. Network forming tendencies decrease with a decrease of the value of the effective charge constituting the dipole: this can be experimentally realized by choosing a different ionomer for the star tip. We systematically varied the value of dipole charges, the fraction of star-arms with dipoles at the tip, and the length of the arms. The choice of explicit charges in our calculations enables us to make better quantitative predictions about the onset of gelation; moreover we get qualitatively distinct results about structural organization of dipoles within a dipole-cluster.

  8. Design and DSP implementation of star image acquisition and star point fast acquiring and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guohui; Wang, Xiaodong; Hao, Zhihang

    2006-02-01

    Star sensor is a special high accuracy photoelectric sensor. Attitude acquisition time is an important function index of star sensor. In this paper, the design target is to acquire 10 samples per second dynamic performance. On the basis of analyzing CCD signals timing and star image processing, a new design and a special parallel architecture for improving star image processing are presented in this paper. In the design, the operation moving the data in expanded windows including the star to the on-chip memory of DSP is arranged in the invalid period of CCD frame signal. During the CCD saving the star image to memory, DSP processes the data in the on-chip memory. This parallelism greatly improves the efficiency of processing. The scheme proposed here results in enormous savings of memory normally required. In the scheme, DSP HOLD mode and CPLD technology are used to make a shared memory between CCD and DSP. The efficiency of processing is discussed in numerical tests. Only in 3.5ms is acquired the five lightest stars in the star acquisition stage. In 43us, the data in five expanded windows including stars are moved into the internal memory of DSP, and in 1.6ms, five star coordinates are achieved in the star tracking stage.

  9. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  10. Are star formation rates of galaxies bimodal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Star formation rate (SFR) distributions of galaxies are often assumed to be bimodal with modes corresponding to star-forming and quiescent galaxies, respectively. Both classes of galaxies are typically studied separately, and SFR distributions of star-forming galaxies are commonly modelled as lognormals. Using both observational data and results from numerical simulations, I argue that this division into star-forming and quiescent galaxies is unnecessary from a theoretical point of view and that the SFR distributions of the whole population can be well fitted by zero-inflated negative binomial distributions. This family of distributions has three parameters that determine the average SFR of the galaxies in the sample, the scatter relative to the star-forming sequence and the fraction of galaxies with zero SFRs, respectively. The proposed distributions naturally account for (I) the discrete nature of star formation, (II) the presence of 'dead' galaxies with zero SFRs and (III) asymmetric scatter. Excluding 'dead' galaxies, the distribution of log SFR is unimodal with a peak at the star-forming sequence and an extended tail towards low SFRs. However, uncertainties and biases in the SFR measurements can create the appearance of a bimodal distribution.

  11. Gravitational waves from neutron star excitations in a binary inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Alessandro; Sturani, Riccardo

    2018-02-01

    In the context of a binary inspiral of mixed neutron star-black hole systems, we investigate the excitation of the neutron star oscillation modes by the orbital motion. We study generic eccentric orbits and show that tidal interaction can excite the f -mode oscillations of the star by computing the amount of energy and angular momentum deposited into the star by the orbital motion tidal forces via closed form analytic expressions. We study the f -mode oscillations of cold neutron stars using recent microscopic nuclear equations of state, and we compute their imprint into the emitted gravitational waves.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New IR photometric study of Ap and Am stars (Chen+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. S.; Liu, J. Y.; Shan, H. G.

    2018-05-01

    In the General Catalog of Ap and Am stars (Renson & Manfroid 2009, Cat. III/260) 8265 stars are included in which, as Renson & Manfroid (2009, Cat. III/260) described, only 426 stars are of the "well known confirmed sample". We take these 426 stars as our working sample. The cross-identifications of 2MASS/WISE counterparts for all Ap, Am, and HgMn stars listed in this paper are made from Cutri et al. (2012, Cat. II/311) by using the radius of 2 arcsec. All 426 Ap, Am, and HgMn stars have 2MASS and/or WISE counterparts, which are listed in Table 3. The cross-identifications of IRAS counterparts are made according to the positional error ellipse of the source, because it has a 95% confidence level (IRAS Explanatory Supplement, Beichman et al. 1988, Cat. II/274). Finally, 202 stars are found to have the IRAS counterparts from IRAS PSC/FSC, which is listed in Table 4. (5 data files).

  13. Structural Studies of Three-Arm Star Block Copolymers Exposed to Extreme Stretch Suggests a Persistent Polymer Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Kell; Borger, Anine L.; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J. K.; Garvey, Christopher J.; Almdal, Kristoffer; Dorokhin, Andriy; Huang, Qian; Hassager, Ole

    2018-05-01

    We present structural small-angle neutron scattering studies of a three-armed polystyrene star polymer with short deuterated segments at the end of each arm. We show that the form factor of the three-armed star molecules in the relaxed state agrees with that of the random phase approximation of Gaussian chains. Upon exposure to large extensional flow conditions, the star polymers change conformation resulting in a highly stretched structure that mimics a fully extended three-armed tube model. All three arms are parallel to the flow, one arm being either in positive or negative stretching direction, while the two other arms are oriented parallel, right next to each other in the direction opposite to the first arm.

  14. Nonuniversal star formation efficiency in turbulent ISM

    DOE PAGES

    Semenov, Vadim A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-29

    Here, we present a study of a star formation prescription in which star formation efficiency depends on local gas density and turbulent velocity dispersion, as suggested by direct simulations of SF in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We test the model using a simulation of an isolated Milky Way-sized galaxy with a self-consistent treatment of turbulence on unresolved scales. We show that this prescription predicts a wide variation of local star formation efficiency per free-fall time,more » $$\\epsilon_{\\rm ff} \\sim 0.1 - 10\\%$$, and gas depletion time, $$t_{\\rm dep} \\sim 0.1 - 10$$ Gyr. In addition, it predicts an effective density threshold for star formation due to suppression of $$\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$$ in warm diffuse gas stabilized by thermal pressure. We show that the model predicts star formation rates in agreement with observations from the scales of individual star-forming regions to the kiloparsec scales. This agreement is non-trivial, as the model was not tuned in any way and the predicted star formation rates on all scales are determined by the distribution of the GMC-scale densities and turbulent velocities $$\\sigma$$ in the cold gas within the galaxy, which is shaped by galactic dynamics. The broad agreement of the star formation prescription calibrated in the GMC-scale simulations with observations, both gives credence to such simulations and promises to put star formation modeling in galaxy formation simulations on a much firmer theoretical footing.« less

  15. Star Formation in Merging Galaxies Using FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Hung, Chao-Ling; Naiman, Jill; Moreno, Jorge; Hopkins, Philip

    2018-01-01

    Galaxy interactions and mergers are efficient mechanisms to birth stars at rates that are significantly higher than found in our Milky Way galaxy. The Kennicut-Schmidt (KS) relation is an empirical relationship between the star-forming rate and gas surface densities of galaxies (Schmidt 1959; Kennicutt 1998). Although most galaxies follow the KS relation, the high levels of star formation in galaxy mergers places them outside of this otherwise tight relationship. The goal of this research is to analyze the gas content and star formation of simulated merging galaxies. Our work utilizes the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high-resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star-forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. In this work, we have noticed a significant increase in the star formation rate at first and second passage, when the two black holes of each galaxy approach one other. Next, we will analyze spatially resolved star-forming regions over the course of the interacting system. Then, we can study when and how the rates that gas converts into stars deviate from the standard KS. These analyses will provide important insights into the physical mechanisms that regulate star formation of normal and merging galaxies and valuable theoretical predictions that can be used to compare with current and future observations from ALMA or the James Webb Space Telescope.

  16. Dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with aspirin resistance following coronary artery bypass grafting: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial [NCT01159639].

    PubMed

    Gasparovic, Hrvoje; Petricevic, Mate; Kopjar, Tomislav; Djuric, Zeljko; Svetina, Lucija; Biocina, Bojan

    2012-08-25

    Coronary artery disease remains the dominant cause of mortality in developed countries. While platelets have been recognized to play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis, the ideal antiplatelet regime after coronary artery surgery remains elusive. The evolution of CABG has presently moved beyond technical improvements to involve modulation of pharmacologic management designed to improve patient outcomes. The aim of this trial will be to test the hypothesis that the addition of clopidogrel to patients with documented postoperative aspirin resistance will reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events. Patients scheduled for isolated coronary artery surgery will be eligible for the study. Patients in whom postoperative multiple electrode aggregometry documents aspirin resistance will be randomized into two groups. The control group will receive 300 mg of aspirin. The dual antiplatelet group will receive 75 mg of clopidogrel in addition to 300 mg of aspirin. Patients will be followed for 6 months. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (death from any cause, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization due to cardiovascular pathology) as well as bleeding events will be recorded. This will be the first trial that will specifically address the issue of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing coronary artery surgery who have been found to be aspirin resistant. In the event that the addition of clopidogrel proves to be beneficial in this subset of surgical patients, this study could significantly impact their future antiplatelet management. This randomized controlled trial has been registered at the ClinicalTrials.gov website (Identifier NCT01159639).

  17. Variable Circumstellar Disks of Classical Be Stars in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhartz, C.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Wisniewski, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Circumstellar disks are common among many stars, at most spectral types, and at different stages of their lifetimes. Among the near-main-sequence classical Be stars, there is growing evidence that these disks form, dissipate, and reform on timescales that differ from star to star. Using data obtained with the Large Monolithic Imager (LMI) at the Lowell Observatory Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT), along with additional complementary data obtained at the University of Toledo Ritter Observatory (RO), we have begun a long-term monitoring project of a well-studied set of galactic star clusters that are known to contain Be stars. Our goal is to develop a statistically significant sample of variable circumstellar disk systems over multiple timescales. With a robust multi-epoch study we can determine the relative fraction of Be stars that exhibit disk-loss or disk-renewal phases, and investigate the range of timescales over which these events occur. A larger sample will improve our understanding of the prevalence and nature of the disk variability, and may provide insight about underlying physical mechanisms.

  18. Dynamical investigations of the multiple stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyaeva, Olga V.; Zhuchkov, Roman Ya.

    2017-11-01

    Two multiple stars - the quadruple star - Bootis (ADS 9173) and the triple star T Taury were investigated. The visual double star - Bootiswas studied on the basis of the Pulkovo 26-inch refractor observations 1982-2013. An invisible satellite of the component A was discovered due to long-term uniform series of observations. Its orbital period is 20 ± 2 years. The known invisible satellite of the component B with near 5 years period was confirmed due to high precision CCD observations. The astrometric orbits of the both components were calculated. The orbits of inner and outer pairs of the pre-main sequence binary T Taury were calculated on the basis of high precision observations by the VLT and on the Keck II Telescope. This weakly hierarchical triple system is stable with probability more than 70%.

  19. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    WDs, causing an overestimated surface gravity, and ultimately determine if these magnetic fields are likely developed through the star's own surface convection zone, or inherited from massive Ap/Bp progenitors. We discovered around 20 000 spectroscopic white dwarfs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), with a corresponding increase in relatively rare varieties of white dwarfs, including the massive ones (Kleinman et al. 2013, ApJS, 204, 5, Kepler et al. 2013, MNRAS, 439, 2934). The mass distributions of the hydrogen-rich (DA) measured from fitting the spectra with model atmospheres calculated using unidimensinal mixing lenght-theory (MLT) shows the average mass (as measured by the surface gravity) increases apparently below 13 000K for DAs (e.g. Bergeron et al. 1991, ApJ, 367, 253; Tremblay et al. 2011, ApJ, 730, 128; Kleinman et al. 2013). Only with the tridimensional (3D) convection calculations of Tremblay et al. 2011 (A&A, 531, L19) and 2013 (A&A, 552, 13; A&A, 557, 7; arXiv 1309.0886) the problem has finally been solved, but the effects of magnetic fields are not included yet in the mass determinations. Pulsating white dwarf stars are used to measure their interior and envelope properties through seismology, and together with the luminosity function of white dwarf stars in clusters and around the Sun are valuable tools for the study of high density physics, and the history of stellar formation.

  20. Studies of Disks Around the Sun and Other Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1997-01-01

    This is a NASA Origins of Solar Systems research program, and this NASA Headquarters grant has now been transferred to a new grant at NASA GSFC (NAG5-4082). Thus the need for this 'Final Report' on a project that is not, in fact, complete. We are conducting research designed to enhance our understanding of the evolution and detectability of comet clouds and disks. This area holds promise for also improving our understanding of outer solar system formation, the bombardment history of the planets, the transport of volatiles and organics from the outer solar system to the inner planets, and to the ultimate fate of comet clouds around the Sun and other stars. According to "standard" theory, both the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud are (at least in part) natural products of the planetary accumulation stage of solar system formation. One expects such assemblages to be a common attribute of other solar systems. Our program consists of modeling collisions in the Kuiper Belt and the dust disks around other stars. The modeling effort focuses on moving from our simple, first-generation, Kuiper Belt collision rate model, to a time-dependent, second-generation model that incorporates physical collisions, velocity evolution, dynamical erosion, and various dust transport mechanisms. This second generation model is to be used to study the evolution of surface mass density and the object-size spectrum in the disk.

  1. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. I. NGC 6611

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Bomans, D. J.

    2008-11-01

    N-body simulations have shown that the dynamical decay of the young (~1 Myr) Orion Nebula cluster could be responsible for the loss of at least half of its initial content of OB stars. This result suggests that other young stellar systems could also lose a significant fraction of their massive stars at the very beginning of their evolution. To confirm this expectation, we used the Mid-Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (completed by the Midcourse Space Experiment satellite) to search for bow shocks around a number of young (⪉several Myr) clusters and OB associations. We discovered dozens of bow shocks generated by OB stars running away from these stellar systems, supporting the idea of significant dynamical loss of OB stars. In this paper, we report the discovery of three bow shocks produced by O-type stars ejected from the open cluster NGC 6611 (M16). One of the bow shocks is associated with the O9.5Iab star HD165319, which was suggested to be one of “the best examples for isolated Galactic high-mass star formation” (de Wit et al. 2005, A&A, 437, 247). Possible implications of our results for the origin of field OB stars are discussed.

  2. "Movie Star" Acting Strangely, Radio Astronomers Find

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers have used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope to make the first-ever time-lapse "movie" showing details of gas motions around a star other than our Sun. The study, the largest observational project yet undertaken using Very Long Baseline Interferometry, has produced surprising results that indicate scientists do not fully understand stellar atmospheres. The "movie" shows that the atmosphere of a pulsating star more than 1,000 light-years away continues to expand during a part of the star's pulsation period in which astronomers expected it to start contracting. Philip Diamond and Athol Kemball, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, TX, today. "The continued expansion we're seeing contradicts current theoretical models for how these stars work," Diamond said. "The models have assumed spherical symmetry in the star's atmosphere, and our movie shows that this is not the case. Such models suggest that a shock wave passes outward from the star. Once it's passed, then the atmosphere should begin to contract because of the star's gravity. We've long passed that point and the contraction has not begun." The time-lapse images show that the gas motions are not uniform around the star. Most of the motion is that of gas moving directly outward from the star's surface. However, in about one-fourth of the ring, there are peculiar motions that do not fit this pattern. The scientists speculate that the rate of mass loss may not be the same from all parts of the star's surface. "A similar star behaved as predicted when studied a few years ago, so we're left to wonder what's different about this one," Diamond said. "Right now, we think that different rates of mass loss in the two stars may be the cause of the difference. This star is losing mass at 100 times the rate of the star in the earlier study." "This

  3. The Initial Mass Function of the First Stars Inferred from Extremely Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, Miho N.; Tominaga, Nozomu; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Nomoto, Ken’ichi

    2018-04-01

    We compare the elemental abundance patterns of ∼200 extremely metal-poor (EMP; [Fe/H] < ‑3) stars to the supernova yields of metal-free stars, in order to obtain insights into the characteristic masses of the first (Population III or Pop III) stars in the universe. The supernova yields are prepared with nucleosynthesis calculations of metal-free stars with various initial masses (M = 13, 15, 25, 40 and 100 M ⊙) and explosion energies (E 51 = E/1051[erg] = 0.5–60), to include low-energy, normal-energy, and high-energy explosions. We adopt the mixing-fallback model, to take into account possible asymmetry in the supernova explosions, and the yields that best fit the observed abundance patterns of the EMP stars are searched by varying the model parameters. We find that the abundance patterns of the EMP stars are predominantly best-fitted by the supernova yields with initial masses M < 40 M ⊙, and that more than than half of the stars are best-fitted by the M = 25 M ⊙ hypernova (E 51 = 10) models. The results also indicate that the majority of the primordial supernovae have ejected 10‑2–10‑1 M ⊙ of 56Ni, leaving behind a compact remnant (either a neutron star or a black hole), with a mass in the range of ∼1.5–5 M ⊙. These results suggest that the masses of the first stars responsible for the first metal enrichment are predominantly <40 M ⊙. This implies that the higher-mass first stars were either less abundant, directly collapsed into a black hole without ejecting heavy elements, or a supernova explosion of a higher-mass first star inhibits the formation of the next generation of low-mass stars at [Fe/H] < ‑3.

  4. Mid-IR Spectra Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate mass pre-main sequence stars, the higher mass analogues to the T Tauri stars. Because of their higher mass, they are expected form more rapidly than the T Tauri stars. Whether the Herbig Ae/Be stars accrete only from collapsing infalling envelopes or whether accrete through geometrically flattened viscous accretion disks is of current debate. When the Herbig Ae/Be stars reach the main sequence they form a class called Vega-like stars which are known from their IR excesses to have debris disks, such as the famous beta Pictoris. The evolutionary scenario between the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars and the main sequence Vega-like stars is not yet revealed and it bears on the possibility of the presence of Habitable Zone planets around the A stars. Photometric studies of Herbig Ae/Be stars have revealed that most are variable in the optical, and a subset of stars show non-periodic drops of about 2 magnitudes. These drops in visible light are accompanied by changes in their colors: at first the starlight becomes reddened, and then it becomes bluer, the polarization goes from less than 0.1 % to roughly 1% during these minima. The theory postulated by V. Grinnin is that large cometary bodies on highly eccentric orbits occult the star on their way to being sublimed, for systems that are viewed edge-on. This theory is one of several controversial theories about the nature of Herbig Ae/Be stars. A 5 year mid-IR spectrophotometric monitoring campaign was begun by Wooden and Butner in 1992 to look for correlations between the variations in visible photometry and mid-IR dust emission features. Generally the approximately 20 stars that have been observed by the NASA Ames HIFOGS spectrometer have been steady at 10 microns. There are a handful, however, that have shown variable mid-IR spectra, with 2 showing variations in both the continuum and features anti-correlated with visual photometry, and 3 showing variations in the emission

  5. INVESTIGATIONS ON FLARE STARS AND NEBULAE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The first part of the report deals with the searching of flare stars in the Pleiades and Praesepe clusters. 13 flares have been found on the... Pleiades and 2 on the Praesepe. Position and characteristics of the flare stars are given. The second part deals with the study of the Orion Nebula with

  6. Teaching through Trade Books: Seeing Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royce, Christine Anne

    2008-01-01

    The winter months are a great time to make observations of several familiar constellations. While there is no scientific reason to "know" the constellations--they are simply imaginative pictures imposed on stars--studying constellations can help students connect with culture in a fun way and develop the awareness that stars are different in…

  7. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-08

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it.

  8. Dwarf Star Erupts in Giant Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This movie taken by NASA'S Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows one of the largest flares, or star eruptions, ever recorded at ultraviolet wavelengths. The star, called GJ 3685A, just happened to be in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's field of view while the telescope was busy observing galaxies. As the movie demonstrates, the seemingly serene star suddenly exploded once, then even more intensely a second time, pouring out in total about one million times more energy than a typical flare from our Sun. The second blast of light constituted an increase in brightness by a factor of at least 10,000.

    Flares are huge explosions of energy stemming from a single location on a star's surface. They are caused by the brief destruction of a star's magnetic fields. Many types of stars experience them, though old, small, rapidly rotating 'red dwarfs' like GJ 3685A tend to flare more frequently and dramatically. These stars, called flare stars, can experience powerful eruptions as often as every few hours. Younger stars, in general, also erupt more often. One of the reasons astronomers study flare stars is to gain a better picture and history of flare events taking place on the Sun.

    A preliminary analysis of the GJ 3685A flare shows that the mechanisms underlying stellar eruptions may be more complex than previously believed. Evidence for the two most popular flare theories was found.

    Though this movie has been sped up (the actual flare lasted about 20 minutes), time-resolved data exist for each one-hundredth of a second. These observations were taken at 2 p.m. Pacific time, April 24, 2004. In the still image, the time sequence starts in the upper left panel, continues in the upper right, then moves to the lower left and ends in the lower right.

    The circular and linear features that appear below and to the right of GJ 3685A during the flare event are detector artifacts caused by the extreme brightness of the flare.

  9. Molecular and Dusty Layers of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars Studied with the VLT Interferometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    the evolution of low to intermediate mass stars towards planetary nebulae . It is also one of the most important sources of chemical enrichment of...planetary nebula (PN) phases, and is thus the most important driver for the further stellar evolution (e.g., Habing & Olofsson, 2003). Mass loss from AGB...branch (AGB) stars is the most important driver for the evolution of low to intermediate mass stars towards planetary nebulae . It is also one of the

  10. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    the models are necessarily quite uncertain (i.e., they are not well "constrained"). It is therefore imperative to enlarge the number of observables and this is possible with asteroseismology. Helioseismology has opened up the way. These observations severely constrain the possible models of the Sun's internal structure. But, depending on their mass and age, stars have very different internal structures, and may also harbour physical processes that are quite different from those in the Sun. Asteroseismological observations of stellar oscillations add crucial information that constrain the models of their inner structure, since the measured frequencies may be compared directly with those computed for the models. The observation of the full stellar disk allows to characterize certain (low degree) oscillation modes which penetrate deep inside the star and it is not necessary to resolve the stellar disk (as we can do for the Sun) in order to obtain useful seismological information. More stars to be observed Observations of bright solar-like stars are already planned with the CORALIE spectrograph. Even fainter stars can be observed with the HARPS spectrograph which will be installed on the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory at the end of 2002. It will be able to observe stars that are one hundred times fainter than those now reachable with CORALIE and with even better accuracy of the velocity measurements. While it will be mostly dedicated to the search of exoplanets, HARPS will be able to conduct an asteroseismological study of about 100 solar-like stars. More information The research reported in this Press Release is described in a scientific article ("P-mode observations on Alpha Cen A" by François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier) that has been accepted for publication as a Letter in the European journal "Astronomy & Astrophysics". Note [1]: Alpha Centauri was earlier known as Rigil Centauri , but that name is not much used because of the similarity with the name of the

  11. Spectrophotometry of Symbiotic Stars (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D.

    2017-12-01

    (Abstract only) Symbiotic stars are fascinating objects - complex binary systems comprising a cool red giant star and a small hot object, often a white dwarf, both embedded in a nebula formed by a wind from the giant star. UV radiation from the hot star ionizes the nebula, producing a range of emission lines. These objects have composite spectra with contributions from both stars plus the nebula and these spectra can change on many timescales. Being moderately bright, they lend themselves well to amateur spectroscopy. This paper describes the symbiotic star phenomenon, shows how spectrophotometry can be used to extract astrophysically useful information about the nature of these systems, and gives results for three symbiotic stars based on the author's observations.

  12. Nonradial oscillation modes of compact stars with a crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Cesar Vásquez; Hall, Zack B.; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2017-12-01

    Oscillation modes of isolated compact stars can, in principle, be a fingerprint of the equation of state (EoS) of dense matter. We study the non-radial high-frequency l =2 spheroidal modes of neutron stars and strange quark stars, adopting a two-component model (core and crust) for these two types of stars. Using perturbed fluid equations in the relativistic Cowling approximation, we explore the effect of a strangelet or hadronic crust on the oscillation modes of strange stars. The results differ from the case of neutron stars with a crust. In comparison to fluid-only configurations, we find that a solid crust on top of a neutron star increases the p -mode frequency slightly with little effect on the f -mode frequency, whereas for strange stars, a strangelet crust on top of a quark core significantly increases the f -mode frequency with little effect on the p -mode frequency.

  13. I-Love-Q: Unexpected Universal Relations for Neutron Stars and Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2013-07-01

    Neutron stars and quark stars are not only characterized by their mass and radius but also by how fast they spin, through their moment of inertia, and how much they can be deformed, through their Love number and quadrupole moment. These depend sensitively on the star’s internal structure and thus on unknown nuclear physics. We find universal relations between the moment of inertia, the Love number, and the quadrupole moment that are independent of the neutron and quark star’s internal structure. These can be used to learn about neutron star deformability through observations of the moment of inertia, break degeneracies in gravitational wave detection to measure spin in binary inspirals, distinguish neutron stars from quark stars, and test general relativity in a nuclear structure-independent fashion.

  14. Neutron star news and puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Madappa

    2014-08-01

    Gerry Brown has had the most influence on my career in Physics, and my life after graduate studies. This article gives a brief account of some of the many ways in which Gerry shaped my research. Focus is placed on the significant strides on neutron star research made by the group at Stony Brook, which Gerry built from scratch. Selected puzzles about neutron stars that remain to be solved are noted.

  15. Photometrically-derived properties of massive-star clusters obtained with different massive-star evolution tracks and deterministic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Aida; Charlot, Stéphane; Eldridge, John

    2015-08-01

    We compute libraries of stellar + nebular spectra of populations of coeval stars with ages of <100 Myr and metallicities of Z=0.001 to 0.040, using different sets of massive-star evolution tracks, i.e., new Padova tracks for single non-rotating stars, the Geneva tracks for single non-rotating and rotating stars, and the Auckland tracks for single non-rotating and binary stars. For the stellar component, we use population synthesis codes galaxev, starburst99, and BPASS, depending on the set of tracks. For the nebular component we use photoionization code cloudy. From these spectra, we obtain magnitudes in filters F275W, F336W, F438W, F547M, F555W, F657N, and F814W of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera Three. We use i) our computed magnitudes, ii) new multi-band photometry of massive-star clusters in nearby (<11 Mpc) galaxies spanning the metallicity range 12+log(O/H)=7.2-9.2, observed as part of HST programs 13364 (PI Calzetti) and 13773 (PI Chandar), and iii) Bayesian inference to a) establish how well the different models are able to constrain the metallicities, extinctions, ages, and masses of the star clusters, b) quantify differences in the cluster properties obtained with the different models, and c) assess how properties of lower-mass clusters are affected by the stochastic sampling of the IMF. In our models, the stellar evolution tracks, stellar atmospheres, and nebulae have similar chemical compositions. Different metallicities are available with different sets of tracks and we compare results from models of similar metallicities. Our results have implications for studies of the formation and evolution of star clusters, the cluster age and mass functions, and the star formation histories of galaxies.

  16. Young Star HD 141569

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-30

    This image shows the dusty disk of planetary material surrounding the young star HD 141569, located 380 light-years away from Earth. It was taken using the vortex coronagraph on the W.M. Keck Observatory. The vortex suppressed light from the star in the center, revealing light from the innermost ring of planetary material around the star (blue). The disk around the star, made of olivine particles, extends from 23 to 70 astronomical units from the star. By comparison, Uranus is over 19 astronomical units from our sun, and Neptune about 30 astronomical units. One astronomical unit is the distance between Earth and our sun. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21090

  17. Observations of southern emission-line stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.

    1976-01-01

    A catalog of 1929 stars showing H-alpha emission on photographic plates is presented which covers the entire southern sky south of declination -25 deg to a red limiting magnitude of about 11.0. The catalog provides previous designations of known emission-line stars equatorial (1900) and galactic coordinates, visual and photographic magnitudes, H-alpha emission parameters, spectral types, and notes on unusual spectral features. The objects listed include 16 M stars, 25 S stars, 37 carbon stars, 20 symbiotic stars, 40 confirmed or suspected T Tauri stars, 16 novae, 14 planetary nebulae, 11 P Cygni stars, 9 Bep stars, 87 confirmed or suspected Wolf-Rayet stars, and 26 'peculiar' stars. Two new T associations are discovered, one in Lupus and one in Chamaeleon. Objects with variations in continuum or H-alpha intensity are noted, and the distribution by spectral type is analyzed. It is found that the sky distribution of these emission-line stars shows significant concentrations in the region of the small Sagittarius cloud and in the Carina region.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PTPS stars. III. The evolved stars sample (Niedzielski+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Adamczyk, M.; Adamow, M.; Nowak, G.; Wolszczan, A.

    2015-11-01

    We present basic atmospheric parameters (Teff, logg, vt and [Fe/H]), rotation velocities and absolute radial velocities as well as luminosities, masses, ages and radii for 402 stars (including 11 single-lined spectroscopic binaries), mostly subgiants and giants. For 272 of them we present parameters for the first time. For another 53 stars we present estimates of Teff and log g based on photometric calibrations. We also present basic properties of the complete list of 744 stars that form the PTPS evolved stars sample. We examined stellar masses for 1255 stars in five other planet searches and found some of them likely to be significantly overestimated. Applying our uniformly determined stellar masses we confirm the apparent increase of companions masses for evolved stars, and we explain it, as well as lack of close-in planets with limited effective radial velocity precision for those stars due to activity. (5 data files).

  19. A Sparkling Spray of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    intriguing region is an ideal laboratory for studying how stars form. The entire area shown here is just a small part of a vast cloud of molecular gas that is in the process of forming the next generation of stars. Besides the feast of objects in this picture there are many interesting objects hidden behind the murk of the nebulosity. In the region between the tip of the Cone Nebula and the brightest star at the top of the picture there are several stellar birthing grounds where young stars are forming. There is even evidence of the intense stellar winds from these youthful embryos blasting out from the hidden stars in the making. This picture of NGC 2264, including the Christmas Tree Cluster, was created from images taken with the Wide Field Imager (WFI), a specialised astronomical camera attached to the 2.2-metre Max-Planck Society/ESO telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. Located nearly 2400 m above sea level, in the mountains of the Atacama Desert, ESO's La Silla enjoys some of the clearest and darkest skies on the whole planet, making the site ideally suited for studying the farthest depths of the Universe. To make this image, the WFI stared at the cluster for more than ten hours through a series of specialist filters to build up a full colour image of the billowing clouds of fluorescing hydrogen gas.

  20. STARS: a software application for the EBEX autonomous daytime star cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Daniel; Didier, Joy; Hanany, Shaul; Hillbrand, Seth; Limon, Michele; Miller, Amber; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Britt; Tucker, Greg; Vinokurov, Yury

    2014-07-01

    The E and B Experiment (EBEX) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to probe polarization signals in the CMB resulting from primordial gravitational waves, gravitational lensing, and Galactic dust emission. EBEX completed an 11 day flight over Antarctica in January 2013 and data analysis is underway. EBEX employs two star cameras to achieve its real-time and post-flight pointing requirements. We wrote a software application called STARS to operate, command, and collect data from each of the star cameras, and to interface them with the main flight computer. We paid special attention to make the software robust against potential in-flight failures. We report on the implementation, testing, and successful in flight performance of STARS.

  1. The RAVE Survey: Rich in Very Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulbright, Jon P.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Ruchti, Gregory R.; Gilmore, G. F.; Grebel, Eva; Bienaymé, O.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Campbell, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F. G.; Williams, M.; Zwitter, T.

    2010-11-01

    Very metal-poor stars are of obvious importance for many problems in chemical evolution, star formation, and galaxy evolution. Finding complete samples of such stars which are also bright enough to allow high-precision individual analyses is of considerable interest. We demonstrate here that stars with iron abundances [Fe/H] <-2 dex, and down to below -4 dex, can be efficiently identified within the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey of bright stars, without requiring additional confirmatory observations. We determine a calibration of the equivalent width of the calcium triplet lines measured from the RAVE spectra onto true [Fe/H], using high spectral resolution data for a subset of the stars. These RAVE iron abundances are accurate enough to obviate the need for confirmatory higher-resolution spectroscopy. Our initial study has identified 631 stars with [Fe/H] <=-2, from a RAVE database containing approximately 200,000 stars. This RAVE-based sample is complete for stars with [Fe/H] lsim-2.5, allowing statistical sample analysis. We identify three stars with [Fe/H] lsim-4. Of these, one was already known to be "ultra metal-poor," one is a known carbon-enhanced metal-poor star, but we obtain [Fe/H] = -4.0, rather than the published [Fe/H] = -3.3, and derive [C/Fe] = +0.9, and [N/Fe] = +3.2, and the third is at the limit of our signal-to-noise ratio. RAVE observations are ongoing and should prove to be a rich source of bright, easily studied, very metal-poor stars. Based in part on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, in the framework of proposals 081.B-0900 and 080.B-0927.

  2. Observational aspects of Herbig Ae/Be stars and of candidate young A/B stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Winter, Dolf

    1996-06-01

    The thesis consists of several studies on candidate young stars of which most material is published or in press and which can be divided into three parts roughly. Part A is about Herbig Ae/Be stars. A complete review of the observational properties of HAeBes is given in Chapter A1 together with a renewed up-to-date catalogue of HAeBes and HAeBe candidates. As an example of the selection of HAeBes from candidate stars, the observational properties of three candidates is discussed in Chapter A2. They are in particular interesting as they are relatively bright with respect to other HAeBes candidates. An advantage of bright HAeBes is that high resolution spectroscopy can be obtained. For two well know HAeBe objects with a favourable oriented disk, UX and BF Ori, a high resolution spectroscopy monitoring programme is presented in Chapters A3 and A4. First results presented indicate that the disk material of UX Ori is accreting in the form of comet-like bodies. Such pioneering results are also found for BF Ori but more details of the cometaries are given. As discussed in Chapter A1, the IR-excess is one of the fundamental discriminators for the selection of HAeBe candidates. A good understanding of the origin of the IR-excess of HAeBe candidates is necessary to study the disk material that ultimately could produce (proto-)planetary systems. Chapter A5 discusses the amount of IR-excess of HAeBe candidates and ideas about the probable origin. In Part B objects are discussed which were originally selected as HAeBe candidates, but for which a more detailed analysis of the observational characteristics show that they are probably more evolved. This group contains very interesting objects as is shown in Chapters B1, B2 and B3, in which the discovery of a new galactic Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) is reported, WRA 751. A well known B[e] star is HD 45677. The B[e]-group was collected to consist of evolved objects with masses less than those of LBVs and comparable with B[e] stars

  3. The Michigan Binary Star Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi P.

    2007-07-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, William J. Hussey and Robert G. Aitken, both at Lick Observatory, began a systematic search for unrecorded binary stars with the aid of the 12" and 36" refracting telescopes at Lick Observatory. Aitken's work (and book on binary stars) are well known, Hussey's contributions less so. In 1905 Hussey, a Michigan engineering graduate, returned to direct the Ann Arbor astronomy program, and immediately he began to design new instrumentation for the study of binary stars and to train potential observers. For a time, he spent six months a year at the La Plata Observatory, where he discovered a number of new pairs and decided upon a major southern hemisphere campaign. He spent a decade obtaining the lenses for a large refractor, through the vicissitudes of war and depression. Finally, he obtained a site in South Africa, a 26" refractor, and a small corps of observers, but he died in London en route to fulfill his dream. His right hand man, Richard Rossiter, established the observatory and spent the next thirty years discovering and measuring binary stars: his personal total is a record for the field. This talk is an account of the methods, results, and utility of the extraordinary binary star factory in the veldt.

  4. Cooling of hypernuclear compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduta, Adriana R.; Sedrakian, Armen; Weber, Fridolin

    2018-04-01

    We study the thermal evolution of hypernuclear compact stars constructed from covariant density functional theory of hypernuclear matter and parametrizations which produce sequences of stars containing two-solar-mass objects. For the input in the simulations, we solve the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer gap equations in the hyperonic sector and obtain the gaps in the spectra of Λ, Ξ0, and Ξ- hyperons. For the models with masses M/M⊙ ≥ 1.5 the neutrino cooling is dominated by hyperonic direct Urca processes in general. In the low-mass stars the (Λp) plus leptons channel is the dominant direct Urca process, whereas for more massive stars the purely hyperonic channels (Σ-Λ) and (Ξ-Λ) are dominant. Hyperonic pairing strongly suppresses the processes on Ξ-s and to a lesser degree on Λs. We find that intermediate-mass 1.5 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 1.8 models have surface temperatures which lie within the range inferred from thermally emitting neutron stars, if the hyperonic pairing is taken into account. Most massive models with M/M⊙ ≃ 2 may cool very fast via the direct Urca process through the (Λp) channel because they develop inner cores where the S-wave pairing of Λs and proton is absent.

  5. A Chandra ACIS Study of 30 Doradus. II. X-Ray Point Sources in the Massive Star Cluster R136 and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Getman, Konstantin V.

    2006-04-01

    We have studied the X-ray point-source population of the 30 Doradus (30 Dor) star-forming complex in the Large Magellanic Cloud using high spatial resolution X-ray images and spatially resolved spectra obtained with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Here we describe the X-ray sources in a 17'×17' field centered on R136, the massive star cluster at the center of the main 30 Dor nebula. We detect 20 of the 32 Wolf-Rayet stars in the ACIS field. The cluster R136 is resolved at the subarcsecond level into almost 100 X-ray sources, including many typical O3-O5 stars, as well as a few bright X-ray sources previously reported. Over 2 orders of magnitude of scatter in LX is seen among R136 O stars, suggesting that X-ray emission in the most massive stars depends critically on the details of wind properties and the binarity of each system, rather than reflecting the widely reported characteristic value LX/Lbol~=10-7. Such a canonical ratio may exist for single massive stars in R136, but our data are too shallow to confirm this relationship. Through this and future X-ray studies of 30 Dor, the complete life cycle of a massive stellar cluster can be revealed.

  6. The Chemical Composition of the Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazunova, L. V.

    The comparison of the results of the studies of the active stars' chemical composition obtained by different authors has been performed. It was concluded that the difference between the abundances of some elements in active and inactive stars becomes significant (> 3σ) only for the active stars with high chromospheric activity (lgR'HK > -4). This is the case primarily for the light elements, namely Li, Na and Al, as well as heavy elements with Z > 30.

  7. Spectroscopic survey of Kepler stars - II. FIES/NOT observations of A- and F-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczura, E.; Polińska, M.; Murphy, S. J.; Smalley, B.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Lykke, J. M.; Triviño Hage, A.; Michalska, G.

    2017-09-01

    We have analysed high-resolution spectra of 28 A and 22 F stars in the Kepler field, observed using the Fibre-Fed Échelle Spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. We provide spectral types, atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances for 50 stars. Balmer, Fe I and Fe II lines were used to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities and microturbulent velocities. We determined chemical abundances and projected rotational velocities using a spectrum synthesis technique. Effective temperatures calculated by spectral energy distribution fitting are in good agreement with those determined from the spectral line analysis. The stars analysed include chemically peculiar stars of the Am and λ Boo types, as well as stars with approximately solar chemical abundances. The wide distribution of projected rotational velocity, vsin I, is typical for A and F stars. The microturbulence velocities obtained are typical for stars in the observed temperature and surface gravity ranges. Moreover, we affirm the results of Niemczura et al. that Am stars do not have systematically higher microturbulent velocities than normal stars of the same temperature.

  8. College Students' Preinstructional Ideas about Stars and Star Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Janelle M.; Prather, Edward E.; Johnson, Bruce; Slater, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    This study (Note 1) investigated the beliefs about stars that students hold when they enter an undergraduate introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors. Students' preinstructional ideas were investigated through the use of several student-supplied-response (SSR) surveys, which asked students to describe their ideas about topics such as…

  9. White dwarf stars with carbon atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Dufour, P; Liebert, J; Fontaine, G; Behara, N

    2007-11-22

    White dwarfs represent the endpoint of stellar evolution for stars with initial masses between approximately 0.07 and 8-10, where is the mass of the Sun (more massive stars end their life as either black holes or neutron stars). The theory of stellar evolution predicts that the majority of white dwarfs have a core made of carbon and oxygen, which itself is surrounded by a helium layer and, for approximately 80 per cent of known white dwarfs, by an additional hydrogen layer. All white dwarfs therefore have been traditionally found to belong to one of two categories: those with a hydrogen-rich atmosphere (the DA spectral type) and those with a helium-rich atmosphere (the non-DAs). Here we report the discovery of several white dwarfs with atmospheres primarily composed of carbon, with little or no trace of hydrogen or helium. Our analysis shows that the atmospheric parameters found for these stars do not fit satisfactorily in any of the currently known theories of post-asymptotic giant branch evolution, although these objects might be the cooler counterpart of the unique and extensively studied PG 1159 star H1504+65 (refs 4-7). These stars, together with H1504+65, might accordingly form a new evolutionary sequence that follows the asymptotic giant branch.

  10. "Wonderful" Star Reveals its Hot Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    For the first time an X-ray image of a pair of interacting stars has been made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The ability to distinguish between the interacting stars - one a highly evolved giant star and the other likely a white dwarf - allowed a team of scientists to observe an X-ray outburst from the giant star and find evidence that a bridge of hot matter is streaming between the two stars. "Before this observation it was assumed that all the X-rays came from a hot disk surrounding a white dwarf, so the detection of an X-ray outburst from the giant star came as a surprise," said Margarita Karovska of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., and lead author article in the latest Astrophysical Journal Letters describing this work. An ultraviolet image made by the Hubble Space Telescope was a key to identifying the location of the X-ray outburst with the giant star. X-ray studies of this system, called Mira AB, may also provide better understanding of interactions between other binary systems consisting of a "normal" star and a collapsed star such as a white dwarf, black hole or a neutron star, where the stellar objects and gas flow cannot be distinguished in an image. HST Ultraviolet Image of Mira HST Ultraviolet Image of Mira The separation of the X-rays from the giant star and the white dwarf was made possible by the superb angular resolution of Chandra, and the relative proximity of the star system at about 420 light years from Earth. The stars in Mira AB are about 6.5 billion miles apart, or almost twice the distance of Pluto from the Sun. Mira A (Mira) was named "The Wonderful" star in the 17th century because its brightness was observed to wax and wane over a period of about 330 days. Because it is in the advanced, red giant phase of a star's life, it has swollen to about 600 times that of the Sun and it is pulsating. Mira A is now approaching the stage where its nuclear fuel supply will be exhausted, and it will collapse

  11. A Comparative Observational Study of YSO Classification in Four Small Star-forming H ii Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sung-Ju; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju

    We have developed a new young stellar object (YSO) identification and classification technique using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. We compare this new technique with previous WISE YSO detection and classification methods that used either infrared colors or spectral energy distribution slopes. In this study, we also use the new technique to detect and examine the YSO population associated with four small H ii regions: KR 7, KR 81, KR 120, and KR 140. The relatively simple structure of these regions allows us to effectively use both spatial and temporal constraints to identify YSOs that are potential productsmore » of triggered star formation. We are also able to identify regions of active star formation around these H ii regions that are clearly not influenced by the H ii region expansion, and thus demonstrate that star formation is on-going on megayear timescales in some of these molecular clouds.« less

  12. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  13. Rotation in young massive star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela

    2017-05-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds show that star clusters form from the hierarchical merger of several sub-clumps. We run smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations of turbulence-supported molecular clouds with mass ranging from 1700 to 43 000 M⊙. We study the kinematic evolution of the main cluster that forms in each cloud. We find that the parent gas acquires significant rotation, because of large-scale torques during the process of hierarchical assembly. The stellar component of the embedded star cluster inherits the rotation signature from the parent gas. Only star clusters with final mass < few × 100 M⊙ do not show any clear indication of rotation. Our simulated star clusters have high ellipticity (˜0.4-0.5 at t = 4 Myr) and are subvirial (Qvir ≲ 0.4). The signature of rotation is stronger than radial motions due to subvirial collapse. Our results suggest that rotation is common in embedded massive (≳1000 M⊙) star clusters. This might provide a key observational test for the hierarchical assembly scenario.

  14. Studying the complex spectral line profiles in the spectra of hot emission stars and quasars .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danezis, E.; Lyratzi, E.; Antoniou, A.; Popović, L. Č.; Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Some Hot Emission Stars and AGNs present peculiar spectral line profiles which are due to DACs and SACs phenomena. The origin and the mechanisms which are responsible for the creation of DACs/SACs is an important problem that has been studied by many researchers. This paper is a review of our efforts to study the origin and the mechanisms of these phenomena. At first we present a theoretic ad hoc picture for the structure of the plasma that surrounds the specific category of hot emission stars that present DACs or SACs. Then we present the mathematical model that we constructed, which is based on the properties of the above ad hoc theoretical structure. Finally, we present some results from our statistical studies that prove the consistency of our model with the classical physical theory.

  15. STAR Graduate and GRO Undergraduate Fellowship Recipient List

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's STAR graduate fellowship program supports masters and doctoral candidates in environmental studies. Each year, students in the United States compete for STAR fellowships through a rigorous review process.

  16. Massive-Star Magnetospheres: Now in 3-D!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Richard

    prototyped. Simulation data from these codes will be used to synthesize observables, suitable for comparison with datasets from ground- and space-based facilities. Project results will be disseminated in the form of journal papers, presentations, data and visualizations, to facilitate the broad communication of our results. In addition, we will release the project codes under an open- source license, to encourage other groups' involvement in modeling massive-star magnetospheres. Through furthering our insights into these magnetospheres, the project is congruous with NASA's Strategic Goal 2, 'Expand scientific understanding of the Earth and the universe in which we live'. By making testable predictions of X-ray emission and UV line profiles, it is naturally synergistic with observational studies of magnetic massive stars using NASA's ROSAT, Chandra, IUE and FUSE missions. By exploring magnetic braking, it will have a direct impact on theoretical predictions of collapsar yields, and thereby help drive forward the analysis and interpretation of gamma-ray burst observations by NASA's Swift and Fermi missions. And, through its general contribution toward understanding the lifecycle of massive stars, the project will complement the past, present and future investments in studying these stars using NASA's other space-based observatories.

  17. Tracing the Fuel for Forming Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-11-01

    Huge reservoirs of cold hydrogen gas the raw fuel for star formation lurk in galaxies throughout the universe. A new study examines whether these reservoirs have always been similar, or whether those in distant galaxies are very different from those in local galaxies today.Left: Optical SLOAN images of the five HIGHz galaxies in this study. Right: ALMA images of the molecular gas in these galaxies. Both images are 30 wide. [Adapted from Cortese et al. 2017]Molecular or Atomic?The formation of stars is a crucial process that determines how galaxies are built and evolve over time. Weve observed that star formation takes place in cold clouds of molecular gas, and that star-formation rates increase in galaxies with a larger surface density of molecular hydrogen so we know that molecular hydrogen feeds the star-forming process.But not all cold gas in the interstellar medium of galaxies exists in molecular form. In the local universe, only around 30% of cold gas is found in molecular form (H2) and able to directly feed star formation; the rest is atomic hydrogen (H I). But is this true of galaxies earlier in the universe as well?Studying Distant GalaxiesCosmological simulations have predicted that earlier in our universes history, the ratio of molecular to atomic hydrogen could be larger i.e., more cold hydrogen may be in a form ready to fuel star formation but this prediction is difficult to test observationally. Currently, radio telescopes are not able to measure the atomic hydrogen in very distant galaxies, such as those at the peak of star formation in the universe, 10 billion years ago.Recently, however, we have measured atomic hydrogen in closer galaxies: those at a redshift of about z 0.20.4, a few billion years ago. One recent study of seven galaxies at this distance, usinga sample from a survey known as COOL BUDHIES, showed that the hydrogen reservoirs of these galaxies are dominated by molecular hydrogen, unlike in the local universe. If this is true of most

  18. SALT Spectroscopy of Evolved Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniazev, A. Y.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Berdnikov, L. N.

    2017-06-01

    Long-slit spectroscopy with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) of central stars of mid-infrared nebulae detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) led to the discovery of numerous candidate luminous blue variables (cLBVs) and other rare evolved massive stars. With the recent advent of the SALT fiber-fed high-resolution echelle spectrograph (HRS), a new perspective for the study of these interesting objects is appeared. Using the HRS we obtained spectra of a dozen newly identified massive stars. Some results on the recently identified cLBV Hen 3-729 are presented.

  19. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems.

    PubMed

    Postnov, Konstantin A; Yungelson, Lev R

    2006-01-01

    We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs), neutron stars (NSs), and black holes (BHs). Binary NSs and BHs are thought to be the primary astrophysical sources of gravitational waves (GWs) within the frequency band of ground-based detectors, while compact binaries of WDs are important sources of GWs at lower frequencies to be covered by space interferometers (LISA). Major uncertainties in the current understanding of properties of NSs and BHs most relevant to the GW studies are discussed, including the treatment of the natal kicks which compact stellar remnants acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution. We discuss the coalescence rates of binary NSs and BHs and prospects for their detections, the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations. Special attention is given to AM CVn-stars - compact binaries in which the Roche lobe is filled by another WD or a low-mass partially degenerate helium-star, as these stars are thought to be the best LISA verification binary GW sources.

  20. A Star on the Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Usually stars that are born together tend to move together but sometimes stars can go rogue and run away from their original birthplace. A pair of astronomers have now discovered the first runaway red supergiant (RSG) ever identified in another galaxy. With a radial velocity discrepancy of 300 km/s, its also the fastest runaway massive star known. Discrepant Speeds: When massive stars form in giant molecular clouds, they create what are known as OB associations: groups of hot, massive, short-lived stars that have similar velocities because theyre moving through space together. But sometimes stars that appear to be part of an OB association dont have the same velocity as the rest of the group. These stars are called runaways.What causes an OB star to run away is still debated, but we know that a fairly significant fraction of OB stars are runaways. In spite of this, surprisingly few runaways have been found that are evolved massive stars i.e., the post-main-sequence state of OB stars. This is presumably because these evolved stars have had more time to move away from their birthplace, and its more difficult to identify a runaway without the context of its original group. An Evolved Runaway: Difference between observed velocity and expected velocity, plotted as a function of expected velocity. The black points are foreground stars. The red points are expected RSGs, clustered around a velocity difference of zero. The green pentagon is the runaway RSG J004330.06+405258.4. [Evans Massey 2015]Despite this challenge, a recent survey of RSGs in the galaxy M31 has led to the detection of a massive star on the run! Kate Evans (Lowell Observatory and California Institute of Technology) and Philip Massey (Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University) discovered that RSG J004330.06+405258.4 is moving through the Andromeda Galaxy with a radial velocity thats off by about 300 km/s from the radial velocity expected for its location.Evans and Massey discovered this rogue star

  1. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or 'protoplanetary disk,' that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars.

    Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, these molecules can be found on charred barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust. Blue specks sprinkled throughout the image are background stars in our Milky Way galaxy.

    The Serpens star-forming region is located approximately 848 light-years away in the Serpens constellation.

    The image is a three-channel, false-color composite, where emission at 4.5 microns is blue, emission at 8.0 microns is green, and 24 micron emission is red.

  2. Photometric Variability of the Be Star Population

    SciTech Connect

    Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Pepper, Joshua; McSwain, M. Virginia

    2017-06-01

    Be stars have generally been characterized by the emission lines in their spectra, and especially the time variability of those spectroscopic features. They are known to also exhibit photometric variability at multiple timescales, but have not been broadly compared and analyzed by that behavior. We have taken advantage of the advent of wide-field, long-baseline, and high-cadence photometric surveys that search for transiting exoplanets to perform a comprehensive analysis of brightness variations among a large number of known Be stars. The photometric data comes from the KELT transit survey, with a typical cadence of 30 minutes, a baseline of up to 10more » years, photometric precision of about 1%, and coverage of about 60% of the sky. We analyze KELT light curves of 610 known Be stars in both the northern and southern hemispheres in an effort to study their variability. Consistent with other studies of Be star variability, we find most of the stars to be photometrically variable. We derive lower limits on the fraction of stars in our sample that exhibit features consistent with non-radial pulsations (25%), outbursts (36%), and long-term trends in the circumstellar disk (37%), and show how these are correlated with spectral sub-types. Other types of variability, such as those owing to binarity, are also explored. Simultaneous spectroscopy for some of these systems from the Be Star Spectra database allow us to better understand the physical causes for the observed variability, especially in cases of outbursts and changes in the disk.« less

  3. First Spectra of O Stars in R136A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Sara

    1994-01-01

    Hubble images of the cluster, R136a, in the LMC indicate that the cluster contains 3 Wolf-Rayet stars, R136a1,-a2, and a3 (Campbell et al. 1992) and numerous O and B-type stars. Although models for WR stars are not well enough developed to infer the basic parameters of the 3 WR stars in R136a, models for O stars are well well established, and they suggest that the O stars in R136a are relatively normal, having initial masses no higher than 60 Msun (Heap et al. 1992, Malumuth & Heap 1992, di Marchi et al. 1993); there are no unusual "super-massive" stars in R136a. With HST/GHRS/CoSTAR, it will be possible to obtain spectra of an O star in R136a without contam- ination by WR stars. These spectra will be able to confirm or invalidate the photometric results. Thus, these spectra will have implications both for the population of R136a and for the validity of stellar population studies of giant extragalactic HII regions and starbursts that are based entirely on photometry.

  4. Building Blocks of Dust and Large Organic Molecules: a Coordinated Laboratory and Astronomical Study of AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael C.; Gottlieb, Carl A.; Cernicharo, Jose

    2017-06-01

    The increased sensitivity and angular resolution of high-altitude ground-based interferometers in the sub-millimeter band has enabled the physics and chemistry of carbon- and oxygen-rich evolved stars to be re-examined at an unprecedented level of detail. Observations of rotational lines in the inner envelope - the region within a few stellar radii of the central star where the molecular seeds of dust are formed - allows one to critically assess models of dust growth. Interferometric observations of the outer envelope provide stringent tests of neutral and ionized molecule formation. All of the astronomical studies are crucially dependent on precise laboratory measurements of the rotational spectra of new species and of vibrationally excited levels of known molecules and their rare isotopic species. By means of a closely coordinated laboratory and astronomical program, a number of exotic species including the disilicon carbide SiCSi, titanium oxides TiO and TiO_2, and carbon chain anions ranging from CN^- to C_8H^- have recently been observed in evolved stars. This talk will provide overview of these findings, and how they impact current models of the ``chemical laboratories'' of evolved stars. Ongoing laboratory studies of small silicon-bearing molecules such as H_2SiO_2 and vibrationally excited SiC_2 will be highlighted.

  5. Metal-poor star formation triggered by the feedback effects from Pop III stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaki, Gen; Susa, Hajime; Hirano, Shingo

    2018-04-01

    Metal enrichment by first-generation (Pop III) stars is the very first step of the matter cycle in structure formation and it is followed by the formation of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. To investigate the enrichment process by Pop III stars, we carry out a series of numerical simulations including the feedback effects of photoionization and supernovae (SNe) of Pop III stars with a range of masses of minihaloes (MHs), Mhalo, and Pop III stars, MPopIII. We find that the metal-rich ejecta reach neighbouring haloes and external enrichment (EE) occurs when the H II region expands before the SN explosion. The neighbouring haloes are only superficially enriched, and the metallicity of the clouds is [Fe/H] < -5. Otherwise, the SN ejecta fall back and recollapse to form an enriched cloud, i.e. an internal-enrichment (IE) process takes place. In the case where a Pop III star explodes as a core-collapse SN (CCSN), the MH undergoes IE, and the metallicity in the recollapsing region is -5 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -3 in most cases. We conclude that IE from a single CCSN can explain the formation of EMP stars. For pair-instability SNe (PISNe), EE takes place for all relevant mass ranges of MHs, consistent with the lack of observational signs of PISNe among EMP stars.

  6. The turbulent formation of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph

    2018-06-01

    How stars are born from clouds of gas is a rich physics problem whose solution will inform our understanding of not just stars but also planets, galaxies, and the universe itself. Star formation is stupendously inefficient. Take the Milky Way. Our galaxy contains about a billion solar masses of fresh gas available to form stars-and yet it produces only one solar mass of new stars a year. Accounting for that inefficiency is one of the biggest challenges of modern astrophysics. Why should we care about star formation? Because the process powers the evolution of galaxies and sets the initial conditions for planet formation and thus, ultimately, for life.

  7. Spectroscopic study of formation, evolution and interaction of M31 and M33 with star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhou; Yang, Yanbin

    2016-02-01

    The recent studies show that the formation and evolution process of the nearby galaxies are still unclear. By using the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) 3.6m telescope, the PanDAS shows complicated substructures (dwarf satellite galaxies, halo globular clusters, extended clusters, star streams, etc.) in the halo of M31 to ~150 kpc from the center of galaxy and M31-M33 interaction has been studied. In our work, we would like to investigate formation, evolution and interaction of M31 and M33, which are the nearest two spiral galaxies in Local Group. The star cluster systems of the two galaxies are good tracers to study the dynamics of the substructures and the interaction. Since 2010, the Xinglong 2.16m, Lijiang 2.4m and MMT 6.5m telescopes have been used for our spectroscopic observations. The radial velocities and Lick absorption-line indices can thus be measured with the spectroscopy and then ages, metallicities and masses of the star clusters can be fitted with the simple stellar population models. These parameters could be used as the input physical parameters for numerical simulations of M31-M33 interaction.

  8. Living with a Red Dwarf: A Chandra Archival Study of dM Star Activity and Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Scott

    2017-09-01

    We propose to analyze 6 archival Chandra visits, not pointed at, but serendipitously including 3 dM stars of known age. GJ 669 AB are a common proper motion pair, each are resolved and detected in 3 exposures, and LHS 373 is a much older dM star also detected on 3 exposures. Photometry (by us) of GJ 669 AB began 5 years ago, is ongoing, and has precisely determined rotation rates for both stars and evidence of frequent flaring from GJ 669 B. We will analyze the multiple exposures, derive an accurate mean level of X-ray activity from the targets, and also separate out and individually analyze and model any observed X-ray flares. This proposal will provide highly accurate coronal properties for the targets, but also very useful data for stellar evolution and planetary habitability studies<