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Sample records for starch synthase iv

  1. Blue maize: morphology and starch synthase characterization of starch granule.

    PubMed

    Utrilla-Coello, Rubi G; Agama-Acevedo, Edith; de la Rosa, Ana Paulina Barba; Martinez-Salgado, Jose L; Rodriguez-Ambriz, Sandra L; Bello-Perez, Luis A

    2009-03-01

    The use of pigmented maize varieties has increased due to their high anthocyanins content, but very few studies are reported about the starch properties of these grains. The aim of this work was to isolate the starch granules from pigmented blue maize and carry out the morphological, physicochemical, and biochemical characterization studies. The proximate composition of starch granules showed high protein contents, after purification, the blue maize starch presented lower protein amount than starch from white maize (control). Although the purity of starch granules was increased, the damaged starch (determined for the Maltase cross absence) was also increased. Scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of some pores and channels in the blue maize starch. The electrophoretic protein profiles showed differences in the bands that correspond to the enzymes involved in the starch biosynthesis; these differences could explain the variation in morphological characteristics of blue maize starches against starch from white maize.

  2. Critical roles of soluble starch synthase SSIIIa and granule-bound starch synthase Waxy in synthesizing resistant starch in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongju; Wang, Lijun; Liu, Guifu; Meng, Xiangbing; Jing, Yanhui; Shu, Xiaoli; Kong, Xiangli; Sun, Jian; Yu, Hong; Smith, Steven M.; Wu, Dianxing; Li, Jiayang

    2016-01-01

    Changes in human lifestyle and food consumption have resulted in a large increase in the incidence of type-2 diabetes, obesity, and colon disease, especially in Asia. These conditions are a growing threat to human health, but consumption of foods high in resistant starch (RS) can potentially reduce their incidence. Strategies to increase RS in rice are limited by a lack of knowledge of its molecular basis. Through map-based cloning of a RS locus in indica rice, we have identified a defective soluble starch synthase gene (SSIIIa) responsible for RS production and further showed that RS production is dependent on the high expression of the Waxya (Wxa) allele, which is prevalent in indica varieties. The resulting RS has modified granule structure; high amylose, lipid, and amylose–lipid complex; and altered physicochemical properties. This discovery provides an opportunity to increase RS content of cooked rice, especially in the indica varieties, which predominates in southern Asia. PMID:27791174

  3. In vitro Biochemical Characterization of All Barley Endosperm Starch Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M.; Ruzanski, Christian; Krucewicz, Katarzyna; Beeren, Sophie R.; Rydhal, Maja G.; Yoshimura, Yayoi; Striebeck, Alexander; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Willats, William G. T.; Palcic, Monica M.

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the main storage polysaccharide in cereals and the major source of calories in the human diet. It is synthesized by a panel of enzymes including five classes of starch synthases (SSs). While the overall starch synthase (SS) reaction is known, the functional differences between the five SS classes are poorly understood. Much of our knowledge comes from analyzing mutant plants with altered SS activities, but the resulting data are often difficult to interpret as a result of pleitropic effects, competition between enzymes, overlaps in enzyme activity and disruption of multi-enzyme complexes. Here we provide a detailed biochemical study of the activity of all five classes of SSs in barley endosperm. Each enzyme was produced recombinantly in E. coli and the properties and modes of action in vitro were studied in isolation from other SSs and other substrate modifying activities. Our results define the mode of action of each SS class in unprecedented detail; we analyze their substrate selection, temperature dependence and stability, substrate affinity and temporal abundance during barley development. Our results are at variance with some generally accepted ideas about starch biosynthesis and might lead to the reinterpretation of results obtained in planta. In particular, they indicate that granule bound SS is capable of processive action even in the absence of a starch matrix, that SSI has no elongation limit, and that SSIV, believed to be critical for the initiation of starch granules, has maltoligosaccharides and not polysaccharides as its preferred substrates. PMID:26858729

  4. Morphological, Thermal, and Rheological Properties of Starches from Maize Mutants Deficient in Starch Synthase III.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Bertoft, Eric; Li, Guantian

    2016-08-31

    Morphological, thermal, and rheological properties of starches from maize mutants deficient in starch synthase III (SSIII) with a common genetic background (W64A) were studied and compared with the wild type. SSIII deficiency reduced granule size of the starches from 16.7 to ∼11 μm (volume-weighted mean). Thermal analysis showed that SSIII deficiency decreased the enthalpy change of starch during gelatinization. Steady shear analysis showed that SSIII deficiency decreased the consistency coefficient and yield stress during steady shearing, whereas additional deficiency in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) increased these values. Dynamic oscillatory analysis showed that SSIII deficiency decreased G' at 90 °C during heating and increased it when the paste was cooled to 25 °C at 40 Hz during a frequency sweep. Additional GBSS deficiency further decreased the G'. Structural and compositional bases responsible for these changes in physical properties of the starches are discussed. This study highlighted the relationship between SSIII and some physicochemical properties of maize starch.

  5. Distribution of branches in whole starches from maize mutants deficient in starch synthase III.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Bertoft, Eric; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2014-05-21

    An earlier study explored the possibility of analyzing the distribution of branches directly in native, whole starch without isolating the amylopectin component. The aim of this study was to explore if this approach can be extended to include starch mutants. Whole starches from du1 maize mutants deficient in starch synthase III (SSIII) with amylose content of ∼30-40% were characterized and compared with the wild type of the common genetic background W64A. Clusters were produced from whole starch by hydrolysis with α-amylase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Their compositions of building blocks and chains were analyzed further by complete α-amylolysis and by debranching, respectively, whereafter the products were subjected to gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. The size and structure of the clusters were compared with those of their isolated amylopectin component. Whereas the whole starch of the wild type sample had a branched structure similar to that of its amylopectin component, the results showed that the du1 mutation resulted in more singly branched building blocks in the whole starch compared to the isolated amylopectin. This suggested that amylose and/or intermediate materials in whole du1 starches likely contributed to the composition of branches. This study explored an alternative procedure to characterize the composition of branches in the whole starch without fractionating the components.

  6. Creation of a high-amylose durum wheat through mutagenesis of starch synthase II (SSIIa)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In cereal seeds mutations in one or more starch synthases lead to decreased amylopectin and increased amylose content. Here, the impact of starch synthase IIa (SSIIa or SGP-1) mutations upon durum starch was investigated. A screen of durum accessions identified two lines lacking SGP-A1, the A geno...

  7. Mutations Affecting Starch Synthase III in Arabidopsis Alter Leaf Starch Structure and Increase the Rate of Starch Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Myers, Alan M.; James, Martha G.

    2005-01-01

    The role of starch synthase (SS) III (SSIII) in the synthesis of transient starch in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was investigated by characterizing the effects of two insertion mutations at the AtSS3 gene locus. Both mutations, termed Atss3-1 and Atss3-2, condition complete loss of SSIII activity and prevent normal gene expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The mutations cause a starch excess phenotype in leaves during the light period of the growth cycle due to an apparent increase in the rate of starch synthesis. In addition, both mutations alter the physical structure of leaf starch. Significant increases were noted in the mutants in the frequency of linear chains in amylopectin with a degree of polymerization greater than approximately 60, and relatively small changes were observed in chains of degree of polymerization 4 to 50. Furthermore, starch in the Atss3-1 and Atss3-2 mutants has a higher phosphate content, approximately two times that of wild-type leaf starch. Total SS activity is increased in both Atss3 mutants and a specific SS activity appears to be up-regulated. The data indicate that, in addition to its expected direct role in starch assembly, SSIII also has a negative regulatory function in the biosynthesis of transient starch in Arabidopsis. PMID:15908598

  8. Effects of homoeologous wheat starch synthase IIa genes on starch properties.

    PubMed

    Shimbata, Tomoya; Ai, Yongfeng; Fujita, Masaya; Inokuma, Takayuki; Vrinten, Patricia; Sunohara, Ai; Saito, Mika; Takiya, Toshiyuki; Jane, Jay-lin; Nakamura, Toshiki

    2012-12-05

    Near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the eight haplotypes of starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) were used to analyze the effects of SSIIa gene dosage on branch chain length, gelatinization, pasting, retrogradation, and enzymatic hydrolysis of starches. Compared to wild-type, the amylopectin of lines missing one or more active SSIIa enzymes had increases in the proportion of short branch chains (DP6-10) and decreases in midlength chains (DP11-24), and the size of these differences depended on the dosage of active SSIIa enzymes. Of the three loci, SSIIa-A1 had the smallest contribution to amylopectin structure and SSIIa-B1 the largest. The different effects of the three SSIIa enzymes on starch properties were also seen in gelatinization, retrogradation, pasting, and enzymatic hydrolysis properties. Such differences in starch properties might be useful in influencing the texture and shelf life of food products.

  9. Physical association of starch biosynthetic enzymes with starch granules of maize endosperm. Granule-associated forms of starch synthase I and starch branching enzyme II.

    PubMed Central

    Mu-Forster, C; Huang, R; Powers, J R; Harriman, R W; Knight, M; Singletary, G W; Keeling, P L; Wasserman, B P

    1996-01-01

    Antibodies were used to probe the degree of association of starch biosynthetic enzymes with starch granules isolated from maize (Zea mays) endosperm. Graded washings of the starch granule, followed by release of polypeptides by gelatinization in 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate, enables distinction between strongly and loosely adherent proteins. Mild aqueous washing of granules resulted in near-complete solubilization of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, indicating that little, if any, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is granule associated. In contrast, all of the waxy protein plus significant levels of starch synthase I and starch branching enzyme II (BEII) remained granule associated. Stringent washings using protease and detergent demonstrated that the waxy protein, more than 85% total endosperm starch synthase I protein, and more than 45% of BEII protein were strongly associated with starch granules. Rates of polypeptide accumulation within starch granules remained constant during endosperm development. Soluble and granule-derived forms of BEII yielded identical peptide maps and overlapping tryptic fragments closely aligned with deduced amino acid sequences from BEII cDNA clones. These observations provide direct evidence that BEII exits as both soluble and granule-associated entities. We conclude that each of the known starch biosynthetic enzymes in maize endosperm exhibits a differential propensity to associate with, or to become irreversibly entrapped within, the starch granule. PMID:8754683

  10. Effects of starch synthase IIa gene dosage on grain, protein and starch in endosperm of wheat.

    PubMed

    Konik-Rose, Christine; Thistleton, Jenny; Chanvrier, Helene; Tan, Ihwa; Halley, Peter; Gidley, Michael; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Wang, Hong; Larroque, Oscar; Ikea, Joseph; McMaugh, Steve; Regina, Ahmed; Rahman, Sadequr; Morell, Matthew; Li, Zhongyi

    2007-11-01

    Starch synthases (SS) are responsible for elongating the alpha-1,4 glucan chains of starch. A doubled haploid population was generated by crossing a line of wheat, which lacks functional ssIIa genes on each genome (abd), and an Australian wheat cultivar, Sunco, with wild type ssIIa alleles on each genome (ABD). Evidence has been presented previously indicating that the SGP-1 (starch granule protein-1) proteins present in the starch granule in wheat are products of the ssIIa genes. Analysis of 100 progeny lines demonstrated co-segregation of the ssIIa alleles from the three genomes with the SGP-1 proteins, providing further evidence that the SGP-1 proteins are the products of the ssIIa genes. From the progeny lines, 40 doubled haploid lines representing the eight possible genotypes for SSIIa (ABD, aBD, AbD, ABd, abD, aBd, Abd, abd) were characterized for their grain weight, protein content, total starch content and starch properties. For some properties (chain length distribution, pasting properties, swelling power, and gelatinization properties), a progressive change was observed across the four classes of genotypes (wild type, single nulls, double nulls and triple nulls). However, for other grain properties (seed weight and protein content) and starch properties (total starch content, granule morphology and crystallinity, granule size distribution, amylose content, amylose-lipid dissociation properties), a statistically significant change only occurred for the triple nulls, indicating that all three genes had to be missing or inactive for a change to occur. These results illustrate the importance of SSIIa in controlling grain and starch properties and the importance of amylopectin fine structure in controlling starch granule properties in wheat.

  11. Gelatinization temperature of rice explained by polymorphisms in starch synthase.

    PubMed

    Waters, Daniel L E; Henry, Robert J; Reinke, Russell F; Fitzgerald, Melissa A

    2006-01-01

    The cooking quality of rice is associated with the starch gelatinization temperature (GT). Rice genotypes with low GT have probably been selected for their cooking quality by humans during domestication. We now report polymorphisms in starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) that explain the variation in rice starch GT. Sequence analysis of the eight exons of SSIIa identified significant polymorphism in only exon 8. These single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were determined in 70 diverse genotypes of rice. Two SNPs could classify all 70 genotypes into either high GT or low GT types which differed in GT by 8 degrees C. 'A' rather than 'G' at base 2412 determined whether a methionine or valine was present at the corresponding amino acid residue in SSIIa, whilst two adjacent SNPs at bases 2543 and 2544 coded for either leucine (GC) or phenylalanine (TT). Rice varieties with high GT starch had a combination of valine and leucine at these residues. In contrast, rice varieties with low GT starch had a combination of either methionine and leucine or valine and phenylalanine at these same residues. At least two distinct polymorphisms have apparently been selected for their desirable cooking qualities in the domestication of rice.

  12. Branching patterns in leaf starches from Arabidopsis mutants deficient in diverse starch synthases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Bertoft, Eric; Szydlowski, Nicolas; d'Hulst, Christophe; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2015-01-12

    This is the first report on the cluster structure of transitory starch from Arabidopsis leaves. In addition to wild type, the molecular structures of leaf starch from mutants deficient in starch synthases (SS) including single enzyme mutants ss1-, ss2-, or ss3-, and also double mutants ss1-ss2- and ss1-ss3- were characterized. The mutations resulted in increased amylose content. Clusters from whole starch were isolated by partial hydrolysis using α-amylase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The clusters were then further hydrolyzed with concentrated α-amylase of B. amyloliquefaciens to produce building blocks (α-limit dextrins). Structures of the clusters and their building blocks were characterized by chromatography of samples before and after debranching treatment. While the mutations increased the size of clusters, the reasons were different as reflected by the composition of their unit chains and building blocks. In general, all mutants contained more of a-chains that preferentially increased the number of small building blocks with only two chains. The clusters of the double mutant ss1-ss3- were very large and possessed also more of large building blocks with four or more chains. The results from transitory starch are compared with those from agriculturally important crops in the context that to what extent the Arabidopsis can be a true biotechnological reflection for starch modifications through genetic means. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Production of a freeze-thaw-stable potato starch by antisense inhibition of three starch synthase genes.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Stephen A; Westcott, Roger J; Tayal, Akash; Jeffcoat, Roger; Schwall, Gerhard P

    2002-03-01

    The use of unmodified starches in frozen foods is severely limited by the undesirable textural changes that occur after freezing and thawing. Retrogradation of glucan chains leads to syneresis, a separation of the starch gel and water phases. Stabilization of the starch structure is normally achieved by chemical modification to prevent these changes from occurring. We have now created a freeze-thaw-stable potato starch by alteration of starch composition and structure by genetic modification. An amylose-free starch with short-chain amylopectin was produced by simultaneous antisense downregulation of three starch synthase genes. This starch is extremely freeze-thaw-stable and shows no syneresis even after five freeze-thaw cycles. The use of this starch has potential for environmental and consumer benefits because its production requires no chemical modification.

  14. Starch synthase 4 is essential for coordination of starch granule formation with chloroplast division during Arabidopsis leaf expansion

    PubMed Central

    Crumpton-Taylor, Matilda; Pike, Marilyn; Lu, Kuan-Jen; Hylton, Christopher M; Feil, Regina; Eicke, Simona; Lunn, John E; Zeeman, Samuel C; Smith, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking the SS4 isoform of starch synthase have strongly reduced numbers of starch granules per chloroplast, suggesting that SS4 is necessary for the normal generation of starch granules. To establish whether it plays a direct role in this process, we investigated the circumstances in which granules are formed in ss4 mutants. Starch granule numbers and distribution and the accumulation of starch synthase substrates and products were investigated during ss4 leaf development, and in ss4 mutants carrying mutations or transgenes that affect starch turnover or chloroplast volume. We found that immature ss4 leaves have no starch granules, but accumulate high concentrations of the starch synthase substrate ADPglucose. Granule numbers are partially restored by elevating the capacity for glucan synthesis (via expression of bacterial glycogen synthase) or by increasing the volumes of individual chloroplasts (via introduction of arc mutations). However, these granules are abnormal in distribution, size and shape. SS4 is an essential component of a mechanism that coordinates granule formation with chloroplast division during leaf expansion and determines the abundance and the flattened, discoid shape of leaf starch granules. PMID:23952675

  15. Class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases and PHA-producing Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Takeharu; Hyakutake, Manami; Mizuno, Kouhei

    2015-08-01

    This review highlights the recent investigations of class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases, the newest classification of PHA synthases. Class IV synthases are prevalent in organisms of the Bacillus genus and are composed of a catalytic subunit PhaC (approximately 40 kDa), which has a PhaC box sequence ([GS]-X-C-X-[GA]-G) at the active site, and a second subunit PhaR (approximately 20 kDa). The representative PHA-producing Bacillus strains are Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus; the nucleotide sequence of phaC and the genetic organization of the PHA biosynthesis gene locus are somewhat different between these two strains. It is generally considered that class IV synthases favor short-chain-length monomers such as 3-hydroxybutyrate (C4) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (C5) for polymerization, but can polymerize some unusual monomers as minor components. In Escherichia coli expressing PhaRC from B. cereus YB-4, the biosynthesized PHA undergoes synthase-catalyzed alcoholytic cleavage using endogenous and exogenous alcohols. This alcoholysis is thought to be shared among class IV synthases, and this reaction is useful not only for the regulation of PHA molecular weight but also for the modification of the PHA carboxy terminus. The novel properties of class IV synthases will open up the possibility for the design of new PHA materials.

  16. Two Distinct Waxy Alleles Impact the Granule-Bound Starch Synthase in Sorghum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) is the enzyme responsible for amylose synthesis in starch granules. Loss of GBSS activity results in starch granules containing mostly amylopectin and little or no amylose, a phenotype described as waxy. Previously, two phenotypic classes of waxy alleles we...

  17. Starch biosynthesis in rice endosperm requires the presence of either starch synthase I or IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naoko; Satoh, Rui; Hayashi, Aki; Kodama, Momoko; Itoh, Rumiko; Aihara, Satomi; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Starch synthase (SS) I and IIIa are the first and second largest components of total soluble SS activity, respectively, in developing japonica rice (Oryza sativa L.) endosperm. To elucidate the distinct and overlapping functions of these enzymes, double mutants were created by crossing the ss1 null mutant with the ss3a null mutant. In the F2 generation, two opaque seed types were found to have either the ss1ss1/SS3ass3a or the SS1ss1/ss3ass3a genotype. Phenotypic analyses revealed lower SS activity in the endosperm of these lines than in those of the parent mutant lines since these seeds had different copies of SSI and SSIIIa genes in a heterozygous state. The endosperm of the two types of opaque seeds contained the unique starch with modified fine structure, round-shaped starch granules, high amylose content, and specific physicochemical properties. The seed weight was ∼90% of that of the wild type. The amount of granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) and the activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) were higher than in the wild type and parent mutant lines. The double-recessive homozygous mutant prepared from both ss1 and ss3a null mutants was considered sterile, while the mutant produced by the leaky ss1 mutant×ss3a null mutant cross was fertile. This present study strongly suggests that at least SSI or SSIIIa is required for starch biosynthesis in rice endosperm. PMID:21730357

  18. Degradation of Glucan Primers in the Absence of Starch Synthase 4 Disrupts Starch Granule Initiation in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuan-Jen; Stettler, Michaela; Streb, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis leaf chloroplasts typically contain five to seven semicrystalline starch granules. It is not understood how the synthesis of each granule is initiated or how starch granule number is determined within each chloroplast. An Arabidopsis mutant lacking the glucosyl-transferase, STARCH SYNTHASE 4 (SS4) is impaired in its ability to initiate starch granules; its chloroplasts rarely contain more than one large granule, and the plants have a pale appearance and reduced growth. Here we report that the chloroplastic α-amylase AMY3, a starch-degrading enzyme, interferes with granule initiation in the ss4 mutant background. The amy3 single mutant is similar in phenotype to the wild type under normal growth conditions, with comparable numbers of starch granules per chloroplast. Interestingly, the ss4 mutant displays a pleiotropic reduction in the activity of AMY3. Remarkably, complete abolition of AMY3 (in the amy3 ss4 double mutant) increases the number of starch granules produced in each chloroplast, suppresses the pale phenotype of ss4, and nearly restores normal growth. The amy3 mutation also restores starch synthesis in the ss3 ss4 double mutant, which lacks STARCH SYNTHASE 3 (SS3) in addition to SS4. The ss3 ss4 line is unable to initiate any starch granules and is thus starchless. We suggest that SS4 plays a key role in granule initiation, allowing it to proceed in a way that avoids premature degradation of primers by starch hydrolases, such as AMY3. PMID:27458017

  19. Deficiency of Starch Synthase IIIa and IVb Alters Starch Granule Morphology from Polyhedral to Spherical in Rice Endosperm1

    PubMed Central

    Toyosawa, Yoshiko; Kawagoe, Yasushi; Matsushima, Ryo; Ogawa, Masahiro; Fukuda, Masako; Kumamaru, Toshihiro; Okazaki, Yozo; Kusano, Miyako; Saito, Kazuki; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sato, Mayuko; Ai, Yongfeng; Fujita, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Starch granule morphology differs markedly among plant species. However, the mechanisms controlling starch granule morphology have not been elucidated. Rice (Oryza sativa) endosperm produces characteristic compound-type granules containing dozens of polyhedral starch granules within an amyloplast. Some other cereal species produce simple-type granules, in which only one starch granule is present per amyloplast. A double mutant rice deficient in the starch synthase (SS) genes SSIIIa and SSIVb (ss3a ss4b) produced spherical starch granules, whereas the parental single mutants produced polyhedral starch granules similar to the wild type. The ss3a ss4b amyloplasts contained compound-type starch granules during early developmental stages, and spherical granules were separated from each other during subsequent amyloplast development and seed dehydration. Analysis of glucan chain length distribution identified overlapping roles for SSIIIa and SSIVb in amylopectin chain synthesis, with a degree of polymerization of 42 or greater. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy of wild-type developing rice seeds revealed that the majority of SSIVb was localized between starch granules. Therefore, we propose that SSIIIa and SSIVb have crucial roles in determining starch granule morphology and in maintaining the amyloplast envelope structure. We present a model of spherical starch granule production. PMID:26747287

  20. Molecular Evolution and Functional Divergence of Soluble Starch Synthase Genes in Cassava (Manihot Esculenta Crantz)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Yifan; Xu, Shuhui; Xu, Chenwu; Yan, Changjie

    2013-01-01

    Soluble starch synthases (SSs) are major enzymes involved in starch biosynthesis in plants. Cassava starch has many remarkable characteristics, which should be influenced by the evolution of SS genes in this starchy root crop. In this work, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of the soluble starch synthases in cassava. Genome-wide identification showed that there are 9 genes encoding soluble starch synthases in cassava. All of the soluble starch synthases encoded by these genes contain both Glyco_transf_5 and Glycos_transf_1 domains, and a correlation analysis showed evidence of coevolution between these 2 domains in cassava SS genes. The SS genes in land plants can be divided into 6 subfamilies that were formed before the origin of seed plants, and species-specific expansion has contributed to the evolution of this family in cassava. A functional divergence analysis for this family provided statistical evidence for shifted evolutionary rates between the subfamilies of land plant soluble starch synthases. Although the main selective pressure acting on land plant SS genes was purifying selection, our results also revealed that point mutation with positive selection contributed to the evolution of 2 SS genes in cassava. The remarkable cassava starch characteristics might be the result of both the duplication and adaptive selection of SS genes. PMID:23888108

  1. Molecular structure of starches from maize mutants deficient in starch synthase III.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Bertoft, Eric; Källman, Anna; Myers, Alan M; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2013-10-16

    Molecular structures of starches from dull1 maize mutants deficient in starch synthase III (SSIII) with a common genetic background (W64A) were characterized and compared with the wild type. Amylose content with altered structure was higher in the nonwaxy mutants (25.4-30.2%) compared to the wild type maize (21.5%) as revealed by gel permeation chromatography. Superlong chains of the amylopectin component were found in all nonwaxy samples. Unit chain length distribution of amylopectins and their φ,β-limit dextrins (reflecting amylopectin internal structure) from dull1 mutants were also characterized by anion-exchange chromatography after debranching. Deficiency of SSIII led to an increased amount of short chains (DP ≤36 in amylopectin), whereas the content of long chains decreased from 8.4% to between 3.1 and 3.7% in both amylopectin and φ,β-limit dextrins. Moreover, both the external and internal chain lengths decreased, suggesting a difference in their cluster structures. Whereas the molar ratio of A:B-chains was similar in all samples (1.1-1.2), some ratios of chain categories were affected by the absence of SSIII, notably the ratio of "fingerprint" A-chains to "clustered" A-chains. This study highlighted the relationship between SSIII and the internal molecular structure of maize starch.

  2. Wheat genome specific granule-bound starch synthase I differentially influence grain starch synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Geetika; Jaiswal, Sarita; Hucl, Pierre; Chibbar, Ravindra N

    2014-12-19

    Wheat grain development is a complex process and is characterized by changes in physicochemical and structural properties of starch. The present study deals with endosperm starch physicochemical properties and structure during development in different granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) null also known as waxy (Wx) genotypes. The study was conducted with pure starch isolated from wheat grains at 3-30 days post anthesis (DPA), at 3-day intervals. Amylose concentration increased throughout grain development in non-waxy (7.2-30.5%) and partial waxy genotypes (6.0-26.8%). Completely waxy genotype showed 7.0% amylose at 3 and 6 DPA, which declined during development and reached non-detectable quantities by 30 DPA. Amylopectin structure had a higher content of short chains at 3 DPA, which decreased continuously until 12 DPA, after which there were only minor changes in amylopectin chain length distribution. Similarly, the average degree of polymerization (DP) increased from 3 DPA (12.3) to 12 DPA (15.0), and then did not differ significantly up to 30 DPA (15.0). This suggests the formation of basic amylopectin architecture in wheat by 12 DPA. Wx-B and Wx-D affected amylopectin short chains mostly of DP 6-8 at 3 and 6 DPA. Wx-A affected the same fraction of chains at 9 and 12 DPA, and Wx-D affected DP 18-25 chains from 18 to 30 DPA, suggesting differential effect of waxy isoproteins on amylopectin structure formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Starch phosphorylation in potato tubers is influenced by allelic variation in the genes encoding glucan water dikinase, starch branching enzymes I and II, and starch synthase III.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Margaret A; Joyce, Nigel I; Genet, Russell A; Cooper, Rebecca D; Murray, Sarah R; Noble, Alasdair D; Butler, Ruth C; Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail M

    2015-01-01

    Starch phosphorylation is an important aspect of plant metabolism due to its role in starch degradation. Moreover, the degree of phosphorylation of starch determines its physicochemical properties and is therefore relevant for industrial uses of starch. Currently, starch is chemically phosphorylated to increase viscosity and paste stability. Potato cultivars with elevated starch phosphorylation would make this process unnecessary, thereby bestowing economic and environmental benefits. Starch phosphorylation is a complex trait which has been previously shown by antisense gene repression to be influenced by a number of genes including those involved in starch synthesis and degradation. We have used an association mapping approach to discover genetic markers associated with the degree of starch phosphorylation. A diverse collection of 193 potato lines was grown in replicated field trials, and the levels of starch phosphorylation at the C6 and C3 positions of the glucosyl residues were determined by mass spectrometry of hydrolyzed starch from tubers. In addition, the potato lines were genotyped by amplicon sequencing and microsatellite analysis, focusing on candidate genes known to be involved in starch synthesis. As potato is an autotetraploid, genotyping included determination of allele dosage. Significant associations (p < 0.001) were found with SNPs in the glucan water dikinase (GWD), starch branching enzyme I (SBEI) and the starch synthase III (SSIII) genes, and with a SSR allele in the SBEII gene. SNPs in the GWD gene were associated with C6 phosphorylation, whereas polymorphisms in the SBEI and SBEII genes were associated with both C6 and C3 phosphorylation and the SNP in the SSIII gene was associated with C3 phosphorylation. These allelic variants have potential as genetic markers for starch phosphorylation in potato.

  4. In vitro studies of enzymatic properties of starch synthases and interactions between starch synthase I and starch branching enzymes from rice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasunori; Aihara, Satomi; Crofts, Naoko; Sawada, Takayuki; Fujita, Naoko

    2014-07-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the functions of the major starch synthase (SS) isozymes SSI, SSIIa, and SSIIIa in rice endosperm and their functional interaction with starch branching enzyme (BE), by using their purified recombinant proteins. All the SS isozymes had similarly significant activities toward branched glucans such as amylopecin and glycogen whereas they scarcely showed activities toward maltohexaose. In vitro studies indicate that SSI mainly attacked A and B chains with degree of polymerization (DP) of 6 and 7 in their external segments and elongated them to DP8. It is likely that SSIIa and SSIIIa produced wider ranges of intermediate chains and long chains, respectively. This study also revealed that without addition of exogenous primer, the glucan synthesis of SSI in the presence of ≧0.3 M citrate was accelerated by the addition of any of the rice BE isozymes- BEI, BEIIa, or BEIIb, whereas no such interaction occurred between SSIIa or SSIIIa with any of the BEs. The SSI-BE unprimed glucan synthesis absolutely required citrate. The interaction between SSI and BE was established by stimulation of SSI activity with BE and by activation of the BE activity by SSI.

  5. PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH Is Required for Localising GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE to Starch Granules and for Normal Amylose Synthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Seung, David; Soyk, Sebastian; Coiro, Mario; Maier, Benjamin A.; Eicke, Simona; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    The domestication of starch crops underpinned the development of human civilisation, yet we still do not fully understand how plants make starch. Starch is composed of glucose polymers that are branched (amylopectin) or linear (amylose). The amount of amylose strongly influences the physico-chemical behaviour of starchy foods during cooking and of starch mixtures in non-food manufacturing processes. The GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE (GBSS) is the glucosyltransferase specifically responsible for elongating amylose polymers and was the only protein known to be required for its biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST) is also specifically required for amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis. PTST is a plastidial protein possessing an N-terminal coiled coil domain and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM). We discovered that Arabidopsis ptst mutants synthesise amylose-free starch and are phenotypically similar to mutants lacking GBSS. Analysis of granule-bound proteins showed a dramatic reduction of GBSS protein in ptst mutant starch granules. Pull-down assays with recombinant proteins in vitro, as well as immunoprecipitation assays in planta, revealed that GBSS physically interacts with PTST via a coiled coil. Furthermore, we show that the CBM domain of PTST, which mediates its interaction with starch granules, is also required for correct GBSS localisation. Fluorescently tagged Arabidopsis GBSS, expressed either in tobacco or Arabidopsis leaves, required the presence of Arabidopsis PTST to localise to starch granules. Mutation of the CBM of PTST caused GBSS to remain in the plastid stroma. PTST fulfils a previously unknown function in targeting GBSS to starch. This sheds new light on the importance of targeting biosynthetic enzymes to sub-cellular sites where their action is required. Importantly, PTST represents a promising new gene target for the biotechnological modification of starch composition, as it is exclusively involved

  6. PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH is required for localising GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE to starch granules and for normal amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Seung, David; Soyk, Sebastian; Coiro, Mario; Maier, Benjamin A; Eicke, Simona; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2015-02-01

    The domestication of starch crops underpinned the development of human civilisation, yet we still do not fully understand how plants make starch. Starch is composed of glucose polymers that are branched (amylopectin) or linear (amylose). The amount of amylose strongly influences the physico-chemical behaviour of starchy foods during cooking and of starch mixtures in non-food manufacturing processes. The GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE (GBSS) is the glucosyltransferase specifically responsible for elongating amylose polymers and was the only protein known to be required for its biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST) is also specifically required for amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis. PTST is a plastidial protein possessing an N-terminal coiled coil domain and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM). We discovered that Arabidopsis ptst mutants synthesise amylose-free starch and are phenotypically similar to mutants lacking GBSS. Analysis of granule-bound proteins showed a dramatic reduction of GBSS protein in ptst mutant starch granules. Pull-down assays with recombinant proteins in vitro, as well as immunoprecipitation assays in planta, revealed that GBSS physically interacts with PTST via a coiled coil. Furthermore, we show that the CBM domain of PTST, which mediates its interaction with starch granules, is also required for correct GBSS localisation. Fluorescently tagged Arabidopsis GBSS, expressed either in tobacco or Arabidopsis leaves, required the presence of Arabidopsis PTST to localise to starch granules. Mutation of the CBM of PTST caused GBSS to remain in the plastid stroma. PTST fulfils a previously unknown function in targeting GBSS to starch. This sheds new light on the importance of targeting biosynthetic enzymes to sub-cellular sites where their action is required. Importantly, PTST represents a promising new gene target for the biotechnological modification of starch composition, as it is exclusively involved

  7. Structures of starches from rice mutants deficient in the starch synthase isozyme SSI or SSIIIa.

    PubMed

    Hanashiro, Isao; Higuchi, Toshiyuki; Aihara, Satomi; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2011-05-09

    Amylose and amylopectin of rice mutants deficient in a starch synthase (SS) isozyme in the endosperm, either SSI (ΔSSI) or SSIIIa (ΔSSIIIa), were structurally altered from those of their parent (cv. Nipponbare, Np). The amylose content was higher in the mutants (Np, 15.5%; ΔSSI, 18.2%; ΔSSIIIa, 23.6%), and the molar ratio of branched amylose and its side chains was increased. The chain-length distribution of the β-amylase limit dextrins of amylopectin showed regularity, which appeared consistent with the generally accepted cluster structure, and the degrees of polymerization found at the intersections were taken as the boundaries of the B-chain fractions. The mole % of the B(1)-B(3) fractions was changed slightly in ΔSSI, which is consistent with the proposed role of SSI in elongating the external part of clusters. In ΔSSIIIa, a significant increase in the B(1) fraction and a decrease in the B(2) and B(3) fractions were observed. The internal chain length of the B(2) and B(3) fractions appeared to be slightly altered, suggesting that the deficiency in SS affected the actions of branching enzyme(s).

  8. Pullulanase and Starch Synthase III Are Associated with Formation of Vitreous Endosperm in Quality Protein Maize

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Clay, Kasi; Thompson, Stephanie S.; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A.; Andrews, Bethany J.; Zechmann, Bernd; Gibbon, Bryan C.

    2015-01-01

    The opaque-2 (o2) mutation of maize increases lysine content, but the low seed density and soft texture of this type of mutant are undesirable. Lines with modifiers of the soft kernel phenotype (mo2) called “Quality Protein Maize” (QPM) have high lysine and kernel phenotypes similar to normal maize. Prior research indicated that the formation of vitreous endosperm in QPM might involve changes in starch granule structure. In this study, we focused on analysis of two starch biosynthetic enzymes that may influence kernel vitreousness. Analysis of recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross of W64Ao2 and K0326Y revealed that pullulanase activity had significant positive correlation with kernel vitreousness. We also found that decreased Starch Synthase III abundance may decrease the pullulanase activity and average glucan chain length given the same Zpu1 genotype. Therefore, Starch Synthase III could indirectly influence the kernel vitreousness by affecting pullulanase activity and coordinating with pullulanase to alter the glucan chain length distribution of amylopectin, resulting in different starch structural properties. The glucan chain length distribution had strong positive correlation with the polydispersity index of glucan chains, which was positively associated with the kernel vitreousness based on nonlinear regression analysis. Therefore, we propose that pullulanase and Starch Synthase III are two important factors responsible for the formation of the vitreous phenotype of QPM endosperms. PMID:26115014

  9. The targeting of starch binding domains from starch synthase III to the cell wall alters cell wall composition and properties.

    PubMed

    Grisolia, Mauricio J; Peralta, Diego A; Valdez, Hugo A; Barchiesi, Julieta; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Busi, María V

    2017-01-01

    Starch binding domains of starch synthase III from Arabidopsis thaliana (SBD123) binds preferentially to cell wall polysaccharides rather than to starch in vitro. Transgenic plants overexpressing SBD123 in the cell wall are larger than wild type. Cell wall components are altered in transgenic plants. Transgenic plants are more susceptible to digestion than wild type and present higher released glucose content. Our results suggest that the transgenic plants have an advantage for the production of bioethanol in terms of saccharification of essential substrates. The plant cell wall, which represents a major source of biomass for biofuel production, is composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins and lignin. A potential biotechnological target for improving the production of biofuels is the modification of plant cell walls. This modification is achieved via several strategies, including, among others, altering biosynthetic pathways and modifying the associations and structures of various cell wall components. In this study, we modified the cell wall of A. thaliana by targeting the starch-binding domains of A. thaliana starch synthase III to this structure. The resulting transgenic plants (E8-SDB123) showed an increased biomass, higher levels of both fermentable sugars and hydrolyzed cellulose and altered cell wall properties such as higher laxity and degradability, which are valuable characteristics for the second-generation biofuels industry. The increased biomass and degradability phenotype of E8-SBD123 plants could be explained by the putative cell-wall loosening effect of the in tandem starch binding domains. Based on these results, our approach represents a promising biotechnological tool for reducing of biomass recalcitrance and therefore, the need for pretreatments.

  10. Enzymatic characterization of starch synthase III from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Senoura, Takeshi; Asao, Ayako; Takashima, Yoshinori; Isono, Naoto; Hamada, Shigeki; Ito, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2007-09-01

    In plants and green algae, several starch synthase isozymes are responsible for the elongation of glucan chains in the biosynthesis of amylose and amylopectin. Multiple starch synthase isozymes, which are classified into five major classes (granule-bound starch synthases, SSI, SSII, SSIII, and SSIV) according to their primary sequences, have distinct enzymatic properties. All the starch synthase isozymes consist of a transit peptide, an N-terminal noncatalytic region (N-domain), and a C-terminal catalytic region (C-domain). To elucidate the enzymatic properties of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) SSIII and the function of the N-domain of kidney bean SSIII, three recombinant proteins were constructed: putative mature recombinant SSIII, recombinant kidney bean SSIII N-domain, and recombinant kidney bean SSIII C-domain. Purified recombinant kidney bean SSIII displayed high specific activities for primers as compared to the other starch synthase isozymes from kidney bean. Kinetic analysis showed that the high specific activities of recombinant kidney bean SSIII are attributable to the high k(cat) values, and that the K(m) values of recombinant kidney bean SSIII C-domain for primers were much higher than those of recombinant kidney bean recombinant SSIII. Recombinant kidney bean SSIII and recombinant kidney bean SSIII C-domain had similar chain-length specificities for the extension of glucan chains, indicating that the N-domain of kidney bean SSIII does not affect the chain-length specificity. Affinity gel electrophoresis indicated that recombinant kidney bean SSIII and recombinant kidney bean SSIII N-domain have high affinities for amylose and amylopectin. The data presented in this study provide direct evidence for the function of the N-domain of kidney bean SSIII as a carbohydrate-binding module.

  11. Essential amino acids of starch synthase IIa differentiate amylopectin structure and starch quality between japonica and indica rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasunori; Francisco, Perigio B; Hosaka, Yuko; Sato, Aya; Sawada, Takayuki; Kubo, Akiko; Fujita, Naoko

    2005-05-01

    Four amino acids were variable between the 'active' indica-type and 'inactive' japonica-type soluble starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) of rice plants; Glu-88 and Gly-604 in SSIIa of indica-cultivars IR36 and Kasalath were replaced by Asp-88 and Ser-604, respectively, in both japonica cultivars Nipponbare and Kinmaze SSIIa, whereas Val-737 and Leu-781 in indica SSIIa were replaced by Met-737 in cv. Nipponbare and Phe-781 in cv. Kinmaze SSIIa, respectively. The SSIIa gene fragments shuffling experiments revealed that Val-737 and Leu-781 are essential not only for the optimal SSIIa activity, but also for the capacity to synthesize indica-type amylopectin. Surprisingly, however, a combination of Phe-781 and Gly-604 could restore about 44% of the SSIIa activity provided that Val-737 was conserved. The introduction of the 'active' indica-type SSIIa gene enabled the japonica-type cv. Kinmaze to synthesize indica-type amylopectin. The starch in the transformed japonica rice plants exhibited gelatinization-resistant properties that are characteristic of indica-rice starch. Transformed lines expressing different levels of the IR36 SSIIa protein produced a variety of starches with amylopectin chain-length distribution patterns that correlated well with their onset temperatures of gelatinization. The present study confirmed that the SSIIa activity determines the type of amylopectin structure of rice starch to be either the typical indica-type or japonica-type, by playing a specific role in the synthesis of the long B(1) chains by elongating short A and B(1) chains, notwithstanding the presence of functional two additional SSII genes, a single SSI gene, two SSIII genes, and two SSIV genes in rice plants.

  12. Characterization of Function of the GlgA2 Glycogen/Starch Synthase in Cyanobacterium sp. Clg1 Highlights Convergent Evolution of Glycogen Metabolism into Starch Granule Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kadouche, Derifa; Ducatez, Mathieu; Cenci, Ugo; Tirtiaux, Catherine; Suzuki, Eiji; Nakamura, Yasunori; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Terrasson, Amandine Durand; Diaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco Javier; Arias, Maria Cecilia; Striebeck, Alexander; Palcic, Monica; Ball, Steven G; Colleoni, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    At variance with the starch-accumulating plants and most of the glycogen-accumulating cyanobacteria, Cyanobacterium sp. CLg1 synthesizes both glycogen and starch. We now report the selection of a starchless mutant of this cyanobacterium that retains wild-type amounts of glycogen. Unlike other mutants of this type found in plants and cyanobacteria, this mutant proved to be selectively defective for one of the two types of glycogen/starch synthase: GlgA2. This enzyme is phylogenetically related to the previously reported SSIII/SSIV starch synthase that is thought to be involved in starch granule seeding in plants. This suggests that, in addition to the selective polysaccharide debranching demonstrated to be responsible for starch rather than glycogen synthesis, the nature and properties of the elongation enzyme define a novel determinant of starch versus glycogen accumulation. We show that the phylogenies of GlgA2 and of 16S ribosomal RNA display significant congruence. This suggests that this enzyme evolved together with cyanobacteria when they diversified over 2 billion years ago. However, cyanobacteria can be ruled out as direct progenitors of the SSIII/SSIV ancestral gene found in Archaeplastida. Hence, both cyanobacteria and plants recruited similar enzymes independently to perform analogous tasks, further emphasizing the importance of convergent evolution in the appearance of starch from a preexisting glycogen metabolism network.

  13. Detection of proteins related to starch synthase activity in the developing mungbean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Ko, Yuan-Tih; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Lee, Ya-Ting; Chang, Jin-Yi

    2005-06-15

    Proteins associated with starch synthase (SS) activities were identified in immature mungbeans (Vigna radiata L. cv KPS1). Seed soluble extract was separated by native-PAGE and subjected to in situ activity staining. The gel zymogram located starch-enzyme complex bands. The soluble extract was also partitioned by preparative-IEF and screened for SS activity using radioactive assay. IEF fractions eluted within pH 4-6 revealed enriched SS activity of 145-fold. Parallel comparison of the protein profiles among the activity stained enzyme complex and the active isoelectric focused fractions on SDS-PAGE depicted three SS-activity-related proteins with molecular size of 32, 53, and 85 kDa. The 85 kDa protein, however, was identified to be methionine synthase by MALDI-TOF analysis and should be a protein physically associated with the active SS. Polyclonal antibodies raised from eluted native enzyme complex neutralized up to 90% activity and antigenically recognize the other 53 and 32 kDa proteins on Western blot. Antibodies raised from the two individual denatured proteins were able to neutralize SS activities near 60% separately, indicating that the 53 kDa and 32 proteins associated with SS activity are potentially involved in starch biosynthesis during mungbean seed development.

  14. Suppression of starch synthase I expression affects the granule morphology and granule size and fine structure of starch in wheat endosperm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Studies in Arabidopsis and rice suggest that manipulation of starch synthase I (SSI) expression in wheat may lead to the production of wheat grains with novel starch structure and properties. This work describes the suppression of SSI expression in wheat grains using RNAi technology, which leads to a low level of enzymatic activity for SSI in the developing endosperm, and a low abundance of SSI protein inside the starch granules of mature grains. The amylopectin fraction of starch from the SSI suppressed lines showed an increased frequency of very short chains (degree of polymerization, dp 6 and 7), a lower proportion of short chains (dp 8–12), and more intermediate chains (dp 13–20) than in the grain from their negative segregant lines. In the most severely affected line, amylose content was significantly increased, the morphology of starch granules was changed, and the proportion of B starch granules was significantly reduced. The change of the fine structure of the starch in the SSI-RNAi suppression lines alters the gelatinization temperature, swelling power, and viscosity of the starch. This work demonstrates that the roles of SSI in the determination of starch structure and properties are similar among different cereals and Arabidopsis. PMID:24634486

  15. Suppression of starch synthase I expression affects the granule morphology and granule size and fine structure of starch in wheat endosperm.

    PubMed

    McMaugh, Stephen J; Thistleton, Jenny L; Anschaw, Emma; Luo, Jixun; Konik-Rose, Christine; Wang, Hong; Huang, Min; Larroque, Oscar; Regina, Ahmed; Jobling, Stephen A; Morell, Matthew K; Li, Zhongyi

    2014-05-01

    Studies in Arabidopsis and rice suggest that manipulation of starch synthase I (SSI) expression in wheat may lead to the production of wheat grains with novel starch structure and properties. This work describes the suppression of SSI expression in wheat grains using RNAi technology, which leads to a low level of enzymatic activity for SSI in the developing endosperm, and a low abundance of SSI protein inside the starch granules of mature grains. The amylopectin fraction of starch from the SSI suppressed lines showed an increased frequency of very short chains (degree of polymerization, dp 6 and 7), a lower proportion of short chains (dp 8-12), and more intermediate chains (dp 13-20) than in the grain from their negative segregant lines. In the most severely affected line, amylose content was significantly increased, the morphology of starch granules was changed, and the proportion of B starch granules was significantly reduced. The change of the fine structure of the starch in the SSI-RNAi suppression lines alters the gelatinization temperature, swelling power, and viscosity of the starch. This work demonstrates that the roles of SSI in the determination of starch structure and properties are similar among different cereals and Arabidopsis.

  16. The barley amo1 locus is tightly linked to the starch synthase IIIa gene and negatively regulates expression of granule-bound starch synthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongyi; Li, Dehong; Du, Xihua; Wang, Hong; Larroque, Oscar; Jenkins, Colin L. D.; Jobling, Stephen A.; Morell, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    In this study of barley starch synthesis, the interaction between mutations at the sex6 locus and the amo1 locus has been characterized. Four barley genotypes, the wild type, sex6, amo1, and the amo1sex6 double mutant, were generated by backcrossing the sex6 mutation present in Himalaya292 into the amo1 ‘high amylose Glacier’. The wild type, amo1, and sex6 genotypes gave starch phenotypes consistent with previous studies. However, the amo1sex6 double mutant yielded an unexpected phenotype, a significant increase in starch content relative to the sex6 phenotype. Amylose content (as a percentage of starch) was not increased above the level observed for the sex6 mutation alone; however, on a per seed basis, grain from lines containing the amo1 mutation (amo1 mutants and amo1sex6 double mutants) synthesize significantly more amylose than the wild-type lines and sex6 mutants. The level of granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) protein in starch granules is increased in lines containing the amo1 mutation (amo1 and amo1sex6). In the amo1 genotype, starch synthase I (SSI), SSIIa, starch branching enzyme IIa (SBEIIa), and SBEIIb also markedly increased in the starch granules. Genetic mapping studies indicate that the ssIIIa gene is tightly linked to the amo1 locus, and the SSIIIa protein from the amo1 mutant has a leucine to arginine residue substitution in a conserved domain. Zymogram analysis indicates that the amo1 phenotype is not a consequence of total loss of enzymatic activity although it remains possible that the amo1 phenotype is underpinned by a more subtle change. It is therefore proposed that amo1 may be a negative regulator of other genes of starch synthesis. PMID:21813797

  17. Identification of genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase involved in amylose metabolism in banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongxia; Sun, Peiguang; Liu, Weixin; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) is responsible for amylose synthesis, but the role of GBSS genes and their encoded proteins remains poorly understood in banana. In this study, amylose content and GBSS activity gradually increased during development of the banana fruit, and decreased during storage of the mature fruit. GBSS protein in banana starch granules was approximately 55.0 kDa. The protein was up-regulated expression during development while it was down-regulated expression during storage. Six genes, designated as MaGBSSI-1, MaGBSSI-2, MaGBSSI-3, MaGBSSI-4, MaGBSSII-1, and MaGBSSII-2, were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among the six genes, the expression pattern of MaGBSSI-3 was the most consistent with the changes in amylose content, GBSS enzyme activity, GBSS protein levels, and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit. These results suggest that MaGBSSI-3 might regulate amylose metabolism by affecting the variation of GBSS levels and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit during development or storage.

  18. Identification of Genes Encoding Granule-Bound Starch Synthase Involved in Amylose Metabolism in Banana Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weixin; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) is responsible for amylose synthesis, but the role of GBSS genes and their encoded proteins remains poorly understood in banana. In this study, amylose content and GBSS activity gradually increased during development of the banana fruit, and decreased during storage of the mature fruit. GBSS protein in banana starch granules was approximately 55.0 kDa. The protein was up-regulated expression during development while it was down-regulated expression during storage. Six genes, designated as MaGBSSI-1, MaGBSSI-2, MaGBSSI-3, MaGBSSI-4, MaGBSSII-1, and MaGBSSII-2, were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among the six genes, the expression pattern of MaGBSSI-3 was the most consistent with the changes in amylose content, GBSS enzyme activity, GBSS protein levels, and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit. These results suggest that MaGBSSI-3 might regulate amylose metabolism by affecting the variation of GBSS levels and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit during development or storage. PMID:24505384

  19. Formation and Deposition of Amylose in the Potato Tuber Starch Granule Are Affected by the Reduction of Granule-Bound Starch Synthase Gene Expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, AGJ.; Jacobsen, E.; Visser, RGF.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of amylose in amyloplasts is catalyzed by granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS). GBSS gene expression was inhibited via antisense RNA in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed potato plants. Analysis of starch production and starch granule composition in transgenic tubers revealed that reduction of GBSS activity always resulted in a reduction of the production of amylose. Field experiments, performed over a 2-year period, showed that stable inhibition of GBSS gene expression can be obtained. Microscopic evaluation of iodine-stained starch granules was shown to be a sensitive system for qualitative and quantitative examination of amylose formation in starch granules of transgenic potato tubers. In plants showing inhibition of GBSS gene expression, the reduced amylose content in tuber starch was not a consequence of a lower amylose content throughout the entire starch granule. Starch granules of transgenic tubers were found to contain amylose at a percentage similar to wild-type starch in a core of varying size at the hilum of each granule. This indicated that reduced GBSS gene expression results in amylose formation in a restricted zone of the granules. The size of this zone is suggested to be dependent on the GBSS protein level. During development of the granules, the available GBSS protein is thought to become limiting, resulting in the formation of starch that lacks amylose. RNA gel blot analysis of tuber tissue showed that inhibition of GBSS gene expression resulted in a reduced GBSS mRNA level but did not affect the expression level of other starch synthesizing enzymes. Antisense RNA could only be detected in leaf tissue of the transgenic plants. PMID:12244219

  20. Biochemical Evidence for the Role of the Waxy Protein from Pea (Pisum sativum L.) as a Granule-Bound Starch Synthase.

    PubMed

    Sivak, M. N.; Wagner, M.; Preiss, J.

    1993-12-01

    Proteins were solubilized from starch extracted from developing pea (Pisum sativum L.) embryos and chromatography of these proteins on a Mono-Q column separated two peaks of starch synthase activity. The major activity peak comprised more than 80% of the total activity. This fraction contained only the Waxy protein, as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate followed by staining for proteins or by immunoblot. A 77-kD polypeptide associated with the starch granules and presumed by others to be a starch synthase could not be detected in any of the active fractions. The native molecular weight of the solubilized starch synthase was 59,600 [plus or minus] 1700 as determined by sucrose density gradient. It is concluded that in pea seeds the Waxy protein and the starch synthase bound to the granule are the same protein.

  1. Identification of the Soluble Starch Synthase Activities of Maize Endosperm1

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Heping; Imparl-Radosevich, Jennifer; Guan, Hanping; Keeling, Peter L.; James, Martha G.; Myers, Alan M.

    1999-01-01

    This study identified the complement of soluble starch synthases (SSs) present in developing maize (Zea mays) endosperm. The product of the du1 gene, DU1, was shown to be one of the two major soluble SSs. The C-terminal 450 residues of DU1 comprise eight sequence blocks conserved in 28 known or predicted glucan synthases. This region of DU1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to possess SS activity. DU1-specific antisera detected a soluble endosperm protein of more than 200 kD that was lacking in du1- mutants. These antisera eliminated 20% to 30% of the soluble SS activity from kernel extracts. Antiserum against the isozyme zSSI eliminated approximately 60% of the total soluble SS, and immunodepletion of du1- mutant extracts with this antiserum nearly eliminated SS activity. Two soluble SS activities were identified by electrophoretic fractionation, each of which correlated specifically with zSSI or DU1. Thus, DU1 and zSSI accounted for the great majority of soluble SS activity present in developing endosperm. The relative activity of the two isozymes did not change significantly during the starch biosynthetic period. DU1 and zSSI may be interdependent, because mutant extracts lacking DU1 exhibited a significant stimulation of the remaining SS activity. PMID:10318698

  2. A soluble starch synthase I gene, IbSSI, alters the content, composition, granule size and structure of starch in transgenic sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yannan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Huan; Zhai, Hong; Liu, Qingchang; He, Shaozhen

    2017-05-24

    Soluble starch synthase I (SSI) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of plant amylopectin. In this study, the gene named IbSSI, was cloned from sweet potato, an important starch crop. A high expression level of IbSSI was detected in the leaves and storage roots of the sweet potato. Its overexpression significantly increased the content and granule size of starch and the proportion of amylopectin by up-regulating starch biosynthetic genes in the transgenic plants compared with wild-type plants (WT) and RNA interference plants. The frequency of chains with degree of polymerization (DP) 5-8 decreased in the amylopectin fraction of starch, whereas the proportion of chains with DP 9-25 increased in the IbSSI-overexpressing plants compared with WT plants. Further analysis demonstrated that IbSSI was responsible for the synthesis of chains with DP ranging from 9 to 17, which represents a different chain length spectrum in vivo from its counterparts in rice and wheat. These findings suggest that the IbSSI gene plays important roles in determining the content, composition, granule size and structure of starch in sweet potato. This gene may be utilized to improve the content and quality of starch in sweet potato and other plants.

  3. Function and characterization of starch synthase I using mutants in rice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoko; Yoshida, Mayumi; Asakura, Noriko; Ohdan, Takashi; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2006-03-01

    Four starch synthase I (SSI)-deficient rice (Oryza sativa) mutant lines were generated using retrotransposon Tos17 insertion. The mutants exhibited different levels of SSI activities and produced significantly lower amounts of SSI protein ranging from 0% to 20% of the wild type. The mutant endosperm amylopectin showed a decrease in chains with degree of polymerization (DP) 8 to 12 and an increase in chains with DP 6 to 7 and DP 16 to 19. The degree of change in amylopectin chain-length distribution was positively correlated with the extent of decrease in SSI activity in the mutants. The structural changes in the amylopectin increased the gelatinization temperature of endosperm starch. Chain-length analysis of amylopectin in the SSI band excised from native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/SS activity staining gel showed that SSI preferentially synthesized DP 7 to 11 chains by elongating DP 4 to 7 short chains of glycogen or amylopectin. These results show that SSI distinctly generates DP 8 to 12 chains from short DP 6 to 7 chains emerging from the branch point in the A or B(1) chain of amylopectin. SSI seemingly functions from the very early through the late stage of endosperm development. Yet, the complete absence of SSI, despite being a major SS isozyme in the developing endosperm, had no effect on the size and shape of seeds and starch granules and the crystallinity of endosperm starch, suggesting that other SS enzymes are probably capable of partly compensating SSI function. In summary, this study strongly suggested that amylopectin chains are synthesized by the coordinated actions of SSI, SSIIa, and SSIIIa isoforms.

  4. Alcoholytic Cleavage of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Chains by Class IV Synthases Induced by Endogenous and Exogenous Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Hyakutake, Manami; Tomizawa, Satoshi; Mizuno, Kouhei; Abe, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-producing Bacillus strains express class IV PHA synthase, which is composed of the subunits PhaR and PhaC. Recombinant Escherichia coli expressing PHA synthase from Bacillus cereus strain YB-4 (PhaRCYB-4) showed an unusual reduction of the molecular weight of PHA produced during the stationary phase of growth. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the low-molecular-weight PHA revealed that its carboxy end structure was capped by ethanol, suggesting that the molecular weight reduction was the result of alcoholytic cleavage of PHA chains by PhaRCYB-4 induced by endogenous ethanol. This scission reaction was also induced by exogenous ethanol in both in vivo and in vitro assays. In addition, PhaRCYB-4 was observed to have alcoholysis activity for PHA chains synthesized by other synthases. The PHA synthase from Bacillus megaterium (PhaRCBm) from another subgroup of class IV synthases was also assayed and was shown to have weak alcoholysis activity for PHA chains. These results suggest that class IV synthases may commonly share alcoholysis activity as an inherent feature. PMID:24334666

  5. cDNA cloning, expression, and characterization of Taro SSII: a novel member of starch synthase II family.

    PubMed

    Lin, Da-Gin; Jeang, Chii-Ling

    2005-10-05

    A novel soluble starch synthase II (SSII) gene was isolated from taro (Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta) tubers. This 2939 bp SSII transcript encodes 804 amino acids with a putative transit peptide of 52 residues. It displays 58-63% identity and 63-69% similarity with SSIIs from other sources. Alignment and phylogenetic analyses showed that taro SSII is more closely related with dicot SSIIs than with the monocot ones, though taro is a monocot. The identification of taro SSII clone as starch synthase was confirmed by the expression of its enzymatic activity in Escherichia coli. Genomic DNA blot analysis revealed a single copy or low number copies of SSII in taro. Expression profile showed that more transcript and protein were accumulated in tubers of 597 +/- 37 g fresh weight, that is, a stage of rapid starch synthesis, than tubers of other stages. By Western blot analysis, SSII was found in both soluble and granule bound portions of tuber extracts, and more SSII protein was found in aged leaves than in leaves of other stages. These results suggest that taro SSII is a novel starch synthase for the synthesis of both transit and storage starch.

  6. Soluble starch synthase I effects differences in amylopectin structure between indica and japonica rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Takemoto-Kuno, Yoko; Suzuki, Keitaro; Nakamura, Sumiko; Satoh, Hikaru; Ohtsubo, Keníchi

    2006-11-29

    The effect of soluble starch synthase I (SSI) on differences of amylopectin structure between the indica and japonica rice varieties was investigated. Native-PAGE/active staining analysis showed that the SSI activity of an indica rice variety, "Kasalath", was significantly lower than that of a japonica rice variety, "Nipponbare", and that the low activity in "Kasalath" was maintained during seed development. The result of northern blot analyses suggests that the low expression of SSI in "Kasalath" is controlled at the transcription levels of SSI mRNA. Chain length distribution of amylopectin in F3 endosperms derived from a cross between two varieties showed that not only SSIIa but also SSI regulated the population of short chains. These results indicate that the low activity of SSI gives rise to the decrease of short chains in amylopectin of indica rice varieties, suggesting that SSI effects the differences in physicochemical properties between two varieties.

  7. Role of the N-terminal starch-binding domains in the kinetic properties of starch synthase III from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Hugo A; Busi, Maria V; Wayllace, Nahuel Z; Parisi, Gustavo; Ugalde, Rodolfo A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2008-03-04

    Starch synthase III (SSIII), one of the SS isoforms involved in plant starch synthesis, has been reported to play a regulatory role in the synthesis of transient starch. SSIII from Arabidopsis thaliana contains 1025 amino acid residues and has an N-terminal transit peptide for chloroplast localization which is followed by three repeated starch-binding domains (SBDs; SSIII residues 22-591) and a C-terminal catalytic domain (residues 592-1025) similar to bacterial glycogen synthase. In this work, we constructed recombinant full-length and truncated isoforms of SSIII, lacking one, two, or three SBDs, and recombinant proteins, containing three, two, or one SBD, to investigate the role of these domains in enzyme activity. Results revealed that SSIII uses preferentially ADPGlc, although UDPGlc can also be used as a sugar donor substrate. When ADPGlc was used, the presence of the SBDs confers particular properties to each isoform, increasing the apparent affinity and the V max for the oligosaccharide acceptor substrate. However, no substantial changes in the kinetic parameters for glycogen were observed when UDPGlc was the donor substrate. Under glycogen saturating conditions, the presence of SBDs increases progressively the apparent affinity and V max for ADPGlc but not for UDPGlc. Adsorption assays showed that the N-terminal region of SSIII, containing three, two, or one SBD module have increased capacity to bind starch depending on the number of SBD modules, with the D23 protein (containing the second and third SBD module) being the one that makes the greatest contribution to binding. The results presented here suggest that the N-terminal SBDs have a regulatory role, showing a starch binding capacity and modulating the catalytic properties of SSIII.

  8. Starch synthase 4 is located in the thylakoid membrane and interacts with plastoglobule-associated proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gámez-Arjona, Francisco M; Raynaud, Sandy; Ragel, Paula; Mérida, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Starch synthesis requires the formation of a primer that can be subsequently elongated and branched. How this primer is produced, however, remains unknown. The control of the number of starch granules produced per chloroplast is also a matter of debate. We previously showed starch synthase 4 (SS4) to be involved in both processes, although the mechanisms involved are yet to be fully characterised. The present work shows that SS4 displays a specific localization different from other starch synthases. Thus, this protein is located in specific areas of the thylakoid membrane and interacts with the proteins fibrillin 1a (FBN1a) and 1b (FBN1b), which are mainly located in plastoglobules. SS4 would seem to be associated with plastoglobules attached to the thylakoids (or to that portion of the thylakoids where plastoglobules have originated), forming a complex that includes the FBN1s and other as-yet unidentified proteins. The present results also indicate that the localization pattern of SS4, and its interactions with the FBN1 proteins, are mediated through its N-terminal region, which contains two long coiled-coil motifs. The localization of SS4 in specific areas of the thylakoid membrane suggests that starch granules are originated at specific regions of the chloroplast.

  9. Is atomic rearrangement of type IV PHA synthases responsible for increased PHA production?

    PubMed

    Tariq, Aamira; Hameed, Abdul; Bokhari, Habib; Masood, Farha

    2015-01-01

    Type IV PHA synthase is a key enzyme responsible for catalyzing the formation of non-toxic, biocompatible, and biodegradable short-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (scl-PHA) under the growth-limiting conditions in the members of the genus Bacillus. The comparative in vitro and in silico analysis of the phaC subunit of type IV PHA synthases among Bacillus cereus FA11, B. cereus FC11, and B. cereus FS1 was done in our study to determine its structural and functional properties. Conserved domain analysis demonstrated that phaC subunit belongs to the alpha/beta (α/β) hydrolase fold. The catalytic triad comprising of cysteine (Cys), histidine (His), and aspartate (Asp) was found to be present at the active site. A shorter inter-atomic distance was found between the carboxyl (-COO) group of Asp and amino (NH2) group of His. Furthermore, slightly long inter-atomic distances between sulfhydryl (SH) group of Cys and NH2 group of His may be pointing toward the broader substrate specificity of type IV PHA synthases. However, a shorter distance between the SH group of Cys and NH2 group of His in case of B. cereus FC11 leads to a higher enzymatic activity and maximum PHA yield (49.26%). The in silico study verifies that the close proximity between SH group of Cys and NH2 group of His in phaC subunit of type IV PHA synthases can be crucial for synthesis of scl-PHA. However, the catalytic activity of type IV PHA synthases declines as the distance between the sulfur (S) atom of the SH group of Cys and the nitrogen (N) atom of NH2 group of His increases.

  10. Novel, Starch-Like Polysaccharides Are Synthesized by an Unbound Form of Granule-Bound Starch Synthase in Glycogen-Accumulating Mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillée, David; Colleoni, Christophe; Shaw, Eudean; Mouille, Gregory; D'Hulst, Christophe; Morell, Matthew; Samuel, Michael S.; Bouchet, Brigitte; Gallant, Daniel J.; Sinskey, Anthony; Ball, Steven

    1999-01-01

    In vascular plants, mutations leading to a defect in debranching enzyme lead to the simultaneous synthesis of glycogen-like material and normal starch. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii comparable defects lead to the replacement of starch by phytoglycogen. Therefore, debranching was proposed to define a mandatory step for starch biosynthesis. We now report the characterization of small amounts of an insoluble, amylose-like material found in the mutant algae. This novel, starch-like material was shown to be entirely dependent on the presence of granule-bound starch synthase (GBSSI), the enzyme responsible for amylose synthesis in plants. However, enzyme activity assays, solubilization of proteins from the granule, and western blots all failed to detect GBSSI within the insoluble polysaccharide matrix. The glycogen-like polysaccharides produced in the absence of GBSSI were proved to be qualitatively and quantitatively identical to those produced in its presence. Therefore, we propose that GBSSI requires the presence of crystalline amylopectin for granule binding and that the synthesis of amylose-like material can proceed at low levels without the binding of GBSSI to the polysaccharide matrix. Our results confirm that amylopectin synthesis is completely blocked in debranching-enzyme-defective mutants of C. reinhardtii. PMID:9880375

  11. Large-scale isolation, fractionation, and purification of soluble starch-synthesizing enzymes: starch synthase and branching enzyme from potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Mukerjea, Rupendra; Falconer, Daniel J; Yoon, Seung-Heon; Robyt, John F

    2010-07-19

    Soluble starch-synthesizing enzymes, starch synthase (SSS) and starch-branching enzyme (SBE), were isolated, fractionated, and purified from white potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) on a large scale. Five steps were used: potato tuber extract from 2 kg of peeled potatoes, two acetone precipitations, and two fractionations on a large ultrafiltration polysulfone hollow fiber 100 kDa cartridge. Three kinds of fractions were obtained: (1) mixtures of SSS and SBE; (2) SSS, free of SBE; and (3) SBE, free of SSS. Contaminating enzymes (amylase, phosphorylase, and disproportionating enzyme) and carbohydrates were absent from the 2nd acetone precipitate and from the column fractions, as judged by the Molisch test and starch triiodide test. Activity yields of 122% (300,000-400,000 units) of SSS fractions and 187% (40,000-50,000 units) of SBE fractions were routinely obtained from the cartridge. Addition of 0.04% (w/v) polyvinyl alcohol 50K and 1 mM dithiothreitol to the glycine buffer (pH 8.4) gave long-term stability and higher yields of SSS and SBE, due to activation of inactive enzymes. Several SSS and SBE fractions from the two fractionations had very high specific activities, indicating high degrees of purification. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of selected SSS and SBE fractions gave two to five SSS and/or SBE activity bands, corresponding to the one to five protein bands present in the 2nd acetone precipitate. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Morphology, associated protein analysis, and identification of 58-kDa starch synthase in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. cv. KPS1) starch granule preparations.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yuan-Tih; Dong, Yu-Ling; Hsieh, Ying-Fang; Kuo, Ja-Chi

    2009-05-27

    Raw starch granules of mature mungbean (Vigna radiata L. cv. KPS1) seeds were prepared by two methods into crude and cesium chloride (CsCl)-washed forms. The purity, shape, size distribution, and associated protein profiles were examined. The appearance of raw starch granules showed a bimodal type distribution in which average granules had typical ovoid shapes, whereas the small ones were spherical. Abnormal granule surface with distinct tumor-like or dented hole features were also observed in raw starch granules. CsCl-washed granules had a smooth surface compared to that of the crude form. The granule size distribution ranged from 6-35 μm; most 15-25 μm (∼53%), followed by 25-35 μm (∼26%). Small granules (<15 μm) amounted to ∼18%, and granules >35 μm consisted of ∼3%. The two forms were further refined by trichloroacetic (TCA) treatment to reveal surface proteins on the crude granules or tightly bound proteins on CsCl-washed granules. In the washed-refined granules, only a few integral proteins were retained. The major 58-kDa protein was identified to be granule-bound starch synthase I by sequence homology with that in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and maize (Zea mays) using MALDI-TOF mass and Mascot search.

  13. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis by class IV PHA synthases employing Ralstonia eutropha PHB(-)4 as host strain.

    PubMed

    Hyakutake, Manami; Saito, Yuta; Tomizawa, Satoshi; Mizuno, Kouhei; Tsuge, Takeharu

    2011-01-01

    Class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase from Bacillus cereus YB-4 (PhaRC(YB4)) or B. megaterium NBRC15308(T) (PhaRC(Bm)) was expressed in Ralstonia eutropha PHB(-)4 to compare the ability to produce PHA and the substrate specificity of PhaRCs. PhaRC(YB4) produced significant amounts of PHA and had broader substrate specificity than PhaRC(Bm).

  14. Soluble Starch Synthase III-1 in Amylopectin Metabolism of Banana Fruit: Characterization, Expression, Enzyme Activity, and Functional Analyses.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongxia; Sun, Peiguang; Liu, Qing; Jia, Caihong; Liu, Juhua; Hu, Wei; Jin, Zhiqiang; Xu, Biyu

    2017-01-01

    Soluble starch synthase (SS) is one of the key enzymes involved in amylopectin biosynthesis in plants. However, no information is currently available about this gene family in the important fruit crop banana. Herein, we characterized the function of MaSSIII-1 in amylopectin metabolism of banana fruit and described the putative role of the other MaSS family members. Firstly, starch granules, starch and amylopectin content were found to increase during banana fruit development, but decline during storage. The SS activity started to increase later than amylopectin and starch content. Secondly, four putative SS genes were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among them, MaSSIII-1 showed the highest expression in banana pulp during fruit development at transcriptional levels. Further Western blot analysis suggested that the protein was gradually increased during banana fruit development, but drastically reduced during storage. This expression pattern was highly consistent with changes in starch granules, amylopectin content, and SS activity at the late phase of banana fruit development. Lastly, overexpression of MaSSIII-1 in tomato plants distinctly changed the morphology of starch granules and significantly increased the total starch accumulation, amylopectin content, and SS activity at mature-green stage in comparison to wild-type. The findings demonstrated that MaSSIII-1 is a key gene expressed in banana fruit and responsible for the active amylopectin biosynthesis, this is the first report in a fresh fruit species. Such a finding may enable the development of molecular markers for banana breeding and genetic improvement of nutritional value and functional properties of banana fruit.

  15. Soluble Starch Synthase III-1 in Amylopectin Metabolism of Banana Fruit: Characterization, Expression, Enzyme Activity, and Functional Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongxia; Sun, Peiguang; Liu, Qing; Jia, Caihong; Liu, Juhua; Hu, Wei; Jin, Zhiqiang; Xu, Biyu

    2017-01-01

    Soluble starch synthase (SS) is one of the key enzymes involved in amylopectin biosynthesis in plants. However, no information is currently available about this gene family in the important fruit crop banana. Herein, we characterized the function of MaSSIII-1 in amylopectin metabolism of banana fruit and described the putative role of the other MaSS family members. Firstly, starch granules, starch and amylopectin content were found to increase during banana fruit development, but decline during storage. The SS activity started to increase later than amylopectin and starch content. Secondly, four putative SS genes were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among them, MaSSIII-1 showed the highest expression in banana pulp during fruit development at transcriptional levels. Further Western blot analysis suggested that the protein was gradually increased during banana fruit development, but drastically reduced during storage. This expression pattern was highly consistent with changes in starch granules, amylopectin content, and SS activity at the late phase of banana fruit development. Lastly, overexpression of MaSSIII-1 in tomato plants distinctly changed the morphology of starch granules and significantly increased the total starch accumulation, amylopectin content, and SS activity at mature-green stage in comparison to wild-type. The findings demonstrated that MaSSIII-1 is a key gene expressed in banana fruit and responsible for the active amylopectin biosynthesis, this is the first report in a fresh fruit species. Such a finding may enable the development of molecular markers for banana breeding and genetic improvement of nutritional value and functional properties of banana fruit. PMID:28424724

  16. Identification and characterization of granule bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) gene of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Feng, Bo; Xu, Zhibin; Sestili, Francesco; Zhao, Guojun; Xiang, Chao; Lafiandra, Domenico; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-25

    Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) is increasingly considered as an important functional food material because of its rich nutraceutical compounds. Reserve starch is the major component of tartary buckwheat seed. However, the gene sequences and the molecular mechanism of tartary buckwheat starch synthesis are unknown so far. In this study, the complete genomic sequence and full-size cDNA coding tartary buckwheat granule-bound starch synthase I (FtGBSSI), which is responsible for amylose synthesis, were isolated and analyzed. The genomic sequence of the FtGBSSI contained 3947 nucleotides and was composed of 14 exons and 13 introns. The cDNA coding sequence of FtGBSSI shared 63.3%-75.1% identities with those of dicots and 56.6%-57.5% identities with monocots (Poaceae). In deduced amino acid sequence of FtGBSSI, eight motifs conserved among plant starch synthases were identified. A cleavage at the site IVC↓G of FtGBSSI protein produces the chloroplast transit sequence of 78 amino acids and the mature protein of 527 amino acids. The FtGBSSI mature protein showed an identity of 73.4%-77.8% with dicot plants, and 67.6%-70.4% with monocot plants (Poaceae). The mature protein was composed of 20 α-helixes and 16 β-strands, and folds into two main domains, N- and C-terminal domains. The critical residues which are involved in ADP and sugar binding were predicted. These results will be useful to modulate starch composition of buckwheat kernels with the aim to produce novel improved varieties in future breeding programs. © 2013.

  17. The N-terminal Part of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 4 Determines the Localization and Activity of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Sandy; Ragel, Paula; Rojas, Tomás; Mérida, Ángel

    2016-05-13

    Starch synthase 4 (SS4) plays a specific role in starch synthesis because it controls the number of starch granules synthesized in the chloroplast and is involved in the initiation of the starch granule. We showed previously that SS4 interacts with fibrillins 1 and is associated with plastoglobules, suborganelle compartments physically attached to the thylakoid membrane in chloroplasts. Both SS4 localization and its interaction with fibrillins 1 were mediated by the N-terminal part of SS4. Here we show that the coiled-coil region within the N-terminal portion of SS4 is involved in both processes. Elimination of this region prevents SS4 from binding to fibrillins 1 and alters SS4 localization in the chloroplast. We also show that SS4 forms dimers, which depends on a region located between the coiled-coil region and the glycosyltransferase domain of SS4. This region is highly conserved between all SS4 enzymes sequenced to date. We show that the dimerization seems to be necessary for the activity of the enzyme. Both dimerization and the functionality of the coiled-coil region are conserved among SS4 proteins from phylogenetically distant species, such as Arabidopsis and Brachypodium This finding suggests that the mechanism of action of SS4 is conserved among different plant species.

  18. Mild water stress of Phaseolus vulgaris plants leads to reduced starch synthesis and extractable sucrose phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vassey, T.L.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Mild water stress, on the order of {minus}1.0 megapascals xylem water potential, can reduce the rate of photosynthesis and eliminate the inhibition of photosynthesis caused by O{sub 2} in water-stress-sensitive plants such as Phaseolus vulgaris. To investigate the lack of O{sub 2} inhibition of photosynthesis, we measured stromal and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, sucrose phosphate synthase, and partitioning of newly fixed carbon between starch and sucrose before, during, and after mild water stress. The extractable activity of the fructose bisphosphatases was unaffected by mild water stress. The extractable activity of SPS was inhibited by more than 60% in plants stressed to water potentials of {minus}0.9 megapascals. Water stress caused a decline in the starch/sucrose partitioning ratio indicating that starch synthesis was inhibited more than sucrose synthesis. We conclude that the reduced rate of photosynthesis during water stress is caused by stomatal closure, and that the restriction of CO{sub 2} supply caused by stomatal closure leads to a reduction in the capacity for both starch and sucrose synthesis. This causes the reduced O{sub 2} inhibition and abrupt CO{sub 2} saturation of photosynthesis.

  19. Functional Interactions between Heterologously Expressed Starch-Branching Enzymes of Maize and the Glycogen Synthases of Brewer's Yeast1

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Beom-seok; Kim, Seungtaek; Scott, M. Paul; Singletary, George W.; Wong, Kit-sum; James, Martha G.; Myers, Alan M.

    2002-01-01

    Starch-branching enzymes (SBEs) catalyze the formation of α(1→6) glycoside bonds in glucan polymers, thus, affecting the structure of amylopectin and starch granules. Two distinct classes of SBE are generally conserved in higher plants, although the specific role(s) of each isoform in determination of starch structure is not clearly understood. This study used a heterologous in vivo system to isolate the function of each of the three known SBE isoforms of maize (Zea mays) away from the other plant enzymes involved in starch biosynthesis. The ascomycete Brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was employed as the host species. All possible combinations of maize SBEs were expressed in the absence of the endogenous glucan-branching enzyme. Each maize SBE was functional in yeast cells, although SBEI had a significant effect only if SBEIIa and SBEIIb also were present. SBEI by itself did not support glucan accumulation, whereas SBEIIa and SBEIIb both functioned along with the native glycogen synthases (GSs) to produce significant quantities of α-glucan polymers. SBEIIa was phenotypically dominant to SBEIIb in terms of glucan structure. The specific branching enzyme present had a significant effect on the molecular weight of the product. From these data we suggest that SBEs and GSs work in a cyclically interdependent fashion, such that SBE action is needed for optimal GS activity; and GS, in turn, influences the further effects of SBE. Also, SBEIIa and SBEIIb appear to act before SBEI during polymer assembly in this heterologous system. PMID:11950968

  20. Expression of the Granule-Bound Starch Synthase I (Waxy) Gene from Snapdragon Is Developmentally and Circadian Clock Regulated1

    PubMed Central

    Mérida, Angel; Rodríguez-Galán, José M.; Vincent, Coral; Romero, José M.

    1999-01-01

    The granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI or waxy) enzyme catalyzes one of the enzymatic steps of starch synthesis. This enzyme is responsible for the synthesis of amylose and is also involved in building the final structure of amylopectin. Little is known about expression of GBSSI genes in tissues other than storage organs, such as seeds, endosperm, and tuber. We have isolated a gene encoding the GBSSI from snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus). This gene is present as a single copy in the snapdragon genome. There is a precise spatial and developmental regulation of its expression in flowers. GBSSI expression was observed in all floral whorls at early developmental stages, but it was restricted to carpel before anthesis. These results give new insights into the role of starch in later reproductive events such as seed filling. In leaves the mRNA level of GBSSI is regulated by an endogenous circadian clock, indicating that the transition from day to night may be accompanied by abolition of expression of starch synthesis genes. This mechanism does not operate in sink tissues such as roots when grown in the dark. PMID:10364391

  1. Functional Interactions between Starch Synthase III and Isoamylase-Type Starch-Debranching Enzyme in Maize Endosperm1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiaohui; Huang, Binquan; Zhang, Mingxu; Zhang, Xiaoli; Rivenbark, Joshua; Lappe, Ryan L.; James, Martha G.; Myers, Alan M.; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A.

    2012-01-01

    This study characterized genetic interactions between the maize (Zea mays) genes dull1 (du1), encoding starch synthase III (SSIII), and isa2, encoding a noncatalytic subunit of heteromeric isoamylase-type starch-debranching enzyme (ISA1/ISA2 heteromer). Mutants lacking ISA2 still possess the ISA1 homomeric enzyme. Eight du1- mutations were characterized, and structural changes in amylopectin resulting from each were measured. In every instance, the same complex pattern of alterations in discontinuous spans of chain lengths was observed, which cannot be explained solely by a discrete range of substrates preferred by SSIII. Homozygous double mutants were constructed containing the null mutation isa2-339 and either du1-Ref, encoding a truncated SSIII protein lacking the catalytic domain, or the null allele du1-R4059. In contrast to the single mutant parents, double mutant endosperms affected in both SSIII and ISA2 were starch deficient and accumulated phytoglycogen. This phenotype was previously observed only in maize sugary1 mutants impaired for the catalytic subunit ISA1. ISA1 homomeric enzyme complexes assembled in both double mutants and were enzymatically active in vitro. Thus, SSIII is required for normal starch crystallization and the prevention of phytoglycogen accumulation when the only isoamylase-type debranching activity present is ISA1 homomer, but not in the wild-type condition, when both ISA1 homomer and ISA1/ISA2 heteromer are present. Previous genetic and biochemical analyses showed that SSIII also is required for normal glucan accumulation when the only isoamylase-type debranching enzyme activity present is ISA1/ISA heteromer. These data indicate that isoamylase-type debranching enzyme and SSIII work in a coordinated fashion to repress phytoglycogen accumulation. PMID:22193705

  2. Preparation and characterization of resistant starch type IV nanoparticles through ultrasonication and miniemulsion cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongbo; Zheng, Jiong; Xia, Xuejuan; Ren, Tingyuan; Kan, Jianquan

    2016-05-05

    This study aimed to assess the properties of resistant starch type IV (chemically modified starch, RS4) prepared from a new and convenient synthesis route by using ultrasonication combined with water-in-oil miniemulsion cross-linking technique. A three-factor Box-Behnken design and optimization was used to minimize particle size through the developed RS4 nanoparticles. The predicted minimized Z-Avel (576.1nm) under the optimum conditions of the process variables (ultrasonic power, 214.57W; sonication time, 114.73min; and oil/water ratio, 10.54:1) was very close to the experimental value (651.0nm) determined in a batch experiment. After preparing the RS4 nanoparticles, morphological, physical, chemical, and functional properties were assessed. Results revealed that RS4 nanoparticle size reached about 600nm. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that ultrasonication induced notches and grooves on the surface. Under polarized light, the polarized cross was impaired. X-ray diffraction results revealed that the crystalline structure was disrupted. Smaller or no endotherms were exhibited in DSC analysis. In the FTIR graph, new peaks at 1532.91 and 1451.50cm(-1) were observed, and pasting properties were reduced. Amylose content, solubility, and SP increased, but RS content decreased. Anti-digestibility remained after ultrasonication. The prepared RS4 nanoparticles could be extensively used in biomedical applications and in the development of new medical materials.

  3. Cloning, expression, and characterization of soluble starch synthase I cDNA from taro (Colocasia esculenta Var. esculenta).

    PubMed

    Lin, Da-Gin; Jeang, Chii-Ling

    2005-10-05

    Soluble starch synthase I (SSSI) cDNA was isolated from taro (Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta) by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends reaction. The transcript of this single-copy gene is 2340 bp and encodes 642 amino acids protein containing a putative transit peptide of 54 residues. Recombinant SSSI protein displayed both primer-dependent and primer-independent activities of starch synthase. More SSSI transcript was expressed in taro leaves than in tubers, with no evident expression in petioles; and more transcript and protein were found in tubers of 597 +/- 37 g of fresh weight than in smaller or larger ones. Two forms of SSSI, i.e., 72 and 66 kDa, exist in leaves, and only the 66 kDa form was found in tubers. The taro SSSI, proposed as a novel member, was located only in the soluble fraction of tuber extract, while SSSI from other sources exist in both soluble and granule-bound forms.

  4. Glycogen synthase from the parabasalian parasite Trichomonas vaginalis: An unusual member of the starch/glycogen synthase family.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wayne A; Pradhan, Prajakta; Madhan, Nayasha; Gist, Galen C; Brittingham, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasitic protist, is the causative agent of the common sexually-transmitted infection trichomoniasis. The organism has long been known to synthesize substantial glycogen as a storage polysaccharide, presumably mobilizing this compound during periods of carbohydrate limitation, such as might be encountered during transmission between hosts. However, little is known regarding the enzymes of glycogen metabolism in T. vaginalis. We had previously described the identification and characterization of two forms of glycogen phosphorylase in the organism. Here, we measure UDP-glucose-dependent glycogen synthase activity in cell-free extracts of T. vaginalis. We then demonstrate that the TVAG_258220 open reading frame encodes a glycosyltransferase that is presumably responsible for this synthetic activity. We show that expression of TVAG_258220 in a yeast strain lacking endogenous glycogen synthase activity is sufficient to restore glycogen accumulation. Furthermore, when TVAG_258220 is expressed in bacteria, the resulting recombinant protein has glycogen synthase activity in vitro, transferring glucose from either UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to glycogen and using both substrates with similar affinity. This protein is also able to transfer glucose from UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to maltose and longer oligomers of glucose but not to glucose itself. However, with these substrates, there is no evidence of processivity and sugar transfer is limited to between one and three glucose residues. Taken together with our earlier work on glycogen phosphorylase, we are now well positioned to define both how T. vaginalis synthesizes and utilizes glycogen, and how these processes are regulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  5. A reduction of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity affects sucrose/starch ratio in leaves but does not inhibit normal plant growth in rice.

    PubMed

    Hashida, Yoichi; Hirose, Tatsuro; Okamura, Masaki; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Ohsugi, Ryu; Aoki, Naohiro

    2016-12-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) has been shown to mediate sucrose/starch ratio in plant leaves through studies of 'starch leaf' species that mainly accumulate starch in their leaves. However, the contribution of SPS to sucrose/starch ratio in rice leaves, which mainly accumulate sucrose (i.e., 'sugar leaf'), has not been confirmed due to inconsistencies in the results of previous studies. In this study, we analyzed mutant lines with reduced SPS activity, which were generated using Tos17 insertion, RNAi, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. The knockdown and knockout mutants of OsSPS1 showed a 29-46% reduction in SPS activity in the leaves, but the carbohydrate content in the leaves and plant growth were not significantly different from those of wild-type plants. In a double knockout mutant of OsSPS1 and OsSPS11 (sps1/sps11), an 84% reduction in leaf SPS activity resulted in higher starch accumulation in the leaves than in the wild-type leaves. However, the sps1/sps11 plants grew normally, which is in contrast to the inhibited growth of SPS mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, a typical starch leaf plant. These results suggest that SPS has a smaller effect on the sucrose/starch ratio in leaves and growth of rice than on starch leaf species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Chen, Ming-Hsuan

    2013-06-05

    Rice, the staple food of south and east Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16, 26, 33, and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Recently, it was documented that the 56 kDa rice allergen was responsible for rice-induced anaphylaxis. The 14-16 kDa allergens have been identified as α-amylase inhibitors; the 26 kDa protein has been identified as α-globulin; and the 33 kDa protein has been identified as glyoxalase I. However, the identity of the 56 kDa rice allergen has not yet been determined. In this study, we demonstrate that serum from patients allergic to maize shows IgE binding to a 56 kDa protein that was present in both maize and rice but not in the oil seeds soybean and peanut. The 56 kDa IgE-binding protein was abundant in the rice endosperm. We have purified this protein from rice endosperm and demonstrated its reactivity to IgE antibodies from the serum of maize-allergic patients. The purified protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, resulting in identification of this rice allergen as granule-bound starch synthase, a product of the Waxy gene. Immunoblot analysis using protein extracts from a waxy mutant of rice revealed the absence of the 56 kDa IgE-binding protein. Our results demonstrate that the 56 kDa rice allergen is granule-bound starch synthase and raise the possibility of using waxy mutants of rice as a potential source of the hypoallergenic diet for patients sensitized to the 56 kDa rice allergen.

  7. Inhibition of the gene expression for granule-bound starch synthase I by RNA interference in sweet potato plants.

    PubMed

    Otani, Motoyasu; Hamada, Tatsuro; Katayama, Kenji; Kitahara, Kakefumi; Kim, Sun-Hyung; Takahata, Yasuhiro; Suganuma, Toshihiko; Shimada, Takiko

    2007-10-01

    Granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) is one of the key enzymes catalyzing the formation of amylose, a linear alpha(1,4)D-glucan polymer, from ADP-glucose. Amylose-free transgenic sweet potato plants were produced by inhibiting sweet potato GBSSI gene expression through RNA interference. The gene construct consisting of an inverted repeat of the first exon separated by intron 1 of GBSSI driven by the CaMV 35S promoter was integrated into the sweet potato genome by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. In over 70% of the regenerated transgenic plants, the expression of GBSSI was inactivated giving rise to storage roots containing amylopectin but not amylose. Electrophoresis analysis failed to detect the GBSSI protein, suggesting that gene silencing of the GBSSI gene had occurred. These results clearly demonstrate that amylose synthesis is completely inhibited in storage roots of sweet potato plants by the constitutive production of the double-stranded RNA of GBSSI fragments. We conclude that RNA interference is an effective method for inhibiting gene expression in the starch metabolic pathway.

  8. Cloning and functional analysis of the promoter of a maize starch synthase III gene (ZmDULL1).

    PubMed

    Wu, J D; Jiang, C P; Zhu, H S; Jiang, H Y; Cheng, B J; Zhu, S W

    2015-05-22

    The ZmDULL1 gene encodes a starch synthase and is a determinant of the structure of endosperm starch in maize (Zea mays L.). However, little is known regarding the regulatory mechanism of the ZmDULL1 gene. In this study, we isolated and characterized the ZmDULL1 promoter (PDULL1), which is the 5' flanking region of ZmDULL1 in maize. Sequence analysis showed that several cis-acting elements important for endosperm expression (GCN4_motif and AACA-element) were located within the promoter. A series of PDULL1 deletion derivatives, PDULL1-1-PDULL1-4, from the translation start code (-1676, -1216, -740, and -343) were fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Each deletion construct was transformed into rice using the Agrobacterium-mediated method, and then GUS activity was measured in transgenic plants. The results showed that PDULL1 was an endosperm-specific promoter. Further analysis showed that the promoter sequence (-343 to -1 base pairs) was sufficient for mediating GUS gene expression in endosperm. These results indicate that the region from -343 to -1 base pairs of PDULL1 is valuable for transgenic rice breeding and genetic engineering studies.

  9. Differences in specificity and compensatory functions among three major starch synthases determine the structure of amylopectin in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Crofts, Naoko; Sugimoto, Kyohei; Oitome, Naoko F; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2017-07-01

    The lengths of amylopectin-branched chains are precise and influence the physicochemical properties of starch, which determine starch functionality. Three major isozymes of starch synthases (SSs), SSI, SSII(a), and SSIII(a), are primarily responsible for amylopectin chain elongation in the storage tissues of plants. To date, the majority of reported rice mutants were generated using japonica cultivars, which have almost inactive SSIIa. Although three SSs share some overlapping chain length preferences, whether they complement each other remains unknown due to the absence of suitable genetic combinations of materials. In this study, rice ss1/SS2a/SS3a and SS1/SS2a/ss3a were newly generated, and the chain length distribution patterns of all the possible combinations of presence and absence of SSI, SSIIa, and SSIIIa activities were compared. This study demonstrated that SSIIa can complement most SSI functions that use glucan chains with DP 6-7 to generate DP 8-12 chains but cannot fully compensate for the elongation of DP 16-19 chains. This suggests that SSIIa preferentially elongates outer but not inner chains of amylopectin. In addition, the results revealed that neither SSI nor SSIIIa compensate for SSIIa. Neither SSI nor SSIIa compensate for elongation of DP >30 by SSIIIa. SSIIa could not resolve the pleiotropic increase of SSI caused by the absence of SSIIIa; instead, SSIIa further elongated those branches elongated by SSI. These results revealed compensatory differences among three major SS isozymes responsible for lengths of amylopectin branches.

  10. Cotton GhCKI disrupts normal male reproduction by delaying tapetum programmed cell death via inactivating starch synthase.

    PubMed

    Min, Ling; Zhu, Longfu; Tu, Lili; Deng, Fenglin; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2013-09-01

    Anther infertility under high temperature (HT) conditions is a critical factor contributing to yield loss in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Using large-scale expression profile sequencing, we studied the effect of HT on cotton anther development. Our analysis revealed that altered carbohydrate metabolism or disrupted tapetal programmed cell death (PCD) underlie anther sterility. Expression of the Gossypium hirsutum casein kinase I (GhCKI) gene, which encodes a homolog of casein kinase I (CKI), was induced in an HT-sensitive cotton line after exposure to HT. As mammalian homologs of GhCKI are involved in inactivation of glycogen synthase and the regulation of apoptosis, GhCKI may be considered a target gene for improving anther fertility under HT conditions. Our studies suggest that GhCKI exhibits starch synthase kinase activity, increases glucose content in early-stage buds and activates the accumulation of abscisic acid, thereby disturbing the balance of reactive oxygen species and eventually disrupting tapetal PCD, leading to anther abortion or indehiscence. These results indicate that GhCKI may be a key regulator of tapetal PCD and anther dehiscence, with the potential to facilitate regulation of HT tolerance in crops. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Type IV resistant starch increases cecum short chain fatty acids level in rats.

    PubMed

    Le Thanh-Blicharz, Joanna; Anioła, Jacek; Kowalczewski, Przemysław; Przygoński, Krzysztof; Zaborowska, Zofia; Lewandowicz, Grażyna

    2014-01-01

    Resistant starches are type of dietary fibers. However, their physiological effects depend on the way they resist digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that new type of RS4 preparations, of in vitro digestibility of about 50%, obtained by cross-linking and acetylation, acts as a prebiotic by increasing short chain fatty acids content in cecum digesta. The rats were fed with diet containing pregelatinized, cross-linked and acetylated starches as a main carbohydrate source. Pregelatinized, but not chemically modified, potato starch was used in the composition of the control diet. After two weeks of experiment the increase of short chain fatty acids contents in ceceum digesta was observed. The intake of starch A, cross-linked only with adipic acid, resulted in increase of about 40% of short chain fatty acids content, whereas starch PA cross-linked with sodium trimetaphosphate and adipic acid of about 50%. The utmost twofold increase was observed in the case of the production of propionic acid. In contrast, the content of butyric acid increased (12%) only as an effect of consumption of starch PA and even decreased (about 30%) in case of starch A. Both RS4 starches caused an increase of the production of acetic acid by more than 40%. No changes in serum biochemistry, liver cholesterol and organ weights of rats were stated.

  12. Nucleotide diversity in starch synthase IIa and validation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in relation to starch gelatinization temperature and other physicochemical properties in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Bao, J S; Corke, H; Sun, M

    2006-11-01

    The characteristics of starch, such as gelatinization temperature (GT), apparent amylose content (AAC), pasting temperature (PT) and other physicochemical properties, determine the quality of various products of rice, e.g., eating, cooking and processing qualities. The GT of rice flour is controlled by the alk locus, which has been co-mapped to the starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) locus. In this study, we sequenced a 2,051 bp DNA fragment spanning part of intron 6, exon 7, intron 7, exon 8 and part of 3' untranslated region of SSIIa for 30 rice varieties with diverse geographical distribution and variation in starch physicochemical properties. A total of 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and one insertion/deletion (InDel) were identified, which could be classified into nine haplotypes. The mean pairwise nucleotide diversity pi was 0.00292, and Watterson's estimator theta was 0.00296 in this collection of rice germplasm. Tajima's D test for selection showed no significant deviation from the neutral expectation (D = - 0.04612, P > 0.10). However, significant associations were found between seven of the SNPs and peak GT (T (p)) at P < 0.05, of which two contiguous SNPs (GC/TT) showed a very strong association with T (p) (P < 0.0001). With some rare exception, this GC/TT polymorphism alone can differentiate rice varieties with high or intermediate GT (possessing the GC allele) from those with low GT (possessing the TT allele). In contrast, none of these SNPs or InDel was significantly associated with amylose content. A further 509 rice varieties with known physicochemical properties (e.g., AAC and PT) and known alleles of other starch synthesizing genes were genotyped for the SSIIa GC/TT alleles. Association analysis indicated that 82% of the total variation of AAC in these samples could be explained by a (CT)n simple sequence repeat (SSR) and a G/T SNP of Waxy gene (Wx), and 62.4% of the total variation of PT could be explained by the GC/TT polymorphism. An

  13. Enhancing sucrose synthase activity in transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers results in increased levels of starch, ADPglucose and UDPglucose and total yield.

    PubMed

    Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Montero, Manuel; Etxeberria, Ed; Sesma, María Teresa; Ovecka, Miroslav; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Ezquer, Ignacio; Li, Jun; Prat, Salomé; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2009-09-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is a highly regulated cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of sucrose and a nucleoside diphosphate into the corresponding nucleoside diphosphate glucose and fructose. To determine the impact of SuSy activity in starch metabolism and yield in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers we measured sugar levels and enzyme activities in tubers of SuSy-overexpressing potato plants grown in greenhouse and open field conditions. We also transcriptionally characterized tubers of SuSy-overexpressing and -antisensed potato plants. SuSy-overexpressing tubers exhibited a substantial increase in starch, UDPglucose and ADPglucose content when compared with controls. Tuber dry weight, starch content per plant and total yield of SuSy-overexpressing tubers increased significantly over those of control plants. In contrast, activities of enzymes directly involved in starch metabolism in SuSy-overexpressing tubers were normal when compared with controls. Transcriptomic analyses using POCI arrays and the MapMan software revealed that changes in SuSy activity affect the expression of genes involved in multiple biological processes, but not that of genes directly involved in starch metabolism. These analyses also revealed a reverse correlation between the expressions of acid invertase and SuSy-encoding genes, indicating that the balance between SuSy- and acid invertase-mediated sucrolytic pathways is a major determinant of starch accumulation in potato tubers. Results presented in this work show that SuSy strongly determines the intracellular levels of UDPglucose, ADPglucose and starch, and total yield in potato tubers. We also show that enhancement of SuSy activity represents a useful strategy for increasing starch accumulation and yield in potato tubers.

  14. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M.; Marri, Lucia; Mellor, Silas B.; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Jensen, Poul E.; Palcic, Monica M.; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98–99%). In addition of being part of a redox directed activity “light switch”, reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these findings

  15. Chemical synthesis of methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside and its use for investigation of the action of starch synthase II.

    PubMed

    Damager, Iben; Olsen, Carl Erik; Blennow, Andreas; Denyer, Kay; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik

    2003-01-20

    The branched pentasaccharide methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside was chemically synthesised and investigated as a primer for particulate starch synthase II (SSII) using starch granules prepared from the low-amylose pea mutant lam as the enzyme source. For chemical synthesis, the trichloroacetimidate activation method was used to synthesise methyl O-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->4)-O-(2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->6)-O-[(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-O-(2,3-di-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->4)-2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside, which was then debenzylated to provide the desired branched pentasaccharide methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside as documented by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Using a large excess of the maltoside, the pentasaccharide was tested as a substrate for starch synthase II (SSII). Both of the non-reducing ends of methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside were extended equally resulting in two hexasaccharide products in nearly equal amounts. Thus, SSII catalyses an equimolar and non-processive elongation reaction of this substrate. Accordingly, the presence of the alpha-1,6 linkages does not dictate a specific structure of the pentasaccharide in which only one of the two non-reducing ends are available for extension.

  16. Enhancing sucrose synthase activity results in increased levels of starch and ADP-glucose in maize (Zea mays L.) seed endosperms.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Muñoz, Francisco José; Ovecka, Miroslav; Montero, Manuel; Sesma, María Teresa; Alonso-Casajús, Nora; Almagro, Goizeder; Sánchez-López, Angela María; Hidalgo, Maite; Zamarbide, Marta; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is a highly regulated cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of sucrose and a nucleoside diphosphate into the corresponding nucleoside diphosphate glucose and fructose. In cereal endosperms, it is widely assumed that the stepwise reactions of SuSy, UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase and ADPglucose (ADPG) pyrophosphorylase (AGP) take place in the cytosol to convert sucrose into ADPG necessary for starch biosynthesis, although it has also been suggested that SuSy may participate in the direct conversion of sucrose into ADPG. In this study, the levels of the major primary carbon metabolites, and the activities of starch metabolism-related enzymes were assessed in endosperms of transgenic maize plants ectopically expressing StSUS4, which encodes a potato SuSy isoform. A total of 29 fertile lines transformed with StSUS4 were obtained, five of them containing a single copy of the transgene that was still functional after five generations. The number of seeds per ear of the five transgenic lines containing a single StSUS4 copy was comparable with that of wild-type (WT) control seeds. However, transgenic seeds accumulated 10-15% more starch at the mature stage, and contained a higher amylose/amylopectin balance than WT seeds. Endosperms of developing StSUS4-expressing seeds exhibited a significant increase in SuSy activity, and in starch and ADPG contents when compared with WT endosperms. No significant changes could be detected in the transgenic seeds in the content of soluble sugars, and in activities of starch metabolism-related enzymes when compared with WT seeds. A suggested metabolic model is presented wherein both AGP and SuSy are involved in the production of ADPG linked to starch biosynthesis in maize endosperm cells.

  17. Heterogeneity of poly(A) sites in the granule-bound starch synthase I gene in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.).

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takashi; Saito, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the cDNAs of granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) in sweet potato indicated that six types of GBSSI were expressed in the tuberous root, and that the poly(A) sites in GBSSI were highly heterogeneous. Several poly(A) sites were located within or downstream of the polymorphic TA repeat. The GBSSI gene has a 23-nucleotide A-rich sequence in the 3' untranslated region, and we believe that the main near-upstream elements of the poly(A) signal are included in this sequence.

  18. New Starch Phenotypes Produced by TILLING in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Sparla, Francesca; Falini, Giuseppe; Botticella, Ermelinda; Pirone, Claudia; Talamè, Valentina; Bovina, Riccardo; Salvi, Silvio; Tuberosa, Roberto; Sestili, Francesco; Trost, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Barley grain starch is formed by amylose and amylopectin in a 1∶3 ratio, and is packed into granules of different dimensions. The distribution of granule dimension is bimodal, with a majority of small spherical B-granules and a smaller amount of large discoidal A-granules containing the majority of the starch. Starch granules are semi-crystalline structures with characteristic X-ray diffraction patterns. Distinct features of starch granules are controlled by different enzymes and are relevant for nutritional value or industrial applications. Here, the Targeting-Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING) approach was applied on the barley TILLMore TILLING population to identify 29 new alleles in five genes related to starch metabolism known to be expressed in the endosperm during grain filling: BMY1 (Beta-amylase 1), GBSSI (Granule Bound Starch Synthase I), LDA1 (Limit Dextrinase 1), SSI (Starch Synthase I), SSIIa (Starch Synthase IIa). Reserve starch of nine M3 mutant lines carrying missense or nonsense mutations was analysed for granule size, crystallinity and amylose/amylopectin content. Seven mutant lines presented starches with different features in respect to the wild-type: (i) a mutant line with a missense mutation in GBSSI showed a 4-fold reduced amylose/amylopectin ratio; (ii) a missense mutations in SSI resulted in 2-fold increase in A:B granule ratio; (iii) a nonsense mutation in SSIIa was associated with shrunken seeds with a 2-fold increased amylose/amylopectin ratio and different type of crystal packing in the granule; (iv) the remaining four missense mutations suggested a role of LDA1 in granule initiation, and of SSIIa in determining the size of A-granules. We demonstrate the feasibility of the TILLING approach to identify new alleles in genes related to starch metabolism in barley. Based on their novel physicochemical properties, some of the identified new mutations may have nutritional and/or industrial applications. PMID:25271438

  19. Comparative in vitro analyses of recombinant maize starch synthases SSI, SSIIa, and SSIII reveal direct regulatory interactions and thermosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Binquan; Keeling, Peter L; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A; Myers, Alan M

    2016-04-15

    Starch synthases SSI, SSII, and SSIII function in assembling the amylopectin component of starch, but their specific roles and means of coordination are not fully understood. Genetic analyses indicate regulatory interactions among SS classes, and physical interactions among them are known. The N terminal extension of cereal SSIII, comprising up to 1200 residues beyond the catalytic domain, is responsible at least in part for these interactions. Recombinant maize SSI, SSIIa, and full-length or truncated SSIII, were tested for functional interactions regarding enzymatic activity. Amino-terminal truncated SSIII exhibited reduced activity compared to full-length enzyme, and addition of the N terminus to the truncated protein stimulated catalytic activity. SSIII and SSI displayed a negative interaction that reduced total activity in a reconstituted system. These data demonstrate that SSIII is both a catalytic and regulatory factor. SSIII activity was reduced by approximately 50% after brief incubation at 45 °C, suggesting a role in reduced starch accumulation during growth in high temperatures. Buffer effects were tested to address a current debate regarding the SS mechanism. Glucan stimulated the SSIIa and SSIII reaction rate regardless of the buffer system, supporting the accepted mechanism in which glucosyl units are added to exogenous primer substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are Involved in Determining the Poly(A) Length of Granule-bound starch synthase 1 Transcript and Modulating Sucrose and Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuya; Arae, Toshihiro; Green, Pamela J; Yamaguchi, Junji; Chiba, Yukako

    2015-05-01

    Removing the poly(A) tail is the first and rate-limiting step of mRNA degradation and apparently an effective step not only for modulating mRNA stability but also for translation of many eukaryotic transcripts. Carbon catabolite repressor 4 (CCR4) has been identified as a major cytoplasmic deadenylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Arabidopsis thaliana homologs of the yeast CCR4, AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b, were identified by sequence-based analysis; however, their role and physiological significance in plants remain to be elucidated. In this study, we revealed that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are localized to cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies, which are specific granules consisting of many enzymes involved in mRNA turnover. Double mutants of AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b exhibited tolerance to sucrose application but not to glucose. The levels of sucrose in the seedlings of the atccr4a/4b double mutants were reduced, whereas no difference was observed in glucose levels. Further, amylose levels were slightly but significantly increased in the atccr4a/4b double mutants. Consistent with this observation, we found that the transcript encoding granule-bound starch synthase 1 (GBSS1), which is responsible for amylose synthesis, is accumulated to a higher level in the atccr4a/4b double mutant plants than in the control plants. Moreover, we revealed that GBSS1 has a longer poly(A) tail in the double mutant than in the control plant, suggesting that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b can influence the poly(A) length of transcripts related to starch metabolism. Our results collectively suggested that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are involved in sucrose and starch metabolism in A. thaliana.

  1. Deficiencies in both starch synthase IIIa and branching enzyme IIb lead to a significant increase in amylose in SSIIa-inactive japonica rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Asai, Hiroki; Abe, Natsuko; Matsushima, Ryo; Crofts, Naoko; Oitome, Naoko F; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2014-10-01

    Starch synthase (SS) IIIa has the second highest activity of the total soluble SS activity in developing rice endosperm. Branching enzyme (BE) IIb is the major BE isozyme, and is strongly expressed in developing rice endosperm. A mutant (ss3a/be2b) was generated from wild-type japonica rice which lacks SSIIa activity. The seed weight of ss3a/be2b was 74-94% of that of the wild type, whereas the be2b seed weight was 59-73% of that of the wild type. There were significantly fewer amylopectin short chains [degree of polymerization (DP) ≤13] in ss3a/be2b compared with the wild type. In contrast, the amount of long chains (DP ≥25) connecting clusters of amylopectin in ss3a/be2b was higher than in the wild type and lower than in be2b. The apparent amylose content of ss3a/be2b was 45%, which was >1.5 times greater than that of either ss3a or be2b. Both SSIIIa and BEIIb deficiencies led to higher activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI), which partly explains the high amylose content in the ss3a/be2b endosperm. The percentage apparent amylose content of ss3a and ss3a/be2b at 10 days after flowering (DAF) was higher than that of the wild type and be2b. At 20 DAF, amylopectin biosynthesis in be2b and ss3a/be2b was not observed, whereas amylose biosynthesis in these lines was accelerated at 30 DAF. These data suggest that the high amylose content in the ss3a/be2b mutant results from higher amylose biosynthesis at two stages, up to 20 DAF and from 30 DAF to maturity.

  2. Diversification of Genes Encoding Granule-Bound Starch Synthase in Monocots and Dicots Is Marked by Multiple Genome-Wide Duplication Events

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Ming; Li, Jing; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Qiong; Guo, Wenwu; Zhu, Tingting; Peng, Junhua; Sun, Fengjie; Li, Shaohua; Korban, Schuyler S.; Han, Yuepeng

    2012-01-01

    Starch is one of the major components of cereals, tubers, and fruits. Genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), which is responsible for amylose synthesis, have been extensively studied in cereals but little is known about them in fruits. Due to their low copy gene number, GBSS genes have been used to study plant phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships. In this study, GBSS genes have been isolated and characterized in three fruit trees, including apple, peach, and orange. Moreover, a comprehensive evolutionary study of GBSS genes has also been conducted between both monocots and eudicots. Results have revealed that genomic structures of GBSS genes in plants are conserved, suggesting they all have evolved from a common ancestor. In addition, the GBSS gene in an ancestral angiosperm must have undergone genome duplication ∼251 million years ago (MYA) to generate two families, GBSSI and GBSSII. Both GBSSI and GBSSII are found in monocots; however, GBSSI is absent in eudicots. The ancestral GBSSII must have undergone further divergence when monocots and eudicots split ∼165 MYA. This is consistent with expression profiles of GBSS genes, wherein these profiles are more similar to those of GBSSII in eudicots than to those of GBSSI genes in monocots. In dicots, GBSSII must have undergone further divergence when rosids and asterids split from each other ∼126 MYA. Taken together, these findings suggest that it is GBSSII rather than GBSSI of monocots that have orthologous relationships with GBSS genes of eudicots. Moreover, diversification of GBSS genes is mainly associated with genome-wide duplication events throughout the evolutionary course of history of monocots and eudicots. PMID:22291904

  3. Starch biosynthesis: experiments on how starch granules grow in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mukerjea, Romila; Mukerjea, Rupendra; Robyt, John F

    2009-01-05

    Four varieties of starch granules from potato, wheat, maize, and rice were fractionated into homogeneous 10-microm-sized ranges. The size with the largest amount of granules was reacted with ADP-[(14)C]Glc, washed, and peeled into 7-9 layers, using a controlled peeling process, involving 90:10 volume proportions of Me(2)SO-H(2)O at 10 degrees C. All of the starches showed biosynthesis of starch throughout the granules. Starch synthase activities were determined for each of the layers. Three of the starches had a relatively large amount of synthase activity in the second layer, with only a small amount in the first layer. Potato starch had the largest amount of activity in the first layer. Starch synthase activity was found to alternate between higher and lower activities throughout all of the varieties of granules, showing that the synthesis was not uniform and also was not exclusively occurring at the surface of the starch granules, which had previously been hypothesized. From these results and our previous studies on the mechanism of starch chain elongation by the addition of d-glucose to the reducing end of a growing chain that is covalently attached to the active site of starch synthase, a hypothesis is proposed for how starch granules grow in vivo.

  4. Starch metabolism in leaves.

    PubMed

    Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2008-01-01

    Starch is the most abundant storage carbohydrate produced in plants. The initiation of transitory starch synthesis and degradation in plastids depends mainly on diurnal cycle, post-translational regulation of enzyme activity and starch phosphorylation. For the proper structure of starch granule the activities of all starch synthase isoenzymes, branching enzymes and debranching enzymes are needed. The intensity of starch biosynthesis depends mainly on the activity of AGPase (adenosine 5'-diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase). The key enzymes in starch degradation are beta-amylase, isoamylase 3 and disproportionating enzyme. However, it should be underlined that there are some crucial differences in starch metabolism between heterotrophic and autotrophic tissues, e.g. is the ability to build multiprotein complexes responsible for biosynthesis and degradation of starch granules in chloroplasts. The observed huge progress in understanding of starch metabolism was possible mainly due to analyses of the complete Arabidopsis and rice genomes and of numerous mutants with altered starch metabolism in leaves. The aim of this paper is to review current knowledge on transient starch metabolism in higher plants.

  5. Loss of the two major leaf isoforms of sucrose-phosphate synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana limits sucrose synthesis and nocturnal starch degradation but does not alter carbon partitioning during photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Volkert, Kathrin; Debast, Stefan; Voll, Lars M; Voll, Hildegard; Schießl, Ingrid; Hofmann, Jörg; Schneider, Sabine; Börnke, Frederik

    2014-10-01

    Sucrose (Suc)-phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyses one of the rate-limiting steps in the synthesis of Suc in plants. The Arabidopsis genome contains four annotated SPS genes which can be grouped into three different families (SPSA1, SPSA2, SPSB, and SPSC). However, the functional significance of this multiplicity of SPS genes is as yet only poorly understood. All four SPS isoforms show enzymatic activity when expressed in yeast although there is variation in sensitivity towards allosteric effectors. Promoter-reporter gene analyses and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR studies indicate that no two SPS genes have the same expression pattern and that AtSPSA1 and AtSPSC represent the major isoforms expressed in leaves. An spsa1 knock-out mutant showed a 44% decrease in leaf SPS activity and a slight increase in leaf starch content at the end of the light period as well as at the end of the dark period. The spsc null mutant displayed reduced Suc contents towards the end of the photoperiod and a concomitant 25% reduction in SPS activity. In contrast, an spsa1/spsc double mutant was strongly impaired in growth and accumulated high levels of starch. This increase in starch was probably not due to an increased partitioning of carbon into starch, but was rather caused by an impaired starch mobilization during the night. Suc export from excised petioles harvested from spsa1/spsc double mutant plants was significantly reduced under illumination as well as during the dark period. It is concluded that loss of the two major SPS isoforms in leaves limits Suc synthesis without grossly changing carbon partitioning in favour of starch during the light period but limits starch degradation during the dark period.

  6. Loss of the two major leaf isoforms of sucrose-phosphate synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana limits sucrose synthesis and nocturnal starch degradation but does not alter carbon partitioning during photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Volkert, Kathrin; Debast, Stefan; Voll, Lars M.; Voll, Hildegard; Schießl, Ingrid; Hofmann, Jörg; Schneider, Sabine; Börnke, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc)-phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyses one of the rate-limiting steps in the synthesis of Suc in plants. The Arabidopsis genome contains four annotated SPS genes which can be grouped into three different families (SPSA1, SPSA2, SPSB, and SPSC). However, the functional significance of this multiplicity of SPS genes is as yet only poorly understood. All four SPS isoforms show enzymatic activity when expressed in yeast although there is variation in sensitivity towards allosteric effectors. Promoter–reporter gene analyses and quantitative real-time reverse transcription–PCR studies indicate that no two SPS genes have the same expression pattern and that AtSPSA1 and AtSPSC represent the major isoforms expressed in leaves. An spsa1 knock-out mutant showed a 44% decrease in leaf SPS activity and a slight increase in leaf starch content at the end of the light period as well as at the end of the dark period. The spsc null mutant displayed reduced Suc contents towards the end of the photoperiod and a concomitant 25% reduction in SPS activity. In contrast, an spsa1/spsc double mutant was strongly impaired in growth and accumulated high levels of starch. This increase in starch was probably not due to an increased partitioning of carbon into starch, but was rather caused by an impaired starch mobilization during the night. Suc export from excised petioles harvested from spsa1/spsc double mutant plants was significantly reduced under illumination as well as during the dark period. It is concluded that loss of the two major SPS isoforms in leaves limits Suc synthesis without grossly changing carbon partitioning in favour of starch during the light period but limits starch degradation during the dark period. PMID:24994761

  7. Elongated phytoglycogen chain length in transgenic rice endosperm expressing active starch synthase IIa affects the altered solubility and crystallinity of the storage α-glucan

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naoko; Toyosawa, Yoshiko; Utsumi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the solubility, crystallinity, and length of the unit chains of plant storage α-glucan was investigated by manipulating the chain length of α-glucans accumulated in a rice mutant. Transgenic lines were produced by introducing a cDNA for starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) from an indica cultivar (SSIIa I, coding for active SSIIa) into an isoamylase1 (ISA1)-deficient mutant (isa1) that was derived from a japonica cultivar (bearing inactive SSIIa proteins). The water-soluble fraction accounted for >95% of the total α-glucan in the isa1 mutant, whereas it was only 35–70% in the transgenic SSIIa I /isa1 lines. Thus, the α-glucans from the SSIIa I /isa1 lines were fractionated into soluble and insoluble fractions prior to the following characterizations. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a weak B-type crystallinity for the α-glucans of the insoluble fraction, while no crystallinity was confirmed for α-glucans in isa1. Concerning the degree of polymerization (DP) ≤30, the chain lengths of these α-glucans differed significantly in the order of SSIIa I /isa1 insoluble > SSIIa I /isa1 soluble > α-glucans in isa1. The amount of long chains with DP ≥33 was higher in the insoluble fraction α-glucans than in the other two α-glucans. No difference was observed in the chain length distributions of the β-amylase limit dextrins among these α-glucans. These results suggest that in the SSIIa I /isa1 transgenic lines, the unit chains of α-glucans were elongated by SSIIaI, whereas the expression of SSIIaI did not affect the branch positions. Thus, the observed insolubility and crystallinity of the insoluble fraction can be attributed to the elongated length of the outer chains due to SSIIaI. PMID:23048127

  8. Analysis of the functional interaction of Arabidopsis starch synthase and branching enzyme isoforms reveals that the cooperative action of SSI and BEs results in glucans with polymodal chain length distribution similar to amylopectin.

    PubMed

    Brust, Henrike; Lehmann, Tanja; D'Hulst, Christophe; Fettke, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Starch synthase (SS) and branching enzyme (BE) establish the two glycosidic linkages existing in starch. Both enzymes exist as several isoforms. Enzymes derived from several species were studied extensively both in vivo and in vitro over the last years, however, analyses of a functional interaction of SS and BE isoforms are missing so far. Here, we present data from in vitro studies including both interaction of leaf derived and heterologously expressed SS and BE isoforms. We found that SSI activity in native PAGE without addition of glucans was dependent on at least one of the two BE isoforms active in Arabidopsis leaves. This interaction is most likely not based on a physical association of the enzymes, as demonstrated by immunodetection and native PAGE mobility analysis of SSI, BE2, and BE3. The glucans formed by the action of SSI/BEs were analysed using leaf protein extracts from wild type and be single mutants (Atbe2 and Atbe3 mutant lines) and by different combinations of recombinant proteins. Chain length distribution (CLD) patterns of the formed glucans were irrespective of SSI and BE isoforms origin and still independent of assay conditions. Furthermore, we show that all SS isoforms (SSI-SSIV) were able to interact with BEs and form branched glucans. However, only SSI/BEs generated a polymodal distribution of glucans which was similar to CLD pattern detected in amylopectin of Arabidopsis leaf starch. We discuss the impact of the SSI/BEs interplay for the CLD pattern of amylopectin.

  9. Analysis of the Functional Interaction of Arabidopsis Starch Synthase and Branching Enzyme Isoforms Reveals that the Cooperative Action of SSI and BEs Results in Glucans with Polymodal Chain Length Distribution Similar to Amylopectin

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Henrike; Lehmann, Tanja; D'Hulst, Christophe; Fettke, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Starch synthase (SS) and branching enzyme (BE) establish the two glycosidic linkages existing in starch. Both enzymes exist as several isoforms. Enzymes derived from several species were studied extensively both in vivo and in vitro over the last years, however, analyses of a functional interaction of SS and BE isoforms are missing so far. Here, we present data from in vitro studies including both interaction of leaf derived and heterologously expressed SS and BE isoforms. We found that SSI activity in native PAGE without addition of glucans was dependent on at least one of the two BE isoforms active in Arabidopsis leaves. This interaction is most likely not based on a physical association of the enzymes, as demonstrated by immunodetection and native PAGE mobility analysis of SSI, BE2, and BE3. The glucans formed by the action of SSI/BEs were analysed using leaf protein extracts from wild type and be single mutants (Atbe2 and Atbe3 mutant lines) and by different combinations of recombinant proteins. Chain length distribution (CLD) patterns of the formed glucans were irrespective of SSI and BE isoforms origin and still independent of assay conditions. Furthermore, we show that all SS isoforms (SSI-SSIV) were able to interact with BEs and form branched glucans. However, only SSI/BEs generated a polymodal distribution of glucans which was similar to CLD pattern detected in amylopectin of Arabidopsis leaf starch. We discuss the impact of the SSI/BEs interplay for the CLD pattern of amylopectin. PMID:25014622

  10. Starch biosynthesis in cereal endosperm.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Seong; Ryoo, Nayeon; Hahn, Tae-Ryong; Walia, Harkamal; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2010-06-01

    Stored starch generally consists of two d-glucose homopolymers, the linear polymer amylose and a highly branched glucan amylopectin that connects linear chains. Amylopectin structurally contributes to the crystalline organization of the starch granule in cereals. In the endosperm, amylopectin biosynthesis requires the proper execution of a coordinated series of enzymatic reactions involving ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), soluble starch synthase (SS), starch branching enzyme (BE), and starch debranching enzyme (DBE), whereas amylose is synthesized by AGPase and granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS). It is highly possible that plastidial starch phosphorylase (Pho1) plays an important role in the formation of primers for starch biosynthesis in the endosperm. Recent advances in our understanding of the functions of individual enzyme isoforms have provided new insights into how linear polymer chains and branch linkages are synthesized in cereals. In particular, genetic analyses of a suite of mutants have formed the basis of a new model outlining the role of various enzyme isoforms in cereal starch production. In our current review, we summarize the recent research findings related to starch biosynthesis in cereal endosperm, with a particular focus on rice.

  11. Low energy costs of F1Fo ATP synthase reversal in colon carcinoma cells deficient in mitochondrial complex IV.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Alexander V; Andreev, Dmitry E; Baranov, Pavel V; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial polarisation is paramount for a variety of cellular functions. Under ischemia, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and proton gradient (ΔpH) are maintained via a reversal of mitochondrial F1Fo ATP synthase (mATPase), which can rapidly deplete ATP and drive cells into energy crisis. We found that under normal conditions in cells with disassembled cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX-deficient HCT116), mATPase maintains ΔΨm at levels only 15-20% lower than in WT cells, and for this utilises relatively little ATP. For a small energy expenditure, mATPase enables mitochondrial ΔpH, protein import, Ca(2+) turnover, and supports free radical detoxication machinery enlarged to protect the cells from oxidative damage. Whereas in COX-deficient cells the main source of ATP is glycolysis, the ΔΨm is still maintained upon inhibition of the adenine nucleotide translocators with bongkrekic acid and carboxyatractyloside, indicating that the role of ANTs is redundant, and matrix substrate level phosphorylation alone or in cooperation with ATP-Mg/Pi carriers can continuously support the mATPase activity. Intriguingly, we found that mitochondrial complex III is active, and it contributes not only to free radical production, but also to ΔΨm maintenance and energy budget of COX-deficient cells. Overall, this study demonstrates that F1Fo ATP synthase can support general mitochondrial and cellular functions, working in extremely efficient 'energy saving' reverse mode and flexibly recruiting free radical detoxication and ATP producing / transporting pathways.

  12. Development of an efficient agrobacterium-mediated gene targeting system for rice and analysis of rice knockouts lacking granule-bound starch synthase (Waxy) and β1,2-xylosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Kenjirou; Wakasa, Yuhya; Ogo, Yuko; Matsuo, Kouki; Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a high-frequency method for Agrobacterium-mediated gene targeting by combining an efficient transformation system using rice suspension-cultured calli and a positive/negative selection system. Compared with the conventional transformation system using calli on solid medium, transformation using suspension-cultured calli resulted in a 5- to 10-fold increase in the number of resistant calli per weight of starting material after positive/negative selection. Homologous recombination occurred in about 1.5% of the positive/negative selected calli. To evaluate the efficacy of our method, we show in this report that knockout rice plants containing either a disrupted Waxy (granule-bound starch synthase) or a disrupted Xyl (β1,2-xylosyltransferase) gene can be easily obtained by homologous recombination. Study of gene function using homologous recombination in higher plants can now be considered routine work as a direct result of this technical advance.

  13. Characterization of multiple SPS knockout mutants reveals redundant functions of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase isoforms in plant viability, and strongly indicates that enhanced respiration and accelerated starch turnover can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bahaji, Abdellatif; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Ricarte-Bermejo, Adriana; Sánchez-López, Ángela María; Muñoz, Francisco José; Romero, Jose M; Ruiz, María Teresa; Baslam, Marouane; Almagro, Goizeder; Sesma, María Teresa; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2015-09-01

    We characterized multiple knock-out mutants of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase (SPSA1, SPSA2, SPSB and SPSC) isoforms. Despite their reduced SPS activity, spsa1/spsa2, spsa1/spsb, spsa2/spsb, spsa2/spsc, spsb/spsc, spsa1/spsa2/spsb and spsa2/spsb/spsc mutants displayed wild type (WT) vegetative and reproductive morphology, and showed WT photosynthetic capacity and respiration. In contrast, growth of rosettes, flowers and siliques of the spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc mutants was reduced compared with WT plants. Furthermore, these plants displayed a high dark respiration phenotype. spsa1/spsb/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsb/spsc seeds poorly germinated and produced aberrant and sterile plants. Leaves of all viable sps mutants, except spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc, accumulated WT levels of nonstructural carbohydrates. spsa1/spsc leaves possessed high levels of metabolic intermediates and activities of enzymes of the glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways, and accumulated high levels of metabolic intermediates of the nocturnal starch-to-sucrose conversion process, even under continuous light conditions. Results presented in this work show that SPS is essential for plant viability, reveal redundant functions of the four SPS isoforms in processes that are important for plant growth and nonstructural carbohydrate metabolism, and strongly indicate that accelerated starch turnover and enhanced respiration can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis in spsa1/spsc leaves.

  14. Postprandial glucose, insulin and gastrointestinal hormones in healthy and diabetic subjects fed a fructose-free and resistant starch type IV-enriched enteral formula.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Cruz Erika; Mesa, María Dolores; Olza, Josune; Buccianti, Gilda; Pérez, Milagros; Moreno-Torres, Rosario; Pérez de la Cruz, Antonio; Gil, Angel

    2013-09-01

    Reducing the dietary glycaemic response has been proposed as a means of reducing the risk of diabetes. To evaluate the effects of a new diabetes-specific formula (DSF) enriched with resistant starch type IV and fructose-free on postprandial glycaemia, insulinaemia and gastrointestinal hormones in healthy volunteers and in outpatient type 2 diabetics. (1) Twenty-four healthy volunteers were divided into two groups: Group 1 ( n = 10) was provided 50 g of the carbohydrate (CHO) constituent of the new product and 50 g of glucose separated by 1 week; Group 2 ( n = 14) was provided 400 ml of the new DSF (T-Diet Plus(®) Diabet NP) and 400 ml of a control product separated by 1 week. (2) Ten type 2 diabetic patients received 400 ml of the new DSF and two other commercially available DSF (Glucerna(®) SR and Novasource(®) Diabet) on three occasions separated by 1 week. Venous blood samples were drawn at time 0 and at different times until 120 min. Glucose, insulin and gastrointestinal hormones were determined. Glycaemic and insulinaemic indices and glycaemic load were calculated. The CHO constituent and the new DSF showed low glycaemic index and glycaemic load. In healthy subjects, insulin and C-peptide release were lower after administration of the CHO constituent as well as after the new DSF (P < 0.001). Ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) production were lower after intake of the CHO constituent (P ranging from <0.001 to 0.019) compared with glucose, and GIP was lower after ingestion of the new DSF (P = 0.002) than after the control product. In type 2 diabetic patients, glucose AUC was lower after the administration of the new DSF (P = 0.037) compared with the others. Our results indicate that this new product could be beneficial for diabetic patients.

  15. Starch poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Cooking starch poisoning; Laundry starch poisoning ... Cooking and laundry starch are both made from vegetable products, most commonly: Corn Potatoes Rice Wheat Both are usually considered nonpoisonous (nontoxic), but ...

  16. Physicochemical properties of starches and proteins in alkali-treated mungbean and cassava starch granules.

    PubMed

    Israkarn, Kamolwan; Na Nakornpanom, Nantarat; Hongsprabhas, Parichat

    2014-05-25

    This study explored the influences of envelope integrity of cooked starch granules on physicochemical and thermophysical properties of mungbean and cassava starches. Alkali treatment was used to selectively leach amylose from the amorphous region of both starches and partially fragmented starch molecules into lower-molecular-weight polymers. It was found that despite the loss of 40% of the original content of amylose, both mungbean and cassava starches retained similar crystallinities, gelatinization temperature ranges, and pasting profiles compared to the native starches. However, the loss of granule-bound starch synthases during alkali treatment and subsequent alkali cooking in excess water played significant roles in determining granular disintegration. The alterations in envelope integrity due to the negative charge repulsion among polymers within the envelope of swollen granules, and the fragmentation of starch molecules, were responsible for the alterations in thermophysical properties of mungbean and cassava starches cooked under alkaline conditions.

  17. Starch gelatinization.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Wajira S; Jackson, David S

    2009-01-01

    Starch occurs as highly organized structures, known as starch granules. Starch has unique thermal properties and functionality that have permitted its wide use in food products and industrial applications. When heated in water, starch undergoes a transition process, during which the granules break down into a mixture of polymers-in-solution, known as gelatinization. The sequence of structural transformations that the starch granule undergoes during this order-to-disorder transition has been extensively researched. None of the published starch gelatinization theories can fully and adequately explain the exact mechanism of sequential structural changes that starch granules undergo during gelatinization. This chapter analyzes several published theories and summarizes our current understanding of the starch gelatinization process.

  18. Starch Synthesis in Arabidopsis. Granule Synthesis, Composition, and Structure1

    PubMed Central

    Zeeman, Samuel C.; Tiessen, Axel; Pilling, Emma; Kato, K. Lisa; Donald, Athene M.; Smith, Alison M.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize starch synthesis, composition, and granule structure in Arabidopsis leaves. First, the potential role of starch-degrading enzymes during starch accumulation was investigated. To discover whether simultaneous synthesis and degradation of starch occurred during net accumulation, starch was labeled by supplying 14CO2 to intact, photosynthesizing plants. Release of this label from starch was monitored during a chase period in air, using different light intensities to vary the net rate of starch synthesis. No release of label was detected unless there was net degradation of starch during the chase. Similar experiments were performed on a mutant line (dbe1) that accumulates the soluble polysaccharide, phytoglycogen. Label was not released from phytoglycogen during the chase indicating that, even when in a soluble form, glucan is not appreciably degraded during accumulation. Second, the effect on starch composition of growth conditions and mutations causing starch accumulation was studied. An increase in starch content correlated with an increased amylose content of the starch and with an increase in the ratio of granule-bound starch synthase to soluble starch synthase activity. Third, the structural organization and morphology of Arabidopsis starch granules was studied. The starch granules were birefringent, indicating a radial organization of the polymers, and x-ray scatter analyses revealed that granules contained alternating crystalline and amorphous lamellae with a periodicity of 9 nm. Granules from the wild type and the high-starch mutant sex1 were flattened and discoid, whereas those of the high-starch mutant sex4 were larger and more rounded. These larger granules contained “growth rings” with a periodicity of 200 to 300 nm. We conclude that leaf starch is synthesized without appreciable turnover and comprises similar polymers and contains similar levels of molecular organization to storage starches, making Arabidopsis

  19. Starch synthesis in Arabidopsis. Granule synthesis, composition, and structure.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Samuel C; Tiessen, Axel; Pilling, Emma; Kato, K Lisa; Donald, Athene M; Smith, Alison M

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize starch synthesis, composition, and granule structure in Arabidopsis leaves. First, the potential role of starch-degrading enzymes during starch accumulation was investigated. To discover whether simultaneous synthesis and degradation of starch occurred during net accumulation, starch was labeled by supplying (14)CO(2) to intact, photosynthesizing plants. Release of this label from starch was monitored during a chase period in air, using different light intensities to vary the net rate of starch synthesis. No release of label was detected unless there was net degradation of starch during the chase. Similar experiments were performed on a mutant line (dbe1) that accumulates the soluble polysaccharide, phytoglycogen. Label was not released from phytoglycogen during the chase indicating that, even when in a soluble form, glucan is not appreciably degraded during accumulation. Second, the effect on starch composition of growth conditions and mutations causing starch accumulation was studied. An increase in starch content correlated with an increased amylose content of the starch and with an increase in the ratio of granule-bound starch synthase to soluble starch synthase activity. Third, the structural organization and morphology of Arabidopsis starch granules was studied. The starch granules were birefringent, indicating a radial organization of the polymers, and x-ray scatter analyses revealed that granules contained alternating crystalline and amorphous lamellae with a periodicity of 9 nm. Granules from the wild type and the high-starch mutant sex1 were flattened and discoid, whereas those of the high-starch mutant sex4 were larger and more rounded. These larger granules contained "growth rings" with a periodicity of 200 to 300 nm. We conclude that leaf starch is synthesized without appreciable turnover and comprises similar polymers and contains similar levels of molecular organization to storage starches, making Arabidopsis

  20. The biosynthesis of starch granules.

    PubMed

    Smith, A M

    2001-01-01

    Although composed simply of glucose polymers, the starch granule is a complex, semicrystalline structure. Much of this complexity arises from the fact that the two primary enzymes of synthesis-starch synthase and starch-branching enzyme-exist as multiple isoforms. Each form has distinct properties and plays a unique role in the synthesis of the two starch polymers, amylose and amylopectin. The debranching enzyme isoamylase also has a profound influence on the synthesis of amylopectin. Despite much speculation, no acceptable model to explain the interactions of all of these enzymes to produce amylose and amylopectin has thus far emerged. The organization of newly synthesized amylopectin to form the semicrystalline matrix of the granule appears to be a physical process, implying the existence of complex interactions between biological and physical processes at the surface of the growing granule. The synthesis of the amylose component occurs within the amylopectin matrix.

  1. Characterization of chemically modified waxy, partially waxy, and wild type tetraploid wheat starch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Durum wheats (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) contain two Granule Bound Starch Synthase (GBSS) genes (wx-A1and wx-B1) controlling amylose synthesis; the other major starch polymer in durum wheat is amylopectin. Starches with little or no amylose are “waxy.” A GBSS null (non-producing) gene results ...

  2. Proteome and phosphoproteome analysis of starch granule-associated proteins from normal maize and mutants affected in starch biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grimaud, Florent; Rogniaux, Hélène; James, Martha G; Myers, Alan M; Planchot, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the exclusively granule-bound starch synthase GBSSI, starch granules also bind significant proportions of other starch biosynthetic enzymes, particularly starch synthases (SS) SSI and SSIIa, and starch branching enzyme (BE) BEIIb. Whether this association is a functional aspect of starch biosynthesis, or results from non-specific entrapment during amylopectin crystallization, is not known. This study utilized genetic, immunological, and proteomic approaches to investigate comprehensively the proteome and phosphoproteome of Zea mays endosperm starch granules. SSIII, BEI, BEIIa, and starch phosphorylase were identified as internal granule-associated proteins in maize endosperm, along with the previously identified proteins GBSS, SSI, SSIIa, and BEIIb. Genetic analyses revealed three instances in which granule association of one protein is affected by the absence of another biosynthetic enzyme. First, eliminating SSIIa caused reduced granule association of SSI and BEIIb, without affecting GBSS abundance. Second, eliminating SSIII caused the appearance of two distinct electrophoretic mobility forms of BEIIb, whereas only a single migration form of BEIIb was observed in wild type or any other mutant granules examined. Third, eliminating BEIIb caused significant increases in the abundance of BEI, BEIIa, SSIII, and starch phosphorylase in the granule, without affecting SSI or SSIIa. Analysis of the granule phosphoproteome with a phosphorylation-specific dye indicated that GBSS, BEIIb, and starch phosphorylase are all phosphorylated as they occur in the granule. These results suggest the possibility that starch metabolic enzymes located in granules are regulated by post-translational modification and/or protein-protein interactions.

  3. Making starch.

    PubMed

    Smith, A M

    1999-06-01

    Improvements in understanding the structure of the starch granule and the nature and roles of starch-synthesising enzymes have allowed detailed mechanisms of the synthesis of the amylopectin and amylose components of the granule to be suggested. However, none of these proposed mechanisms has yet been shown to operate in vivo. Several critical aspects of granule synthesis, including granule initiation and the formation of the growth rings, remain a mystery.

  4. The diurnal metabolism of leaf starch.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Samuel C; Smith, Steven M; Smith, Alison M

    2007-01-01

    Starch is a primary product of photosynthesis in leaves. In most plants, a large fraction of the carbon assimilated during the day is stored transiently in the chloroplast as starch for use during the subsequent night. Photosynthetic partitioning into starch is finely regulated, and the amount of carbohydrate stored is dependent on the environmental conditions, particularly day length. This regulation is applied at several levels to control the flux of carbon from the Calvin cycle into starch biosynthesis. Starch is composed primarily of branched glucans with an architecture that allows the formation of a semi-crystalline insoluble granule. Biosynthesis has been most intensively studied in non-photosynthetic starch-storing organs, such as developing seeds and tubers. Biosynthesis in leaves has received less attention, but recent reverse-genetic studies of Arabidopsis (thale cress) have produced data generally consistent with what is known for storage tissues. The pathway involves starch synthases, which elongate the glucan chains, and branching enzymes. Remarkably, enzymes that partially debranch glucans are also required for normal amylopectin synthesis. In the last decade, our understanding of starch breakdown in leaves has advanced considerably. Starch is hydrolysed to maltose and glucose at night via a pathway that requires recently discovered proteins in addition to well-known enzymes. These sugars are exported from the plastid to support sucrose synthesis, respiration and growth. In the present review we provide an overview of starch biosynthesis, starch structure and starch degradation in the leaves of plants. We focus on recent advances in each area and highlight outstanding questions.

  5. A new fructose-free, resistant-starch type IV-enriched enteral formula improves glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk biomarkers when administered for six weeks to elderly diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mesa García, María Dolores; García-Rodríguez, Cruz Erika; Rico, María de la Cruz; Aguilera, Concepción María; Pérez-Rodríguez, Milagros; Pérez-de-la-Cruz, Antonio Jesús; Gil, Ángel

    2017-02-01

    Reducing the dietary glycaemic response has been proposed as a way to reduce the risk of diabetes complications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk biomarkers in fragile, elderly type 2 diabetes patients after the intake of a new fructose-free diabetes-specific formula enriched with resistant-starch type IV and high in monounsaturated fatty acids. Forty-one type 2 diabetes patients aged 78.9 ± 2.8 years were fed exclusively with an enteral diabetes-specific formula for 6 weeks. Data were collected at baseline and after 6 weeks of feeding. Carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and inflammatory and cardiovascular risk biomarkers were measured to evaluated the course of diabetes complications. Blood glycated haemoglobin significantly decreased after the intervention (6.1 ± 0.1 vs. 5.8 ± 0.1 %; p< 0,045), as well as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and soluble E-selectin (p < 0.05), while soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 tended to decrease from baseline to 6 weeks (p = 0.084 and p = 0.05, respectively). The new product improves glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk without altering lipid metabolism, which is useful for the prevention of diabetic complications. Longer intervention studies are needed in order to validate these results in a larger population.

  6. Regulation of starch synthesis in potato tubers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, H.; Oparka, K.; Viola, R.; Wright, K.; Ross, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Following tuber excision from the mother plant sucrose synthase activity fell from 3,120 to 960 nmol/g.f. wt./h within 7 days and starch synthesis ({sup 14}C sucrose incorporated into isolated discs) from 23 to 7 nmol/g.f. wt./h. While the maximum catalytic activity of sucrose synthase was more than sufficient to account for the observed rate of starch synthesis a maximum of 27% of sucrose incorporated by discs was converted into starch within 3 h. This compared with 80% conversion of {sup 14}C glucose incorporated. Tuber excision also reduced the rate of starch biosynthesis with glucose as a substrate (from 206 to 64 nmol/g.f. wt./h). The activities of UDPG-pyrophosphorylase, PPi-PFK, ATP-PFK, starch synthase and hexokinase (glucose or fructose substrates) were unaffected by tuber removal. ADPG pyrophosphorylase activity was reduced from 8,000 to 4,500 nmol/g.f. wt./h. Preliminary experiments indicate that the decline in sucrose synthease activity is prevented by maintaining sucrose flux into tubers through the cut stolon.

  7. Effects of grain development on formation of resistant starch in rice.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaoli; Sun, Jian; Wu, Dianxing

    2014-12-01

    Three rice mutants with different contents of resistant starch (RS) were selected to investigate the effects of grain filling process on the formation of resistant starch. During grain development, the content of RS was increased with grain maturation and showed negative correlations with the grain weight and the starch molecular weight (Mn, Mw) and a positive correlation with the distribution of molecular mass (polydispersity, Pd). The morphologies of starch granules in high-RS rice were almost uniform in single starch granules and exhibited different proliferation modes from common rice. The lower activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and starch branching enzyme and the higher activity of starch synthase and starch de-branching enzyme observed in high-RS rice might be responsible for the formation of small irregular starch granules with large spaces between them. In addition, the lower molecular weight and the broad distribution of molecular weights lead to differences in the physiochemical properties of starch.

  8. Measurement of effector protein injection by type III and type IV secretion systems by using a 13-residue phosphorylatable glycogen synthase kinase tag.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Julie Torruellas; Ferracci, Franco; Jackson, Michael W; Joseph, Sabrina S; Pattis, Isabelle; Plano, Lisa R W; Fischer, Wolfgang; Plano, Gregory V

    2006-10-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (T3SSs) or T4SSs to inject or translocate virulence proteins into eukaryotic cells. Several different reporter systems have been developed to measure the translocation of these proteins. In this study, a peptide tag-based reporter system was developed and used to monitor the injection of T3S and T4S substrates. The glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) tag is a 13-residue phosphorylatable peptide tag derived from the human GSK-3beta kinase. Translocation of a GSK-tagged protein into a eukaryotic cell results in host cell protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the tag, which can be detected with phosphospecific GSK-3beta antibodies. A series of expression plasmids encoding Yop-GSK fusion proteins were constructed to evaluate the ability of the GSK tag to measure the injection of Yops by the Yersinia pestis T3SS. GSK-tagged YopE, YopH, LcrQ, YopK, YopN, and YopJ were efficiently phosphorylated when translocated into HeLa cells. Similarly, the injection of GSK-CagA by the Helicobacter pylori T4SS into different cell types was measured via phosphorylation of the GSK tag. The GSK tag provides a simple method to monitor the translocation of T3S and T4S substrates.

  9. Insights into molecular structure and digestion rate of oat starch.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinchuan; Kuang, Qirong; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Sumei; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Xingxun; Wang, Shujun

    2017-04-01

    The in vitro digestibility of oat starch and its relationship with starch molecular structure was investigated. The in vitro digestion results showed that the first-order kinetic constant (k) of oat starches (OS-1 and OS-2) was lower than that of rice starch. The size of amylose chains, amylose content and degree of branching (DB) of amylopectin in oat starch were significantly higher than the corresponding parameters in rice starch. The larger molecular size of oat starch may account for its lower digestion rate. The fine structure of amylopectin showed that oat starch had less chains of DP 6-12 and DP>36, which may explain the small difference in digestion rate between oat and rice starch. The biosynthesis model from oat amylopectin fine structure data suggested a lower starch branching enzyme (SBE) activity and/or a higher starch synthase (SS) activity, which may decrease the DB of oat starch and increase its digestion rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multigene engineering of starch biosynthesis in maize endosperm increases the total starch content and the proportion of amylose.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lili; Yu, Xiaoming; Qi, Xin; Yu, Qian; Deng, Sen; Bai, Bing; Li, Ning; Zhang, Ai; Zhu, Changfu; Liu, Bao; Pang, Jinsong

    2013-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays spp. mays) is a staple crop for more than 900 million people. The seeds or kernels provide a rich source of calories because ~70% of the weight is carbohydrate, mostly in the form of starch. The content and composition of starch are complex traits controlled by many genes, offering multiple potential targets for intervention. We used a multigene engineering approach combining the overexpression of Bt2, Sh2, Sh1 and GbssIIa (to enhance the activity of sucrose synthase, AGPase and granule-bound starch synthase) with the suppression of SbeI and SbeIIb by RNA interference (to reduce the activity of starch branching enzyme). Maize plants expressing all six genes plus the selectable marker showed a 2.8-7.7% increase in the endosperm starch content and a 37.8-43.7% increase in the proportion of amylose, which was significant compared to untransformed control plants. We also observed improvements in other agronomic traits, such as a 20.1-34.7% increase in 100-grain weight, a 13.9-19.0% increase in ear weight, and larger kernels with a better appearance, presumably reflecting the modified starch structure within the kernels. Our results confirm that multigene engineering applied to the starch biosynthesis pathway can not only modulate the quality and quantity of starch but can also improve starch-dependent agronomic traits.

  11. Neurotoxic Abeta peptides increase oxidative stress in vivo through NMDA-receptor and nitric-oxide-synthase mechanisms, and inhibit complex IV activity and induce a mitochondrial permeability transition in vitro.

    PubMed

    Parks, J K; Smith, T S; Trimmer, P A; Bennett, J P; Parker, W D

    2001-02-01

    Beta amyloid (Abeta) peptides accumulate in Alzheimer's disease and are neurotoxic possibly through the production of oxygen free radicals. Using brain microdialysis we characterized the ability of Abeta to increase oxygen radical production in vivo. The 1-40 Abeta fragment increased 2,3-dehydroxybenzoic acid efflux more than the 1-28 fragment, in a manner dependent on nitric oxide synthase and NMDA receptor channels. We then examined the effects of Abeta peptides on mitochondrial function in vitro. Induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition in isolated rat liver mitochondria by Abeta(25-35) and Abeta(35-25) exhibited dose dependency and required calcium and phosphate. Cyclosporin A prevented the transition as did ruthenium red, chlorpromazine, or N-ethylmaleimide. ADP and magnesium delayed the onset of mitochondrial permeability transition. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Abeta aggregates and swollen mitochondria and preservation of mitochondrial structure by inhibitors of mitochondrial permeability transition. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity was selectively inhibited by Abeta(25-35) but not by Abeta(35-25). Neurotoxic Abeta peptide can increase oxidative stress in vivo through mechanisms involving NMDA receptors and nitric oxide sythase. Increased intracellular Abeta levels can further exacerbate the genetically driven complex IV defect in sporadic Alzheimer's disease and may precipitate mitochondrial permeability transition opening. In combination, our results provide potential mechanisms to support the feed-forward hypothesis of Abeta neurotoxicity.

  12. Regulation of starch accumulation by granule-associated plant 14-3-3 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sehnke, Paul C.; Chung, Hwa-Jee; Wu, Ke; Ferl, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    In higher plants the production of starch is orchestrated by chloroplast-localized biosynthetic enzymes, namely starch synthases, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and starch branching and debranching enzymes. Diurnal regulation of these enzymes, as well as starch-degrading enzymes, influences both the levels and composition of starch, and is dependent in some instances upon phosphorylation-linked regulation. The phosphoserine/threonine-binding 14-3-3 proteins participate in environmentally responsive phosphorylation-related regulatory functions in plants, and as such are potentially involved in starch regulation. We report here that reduction of the ɛ subgroup of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins by antisense technology resulted in a 2- to 4-fold increase in leaf starch accumulation. Dark-governed starch breakdown was unaffected in these “antisense plants,” indicating an unaltered starch-degradation pathway and suggesting a role for 14-3-3 proteins in regulation of starch synthesis. Absorption spectra and gelatinization properties indicate that the starch from the antisense plants has an altered branched glucan composition. Biochemical characterization of protease-treated starch granules from both Arabidopsis leaves and maize endosperm showed that 14-3-3 proteins are internal intrinsic granule proteins. These data suggest a direct role for 14-3-3 proteins in starch accumulation. The starch synthase III family is a possible target for 14-3-3 protein regulation because, uniquely among plastid-localized starch metabolic enzymes, all members of the family contain the conserved 14-3-3 protein phosphoserine/threonine-binding consensus motif. This possibility is strengthened by immunocapture using antibodies to DU1, a maize starch synthase III family member, and direct interaction with biotinylated 14-3-3 protein, both of which demonstrated an association between 14-3-3 proteins and DU1 or DU1-like proteins. PMID:11149942

  13. Soybean cotyledon starch metabolism is sensitive to altered gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. S.; Piastuch, W. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have demonstrated that etiolated soybean seedlings grown under the altered gravity conditions of clinorotation (1 rpm) and centrifugation (5xg) exhibit changes in starch metabolism. Cotyledon starch concentration was lower (-28%) in clinorotated plants and higher (+24%) in centrifuged plants than in vertical control plants. The activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in the cotyledons was affected in a similar way, i.e. lower (-37%) in the clinorotated plants and higher (+22%) in the centrifuged plants. Other starch metabolic enzyme activities, starch synthase, starch phosphorylase and total hydrolase were not affected by the altered gravity treatments. We conclude that the observed changes in starch concentrations were primarily due to gravity-mediated differences in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity.

  14. Soybean cotyledon starch metabolism is sensitive to altered gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. S.; Piastuch, W. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1994-08-01

    We have demonstrated that etiolated soybean seedlings grown under the altered gravity conditions of clinorotation (1 rpm) and centrifugation (5xg) exhibit changes in starch metabolism. Cotyledon starch concentration was lower (-28%) in clinorotated plants and higher (+24%) in centrifuged plants than in vertical control plants. The activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in the cotyledons was affected in a similar way, i.e. lower (-37%) in the clinorotated plants and higher (+22%) in the centrifuged plants. Other starch metabolic enzyme activities, starch synthase, starch phosphorylase and total hydrolase were not affected by the altered gravity treatments. We conclude that the observed changes in starch concentrations were primarily due to gravity-mediated differences in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity.

  15. Soybean cotyledon starch metabolism is sensitive to altered gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. S.; Piastuch, W. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have demonstrated that etiolated soybean seedlings grown under the altered gravity conditions of clinorotation (1 rpm) and centrifugation (5xg) exhibit changes in starch metabolism. Cotyledon starch concentration was lower (-28%) in clinorotated plants and higher (+24%) in centrifuged plants than in vertical control plants. The activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in the cotyledons was affected in a similar way, i.e. lower (-37%) in the clinorotated plants and higher (+22%) in the centrifuged plants. Other starch metabolic enzyme activities, starch synthase, starch phosphorylase and total hydrolase were not affected by the altered gravity treatments. We conclude that the observed changes in starch concentrations were primarily due to gravity-mediated differences in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity.

  16. Cecropia peltata Accumulates Starch or Soluble Glycogen by Differentially Regulating Starch Biosynthetic Genes[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Sylvain; Umhang, Martin; Eicke, Simona; Streb, Sebastian; Qi, Weihong; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2013-01-01

    The branched glucans glycogen and starch are the most widespread storage carbohydrates in living organisms. The production of semicrystalline starch granules in plants is more complex than that of small, soluble glycogen particles in microbes and animals. However, the factors determining whether glycogen or starch is formed are not fully understood. The tropical tree Cecropia peltata is a rare example of an organism able to make either polymer type. Electron micrographs and quantitative measurements show that glycogen accumulates to very high levels in specialized myrmecophytic structures (Müllerian bodies), whereas starch accumulates in leaves. Compared with polymers comprising leaf starch, glycogen is more highly branched and has shorter branches—factors that prevent crystallization and explain its solubility. RNA sequencing and quantitative shotgun proteomics reveal that isoforms of all three classes of glucan biosynthetic enzyme (starch/glycogen synthases, branching enzymes, and debranching enzymes) are differentially expressed in Müllerian bodies and leaves, providing a system-wide view of the quantitative programming of storage carbohydrate metabolism. This work will prompt targeted analysis in model organisms and cross-species comparisons. Finally, as starch is the major carbohydrate used for food and industrial applications worldwide, these data provide a basis for manipulating starch biosynthesis in crops to synthesize tailor-made polyglucans. PMID:23632447

  17. Cecropia peltata accumulates starch or soluble glycogen by differentially regulating starch biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Sylvain; Umhang, Martin; Eicke, Simona; Streb, Sebastian; Qi, Weihong; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2013-04-01

    The branched glucans glycogen and starch are the most widespread storage carbohydrates in living organisms. The production of semicrystalline starch granules in plants is more complex than that of small, soluble glycogen particles in microbes and animals. However, the factors determining whether glycogen or starch is formed are not fully understood. The tropical tree Cecropia peltata is a rare example of an organism able to make either polymer type. Electron micrographs and quantitative measurements show that glycogen accumulates to very high levels in specialized myrmecophytic structures (Müllerian bodies), whereas starch accumulates in leaves. Compared with polymers comprising leaf starch, glycogen is more highly branched and has shorter branches--factors that prevent crystallization and explain its solubility. RNA sequencing and quantitative shotgun proteomics reveal that isoforms of all three classes of glucan biosynthetic enzyme (starch/glycogen synthases, branching enzymes, and debranching enzymes) are differentially expressed in Müllerian bodies and leaves, providing a system-wide view of the quantitative programming of storage carbohydrate metabolism. This work will prompt targeted analysis in model organisms and cross-species comparisons. Finally, as starch is the major carbohydrate used for food and industrial applications worldwide, these data provide a basis for manipulating starch biosynthesis in crops to synthesize tailor-made polyglucans.

  18. Exogenous sucrose utilization and starch biosynthesis among sweet potato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Young Ock; Kim, Sun Ha; Kim, Cha Young; Lee, Joon-Seol; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Lee, Haeng-Soon

    2010-01-11

    Three sweetpotato cultivars were investigated for their starch content and amylose/amylopectin ratio. Ym starch contains 87.2% amylopectin and 12.8% amylose, when total starch was calculated as 100%. The Zm cultivar contains 33.6% amylopectin and 18.2% amylose, and its total starch was calculated as 51.8% of that of Ym. The Hm cultivar contains 39.1% amylopectin and 30.5% amylose, and its total starch was 69.6%. We analyzed the expression levels of starch and sucrose biosynthesis-related genes including AGPases a, b, and c; sucrose synthases I and II; starch synthase I; GBSS I; and SBEs I and II. All genes tested in this experiment were detected only in Ym, while several genes showed very faint or no expression in Zm and Hm. We also measured tissue-specific expression of these genes in whole plants of Ym. Most of the genes are expressed in the stem and roots of the plants. Expression profiles of starch synthesis-related genes of the sweetpotato leaves were investigated after supplementing the different concentrations of sucrose solution. All genes in Ym were clearly induced by sucrose, but the expression levels of some of these genes did not change in Zm and Hm. The total starch content of Ym, Zm, and Hm gradually increased over time on addition of 3%, 6%, and 9% sucrose concentrations. The greatest accumulation was observed in Ym at 48h, and it was almost 2.24 times higher than that of the (0%) control, while Zm and Hm showed 1.76 and 1.91 times higher levels of starch, respectively. These results indicate that cooperative expression of all related genes is essential for starch biosynthesis from sucrose. This is the first report on different sucrose contents and the efficiency with which exogenous sucrose switches on gene expression of starch biosynthesis-related genes among cultivars. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Properties of corn starch subjected hydrothermal modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryszkin, Artur; Zięba, Tomasz; Kapelko-Żeberska, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heating a water dispersion of corn starch to various temperatures, followed by its freezing and defrosting, on selected properties of re-formed starch pastes. A suspension of starch was heated to various temperatures ranging from 59 to 94°C, and afterwards frozen and defrosted. The differential scanning calorimetry (Mettler Toledo, 822E) thermal characteristics of starch pre-heated to temperatures not inducing complete pasting revealed transitions of: (I) retrograded amylopectin, (II) non-pasted starch, (III) amylose-lipid complexes, (IV) retrograded amylose, and (V) highly thermostable starch structures. The application of higher temperatures during heating caused disappearance of transitions II and V. The increase of pre-heating temperature induced firstly a decrease and then stabilization of the swelling power as well as a successive decrease in starch solubility. Pastes pre-heated to temperatures over 79°C contained large macroparticles that were increasing viscosity of the re-formed starch paste (their size was positively correlated with viscosity value).

  20. Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of starch regulatory enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, Thomas W.

    2016-05-11

    ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and the plastidial starch phosphorylase1 (Pho1) are two regulatory enzymes whose catalytic activities are essential for starch granule synthesis. Conversion of the pre-starch granule to the mature form is dependent on AGPase, which produces ADPglucose, the substrate used by starch synthases. The catalytic activity of AGPase is controlled by small effector molecules and a prime goal of this project was to decipher the role of the two subunit types that comprise the heterotetrameric enzyme structure. Extensive genetic and biochemical studies showed that catalysis was contributed mainly by the small subunit although the large subunit was required for maximum activity. Both subunits were needed for allosteric regulatory properties. We had also demonstrated that the AGPase catalyzed reaction limits the amount of starch accumulation in developing rice seeds and that carbon flux into rice seed starch can be increased by expression of a cytoplasmic-localized, up-regulated bacterial AGPase enzyme form. Results of subsequent physiological and metabolite studies showed that the AGPase reaction is no longer limiting in the AGPase transgenic rice lines and that one or more downstream processes prevent further increases in starch biosynthesis. Further studies showed that over-production of ADPglucose dramatically alters the gene program during rice seed development. Although the expression of nearly all of the genes are down-regulated, levels of a starch binding domain containing protein (SBDCP) are elevated. This SBDCP was found to bind to and inhibit the catalytic activity of starch synthase III and, thereby preventing maximum starch synthesis from occurring. Surprisingly, repression of SBDCP elevated expression of starch synthase III resulting in increasing rice grain weight. A second phase of this project examined the structure-function of Pho1, the enzyme required during the initial phase of pre-starch granule formation and its

  1. Association mapping of starch physicochemical properties with starch biosynthesizing genes in waxy rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Zhang, Gan; Tong, Chuan; Sun, Xiao; Corke, Harold; Sun, Mei; Bao, Jinsong

    2013-10-23

    Waxy (glutinous) rice is widely used in traditional foods, and understanding the genetic bases of its diverse physicochemical properties will contribute to breeding of new waxy rice with unique qualities. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic relationship between the starch biosynthesis related genes and the physicochemical properties of waxy rice using association mapping. A total of 36 molecular markers representing 18 genes were used to genotype 50 waxy rice accessions for which starch properties were previously available. Most of the starch properties differed between high and low gelatinization temperature (GT) groups, whereas most traits were similar between the low-GT indica rice and low-GT japonica rice, suggesting GT was the main determinant of the starch quality of waxy rice. Association mapping indicated that the starch properties of waxy rice were mainly controlled by starch synthase IIa (SSIIa or SSII-3, a major gene responsible for the gelatinization temperature) and SSI. It was found that gene-gene interactions were also important for the genetic control of starch properties of waxy rice. This study suggests that application of the functional SNPs of SSIIa in molecular breeding may facilitate quality improvement of waxy rice.

  2. Starch synthesis and programmed cell death during endosperm development in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack).

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yan; Li, Wei-Hua; Li, Cheng; Gaudet, Denis A; Laroche, André; Cao, Lian-Pu; Lu, Zhen-Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack) grains synthesize and accumulate starch as their main energy source. Starch accumulation rate and synthesis activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, soluble starch synthases, granule-bound starch synthase and starch-branching enzyme showed similar pattern of unimodal curves during endosperm development. There was no significant difference in activity of the starch granule-bound protein isolated from total and separated starch granules at different developmental stages after anthesis in triticale. Evans Blue staining and analysis of DNA fragmentation indicated that cells of triticale endosperm undergo programmed cell death during its development. Dead cells within the endosperm were detected at 6 d post anthesis (DPA), and evidence of DNA fragmentation was first observed at 21 DPA. The period between initial detection of PCD to its rapid increase overlapped with the key stages of rapid starch accumulation during endosperm development. Cell death occurred stochastically throughout the whole endosperm, meanwhile, the activities of starch biosynthetic enzymes and the starch accumulation rate decreased in the late stages of grain filling. These results suggested that the timing and progression of PCD in triticale endosperm may interfere with starch synthesis and accumulation.

  3. Preamylopectin Processing: A Mandatory Step for Starch Biosynthesis in Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Mouille, G.; Maddelein, M. L.; Libessart, N.; Talaga, P.; Decq, A.; Delrue, B.; Ball, S.

    1996-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that the [alpha]-(1->4)-linked and [alpha]-(1->6)-branched glucans of starch are generated by the coordinated action of elongation (starch synthases) and branching enzymes. We have identified a novel Chlamydomonas locus (STA7) that when defective leads to a wipeout of starch and its replacement by a small amount of glycogen-like material. Our efforts to understand the enzymological basis of this phenotype have led us to determine the selective disappearance of an 88-kD starch hydrolytic activity. We further demonstrate that this enzyme is a debranching enzyme. Cleavage of the [alpha]-(1->6) linkage in a branched precursor of amylopectin (preamylopectin) has provided us with the ground rules for understanding starch biosynthesis in plants. Therefore, we propose that amylopectin clusters are synthesized by a discontinuous mechanism involving a highly specific glucan trimming mechanism. PMID:12239416

  4. Polymorphism of starch pathway genes in cassava.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, L M; Brito, A C; Carmo, C D; Oliveira, E J

    2016-12-02

    The distribution and frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can help to understand changes associated with characteristics of interest. We aimed to evaluate nucleotide diversity in six genes involved in starch biosynthesis in cassava using a panel of 96 unrelated accessions. The genes were sequenced, aligned, and used to obtain values for nucleotide diversity (π), segregating sites (θ), Tajima's D test, and neighbor-joining (NJ) clustering. On average, one SNP per 147 and 171 bp was identified in exon and intron regions, respectively. Thirteen heterozygous loci were found. Three of seven SNPs in the exon region resulted in non-synonymous replacement or four synonymous substitutions. However, no associations were noted between SNPs and root dry-matter content. The parameter π ranged from 0.0001 (granule bound starch synthase I) to 0.0033 (α-amylase), averaging 0.0011, while θ ranged from 0.00014 (starch branching enzyme) to 0.00584 (starch synthase I), averaging 0.002353. The θ diversity value was typically double that of the π. Results of the D test did not suggest any evidence of deviance of neutrality in these genes. Among the evaluated accession, 82/96 were clustered using the NJ method but without a clear separation of the root dry-matter content, root pulp coloration, and classification of the cyanogenic compound content. High variation in genes of the starch biosynthetic pathway can be used to identify associations with the functional properties of starch for the use of polymorphisms for selection purposes.

  5. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms.

  6. Relationships among Genetic, Structural, and Functional Properties of Rice Starch.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangli; Chen, Yaling; Zhu, Ping; Sui, Zhongquan; Corke, Harold; Bao, Jinsong

    2015-07-15

    We determined the relationships among the structural properties, in vitro digestibility, and genetic factors in starches of 14 rice cultivars. Weight-based chain-length distributions in amylopectin ranged from 18.07% to 24.71% (fa, DP 6-12), 45.01% to 55.67% (fb1, DP 13-24), 12.72% to 14.05% (fb2, DP 25-36), and 10.80 to 20.72% (fb3, DP > 36), respectively. The contents of rapidly digestible starch (RDS), slowly digestible starch (SDS), and resistant starch (RS) ranged from 78.5% to 87.5%, 1.2% to 6.0%, and 10.1% to 18.0%, respectively. AAC was negatively correlated with RDS content but positively correlated with RS content in rice starch. The proportion of short chains in amylopectin, i.e. the amount of fraction IIa (FrIIa) fractionated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), was positively correlated with RDS. Starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) gene controlled the degree of crystallinity, the amount of fa chains of amylopectin. SSIIIa gene controlled the amount of fb1 chains. Wx gene controlled the FrI, FrIIa, RDS, and RS. Starch debranching enzyme isoamylase II (ISA2) gene also controlled the RDS, which may suggest that RDS was also affected by amylopectin structure, although no correlation between them was found. This study indicated that genetics (i.e., starch biosynthesis related genes) controlled the structural properties of starch, and both amylose content and amylopectin fine structure determined functional properties of rice starch (i.e., the digestion), each in a different way. Understanding the "genetics-structure-function" relationships in rice starches will assist plant breeders and food processors in developing new rice varieties and functional foods.

  7. Starch Synthesis in Shriveled and Plump Triticale Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Te May; Poklemba, Chris J.; Metzger, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Seven lines of triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack) with either shriveled or plump seed characteristics were planted in the field, and seed developmental changes in weight, starch content, the activity of starch biosynthetic and degradative enzymes, and ATP content were studied in three consecutive years in Oregon. Experimental results varied among genotypes and with growing environment, but overall indicated that: (a) amylase activity was higher in shriveled lines, but was not directly synchronized with the occurrence of shriveling at later stages of seed formation; (b) ADP-glucose starch synthase contributed to starch accumulation in triticale, but it appeared not to be associated with shriveledness as no stage-related changes were observed; and (c) ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity was 2- to 3-fold higher in plump lines than that of shriveled lines, indicating that this enzyme may play an important role in the degree of plumpness or stach accumulation of triticale seeds. PMID:16663276

  8. Starch biosynthetic genes and enzymes are expressed and active in the absence of starch accumulation in sugar beet tap-root

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starch is the predominant storage compound in underground plant tissues like roots and tubers. An exception is sugar beet tap-root (Beta vulgaris ssp altissima) which exclusively stores sucrose. The underlying mechanism behind this divergent storage accumulation in sugar beet is currently not fully known. From the general presence of starch in roots and tubers it could be speculated that the lack in sugar beet tap-roots would originate from deficiency in pathways leading to starch. Therefore with emphasis on starch accumulation, we studied tap-roots of sugar beet using parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) as a comparator. Results Metabolic and structural analyses of sugar beet tap-root confirmed sucrose as the exclusive storage component. No starch granules could be detected in tap-roots of sugar beet or the wild ancestor sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima). Analyses of parsnip showed that the main storage component was starch but tap-root tissue was also found to contain significant levels of sugars. Surprisingly, activities of four main starch biosynthetic enzymes, phosphoglucomutase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase and starch branching enzyme, were similar in sugar beet and parsnip tap-roots. Transcriptional analysis confirmed expression of corresponding genes. Additionally, expression of genes involved in starch accumulation such as for plastidial hexose transportation and starch tuning functions could be determined in tap-roots of both plant species. Conclusion Considering underground storage organs, sugar beet tap-root upholds a unique property in exclusively storing sucrose. Lack of starch also in the ancestor sea beet indicates an evolved trait of biological importance. Our findings in this study show that gene expression and enzymatic activity of main starch biosynthetic functions are present in sugar beet tap-root during storage accumulation. In view of this, the complete lack of starch in sugar beet tap-roots is enigmatic. PMID

  9. Plasma modification of starch.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan

    2017-10-01

    Plasma is a medium of unbound negative and positive particles with the overall electrical charge being roughly zero. Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging green technology with great potential to improve the quality and microbial safety of various food materials. Starch is a major component of many food products and is an important ingredient for food and other industries. There has been increasing interest in utilizing plasma to modify the functionalities of starch through interactions with reactive species. This mini-review summarises the impact of plasma on composition, chemical and granular structures, physicochemical properties, and uses of starch. Structure-function relationships of starch components as affected by plasma modifications are discussed. Effect of plasma on the properties of wheat flour, which is a typical example of starch based complex food systems, is also reviewed. Future research directions on how to better utilise plasma to improve the functionalities of starch are suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  11. Starch nanoparticles: a review.

    PubMed

    Le Corre, Déborah; Bras, Julien; Dufresne, Alain

    2010-05-10

    Starch is a natural, renewable, and biodegradable polymer produced by many plants as a source of stored energy. It is the second most abundant biomass material in nature. The starch structure has been under research for years, and because of its complexity, an universally accepted model is still lacking (Buleon, A.; et al. Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 1998, 23, 85-112). However, the predominant model for starch is a concentric semicrystalline multiscale structure that allows the production of new nanoelements: (i) starch nanocrystals resulting from the disruption of amorphous domains from semicrystalline granules by acid hydrolysis and (ii) starch nanoparticles produced from gelatinized starch. This paper intends to give a clear overview of starch nanoparticle preparation, characterization, properties, and applications. Recent studies have shown that they could be used as fillers to improve mechanical and barrier properties of biocomposites. Their use for industrial packaging, continuously looking for innovative solutions for efficient and sustainable systems, is being investigated. Therefore, recently, starch nanoparticles have been the focus of an exponentially increasing number of works devoted to develop biocomposites by blending starch nanoparticles with different biopolymeric matrices. To our knowledge, this topic has never been reviewed, despite several published strategies and conclusions.

  12. Starch-binding domain shuffling in Aspergillus niger glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Catherine A G; Fang, Tsuei-Yun; Reilly, Peter J; Ford, Clark

    2003-07-01

    Aspergillus niger glucoamylase (GA) consists mainly of two forms, GAI [from the N-terminus, catalytic domain + linker + starch-binding domain (SBD)] and GAII (catalytic domain + linker). These domains were shuffled to make RGAI (SBD + linker + catalytic domain), RGAIDeltaL (SBD + catalytic domain) and RGAII (linker + catalytic domain), with domains defined by function rather than by tertiary structure. In addition, Paenibacillus macerans cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase SBD replaced the closely related A.niger GA SBD to give GAE. Soluble starch hydrolysis rates decreased as RGAII approximately GAII approximately GAI > RGAIDeltaL approximately RGAI approximately GAE. Insoluble starch hydrolysis rates were GAI > RGAIDeltaL > RGAI > GAE approximately RGAII > GAII, while insoluble starch-binding capacities were GAI > RGAI > RGAIDeltaL > RGAII > GAII > GAE. These results indicate that: (i) moving the SBD to the N-terminus or replacing the native SBD somewhat affects soluble starch hydrolysis; (ii) SBD location significantly affects insoluble starch binding and hydrolysis; (iii) insoluble starch hydrolysis is imperfectly correlated with its binding by the SBD; and (iv) placing the P.macerans cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase SBD at the end of a linker, instead of closely associated with the rest of the enzyme, severely reduces its ability to bind and hydrolyze insoluble starch.

  13. Tests for the mechanism of starch biosynthesis: de novo synthesis or an amylogenin primer synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mukerjea, Rupendra; Robyt, John F

    2013-05-03

    Studies in 1940 on potato phosphorylase reaction with starch found that d-glucopyranose from α-d-glucopyranosyl-1-phosphate was added to the nonreducing-ends of starch chains. This led to the hypothesis that the biosynthesis of starch required a preformed primer. Later it was found that phosphorylase was exclusively a degradative enzyme in vivo and that starch-synthase was the enzyme that reacted with ADPGlc to biosynthesize starch. Amylogenin, a putative self-glycosylated protein, was postulated to be the primer, although it was never demonstrated or found. In the present study, three reactions were performed in sequence with a highly purified potato starch-synthase to determine whether an amylogenin primer was present and required or whether the biosynthesis was de novo. Reaction 1 was performed by adding 2.0mM ADPGlc to synthesize the putative primer to a possible amylogenin in the preparation; in Reaction 2, 10mM ADP-[(14)C]Glc was added; and in Reaction 3, 10mM nonlabeled ADPGlc was added. After the isolation, reduction, and acid hydrolysis of the products of Reactions 2 and 3, (14)C-d-glucitol was obtained from Reaction 2 and was decreased by Reaction 3. The formation of (14)C-d-glucitol and its decrease showed that an amylogenin, protein primer was not involved in starch biosynthesis and the synthesis is de novo by the addition of d-glucose to the reducing-ends of growing starch chains.

  14. Tracking sulfur and phosphorus within single starch granules using synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence mapping.

    PubMed

    Buléon, Alain; Cotte, Marine; Putaux, Jean-Luc; d'Hulst, Christophe; Susini, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Native starch accumulates as granules containing two glucose polymers: amylose and amylopectin. Phosphate (0.2-0.5%) and proteins (0.1-0.7%) are also present in some starches. Phosphate groups play a major role in starch metabolism while granule-bound starch synthase 1 (GBSS1) which represents up to 95% of the proteins bound to the granule is responsible for amylose biosynthesis. Synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) was used for the first time for high-resolution mapping of GBSS1 and phosphate groups based on the XRF signal of sulfur (S) and phosphorus (P), respectively. Wild-type starches were studied as well as their related mutants lacking GBSS1 or starch-phosphorylating enzyme. Wild-type potato and maize starch exhibited high level of phosphorylation and high content of sulfur respectively when compared to mutant potato starch lacking glucan water dikinase (GWD) and mutant maize starch lacking GBSS1. Phosphate groups are mostly present at the periphery of wild-type potato starch granules, and spread all over the granule in the amylose-free mutant. P and S XRF were also measured within single small starch granules from Arabidopsis or Chlamydomonas not exceeding 3-5μm in diameter. Imaging GBSS1 (by S mapping) in potato starch sections showed that the antisense technique suppresses the expression of GBSS1 during biosynthesis. P mapping confirmed that amylose is mostly present in the center of the granule, which had been suggested before. μXRF is a potentially powerful technique to analyze the minor constituents of starch and understand starch structure/properties or biosynthesis by the use of selected genetic backgrounds. © 2013.

  15. Characterization of the endosperm starch and the pleiotropic effects of biosynthetic enzymes on their properties in novel mutant rice lines with high resistant starch and amylose content.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuuki; Crofts, Naoko; Abe, Misato; Hosaka, Yuko; Fujita, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    Resistant starch (RS) is beneficial to human health. In order to reduce the current prevalence of diabetes and obesity, several transgenic and mutant crops containing high RS content are being developed. RS content of steamed rice with starch-branching enzyme (BE)IIb-deficient mutant endosperms is considerably high. To understand the mechanisms of RS synthesis and to increase RS content, we developed novel mutant rice lines by introducing the gene encoding starch synthase (SS)IIa and/or granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS)I from an indica rice cultivar into a japonica rice-based BEIIb-deficient mutant line, be2b. Introduction of SSIIa from an indica rice cultivar produced higher levels of amylopectin chains with degree of polymerization (DP) 11-18 than those in be2b; the extent of the change was slight due to the shortage of donor chains for SSIIa (DP 6-12) owing to BEIIb deficiency. The introduction of GBSSI from an indica rice cultivar significantly increased amylose content (by approximately 10%) in the endosperm starch. RS content of the new mutant lines was the same as or slightly higher than that of the be2b parent line. The relationship linking starch structure, RS content, and starch biosynthetic enzymes in the new mutant lines has also been discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of oxidized starch on the properties of thermoplastic starch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Rong; Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhao, Guo-Ming; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-07-01

    Thermoplastic starch was prepared by adding oxidized starches and glycerol together into starch. The addition of oxidized starch improved the rheological properties and also increased the toughness of thermoplastic starch. Compared with TPS30, the elongation at break increased from 126.8% to 152.5% when 5wt% OS 117% was added. Good compatibility of thermoplastic starch between the matrix and oxidized starch was confirmed by SEM. The addition of oxidized starch lowered the storage modulus and glass transition temperature (Tg) of thermoplastic starch, decreasing Tg from 34.1 to 30°C when 10 wt% OS117% was added. The thermal stability of blending was improved by adding oxidized starches, i.e. when 5 wt% OS70% was added, T5% increased from 134 to 156°C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Critical Function of Sucrose Metabolism Related-Enzymes in Starch Accumulation in the Storage Root of Sweet Potato

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Wu, Zhengdan; Tang, Daobin; Luo, Kai; Lu, Huixiang; Liu, Yingying; Dong, Jie; Wang, Xin; Lv, Changwen; Wang, Jichun; Lu, Kun

    2017-01-01

    The starch properties of the storage root (SR) affect the quality of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.). Although numerous studies have analyzed the accumulation and properties of starch in sweet potato SRs, the transcriptomic variation associated with starch properties in SR has not been quantified. In this study, we measured the starch and sugar contents and analyzed the transcriptome profiles of SRs harvested from sweet potatoes with high, medium, and extremely low starch contents, at five developmental stages [65, 80, 95, 110, and 125 days after transplanting (DAP)]. We found that differences in both water content and starch accumulation in the dry matter affect the starch content of SRs in different sweet potato genotypes. Based on transcriptome sequencing data, we assembled 112336 unigenes, and identified several differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, and revealed the transcriptional regulatory network controlling starch and sucrose metabolism in sweet potato SRs. Correlation analysis between expression patterns and starch and sugar contents suggested that the sugar–starch conversion steps catalyzed by sucrose synthase (SuSy) and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) may be essential for starch accumulation in the dry matter of SRs, and IbβFRUCT2, a vacuolar acid invertase, might also be a key regulator of starch content in the SRs. Our results provide valuable resources for future investigations aimed at deciphering the molecular mechanisms determining the starch properties of sweet potato SRs. PMID:28690616

  18. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Critical Function of Sucrose Metabolism Related-Enzymes in Starch Accumulation in the Storage Root of Sweet Potato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wu, Zhengdan; Tang, Daobin; Luo, Kai; Lu, Huixiang; Liu, Yingying; Dong, Jie; Wang, Xin; Lv, Changwen; Wang, Jichun; Lu, Kun

    2017-01-01

    The starch properties of the storage root (SR) affect the quality of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.). Although numerous studies have analyzed the accumulation and properties of starch in sweet potato SRs, the transcriptomic variation associated with starch properties in SR has not been quantified. In this study, we measured the starch and sugar contents and analyzed the transcriptome profiles of SRs harvested from sweet potatoes with high, medium, and extremely low starch contents, at five developmental stages [65, 80, 95, 110, and 125 days after transplanting (DAP)]. We found that differences in both water content and starch accumulation in the dry matter affect the starch content of SRs in different sweet potato genotypes. Based on transcriptome sequencing data, we assembled 112336 unigenes, and identified several differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, and revealed the transcriptional regulatory network controlling starch and sucrose metabolism in sweet potato SRs. Correlation analysis between expression patterns and starch and sugar contents suggested that the sugar-starch conversion steps catalyzed by sucrose synthase (SuSy) and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) may be essential for starch accumulation in the dry matter of SRs, and IbβFRUCT2, a vacuolar acid invertase, might also be a key regulator of starch content in the SRs. Our results provide valuable resources for future investigations aimed at deciphering the molecular mechanisms determining the starch properties of sweet potato SRs.

  19. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  20. Characterization of starch nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymońska, J.; Targosz-Korecka, M.; Krok, F.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomaterials already attract great interest because of their potential applications in technology, food science and medicine. Biomaterials are biodegradable and quite abundant in nature, so they are favoured over synthetic polymer based materials. Starch as a nontoxic, cheap and renewable raw material is particularly suitable for preparation of nanoparticles. In the paper, the structure and some physicochemical properties of potato and cassava starch particles of the size between 50 to 100 nm, obtained by mechanical treatment of native starch, were presented. We demonstrated, with the aim of the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM), that the shape and dimensions of the obtained nanoparticles both potato and cassava starch fit the blocklets - previously proposed as basic structural features of native starch granules. This observation was supported by aqueous solubility and swelling power of the particles as well as their iodine binding capacity similar to those for amylopectin-type short branched polysaccharide species. Obtained results indicated that glycosidic bonds of the branch linkage points in the granule amorphous lamellae might be broken during the applied mechanical treatment. Thus the released amylopectin clusters could escape out of the granules. The starch nanoparticles, for their properties qualitatively different from those of native starch granules, could be utilized in new applications.

  1. Use of advanced recombinant lines to study the impact and potential of mutations affecting starch synthesis in barley☆

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas P.; Fahy, Brendan; Leigh, Fiona; Howell, Phil; Powell, Wayne; Greenland, Andy; Trafford, Kay; Smith, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects on barley starch and grain properties of four starch synthesis mutations were studied during the introgression of the mutations from diverse backgrounds into an elite variety. The lys5f (ADPglucose transporter), wax (granule-bound starch synthase), isa1 (debranching enzyme isoamylase 1) and sex6 (starch synthase IIa) mutations were introgressed into NFC Tipple to give mutant and wild-type BC2F4 families with different genomic contributions of the donor parent. Comparison of starch and grain properties between the donor parents, the BC2F4 families and NFC Tipple allowed the effects of the mutations to be distinguished from genetic background effects. The wax and sex6 mutations had marked effects on starch properties regardless of genetic background. The sex6 mutation conditioned low grain weight and starch content, but the wax mutation did not. The lys5 mutation conditioned low grain weight and starch content, but exceptionally high β-glucan contents. The isa1 mutation promotes synthesis of soluble α-glucan (phytoglycogen). Its introgression into NFC Tipple increased grain weight and total α-glucan content relative to the donor parent, but reduced the ratio of phytoglycogen to starch. This study shows that introgression of mutations into a common, commercial background provides new insights that could not be gained from the donor parent. PMID:24748716

  2. Use of advanced recombinant lines to study the impact and potential of mutations affecting starch synthesis in barley.

    PubMed

    Howard, Thomas P; Fahy, Brendan; Leigh, Fiona; Howell, Phil; Powell, Wayne; Greenland, Andy; Trafford, Kay; Smith, Alison M

    2014-03-01

    The effects on barley starch and grain properties of four starch synthesis mutations were studied during the introgression of the mutations from diverse backgrounds into an elite variety. The lys5f (ADPglucose transporter), wax (granule-bound starch synthase), isa1 (debranching enzyme isoamylase 1) and sex6 (starch synthase IIa) mutations were introgressed into NFC Tipple to give mutant and wild-type BC2F4 families with different genomic contributions of the donor parent. Comparison of starch and grain properties between the donor parents, the BC2F4 families and NFC Tipple allowed the effects of the mutations to be distinguished from genetic background effects. The wax and sex6 mutations had marked effects on starch properties regardless of genetic background. The sex6 mutation conditioned low grain weight and starch content, but the wax mutation did not. The lys5 mutation conditioned low grain weight and starch content, but exceptionally high β-glucan contents. The isa1 mutation promotes synthesis of soluble α-glucan (phytoglycogen). Its introgression into NFC Tipple increased grain weight and total α-glucan content relative to the donor parent, but reduced the ratio of phytoglycogen to starch. This study shows that introgression of mutations into a common, commercial background provides new insights that could not be gained from the donor parent.

  3. Nature of the Periplastidial Pathway of Starch Synthesis in the Cryptophyte Guillardia theta

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Philippe; Haferkamp, Ilka; Dauvillée, David; Haebel, Sophie; Steup, Martin; Buléon, Alain; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Colleoni, Christophe; d'Hulst, Christophe; Plancke, Charlotte; Gould, Sven; Maier, Uwe; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard; Ball, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The nature of the periplastidial pathway of starch biosynthesis was investigated with the model cryptophyte Guillardia theta. The storage polysaccharide granules were shown to be composed of both amylose and amylopectin fractions with a chain length distribution and crystalline organization very similar to those of starch from green algae and land plants. Most starch granules displayed a shape consistent with biosynthesis occurring around the pyrenoid through the rhodoplast membranes. A protein with significant similarity to the amylose-synthesizing granule-bound starch synthase 1 from green plants was found as the major polypeptide bound to the polysaccharide matrix. N-terminal sequencing of the mature protein proved that the precursor protein carries a nonfunctional transit peptide in its bipartite topogenic signal sequence which is cleaved without yielding transport of the enzyme across the two inner plastid membranes. The enzyme was shown to display similar affinities for ADP and UDP-glucose, while the Vmax measured with UDP-glucose was twofold higher. The granule-bound starch synthase from Guillardia theta was demonstrated to be responsible for the synthesis of long glucan chains and therefore to be the functional equivalent of the amylose-synthesizing enzyme of green plants. Preliminary characterization of the starch pathway suggests that Guillardia theta utilizes a UDP-glucose-based pathway to synthesize starch. PMID:16757743

  4. Centrifugally spun starch-based fibers from amylopectin rich starches.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianglong; Chen, Huanhuan; Yang, Bin

    2016-02-10

    Centrifugal spinning and electrospinning have proved to be effective techniques for fabricating micro-to-nanofibers. However, starches of amylopectin content above 65% cannot be fabricated to fiber by electrospinning. This paper is focus on the centrifugal spinnability of amylopectin rich starches. We investigated the amylopectin content of starches by Dual-wavelength colorimetry, studied the rheological properties of starch dopes to determine entanglement concentration (ce) by rotary rheometer. Results indicated that amylopectin rich native corn and potato starches, which with amylopectin content higher than 65%, were suitable for centrifugal spinning to micro-to-nanofibers. Additionally, starch-based fibers were successfully fabricated from the amylose rich corn starch as well. Rheological studies showed that the entanglement concentration (ce) of starch solution was crucial for successful centrifugal spinning. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experiment 9: ASTROCULTURE: Growth and Starch Accumulation of Potato Tuber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, Theodore W.; Brown, Christopher S.; Croxdale, Judith G.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    1998-01-01

    Potato explants (leaf, small stem section, and axillary bud) flown on STS-73 developed tubers of 1.5 cm diameter and 1.7 g mass during the 16-day period of space flight. The experiment was undertaken in the ASTROCULTURE(TM) experiment package under controlled temperature, humidity, lighting, and carbon dioxide concentrations. The tubers that formed in the explant system under microgravity had the same gross morphology, the same anatomical configuration of cells and tissues, and the same sizes, shapes, and surface character of starch granules as tubers formed in a 1 g environment. The total accumulation of starch and other energy containing compounds was similar in space flight and ground control tubers. Enzyme activity of starch synthase, starch phosphorylase, and total hydrolase was similar in space flight and ground controls, but activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was reduced in the space flight tuber tissue. This experiment documented that potatoes will metabolize and accumulate starch as effectively in space flight as on the ground. Thus, this data provides the potential for effective utilization of potatoes in life support systems of space bases.

  6. Space Experiment on Tuber Development and Starch Accumulation for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts,Theodore W.; Croxdale, Judith C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1997-01-01

    Potato explants (leaf, small stem section, and axillary bud), flown on STS-73, developed tubers of 1.5 cm diameter and 1.7 g mass during the 16 day period of spaceflight. The experiment was undertaken in the ASTROCULTURE(Trademark) experiment package under controlled temperature, humidity, lighting, and carbon dioxide concentrations. The tubers formed in the explant system under microgravity had the same gross morphology, the same anatomical configuration of cells and tissues, and the same sizes, shapes, and surface character of starch granules as tubers formed in a 1 g environment. The total accumulation of starch and other energy containing compounds was singular in space flight and ground control tubers. Enzyme activity of starch synthase, starch phosphorylase, and total hydrolase was similar in spaceflight and ground controls but activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was reduced in the spaceflight tuber tissue. This experiment documented that potatoes will metabolize and accumulate starch as effectively in spaceflight as on the ground and thus this data provides the potential for effective utilization of potatoes in life support systems of space bases.

  7. New starch methodology to measure both soluble and insoluble starch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch is a natural sugarcane juice impurity that greatly influences raw sugar quality and affects factory and refinery processing. Since the advent of the USDA Starch Research method, the mechanisms in which starch concentration and physical form affects sugar crop processing, conversion, and end-g...

  8. Food microstructure and starch digestion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspreet; Kaur, Lovedeep; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-01-01

    Microstructural characteristics of starch-based natural foods such as parenchyma or cotyledon cell shape, cell size and composition, and cell wall composition play a key role in influencing the starch digestibility during gastrointestinal digestion. The stability of cell wall components and the arrangement of starch granules in the cells may affect the free access of amylolytic enzymes during digestion. Commonly used food processing techniques such as thermal processing, extrusion cooking, and post-cooking refrigerated storage alter the physical state of starch (gelatinization, retrogradation, etc.) and its digestibility. Rheological characteristics (viscosity) of food affect the water availability during starch hydrolysis and, consequently, the absorption of digested carbohydrates in the gastrointestinal tract. The nonstarch ingredients and other constituents present in food matrix, such as proteins and lipids interact with starch during processing, which leads to an alteration in the overall starch digestibility and physicochemical characteristics of digesta. Starch digestibility can be controlled by critically manipulating the food microstructure, processing techniques, and food composition.

  9. Replacement of the Endogenous Starch Debranching Enzymes ISA1 and ISA2 of Arabidopsis with the Rice Orthologs Reveals a Degree of Functional Conservation during Starch Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the interchangeability of enzymes in starch metabolism between dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plant species. Amylopectin - a branched glucose polymer - is the major component of starch and is responsible for its semi-crystalline property. Plants synthesize starch with distinct amylopectin structures, varying between species and tissues. The structure determines starch properties, an important characteristic for cooking and nutrition, and for the industrial uses of starch. Amylopectin synthesis involves at least three enzyme classes: starch synthases, branching enzymes and debranching enzymes. For all three classes, several enzyme isoforms have been identified. However, it is not clear which enzyme(s) are responsible for the large diversity of amylopectin structures. Here, we tested whether the specificities of the debranching enzymes (ISA1 and ISA2) are major determinants of species-dependent differences in amylopectin structure by replacing the dicotyledonous Arabidopsis isoamylases (AtISA1 and AtISA2) with the monocotyledonous rice (Oryza sativa) isoforms. We demonstrate that the ISA1 and ISA2 are sufficiently well conserved between these species to form heteromultimeric chimeric Arabidopsis/rice isoamylase enzymes. Furthermore, we were able to reconstitute the endosperm-specific rice OsISA1 homomultimeric complex in Arabidopsis isa1isa2 mutants. This homomultimer was able to facilitate normal rates of starch synthesis. The resulting amylopectin structure had small but significant differences in comparison to wild-type Arabidopsis amylopectin. This suggests that ISA1 and ISA2 have a conserved function between plant species with a major role in facilitating the crystallization of pre-amylopectin synthesized by starch synthases and branching enzymes, but also influencing the final structure of amylopectin. PMID:24642810

  10. Engineering the Chloroplast Targeted Malarial Vaccine Antigens in Chlamydomonas Starch Granules

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillée, David; Delhaye, Stéphane; Gruyer, Sébastien; Slomianny, Christian; Moretz, Samuel E.; d'Hulst, Christophe; Long, Carole A.; Ball, Steven G.; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2010-01-01

    Background Malaria, an Anopheles-borne parasitic disease, remains a major global health problem causing illness and death that disproportionately affects developing countries. Despite the incidence of malaria, which remains one of the most severe infections of human populations, there is no licensed vaccine against this life-threatening disease. In this context, we decided to explore the expression of Plasmodium vaccine antigens fused to the granule bound starch synthase (GBSS), the major protein associated to the starch matrix in all starch-accumulating plants and algae such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Methods and Findings We describe the development of genetically engineered starch granules containing plasmodial vaccine candidate antigens produced in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that the C-terminal domains of proteins from the rodent Plasmodium species, Plasmodium berghei Apical Major Antigen AMA1, or Major Surface Protein MSP1 fused to the algal granule bound starch synthase (GBSS) are efficiently expressed and bound to the polysaccharide matrix. Mice were either immunized intraperitoneally with the engineered starch particles and Freund adjuvant, or fed with the engineered particles co-delivered with the mucosal adjuvant, and challenged intraperitoneally with a lethal inoculum of P. Berghei. Both experimental strategies led to a significantly reduced parasitemia with an extension of life span including complete cure for intraperitoneal delivery as assessed by negative blood thin smears. In the case of the starch bound P. falciparum GBSS-MSP1 fusion protein, the immune sera or purified immunoglobulin G of mice immunized with the corresponding starch strongly inhibited in vitro the intra-erythrocytic asexual development of the most human deadly plasmodial species. Conclusion This novel system paves the way for the production of clinically relevant plasmodial antigens as algal starch-based particles designated herein as

  11. Enzyme activities and gene expression of starch metabolism provide insights into grape berry development

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xudong; Zhang, Chaobo; Wu, Weimin; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chuan; Fang, Jinggui

    2017-01-01

    Grapes are categorized as a non-climacteric type of fruit which its ripening is not associated to important rises in respiration and ethylene synthesis. The starch metabolism shares a certain role in the carbohydrate metabolic pathways during grape berry development, and is regarded as an important transient pool in the pathway of sugar accumulation. However, the comprehensive role of starch and its contribution to the quality and flavor of grape berry have not been explored thoroughly. In this study, the expression levels of genes enzyme activities and carbohydrate concentrations related to starch metabolism, were analyzed to understand the molecular mechanism of starch accumulation during grape berry development. The results indicated that starch granules in grape berry were located at the chloroplast in the sub-epidermal tissues, acting as the temporary reserves of photosynthetic products to meet the needs for berry development, and relatively high starch contents could be detected at véraison stage. Moreover, both ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) and sucrose phosphate synthase (EC 2.3.1.14) involved in starch synthesis displayed elevated gene expression and enzymes activities in the sub-epidermal tissue, while α- and β-amylases involved in its degradation were highly transcribed and active in the central flesh, explaining the absence of starch in this last tissue. Change in the gene expression and activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, β-amylase and sucrose phosphate synthase revealed that they were regulated by the circadian rhythms in the fruitlets compared with those in the leaves. Both the morphological, enzymological and transcriptional data in this study provide advanced understandings on the function of starch during berry development and ripening that are so important for berry quality. This study will further facilitate our understanding of the sugar metabolism in grape berry as well as in other plant species. PMID:28529757

  12. [Hydroxyethyl starch solutions].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara

    2005-01-01

    Hypovolemia is common among surgical, trauma, and intensive care unit patients. It can occur in the absence of obvious fluid loss secondary to vasodilatation or during generalized alterations of the endothelial barrier resulting in increased capillary permeability. Hydroxyethyl starch solutions are increasingly used for the volume replacement therapy. Hydroxyethyl starch solutions are synthetic colloids with the pharmacological properties that are the closest to natural colloids. Important characteristics for these products are molecular weight, their concentration, the degree of molar substitution, and the substitution pattern. In this review article a large variety of hydroxyethyl starch solutions, their physical and chemical characteristics, pharmacokinetics and metabolism, the main route of elimination, mechanism of action, effect on blood plasma volume, safety, tolerability and side effects (the risk of adverse effects on hemostasis, platelet function, frequency of pruritus, anaphylactoid reaction, incidence of rise in serum amylase) are presented.

  13. Physicochemical properties of kiwifruit starch.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongxing; Zhu, Fan

    2017-04-01

    Three varieties of golden kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) (Gold3, Gold9 and Hort16A) were collected at the commercial harvesting time, and physicochemical properties of starches from core and outer pericarp were studied. Starch contents (dry weight basis) in outer pericarp and core tissues ranged from 38.6 to 51.8% and 34.6 to 40.7%, respectively. All the kiwifruit starches showed B-type polymorph. Compared to the outer pericarp starches, amylose content and enzyme susceptibility of core starches were higher, and the degree of crystallinity, granule size and gelatinization parameters of core starches were somewhat lower. This suggests different biosynthetic properties between these two starches. The enthalpy changes of gelatinization of outer pericarp starches were high (∼21J/g). Rheological properties of outer pericarp starches were compared with normal maize and potato starches showed high yield stress of flow properties. This study revealed the unique properties of kiwifruit starch among various types of starches.

  14. Homologs of PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH Control Starch Granule Initiation in Arabidopsis Leaves[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    David, Laure C.; Abt, Melanie; Lu, Kuan-Jen

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanism that initiates the synthesis of starch granules is poorly understood. Here, we discovered two plastidial proteins involved in granule initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. Both contain coiled coils and a family-48 carbohydrate binding module (CBM48) and are homologs of the PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST) protein; thus, we named them PTST2 and PTST3. Chloroplasts in mesophyll cells typically contain five to seven granules, but remarkably, most chloroplasts in ptst2 mutants contained zero or one large granule. Chloroplasts in ptst3 had a slight reduction in granule number compared with the wild type, while those of the ptst2 ptst3 double mutant contained even fewer granules than ptst2. The ptst2 granules were larger but similar in morphology to wild-type granules, but those of the double mutant had an aberrant morphology. Immunoprecipitation showed that PTST2 interacts with STARCH SYNTHASE4 (SS4), which influences granule initiation and morphology. Overexpression of PTST2 resulted in chloroplasts containing many small granules, an effect that was dependent on the presence of SS4. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the CBM48 domain of PTST2, which is essential for its function, interacts with long maltooligosaccharides. We propose that PTST2 and PTST3 are critical during granule initiation, as they bind and deliver suitable maltooligosaccharide primers to SS4. PMID:28684429

  15. Homologs of PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH Control Starch Granule Initiation in Arabidopsis Leaves.

    PubMed

    Seung, David; Boudet, Julien; Monroe, Jonathan; Schreier, Tina B; David, Laure C; Abt, Melanie; Lu, Kuan-Jen; Zanella, Martina; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2017-07-01

    The molecular mechanism that initiates the synthesis of starch granules is poorly understood. Here, we discovered two plastidial proteins involved in granule initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. Both contain coiled coils and a family-48 carbohydrate binding module (CBM48) and are homologs of the PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST) protein; thus, we named them PTST2 and PTST3. Chloroplasts in mesophyll cells typically contain five to seven granules, but remarkably, most chloroplasts in ptst2 mutants contained zero or one large granule. Chloroplasts in ptst3 had a slight reduction in granule number compared with the wild type, while those of the ptst2 ptst3 double mutant contained even fewer granules than ptst2 The ptst2 granules were larger but similar in morphology to wild-type granules, but those of the double mutant had an aberrant morphology. Immunoprecipitation showed that PTST2 interacts with STARCH SYNTHASE4 (SS4), which influences granule initiation and morphology. Overexpression of PTST2 resulted in chloroplasts containing many small granules, an effect that was dependent on the presence of SS4. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the CBM48 domain of PTST2, which is essential for its function, interacts with long maltooligosaccharides. We propose that PTST2 and PTST3 are critical during granule initiation, as they bind and deliver suitable maltooligosaccharide primers to SS4. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. Starch as a determinant of plant fitness under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Thalmann, Matthias; Santelia, Diana

    2017-03-09

    I. II. III. IV. V. VI. References SUMMARY: Abiotic stresses, such as drought, high salinity and extreme temperatures, pose one of the most important constraints to plant growth and productivity in many regions of the world. A number of investigations have shown that plants, including several important crops, remobilize their starch reserve to release energy, sugars and derived metabolites to help mitigate the stress. This is an essential process for plant fitness with important implications for plant productivity under challenging environmental conditions. In this Tansley insight, we evaluate the current literature on starch metabolism in response to abiotic stresses, and discuss the key enzymes involved and how they are regulated.

  17. A review of starch-branching enzymes and their role in amylopectin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Starch-branching enzymes (SBEs) are one of the four major enzyme classes involved in starch biosynthesis in plants and algae, and their activities play a crucial role in determining the structure and physical properties of starch granules. SBEs generate α-1,6-branch linkages in α-glucans through cleavage of internal α-1,4 bonds and transfer of the released reducing ends to C-6 hydroxyls. Starch biosynthesis in plants and algae requires multiple isoforms of SBEs and is distinct from glycogen biosynthesis in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes which uses a single branching enzyme (BE) isoform. One of the unique characteristics of starch structure is the grouping of α-1,6-branch points in clusters within amylopectin. This is a feature of SBEs and their interplay with other starch biosynthetic enzymes, thus facilitating formation of the compact water-insoluble semicrystalline starch granule. In this respect, the activity of SBE isoforms is pivotal in starch granule assembly. SBEs are structurally related to the α-amylase superfamily of enzymes, sharing three domains of secondary structure with prokaryotic Bes: the central (β/α)8 -barrel catalytic domain, an NH2 -terminal domain involved in determining the size of α-glucan chain transferred, and the C-terminal domain responsible for catalytic capacity and substrate preference. In addition, SBEs have conserved plant-specific domains, including phosphorylation sites which are thought to be involved in regulating starch metabolism. SBEs form heteromeric protein complexes with other SBE isoforms as well as other enzymes involved in starch synthesis, and assembly of these protein complexes is regulated by protein phosphorylation. Phosphorylated SBEIIb is found in multienzyme complexes with isoforms of glucan-elongating starch synthases, and these protein complexes are implicated in amylopectin cluster formation. This review presents a comparative overview of plant SBEs and includes a review of their properties

  18. Thermoplastic starch-waxy maize starch nanocrystals nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Angellier, Hélène; Molina-Boisseau, Sonia; Dole, Patrice; Dufresne, Alain

    2006-02-01

    Waxy maize starch nanocrystals obtained by hydrolysis of native granules were used as a reinforcing agent in a thermoplastic waxy maize starch matrix plasticized with glycerol. Compared to our previous studies on starch nanocrystals reinforced natural rubber (NR) [Macromolecules 2005, 38, 3783; 2005, 38, 9161], the present system presents two particularities: (i) thermoplastic starch is a polar matrix, contrarily to NR, and (ii) the chemical structures of the matrix and the filler are similar. The influence of the glycerol content, filler content, and aging on the reinforcing properties of waxy maize starch nanocrystals (tensile tests, DMA) and crystalline structure (X-ray diffraction) of materials were studied. It was shown that the reinforcing effect of starch nanocrystals can be attributed to strong filler/filler and filler/matrix interactions due to the establishment of hydrogen bonding. The presence of starch nanocrystals leads to a slowing down of the recrystallization of the matrix during aging in humid atmosphere.

  19. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  20. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  1. Maize endosperm-specific transcription factors O2 and PBF network the regulation of protein and starch synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Zheng, Xixi; Yang, Jun; Messing, Joachim; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-09-27

    The maize endosperm-specific transcription factors opaque2 (O2) and prolamine-box binding factor (PBF) regulate storage protein zein genes. We show that they also control starch synthesis. The starch content in the PbfRNAi and o2 mutants was reduced by ∼5% and 11%, respectively, compared with normal genotypes. In the double-mutant PbfRNAi;o2, starch was decreased by 25%. Transcriptome analysis reveals that >1,000 genes were affected in each of the two mutants and in the double mutant; these genes were mainly enriched in sugar and protein metabolism. Pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase 1 and 2 (PPDKs) and starch synthase III (SSIII) are critical components in the starch biosynthetic enzyme complex. The expression of PPDK1, PPDK2, and SSIII and their protein levels are further reduced in the double mutants as compared with the single mutants. When the promoters of these genes were analyzed, we found a prolamine box and an O2 box that can be additively transactivated by PBF and O2. Starch synthase IIa (SSIIa, encoding another starch synthase for amylopectin) and starch branching enzyme 1 (SBEI, encoding one of the two main starch branching enzymes) are not directly regulated by PBF and O2, but their protein levels are significantly decreased in the o2 mutant and are further decreased in the double mutant, indicating that o2 and PbfRNAi may affect the levels of some other transcription factor(s) or mRNA regulatory factor(s) that in turn would affect the transcript and protein levels of SSIIa and SBEI These findings show that three important traits-nutritional quality, calories, and yield-are linked through the same transcription factors.

  2. Maize endosperm-specific transcription factors O2 and PBF network the regulation of protein and starch synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Zheng, Xixi; Yang, Jun; Messing, Joachim; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-01-01

    The maize endosperm-specific transcription factors opaque2 (O2) and prolamine-box binding factor (PBF) regulate storage protein zein genes. We show that they also control starch synthesis. The starch content in the PbfRNAi and o2 mutants was reduced by ∼5% and 11%, respectively, compared with normal genotypes. In the double-mutant PbfRNAi;o2, starch was decreased by 25%. Transcriptome analysis reveals that >1,000 genes were affected in each of the two mutants and in the double mutant; these genes were mainly enriched in sugar and protein metabolism. Pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase 1 and 2 (PPDKs) and starch synthase III (SSIII) are critical components in the starch biosynthetic enzyme complex. The expression of PPDK1, PPDK2, and SSIII and their protein levels are further reduced in the double mutants as compared with the single mutants. When the promoters of these genes were analyzed, we found a prolamine box and an O2 box that can be additively transactivated by PBF and O2. Starch synthase IIa (SSIIa, encoding another starch synthase for amylopectin) and starch branching enzyme 1 (SBEI, encoding one of the two main starch branching enzymes) are not directly regulated by PBF and O2, but their protein levels are significantly decreased in the o2 mutant and are further decreased in the double mutant, indicating that o2 and PbfRNAi may affect the levels of some other transcription factor(s) or mRNA regulatory factor(s) that in turn would affect the transcript and protein levels of SSIIa and SBEI. These findings show that three important traits—nutritional quality, calories, and yield—are linked through the same transcription factors. PMID:27621432

  3. Starches, resistant starches, the gut microflora and human health.

    PubMed

    Bird, A R; Brown, I L; Topping, D L

    2000-03-01

    Starches are important as energy sources for humans and also for their interactions with the gut microflora throughout the digestive tact. Largely, those interactions promote human health. In the mouth, less gelatinised starches may lower risk of cariogensis. In the large bowel, starches which have escaped small intestinal digestion (resistant starch), together with proteins, other undigested carbohydrates and endogenous secretions are fermented by the resident microflora. The resulting short chain fatty acids contribute substantially to the normal physiological functions of the viscera. Specific types of resistant starch (e.g. the chemically modified starches used in the food industry) may be used to manipulate the gut bacteria and their products (including short chain fatty acids) so as to optimise health. In the upper gut, these starches may assist in the transport of probiotic organisms thus promoting the immune response and suppressing potential pathogens. However, it appears unlikely that current probiotic organisms can be used to modulate large bowel short chain fatty acids in adults although resistant starch and other prebiotics can do so. Suggestions that starch may exacerbate certain conditions (such as ulcerative colitis) through stimulating the growth of certain pathogenic organisms appear to be unfounded. Short chain fatty acids may modulate tissue levels and effects of growth factors in the gut and so modify gut development and risk of serious disease, including colo-rectal cancer. However, information on the relationship between starches and the microflora is relatively sparse and substantial opportunities exist both for basic research and food product development.

  4. Characterization of Arenga starch in comparison with sago starch.

    PubMed

    Adawiyah, Dede R; Sasaki, Tomoko; Kohyama, Kaoru

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this research was to characterize the composition and physical properties of palm starch obtained from Arenga pinnata in comparison with another palm starch from Metroxylon sago. The amylose contents of both starches were not significantly different. Peak gelatinization temperature was also similar at approximately 67 °C, but arenga starch showed a narrower range of gelatinization temperature than sago. The crystallinity and swelling power capacity of arenga starch were lower than those of sago. Arenga and sago starch paste at low concentrations showed shear thinning behavior, and sago formed a more viscous sol/paste than arenga. The sol-gel transition concentration of sago starch paste was found at a lower concentration than arenga starch. At high concentrations, gel from arenga starch was more rigid than that of sago. The breaking properties and texture profile of both starch gels were also clearly different, suggesting that they are suited for different applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  6. Understanding and influencing starch biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kossmann, J; Lloyd, J

    2000-01-01

    Starch is one of the most important products synthesized by plants that is used in industrial processes. If it were possible to increase production or modify starches in vivo, using combinations or either genetically altered or mutant plants, it may make them cheaper for use by industry, or open up new markets for the modified starches. The conversion of sucrose to starch in storage organs is, therefore, discussed. In particular the roles of the different enzymes directly involved in synthesizing the starch molecules on altering starch structure are reviewed, as well as the different models for the production of the fine structure of amylopectin. In addition, the process of starch phosphorylation, which is also important in determining the physical properties of starches, is reviewed. It is hoped that detailed knowledge of these processes will lead to the rational design of tailored starches. Starch degradation is also an important process, for example, in the cold-sweetening of potato tubers, but outside of cereal endosperm little is known about the processes involved. The enzymes thought to be involved and the evidence for this are discussed.

  7. Feedback inhibition of starch degradation in Arabidopsis leaves mediated by trehalose 6-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marina Camara Mattos; Hejazi, Mahdi; Fettke, Joerg; Steup, Martin; Feil, Regina; Krause, Ursula; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Vosloh, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos María; Ivakov, Alexander; Yadav, Umesh Prasad; Piques, Maria; Metzner, Daniela; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John Edward

    2013-11-01

    Many plants accumulate substantial starch reserves in their leaves during the day and remobilize them at night to provide carbon and energy for maintenance and growth. In this paper, we explore the role of a sugar-signaling metabolite, trehalose-6-phosphate (Tre6P), in regulating the accumulation and turnover of transitory starch in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. Ethanol-induced overexpression of trehalose-phosphate synthase during the day increased Tre6P levels up to 11-fold. There was a transient increase in the rate of starch accumulation in the middle of the day, but this was not linked to reductive activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. A 2- to 3-fold increase in Tre6P during the night led to significant inhibition of starch degradation. Maltose and maltotriose did not accumulate, suggesting that Tre6P affects an early step in the pathway of starch degradation in the chloroplasts. Starch granules isolated from induced plants had a higher orthophosphate content than granules from noninduced control plants, consistent either with disruption of the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle that is essential for efficient starch breakdown or with inhibition of starch hydrolysis by β-amylase. Nonaqueous fractionation of leaves showed that Tre6P is predominantly located in the cytosol, with estimated in vivo Tre6P concentrations of 4 to 7 µm in the cytosol, 0.2 to 0.5 µm in the chloroplasts, and 0.05 µm in the vacuole. It is proposed that Tre6P is a component in a signaling pathway that mediates the feedback regulation of starch breakdown by sucrose, potentially linking starch turnover to demand for sucrose by growing sink organs at night.

  8. Functional and structural characterization of plastidic starch phosphorylase during barley endosperm development

    PubMed Central

    Ruzanski, Christian; Krucewicz, Katarzyna; Meier, Sebastian; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte; Palcic, Monica M.

    2017-01-01

    The production of starch is essential for human nutrition and represents a major metabolic flux in the biosphere. The biosynthesis of starch in storage organs like barley endosperm operates via two main pathways using different substrates: starch synthases use ADP-glucose to produce amylose and amylopectin, the two major components of starch, whereas starch phosphorylase (Pho1) uses glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), a precursor for ADP-glucose production, to produce α-1,4 glucans. The significance of the Pho1 pathway in starch biosynthesis has remained unclear. To elucidate the importance of barley Pho1 (HvPho1) for starch biosynthesis in barley endosperm, we analyzed HvPho1 protein production and enzyme activity levels throughout barley endosperm development and characterized structure-function relationships of HvPho1. The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of starch granule biosynthesis, that is, the enzymes and substrates involved in the initial transition from simple sugars to polysaccharides, remain unclear. We found that HvPho1 is present as an active protein at the onset of barley endosperm development. Notably, purified recombinant protein can catalyze the de novo production of α-1,4-glucans using HvPho1 from G1P as the sole substrate. The structural properties of HvPho1 provide insights into the low affinity of HvPho1 for large polysaccharides like starch or amylopectin. Our results suggest that HvPho1 may play a role during the initiation of starch biosynthesis in barley. PMID:28407006

  9. Functional and structural characterization of plastidic starch phosphorylase during barley endosperm development.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A; Ruzanski, Christian; Krucewicz, Katarzyna; Meier, Sebastian; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte; Palcic, Monica M

    2017-01-01

    The production of starch is essential for human nutrition and represents a major metabolic flux in the biosphere. The biosynthesis of starch in storage organs like barley endosperm operates via two main pathways using different substrates: starch synthases use ADP-glucose to produce amylose and amylopectin, the two major components of starch, whereas starch phosphorylase (Pho1) uses glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), a precursor for ADP-glucose production, to produce α-1,4 glucans. The significance of the Pho1 pathway in starch biosynthesis has remained unclear. To elucidate the importance of barley Pho1 (HvPho1) for starch biosynthesis in barley endosperm, we analyzed HvPho1 protein production and enzyme activity levels throughout barley endosperm development and characterized structure-function relationships of HvPho1. The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of starch granule biosynthesis, that is, the enzymes and substrates involved in the initial transition from simple sugars to polysaccharides, remain unclear. We found that HvPho1 is present as an active protein at the onset of barley endosperm development. Notably, purified recombinant protein can catalyze the de novo production of α-1,4-glucans using HvPho1 from G1P as the sole substrate. The structural properties of HvPho1 provide insights into the low affinity of HvPho1 for large polysaccharides like starch or amylopectin. Our results suggest that HvPho1 may play a role during the initiation of starch biosynthesis in barley.

  10. Effect of high temperature on grain filling period, yield, amylose content and activity of starch biosynthesis enzymes in endosperm of basmati rice.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nisar; Tetlow, Ian J; Nawaz, Sehar; Iqbal, Ahsan; Mubin, Muhammad; Nawaz ul Rehman, Muhammad Shah; Butt, Aisha; Lightfoot, David A; Maekawa, Masahiko

    2015-08-30

    High temperature during grain filling affects yield, starch amylose content and activity of starch biosynthesis enzymes in basmati rice. To investigate the physiological mechanisms underpinning the effects of high temperature on rice grain, basmati rice was grown under two temperature conditions - 32 and 22 °C - during grain filling. High temperature decreased the grain filling period from 32 to 26 days, reducing yield by 6%, and caused a reduction in total starch (3.1%) and amylose content (22%). Measurable activities of key enzymes involved in sucrose to starch conversion, sucrose synthase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch phosphorylase and soluble starch synthase in endosperms developed at 32 °C were lower than those at 22 °C compared with similar ripening stage on an endosperm basis. In particular, granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) activity was significantly lower than corresponding activity in endosperms developing at 22 °C during all developmental stages analyzed. Results suggest changes in amylose/amylopectin ratio observed in plants grown at 32 °C was attributable to a reduction in activity of GBSS, the sole enzyme responsible for amylose biosynthesis. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. The properties of different cultivars of Jinhai sweet potato starches in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junjie; Liu, Lizeng; Lian, Xijun; Li, Lin; Wu, Hong

    2014-06-01

    IR, (13)C NMR, X-ray diffraction and DSC applied to study the physicochemical properties of starches from six different cultivars of Jinhai (I-VI) sweet potato strains in China. Jinhai II showed the highest rate of retrogradation while Jinhai III showed the lowest in all studied cultivars. The hydrolysis rates of those starches by α-amylase were from 98.1% in Jinhai II to 99.9% in Jinhai VI with a mean value of 99.3%. The ratio of R (1158/991cm(-1)) in IR spectra of those six different sweet potato starches could be the feature to identify them. All of the six studied Jinhai sweet potato starches showed strong peak at diffraction angle (2θ) of 17°, 15° and 23°, meanwhile an extremely weak peak at 2θ around 5.5° was also identical. XRD pattern of Jinhai II and IV starch also gave strong diffraction peaks at 26.6°, which could be the characteristics of them. The enthalpy and Tp of Jinhai II were especially lower than other cultivars. Jinhai IV revealed two Tp of 128.0°C and 140°C, respectively. The second Tp was maybe the characteristic of Jinhai IV starch. IR and DSC were the most effective methods to distinguish different cultivars of sweet potato. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Starch Biorefinery Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Läufer, Albrecht

    2017-03-07

    Nature uses enzymes to build and convert biomass; mankind uses the same enzymes and produces them on a large scale to make optimum use of biomass in biorefineries. Bacterial α-amylases and fungal glucoamylases have been the workhorses of starch biorefineries for many decades. Pullulanases were introduced in the 1980s. Proteases, cellulases, hemicellulases, and phytases have been on the market for a few years as process aids, improving yields, performance, and costs. Detailed studies of the complex chemical structures of biomass and of the physicochemical limitations of industrial biorefineries have led enzyme developers to produce novel tailor-made solutions for improving yield and profitability in the industry. This chapter reviews the development of enzyme applications in the major starch biorefining processes.

  13. Relationships between dry matter content, ensiling, ammonia-nitrogen, and ruminal in vitro starch digestibility in high-moisture corn samples.

    PubMed

    Ferraretto, L F; Taysom, K; Taysom, D M; Shaver, R D; Hoffman, P C

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to determine relationships between high-moisture corn (HMC) dry matter (DM), ammonia-N [% of crude protein (CP)], and soluble CP concentrations, and pH, with 7-h ruminal in vitro starch digestibility (ivStarchD), and (2) to evaluate the effect of ensiling on pH, ammonia-N, soluble CP, and ivStarchD measurements in HMC. A data set comprising 6,131 HMC samples (55 to 80% DM) obtained from a commercial feed analysis laboratory was used for this study. Month of sample submittal was assumed to be associated with length of the ensiling period. Data for month of sample submittal were analyzed using Proc Mixed in SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) with month as a fixed effect. Regressions to determine linear and quadratic relationships between ivStarchD and ammonia-N, soluble CP, pH, and DM content were performed using Proc Mixed. The ivStarchD increased by 9 percentage units from October to August of the following year. Similar results were observed for ammonia-N and soluble CP with increases from 1.8 to 4.6% of CP and 31.3 to 46.4% of CP, respectively, from October to August of the following year. Ammonia-N was positively related to ivStarchD (R(2)=0.61). The DM content of HMC at silo removal was negatively related (R(2)=0.47) to ivStarchD with a decrease of 1.6 percentage units in ivStarchD per 1-percentage-unit increase in DM content. The pH of HMC was negatively related to ammonia-N (R(2)=0.53), soluble CP (R(2)=0.57), and ivStarchD (R(2)=0.51). Combined, ammonia-N, DM, soluble CP, and pH provided a good prediction of ivStarchD (adjusted R(2)=0.70). Increasing pH, ammonia-N, soluble CP, and ivStarchD values indicate that HMC may need up to 10 mo of ensiling to reach maximum starch digestibility. Ammonia-N, DM content, soluble CP concentration, and pH are good indicators of ruminal in vitro starch digestibility for high-moisture corn. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  14. Starch digestion capacity of poultry.

    PubMed

    Svihus, B

    2014-09-01

    Starch is quantitatively the most important nutrient in poultry diets and will to a large extent be present as intact starch granules due to very limited extent of gelatinization during pelleting. Although native starch is difficult to digest due to a semi-crystalline structure, even fast-growing broiler chickens appears to be able to digest this starch more or less completely during passage through the jejunum. However, reduced starch digestibility has been observed, particularly in pelleted diets containing large quantities of wheat. Although properties of the starch granule such as size and components on the granule surface may affect digestibility, the entrapment of starch granules in cell walls and a protein matrix may be even more important factors impeding starch digestion. In that case, this and the fact that amylase secretion is normally very high in poultry may explain the lack of convincing effects of exogenous α-amylase added to the diet. However, few well-designed experiments assessing mechanisms of starch digestion and the effect of α-amylase supplementation have been carried out, and thus more research is needed in this important area. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. STARCH HYDROLYSIS BY STREPTOCOCCUS EQUINUS

    PubMed Central

    Dunican, Lawrence K.; Seeley, Harry W.

    1962-01-01

    Dunican, Lawrence K. (Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.) and Harry W. Seeley. Starch hydrolysis by Streptococcus equinus. J. Bacteriol. 82:264–269. 1962.—In a study of starch hydrolysis by strains of Streptococcus equinus, 52 isolates were obtained and their amylolytic abilities determined. It was found that all the strains could hydrolyze starch to some extent when grown in the presence of an easily fermentable carbohydrate, viz., glucose. Without this carbohydrate the organisms did not hydrolyze starch. The hydrolysis of starch was inhibited when the organisms were grown in an atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 95% N2, even if grown in the presence of a fermentable monosaccharide. S. bovis, which was used as a reference organism, readily hydrolyzed starch in the absence of monosaccharides and in atmospheres containing CO2. In no instance did S. equinus hydrolyze the starch to the level of reducing sugars. Negligible amounts of reducing sugars were recovered when the cell-free filtrates of S. equinus were incubated with starch. With S. bovis, the yield of reducing sugars under such conditions was almost quantitative. These facts extend further the differences between these related organisms. The ability to synthesize an internal starchlike polysaccharide was noted in most of the strains of S. equinus. Synthesis was found when the organisms were grown on maltose or on a starch medium containing a small amount of fermentable monosaccharide. PMID:13888473

  16. Transcriptomic identification and expression of starch and sucrose metabolism genes in the seeds of Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Lin, Qing; Feng, Yanzhi; Fan, Xiaoming; Zou, Feng; Yuan, De-Yi; Zeng, Xiaochun; Cao, Heping

    2015-01-28

    The Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) seed provides a rich source of carbohydrates as food and feed. However, little is known about starch biosynthesis in the seeds. The objectives of this study were to determine seed composition profiles and identify genes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism. Metabolite analysis showed that starch was the major component and rapidly accumulated during seed endosperm development. Amylopectin was approximately 3-fold of amylose content in chestnut starch. Illumina platform-based transcriptome sequencing generated 56671 unigenes in two cDNA libraries from seed endosperms collected at 45 and 75 days after flowering (DAF). A total of 1537 unigenes showed expression differences ≥2-fold in the two stages of seeds including 570 up-regulated and 967 down-regulated unigenes. One hundred and fifty-two unigenes were identified as involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, including 1 for glycogenin glucosyltransferase, 4 for adenylate transporter (brittle1-type), 3 for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP, not brittle2- or shrunken2-type), 3 for starch synthase (SS), 2 for starch branching enzyme, 5 for starch debranching enzyme, 11 for sucrose synthase, and 3 for sucrose-phosphate synthase. Among them, 58 unigenes showed a ≥2-fold expression difference between the 45 and 75 DAF seeds including 11 up- and 47 down-regulated unigenes. The expression of 21 unigenes putatively coding for major enzymes in starch and sucrose metabolism was validated by qPCR using RNA from five seed stages. Expression profiles and correlation analysis indicated that the mRNA levels of AGP (large and small subunits), granule-bound SS2, and soluble SS1 and SS4 were well-correlated with starch accumulation in the seeds. This study suggests that the starch biosynthesis pathway in Chinese chestnut is similar to that of potato tuber/Arabidopsis leaf and differs from that of maize endosperm. The information provides valuable metabolite and genetic resources

  17. Metabolic analysis of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) berries from extreme genotypes reveals hallmarks for fruit starch metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nardozza, Simona; MacRae, Elspeth A.; Sulpice, Ronan; Clearwater, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato, melon, grape, peach, and strawberry primarily accumulate soluble sugars during fruit development. In contrast, kiwifruit (Actinidia Lindl. spp.) and banana store a large amount of starch that is released as soluble sugars only after the fruit has reached maturity. By integrating metabolites measured by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, enzyme activities measured by a robot-based platform, and transcript data sets during fruit development of Actinidia deliciosa genotypes contrasting in starch concentration and size, this study identified the metabolic changes occurring during kiwifruit development, including the metabolic hallmarks of starch accumulation and turnover. At cell division, a rise in glucose (Glc) concentration was associated with neutral invertase (NI) activity, and the decline of both Glc and NI activity defined the transition to the cell expansion and starch accumulation phase. The high transcript levels of β-amylase 9 (BAM9) during cell division, prior to net starch accumulation, and the correlation between sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity and sucrose suggest the occurrence of sucrose cycling and starch turnover. ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is identified as a key enzyme for starch accumulation in kiwifruit berries, as high-starch genotypes had 2- to 5-fold higher AGPase activity, which was maintained over a longer period of time and was also associated with enhanced and extended transcription of the AGPase large subunit 4 (APL4). The data also revealed that SPS and galactinol might affect kiwifruit starch accumulation, and suggest that phloem unloading into kiwifruit is symplastic. These results are relevant to the genetic improvement of quality traits such as sweetness and sugar/acid balance in a range of fruit species. PMID:24058160

  18. Lineage-Specific Evolutionary Histories and Regulation of Major Starch Metabolism Genes during Banana Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Jourda, Cyril; Cardi, Céline; Gibert, Olivier; Giraldo Toro, Andrès; Ricci, Julien; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants. It is also a major feature of cultivated bananas as it accumulates to large amounts during banana fruit development before almost complete conversion to soluble sugars during ripening. Little is known about the structure of major gene families involved in banana starch metabolism and their evolution compared to other species. To identify genes involved in banana starch metabolism and investigate their evolutionary history, we analyzed six gene families playing a crucial role in plant starch biosynthesis and degradation: the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (AGPases), starch synthases (SS), starch branching enzymes (SBE), debranching enzymes (DBE), α-amylases (AMY) and β-amylases (BAM). Using comparative genomics and phylogenetic approaches, these genes were classified into families and sub-families and orthology relationships with functional genes in Eudicots and in grasses were identified. In addition to known ancestral duplications shaping starch metabolism gene families, independent evolution in banana and grasses also occurred through lineage-specific whole genome duplications for specific sub-families of AGPase, SS, SBE, and BAM genes; and through gene-scale duplications for AMY genes. In particular, banana lineage duplications yielded a set of AGPase, SBE and BAM genes that were highly or specifically expressed in banana fruits. Gene expression analysis highlighted a complex transcriptional reprogramming of starch metabolism genes during ripening of banana fruits. A differential regulation of expression between banana gene duplicates was identified for SBE and BAM genes, suggesting that part of starch metabolism regulation in the fruit evolved in the banana lineage. PMID:27994606

  19. Lineage-Specific Evolutionary Histories and Regulation of Major Starch Metabolism Genes during Banana Ripening.

    PubMed

    Jourda, Cyril; Cardi, Céline; Gibert, Olivier; Giraldo Toro, Andrès; Ricci, Julien; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants. It is also a major feature of cultivated bananas as it accumulates to large amounts during banana fruit development before almost complete conversion to soluble sugars during ripening. Little is known about the structure of major gene families involved in banana starch metabolism and their evolution compared to other species. To identify genes involved in banana starch metabolism and investigate their evolutionary history, we analyzed six gene families playing a crucial role in plant starch biosynthesis and degradation: the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (AGPases), starch synthases (SS), starch branching enzymes (SBE), debranching enzymes (DBE), α-amylases (AMY) and β-amylases (BAM). Using comparative genomics and phylogenetic approaches, these genes were classified into families and sub-families and orthology relationships with functional genes in Eudicots and in grasses were identified. In addition to known ancestral duplications shaping starch metabolism gene families, independent evolution in banana and grasses also occurred through lineage-specific whole genome duplications for specific sub-families of AGPase, SS, SBE, and BAM genes; and through gene-scale duplications for AMY genes. In particular, banana lineage duplications yielded a set of AGPase, SBE and BAM genes that were highly or specifically expressed in banana fruits. Gene expression analysis highlighted a complex transcriptional reprogramming of starch metabolism genes during ripening of banana fruits. A differential regulation of expression between banana gene duplicates was identified for SBE and BAM genes, suggesting that part of starch metabolism regulation in the fruit evolved in the banana lineage.

  20. Isolation, identification and characterisation of starch-interacting proteins by 2-D affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Irwin, Jennifer A; Higgins, Jody; Rahman, Sadequr; Morell, Matthew K

    2006-05-01

    A 2-D affinity electrophoretic technique (2-DAE) has been used to isolate proteins that interact with various starch components from total barley endosperm extracts. In the first dimension, proteins are separated by native PAGE. The second-dimensional gel contains polysaccharides such as amylopectin and glycogen. The migration of starch-interacting proteins in this dimension is determined by their affinity towards a particular polysaccharide and these proteins are therefore spatially separated from the bulk of proteins in the crude extract. Four distinct proteins demonstrate significant affinity for amylopectin and have been identified as starch branching enzyme I (SBEI), starch branching enzyme IIa (SBEIIa), SBEIIb and starch phosphorylase using polyclonal antibodies and zymogram activity analysis. In the case of starch phosphorylase, a protein spot was excised from a 2-DAE polyacrylamide gel and analysed using Q-TOF MS/MS, resulting in the alignment of three internal peptide sequences with the known sequence of the wheat plastidic starch phosphorylase isoform. This assignment was confirmed by the determination of the enzyme's function using zymogram analysis. Dissociation constants (Kd) were calculated for the three enzymes at 4 degrees C and values of 0.20, 0.21 and 1.3 g/L were determined for SBEI, SBEIIa and starch phosphorylase, respectively. Starch synthase I could also be resolved from the other proteins in the presence of glycogen and its identity was confirmed using a polyclonal antibody and by activity analysis. The 2-DAE method described here is simple, though powerful, enabling protein separation from crude extracts on the basis of function.

  1. Surface Localization of Zein Storage Proteins in Starch Granules from Maize Endosperm1

    PubMed Central

    Mu-Forster, Chen; Wasserman, Bruce P.

    1998-01-01

    Starch granules from maize (Zea mays) contain a characteristic group of polypeptides that are tightly associated with the starch matrix (C. Mu-Forster, R. Huang, J.R. Powers, R.W. Harriman, M. Knight, G.W. Singletary, P.L. Keeling, B.P. Wasserman [1996] Plant Physiol 111: 821–829). Zeins comprise about 50% of the granule-associated proteins, and in this study their spatial distribution within the starch granule was determined. Proteolysis of starch granules at subgelatinization temperatures using the thermophilic protease thermolysin led to selective removal of the zeins, whereas granule-associated proteins of 32 kD or above, including the waxy protein, starch synthase I, and starch-branching enzyme IIb, remained refractory to proteolysis. Granule-associated proteins from maize are therefore composed of two distinct classes, the surface-localized zeins of 10 to 27 kD and the granule-intrinsic proteins of 32 kD or higher. The origin of surface-localized δ-zein was probed by comparing δ-zein levels of starch granules obtained from homogenized whole endosperm with granules isolated from amyloplasts. Starch granules from amyloplasts contained markedly lower levels of δ-zein relative to granules prepared from whole endosperm, thus indicating that δ-zein adheres to granule surfaces after disruption of the amyloplast envelope. Cross-linking experiments show that the zeins are deposited on the granule surface as aggregates. In contrast, the granule-intrinsic proteins are prone to covalent modification, but do not form intermolecular cross-links. We conclude that individual granule intrinsic proteins exist as monomers and are not deposited in the form of multimeric clusters within the starch matrix. PMID:9536075

  2. Metabolic analysis of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) berries from extreme genotypes reveals hallmarks for fruit starch metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nardozza, Simona; Boldingh, Helen L; Osorio, Sonia; Höhne, Melanie; Wohlers, Mark; Gleave, Andrew P; MacRae, Elspeth A; Richardson, Annette C; Atkinson, Ross G; Sulpice, Ronan; Fernie, Alisdair R; Clearwater, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Tomato, melon, grape, peach, and strawberry primarily accumulate soluble sugars during fruit development. In contrast, kiwifruit (Actinidia Lindl. spp.) and banana store a large amount of starch that is released as soluble sugars only after the fruit has reached maturity. By integrating metabolites measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, enzyme activities measured by a robot-based platform, and transcript data sets during fruit development of Actinidia deliciosa genotypes contrasting in starch concentration and size, this study identified the metabolic changes occurring during kiwifruit development, including the metabolic hallmarks of starch accumulation and turnover. At cell division, a rise in glucose (Glc) concentration was associated with neutral invertase (NI) activity, and the decline of both Glc and NI activity defined the transition to the cell expansion and starch accumulation phase. The high transcript levels of β-amylase 9 (BAM9) during cell division, prior to net starch accumulation, and the correlation between sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity and sucrose suggest the occurrence of sucrose cycling and starch turnover. ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is identified as a key enzyme for starch accumulation in kiwifruit berries, as high-starch genotypes had 2- to 5-fold higher AGPase activity, which was maintained over a longer period of time and was also associated with enhanced and extended transcription of the AGPase large subunit 4 (APL4). The data also revealed that SPS and galactinol might affect kiwifruit starch accumulation, and suggest that phloem unloading into kiwifruit is symplastic. These results are relevant to the genetic improvement of quality traits such as sweetness and sugar/acid balance in a range of fruit species.

  3. Starch-filled polymer composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This report describes the development of degradable polymer composites that can be made at room temperature without special equipments. The developed composites are made from ethyl cyanoacrylate and starch. The polymer composites produced by this procedure contain 60 wt% of starch with compressive s...

  4. Responsive starch-based materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch, a low-cost, annually renewable resource, is naturally hydrophilic and its properties change with relative humidity. Starch’s hygroscopic nature can be used to develop materials which change shape or volume in response to environmental changes (e.g. humidity). For example, starch-based graf...

  5. Physicochemical properties of maca starch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Li, Guantian; Wang, Sunan; Yao, Weirong; Zhu, Fan

    2017-03-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii Walpers) is gaining research attention due to its unique bioactive properties. Starch is a major component of maca roots, thus representing a novel starch source. In this study, the properties of three maca starches (yellow, purple and black) were compared with commercially maize, cassava, and potato starches. The starch granule sizes ranged from 9.0 to 9.6μm, and the granules were irregularly oval. All the maca starches presented B-type X-ray diffraction patterns, with the relative degree of crystallinity ranging from 22.2 to 24.3%. The apparent amylose contents ranged from 21.0 to 21.3%. The onset gelatinization temperatures ranged from 47.1 to 47.5°C as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry. Significant differences were observed in the pasting properties and textural parameters among all of the studied starches. These characteristics suggest the utility of native maca starch in products subjected to low temperatures during food processing and other industrial applications.

  6. Starch Applications for Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Starch is one of the most abundant and economical renewable biopolymers in nature. Starch molecules are high molecular weight polymers of D-glucose linked by α-(1,4) and α-(1,6) glycosidic bonds, forming linear (amylose) and branched (amylopectin) structures. Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starches (OSA-starch) are designed by carefully choosing a proper starch source, path and degree of modification. This enables emulsion and micro-encapsulation delivery systems for oil based flavors, micronutrients, fragrance, and pharmaceutical actives. A large percentage of flavors are encapsulated by spray drying in today's industry due to its high throughput. However, spray drying encapsulation faces constant challenges with retention of volatile compounds, oxidation of sensitive compound, and manufacturing yield. Specialty OSA-starches were developed suitable for the complex dynamics in spray drying and to provide high encapsulation efficiency and high microcapsule quality. The OSA starch surface activity, low viscosity and film forming capability contribute to high volatile retention and low active oxidation. OSA starches exhibit superior performance, especially in high solids and high oil load encapsulations compared with other hydrocolloids. The submission is based on research and development of Ingredion

  7. Characterization of potato leaf starch.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Stalin; Koch, Kristine; Andersson, Roger; Aman, Per

    2004-04-07

    The starch accumulation-degradation process as well as the structure of leaf starch are not completely understood. To study this, starch was isolated from potato leaves collected in the early morning and late afternoon in July and August, representing different starch accumulation rates. The starch content of potato leaves varied between 2.9 and 12.9% (dry matter basis) over the night and day in the middle of July and between 0.6 and 1.5% in August. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of the four isolated starch samples showed that the granules had either an oval or a round shape and did not exceed 5 microm in size. Starch was extracted by successive washing steps with dimethyl sulfoxide and precipitated with ethanol. An elution profile on Sepharose CL-6B of debranched starch showed the presence of a material with a chain length distribution between that generally found for amylose and amylopectin. Amylopectin unit chains of low molecular size were present in a higher amount in the afternoon than in the morning samples. What remains at the end of the night is depleted in specific chain lengths, mainly between DP 15 and 24 and above DP 35, relative to the end of the day.

  8. Brucite nanoplate reinforced starch bionanocomposites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this paper the mechanical reinforcement in a series of bionanocomposites films based on starch and nano-sized brucite, Mg(OH)2, was investigated. Brucite nanoplates with an aspect ratio of 9.25 were synthesized by wet precipitation and incorporated into starch matrices at different concentrations...

  9. Microbial starch-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, Norma; Sánchez, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    Glucosidic bonds from different non-soluble polysaccharides such as starch, cellulose and xylan are hydrolyzed by amylases, cellulases and xylanases, respectively. These enzymes are produced by microorganisms. They have a modular structure that is composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. Starch-binding modules are present in microbial enzymes that are involved in starch metabolism; these are classified into several different families on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. Such binding domains promote attachment to the substrate and increase its concentration at the active site of the enzyme, which allows microorganisms to degrade non-soluble starch. Fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to notice two evolutionary clusters of microbial starch-binding domains. These domains have enormous potential as tags for protein immobilization, as well as for the tailoring of enzymes that play a part in polysaccharide metabolism.

  10. The Structure of Sucrose Synthase-1 from Arabidopsis thaliana and Its Functional Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Anderson, Spencer; Zhang, Yanfeng; Garavito, R. Michael

    2014-10-02

    Sucrose transport is the central system for the allocation of carbon resources in vascular plants. During growth and development, plants control carbon distribution by coordinating sites of sucrose synthesis and cleavage in different plant organs and different cellular locations. Sucrose synthase, which reversibly catalyzes sucrose synthesis and cleavage, provides a direct and reversible means to regulate sucrose flux. Depending on the metabolic environment, sucrose synthase alters its cellular location to participate in cellulose, callose, and starch biosynthesis through its interactions with membranes, organelles, and cytoskeletal actin. The x-ray crystal structure of sucrose synthase isoform 1 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSus1) has been determined as a complex with UDP-glucose and as a complex with UDP and fructose, at 2.8- and 2.85-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. The AtSus1 structure provides insights into sucrose catalysis and cleavage, as well as the regulation of sucrose synthase and its interactions with cellular targets.

  11. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  12. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Burke, Charles Cullen; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate.

  13. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, R.B.; Wildung, M.R.; Burke, C.C.; Gershenzon, J.

    1999-03-02

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate. 5 figs.

  14. Starch biosynthetic enzymes from developing maize endosperm associate in multisubunit complexes.

    PubMed

    Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A; Liu, Fushan; Marsh, Rebekah S; Kim, Seungtaek; Gan, Qinglei; Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J; James, Martha G; Myers, Alan M

    2008-04-01

    Mutations affecting specific starch biosynthetic enzymes commonly have pleiotropic effects on other enzymes in the same metabolic pathway. Such genetic evidence indicates functional relationships between components of the starch biosynthetic system, including starch synthases (SSs), starch branching enzymes (BEs), and starch debranching enzymes; however, the molecular explanation for these functional interactions is not known. One possibility is that specific SSs, BEs, and/or starch debranching enzymes associate physically with each other in multisubunit complexes. To test this hypothesis, this study sought to identify stable associations between three separate SS polypeptides (SSI, SSIIa, and SSIII) and three separate BE polypeptides (BEI, BEIIa, and BEIIb) from maize (Zea mays) amyloplasts. Detection methods included in vivo protein-protein interaction tests in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nuclei, immunoprecipitation, and affinity purification using recombinant proteins as the solid phase ligand. Eight different instances were detected of specific pairs of proteins associating either directly or indirectly in the same multisubunit complex, and direct, pairwise interactions were indicated by the in vivo test in yeast. In addition, SSIIa, SSIII, BEIIa, and BEIIb all comigrated in gel permeation chromatography in a high molecular mass form of approximately 600 kD, and SSIIa, BEIIa, and BEIIb also migrated in a second high molecular form, lacking SSIII, of approximately 300 kD. Monomer forms of all four proteins were also detected by gel permeation chromatography. The 600- and 300-kD complexes were stable at high salt concentration, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are involved in the association between subunits.

  15. Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes from Developing Maize Endosperm Associate in Multisubunit Complexes1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A.; Liu, Fushan; Marsh, Rebekah S.; Kim, Seungtaek; Gan, Qinglei; Tetlow, Ian J.; Emes, Michael J.; James, Martha G.; Myers, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations affecting specific starch biosynthetic enzymes commonly have pleiotropic effects on other enzymes in the same metabolic pathway. Such genetic evidence indicates functional relationships between components of the starch biosynthetic system, including starch synthases (SSs), starch branching enzymes (BEs), and starch debranching enzymes; however, the molecular explanation for these functional interactions is not known. One possibility is that specific SSs, BEs, and/or starch debranching enzymes associate physically with each other in multisubunit complexes. To test this hypothesis, this study sought to identify stable associations between three separate SS polypeptides (SSI, SSIIa, and SSIII) and three separate BE polypeptides (BEI, BEIIa, and BEIIb) from maize (Zea mays) amyloplasts. Detection methods included in vivo protein-protein interaction tests in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nuclei, immunoprecipitation, and affinity purification using recombinant proteins as the solid phase ligand. Eight different instances were detected of specific pairs of proteins associating either directly or indirectly in the same multisubunit complex, and direct, pairwise interactions were indicated by the in vivo test in yeast. In addition, SSIIa, SSIII, BEIIa, and BEIIb all comigrated in gel permeation chromatography in a high molecular mass form of approximately 600 kD, and SSIIa, BEIIa, and BEIIb also migrated in a second high molecular form, lacking SSIII, of approximately 300 kD. Monomer forms of all four proteins were also detected by gel permeation chromatography. The 600- and 300-kD complexes were stable at high salt concentration, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are involved in the association between subunits. PMID:18281416

  16. Starches, Sugars and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Erik E. J. G.; Abete, Itziar; Astrup, Arne; Martinez, J. Alfredo; van Baak, Marleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity, not only in adults but also in children and adolescents, is one of the most important public health problems in developed and developing countries. As one possible way to tackle obesity, a great interest has been stimulated in understanding the relationship between different types of dietary carbohydrate and appetite regulation, body weight and body composition. The present article reviews the conclusions from recent reviews and meta-analyses on the effects of different starches and sugars on body weight management and metabolic disturbances, and provides an update of the most recent studies on this topic. From the literature reviewed in this paper, potential beneficial effects of intake of starchy foods, especially those containing slowly-digestible and resistant starches, and potential detrimental effects of high intakes of fructose become apparent. This supports the intake of whole grains, legumes and vegetables, which contain more appropriate sources of carbohydrates associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases, rather than foods rich in sugars, especially in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages. PMID:22254101

  17. Starches from A to C. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model microbial system to investigate the biosynthesis of the plant amylopectin crystal.

    PubMed Central

    Buléon, A; Gallant, D J; Bouchet, B; Mouille, G; D'Hulst, C; Kossmann, J; Ball, S

    1997-01-01

    Wide-angle powder x-ray diffraction analysis was carried out on starch extracted from wild-type and mutant Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. Strains containing no defective starch synthases as well as mutants carrying a disrupted granule-bound starch synthase structural gene displayed the A type of diffraction pattern with a high degree of crystallinity. Mutants carrying a defect for the major soluble starch synthase (SSS), SSS II, were characterized by a switch to the B type of diffraction pattern with very low crystallinity. Mutant strains carrying SSS I as the only glucan elongation enzyme regained some of their crystallinity but switched to the C type of diffraction pattern. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis correlated tightly with the x-ray diffraction results. Together with the electron microscopy analyses, these results establish C. reinhardtii as a microbial model system displaying all aspects of cereal starch synthesis and structure. We further show that SSS II is the major enzyme involved in the synthesis of crystalline structures in starch and demonstrate that SSS I alone builds a new type of amylopectin structure. PMID:9390431

  18. Mixed biopolymer systems based on starch.

    PubMed

    Abd Elgadir, M; Akanda, Md Jahurul Haque; Ferdosh, Sahena; Mehrnoush, Amid; Karim, Alias A; Noda, Takahiro; Sarker, Md Zaidul Islam

    2012-01-09

    A binary mixture of starch-starch or starch with other biopolymers such as protein and non-starch polysaccharides could provide a new approach in producing starch-based food products. In the context of food processing, a specific adjustment in the rheological properties plays an important role in regulating production processing and optimizing the applicability, stability, and sensory of the final food products. This review examines various biopolymer mixtures based on starch and the influence of their interaction on physicochemical and rheological properties of the starch-based foods. It is evident that the physicochemical and rheological characteristics of the biopolymers mixture are highly dependent on the type of starch and other biopolymers that make them up mixing ratios, mixing procedure and presence of other food ingredients in the mixture. Understanding these properties will lead to improve the formulation of starch-based foods and minimize the need to resort to chemically modified starch.

  19. Sago starch and its utilisation.

    PubMed

    Abd-Aziz, Suraini

    2002-01-01

    The importance and development of industrial biotechnology processing has led to the utilisation of microbial enzymes in various applications. One of the important enzymes is amylase, which hydrolyses starch to glucose. In Malaysia, the use of sago starch has been increasing, and it is presently being used for the production of glucose. Sago starch represents an alternative cheap carbon source for fermentation processes that is attractive out of both economic and geographical considerations. Production of fermentable sugars from the hydrolysis of starches is normally carried out by an enzymatic processes that involves two reaction steps, liquefaction and saccharification, each of which has different temperature and pH optima with respect to the maximum reaction rate. This method of starch hydrolysis requires the use of an expensive temperature control system and a complex mixing device. Our laboratory has investigated the possibility of using amylolytic enzyme-producing microorganisms in the continuous single-step biological hydrolysis of sago flour for the production of a generic fermentation medium. The ability of a novel DNA-recombinated yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YKU 107 (expressing alpha-amylase production) to hydrolyse gelatinised sago starch production has been studied with the aim of further utilizing sago starch to obtain value-added products.

  20. Inferring transcriptional gene regulation network of starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using graphical Gaussian model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Starch serves as a temporal storage of carbohydrates in plant leaves during day/night cycles. To study transcriptional regulatory modules of this dynamic metabolic process, we conducted gene regulation network analysis based on small-sample inference of graphical Gaussian model (GGM). Results Time-series significant analysis was applied for Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome data to obtain a set of genes that are highly regulated under a diurnal cycle. A total of 1,480 diurnally regulated genes included 21 starch metabolic enzymes, 6 clock-associated genes, and 106 transcription factors (TF). A starch-clock-TF gene regulation network comprising 117 nodes and 266 edges was constructed by GGM from these 133 significant genes that are potentially related to the diurnal control of starch metabolism. From this network, we found that β-amylase 3 (b-amy3: At4g17090), which participates in starch degradation in chloroplast, is the most frequently connected gene (a hub gene). The robustness of gene-to-gene regulatory network was further analyzed by TF binding site prediction and by evaluating global co-expression of TFs and target starch metabolic enzymes. As a result, two TFs, indeterminate domain 5 (AtIDD5: At2g02070) and constans-like (COL: At2g21320), were identified as positive regulators of starch synthase 4 (SS4: At4g18240). The inference model of AtIDD5-dependent positive regulation of SS4 gene expression was experimentally supported by decreased SS4 mRNA accumulation in Atidd5 mutant plants during the light period of both short and long day conditions. COL was also shown to positively control SS4 mRNA accumulation. Furthermore, the knockout of AtIDD5 and COL led to deformation of chloroplast and its contained starch granules. This deformity also affected the number of starch granules per chloroplast, which increased significantly in both knockout mutant lines. Conclusions In this study, we utilized a systematic approach of microarray analysis to discover

  1. Effects of granule swelling on starch saccharification by granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaofeng; Cai, Liming; Gu, Zhengbiao; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-08-13

    The effects of granule swelling on enzymatic saccharification of normal corn starch by granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme were investigated. After swelling, Km values for the saccharification of granular starch decreased compared with native granular starch, indicating that granule swelling caused granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme to have higher affinity for starch granules. The partial swelling of starch granules enhanced starch saccharification. Furthermore, the enhancement at an earlier stage of enzymatic reaction was much more significant than that at later stages. For granular starch pretreated at 67.5 °C for 30 min, conversions to glucose after incubation with the enzyme at 32 °C for 4 and 24 h were approximately 3-fold and 26% higher than for native granular starch, respectively. As a result, proper heat pretreatment of granular starch before simultaneous saccharification and fermentation has great potential to facilitate industrial production of ethanol by use of granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme.

  2. Myocardial Regulation of Lipidomic Flux by Cardiolipin Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kiebish, Michael A.; Yang, Kui; Sims, Harold F.; Jenkins, Christopher M.; Liu, Xinping; Mancuso, David J.; Zhao, Zhongdan; Guan, Shaoping; Abendschein, Dana R.; Han, Xianlin; Gross, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomic regulation of mitochondrial cardiolipin content and molecular species composition is a prominent regulator of bioenergetic efficiency. However, the mechanisms controlling cardiolipin metabolism during health or disease progression have remained elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that cardiac myocyte-specific transgenic expression of cardiolipin synthase results in accelerated cardiolipin lipidomic flux that impacts multiple aspects of mitochondrial bioenergetics and signaling. During the postnatal period, cardiolipin synthase transgene expression results in marked changes in the temporal maturation of cardiolipin molecular species during development. In adult myocardium, cardiolipin synthase transgene expression leads to a marked increase in symmetric tetra-18:2 molecular species without a change in total cardiolipin content. Mechanistic analysis demonstrated that these alterations result from increased cardiolipin remodeling by sequential phospholipase and transacylase/acyltransferase activities in conjunction with a decrease in phosphatidylglycerol content. Moreover, cardiolipin synthase transgene expression results in alterations in signaling metabolites, including a marked increase in the cardioprotective eicosanoid 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid. Examination of mitochondrial bioenergetic function by high resolution respirometry demonstrated that cardiolipin synthase transgene expression resulted in improved mitochondrial bioenergetic efficiency as evidenced by enhanced electron transport chain coupling using multiple substrates as well as by salutary changes in Complex III and IV activities. Furthermore, transgenic expression of cardiolipin synthase attenuated maladaptive cardiolipin remodeling and bioenergetic inefficiency in myocardium rendered diabetic by streptozotocin treatment. Collectively, these results demonstrate the unanticipated role of cardiolipin synthase in maintaining physiologic membrane structure and function even under metabolic

  3. Impact of down-regulation of starch branching enzyme IIb in rice by artificial microRNA- and hairpin RNA-mediated RNA silencing

    PubMed Central

    Butardo, Vito M.; Fitzgerald, Melissa A.; Bird, Anthony R.; Gidley, Michael J.; Flanagan, Bernadine M.; Larroque, Oscar; Resurreccion, Adoracion P.; Laidlaw, Hunter K. C.; Jobling, Stephen A.; Morell, Matthew K.; Rahman, Sadequr

    2011-01-01

    The inactivation of starch branching IIb (SBEIIb) in rice is traditionally associated with elevated apparent amylose content, increased peak gelatinization temperature, and a decreased proportion of short amylopectin branches. To elucidate further the structural and functional role of this enzyme, the phenotypic effects of down-regulating SBEIIb expression in rice endosperm were characterized by artificial microRNA (amiRNA) and hairpin RNA (hp-RNA) gene silencing. The results showed that RNA silencing of SBEIIb expression in rice grains did not affect the expression of other major isoforms of starch branching enzymes or starch synthases. Structural analyses of debranched starch showed that the doubling of apparent amylose content was not due to an increase in the relative proportion of amylose chains but instead was due to significantly elevated levels of long amylopectin and intermediate chains. Rices altered by the amiRNA technique produced a more extreme starch phenotype than those modified using the hp-RNA technique, with a greater increase in the proportion of long amylopectin and intermediate chains. The more pronounced starch structural modifications produced in the amiRNA lines led to more severe alterations in starch granule morphology and crystallinity as well as digestibility of freshly cooked grains. The potential role of attenuating SBEIIb expression in generating starch with elevated levels of resistant starch and lower glycaemic index is discussed. PMID:21791436

  4. Hybrid polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Hagen, Andrew; Katz, Leonard; Keasling, Jay D.; Poust, Sean; Zhang, Jingwei; Zotchev, Sergey

    2016-05-10

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing an even-chain or odd-chain diacid or lactam or diamine. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the even-chain diacid, odd-chain diacid, or KAPA. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS capable of synthesizing a pimelic acid or KAPA, and when cultured produces biotin.

  5. Feedback Inhibition of Starch Degradation in Arabidopsis Leaves Mediated by Trehalose 6-Phosphate1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Marina Camara Mattos; Hejazi, Mahdi; Fettke, Joerg; Steup, Martin; Feil, Regina; Krause, Ursula; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Vosloh, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos María; Ivakov, Alexander; Yadav, Umesh Prasad; Piques, Maria; Metzner, Daniela; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John Edward

    2013-01-01

    Many plants accumulate substantial starch reserves in their leaves during the day and remobilize them at night to provide carbon and energy for maintenance and growth. In this paper, we explore the role of a sugar-signaling metabolite, trehalose-6-phosphate (Tre6P), in regulating the accumulation and turnover of transitory starch in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. Ethanol-induced overexpression of trehalose-phosphate synthase during the day increased Tre6P levels up to 11-fold. There was a transient increase in the rate of starch accumulation in the middle of the day, but this was not linked to reductive activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. A 2- to 3-fold increase in Tre6P during the night led to significant inhibition of starch degradation. Maltose and maltotriose did not accumulate, suggesting that Tre6P affects an early step in the pathway of starch degradation in the chloroplasts. Starch granules isolated from induced plants had a higher orthophosphate content than granules from noninduced control plants, consistent either with disruption of the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle that is essential for efficient starch breakdown or with inhibition of starch hydrolysis by β-amylase. Nonaqueous fractionation of leaves showed that Tre6P is predominantly located in the cytosol, with estimated in vivo Tre6P concentrations of 4 to 7 µm in the cytosol, 0.2 to 0.5 µm in the chloroplasts, and 0.05 µm in the vacuole. It is proposed that Tre6P is a component in a signaling pathway that mediates the feedback regulation of starch breakdown by sucrose, potentially linking starch turnover to demand for sucrose by growing sink organs at night. PMID:24043444

  6. Starch granules: structure and biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Buléon, A; Colonna, P; Planchot, V; Ball, S

    1998-08-01

    The emphasis of this review is on starch structure and its biosynthesis. Improvements in understanding have been brought about during the last decade through the development of new physicochemical and biological techniques, leading to real scientific progress. All this literature needs to be kept inside the general literature about biopolymers, despite some confusing results or discrepancies arising from the biological variability of starch. However, a coherent picture of starch over all the different structural levels can be presented, in order to obtain some generalizations about its structure. In this review we will focus first on our present understanding of the structures of amylose and amylopectin and their organization within the granule, and we will then give insights on the biosynthetic mechanisms explaining the biogenesis of starch in plants.

  7. Slow digestion property of native cereal starches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genyi; Ao, Zihua; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2006-11-01

    The slow digestion property of native cereal starches, represented by normal maize starch, was investigated. The in vitro Englyst test showed that 53.0% of the maize starch is slowly digestible starch (SDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that SDS starts from an increase of pore size until almost complete fragmentation of starch granules. However, similar amounts of SDS ( approximately 50%) were shown for partially digested fragmented starch residuals, which would normally be considered resistant to digestion based on the Englyst assay. Molecularly, both amylopectin (AP) and amylose (AM) contributed to the amount of SDS as evidenced by a similar ratio of AP to AM at different digestion times. Consistently, similar degrees of crystallinity, comparable gelatinization behavior, and similar debranched profiles of starch residuals following different digestion times indicated that the crystalline and amorphous regions of starch granules were evenly digested through a mechanism of side-by-side digestion of concentric layers of semicrystalline shells of native starch granules.

  8. Starch digestibility of foods: a nutritional perspective.

    PubMed

    Dreher, M L; Dreher, C J; Berry, J W

    1984-01-01

    Dietary starch varies greatly in digestibility and its effects on the utilization of other nutrients. The variation appears to be due to differences in starch components and their crystallinity. Processing treatments, storage conditions, chemical modification, and genetic breeding influence the digestibility of starch. Cereal starches are generally more digestible than root/tuber and legume starches. Although cooking often significantly improves the digestibility of poor and intermediately digestible starches, some foods such as bananas with starches of these types are consumed uncooked. The efficient digestion of starch is especially important to specific groups of people such as infants under 6 months of age. Ruminants must also be provided with highly digestible starch to assure maximum production efficiency. Poor digestibility of starch may have negative effects on the utilization of protein and minerals but is likely to have positive effects on the availability of certain vitamins. Decreases in the rate of starch digestion may have therapeutic application. Most clinical studies have reported that starch blockers do not elicit a significant decrease in the digestion of starch in humans. Much remains to be learned, clarified, and understood about starch digestion and its effects on diabetes and weight control.

  9. Physicochemical and functional characteristics of lentil starch.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M; Aldred, P; McKnight, S; Panozzo, J F; Kasapis, S; Adhikari, R; Adhikari, B

    2013-02-15

    The physicochemical properties of lentil starch were measured and linked up with its functional properties and compared with those of corn and potato starches. The amylose content of lentil starch was the highest among these starches. The crystallinity and gelatinization enthalpy of lentil starch were the lowest among these starches. The high amylose: amylopectin ratio in lentil starch resulted into low crystallinity and gelatinization enthalpy. Gelatinization and pasting temperatures of lentil starch were in between those of corn and potato starches. Lentil starch gels showed the highest storage modulus, gel strength and pasting viscosity than corn and potato starch gels. Peleg's model was able to predict the stress relaxation data of these starches well (R(2)>0.98). The elastic modulus of lentil starch gel was less frequency dependent and higher in magnitude at high temperature (60 °C) than at lower temperature (10 °C). Lentil starch is suitable where higher gel strengthened pasting viscosity are desired. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Purification, characterization and physiological role of sucrose synthase in the pea seed coat (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Déjardin, A; Rochat, C; Maugenest, S; Boutin, J P

    1997-01-01

    The seed coat is a maternal organ which surrounds the embryo and is involved in the control of its nutrition. This study with pea (Pisum sativum L.) was conducted to understand more fully the sucrose/starch interconversions occurring in the seed coat. The concentrations of soluble sugars, the starch content, and the activities of the sucrose-metabolizing enzymes, sucrose synthase (Sus; EC 2.4.1.13), alkaline and soluble acid invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) and sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14) were compared at four developmental stages during seed filling. Among the four enzymes, only Sus activity was very high and strongly correlated with the starch concentration in the seed coat. Sucrose synthase catalyses the cleavage of sucrose in the presence of UDP into UDP-glucose and fructose. Sucrose synthase was purified from pea seed coats in a three-step protocol, consisting of diethylaminoethyl-Sephacel chromatography, gel filtration and affinity chromatography. The enzyme was characterized at the biochemical and molecular levels. Sucrose synthase exhibits biochemical properties which allow it to function in the direction of both sucrose cleavage and synthesis. The mass-action ratio of its four substrate was close to the theoretical equilibrium constant at the four developmental stages we studied. A labelling experiment on seed coats has shown that Sus activity is reversible in vivo and can produce 37% of neo-synthesized sucrose in the seed coat cells (minimum value). It is concluded that Sus could play a central role in the control of sucrose concentration in the seed coat cells in response to the demand for sucrose in the embryo during the development of the seed.

  11. Improving starch for food and industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Steve

    2004-04-01

    Progress in understanding starch biosynthesis, and the isolation of many of the genes involved in this process, has enabled the genetic modification of crops in a rational manner to produce novel starches with improved functionality. For example, potato starches have been created that contain unprecedented levels of amylose and phosphate. Amylose-free short-chain amylopectin starches have also been developed; these starches have excellent freeze-thaw stability without the need for chemical modification. These developments highlight the potential to create even more modified starches in the future.

  12. The relation of starch phosphorylases to starch metabolism in wheat.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Nicole; Ziegler, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Tissues of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., var. Star) exhibit three starch phosphorylase activity forms resolved by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel affinity electrophoresis (P1, P2 and P3). Compartmentation analysis of young leaf tissues showed that P3 is plastidic, whereas P1 and P2 are cytosolic. P1 exhibits a strong binding affinity to immobilized glycogen upon electrophoresis, whereas P2 and the chloroplastic P3 do not. Cytosolic leaf phosphorylase was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. The single polypeptide product constituted both the P1 and P2 activity forms. Probes for the detection of phosphorylase transcripts were derived from cDNA sequences of cytosolic and plastidic phosphorylases, and these-together with activity assays and a cytosolic phosphorylase-specific antiserum-were used to monitor phosphorylase expression in leaves and seeds. Mature leaves contained only plastidic phosphorylase, which was also strongly evident in the endosperm of developing seeds at the onset of reserve starch accumulation. Germinating seeds contained only cytosolic phosphorylase, which was restricted to the embryo. Plastidic phosphorylase thus appears to be associated with transitory leaf starch metabolism and with the initiation of seed endosperm reserve starch accumulation, but it plays no role in the degradation of the reserve starch. Cytosolic phosphorylase may be involved in the processing of incoming carbohydrate during rapid tissue growth.

  13. Biodegradation of poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/starch blends and composites in composting and culture environments: the effect of compatibilization on the inherent biodegradability of the host polymer.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Pandey, J K; Rutot, D; Degée, Ph; Dubois, Ph

    2003-08-12

    The biodegradability of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) was studied in blends and composites of modified and granular starch. Four types of PCL-starch compositions were prepared: (i) PCL-granular starch blends; (ii) hydrophobic coating of starch particles by n-butylisocyanate (C(4) starch) and octadecyltrichlorosilane (C(18) starch), followed by melt blending with PCL; (iii) PCL-starch blends compatibilized by PCL-g-dextran grafted copolymer (PGD); and (iv) PCL-grafted starch particles (PGS) as obtained by in situ ring-opening polymerization of caprolactone (CL) initiated directly from hydroxyl functions at the granular starch surface. Biodegradability of these materials was measured by monitoring the percentage of weight loss in composting and the rate of fungal colonization when samples were used as a sole carbon source for fungus (A. niger). Intrinsic viscosity [eta] of host PCL chains was measured after extraction of composted samples in boiled chloroform. SEM was used to study the surface morphology after compost incubation of the samples. The inherent biodegradability of host polymer was enhanced with surface compatibilization during composting for longer incubation. It was observed that the weight loss during composting increased with the decrease in interfacial tension between filler and polymer. In general, it was concluded that inherent biodegradability does not depend very significantly on the concentration of starch in the polyester matrix, but on the compatibilization efficiency. The effect of the PCL fraction in the graft copolymer, when used as compatibilizer, was also studied on the biodegradability of the host polymer.

  14. Mammalian Ceramide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michal; Futerman, Anthony H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In mammals, ceramide, a key intermediate in sphingolipid metabolism and an important signaling molecule, is synthesized by a family of six ceramide synthases (CerS), each of which synthesizes ceramides with distinct acyl chain lengths. There are a number of common biochemical features between the CerS, such as their catalytic mechanism, and their stucture and intracellular localization. Different CerS also display remarkable differences in their biological properties, with each of them playing distinct roles in processes as diverse as cancer and tumor suppression, in the response to chemotherapeutic drugs, in apoptosis, and in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20222015

  15. Mammalian ceramide synthases.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michal; Futerman, Anthony H

    2010-05-01

    In mammals, ceramide, a key intermediate in sphingolipid metabolism and an important signaling molecule, is synthesized by a family of six ceramide synthases (CerS), each of which synthesizes ceramides with distinct acyl chain lengths. There are a number of common biochemical features between the CerS, such as their catalytic mechanism, and their structure and intracellular localization. Different CerS also display remarkable differences in their biological properties, with each of them playing distinct roles in processes as diverse as cancer and tumor suppression, in the response to chemotherapeutic drugs, in apoptosis, and in neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Systematic Analysis of Pericarp Starch Accumulation and Degradation during Wheat Caryopsis Development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xurun; Li, Bo; Wang, Leilei; Chen, Xinyu; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Zhong; Xiong, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Although wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) pericarp starch granule (PSG) has been well-studied, our knowledge of its features and mechanism of accumulation and degradation during pericarp growth is poor. In the present study, developing wheat caryopses were collected and starch granules were extracted from their pericarp to investigate the morphological and structural characteristics of PSGs using microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Relative gene expression levels of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (APGase), granule-bound starch synthase II (GBSS II), and α-amylase (AMY) were quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. PSGs presented as single or multiple starch granules and were synthesized both in the amyloplast and chloroplast in the pericarp. PSG degradation occurred in the mesocarp, beginning at 6 days after anthesis. Amylose contents in PSGs were lower and relative degrees of crystallinity were higher at later stages of development than at earlier stages. Short-range ordered structures in the external regions of PSGs showed no differences in the developing pericarp. When hydrolyzed by α-amylase, PSGs at various developmental stages showed high degrees of enzymolysis. Expression levels of AGPase, GBSS II, and AMY were closely related to starch synthesis and degradation. These results help elucidate the mechanisms of accumulation and degradation as well as the functions of PSG during wheat caryopsis development. PMID:26394305

  17. Systematic Analysis of Pericarp Starch Accumulation and Degradation during Wheat Caryopsis Development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xurun; Li, Bo; Wang, Leilei; Chen, Xinyu; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Zhong; Xiong, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Although wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) pericarp starch granule (PSG) has been well-studied, our knowledge of its features and mechanism of accumulation and degradation during pericarp growth is poor. In the present study, developing wheat caryopses were collected and starch granules were extracted from their pericarp to investigate the morphological and structural characteristics of PSGs using microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Relative gene expression levels of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (APGase), granule-bound starch synthase II (GBSS II), and α-amylase (AMY) were quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. PSGs presented as single or multiple starch granules and were synthesized both in the amyloplast and chloroplast in the pericarp. PSG degradation occurred in the mesocarp, beginning at 6 days after anthesis. Amylose contents in PSGs were lower and relative degrees of crystallinity were higher at later stages of development than at earlier stages. Short-range ordered structures in the external regions of PSGs showed no differences in the developing pericarp. When hydrolyzed by α-amylase, PSGs at various developmental stages showed high degrees of enzymolysis. Expression levels of AGPase, GBSS II, and AMY were closely related to starch synthesis and degradation. These results help elucidate the mechanisms of accumulation and degradation as well as the functions of PSG during wheat caryopsis development.

  18. Dosage effects of Waxy gene on the structures and properties of corn starch.

    PubMed

    Yangcheng, Hanyu; Blanco, Michael; Gardner, Candice; Li, Xuehong; Jane, Jay-Lin

    2016-09-20

    The objective of this study was to understand dosage effects of the Waxy gene on the structures of amylose and amylopectin and on the properties of corn starch. Reciprocal crossing of isogenic normal and waxy corn lines was conducted to develop hybrids with different dosages (0, 1, 2, 3) of Waxy gene in the endosperm. The amylose content of starch and proportions of branch chains of DP 17-30 and extra-long branch chains (DP>100) of amylopectin were positively correlated with the Waxy-gene dosage. Proportions of short (DP<17) and long branch-chains (DP 30-80), however, were negatively correlated with the Waxy-gene dosage. The gelatinization conclusion-temperature and temperature-range of the starch were negatively correlated with the Waxy-gene dosage, indicating that amylose facilitated dissociation of the surrounding crystalline regions. These results helped us understand the function of granule-bound starch synthase I in the biosynthesis of amylose and amylopectin and impacts of Waxy-gene dosages on the properties of corn starch.

  19. Processing of novel elevated amylose wheats: functional properties and starch digestibility of extruded products.

    PubMed

    Chanvrier, Hélène; Appelqvist, Ingrid A M; Bird, Anthony R; Gilbert, Elliot; Htoon, Aung; Li, Zhongyi; Lillford, Peter J; Lopez-Rubio, Amparo; Morell, Matthew K; Topping, David L

    2007-12-12

    Different types of novel wheat lines with different starch contents and amylose/amylopectin ratios, relating to defined alterations in the number and activity of starch synthase IIa genes, were processed by pilot-plant extrusion. Two types of products were produced: pure wholemeal products and breakfast cereals made from wholemeal/maize blends. Lower apparent shear viscosity was obtained in the extruder with lower starch content and higher amylose/amylopectin ratio flours (SSIIa-deficient line). The bulk density of the products decreased with increasing extrusion temperature and was always higher for the triple-null line. The bulk density was not completely explained by the melt shear viscosity, suggesting the importance of the fillers (fibers, brans) in the process of expansion and structure acquisition. The different mechanical properties were explained by the density and by the material constituting the cell walls. Enzyme-resistant starch (RS) content and hydrolysis index (HI) were not correlated to the extrusion temperature, but RS was higher in pure wholemeal products and in the SSIIa-deficient line. These results are discussed in terms of starch molecular architecture and product microstructure.

  20. Circadian Clock Regulation of Starch Metabolism Establishes GBSSI as a Major Contributor to Amylopectin Synthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ral, Jean-Philippe; Colleoni, Christophe; Wattebled, Fabrice; Dauvillée, David; Nempont, Clément; Deschamps, Philippe; Li, Zhongyi; Morell, Matthew K.; Chibbar, Ravindra; Purton, Saul; d'Hulst, Christophe; Ball, Steven G.

    2006-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii displays a diurnal rhythm of starch content that peaks in the middle of the night phase if the algae are provided with acetate and CO2 as a carbon source. We show that this rhythm is controlled by the circadian clock and is tightly correlated to ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. Persistence of this rhythm depends on the presence of either soluble starch synthase III or granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI). We show that both enzymes play a similar function in synthesizing the long glucan fraction that interconnects the amylopectin clusters. We demonstrate that in log phase-oscillating cultures, GBSSI is required to obtain maximal polysaccharide content and fully compensates for the loss of soluble starch synthase III. A point mutation in the GBSSI gene that prevents extension of amylopectin chains, but retains the enzyme's normal ability to extend maltooligosaccharides, abolishes the function of GBSSI both in amylopectin and amylose synthesis and leads to a decrease in starch content in oscillating cultures. We propose that GBSSI has evolved as a major enzyme of amylopectin synthesis and that amylose synthesis comes as a secondary consequence of prolonged synthesis by GBSSI in arrhythmic systems. Maintenance in higher plant leaves of circadian clock control of GBSSI transcription is discussed. PMID:16844835

  1. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  2. Rheological properties of reactive extrusion modified waxy starch and waxy starch-polyacrylamide copolymer gels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rheological properties of modified waxy starch and waxy starch-polyacrylamide graft copolymers prepared by reactive extrusion were investigated. Both materials can absorb huge amount of water and form gels. The modified waxy starch and waxy starch-polyacrylamide graft copolymer gels all exhibite...

  3. Comparison of Cationic and Unmodified Starches in Reactive Extrusion of Starch-Polyacrylamide Graft Copolymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Graft copolymers of starch and polyacrylamide (PAAm) were prepared using reactive extrusion in a corotating twin screw extruder. The effect of cationic starch modification was examined using unmodified and cationic dent starch (approximately 23% amylose) and waxy maize starch (approximately 2% amyl...

  4. A parameterized model of amylopectin synthesis provides key insights into the synthesis of granular starch.

    PubMed

    Wu, Alex Chi; Morell, Matthew K; Gilbert, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    A core set of genes involved in starch synthesis has been defined by genetic studies, but the complexity of starch biosynthesis has frustrated attempts to elucidate the precise functional roles of the enzymes encoded. The chain-length distribution (CLD) of amylopectin in cereal endosperm is modeled here on the basis that the CLD is produced by concerted actions of three enzyme types: starch synthases, branching and debranching enzymes, including their respective isoforms. The model, together with fitting to experiment, provides four key insights. (1) To generate crystalline starch, defined restrictions on particular ratios of enzymatic activities apply. (2) An independent confirmation of the conclusion, previously reached solely from genetic studies, of the absolute requirement for debranching enzyme in crystalline amylopectin synthesis. (3) The model provides a mechanistic basis for understanding how successive arrays of crystalline lamellae are formed, based on the identification of two independent types of long amylopectin chains, one type remaining in the amorphous lamella, while the other propagates into, and is integral to the formation of, an adjacent crystalline lamella. (4) The model provides a means by which a small number of key parameters defining the core enzymatic activities can be derived from the amylopectin CLD, providing the basis for focusing studies on the enzymatic requirements for generating starches of a particular structure. The modeling approach provides both a new tool to accelerate efforts to understand granular starch biosynthesis and a basis for focusing efforts to manipulate starch structure and functionality using a series of testable predictions based on a robust mechanistic framework.

  5. Biogenesis and Degradation of Starch

    PubMed Central

    Ohad, Itzhak; Friedberg, Ilan; Ne'Eman, Zvi; Schramm, Michael

    1971-01-01

    Storage of mature or developing potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum “Up-to-Date” variety) at 4 C causes a reduction in the starch content and the elevation in the level of free sugars. This phenomenon is not observed when the tubers are stored at 25 C. Changes in the morphology of cells from developing or mature tubers after storage at 4 or 25 C have been followed by electron microscopy. During all stages of the tuber development the starch granules are surrounded by a membrane derived from the plastid envelope. Storage in the cold induces disintegration of this membrane. A membrane fraction isolated from starch granules of tubers stored at 4 C has a lower buoyant density, and the electrophoretic pattern of its proteins is different from that of a similar membrane fraction obtained from tubers stored at 25 C. It is suggested that the cold-induced changes in the starch and sugar content during storage of potato tubers might be correlated with damage to the membranes surrounding the starch granules and changes in their permeability to degradative enzymes and substrates. Images PMID:16657644

  6. Starch phosphorylation: insights and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahlow, Sebastian; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    During starch metabolism, the phosphorylation of glucosyl residues of starch, to be more precise of amylopectin, is a repeatedly observed process. This phosphorylation is mediated by dikinases, the glucan, water dikinase (GWD) and the phosphoglucan, water dikinase (PWD). The starch-related dikinases utilize ATP as dual phosphate donor transferring the terminal γ-phosphate group to water and the β-phosphate group selectively to either C6 position or C3 position of a glucosyl residue within amylopectin. By the collaborative action of both enzymes, the initiation of a transition of α-glucans from highly ordered, water-insoluble state to a less order state is realized and thus the initial process of starch degradation. Consequently, mutants lacking either GWD or PWD reveal a starch excess phenotype as well as growth retardation. In this review, we focus on the increased knowledge collected over the last years related to enzymatic properties, the precise definition of the substrates, the physiological implications, and discuss ongoing questions.

  7. Changes in the activities of starch metabolism enzymes in rice grains in response to elevated CO2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Li-Yong; Lin, Er-Da; Zhao, Hong-Liang; Feng, Yong-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is currently (2012) 393.1 μmol mol-1, an increase of approximately 42 % over pre-industrial levels. In order to understand the responses of metabolic enzymes to elevated CO2 concentrations, an experiment was conducted using the Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE )system. Two conventional japonica rice varieties ( Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) grown in North China, Songjing 9 and Daohuaxiang 2, were used in this study. The activities of ADPG pyrophosphorylase, soluble and granule-bound starch synthases, and soluble and granule-bound starch branching enzymes were measured in rice grains, and the effects of elevated CO2 on the amylose and protein contents of the grains were analyzed. The results showed that elevated CO2 levels significantly increased the activity of ADPG pyrophosphorylase at day 8, 24, and 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 56.67 % for Songjing 9 and 21.31 % for Daohuaxiang 2. Similarly, the activities of starch synthesis enzymes increased significantly from the day 24 after flower to the day 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 36.81 % for Songjing 9 and 66.67 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in soluble starch synthase (SSS), and 25.00 % for Songjing 9 and 36.44 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), respectively. The elevated CO2 concentration significantly increased the activity of soluble starch branching enzyme (SSBE) at day 16, 32, and 40 after flower, and also significantly increased the activity of granule-bound starch branching enzyme (GBSBE) at day 8, 32, and 40 after flower. The elevated CO2 concentration increased the peak values of enzyme activity, and the timing of the activity peaks for SSS and GBSBE were earlier in Songjing 9 than in Daohuaxiang 2. There were obvious differences in developmental stages between the two varieties of rice, which indicated that the elevated CO2 concentration increased enzyme activity expression and starch synthesis, affecting the final contents

  8. Changes in the activities of starch metabolism enzymes in rice grains in response to elevated CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Yong; Lin, Er-Da; Zhao, Hong-Liang; Feng, Yong-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The global atmospheric CO(2) concentration is currently (2012) 393.1 μmol mol(-1), an increase of approximately 42 % over pre-industrial levels. In order to understand the responses of metabolic enzymes to elevated CO(2) concentrations, an experiment was conducted using the Free Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE )system. Two conventional japonica rice varieties (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) grown in North China, Songjing 9 and Daohuaxiang 2, were used in this study. The activities of ADPG pyrophosphorylase, soluble and granule-bound starch synthases, and soluble and granule-bound starch branching enzymes were measured in rice grains, and the effects of elevated CO(2) on the amylose and protein contents of the grains were analyzed. The results showed that elevated CO(2) levels significantly increased the activity of ADPG pyrophosphorylase at day 8, 24, and 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 56.67 % for Songjing 9 and 21.31 % for Daohuaxiang 2. Similarly, the activities of starch synthesis enzymes increased significantly from the day 24 after flower to the day 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 36.81 % for Songjing 9 and 66.67 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in soluble starch synthase (SSS), and 25.00 % for Songjing 9 and 36.44 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), respectively. The elevated CO(2) concentration significantly increased the activity of soluble starch branching enzyme (SSBE) at day 16, 32, and 40 after flower, and also significantly increased the activity of granule-bound starch branching enzyme (GBSBE) at day 8, 32, and 40 after flower. The elevated CO(2) concentration increased the peak values of enzyme activity, and the timing of the activity peaks for SSS and GBSBE were earlier in Songjing 9 than in Daohuaxiang 2. There were obvious differences in developmental stages between the two varieties of rice, which indicated that the elevated CO(2) concentration increased enzyme activity expression and starch synthesis, affecting the

  9. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Glucan Branching Enzymes from Plants and Bacteria in Arabidopsis Reveals Marked Differences in Their Functions and Capacity to Mediate Starch Granule Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuan-Jen; Streb, Sebastian; Meier, Florence; Pfister, Barbara; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    The major component of starch is the branched glucan amylopectin, the branching pattern of which is one of the key factors determining its ability to form semicrystalline starch granules. Here, we investigated the functions of different branching enzyme (BE) types by expressing proteins from maize (Zea mays BE2a), potato (Solanum tuberosum BE1), and Escherichia coli (glycogen BE [EcGLGB]) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant plants that are deficient in their endogenous BEs and therefore, cannot make starch. The expression of each of these three BE types restored starch biosynthesis to differing degrees. Full complementation was achieved using the class II BE ZmBE2a, which is most similar to the two endogenous Arabidopsis isoforms. Expression of the class I BE from potato, StBE1, resulted in partial complementation and high amylose starch. Expression of the glycogen BE EcGLGB restored only minimal amounts of starch production, which had unusual chain length distribution, branch point distribution, and granule morphology. Nevertheless, each type of BE together with the starch synthases and debranching enyzmes were able to create crystallization-competent amylopectin polymers. These data add to the knowledge of how the properties of the BE influence the final composition of starch and fine structure of amylopectin. PMID:26358415

  10. Comparative binding and disintegrating property of Echinochloa colona starch (difra starch) against maize, sorghum, and cassava starch.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Daud Baraka; Charoo, Naseem Ahmad; Elgorashi, Abubakr Suliman

    2014-08-01

    Starch obtained from different botanical sources exhibit different characteristics due to variation in amylase-amylopectin ratio, which results in different binder substrate interactions. The present study characterized Echinochloa colona (L.) Link (Poaceae) starch and evaluated its compressional characteristics for use as tablet excipient against commonly used maize, sorghum, and cassava starch. Three experimental design studies were performed to determine the effects of the maize starch and povidone on physical properties of paracetamol (250 mg) tablets. The effect of superdisintegrants sodium starch glycolate and croscarmellose sodium on the optimized composition obtained in the preceding experiments was evaluated in two factorial experimental studies. The maize starch in the optimum formulations was replaced with difra, sorghum, and cassava starch, and tablets prepared from these starches were compared for their compressional characteristics, lubrication sensitivity, moisture uptake, and drug release. Tablets prepared from maize starch and povidone (30:9, w/w) blend which was previously mixed for 8 min disintegrated (DT) in 10 min. Superdisintegrants decreased DT of tablets significantly (p < 0.05) to 2.2 min. The Hausner ratios of co-processed mixtures containing sorghum, maize, and difra starch were 1.19, 1.21, and 1.26, respectively, with equilibrium moisture content of 8-9%. The DT of sorghum and difra starch formulations which related directly to their higher hydration capacity (difra > sorghum > maize starch) and swelling property was 1.5 min and 2.5 min, respectively, with a friability of 0.32%. The effect of lubrication on the DT and friability of tablets containing maize and difra starch was significant (p < 0.05). However, more than 90% drug was released in vitro dissolution studies. Difra starch can replace maize and sorghum starch as tablet excipient.

  11. Structural and physicochemical characterisation of rye starch.

    PubMed

    Gomand, S V; Verwimp, T; Goesaert, H; Delcour, J A

    2011-12-13

    The gelatinisation, pasting and retrogradation properties of three rye starches isolated using a proteinase-based procedure were investigated and compared to those of wheat starch isolated in a comparable way. On an average, the rye starch granules were larger than those of wheat starch. The former had very comparable gelatinisation temperatures and enthalpies, but slightly lower gelatinisation temperatures than wheat starch. Under standardised conditions, they retrograded to a lesser extent than wheat starch. The lower gelatinisation temperatures and tendencies of the rye starches to retrograde originated probably from their higher levels of short amylopectin (AP) chains [degree of polymerisation (DP) 6-12] and their lower levels of longer chains (DP 13-24) than observed for wheat starch. The rapid visco analysis differences in peak and end viscosities between the rye starches as well as between rye and wheat starches were at least partly attributable to differences in the levels of AP short chains and in average amylose molecular weight. The AP average chain lengths and exterior chain lengths were slightly lower for rye starches, while the interior chain lengths were slightly higher than those for wheat starch.

  12. Starch Granule Variability in Wild Solanum Species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because most of the dry matter of potato tubers is starch, an understanding of starch properties is important in potato improvement programs. Starch granule size is considered to influence tuber processing quality parameters such as gelatinization temperature, viscosity, and water holding capacity. ...

  13. Studies of Amylose Content in Potato Starch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato starch is typically low in amylose (~20-25%), but high amylose starch has superior nutritional qualities. The ratio between amylose and amylopectin is the most important property influencing the physical properties of starch. There is a strong case to be made for the development of food crops...

  14. Esterification of Starch in Ionic Liquids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We shall discuss the use of various ionic liquids in the preparation of starch esters. Starch was reacted with vinyl acetate in different 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (bmim) salts as solvents in an effort to produce starches with different acetylation patterns. Overall degree of substitution (DS) w...

  15. Starch gelatinization under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Faroongsarng, D; Wongpoowarak, W; Mitrevej, A

    1999-01-01

    The behavior under thermal stress of starch dispersed in water was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to estimate the heat transported through the aqueous medium in gelatinization, and to characterize the range of gelatinization temperatures. In DSC scanning mode, the endotherm of 10% starch in aqueous dispersion showed the tracing of gelatinization at between 67 and 80 degrees C, having an onset at approximately 69 degrees C. In the isothermal mode, characteristically distinct isothermal heat flow profiles were revealed. It was hypothesized that the thermal influx proposed as being analogous to the diffusion process may affect the profiles. The profiles were transformed and nonlinearly fitted according to the square root of time model to characterize a so-called t-parameter, which was related to mean square displacement of molecular distribution. The t-parameter of starch in excess of water decreased compared to that of water only. The plot of difference in these t-parameters, expressed as delta, against temperature showed a dramatically decreased delta at the temperature between 66.7 and 75.2 degrees C, which coincided with the findings from scanning mode DSC. It was further hypothesized that the decreased delta may be due to the gelatinizing process. According to the theory of polymer solution, the critical temperature (theta) at 75.2 degrees C, where the free energy became theoretically negative, i.e., the starch became spontaneously dissolved, was drawn. This theta was located within the range of gelatinizing temperatures. It was deduced that starch polymer may have dissolved during gelatinization. The dissolution from acetaminophen tablets prepared by starch paste was lower compared with that of negative controls (without paste). Moreover, the paste prepared at gelatinizing temperature (70 degrees C) seemed to inhibit acetaminophen dissolution from tablet matrices more than that prepared at subgelatinizing temperature (50 degrees C).

  16. Physicochemical properties of starches isolated from pumpkin compared with potato and corn starches.

    PubMed

    Przetaczek-Rożnowska, Izabela

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the selected physicochemical, thermal and rheological properties of pumpkin starches and compared with the properties of potato and corn starches used as control samples. Pumpkin starches could be used in the food industry as a free gluten starch. Better thermal and rheological properties could contribute to reduce the costs of food production. The syneresis of pumpkin starches was similar to that of potato starch but much lower than that for corn starch. Pasting temperatures of pumpkin starches were lower by 17-21.7°C and their final viscosities were over 1000cP higher than corn paste, but were close to the values obtained for potato starch. The thermodynamic characteristic showed that the transformation temperatures of pumpkin starches were lower than those measured for control starches. A level of retrogradation was much lower in pumpkin starch pastes (32-48%) than was in the case of corn (59%) or potato (77%) starches. The pumpkin starches gels were characterized by a much greater hardness, cohesiveness and chewiness, than potato or corn starches gels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Polymer grafting onto starch nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Labet, Marianne; Thielemans, Wim; Dufresne, Alain

    2007-09-01

    Monocrystalline starch nanoparticles were successfully grafted with poly(tetrahydrofuran), poly(caprolactone), and poly(ethylene glycol) monobutyl ether chains using toluene 2,4-diisocyanate as a linking agent. Surface grafting was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, differential scanning calorimetry, elemental analysis, and contact angle measurements. Transmission electron microscopy observations of modified starch nanocrystals showed either the individualization of nanoparticles or the formation of a film, depending on the polymer used. It was shown that grafting efficiency decreased with the length of the polymeric chains, as expected. The resulting modified nanoparticles can find applications in the field of co-continuous nanocomposite materials.

  18. In Planta Recapitulation of Isoprene Synthases Evolution from Ocimene Synthases.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingai; Xu, Jia; Algarra Alarcon, Alberto; Carlin, Silvia; Barbaro, Enrico; Cappellin, Luca; Velikova, Violeta; Vrhovsek, Urska; Loreto, Francesco; Varotto, Claudio

    2017-06-16

    Isoprene is the most abundant biogenic volatile hydrocarbon compound naturally emitted by plants and plays a major role in atmospheric chemistry. It has been proposed that isoprene synthases (IspS) may readily evolve from other terpene synthases, but this hypothesis has not been experimentally investigated.We isolated and functionally validated in Arabidopsis the first isoprene synthase gene, AdoIspS, from a monocotyledonous species (Arundo donax L., Poaceae). Phylogenetic reconstruction indicates that AdoIspS and dicots isoprene synthases most likely originated by parallel evolution from TPS-b monoterpene synthases. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated in vivo the functional and evolutionary relevance of the residues considered diagnostic for IspS function. One of these positions was identified by saturating mutagenesis as a major determinant of substrate specificity in AdoIspS able to cause in vivo a dramatic change in total volatile emission from hemi- to monoterpenes and supporting evolution of isoprene synthases from ocimene synthases. The mechanism responsible for IspS neofunctionalization by active site size modulation by a single amino acid mutation demonstrated in this study might be general, as the very same amino acidic position is implicated in the parallel evolution of different short-chain terpene synthases from both angiosperms and gymnosperms.Based on these results, we present a model reconciling in a unified conceptual framework the apparently contrasting patterns previously observed for isoprene synthase evolution in plants. These results indicate that parallel evolution may be driven by relatively simple biophysical constraints, and illustrate the intimate molecular evolutionary links between the structural and functional bases of traits with global relevance. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Starch characteristics influencing resistant starch content of cooked buckwheat groats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enzyme resistant starch (RS), owing to its health benefits such as colon cancer inhibition, reduced glycemic response, reduced cholesterol level, prevention of gall stone formation and obesity, has received an increasing attention from consumers and food manufacturers, whereas intrinsic and extrinsi...

  20. Mechanisms of acetohydroxyacid synthases.

    PubMed

    Chipman, David M; Duggleby, Ronald G; Tittmann, Kai

    2005-10-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthases are thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent biosynthetic enzymes found in all autotrophic organisms. Over the past 4-5 years, their mechanisms have been clarified and illuminated by protein crystallography, engineered mutagenesis and detailed single-step kinetic analysis. Pairs of catalytic subunits form an intimate dimer containing two active sites, each of which lies across a dimer interface and involves both monomers. The ThDP adducts of pyruvate, acetaldehyde and the product acetohydroxyacids can be detected quantitatively after rapid quenching. Determination of the distribution of intermediates by NMR then makes it possible to calculate individual forward unimolecular rate constants. The enzyme is the target of several herbicides and structures of inhibitor-enzyme complexes explain the herbicide-enzyme interaction.

  1. Pullulanase: Role in Starch Hydrolysis and Potential Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hii, Siew Ling; Tan, Joo Shun; Ling, Tau Chuan; Ariff, Arbakariya Bin

    2012-01-01

    The use of pullulanase (EC 3.2.1.41) has recently been the subject of increased applications in starch-based industries especially those aimed for glucose production. Pullulanase, an important debranching enzyme, has been widely utilised to hydrolyse the α-1,6 glucosidic linkages in starch, amylopectin, pullulan, and related oligosaccharides, which enables a complete and efficient conversion of the branched polysaccharides into small fermentable sugars during saccharification process. The industrial manufacturing of glucose involves two successive enzymatic steps: liquefaction, carried out after gelatinisation by the action of α-amylase; saccharification, which results in further transformation of maltodextrins into glucose. During saccharification process, pullulanase has been used to increase the final glucose concentration with reduced amount of glucoamylase. Therefore, the reversion reaction that involves resynthesis of saccharides from glucose molecules is prevented. To date, five groups of pullulanase enzymes have been reported, that is, (i) pullulanase type I, (ii) amylopullulanase, (iii) neopullulanase, (iv) isopullulanase, and (v) pullulan hydrolase type III. The current paper extensively reviews each category of pullulanase, properties of pullulanase, merits of applying pullulanase during starch bioprocessing, current genetic engineering works related to pullulanase genes, and possible industrial applications of pullulanase. PMID:22991654

  2. Pullulanase: role in starch hydrolysis and potential industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Hii, Siew Ling; Tan, Joo Shun; Ling, Tau Chuan; Ariff, Arbakariya Bin

    2012-01-01

    The use of pullulanase (EC 3.2.1.41) has recently been the subject of increased applications in starch-based industries especially those aimed for glucose production. Pullulanase, an important debranching enzyme, has been widely utilised to hydrolyse the α-1,6 glucosidic linkages in starch, amylopectin, pullulan, and related oligosaccharides, which enables a complete and efficient conversion of the branched polysaccharides into small fermentable sugars during saccharification process. The industrial manufacturing of glucose involves two successive enzymatic steps: liquefaction, carried out after gelatinisation by the action of α-amylase; saccharification, which results in further transformation of maltodextrins into glucose. During saccharification process, pullulanase has been used to increase the final glucose concentration with reduced amount of glucoamylase. Therefore, the reversion reaction that involves resynthesis of saccharides from glucose molecules is prevented. To date, five groups of pullulanase enzymes have been reported, that is, (i) pullulanase type I, (ii) amylopullulanase, (iii) neopullulanase, (iv) isopullulanase, and (v) pullulan hydrolase type III. The current paper extensively reviews each category of pullulanase, properties of pullulanase, merits of applying pullulanase during starch bioprocessing, current genetic engineering works related to pullulanase genes, and possible industrial applications of pullulanase.

  3. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    Starch is the major reserve polysaccharide in nature and accounts for the majority of the caloric intact of humans. It is also gaining importance as a renewable and biodegradable industrial material. There is burgeoning interest in increasing the amount and altering the properties of the plant starches by plant genetic modification. A rational approach to this effort will require a detailed, atomic-level understanding of the enzymatic processes that produce the starch granule. The starch granule is a complex particle made up of alternating layers of crystalline and amorphous lamellae. It consists of two types of polymer, amylose, a polymer of relatively long chains of α-1,4-linked glucans that contain virtually no branches, and amylopectin, which is highly branched and contains much shorter chains. This complex structure is synthesized by the coordinate activities of the starch synthases (SS), which elongate the polysaccharide chain by addition of glucose units via α-1,4 linkages using ADP- glucose as a donor, and branching enzymes (BE), which branch the polysaccharide chain by cleavage of α₋1,4 linkages and subsequent re-attachment via α₋1,6 linkages. Several isoforms of both starch synthase (SS) and branching enzyme (BE) are found in plants, including SSI, SSII, SSIII and granule- bound SS (GBSS), and SBEI, SBEIIa and SBEIIb. These isoforms have different activities and substrate and product specificities and play different roles in creating the granule and determining the properties of the resulting starch. The overarching goal of this proposal is to begin to understand the regulation and specificities of these enzymes at the atomic level. High-resolution X-ray structures of these enzymes bound to substrates and products will be determined to visualize the molecular interactions responsible for the properties of the enzymes. Hypotheses regarding these issues will then be tested using mutagenesis and enzyme assays. To date, we have determined the

  4. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  5. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  6. Resistant starch: promise for improving human health.

    PubMed

    Birt, Diane F; Boylston, Terri; Hendrich, Suzanne; Jane, Jay-Lin; Hollis, James; Li, Li; McClelland, John; Moore, Samuel; Phillips, Gregory J; Rowling, Matthew; Schalinske, Kevin; Scott, M Paul; Whitley, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Ongoing research to develop digestion-resistant starch for human health promotion integrates the disciplines of starch chemistry, agronomy, analytical chemistry, food science, nutrition, pathology, and microbiology. The objectives of this research include identifying components of starch structure that confer digestion resistance, developing novel plants and starches, and modifying foods to incorporate these starches. Furthermore, recent and ongoing studies address the impact of digestion-resistant starches on the prevention and control of chronic human diseases, including diabetes, colon cancer, and obesity. This review provides a transdisciplinary overview of this field, including a description of types of resistant starches; factors in plants that affect digestion resistance; methods for starch analysis; challenges in developing food products with resistant starches; mammalian intestinal and gut bacterial metabolism; potential effects on gut microbiota; and impacts and mechanisms for the prevention and control of colon cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Although this has been an active area of research and considerable progress has been made, many questions regarding how to best use digestion-resistant starches in human diets for disease prevention must be answered before the full potential of resistant starches can be realized.

  7. Mechanical properties and solubility in water of corn starch-collagen composite films: Effect of starch type and concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Wenhang; Ye, Ran; Liu, Anjun; Xiao, Jingdong; Liu, Yaowei; Zhao, Yana

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the possibility of enhancing the properties of collagen with three different maize starches: waxy maize starch, normal starch, and high amylose starch. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that starch-collagen films had a rougher surface compared to pure collagen films which became smoother upon heating. Amylose starch and normal starch increased the tensile strength of unheated collagen films in both dry and wet states, while all starches increased tensile strength of collagen film by heating. Depending upon the amylose content and starch concentrations, film solubility in water decreased with the addition of starch. DSC thermograms demonstrated that addition of all starches improved the thermal stability of the collagen film. Moreover, X-ray diffraction results indicated that except for high amylose starch, the crystallinity of both starch and collagen was significantly decreased when subject to heating. FTIR spectra indicated that intermolecular interactions between starch and collagen were enhanced upon heating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Solvent effects on starch dissolution and gelatinization.

    PubMed

    Koganti, Nagamani; Mitchell, John R; Ibbett, Roger N; Foster, Tim J

    2011-08-08

    The disruption of starch granular structure during dissolution in varying concentrations of N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) has been studied using three maize starches with varying ratios of amylose and amylopectin. Behavior in NMMO has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), microscopy, rapid viscosity analysis (RVA), and rheometry. Exothermic transitions were observed for the three starches in both 78 and 70% NMMO; the transition changed to an endotherm at 60 and 50% NMMO. Consistent with DSC, hot stage microscopy showed that starch granules dissolved at NMMO concentrations of 78 and 70%, whereas in 60 and 50% NMMO, gelatinization behavior similar to that found for starch in water was observed. Mechanical spectroscopy revealed the dominant viscous behavior (G″ > G') of starch at NMMO concentrations of 70 and 78% and more elastic behavior (G' > G″) at lower concentrations. Starch solutions in 78% NMMO obey the Cox-Merz rule, suggesting that the solutions are homogeneous on a molecular level.

  9. Preparation, characterization and utilization of starch nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Young; Park, Sung Soo; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2015-02-01

    Starch is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature and is typically isolated from plants in the form of micro-scale granules. Recent studies reported that nano-scale starch particles could be readily prepared from starch granules, which have unique physical properties. Because starch is environmentally friendly, starch nanoparticles are suggested as one of the promising biomaterials for novel utilization in foods, cosmetics, medicines as well as various composites. An overview of the most up-to-date information regarding the starch nanoparticles including the preparation processes and physicochemical characterization will be presented in this review. Additionally, the prospects and outlooks for the industrial utilization of starch nanoparticles will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Properties of baked foams from citric acid modified cassava starch and native cassava starch blends.

    PubMed

    Pornsuksomboon, Kanlaya; Holló, Berta Barta; Szécsényi, Katalin Mészáros; Kaewtatip, Kaewta

    2016-01-20

    Starch foams from native cassava starch (NS) and citric acid modified cassava starch (CNS) were prepared using baking processes with blend ratios of 80/20, 60/40, 50/50, 40/60 and 20/80. The density, thickness, morphology, thermal stability and water absorption of the NS, CNS and blended starch foams were determined. The ratio of the two starch components had a significant influence on the density and thickness of the blended starch foams. All blended starch foams showed good water resistance. Moreover, the morphology of the blended starch foam with the NS/CNS ratio of 50/50 showed a more ordered distribution of cell sizes with thicker cell walls than for the NS and CNS foams. The thermal stability of the blended starch foams was somewhat lower than the stability of the NS foam but not to the extent that it affected any potential practical applications.

  11. Starch composites with aconitic acid.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, William Neil; Doherty, William O S

    2016-05-05

    The aim of this project is to examine the effectiveness of using aconitic acid (AcA), a tricarboxylic acid which contains a carbon/carbon double bond (CC), to enhance the properties of starch-based films. Starch/glycerol cast films were prepared with 0, 2, 5, 10 and 15wt% AcA (starch wt% basis) and the properties analysed. It was shown that AcA acted as both a cross-linking agent and also a strong plasticising agent. The 5wt% AcA derived starch films were the most effectively cross-linked having the lowest solubility (28wt%) and decreased swelling coefficient (35vol.%) by approximately 3 times and 2.4 times respectively compared to the control film submerged in water (23°C). There was also a significant increase in the film elongation at break by approximately 35 times (compared to the control) with the addition of 15wt% AcA, emphasising the plasticising effect of AcA. However, generally there was a reduced tensile strength, softening of the film, and reduced thermal stability with increased amounts of AcA.

  12. Annealing properties of rice starch.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thermal properties of starch can be modified by annealing, i.e., a pre-treatment in excessive amounts of water at temperatures below the gelatinization temperatures. This treatment is known to improve the crystalline properties, and is a useful tool to gain a better control of the functional proper...

  13. Hydrothermal modification of rice starches.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice starch of long grain and waxy cultivars were annealed (ANN) in excess water at 50 oC for 4 hrs. They were also modified under heat-moisture treatment (HMT) conditions at 110 oC, and various moisture contents (20%, 30%, and 40%) for 8 hrs. These treatments altered the pasting and gelling prope...

  14. Limiting factors of starch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Colonna, P; Leloup, V; Buléon, A

    1992-10-01

    Foods appear as complex structures, in which starch may be present in different forms. These, including the molecular characteristics and the crystalline organization, depend on processing conditions and compositions of ingredients. The main changes in starch macro- and microstructures are the increase of surface area to volume ratio in the solid phase, the modification of the crystallinity as affected by gelatinization and gelation, and the depolymerization of amylose and amylopectin. Starch modification may be estimated by different methodologies, which should be selected according to the level of structure considered. When amylose and amylopectin are in solution, rapid and total hydrolysis leads to the formation of a mixture of linear oligosaccharides and branched alpha-limit dextrins. However, starch usually occurs in foods as solid structures. Structural factors of starchy materials influence their enzymic hydrolysis. A better understanding of the enzymatic process enables the identification of the structural factors limiting hydrolysis: diffusion of enzyme molecules, porosity of solid substrates, adsorption of enzymes onto solid substrates, and the catalytic event. A mechanistic modelling should be possible in the future.

  15. Isolation of streptococcal hyaluronate synthase.

    PubMed

    Prehm, P; Mausolf, A

    1986-05-01

    Hyaluronate synthase was isolated from protoblast membranes of streptococci by Triton X-114 extraction and cetylpyridinium chloride precipitation. It was identified as a 52,000-Mr protein, which bound to nascent hyaluronate and was affinity-labelled by periodate-oxidized UDP-glucuronic acid and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. Antibodies directed against the 52,000-Mr protein inhibited hyaluronate synthesis. Mutants defective in hyaluronate synthase activity lacked the 52,000-Mr protein in membrane extracts. Synthase activity was solubilized from membranes by cholate in active form and purified by ion-exchange chromatography.

  16. Isolation of streptococcal hyaluronate synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Prehm, P; Mausolf, A

    1986-01-01

    Hyaluronate synthase was isolated from protoblast membranes of streptococci by Triton X-114 extraction and cetylpyridinium chloride precipitation. It was identified as a 52,000-Mr protein, which bound to nascent hyaluronate and was affinity-labelled by periodate-oxidized UDP-glucuronic acid and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. Antibodies directed against the 52,000-Mr protein inhibited hyaluronate synthesis. Mutants defective in hyaluronate synthase activity lacked the 52,000-Mr protein in membrane extracts. Synthase activity was solubilized from membranes by cholate in active form and purified by ion-exchange chromatography. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3092808

  17. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  18. Development of waxy cassava with different Biological and physico-chemical characteristics of starches for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan-Shan; Dufour, Dominique; Sánchez, Teresa; Ceballos, Hernan; Zhang, Peng

    2011-08-01

    The quality of cassava starch, an important trait in cassava breeding programs, determines its applications in various industries. For example, development of waxy (having a low level of amylose) cassava is in demand. Amylose is synthesized by granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) in plants, and therefore, down-regulation of GBSSI expression in cassava might lead to reduced amylose content. We produced 63 transgenic cassava plant lines that express hair-pin dsRNAs homologous to the cassava GBSSI conserved region under the control of the vascular-specific promoter p54/1.0 from cassava (p54/1.0::GBSSI-RNAi) or cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S (35S::GBSSI-RNAi). After the screening storage roots and starch granules from field-grown plants with iodine staining, the waxy phenotype was discovered: p54/1.0::GBSSI-RNAi line A8 and 35S::GBSSI-RNAi lines B9, B10, and B23. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that there was no detectable GBSSI protein in the starch granules of plants with the waxy phenotype. Further, the amylose content of transgenic starches was significantly reduced (<5%) compared with the level in starch granules from the wild-type (about 25%). The inner structure of the waxy starch granules differed from that of the untransformed ones, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy analysis as well as morphological changes in the iodine-starch complex. Endothermic enthalpy was reduced in waxy cassava starches, according to differential scanning calorimeter analysis. Except B9, all waxy starches displayed the A-type X-ray diffraction pattern. Amylogram patterns of the waxy cassava starches were analyzed using a rapid viscosity analyzer and found to have increased values for clarity, peak viscosity, gel breakdown, and swelling index. Setback, consistency, and solubility were notably reduced. Therefore, waxy cassava with novel starch in its storage roots was produced using the biotechnological approach, promoting its

  19. Allelic variants of the amylose extender mutation of maize demonstrate phenotypic variation in starch structure resulting from modified protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fushan; Ahmed, Zaheer; Lee, Elizabeth A.; Donner, Elizabeth; Liu, Qiang; Ahmed, Regina; Morell, Matthew K.; Emes, Michael J.; Tetlow, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    amylose extender (ae−) starches characteristically have modified starch granule morphology resulting from amylopectin with reduced branch frequency and longer glucan chains in clusters, caused by the loss of activity of the major starch branching enzyme (SBE), which in maize endosperm is SBEIIb. A recent study with ae− maize lacking the SBEIIb protein (termed ae1.1 herein) showed that novel protein–protein interactions between enzymes of starch biosynthesis in the amyloplast could explain the starch phenotype of the ae1.1 mutant. The present study examined an allelic variant of the ae− mutation, ae1.2, which expresses a catalytically inactive form of SBEIIb. The catalytically inactive SBEIIb in ae1.2 lacks a 28 amino acid peptide (Val272–Pro299) and is unable to bind to amylopectin. Analysis of starch from ae1.2 revealed altered granule morphology and physicochemical characteristics distinct from those of the ae1.1 mutant as well as the wild-type, including altered apparent amylose content and gelatinization properties. Starch from ae1.2 had fewer intermediate length glucan chains (degree of polymerization 16–20) than ae1.1. Biochemical analysis of ae1.2 showed that there were differences in the organization and assembly of protein complexes of starch biosynthetic enzymes in comparison with ae1.1 (and wild-type) amyloplasts, which were also reflected in the composition of starch granule-bound proteins. The formation of stromal protein complexes in the wild-type and ae1.2 was strongly enhanced by ATP, and broken by phosphatase treatment, indicating a role for protein phosphorylation in their assembly. Labelling experiments with [γ-32P]ATP showed that the inactive form of SBEIIb in ae1.2 was phosphorylated, both in the monomeric form and in association with starch synthase isoforms. Although the inactive SBEIIb was unable to bind starch directly, it was strongly associated with the starch granule, reinforcing the conclusion that its presence in the

  20. Physicochemical and functional properties of ozone-oxidized starch.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hui T; Bhat, Rajeev; Karim, Alias A

    2009-07-08

    The effects of oxidation by ozone gas on some physicochemical and functional properties of starch (corn, sago, and tapioca) were investigated. Starch in dry powder form was exposed to ozone for 10 min at different ozone generation times (OGTs). Carboxyl and carbonyl contents increased markedly in all starches with increasing OGTs. Oxidation significantly decreased the swelling power of oxidized sago and tapioca starches but increased that of oxidized corn starch. The solubility of tapioca starch decreased and sago starch increased after oxidation. However, there was an insignificant changed in the solubility of oxidized corn starch. Intrinsic viscosity [eta] of all oxidized starches decreased significantly, except for tapioca starch oxidized at 5 min OGT. Pasting properties of the oxidized starches followed different trends as OGTs increased. These results show that under similar conditions of ozone treatment, the extent of starch oxidation varies among different types of starch.

  1. Protein Phosphorylation in Amyloplasts Regulates Starch Branching Enzyme Activity and Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tetlow, Ian J.; Wait, Robin; Lu, Zhenxiao; Akkasaeng, Rut; Bowsher, Caroline G.; Esposito, Sergio; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Morell, Matthew K.; Emes, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation in amyloplasts and chloroplasts of Triticum aestivum (wheat) was investigated after the incubation of intact plastids with γ-32P-ATP. Among the soluble phosphoproteins detected in plastids, three forms of starch branching enzyme (SBE) were phosphorylated in amyloplasts (SBEI, SBEIIa, and SBEIIb), and both forms of SBE in chloroplasts (SBEI and SBEIIa) were shown to be phosphorylated after sequencing of the immunoprecipitated 32P-labeled phosphoproteins using quadrupole-orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the phosphorylated SBE forms indicated that the proteins are all phosphorylated on Ser residues. Analysis of starch granule–associated phosphoproteins after incubation of intact amyloplasts with γ-32P-ATP indicated that the granule-associated forms of SBEII and two granule-associated forms of starch synthase (SS) are phosphorylated, including SSIIa. Measurement of SBE activity in amyloplasts and chloroplasts showed that phosphorylation activated SBEIIa (and SBEIIb in amyloplasts), whereas dephosphorylation using alkaline phosphatase reduced the catalytic activity of both enzymes. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation had no effect on the measurable activity of SBEI in amyloplasts and chloroplasts, and the activities of both granule-bound forms of SBEII in amyloplasts were unaffected by dephosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation experiments using peptide-specific anti-SBE antibodies showed that SBEIIb and starch phosphorylase each coimmunoprecipitated with SBEI in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, suggesting that these enzymes may form protein complexes within the amyloplast in vivo. Conversely, dephosphorylation of immunoprecipitated protein complex led to its disassembly. This article reports direct evidence that enzymes of starch metabolism (amylopectin synthesis) are regulated by protein phosphorylation and indicate a wider role for protein phosphorylation and protein

  2. Comparative Phosphoproteomic Analysis under High-Nitrogen Fertilizer Reveals Central Phosphoproteins Promoting Wheat Grain Starch and Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Shoumin; Deng, Xiong; Zhang, Ming; Zhu, Gengrui; Lv, Dongwen; Wang, Yaping; Zhu, Dong; Yan, Yueming

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a macronutrient important for plant growth and development. It also strongly influences starch and protein synthesis, closely related to grain yield and quality. We performed the first comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of developing wheat grains in response to high-N fertilizer. Physiological and biochemical analyses showed that application of high-N fertilizer resulted in significant increases in leaf length and area, chlorophyll content, the activity of key enzymes in leaves such as nitrate reductase (NR), and in grains such as sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), sucrose synthase (SuSy), and ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase). This enhanced enzyme activity led to significant improvements in starch content, grain yield, and ultimately, bread making quality. Comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of developing grains under the application of high-N fertilizer performed 15 and 25 days post-anthesis identified 2470 phosphosites among 1372 phosphoproteins, of which 411 unique proteins displayed significant changes in phosphorylation level (>2-fold or <0.5-fold). These phosphoproteins are involved mainly in signaling transduction, starch synthesis, energy metabolism. Pro-Q diamond staining and Western blotting confirmed our phosphoproteomic results. We propose a putative pathway to elucidate the important roles of the central phosphoproteins regulating grain starch and protein synthesis. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of protein phosphorylation modifications involved in grain development, yield and quality formation. PMID:28194157

  3. Phosphanilic Acid Inhibits Dihydropteroate Synthase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    dihydropteroate synthases of P. aeruginosa and E . coli were about equally susceptible to inhibition by PA. These results suggest that cells of P. aeruginosa...are more permeable to PA than cells of E . coli . Although a weak inhibitor, PA acted on dihydropteroate synthase in the same manner as the sulfonamides...with which PA is structurally related. Inhibition of E . coli by PA in a basal salts-glucose medium was prevented by p-aminobenzoic acid (pABA). However

  4. Bacterial nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Crane, Brian R; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Patel, Bhumit A

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are multidomain metalloproteins first identified in mammals as being responsible for the synthesis of the wide-spread signaling and protective agent nitric oxide (NO). Over the past 10 years, prokaryotic proteins that are homologous to animal NOSs have been identified and characterized, both in terms of enzymology and biological function. Despite some interesting differences in cofactor utilization and redox partners, the bacterial enzymes are in many ways similar to their mammalian NOS (mNOS) counterparts and, as such, have provided insight into the structural and catalytic properties of the NOS family. In particular, spectroscopic studies of thermostable bacterial NOSs have revealed key oxyheme intermediates involved in the oxidation of substrate L-arginine (Arg) to product NO. The biological functions of some bacterial NOSs have only more recently come to light. These studies disclose new roles for NO in biology, such as taking part in toxin biosynthesis, protection against oxidative stress, and regulation of recovery from radiation damage.

  5. Physicochemical Properties of Starch Isolated from Bracken (Pteridium aquilinim) Rhizome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xurun; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Zhong; Xiong, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) is an important wild plant starch resource worldwide. In this work, starch was separated from bracken rhizome, and the physicochemical properties of this starch were systematically investigated and compared with 2 other common starches, that is, starches from waxy maize and potato. There were significant differences in shape, birefringence patterns, size distribution, and amylose content between bracken and the 2 other starches. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that bracken starch exhibited a typical C-type crystalline structure. Bracken starch presented, respectively, lower and higher relative degree of crystallinity than waxy maize and potato starches. Ordered structures in particle surface differed among these 3 starches. The swelling power tendency of bracken starch in different temperature intervals was very similar to that of potato starch. The viscosity parameters during gelatinization were the lowest in waxy maize, followed by bracken and potato starches. The contents of 3 nutritional components, that is, rapidly digestible, slowly digestible, and resistant starches in native, gelatinized, and retrograded starch from bracken rhizome presented more similarities with potato starch than waxy maize starch. These finding indicated that physicochemical properties of bracken starch showed more similarities with potato starch than waxy maize starch. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. 21 CFR 178.3520 - Industrial starch-modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Industrial starch-modified. 178.3520 Section 178... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3520 Industrial starch-modified. Industrial starch... provisions of this section. (a) Industrial starch-modified is identified as follows: (1) A food starch...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3520 - Industrial starch-modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Industrial starch-modified. 178.3520 Section 178... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3520 Industrial starch-modified. Industrial starch... provisions of this section. (a) Industrial starch-modified is identified as follows: (1) A food starch...

  8. 21 CFR 178.3520 - Industrial starch-modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Industrial starch-modified. 178.3520 Section 178... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3520 Industrial starch-modified. Industrial starch... provisions of this section. (a) Industrial starch-modified is identified as follows: (1) A food starch...

  9. Rheological and textural properties of pulse starch gels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The properties of starch gels from black beans, chickpeas, lentils and navy beans were investigated. Differences were shown between starch sources, and effect of starch concentration was studied. Navy bean starch had the highest peak and final viscosities in pasting tests, while black bean starch h...

  10. Thermal and rheological properties of breadfruit starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyu; Chen, Ling; Li, Xiaoxi; Xie, Fengwei; Liu, Hongshen; Yu, Long

    2011-01-01

    The thermal and rheological properties of breadfruit starch were studied using DSC and 2 different rheometers. It was found that the gelatinization temperature of starch with excess moisture content (>70%) was at approximately 75 °C. A new endotherm was detected at about 173 °C when the moisture content was lower than required for full gelatinization of the starch. A detailed examination revealed that this endotherm represented the melting of amylose-lipid complexes. Breadfruit starch paste exhibited shear-thinning fluid characteristics, and good thermal and pH stability. The setback viscosity of the breadfruit starch was lower than that of potato and corn starches. The rheological properties of the breadfruit starch paste was well described by the Herschel-Bulkley model at a shear rate of 0 to 100 s(-1), where R(2) is greater than 0.95, and it behaved like a yield-pseudoplastic fluid. Both the storage modulus and loss modulus of the paste initially increased sharply, then dropped after reaching the gelatinization peak. Breadfruit starch gel showed both flexibility and viscosity. Suspension with 6% starch content exhibited very weak gel rigidity; however, this increased significantly at starch contents above 20%.

  11. The Simultaneous Abolition of Three Starch Hydrolases Blocks Transient Starch Breakdown in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Eicke, Simona; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated which enzymes are involved in debranching amylopectin during transient starch degradation. Previous studies identified two debranching enzymes, isoamylase 3 (ISA3) and limit dextrinase (LDA), involved in this process. However, plants lacking both enzymes still degrade substantial amounts of starch. Thus, other enzymes/mechanisms must contribute to starch breakdown. We show that the chloroplastic α-amylase 3 (AMY3) also participates in starch degradation and provide evidence that all three enzymes can act directly at the starch granule surface. The isa3 mutant has a starch excess phenotype, reflecting impaired starch breakdown. In contrast, removal of AMY3, LDA, or both enzymes together has no impact on starch degradation. However, removal of AMY3 or LDA in addition to ISA3 enhances the starch excess phenotype. In plants lacking all three enzymes, starch breakdown is effectively blocked, and starch accumulates to the highest levels observed so far. This provides indirect evidence that the heteromultimeric debranching enzyme ISA1-ISA2 is not involved in starch breakdown. However, we illustrate that ISA1-ISA2 can hydrolyze small soluble branched glucans that accumulate when ISA3 and LDA are missing, albeit at a slow rate. Starch accumulation in the mutants correlates inversely with plant growth. PMID:23019330

  12. Molecular disassembly of starch granules during gelatinization and its effect on starch digestibility: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Copeland, Les

    2013-11-01

    Starch is the most important glycemic carbohydrate in foods. The relationship between the rate and extent of starch digestion to produce glucose for absorption into the bloodstream and risk factors for diet-related diseases is of considerable nutritional interest. Native starch is attacked slowly by enzymes, but after hydrothermal processing its susceptibility to enzymatic breakdown is greatly increased. Most starch consumed by humans has undergone some form of processing or cooking, which causes native starch granules to gelatinize, followed by retrogradation on cooling. The extent of gelatinization and retrogradation are major determinants of the susceptibility of starch to enzymatic digestion and its functional properties for food processing. The type and extent of changes that occur in starch as a result of gelatinization, pasting and retrogradation are determined by the type of the starch, processing and storage conditions. A mechanistic understanding of the molecular disassembly of starch granules during gelatinization is critical to explaining the effects of processing or cooking on starch digestibility. This review focuses on the molecular disassembly of starch granules during starch gelatinization over a wide range of water levels, and its consequential effect on in vitro starch digestibility and in vivo glycemic index.

  13. Carotenoid accumulation affects redox status, starch metabolism, and flavonoid/anthocyanin accumulation in citrus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongbo; Wang, Jiangbo; Dong, Xintian; Han, Yan; Ma, Qiaoli; Ding, Yuduan; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Jiancheng; Chen, Haijiang; Xu, Qiang; Xu, Juan; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-02-03

    Carotenoids are indispensable plant secondary metabolites that are involved in photosynthesis, antioxidation, and phytohormone biosynthesis. Carotenoids are likely involved in other biological functions that have yet to be discovered. In this study, we integrated genomic, biochemical, and cellular studies to gain deep insight into carotenoid-related biological processes in citrus calli overexpressing CrtB (phytoene synthase from Pantoea agglomerans). Fortunella hindsii Swingle (a citrus relative) and Malus hupehensis (a wild apple) calli were also utilized as supporting systems to investigate the effect of altered carotenoid accumulation on carotenoid-related biological processes. Transcriptomic analysis provided deep insight into the carotenoid-related biological processes of redox status, starch metabolism, and flavonoid/anthocyanin accumulation. By applying biochemical and cytological analyses, we determined that the altered redox status was associated with variations in O2 (-) and H2O2 levels. We also ascertained a decline in starch accumulation in carotenoid-rich calli. Furthermore, via an extensive cellular investigation of the newly constructed CrtB overexpressing Fortunella hindsii Swingle, we demonstrated that starch level reducation occurred in parallel with significant carotenoid accumulation. Moreover, studying anthocyanin-rich Malus hupehensis calli showed a negative effect of carotenoids on anthocyanin accumulation. In citrus, altered carotenoid accumulation resulted in dramatic effects on metabolic processes involved in redox modification, starch degradation, and flavonoid/anthocyanin biosynthesis. These findings provided new perspectives to understand the biological importance of carotenogenesis and of the developmental processes associated with the nutritional and sensory qualities of agricultural products that accumulate carotenoids.

  14. Combined effects of Wx and SSIIa haplotypes on rice starch physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xunchao; Kang, Cuifang; Xu, Shunju; Yang, Bowen

    2017-03-01

    Wx and SSIIa are central genes for determining starch physicochemical properties and rice endosperm starch is composed of linear amylose, which is entirely synthesized by granule bound starch synthase I (GBSSI, encoded by Wx) and branched amylopectin. In the present study, different haplotypes of rice were examined to investigate the combined effects of pivotal genes in the metabolic chain of starch, Wx and SSIIa. Wx haplotypes differed in terms of apparent amylose content (AAC) and gel consistency (GC). The I-3 [haplotype I (Int1T/Ex10C) of Wx and haplotype 3 (A-G-TT) of SSIIa] and the I-4 combinations of rice had better eating and cooking qualities (ECQs) with lower AAC, lower gelatinization temperature (GT) and softer GC. The characteristic parameters of Rapid Visco-analyser (RVA) could distinguish differences in AAC and GC but not GT. The I-3 and I-4 haplotype combinations of Wx and SSIIa represent key targets for the production of rice with better ECQs. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. 75 FR 879 - National Starch and Chemical Company Specialty Starches Division Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration National Starch and Chemical Company Specialty Starches Division..., applicable to workers of National Starch and Chemical Company, Specialty Starches Division, Island Falls.... The workers were engaged in the production of drum dried and modified food starches. New information...

  16. Starch gelatinization in coiled heaters.

    PubMed

    Kelder, J D H; Ptasinski, K J; Kerkhof, P J A M

    2004-01-01

    A gelatinizing model food derived from a 5% w/w cross-linked waxy maize starch suspension was simulated in coiled heaters to assess the impact of centrifugal forces on flow and heat transfer. For four coil diameters (D = 0.25, 1, 2.5, and infinity m) and three flow rates (w = 0.5, 1, and 2 m/s), heat transfer, viscous development, and the severity of channeling were evaluated. Increasing curvature proved to suppress channeling as a result of more uniform heating and gelatinization. The maximum attainable viscosity was also higher, implying a lower starch consumption for a target viscosity. Higher flow rates necessitated longer heaters, and the maximum viscosity decreased. Moderate product velocities are therefore recommended.

  17. Lipoic Acid Synthase (LASY)

    PubMed Central

    Padmalayam, Indira; Hasham, Sumera; Saxena, Uday; Pillarisetti, Sivaram

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Lipoic acid synthase (LASY) is the enzyme that is involved in the endogenous synthesis of lipoic acid, a potent mitochondrial antioxidant. The aim of this study was to study the role of LASY in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We studied expression of LASY in animal models of type 2 diabetes. We also looked at regulation of LASY in vitro under conditions that exist in diabetes. Additionally, we looked at effects of LASY knockdown on cellular antioxidant status, inflammation, mitochondrial function, and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. RESULTS—LASY expression is significantly reduced in tissues from animal models of diabetes and obesity compared with age- and sex-matched controls. In vitro, LASY mRNA levels were decreased by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and high glucose. Downregulation of the LASY gene by RNA interference (RNAi) reduced endogenous levels of lipoic acid, and the activities of critical components of the antioxidant defense network, increasing oxidative stress. Treatment with exogenous lipoic acid compensated for some of these defects. RNAi-mediated downregulation of LASY induced a significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. In endothelial cells, downregulation of LASY aggravated the inflammatory response that manifested as an increase in both basal and TNF-α–induced expression of the proinflammatory cytokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Overexpression of the LASY gene ameliorated the inflammatory response. CONCLUSIONS—Deficiency of LASY results in an overall disturbance in the antioxidant defense network, leading to increased inflammation, insulin resistance, and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:19074983

  18. Potential of Starch Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, N. H.; Muhammad, N.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, the development of biodegradable materials from renewable sources based on polymeric biomaterials have grown rapidly due to increase environmental concerns and the shortage of petroleum sources. In this regard, naturally renewable polymers such as starch has shown great potential as environmental friendly materials. Besides, the unique properties of starch such as biodegradable and non-toxic, biocompatible and solubility make them useful for a various biomedical applications. Regardless of their unique properties, starch materials are known to have limitations in term of poor processability, low mechanical properties, poor long term stability and high water sensitivity. In order to overcome these limitations, the incorporation of nano size fillers into starch materials (nanocomposites) has been introduced. This review aims to give an overview about structure and characteristics of starch, modification of starch by nanocomposites and their potential for biomedical applications.

  19. Characterisation and disintegration properties of irradiated starch.

    PubMed

    De Kerf, M; Mondelaers, W; Lahorte, P; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P

    2001-06-19

    Irradiation treatment could provide a quick and simple way to modify the physical, chemical and pharmaceutical properties of biopolymers such as starch. Corn, potato and drum dried corn starch were exposed to X-ray and electron beam (e-beam) irradiation treatment at doses of 10, 50 and 100 kGy. The disintegration properties of these starches were compared using alpha-lactose monohydrate tablets containing 5% (w/w) starch as disintegrant. Starch solubility increased, while its swelling capacity decreased with increasing irradiation dose. The irradiation treatment caused fragmentation of the amylopectin fraction. Irradiation modified the different starches thoroughly, showing remarkable differences in disintegration properties after X-ray treatment and e-beam modification. The e-beam modification resulted in significantly higher disintegration times of the tablets.

  20. Formation of nanoporous aerogels from wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Ubeyitogullari, Ali; Ciftci, Ozan N

    2016-08-20

    Biodegradable nanoporous aerogels were obtained from wheat starch using a simple and green method based on supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) drying. Effects of processing parameters (temperature, wheat starch concentration and mixing rate during gelatinization; temperature, pressure, and flow rate of CO2, during SC-CO2 drying) on the aerogel formation were investigated, and optimized for the highest surface area and smallest pore size of the aerogels. At the optimized conditions, wheat starch aerogels had surface areas between 52.6-59.7m(2)/g and densities ranging between 0.05-0.29g/cm(3). The average pore size of the starch aerogels was 20nm. Starch aerogels were stable up to 280°C. Due to high surface area and nanoporous structure, wheat starch aerogels are promising carrier systems for bioactives and drugs in food and pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of starches on mechanical properties of paracetamol tablet formulations. I. Pregelatinization of starch binders.

    PubMed

    Alebiowu, Gbenga; Itiola, Oludele Adelanwa

    2003-09-01

    A study has been made of the effects of pregelatinization of native sorghum and plantain starches on the mechanical properties of a paracetamol tablet formulation in comparison with corn starch BP. The mechanical properties tested, viz. tensile strength (T) and brittle fracture index (BFI) of the paracetamol tablets were affected by pregelatinization of the starch. The results suggest that pregelatinized starches may be useful as binders when a particular degree of bond strength and brittleness is desired.

  2. Structural and functional properties of C-type starches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinwen; Cai, Canhui; Man, Jianmin; Zhou, Weidong; Wei, Cunxu

    2014-01-30

    This study investigated the structural and functional properties of C-type starches from pea seeds, faba bean seeds, yam rhizomes and water chestnut corms. These starches were mostly oval in shape with significantly different sizes and contents of amylose, damaged starch and phosphorus. Pea, faba bean and water chestnut starches had central hila, and yam starch had eccentric hilum. Water chestnut and yam starches had higher amylopectin short and long chain, respectively. Water chestnut and faba bean starches showed CA-type crystallinities, and pea and yam starches had C-type crystallinities. Water chestnut starch had the highest swelling power, granule swelling and pasting viscosity, lowest gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy. Faba bean starch had the lowest pasting viscosity, whereas yam starch had the highest gelatinization temperatures. Water chestnut and yam starches possessed significantly higher and lower susceptibility to acid and enzyme hydrolysis, the highest and lowest RDS contents, and the lowest and highest RS contents, respectively.

  3. Issues of Starch in Sugarcane Processing and Prospects of Breeding for Low Starch Content in Sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch is a sugarcane impurity that adversely affects the quantity and quality of sugar processes and products. The increased production of combine and green harvested sugarcane has increased delivery of starch to sugarcane factories. Starch occurs as granules composed of amylose and amylopectin p...

  4. Starch-Soybean Oil Composites with High Oil: Starch Ratios Prepared by Steam Jet Cooking

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aqueous mixtures of soybean oil and starch were jet cooked at oil:starch ratios ranging from 0.5:1 to 4:1 to yield dispersions of micron-sized oil droplets that were coated with a thin layer of starch at the oil-water interface. The jet cooked dispersions were then centrifuged at 2060 and 10,800 x ...

  5. Starch aerogel beads obtained from inclusion complexes prepared from high amylose starch and sodium palmitate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch aerogels are a class of low density highly porous renewable materials currently prepared from retrograded starch gels and are of interest for their good surface area, porosity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Recently, we have reported on starches containing amylose-fatty acid salt h...

  6. Inducing PLA/starch compatibility through butyl-etherification of waxy and high amylose starch.

    PubMed

    Wokadala, Obiro Cuthbert; Emmambux, Naushad Mohammad; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2014-11-04

    In this study, waxy and high amylose starches were modified through butyl-etherification to facilitate compatibility with polylactide (PLA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and wettability tests showed that hydrophobic butyl-etherified waxy and high amylose starches were obtained with degree of substitution values of 2.0 and 2.1, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry, tensile testing, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated improved PLA/starch compatibility for both waxy and high amylose starch after butyl-etherification. The PLA/butyl-etherified waxy and high amylose starch composite films had higher tensile strength and elongation at break compared to PLA/non-butyl-etherified composite films. The morphological study using SEM showed that PLA/butyl-etherified waxy starch composites had a more homogenous microstructure compared to PLA/butyl-etherified high amylose starch composites. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that PLA/starch composite thermal stability decreased with starch butyl-etherification for both waxy and high amylose starches. This study mainly demonstrates that PLA/starch compatibility can be improved through starch butyl-etherification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Position of modifying groups on starch chains of octenylsuccinic anhydride-modified waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yanjie; Kaufman, Rhett C; Wilson, Jeff D; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-06-15

    Octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starches with a low (0.018) and high (0.092) degree of substitution (DS) were prepared from granular native waxy maize starch in aqueous slurry. The position of OS substituents along the starch chains was investigated by enzyme hydrolysis followed by chromatographic analysis. Native starch and two OS starches with a low and high DS had β-limit values of 55.9%, 52.8%, and 34.4%, respectively. The weight-average molecular weight of the β-limit dextrin from the OS starch with a low DS was close to that of the β-limit dextrin from native starch but lower than that of the β-limit dextrin from the OS starch with a high DS. Debranching of OS starches was incomplete compared with native starch. OS groups in the OS starch with a low DS were located on the repeat units near the branching points, whereas the OS substituents in the OS starch with a high DS occurred both near the branching points and the non-reducing ends. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improved method for detection of starch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohawale, M.R.; Wilson, J.J.; Khachatourians, G.G.; Ingledew, W.M.

    1982-09-01

    A new starch hydrolysis detection method which does not rely on iodine staining or the use of color-complexed starch is described. A linear relationship was obtained with agar-starch plates when net clearing zones around colonies of yeasts were plotted against enzyme levels (semilogarithm scale) produced by the same yeast strains in liquid medium. A similar relationship between starch clearing zones and alpha-amylase levels from three different sources was observed. These observations suggest that the method is useful in mutant isolations, strain improvement programs, and the prediction of alpha-amylase activities in culture filtrates or column effluents. (Refs. 18).

  9. Physical modification of food starch functionalities.

    PubMed

    BeMiller, James N; Huber, Kerry C

    2015-01-01

    Because, in general, native starches do not have properties that make them ideally suited for applications in food products, most starch is modified by dervatization to improve its functionality before use in processed food formulations, and because food processors would prefer not to have to use the modified food starch label designation required when chemically modified starches are used, there is considerable interest in providing starches with desired functionalities that have not been chemically modified. One investigated approach is property modification via physical treatments, that is, modifications of starches imparted by physical treatments that do not result in any chemical modification of the starch. Physical treatments are divided into thermal and nonthermal treatments. Thermal treatments include those that produce pregelatinized and granular cold-water-swelling starches, heat-moisture treatments, annealing, microwave heating, so-called osmotic pressure treatment, and heating of dry starch. Nonthermal treatments include ultrahigh-pressure treatments, instantaneous controlled pressure drop, use of high-pressure homogenizers, dynamic pulsed pressure, pulsed electric field, and freezing and thawing.

  10. Photosynthate Partitioning into Starch in Soybean Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chatterton, N. Jerry; Silvius, John E.

    1979-01-01

    Photosynthesis, photosynthate partitioning into foliar starch, and translocation were investigated in soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Amsoy 71), grown under different photoperiods and photosynthetic periods to determine the controls of leaf starch accumulation. Starch accumulation rates in soybean leaves were inversely related to the length of the daily photosynthetic period under which the plants were grown. Photosynthetic period and not photoperiod per se appears to be the important factor. Plants grown in a 14-hour photosynthetic period partitioned approximately 60% of the daily foliar accumulation into starch whereas 7-hour plants partitioned about 90% of their daily foliar accumulation into starch. The difference in starch accumulation resulted from a change in photosynthate partitioning between starch and leaf residual dry weight. Residual dry weight is defined as leaf dry weight minus the weight of total nonstructural carbohydrates. Differences in photosynthate partitioning into starch were also associated with changes in photosynthetic and translocation rates, as well as with leaf and whole plant morphology. It is concluded that leaf starch accumulation is a programmed process and not simply the result of a limitation in translocation. PMID:16661047

  11. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  12. Structural and molecular basis of starch viscosity in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Ral, J-P; Cavanagh, C R; Larroque, O; Regina, A; Morell, M K

    2008-06-11

    Wheat starch is considered to have a low paste viscosity relative to other starches. Consequently, wheat starch is not preferred for many applications as compared to other high paste viscosity starches. Increasing the viscosity of wheat starch is expected to increase the functionality of a range of wheat flour-based products in which the texture is an important aspect of consumer acceptance (e.g., pasta, and instant and yellow alkaline noodles). To understand the molecular basis of starch viscosity, we have undertaken a comprehensive structural and rheological analysis of starches from a genetically diverse set of wheat genotypes, which revealed significant variation in starch traits including starch granule protein content, starch-associated lipid content and composition, phosphate content, and the structures of the amylose and amylopectin fractions. Statistical analysis highlighted the association between amylopectin chains of 18-25 glucose residues and starch pasting properties. Principal component analysis also identified an association between monoesterified phosphate and starch pasting properties in wheat despite the low starch-phosphate level in wheat as compared to tuber starches. We also found a strong negative correlation between the phosphate ester content and the starch content in flour. Previously observed associations between internal starch granule fatty acids and the swelling peak time and pasting temperature have been confirmed. This study has highlighted a range of parameters associated with increased starch viscosity that could be used in prebreeding/breeding programs to modify wheat starch pasting properties.

  13. Using PLATO IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meller, David V.

    This beginning reference manual describes PLATO IV hardware for prospective users and provides an introduction to PLATO for new authors. The PLATO terminal is described in detail in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 provides a block diagram of the PLATO IV system. Procedures for getting on line are described in Chapter 3, and Chapter 4 provides references to…

  14. Starch-branching enzymes preferentially associated with A-type starch granules in wheat endosperm.

    PubMed

    Peng, M; Gao, M; Båga, M; Hucl, P; Chibbar, R N

    2000-09-01

    Two starch granule-bound proteins (SGP), SGP-140 and SGP-145, were preferentially associated with A-type starch granules (>10 microm) in developing and mature wheat (Triticum aestivum) kernels. Immunoblotting and N-terminal sequencing suggested that the two proteins were different variants of SBEIc, a 152-kD isoform of wheat starch-branching enzyme. Both SGP-140 and SGP-145 were localized to the endosperm starch granules but were not found in the endosperm soluble fraction or pericarp starch granules younger than 15 d post anthesis (DPA). Small-size starch granules (<10 microm) initiated before 15 DPA incorporated SGP-140 and SGP-145 throughout endosperm development and grew into full-size A-type starch granules (>10 microm). In contrast, small-size starch granules harvested after 15 DPA contained only low amounts of SGP-140 and SGP-145 and developed mainly into B-type starch granules (<10 microm). Polypeptides of similar mass and immunologically related to SGP-140 and/or SGP-145 were also preferentially incorporated into A-type starch granules of barley (Hordeum vulgare), rye (Secale cereale), and triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack) endosperm, which like wheat endosperm have a bimodal starch granule size distribution.

  15. Comparative transcriptome analysis coupled to X-ray CT reveals sucrose supply and growth velocity as major determinants of potato tuber starch biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Even though the process of potato tuber starch biosynthesis is well understood, mechanisms regulating biosynthesis are still unclear. Transcriptome analysis provides valuable information as to how genes are regulated. Therefore, this work aimed at investigating transcriptional regulation of starch biosynthetic genes in leaves and tubers of potato plants under various conditions. More specifically we looked at gene expression diurnally in leaves and tubers, during tuber induction and in tubers growing at different velocities. To determine velocity of potato tuber growth a new method based on X-ray Computed Tomography (X-ray CT) was established. Results Comparative transcriptome analysis between leaves and tubers revealed striking similarities with the same genes being differentially expressed in both tissues. In tubers, oscillation of granule bound starch synthase (GBSS) expression) was observed which could be linked to sucrose supply from source leaves. X-ray CT was used to determine time-dependent changes in tuber volume and the growth velocity was calculated. Although there is not a linear correlation between growth velocity and expression of starch biosynthetic genes, there are significant differences between growing and non-growing tubers. Co-expression analysis was used to identify transcription factors positively correlating with starch biosynthetic genes possibly regulating starch biosynthesis. Conclusion Most starch biosynthetic enzymes are encoded by gene families. Co-expression analysis revealed that the same members of these gene families are co-regulated in leaves and tubers. This suggests that regulation of transitory and storage starch biosynthesis in leaves and tubers, respectively, is surprisingly similar. X-ray CT can be used to monitor growth and development of belowground organs and allows to link tuber growth to changes in gene expression. Comparative transcriptome analysis provides a useful tool to identify transcription factors

  16. Comparative transcriptome analysis coupled to X-ray CT reveals sucrose supply and growth velocity as major determinants of potato tuber starch biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Stephanus J; Senning, Melanie; Sonnewald, Sophia; Kessling, Petra-Maria; Goldstein, Ralf; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2010-02-05

    Even though the process of potato tuber starch biosynthesis is well understood, mechanisms regulating biosynthesis are still unclear. Transcriptome analysis provides valuable information as to how genes are regulated. Therefore, this work aimed at investigating transcriptional regulation of starch biosynthetic genes in leaves and tubers of potato plants under various conditions. More specifically we looked at gene expression diurnally in leaves and tubers, during tuber induction and in tubers growing at different velocities. To determine velocity of potato tuber growth a new method based on X-ray Computed Tomography (X-ray CT) was established. Comparative transcriptome analysis between leaves and tubers revealed striking similarities with the same genes being differentially expressed in both tissues. In tubers, oscillation of granule bound starch synthase (GBSS) expression) was observed which could be linked to sucrose supply from source leaves. X-ray CT was used to determine time-dependent changes in tuber volume and the growth velocity was calculated. Although there is not a linear correlation between growth velocity and expression of starch biosynthetic genes, there are significant differences between growing and non-growing tubers. Co-expression analysis was used to identify transcription factors positively correlating with starch biosynthetic genes possibly regulating starch biosynthesis. Most starch biosynthetic enzymes are encoded by gene families. Co-expression analysis revealed that the same members of these gene families are co-regulated in leaves and tubers. This suggests that regulation of transitory and storage starch biosynthesis in leaves and tubers, respectively, is surprisingly similar. X-ray CT can be used to monitor growth and development of belowground organs and allows to link tuber growth to changes in gene expression. Comparative transcriptome analysis provides a useful tool to identify transcription factors possibly involved in the

  17. Production and physicochemical characterization of resistant starch type III derived from pea starch.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Undine; Rössler, Christine; Schmiedl, Detlef; Jacobasch, Gisela

    2003-02-01

    Smooth pea starch was used for the production of physiological important resistant starch type III. For reduction of the molecular weight of the starch, different strategies including enzymatic debranching and acid hydrolysis (lintnerization), were tested to obtain an optimal starting material for retrogradation. The resulting polymer chain lengths were analyzed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Temperature regimes and starch concentrations in gel were optimized during the retrogradation with the aim to obtain a high yield of resistant starch. Optimal conditions led to resistant starch contents up to 74%. The products were thermostable and showed no loss of resistant structures after autoclaving. The peak temperatures of the thermal transition were at approximately 147 degrees C. The resulting resistant starch products are suitable for the generation of functional foods.

  18. A starch-accumulating mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in a chloroplastic starch-hydrolysing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, S C; Northrop, F; Smith, A M; Rees, T

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to identify enzymes that participate in the degradation of transitory starch in Arabidopsis. A mutant line was isolated by screening leaves at the end of the night for the presence of starch. The mutant had a higher starch content than the wild-type throughout the diurnal cycle. This accumulation was due to a reduction in starch breakdown, leading to an imbalance between the rates of synthesis and degradation. No reduction in the activity of endo-amylase (alpha-amylase), beta-amylase, starch phosphorylase, maltase, pullulanase or D-enzyme could be detected in crude extracts of leaves of the mutant. However, native PAGE in gels containing amylopectin revealed that a starch-hydrolysing activity, putatively identified as an endo-amylase and present in wild-type chloroplasts, was absent or appreciably reduced in the mutant. This is the first time that a specific enzyme required for starch degradation has been identified in leaves.

  19. Characterisation of corn starch-based films reinforced with taro starch nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Qiu, Chao; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2015-05-01

    Taro starch nanoparticles (TSNPs) obtained by hydrolysis with pullulanase and the recrystallisation of gelatinised starch were used as reinforcing agents in corn starch films. The influence of TSNPs contents (0.5-15%) on the physical, mechanical, thermal, and structural properties of starch films was investigated. An increase in the concentration of TSNPs led to a significant decrease in the water vapour permeability (WVP) of films. The addition of TSNPs increased the tensile strength (TS) of films from 1.11 MPa to 2.87 MPa. Compared with pure starch films, the surfaces of nanocomposite films became uneven. The onset temperature (To) and melting temperature (Tm) of films containing TSNPs were higher than those of pure starch films. The addition of TSNPs improved the thermal stability of starch films.

  20. Acetylation and characterization of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, L A; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Jìmenez-Aparicio, A; Paredes-López, O

    2000-01-01

    Banana native starch was acetylated and some of its functional properties were evaluated and compared to corn starch. In general, acetylated banana starch presented higher values in ash, protein and fat than corn acetylated starch. The modified starches had minor tendency to retrogradation assessed as % transmittance of starch pastes. At high temperature acetylated starches presented a water retention capacity similar to their native counterpart. The acetylation considerably increased the solubility of starches, and a similar behavior was found for swelling power. When freeze-thaw stability was studied, acetyl banana starch drained approximately 60% of water in the first and second cycles, but in the third and fourth cycles the percentage of separated water was low. However, acetyl corn starch showed lower freeze-thaw stability than the untreated sample. The modification increased the viscosity of banana starch pastes.

  1. Functional properties of yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus) starch.

    PubMed

    Mélo, E A; Stamford, T L M; Silva, M P C; Krieger, N; Stamford, N P

    2003-08-01

    The study was carried out in order to determine and establish the functional characters of starch extracted from yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus (L) Urban) compared with cassava starch. Yam bean is a tropical tuber legume easily grown and holds a great potential as a new source of starch. Yam bean starch shows functional properties which are peculiar to those of most starch root crops. Gelatinization temperature (53-63 degrees C) and the pasting temperature (64.5 degrees C) are less than those of cereal starch, however, the swelling power is high (54.4 g gel/g dried starch). Yam bean starch paste presents a high viscosity profile, high retrogradation tendency and low stability on cooking. The functional properties of yam bean starch, similar to those of cassava starch, allows yam bean to be used as a potential new source of starch.

  2. Sources and intake of resistant starch in the Chinese diet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyong; Liu, Ruiping; Qin, Chengyong; Meng, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yun; Xu, Guifa

    2010-01-01

    Resistant starch (RS) escapes digestion in the small intestine and may ferment in the large intestine. The purpose of this study was to determine the resistant starch content in typical starchy foods and to estimate the daily resistant starch intake and identify key sources of dietary resistant starch in the Chinese diets. The resistant starch contents of 121 foods were determined using a method that mimicked gastrointestinal conditions. Tubers and legumes had high resistant starch contents. Rough food processing retained large amounts of resistant starch. In general, the content of RS decreased when foods were cooked. Deep fried and roasted foods had higher levels of resistant starch than braised foods. The average resistant starch intake in the Chinese population was estimated to be 14.9 g per day based on a dietary survey. The main resistant starch sources in the Chinese diet were cereal and tuber products. Based on dietary habits, however, the resistant starch intake varies considerably among individuals.

  3. Responses of Landoltia punctata to cobalt and nickel: Removal, growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant system and starch metabolism.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Ding, Yanqiang; Xu, Yaliang; Li, Zhidan; Jin, Yanling; He, Kaize; Fang, Yang; Zhao, Hai

    2017-09-01

    Landoltia punctata has been considered as a potential bioenergy crop due to its high biomass and starch yields in different cultivations. Cobalt and nickel are known to induce starch accumulation in duckweed. We monitored the growth rate, net photosynthesis rate, total chlorophyll content, Rubisco activity, Co(2+) and Ni(2+) contents, activity of antioxidant enzymes, starch content and activity of related enzymes under various concentrations of cobalt and nickel. The results indicate that Co(2+) and Ni(2+) (≤0.5mgL(-1)) can facilitate growth in the beginning. Although the growth rate, net photosynthesis rate, chlorophyll content and Rubisco activity were significantly inhibited at higher concentrations (5mgL(-1)), the starch content increased sharply up to 53.3% dry weight (DW) in L. punctata. These results were attributed to the increase in adenosine diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and soluble starch synthase (SSS) activities and the decrease in α-amylase activity upon exposure to excess Co(2+) and Ni(2+). In addition, a substantial increase in the antioxidant enzyme activities and high flavonoid contents in L. punctata may have largely resulted in the metal tolerance. Furthermore, the high Co(2+) and Ni(2+) contents (2012.9±18.8 and 1997.7±29.2mgkg(-1) DW) in the tissue indicate that L. punctata is a hyperaccumulator. Thus, L. punctata can be considered as a potential candidate for the simultaneous bioremediation of Co(2+)- and Ni(2+)-polluted water and high-quality biomass production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mycocerosic acid synthase exemplifies the architecture of reducing polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Dominik A; Jakob, Roman P; Zähringer, Franziska; Maier, Timm

    2016-03-24

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are biosynthetic factories that produce natural products with important biological and pharmacological activities. Their exceptional product diversity is encoded in a modular architecture. Modular PKSs (modPKSs) catalyse reactions colinear to the order of modules in an assembly line, whereas iterative PKSs (iPKSs) use a single module iteratively as exemplified by fungal iPKSs (fiPKSs). However, in some cases non-colinear iterative action is also observed for modPKSs modules and is controlled by the assembly line environment. PKSs feature a structural and functional separation into a condensing and a modifying region as observed for fatty acid synthases. Despite the outstanding relevance of PKSs, the detailed organization of PKSs with complete fully reducing modifying regions remains elusive. Here we report a hybrid crystal structure of Mycobacterium smegmatis mycocerosic acid synthase based on structures of its condensing and modifying regions. Mycocerosic acid synthase is a fully reducing iPKS, closely related to modPKSs, and the prototype of mycobacterial mycocerosic acid synthase-like PKSs. It is involved in the biosynthesis of C20-C28 branched-chain fatty acids, which are important virulence factors of mycobacteria. Our structural data reveal a dimeric linker-based organization of the modifying region and visualize dynamics and conformational coupling in PKSs. On the basis of comparative small-angle X-ray scattering, the observed modifying region architecture may be common also in modPKSs. The linker-based organization provides a rationale for the characteristic variability of PKS modules as a main contributor to product diversity. The comprehensive architectural model enables functional dissection and re-engineering of PKSs.

  5. Antimicrobial nanostructured starch based films for packaging.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana S; Oliveira, M; de Sá, Arsénio; Rodrigues, Rui M; Cerqueira, Miguel A; Vicente, António A; Machado, A V

    2015-09-20

    Montmorillonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt C30B/starch nanocomposite (C30B/ST-NC), silver nanoparticles/starch nanocomposite (Ag-NPs/ST-NC) and both silver nanoparticles/C30B/starch nanocomposites (Ag-NPs/C30B/ST-NC) films were produced. The nanoclay (C30B) was dispersed in a starch solution using an ultrasonic probe. Different concentrations of Ag-NPs (0.3, 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0mM) were synthesized directly in starch and in clay/starch solutions via chemical reduction method. Dispersion of C30B silicate layers and Ag-NPs in ST films characterized by X-ray and scanning electron microscopy showed that the presence of Ag-NPs enhanced clay dispersion. Color and opacity measurements, barrier properties (water vapor and oxygen permeabilities), dynamic mechanical analysis and contact angle were evaluated and related with the incorporation of C30B and Ag-NPs. Films presented antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans without significant differences between Ag-NPs concentrations. The migration of components from the nanostructured starch films, assessed by food contact tests, was minor and under the legal limits. These results indicated that the starch films incorporated with C30B and Ag-NPs have potential to be used as packaging nanostructured material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Production of PLA-Starch Fibers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Composites of polylactic acid (PLA) with starch have been prepared previously in an effort to reduce cost as well as to modify other properties such as biodegradation rate. However, strength and elongation both decrease on addition of starch due to poor adhesion and stress concentration at the inte...

  7. Pasting characteristics of starch-lipid composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch-lipid composites (SLC) have been used as fat replacers and stabilizers in beef patties, dairy products, and baked goods. The SLC are produced by mixing aqueous starch slurry with a lipid source, and steam jet-cooking. The SLC may be dried using a drum drier and then milled in a Retch mill. ...

  8. Factors affecting the digestibility of raw and gelatinized potato starches.

    PubMed

    Noda, T; Takigawa, S; Matsuura-Endo, C; Suzuki, T; Hashimoto, N; Kottearachchi, N S; Yamauchi, H; Zaidul, I S M

    2008-09-15

    The enzymatic digestibilities of raw and gelatinized starches in various potato starches, as well as sweet potato, cassava, and yam starches, were estimated, along with other starch properties, such as the phosphorus content, median granule size, and rapid visco analyzer (RVA) pasting properties. Furthermore, correlation coefficients were calculated between the hydrolysis rates (HR) by amylase and other starch quality parameters. A larger granule size was closely associated with a lower HR in raw starch, while the HR in gelatinized starch did not correlate with the median granule size. An increase in phosphorus content resulted in a definitely lower HR in raw starch and tended to decrease the HR in gelatinized starch for the composite of potato and other starches. In contrast, no correlation coefficients of the phosphorus content with the HRs in raw and gelatinized starches were observed within potato starches. Starches with higher peak viscosity and breakdown showed a lower HR in raw starch, while few or no effects of these RVA parameters on the HR in gelatinized starch were observed for the composite of potato and other starches or among potato starches, respectively. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Starch nanoparticles formation via high power ultrasonication.

    PubMed

    Bel Haaj, Sihem; Magnin, Albert; Pétrier, Christian; Boufi, Sami

    2013-02-15

    Nano-sized starch particles (NSP) were prepared from starch granules using a purely physical method of high-intensity ultrasonication. Particle size distribution, Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and Wide-Angle X-ray Diffraction (WAXD) were used to characterize the morphology and crystal structure of the ensuing nanoparticles. The results revealed that ultrasound treatment of the starch suspension in water and at low temperature for 75 min results in the formation of starch nanoparticles between 30 and 100 nm in size. An attempt to explain the generation of starch nanoparticles was made on the basis of WAXD, Raman analysis and FE-SEM observation. Compared to acid hydrolysis, which is the most commonly adopted process, the present approach has the advantage of being quite rapid, presenting a higher yield and not requiring any chemical treatment.

  10. Preparation and characterization of octenylsuccinylated plantain starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, Maria C; San Martín-Gonzalez, María F; BeMiller, James N; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2014-09-01

    Plantain starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at two concentrations (3 and 15% w/w) of OSA. The morphology, granule size distribution, pasting, gelatinization, swelling, and solubility of granules and structural features of the starch polymers were evaluated. Granules of the OSA-modified starches increased in size during cooking more than did the granules of the native starch, and the effect was greater at the higher OSA concentration. Pasting viscosities also increased, but gelatinization and pasting temperatures and enthalpy of gelatinization decreased in the OSA-modified starches. It was concluded that insertion of OS groups effected disorder in the granular structure. Solubility, weight average molar mass, Mw¯, and z-average radius of gyration, RGz, of the amylopectin decreased as the OSA concentration increased, indicating a decrease in molecular size.

  11. Understanding starch gelatinization: The phase diagram approach.

    PubMed

    Carlstedt, Jonas; Wojtasz, Joanna; Fyhr, Peter; Kocherbitov, Vitaly

    2015-09-20

    By constructing a detailed phase diagram for the potato starch-water system based on data from optical microscopy, synchrotron X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry, we show that gelatinization can be interpreted in analogy with a eutectic transition. The phase rule explains why the temperature of the gelatinization transition (G) is independent on water content. Furthermore, the melting (M1) endotherm observed in DSC represents a liquidus line; the temperature for this event increases with increasing starch concentration. Both the lamellar spacing and the inter-helix distance were observed to decrease with increasing starch content for starch concentrations between approximately 65 wt% and 75 wt%, while the inter-helix distance continued decreasing upon further dehydration. Understanding starch gelatinization has been a longstanding challenge. The novel approach presented here shows interpretation of this phenomenon from a phase equilibria perspective.

  12. Sucrose Synthase: Expanding Protein Function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sucrose synthase (SUS: EC 2.4.1.13), a key enzyme in plant sucrose catabolism, is uniquely able to mobilize sucrose into multiple pathways involved in metabolic, structural, and storage functions. Our research indicates that the biological function of SUS may extend beyond its catalytic activity. Th...

  13. Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase/phosphatase regulates cell shape and plant architecture in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chary, S Narasimha; Hicks, Glenn R; Choi, Yoon Gi; Carter, David; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2008-01-01

    The vacuole occupies most of the volume of plant cells; thus, the tonoplast marker delta-tonoplast intrinsic protein-green fluorescent protein delineates cell shape, for example, in epidermis. This permits rapid identification of mutants. Using this strategy, we identified the cell shape phenotype-1 (csp-1) mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana. Beyond an absence of lobes in pavement cells, phenotypes included reduced trichome branching, altered leaf serration and stem branching, and increased stomatal density. This result from a point mutation in AtTPS6 encoding a conserved amino-terminal domain, thought to catalyze trehalose-6-phosphate synthesis and a carboxy-terminal phosphatase domain, is catalyzing a two-step conversion to trehalose. Expression of AtTPS6 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants tps1 (encoding a synthase domain) and tps2 (encoding synthase and phosphatase domains) indicates that AtTPS6 is an active trehalose synthase. AtTPS6 fully complemented defects in csp-1. Mutations in class I genes (AtTPS1-AtTPS4) indicate a role in regulating starch storage, resistance to drought, and inflorescence architecture. Class II genes (AtTPS5-AtTPS11) encode multifunctional enzymes having synthase and phosphatase activity. We show that class II AtTPS6 regulates plant architecture, shape of epidermal pavement cells, and branching of trichomes. Thus, beyond a role in development, we demonstrate that the class II gene AtTPS6 is important for controlling cellular morphogenesis.

  14. Molecular disassembly of rice and lotus starches during thermal processing and its effect on starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Sun, Yue; Wang, Jinrong; Wang, Shuo; Copeland, Les

    2016-02-01

    The molecular disassembly of starch during thermal processing is a major determinant for the susceptibility of starch to enzymatic digestion. In the present study, the effects of thermal processing on the disassembly of the granular structure and the in vitro enzymatic digestibility of rice and lotus starches were investigated. After heating at 50 °C, rice and lotus starches did not show significant changes in granular morphology, long-range crystallinity and short-range molecular order. As the temperature increased to 60 °C, rice starch underwent a partial gelatinization followed by an incomplete disruption of granular morphology, crystallites and molecular order. In contrast, lotus starch was almost completely gelatinized at 60 °C. At 70 °C or higher, both starches were fully gelatinized with complete disruption of the micro and macro structures. Our results show that gelatinization greatly increased the in vitro enzymatic digestibility of both starches, but that the degree of disassembly of the starch structure during thermal processing was not a major determinant of the digestibility of gelatinized starch.

  15. Screening of seeds prepared from retrograded potato starch to increase retrogradation rate of maize starch.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Liu, Lizeng; Guo, Junjie; Li, Lin; Wu, Changyan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, retrograded potato starches treated by oxalic, hydrochloric and citric acids and/with amylase respectively, as seed crystals, are added into maize starch paste to increase maize starch retrogradation rate. The results show that addition of seed accelerates maize starch retrogradation greatly. Seed prepared from retrograded potato starch treated by oxalic acid increases maize starch retrogradation rate most, from 1.5% to 49%. The results of IR spectra of retrograded maize starch derived from different seeds show that double helix, not hydrogen bond, probably forms at stage of seed growth during retrogradation. The results of IR spectra, X-ray and SEM indicate that treatment of retrograded potato starch with oxalic acid leads to formation of more hydrogen bonds and an increase of seed crystal planes, which markedly promotes the growth of the seed. Retrogradation of maize starch by seeding method surely includes a stage of crystal growth through double helix in a way different from normal maize starch retrogradation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Encapsulation altered starch digestion: toward developing starch-based delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2014-01-30

    Starch is an abundant biomaterial that forms a vital energy source for humans. Altering its digestion, e.g. increasing the proportions of slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS), would revolutionize starch utility in addressing a number of health issues related to glucose absorption, glycemic index and colon health. The research reported in this article is based on my hypothesis that water channels present in the B-type starch crystalline matrix, particularly in tuber starches, can embed guest molecules such as nutraceuticals, drugs, flavor compounds and vitamins leading to altered starch digestion. Toward this goal, potato starch has been chosen as the model tuber starch, and ibuprofen, benzocaine, sulfapyridine, curcumin, thymol and ascorbic acid as model guest molecules. X-ray powder diffraction and FT-IR analyses clearly suggest the incorporation of guest molecules in the water channels of potato starch. Furthermore, the in vitro digestion profiles of complexes are intriguing with major variations occurring after 60 min of starch digestion and finally at 120 min. These changes are concomitantly reflected in the SDS and RS amounts, with about 24% decrease in SDS for benzocaine complex and 6% increase in RS for ibuprofen complex, attesting the ability of guest molecule encapsulation in modulating the digestion properties of potato starch. Overall, this research provides an elegant opportunity for the design and development of novel starch-based stable carriers that not only bestow tailored glucose release rates but could also transport health promoting and disease preventing compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Paraformaldehyde-Resistant Starch-Fermenting Bacteria in “Starch-Base” Drilling Mud

    PubMed Central

    Myers, G. E.

    1962-01-01

    Starch-fermenting bacteria were found in each of 12 samples of nonfermenting starch-base drilling mud examined. Of the 12 samples, 3 contained very active starch-fermenting gram-positive spore-bearing bacilli closely resembling Bacillus subtilis. Similar active starch-fermenting bacteria were found in fermenting starch-base drilling mud and in corn starch and slough water used to prepare such mud. The active starch-fermenting microorganisms completely hydrolyzed 1% (w/v) corn starch within 24 hr at 37.5 C. The active starch-fermenting bacteria isolated from fermenting drilling mud were capable of surviving 12 hr of continuous exposure to 0.1% (w/w) paraformaldehyde or 1 hr of continuous exposure to 0.5% (w/w) paraformaldehyde, with no diminution in starch-fermenting ability. The same organisms fermented starch after 3 hr of continuous exposure to 0.5% (w/w) paraformaldehyde, but not after 4 hr of exposure. The phenomenon of rapid disappearance of paraformaldehyde from fermenting drilling mud was observed in the laboratory using a modified sodium sulfite test. Paraformaldehyde, initially present in a concentration of 0.192 lb per barrel of mud, completely disappeared in 9 hr at 22 to 23 C. A significant decrease in paraformaldehyde concentration was detected 0.5 hr after preparation of the mud. It is suggested that the presence of relatively high concentrations of ammonia and chloride in the mud may facilitate the disappearance of paraformaldehyde. The failure of 0.1% (w/w) paraformaldehyde to inhibit the strong starch-fermenting microorganisms isolated from fermenting drilling mud, and the rapid disappearance of paraformaldehyde from the mud, explains the fermentation of starch which occurred in this mud, despite the addition of paraformaldehyde. PMID:13936949

  18. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site.

  19. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous catheter - home; Port - home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... is given quickly, all at once. A slow infusion, which means the medicine is given slowly over ...

  20. 21 CFR 178.3520 - Industrial starch-modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Industrial starch-modified. 178.3520 Section 178... § 178.3520 Industrial starch-modified. Industrial starch-modified may be safely used as a component of..., transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Industrial starch-modified is...

  1. Formation of Elongated Starch Granules in High-amylose Maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    GEMS-0067 maize starch contains up to 32% elongated starch granules much higher than amylose-extender (ae) single-mutant maize starch (~7%) and normal (non-mutant) maize starch (0%). These elongated granules are highly resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis at 95-100 C, which function as resistant starc...

  2. Sphingomyelin synthase SMS2 displays dual activity as ceramide phosphoethanolamine synthase[S

    PubMed Central

    Ternes, Philipp; Brouwers, Jos F. H. M.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; Holthuis, Joost C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids are vital components of eukaryotic membranes involved in the regulation of cell growth, death, intracellular trafficking, and the barrier function of the plasma membrane (PM). While sphingomyelin (SM) is the major sphingolipid in mammals, previous studies indicate that mammalian cells also produce the SM analog ceramide phosphoethanolamine (CPE). Little is known about the biological role of CPE or the enzyme(s) responsible for CPE biosynthesis. SM production is mediated by the SM synthases SMS1 in the Golgi and SMS2 at the PM, while a closely related enzyme, SMSr, has an unknown biochemical function. We now demonstrate that SMS family members display striking differences in substrate specificity, with SMS1 and SMSr being monofunctional enzymes with SM and CPE synthase activity, respectively, and SMS2 acting as a bifunctional enzyme with both SM and CPE synthase activity. In agreement with the PM residency of SMS2, we show that both SM and CPE synthase activities are enhanced at the surface of SMS2-overexpressing HeLa cells. Our findings reveal an unexpected diversity in substrate specificity among SMS family members that should enable the design of specific inhibitors to target the biological role of each enzyme individually. PMID:19454763

  3. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  4. Native starch in tablet formulations: properties on compaction.

    PubMed

    Bos, C E; Bolhuis, G K; Van Doorne, H; Lerk, C F

    1987-10-16

    Maize, potato, rice and tapioca (cassava) starch were evaluated with respect to their properties on direct compression. Rice starch showed much better compactibility as compared to maize, potato and tapioca starch. Moreover, its binding capacity proved to be almost insensitive to mixing with magnesium stearate. This in contrast to the dramatic decrease in crushing strength of potato starch tablets containing the lubricant. The compactibility of the starches was found to be strongly affected by the equilibrium moisture content of the starches, which is dependent on the relative humidity of the atmosphere under which the powders were stored. All starches showed adequate capacity for water uptake to act as a disintegrant. Rice starch exhibited worst flowability, caused by its fine particle size as compared to the other starches. Granulation of rice starch changed it into a potential filler-binder in tablets prepared by direct compression.

  5. Model approach to starch functionality in bread making.

    PubMed

    Goesaert, Hans; Leman, Pedro; Delcour, Jan A

    2008-08-13

    We used modified wheat starches in gluten-starch flour models to study the role of starch in bread making. Incorporation of hydroxypropylated starch in the recipe reduced loaf volume and initial crumb firmness and increased crumb gas cell size. Firming rate and firmness after storage increased for loaves containing the least hydroxypropylated starch. Inclusion of cross-linked starch had little effect on loaf volume or crumb structure but increased crumb firmness. The firming rate was mostly similar to that of control samples. Presumably, the moment and extent of starch gelatinization and the concomitant water migration influence the structure formation during baking. Initial bread firmness seems determined by the rigidity of the gelatinized granules and leached amylose. Amylopectin retrogradation and strengthening of a long-range network by intensifying the inter- and intramolecular starch-starch and possibly also starch-gluten interactions (presumably because of water incorporation in retrograded amylopectin crystallites) play an important role in firming.

  6. Plant-crafted starches for bioplastics production.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Domenico; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Leroy, Eric; Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Guilois, Sophie; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Mortensen, Kell; Lourdin, Denis; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-11-05

    Transgenically-produced amylose-only (AO) starch was used to manufacture bioplastic prototypes. Extruded starch samples were tested for crystal residues, elasticity, glass transition temperature, mechanical properties, molecular mass and microstructure. The AO starch granule crystallinity was both of the B- and Vh-type, while the isogenic control starch was mainly A-type. The first of three endothermic transitions was attributed to gelatinization at about 60°C. The second and third peaks were identified as melting of the starch and amylose-lipid complexes, respectively. After extrusion, the AO samples displayed Vh- and B-type crystalline structures, the B-type polymorph being the dominant one. The AO prototypes demonstrated a 6-fold higher mechanical stress at break and 2.5-fold higher strain at break compared to control starch. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed a significant increase in the storage modulus (E') for AO samples compared to the control. The data support the use of pure starch-based bioplastics devoid of non-polysaccharide fillers.

  7. Permeation of volatile compounds through starch films.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Gülden; Jongboom, Remy O J; Feil, Herman; van Dijk, Cees; Hennink, Wim E

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the factors that affect the permeation of volatiles through starch films. These films were obtained by casting gelatinized starch/water/glycerol mixtures. The films were dried and conditioned under different conditions (temperature and relative humidity) resulting in films that vary in the degree of starch crystallinity and glycerol and water content. The permeation of two model volatiles (carvone and diacetyl) at 20 degrees C and at 30, 60, or 90% relative humidity (RH) was analyzed gravimetrically. Further, the solubility of the two model compounds (under conditions where the permeation experiments were carried out) was determined. From the obtained permeation and solubility data, the diffusion coefficients of these compounds in the different starch films were calculated. The crystallinity in the starch films increased with increasing water content of the films during preparation. The water content of the resulting films in turn increased with increasing glycerol and when the films were exposed to a higher RH during drying or conditioning. For films with the same composition, the flux for diacetyl was greater than for carvone. The solubilities of diacetyl and carvone were slightly dependent on the properties of the films. It was found that with increasing starch crystallinity the diffusion coefficient for both compounds decreases, which is probably due to the impermeability of starch crystallites. Interestingly, in films with about the same extent of crystallinity, the diffusion can be described with the free volume model, with water and glycerol determining the amount of free volume.

  8. Adhesion of Vibrio cholerae to granular starches.

    PubMed

    Gancz, Hanan; Niderman-Meyer, Orly; Broza, Meir; Kashi, Yechezkel; Shimoni, Eyal

    2005-08-01

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by specific serogroups of Vibrio cholerae that are pathogenic to humans. Cholera can become epidemic and deadly without adequate medical care. Appropriate rehydration therapy can reduce the mortality rate from as much as 50% of the affected individuals to <1%. Thus, oral rehydration therapy (ORT) is an important measure in the treatment of this disease. To further reduce the symptoms associated with cholera, improvements in oral rehydration solution (ORS) by starch incorporation were suggested. Here, we report that V. cholerae adheres to starch granules incorporated in ORS. Adhesion of 98% of the cells was observed within 2 min when cornstarch granules were used. Other starches showed varied adhesion rates, indicating that starch source and composition play an important role in the interaction of V. cholerae and starch granules. Sugars metabolized by V. cholerae showed a repressive effect on the adhesion process. The possible mechanisms involved are discussed. Comparing V. cholerae adhesion with the adhesion of other pathogens suggests the involvement of starch degradation capabilities. This adhesion to granular starch can be used to improve ORT.

  9. The sucrose analog palatinose leads to a stimulation of sucrose degradation and starch synthesis when supplied to discs of growing potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Fernie, A R; Roessner, U; Geigenberger, P

    2001-04-01

    In the present paper we investigated the effect of the sucrose (Suc) analog palatinose on potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber metabolism. In freshly cut discs of growing potato tubers, addition of 5 mM palatinose altered the metabolism of exogenously supplied [U-14C]Suc. There was slight inhibition of the rate of 14C-Suc uptake, a 1.5-fold increase in the rate at which 14C-Suc was subsequently metabolized, and a shift in the allocation of the metabolized label in favor of starch synthesis. The sum result of these changes was a 2-fold increase in the absolute rate of starch synthesis. The increased rate of starch synthesis was accompanied by a 3-fold increase in inorganic pyrophosphate, a 2-fold increase in UDP, decreased UTP/UDP, ATP/ADP, and ATP/AMP ratios, and decreased adenylate energy charge, whereas glycolytic and Krebs cycle intermediates were unchanged. In addition, feeding palatinose to potato discs also stimulated the metabolism of exogenous 14C-glucose in favor of starch synthesis. In vitro studies revealed that palatinose is not metabolized by Suc synthases or invertases within potato tuber extracts. Enzyme kinetics revealed different effects of palatinose on Suc synthase and invertase activities, implicating palatinose as an allosteric effector leading to an inhibition of Suc synthase and (surprisingly) to an activation of invertase in vitro. However, measurement of tissue palatinose levels revealed that these were too low to have significant effects on Suc degrading activities in vivo. These results suggest that supplying palatinose to potato tubers represents a novel way to increase starch synthesis.

  10. The Sucrose Analog Palatinose Leads to a Stimulation of Sucrose Degradation and Starch Synthesis When Supplied to Discs of Growing Potato Tubers1

    PubMed Central

    Fernie, Alisdair R.; Roessner, Ute; Geigenberger, Peter

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper we investigated the effect of the sucrose (Suc) analog palatinose on potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber metabolism. In freshly cut discs of growing potato tubers, addition of 5 mm palatinose altered the metabolism of exogenously supplied [U-14C]Suc. There was slight inhibition of the rate of 14C-Suc uptake, a 1.5-fold increase in the rate at which 14C-Suc was subsequently metabolized, and a shift in the allocation of the metabolized label in favor of starch synthesis. The sum result of these changes was a 2-fold increase in the absolute rate of starch synthesis. The increased rate of starch synthesis was accompanied by a 3-fold increase in inorganic pyrophosphate, a 2-fold increase in UDP, decreased UTP/UDP, ATP/ADP, and ATP/AMP ratios, and decreased adenylate energy charge, whereas glycolytic and Krebs cycle intermediates were unchanged. In addition, feeding palatinose to potato discs also stimulated the metabolism of exogenous 14C-glucose in favor of starch synthesis. In vitro studies revealed that palatinose is not metabolized by Suc synthases or invertases within potato tuber extracts. Enzyme kinetics revealed different effects of palatinose on Suc synthase and invertase activities, implicating palatinose as an allosteric effector leading to an inhibition of Suc synthase and (surprisingly) to an activation of invertase in vitro. However, measurement of tissue palatinose levels revealed that these were too low to have significant effects on Suc degrading activities in vivo. These results suggest that supplying palatinose to potato tubers represents a novel way to increase starch synthesis. PMID:11299376

  11. Effects of salts on the gelatinization and retrogradation properties of maize starch and waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hongxian; Yang, Hong; Zhao, Siming; Liu, Youming; Liu, Ru

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of salts on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and waxy maize starch. Experimental results showed that the salting-out or structure-making ions, such as F(-) and SO4(2-), decreased the swelling power, solubility and transparency of both starches, but increased the gelatinization temperature, enthalpy, and syneresis, due to the tendency of these ions to protect the hydrogen bond links among starch molecules. On the other hand, the salting-in or structure-breaking ions, such as I(-) and SCN(-), exhibited the opposite effects. Microscopic observations confirmed such effects of salts on both starches. Furthermore, the effects of salts were more significant on waxy maize and on normal maize starch. Generally, salts could significantly influence on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and waxy maize starch, following the order of the Hofmeister series. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of pressure and temperature on the gelatinization of starch at various starch concentrations.

    PubMed

    Baks, Tim; Bruins, Marieke E; Janssen, Anja E M; Boom, Remko M

    2008-01-01

    The effects of pressure, temperature, and treatment time on the degree of gelatinization were determined with differential scanning calorimetry measurements for wheat starch-water mixtures with starch concentrations varying between 5 and 80 w/w %. Although simple models could be used to describe the degree of starch gelatinization as a function of pressure or temperature, a more complex model based on the Gibbs energy difference had to be used to describe the degree of gelatinization as a function of both pressure and temperature. The experimental and model data were used to construct a phase diagram for 5, 30, and 60 w/w % wheat starch-water mixtures. Data obtained from literature were in accordance with our phase diagrams. These phase diagrams can be used to estimate the degree of gelatinisation after applying a certain pressure and temperature on a starch-water mixture with starch concentrations in the range of 5 and 60 w/w %.

  13. Applicability, Commercial Utility and Recent Patents on Starch and Starch Derivative as Pharmaceutical Drug Delivery Carrier.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shreya; Malviya, Rishabha; Sharma, Pramod K

    2015-01-01

    Natural polymers are widely utilized in pharmaceutical and food industries. Starch, a major carbohydrate is a staple food in human and animal diets which is simply extractable from various sources, like potato, maize, corn, wheat, etc. It is widely used as a raw material in various food and non food industries as well as in paper, textile and other industries. This article summarizes the starch and modification of starch and to produce a novel molecule with various applications in industries including number of advances in pharmaceutical industry. The unique characteristics of starch and their modified form can be successfully used as drug delivery carriers in various pharmaceutical preparations. It is widely used as controlled and sustained release polymer, tablet disintegrant, drug delivery carrier, plasma volume expander and also finds its applicability in bone tissue engineering and in artificial red cells. It also includes the patents related to starch and modified starch based products and their commercial utility.

  14. Scanning probe acoustic microscopy of extruded starch materials: direct visual evidence of starch crystal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongdong; Liu, Boxiang; Li, Mengxing; Wei, Min; Li, Hua; Liu, Peng; Wan, Tuo

    2013-10-15

    Scanning probe acoustic microscopy (SPAM) has been successfully used to study inorganic and keratin biomaterials. However, few studies have attempted to apply SPAM to structural study of non-keratin organic materials such as starch based materials. This study investigated hardness and surface finish to establish sample preparation method suitable for SPAM imaging and acquired clear acoustic images of extruded starch materials. Acquired acoustic images directly exhibited certain structure of starch materials and provided visual evidence of starch material components and aggregates. In addition, through correlating acoustic images with X-ray diffraction data, crystal-structural information in nano-scale was obtained and acoustic image contrast showed a linear relationship with starch amylose content in extruded starch materials.

  15. Resistant starch alters colonic contractility and expression of related genes in rats fed a Western diet.

    PubMed

    Patten, Glen S; Kerr, Caroline A; Dunne, Robert A; Shaw, Janet M; Bird, Anthony R; Regina, Ahmed; Morell, Matthew K; Lockett, Trevor J; Molloy, Peter L; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Topping, David L; Conlon, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Dietary fiber shortens gut transit time, but data on the effects of fiber components (including resistant starch, RS) on intestinal contractility are limited. We have examined RS effects in male Sprague-Dawley rats fed either a high-amylose maize starch (HAMS) or a wholemeal made from high-amylose wheat (HAW) on ileal and colonic contractility ex vivo and expression of genes associated with smooth muscle contractility. Rats were fed diets containing 19 % fat, 20 % protein, and either low-amylose maize starch (LAMS), HAMS, wholemeal low-amylose wheat (LAW) or HAW for 11 week. Isolated ileal and proximal colonic sections were induced to contract electrically, or by receptor-independent (KCl) or receptor-dependent agents. Colonic gene expression was assessed using an Affymetrix microarray. Ileal contractility was unaffected by treatment. Maximal proximal colonic contractility induced electrically or by angiotensin II or carbachol was lower for rats fed HAMS and LAW relative to those fed LAMS (P < 0.05). The colonic expression of genes, including cholinergic receptors (Chrm2, Chrm3), serotonin receptors (Htr5a, Htr7), a protease-activated receptor (F2r), a prokineticin receptor (Prokr1), prokineticin (Prok1), and nitric oxide synthase 2 (Nos2), was altered by dietary HAMS relative to LAMS (P < 0.05). HAW did not significantly affect these genes or colonic contractility relative to effects of LAMS. RS and other fiber components could influence colorectal health through modulation of stool transit time via effects on muscular contractility.

  16. Starch Degradation Metabolism towards Sucrose Synthesis in Germinating Araucaria araucana Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Cardemil, Liliana; Varner, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    As starch is the main seed reserve material in both species of Araucaria of South America, A. araucana and A. angustifolia, it is important to understand starch breakdown in both embryo and megagametophyte tissues of Araucaria seeds. Sugar analysis by thin layer chromatography indicates that sucrose is the main sugar produced in both tissues. Enzyme reactions coupled to benzidine oxidation indicate that sucrose is the main sugar moved from the megagametophyte to the growing regions of the embryo via the cotyledons. Phosphorylase was detected in both embryo and megagametophyte tissues by the formation of [32P]glucose-1-P and by formation of [14C] amylopectin from [14C]glucose-1-P. The enzyme activity increases 5-fold in both embryo and gametophyte to a peak 18 hours after the start of imbibition. Debranching enzyme, α-glucosidase, and hexokinase are also present in both embryonic and megagametophytic tissues. Branched glucan oligosaccharides accumulate during this time, reaching a maximum 40 hours after imbibition starts, and decline after germination occurs. The pattern of activity of the enzymes studied in this work suggests that starch degradation is initiated by α-amylase and phosphorylase in the embryo and by phosphorylase mainly in the megagametophyte. Sucrose-P synthase seems to be the enzyme responsible for sucrose synthesis in both tissues. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 9 PMID:16663947

  17. Microwave-accelerated methylation of starch.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vandana; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2008-01-14

    A novel microwave-accelerated method for methylating soluble starch is described. Soluble starch could be fully methylated in 72% yield within 4.66 min using iodomethane and 30% potassium hydroxide under microwave irradiation. The completely methylated starch thus obtained was hydrolyzed with 60% HCO(2)H for 1.5 min under 80% MW power, followed by 0.05 M H(2)SO(4) for 2.0 min under 100% MW power. The partially methylated monosaccharides were separated by preparative paper chromatography and identified by their melting points and optical rotations.

  18. Two carbon fluxes to reserve starch in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber cells are closely interconnected but differently modulated by temperature

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Joerg; Leifels, Lydia; Brust, Henrike; Herbst, Karoline; Steup, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Parenchyma cells from tubers of Solanum tuberosum L. convert several externally supplied sugars to starch but the rates vary largely. Conversion of glucose 1-phosphate to starch is exceptionally efficient. In this communication, tuber slices were incubated with either of four solutions containing equimolar [U-14C]glucose 1-phosphate, [U-14C]sucrose, [U-14C]glucose 1-phosphate plus unlabelled equimolar sucrose or [U-14C]sucrose plus unlabelled equimolar glucose 1-phosphate. 14C-incorporation into starch was monitored. In slices from freshly harvested tubers each unlabelled compound strongly enhanced 14C incorporation into starch indicating closely interacting paths of starch biosynthesis. However, enhancement disappeared when the tubers were stored. The two paths (and, consequently, the mutual enhancement effect) differ in temperature dependence. At lower temperatures, the glucose 1-phosphate-dependent path is functional, reaching maximal activity at approximately 20 °C but the flux of the sucrose-dependent route strongly increases above 20 °C. Results are confirmed by in vitro experiments using [U-14C]glucose 1-phosphate or adenosine-[U-14C]glucose and by quantitative zymograms of starch synthase or phosphorylase activity. In mutants almost completely lacking the plastidial phosphorylase isozyme(s), the glucose 1-phosphate-dependent path is largely impeded. Irrespective of the size of the granules, glucose 1-phosphate-dependent incorporation per granule surface area is essentially equal. Furthermore, within the granules no preference of distinct glucosyl acceptor sites was detectable. Thus, the path is integrated into the entire granule biosynthesis. In vitro 14C-incorporation into starch granules mediated by the recombinant plastidial phosphorylase isozyme clearly differed from the in situ results. Taken together, the data clearly demonstrate that two closely but flexibly interacting general paths of starch biosynthesis are functional in potato tuber cells. PMID

  19. Identification and reproducibility of diagnostic DNA markers for tuber starch and yield optimization in a novel association mapping population of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Schönhals, E M; Ortega, F; Barandalla, L; Aragones, A; Ruiz de Galarreta, J I; Liao, J-C; Sanetomo, R; Walkemeier, B; Tacke, E; Ritter, E; Gebhardt, C

    2016-04-01

    SNPs in candidate genes Pain - 1, InvCD141 (invertases), SSIV (starch synthase), StCDF1 (transcription factor), LapN (leucine aminopeptidase), and cytoplasm type are associated with potato tuber yield, starch content and/or starch yield. Tuber yield (TY), starch content (TSC), and starch yield (TSY) are complex characters of high importance for the potato crop in general and for industrial starch production in particular. DNA markers associated with superior alleles of genes that control the natural variation of TY, TSC, and TSY could increase precision and speed of breeding new cultivars optimized for potato starch production. Diagnostic DNA markers are identified by association mapping in populations of tetraploid potato varieties and advanced breeding clones. A novel association mapping population of 282 genotypes including varieties, breeding clones and Andean landraces was assembled and field evaluated in Northern Spain for TY, TSC, TSY, tuber number (TN) and tuber weight (TW). The landraces had lower mean values of TY, TW, TN, and TSY. The population was genotyped for 183 microsatellite alleles, 221 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in fourteen candidate genes and eight known diagnostic markers for TSC and TSY. Association test statistics including kinship and population structure reproduced five known marker-trait associations of candidate genes and discovered new ones, particularly for tuber yield and starch yield. The inclusion of landraces increased the number of detected marker-trait associations. Integration of the present association mapping results with previous QTL linkage mapping studies for TY, TSC, TSY, TW, TN, and tuberization revealed some hot spots of QTL for these traits in the potato genome. The genomic positions of markers linked or associated with QTL for complex tuber traits suggest high multiplicity and genome wide distribution of the underlying genes.

  20. Two carbon fluxes to reserve starch in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber cells are closely interconnected but differently modulated by temperature.

    PubMed

    Fettke, Joerg; Leifels, Lydia; Brust, Henrike; Herbst, Karoline; Steup, Martin

    2012-05-01

    Parenchyma cells from tubers of Solanum tuberosum L. convert several externally supplied sugars to starch but the rates vary largely. Conversion of glucose 1-phosphate to starch is exceptionally efficient. In this communication, tuber slices were incubated with either of four solutions containing equimolar [U-¹⁴C]glucose 1-phosphate, [U-¹⁴C]sucrose, [U-¹⁴C]glucose 1-phosphate plus unlabelled equimolar sucrose or [U-¹⁴C]sucrose plus unlabelled equimolar glucose 1-phosphate. C¹⁴-incorporation into starch was monitored. In slices from freshly harvested tubers each unlabelled compound strongly enhanced ¹⁴C incorporation into starch indicating closely interacting paths of starch biosynthesis. However, enhancement disappeared when the tubers were stored. The two paths (and, consequently, the mutual enhancement effect) differ in temperature dependence. At lower temperatures, the glucose 1-phosphate-dependent path is functional, reaching maximal activity at approximately 20 °C but the flux of the sucrose-dependent route strongly increases above 20 °C. Results are confirmed by in vitro experiments using [U-¹⁴C]glucose 1-phosphate or adenosine-[U-¹⁴C]glucose and by quantitative zymograms of starch synthase or phosphorylase activity. In mutants almost completely lacking the plastidial phosphorylase isozyme(s), the glucose 1-phosphate-dependent path is largely impeded. Irrespective of the size of the granules, glucose 1-phosphate-dependent incorporation per granule surface area is essentially equal. Furthermore, within the granules no preference of distinct glucosyl acceptor sites was detectable. Thus, the path is integrated into the entire granule biosynthesis. In vitro C¹⁴C-incorporation into starch granules mediated by the recombinant plastidial phosphorylase isozyme clearly differed from the in situ results. Taken together, the data clearly demonstrate that two closely but flexibly interacting general paths of starch biosynthesis are functional

  1. SIRT3 Deacetylates Ceramide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Novgorodov, Sergei A.; Riley, Christopher L.; Keffler, Jarryd A.; Yu, Jin; Kindy, Mark S.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Lombard, David B.; Gudz, Tatyana I.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports the role of mitochondrial ceramide accumulation as a cause of mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after stroke. Herein, we report that SIRT3 regulates mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis via deacetylation of ceramide synthase (CerS) 1, 2, and 6. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that CerS1, CerS2, and CerS6, but not CerS4, are associated with SIRT3 in cerebral mitochondria. Furthermore, CerS1, -2, and -6 are hyperacetylated in the mitochondria of SIRT3-null mice, and SIRT3 directly deacetylates the ceramide synthases in a NAD+-dependent manner that increases enzyme activity. Investigation of the SIRT3 role in mitochondrial response to brain ischemia/reperfusion (IR) showed that SIRT3-mediated deacetylation of ceramide synthases increased enzyme activity and ceramide accumulation after IR. Functional studies demonstrated that absence of SIRT3 rescued the IR-induced blockade of the electron transport chain at the level of complex III, attenuated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, and decreased reactive oxygen species generation and protein carbonyls in mitochondria. Importantly, Sirt3 gene ablation reduced the brain injury after IR. These data support the hypothesis that IR triggers SIRT3-dependent deacetylation of ceramide synthases and the elevation of ceramide, which could inhibit complex III, leading to increased reactive oxygen species generation and brain injury. The results of these studies highlight a novel mechanism of SIRT3 involvement in modulating mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis and suggest an important role of SIRT3 in mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after experimental stroke. PMID:26620563

  2. Dilute solution properties of canary seed (Phalaris canariensis) starch in comparison to wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Irani, Mahdi; Razavi, Seyed M A; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Hucl, Pierre; Patterson, Carol Ann

    2016-06-01

    Dilute solution properties of an unknown starch are important to understand its performance and applications in food and non-food industries. In this paper, rheological and molecular properties (intrinsic viscosity, molecular weight, shape factor, voluminosity, conformation and coil overlap parameters) of the starches from two hairless canary seed varieties (CO5041 & CDC Maria) developed for food use were evaluated in the dilute regime (Starch dispersions in DMSO (0.5g/dl)) and compared with wheat starch (WS). The results showed that Higiro model is the best among five applied models for intrinsic viscosity determination of canary seed starch (CSS) and WS on the basis of coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE). WS sample showed higher intrinsic viscosity value (1.670dl/g) in comparison to CSS samples (1.325-1.397dl/g). Berry number and the slope of master curve demonstrated that CSS and WS samples were in dilute domain without entanglement occurrence. The shape factor suggested spherical and ellipsoidal structure for CO5041 starch and ellipsoidal for CDC Maria starch and WS. The molecular weight, coil radius and coil volume of CSSs were smaller than WS. The behavior and molecular characterization of canary seed starch showed its unique properties compared with wheat starch.

  3. Electron microscopy and composition of raw acorn starch in relation to in vivo starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Cappai, Maria Grazia; Alesso, Giuseppe Andrea; Nieddu, Giuseppa; Sanna, Marina; Pinna, Walter

    2013-06-01

    The structure and composition of starch play an important role as co-factors affecting raw starch digestibility: such features were investigated in raw acorn starch from the most diffused oak trees in the Mediterranean basin. A total of 620 whole ripe acorns from Holm (Quercus ilex L., n = 198), Downy (Quercus pubescens Willd., n = 207) and Cork (Quercus suber L., n = 215) oaks sampled on the Sardinia Isle (40° 56' 0'' N; 9° 4' 0'' E; 545 m above the mean sea level) in the same geographical area, were analyzed for their chemical composition. The starch contents ranged between 51.2% and 53.5% of dry matter. The starch granules displayed a spheroid/ovoid and cylindrical shape; on scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analyses, a bimodal distribution of starch granule size was observed both for Holm and Cork oak acorns, whereas the starch granules of Downy oak acorns showed diameters between 10.2 and 13.8 μm. The specific amylose to amylopectin ratio of acorn starch was 25.8%, 19.5% and 34.0% in the Holm, Downy and Cork oaks, respectively. The (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signal analysis displayed a pivotal spectrum for the identification of the amylose peaks in raw acorn starch, as a basis for the amylose to amylopectin ratio determination.

  4. In vitro analyses of resistant starch in retrograded waxy and normal corn starches.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jong-Yea; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2013-04-01

    Gelatinized waxy and normal corn starches (40% starch) were subjected to temperature cycling between 4 and 30°C (1 day at each temperature) or isothermal storage (4°C) to induce retrogradation. The in vitro analysis methods that are currently used for the measurement of resistant starch (RS), i.e. Englyst, AACC 32-40 and Goni methods, were compared with homogenized retrograded starch gels and freeze-dried powders of the gels. RS contents obtained by the three analysis methods were in the following order: Goni>Englyst>AACC. Although different RS values were obtained among the analysis methods, similar trends in regards to the starch type and storage conditions could be observed. Little or no RS was found in freeze-dried powders of the retrograded starch gels and storage conditions had no effect, indicating that the physical state for RS analysis is important. More RS was found in normal corn starch gels than in waxy corn starch gels under identical storage conditions and in the gels stored under temperature cycling than those under isothermal storage (4°C), indicating that the presence of amylose inhibits starch digestion and the level of crystalline structure of re-crystallized amylopectin also affects the RS formation during retrogradation.

  5. Resistant starch improvement of rice starches under a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatments.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pham Van; Vien, Ngo Lam; Lan Phi, Nguyen Thi

    2016-01-15

    The effects of a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatment on formation of resistant starch (RS) and characteristics of high-amylose, normal and waxy rice starches were investigated in this study. The degrees of polymerization of the rice starches treated with citric acid, lactic acid or acetic acid were significantly reduced as compared to the native starches. The RS contents of acid and heat-moisture treated rice starches were in a range of 30.1-39.0%, significantly higher than those of native rice starches (6.3-10.2%) and those of heat-moisture treated rice starches (18.5-23.9%). The acid and heat-moisture treatments reduced swelling power and viscosity, but increased solubility of the starches, while the crystalline structure did not change. Among the organic acids used, citric acid had the most impact on starch characteristics and RS formation, followed by lactic acid and acetic acid. The results are useful in production of RS for functional food application.

  6. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  7. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production by a novel bacterium Massilia sp. UMI-21 isolated from seaweed, and molecular cloning of its polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Han, Xuerong; Satoh, Yasuharu; Kuriki, Yumi; Seino, Teruyuki; Fujita, Shinji; Suda, Takanori; Kobayashi, Takanori; Tajima, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    We successfully isolated one microorganism (UMI-21) from Ulva, a green algae that contains starch. The strain UMI-21 can produce polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) from starch, maltotriose, or maltose as a sole carbon source. Taxonomic studies and 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that strain UMI-21 was phylogenetically related to species of the genus Massilia. The PHA content under the cultivation condition using a 10-L jar fermentor was 45.5% (w/w). This value was higher than that obtained after cultivation in a flask, suggesting the possibility of large-scale PHA production by UMI-21 from starch. A major issue for the industrial production of microbial PHAs is the very high production cost. Starch is a relatively inexpensive substrate that is also found in abundant seaweeds such as Ulva. Therefore, the strain isolated in this study may be very useful for producing PHA from seaweeds containing polysaccharides such as starch. In addition, a 3.7-kbp DNA fragment containing the whole PHA synthase gene (phaC) was obtained from the strain UMI-21. The results of open reading frame (ORF) analysis suggested that the DNA fragment contained two ORFs, which were composed of 1740 (phaC) and 564 bp (phaR). The deduced amino acid sequence of PhaC from strain UMI-21 shared high similarity with PhaC from Ralstonia eutropha, which is a representative PHA-producing bacterium with a class I PHA synthase. This is the first report for the cloning of the PHA synthase gene from Massilia species.

  8. Cooking behavior and starch digestibility of NUTRIOSE® (resistant starch) enriched noodles from sweet potato flour and starch.

    PubMed

    Menon, Renjusha; Padmaja, G; Sajeev, M S

    2015-09-01

    The effect of a resistant starch source, NUTRIOSE® FB06 at 10%, 15% and 20% in sweet potato flour (SPF) and 5% and 10% in sweet potato starch (SPS) in reducing the starch digestibility and glycaemic index of noodles was investigated. While NUTRIOSE (10%) significantly reduced the cooking loss in SPF noodles, this was enhanced in SPS noodles and guar gum (GG) supplementation reduced CL of both noodles. In vitro starch digestibility (IVSD) was significantly reduced in test noodles compared to 73.6g glucose/100g starch in control SPF and 65.9 g in SPS noodles. Resistant starch (RS) was 54.96% for NUTRIOSE (15%)+GG (1%) fortified SPF noodles and 53.3% for NUTRIOSE (5%)+GG (0.5%) fortified SPS noodles, as against 33.8% and 40.68%, respectively in SPF and SPS controls. Lowest glycaemic index (54.58) and the highest sensory scores (4.23) were obtained for noodles with 15% NUTRIOSE+1% GG.

  9. Physicochemical and binder properties of starch obtained from Cyperus esculentus.

    PubMed

    Manek, Rahul V; Builders, Philip F; Kolling, William M; Emeje, Martins; Kunle, Olobayo O

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate starch from the tubers of Cyperus esculentus L. and evaluate its physicochemical and binder properties. Extraction of starch using sodium metabisulfite yielded 37 g of starch per 100 g of the tubers. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that Cyperus starch consists of oval to elliptical particles with a smooth surface. Cyperus starch demonstrates a narrow particle size distribution with a mean of 8.25 μm. Cyperus starch conforms well to United States Pharmacopeia standards established for widely used starches like maize and potato. The X-ray powder diffraction pattern and moisture sorption profile of Cyperus starch were comparable to that of maize starch. Cyperus starch had lower swelling power than maize and potato starch, indicative of stronger associative forces within the granules. Carr's index and Hausner ratio indicate that Cyperus starch should have comparable flow properties with respect to maize and potato starch. Cyperus starch was employed as binder for the formulation of metronidazole tablets. Formulations containing 5%, 7.5%, and 10% Cyperus starch were compared with those containing 10% potato starch. At 10% binder concentration, the tablets containing Cyperus starch exhibited better hardness and negligible friability as compared with those with potato starch. Although the binder concentration had a significant effect on the disintegration time of the tablets, it did not seem to affect the dissolution profile. These results indicate that Cyperus starch provides excellent binding properties without compromising drug release characteristics and should be explored in pharmaceutical formulations.

  10. Biotechnological relevance of starch-degrading enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Traditional enzymes, such as the amylases and the proteases, have been improved, novel applications have been found and new and valuable products have been marketed. The enzymatic hydrolysis of starch is described in some detail. (Refs. 8).

  11. Formation of starch in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Barbara; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2016-07-01

    Starch-rich crops form the basis of our nutrition, but plants have still to yield all their secrets as to how they make this vital substance. Great progress has been made by studying both crop and model systems, and we approach the point of knowing the enzymatic machinery responsible for creating the massive, insoluble starch granules found in plant tissues. Here, we summarize our current understanding of these biosynthetic enzymes, highlighting recent progress in elucidating their specific functions. Yet, in many ways we have only scratched the surface: much uncertainty remains about how these components function together and are controlled. We flag-up recent observations suggesting a significant degree of flexibility during the synthesis of starch and that previously unsuspected non-enzymatic proteins may have a role. We conclude that starch research is not yet a mature subject and that novel experimental and theoretical approaches will be important to advance the field.

  12. Dry Starch Powders Modified Teabag Method

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following is a test protocol for a “tea bag analysis” that was conducted on PMN starches by the Corn Refiners Association. This protocol is one approach to providing information on swellability of high molecular weight polymers.

  13. Production of modified starches by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Il-Jun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Yook, Hong-Sun; Bae, Chun-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Soo; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Chung, Cha-Kwon

    1999-04-01

    As a new processing method for the production of modified starch, gamma irradiation and four kinds of inorganic peroxides were applied to commercial corn starch. The addition of inorganic peroxides without gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation without the addition of inorganic peroxides effectively decreased initial viscosity, but did not sufficiently keep viscosity stable. The combination of adding ammonium persulfate (APS) and gamma irradiation showed the lowest initial viscosity and the best stability out of the tested four kinds of inorganic peroxides. Among the tested mixing methods of APS, soaking was found to be more effective than dry blending or spraying. Therefore, the production of modified starch with low viscosity as well as with sufficient viscosity stability became feasible by the control of gamma irradiation dose levels and the amount of added APS to starch.

  14. [Characterisation of Dioscorea bulbifera native starch].

    PubMed

    Araujo de Vizcarrondo, Consuelo; Rincón, Alicia Mariela; Padilla, Fanny

    2004-06-01

    A non conventional source of starch, bulbs of Dioscorea bulbifera, was evaluated. Giving a yield of 28.48 g/100 g on dry weight, chemical composition, physical, physico-chemical and morphological characteristics were assessed, as well as its rheological properties. Chemical analysis showed a amylose content of 29.37%. Micrographies showed that most of the starch granules were of irregular shape, similar to a pyramid with rounded vertices, and a smaller number were elongated with smooth surface. Dioscorea starch showed a gelatinization temperature of 70.8 degrees C and maximum viscosity at 88.6 degrees C of 435 Brabender units (BU). It presented a relatively stable consistency to the cooking process and a low tendency to retrogradation; which suggest the starch possible use in food products that need a fast viscosity and a gel with a stable consistency.

  15. Starch-Poly(Hydroxylalkanoate) Composites and Blends

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper summarizes research on starch-polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) blends and composites. Efforts to increase compatibility, characterize mechanical and biodegradation properties are described. A range of blend products have been prepared including molded plastics, films and foams. Finally, futu...

  16. Rheological behaviour of heated potato starch dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juszczak, L.; Witczak, M.; Ziêba, T.; Fortuna, T.

    2012-10-01

    The study was designed to investigate the rheological properties of heated potato starch dispersions. Water suspensions of starch were heated at 65, 80 or 95°C for 5, 15, 30 or 60 min. The dispersions obtained were examined for granule size distribution and rheology. It was found that the starch dispersions significantly differed in both respects. The mean diameters of starch granules were largest for the dispersion heated at 65°C and smallest for that heated at 95°C. As the heating temperature was raised, the yield stresses and consistency coefficients decreased, while the flow behaviour indexes and Casson plastic viscosities increased. There were also differences in the viscoelastic properties of the dispersions: for those heated at 65°C the storage and loss moduli increased with heating time whereas for those heated at 80°C both moduli decreased.

  17. Paint removal using wheat starch blast media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Terry; Oestreich, John

    1993-03-01

    A review of the Wheat Starch Blasting technology is presented. Laboratory evaluations covering Almen Arc testing on bare 2024-T3 aluminum and magnesium, as well as crack detection on 7075-T6 bare aluminum, are discussed. Comparisons with Type V plastic media show lower residual stresses are achieved on aluminum and magnesium with wheat starch media. Dry blasting effects on the detection of cracks confirms better crack visibility with wheat starch media versus Type V or Type II plastic media. Testing of wheat starch media in several composite test programs, including fiberglass, Kevlar, and graphite-epoxy composites, showed no fiber damage. Process developments and production experience at the first U.S. aircraft stripping facility are also reviewed. Corporate and regional aircraft are being stripped in this three nozzle dry blast hanger.

  18. Effect of exogenous sucrose on the enzymes of starch degradation and sucrose metabolism in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Narinder; Kaur, Harpreet; Gupta, Anil K

    2005-10-01

    Addition of exogenous sucrose and mannitol in the growth medium decreased the germination and growth of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. cv C-88) seedlings. The reduced seedling growth appeared to be due to the decreased acid invertase activity in growing parts of the seedlings. An exogenous supply of sucrose upregulated the sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity in different parts of seedlings. Decreased amylase activity in cotyledons and the mobilization of starch from cotyledons to the growing axis was observed in the presence of exogenous sucrose and mannitol. High sucrose content observed in different tissues in the presence of exogenous sucrose and mannitol was possibly due to high SPS and low acid invertase activities and reduced conversion of sucrose to starch. It appears that exogenous sucrose acts mainly as an osmoticum, rather than a source of carbon for the growing seedlings.

  19. Preparation of indigestible pyrodextrins from different starch sources.

    PubMed

    Laurentin, Alexander; Cárdenas, Marité; Ruales, Jenny; Pérez, Elevina; Tovar, Juscelino

    2003-08-27

    Starch-modifying processes, such as pyrodextrinization, are potential ways to alter the nutritional features of this polysaccharide. A widely used method for pyrodextrinizing maize starch was also applied to lentil, sorghum, cocoyam, sagu, and cassava starches, and the in vitro digestibility of the products was evaluated. Pyrodextrins were produced by heating starch at 140 degrees C for 3 h, with catalytic amounts of HCl. The enzymatically available starch content of all preparations decreased by 55-65% after modification. Thus, pyrodextrinization seems to be an effective way to produce indigestible glucans from different starches. Pyrodextrins obtained were complex mixtures of starch derivatives with a wide range of molecular weight as estimated by gel filtration chromatography. Both their molecular weight profiles and contents of indigestible fractions varied with starch source. Experiments with lentil and cassava starches showed that changing dextrinization conditions also affects the susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis of the product.

  20. Phosphoglucan phosphatase function sheds light on starch degradation.

    PubMed

    Silver, Dylan M; Kötting, Oliver; Moorhead, Greg B G

    2014-07-01

    Phosphoglucan phosphatases are novel enzymes that remove phosphates from complex carbohydrates. In plants, these proteins are vital components in the remobilization of leaf starch at night. Breakdown of starch is initiated through reversible glucan phosphorylation to disrupt the semi-crystalline starch structure at the granule surface. The phosphoglucan phosphatases starch excess 4 (SEX4) and like-SEX4 2 (LSF2) dephosphorylate glucans to provide access for amylases that release maltose and glucose from starch. Another phosphatase, LSF1, is a putative inactive scaffold protein that may act as regulator of starch degradative enzymes at the granule surface. Absence of these phosphatases disrupts starch breakdown, resulting in plants accumulating excess starch. Here, we describe recent advances in understanding the biochemical and structural properties of each of these starch phosphatases.

  1. Physicochemical properties and digestibility of hydrothermally treated waxy rice starch.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Feng; Ma, Fei; Kong, Fansheng; Gao, Qunyu; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-04-01

    Waxy rice starch was subjected to annealing (ANN) and heat-moisture treatment (HMT). These starches were also treated by a combination of ANN and HMT. The impact of single and dual modifications (ANN-HMT and HMT-ANN) on the molecular weight (M(w)), crystalline structure, thermal properties, and the digestibility were investigated. The relative crystallinity and short-range order on the granule surface increased on ANN, whereas decreased on HMT. All treated starches showed lower M(w) than that of the native starch. Gelatinization onset temperature, peak temperature and conclusion temperature increased for both single and dual treatments. Increased slowly digestible starch content was found on HMT and ANN-HMT. However, resistant starch levels decreased in all treated starches as compared with native starch. The results would imply that hydrothermal treatment induced structural changes in waxy rice starch significantly affected its digestibility.

  2. Morphological features and physicochemical properties of waxy wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanxin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Chunzhong; Zhou, Xing

    2013-11-01

    Morphological features, granule composition, and physicochemical properties of waxy wheat starch were compared with those of normal wheat starch. The morphologies and granule populations were found to be similar for the two starches. However, waxy wheat starch contained a smaller proportion of B-type granules, had a larger average granule diameter, and a higher degree of crystallinity than normal wheat starch, as measured by particle size analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. These differences resulted in a higher gelatinization temperature, transition enthalpy, peak viscosity, breakdown, swelling power, lower peak viscosity temperature and final viscosity in waxy wheat starch. These points suggest that waxy wheat starch should have greater resistance to retrogradation during cooling and higher water-holding capacity under dry conditions. Highlighting the differences in physicochemical properties of waxy and normal wheat starches should help point toward effective applications of waxy wheat starch in the food industry.

  3. [Physical, chemical and biological properties of food modified starches].

    PubMed

    Gapparov, M M; Sokolov, A I; Martynova, E A; Kulikova, O S; Bessonov, V V; Berketova, L V

    2007-01-01

    Aim of work was to compare the chemical and biological properties of starches modified by adipinic acid acetylation. Starches in question were: native maize starch "Novation 4600"; acetylated adipat di-starch of the cold swelling "Prejeflo CH 20"; acetylated adipat di-starch of the cold swelling "Prejeflo CH 40"; acetylated adipat di-starch of the hot swelling "Clearam CH 2020". The differences between starches were connected with number of cross-cut lacings in the structure, and with abilities to be gelatinized in the cold water. Rate of hydrolysis and water-retaining capacities were higher for cold swelling starches which contained the smaller number of resistance fractions. Acetyl value of cold swelling starches was higher under elevation of cross-cut lacing.

  4. New starch preparations resistant to enzymatic digestion.

    PubMed

    Jochym, Kamila; Kapusniak, Janusz; Barczynska, Renata; Sliżewska, Katarzyna

    2012-03-15

    New starch preparations were produced by thermolysis of potato starch in the presence of inorganic (hydrochloric) and organic (citric and tartaric) acids under controlled conditions. The starch preparations were physicochemically and structurally characterised and analysed for their resistance to enzymatic digestion in vitro. The content of resistant fraction in dextrin D1, obtained by heating starch acidified with hydrochloric and citric acids, determined by the AOAC 2001.03 and pancreatin-gravimetric methods was similar (~200 g kg⁻¹). In the case of dextrin D3, obtained by heating starch acidified with hydrochloric and tartaric acids, the result of determination by the pancreatin-gravimetric method was almost four times higher than that obtained with the AOAC 2001.03 method. The enzymatic tests revealed that dextrin D3 obtained with excess tartaric acid can be classified as RS4, which can only be partially determined by enzymatic-gravimetric methods. Tartaric acid at high concentration had a significantly stronger influence on starch hydrolysis than citric acid. This was confirmed by chromatographic analysis of dextrins and chemical investigation of the reducing power. The results confirmed the possibility of applying dextrins, prepared under specific conditions, as soluble dietary fibre. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Heat expanded starch-based compositions.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Gregory M; Klamczynski, Artur K; Holtman, Kevin M; Shey, Justin; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Berrios, Jose; Wood, Delilah; Orts, William J; Imam, Syed H

    2007-05-16

    A heat expansion process similar to that used for expanded bead polystyrene was used to expand starch-based compositions. Foam beads made by solvent extraction had the appearance of polystyrene beads but did not expand when heated due to an open-cell structure. Nonporous beads, pellets, or particles were made by extrusion or by drying and milling cooked starch slurries. The samples expanded into a low-density foam by heating 190-210 degrees C for more than 20 s at ambient pressures. Formulations containing starch (50-85%), sorbitol (5-15%), glycerol (4-12%), ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVAL, 5-15%), and water (10-20%) were studied. The bulk density was negatively correlated to sorbitol, glycerol, and water content. Increasing the EVAL content increased the bulk density, especially at concentrations higher than 15%. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAL) increased the bulk density more than EVAL. The bulk density was lowest in samples made of wheat and potato starch as compared to corn starch. The expansion temperature for the starch pellets decreased more than 20 degrees C as the moisture content was increased from 10 to 25%. The addition of EVAL in the formulations decreased the equilibrium moisture content of the foam and reduced the water absorption during a 1 h soaking period.

  6. The Other Double Helix--The Fascinating Chemistry of Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Robert D.; Tarbet, Bryon J.

    2000-08-01

    Current textbooks deal only briefly with the chemistry of starch. A short review with 21 references is presented, describing the structure of starch and indicating the double helix structure of A-type and B-type starch. The structure of the starch granule is examined, pointing out the existence of growth rings of alternating crystalline and noncrystalline starch, with growing amylopectin molecules extending from the hilum (point of origin) to the surface of the starch granule. The swelling of starch granules in water, above the gelatinization temperature of about 60 °C, is discussed. The process of gelatinization involves unraveling of the starch helix and a manyfold increase in volume of the starch granule as water is imbibed and bound to the unraveled starch polymer by hydrogen bonding. Baking bread or pastries causes unraveling of the starch helix, and the process by which these products become stale corresponds primarily to the re-forming of the starch helix. The importance of this phenomenon in food science is discussed. The absorption of nonpolar linear molecules such as I2, or linear nonpolar portions of molecules such as n-butanol or fats and phospholipids, by the C-type helix of starch is examined. The way in which starch is structurally modified to retard staling is discussed in relation to food technology.

  7. Engineering Potato Starch with a Higher Phosphate Content

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuan; Huang, Xing-Feng; Visser, Richard G. F.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphate esters are responsible for valuable and unique functionalities of starch for industrial applications. Also in the cell phosphate esters play a role in starch metabolism, which so far has not been well characterized in storage starch. Laforin, a human enzyme composed of a carbohydrate-binding module and a dual-specificity phosphatase domain, is involved in the dephosphorylation of glycogen. To modify phosphate content and better understand starch (de)phosphorylation in storage starch, laforin was engineered and introduced into potato (cultivar Kardal). Interestingly, expression of an (engineered) laforin in potato resulted in significantly higher phosphate content of starch, and this result was confirmed in amylose-free potato genetic background (amf). Modified starches exhibited altered granule morphology and size compared to the control. About 20–30% of the transgenic lines of each series showed red-staining granules upon incubation with iodine, and contained higher phosphate content than the blue-stained starch granules. Moreover, low amylose content and altered gelatinization properties were observed in these red-stained starches. Principle component and correlation analysis disclosed a complex correlation between starch composition and starch physico-chemical properties. Ultimately, the expression level of endogenous genes involved in starch metabolism was analysed, revealing a compensatory response to the decrease of phosphate content in potato starch. This study provides a new perspective for engineering starch phosphate content in planta by making use of the compensatory mechanism in the plant itself. PMID:28056069

  8. Engineering Potato Starch with a Higher Phosphate Content.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuan; Huang, Xing-Feng; Visser, Richard G F; Trindade, Luisa M

    2017-01-01

    Phosphate esters are responsible for valuable and unique functionalities of starch for industrial applications. Also in the cell phosphate esters play a role in starch metabolism, which so far has not been well characterized in storage starch. Laforin, a human enzyme composed of a carbohydrate-binding module and a dual-specificity phosphatase domain, is involved in the dephosphorylation of glycogen. To modify phosphate content and better understand starch (de)phosphorylation in storage starch, laforin was engineered and introduced into potato (cultivar Kardal). Interestingly, expression of an (engineered) laforin in potato resulted in significantly higher phosphate content of starch, and this result was confirmed in amylose-free potato genetic background (amf). Modified starches exhibited altered granule morphology and size compared to the control. About 20-30% of the transgenic lines of each series showed red-staining granules upon incubation with iodine, and contained higher phosphate content than the blue-stained starch granules. Moreover, low amylose content and altered gelatinization properties were observed in these red-stained starches. Principle component and correlation analysis disclosed a complex correlation between starch composition and starch physico-chemical properties. Ultimately, the expression level of endogenous genes involved in starch metabolism was analysed, revealing a compensatory response to the decrease of phosphate content in potato starch. This study provides a new perspective for engineering starch phosphate content in planta by making use of the compensatory mechanism in the plant itself.

  9. Molecular evolution accompanying functional divergence of duplicated genes along the plant starch biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Nougué, Odrade; Corbi, Jonathan; Ball, Steven G; Manicacci, Domenica; Tenaillon, Maud I

    2014-05-15

    Starch is the main source of carbon storage in the Archaeplastida. The starch biosynthesis pathway (sbp) emerged from cytosolic glycogen metabolism shortly after plastid endosymbiosis and was redirected to the plastid stroma during the green lineage divergence. The SBP is a complex network of genes, most of which are members of large multigene families. While some gene duplications occurred in the Archaeplastida ancestor, most were generated during the sbp redirection process, and the remaining few paralogs were generated through compartmentalization or tissue specialization during the evolution of the land plants. In the present study, we tested models of duplicated gene evolution in order to understand the evolutionary forces that have led to the development of SBP in angiosperms. We combined phylogenetic analyses and tests on the rates of evolution along branches emerging from major duplication events in six gene families encoding sbp enzymes. We found evidence of positive selection along branches following cytosolic or plastidial specialization in two starch phosphorylases and identified numerous residues that exhibited changes in volume, polarity or charge. Starch synthases, branching and debranching enzymes functional specializations were also accompanied by accelerated evolution. However, none of the sites targeted by selection corresponded to known functional domains, catalytic or regulatory. Interestingly, among the 13 duplications tested, 7 exhibited evidence of positive selection in both branches emerging from the duplication, 2 in only one branch, and 4 in none of the branches. The majority of duplications were followed by accelerated evolution targeting specific residues along both branches. This pattern was consistent with the optimization of the two sub-functions originally fulfilled by the ancestral gene before duplication. Our results thereby provide strong support to the so-called "Escape from Adaptive Conflict" (EAC) model. Because none of the

  10. The PLATO IV Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based instructional system consists of a large scale centrally located CDC 6400 computer and a large number of remote student terminals. This is a brief and general description of the proposed input/output hardware necessary to interface the student terminals with the computer's central processing unit (CPU) using available…

  11. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  12. Little Jiffy, Mark IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Henry F.; Rice, John

    1974-01-01

    In this paper three changes and one new development for the method of exploratory factor analysis (a second generation Little Jiffy) developed by Kaiser are described. Following this short description a step-by-step computer algorithm of the revised method, dubbed Little Jiffy, Mark IV is presented. (MP)

  13. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  14. Acetohydroxyacid synthases: evolution, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yadi; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-10-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase, a thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme, can condense either two pyruvate molecules to form acetolactate for synthesizing L-valine and L-leucine or pyruvate with 2-ketobutyrate to form acetohydroxybutyrate for synthesizing L-isoleucine. Because the key reaction catalyzed by acetohydroxyacid synthase in the biosynthetic pathways of branched-chain amino acids exists in plants, fungi, archaea, and bacteria, but not in animals, acetohydroxyacid synthase becomes a potential target for developing novel herbicides and antimicrobial compounds. In this article, the evolution, structure, and catalytic mechanism of acetohydroxyacid synthase are summarized.

  15. Shedding of hyaluronate synthase from streptococci.

    PubMed

    Mausolf, A; Jungmann, J; Robenek, H; Prehm, P

    1990-04-01

    Hyaluronate synthase was shed into the culture medium from growing streptococci (group C) together with nascent hyaluronate. The mechanism of solubilization was analysed using isolated protoplast membranes. Solubilization increased when membranes were suspended in larger volumes, but it was temperature-independent and was not inhibited by protease inhibitors. Increased hyaluronate chain length enhanced solubilization. The soluble synthase could re-integrate into Streptococcal membranes in a saturable manner. The soluble synthase behaved like an integral membrane protein, although it was not integrated into phospholipid vesicles. In sucrose velocity centrifugation the synthase had a higher sedimentation rate in detergent-free solution, indicating that it existed in an aggregated state.

  16. Effects of β-amylolysis on the resistant starch formation of debranched corn starches.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Curtis R; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2012-05-09

    Retrograded amylose is resistant to digestion by amylolytic enzymes, which is known as resistant starch type III (RS3). In this study we investigated the effect of β-amylase hydrolysis on the formation and physicochemical properties of RS3 from debranched corn starches. Three types of corn starch (Hylon VII, Hylon V, and common corn) were first gelatinized and then hydrolyzed using β-amylase to varying degrees. The resultant hydrolyzed starch was debranched with isoamylase and then exposed to temperature cycling to promote RS formation. A broad endotherm from approximately 45 to 120 °C and a small endotherm above 150 °C were noted for all retrograded starches. All three corn starches had increased RS contents after moderate β-amylolysis, with Hylon V having the highest RS content at 70.7% after 4 h of β-amylolysis. The results suggest that RS3 formation is affected by the starch composition as well as the starch structure and can be increased by moderate β-amylolysis.

  17. Temperature and dietary starch level affected protein but not starch digestibility in gilthead sea bream juveniles.

    PubMed

    Couto, A; Enes, P; Peres, H; Oliva-Teles, A

    2012-06-01

    A study was carried out with gilthead sea bream juveniles to assess the effect of water temperature (18 and 25°C) and dietary pregelatinized starch level (10, 20 and 30%) on digestibility of protein and starch and on the activity of proteolytic and amylolytic enzymes. ADC of pregelatinized starch was very high (>99%) irrespectively of dietary inclusion level, and it was not affected by water temperature. ADC of protein was also high (>90%) but improved at the higher water temperature. Dietary starch interacted with protein digestibility, which decreased as dietary starch level increased. Temperature affected both acid and basic protease activities, with acid protease activity being higher at 25°C and basic protease activity being higher at 18°C. However, total proteolytic activity and amylase activities were not affected by water temperature. Dietary carbohydrate exerted no effect on proteolytic or amylolitic activities. It is concluded that gilthead sea bream juveniles digest pregelatinized starch very efficiently irrespective of water temperature, due to adjustments of amylase activity to cope with temperature differences. Pregelatinized starch interacts negatively with protein digestibility, with the ADC of protein decreasing as dietary starch levels increase.

  18. Surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Kasarda, Donald D; Dupont, Frances M; Vensel, William H; Altenbach, Susan B; Lopez, Rocio; Tanaka, Charlene K; Hurkman, William J

    2008-11-12

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries but is avoided in the United States because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye, and barley proteins and products that contain them. These proteins are capable of initiating damage to the absorptive lining of the small intestine in CD patients, apparently as a consequence of undesirable interactions with the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this study, starch surface-associated proteins were extracted from four commercial wheat starches, fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and gel electrophoresis, and identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. More than 150 proteins were identified, many of which (for example, histones, purothionins, and glutenins) had not been recognized previously as starch-associated. The commercial starches were analyzed by the R-5 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method to estimate the amount of harmful gluten protein present. One of these starches had a low gluten content of 7 ppm and actually fell within the range proposed as a new Codex Alimentarius Standard for naturally gluten-free foods (maximum 20 ppm). This low level of gluten indicates that the starch should be especially suitable for use by celiac patients, although wheat starches with levels up to 100 ppm are deemed safe in the proposed Codex standards.

  19. Preparation and characterization of resistant starch III from elephant foot yam (Amorphophallus paeonifolius) starch.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chagam Koteswara; Haripriya, Sundaramoorthy; Noor Mohamed, A; Suriya, M

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the properties of resistant starch (RS) III prepared from elephant foot yam starch using pullulanase enzyme. Native and gelatinized starches were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis (pullulanase, 40 U/g per 10h), autoclaved (121°C/30 min), stored under refrigeration (4°C/24h) and then lyophilized. After preparation of resistant starch III, the morphological, physical, chemical and functional properties were assessed. The enzymatic and retrogradation process increased the yield of resistant starch III from starch with a concomitant increase increase in its water absorption capacity and water solubility index. A decrease in swelling power was observed due to the hydrolysis and thermal process. Te reduced pasting properties and hardness of resistant starch III were associated with the disintegration of starch granules due to the thermal process. The viscosity was found to be inversely proportional to the RS content in the sample. The thermal properties of RS increased due to retrogradation and recrystallization (P<0.05). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Resistant-starch Formation in High-amylose Maize Starch During Kernel Development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to understand the resistant-starch (RS) formation during the kernel development of high-amylose maize, GEMS-0067 line. RS content of the starch, determined using AOAC Method 991.43 for total dietary fiber, increased with kernel maturation and the increase in amylose/...

  1. Characterization of enzyme-resistant starch in maize amylose-extender mutant starches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the human digestive system, a type of starch known as resistant starch (RS) can not be digested. RS is not absorbed in the small intestine, and is passed to the large intestine where it is fermented by bacteria to produce short-chain fatty acids, which have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory prop...

  2. Resistant Starch and Starch Thermal Characteristics in Exotic Corn Lines Grown in Temperate and Tropical Environments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn as a food that is heated and cooled to allow starch retrogradation has higher levels of resistant starch (RS). Increasing the amount of RS can make corn an even healthier food and may be accomplished by breeding and selection, especially by using exotic germplasm. Sixty breeding lines of introg...

  3. Plantain and banana starches: granule structural characteristics explain the differences in their starch degradation patterns.

    PubMed

    Soares, Claudinéia Aparecida; Peroni-Okita, Fernanda Helena Gonçalves; Cardoso, Mateus Borba; Shitakubo, Renata; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana

    2011-06-22

    Different banana cultivars were used to investigate the influences of starch granule structure and hydrolases on degradation. The highest degrees of starch degradation were observed in dessert bananas during ripening. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed smooth granule surface in the green stage in all cultivars, except for Mysore. The small and round granules were preferentially degraded in all of the cultivars. Terra demonstrated a higher degree of crystallinity and a short amylopectin chain length distribution, resulting in high starch content in the ripe stage. Amylose content and the crystallinity index were more strongly correlated than the distribution of amylopectin branch chain lengths in banana starches. α- and β-amylase activities were found in both forms, soluble in the pulp and associated with the starch granule. Starch-phosphorylase was not found in Mysore. On the basis of the profile of α-amylase in vitro digestion and the structural characteristics, it could be concluded that the starch of plantains has an arrangement of granules more resistant to enzymes than the starch of dessert bananas.

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on thermophysical properties of plasticized starch and starch surfactant films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Krystyna; Watzeels, Nick; Rahier, Hubert

    2014-06-01

    In this work the influence of gamma irradiation on the thermomechanical properties of the films formed in potato starch-glycerol and potato starch-glycerol-surfactant systems were examined by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis, DMA, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC, and the results were correlated to the amount of the volatile fraction in the films.

  5. Characterization of starch films containing starch nanoparticles: part 1: physical and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ai-Min; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Dong; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-07-25

    We report, for the first time, the preparation method and characteristics of starch films incorporating spray dried and vacuum freeze dried starch nanoparticles. Physical properties of these films such as morphology, crystallinity, water vapor permeability (WVP), opacity, and glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties (strain versus temperature, strain versus stress, Young's modulus and toughness) were measured. Addition of both starch nanoparticles in starch films increased roughness of surface, lowered degree of crystallinity by 23.5%, WVP by 44% and Tg by 4.3°C, respectively compared to those of starch-only films. Drying method used in preparation of starch nanoparticles only affected opacity of films. The incorporation of nanoparticles in starch films resulted into denser films due to which the extent of variation of strain with temperature was much lower. The toughness and Young's modulus of films containing both types of starch nanoparticles were lower than those of control films especially at <100°C. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Position of modifying groups on starch chains of octenylsuccinic anhydride-modified waxy maize starch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starches with degree of substitution of 0.018 (OS-S-L) and 0.092 (OS-S-H) were prepared from granular native waxy maize starch in an aqueous slurry system. The substitution distribution of OS groups was investigated by enzyme hydrolysis followed by chromatogr...

  7. Starch bioavailability in arepas made from ordinary or high amylose corn: concentration and gastrointestinal fate of resistant starch in rats.

    PubMed

    Granfeldt, Y E; Drews, A W; Björck, I M

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the importance of the amylose/amylopectin ratio for the content and gastrointestinal fate of resistant starch in a realistic composite starchy food. Corn-based breads (arepas) from dent corn (25% amylose) and from high amylose corn (70% amylose) were used as test products. Resistant starch concentration was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using rats treated with an antibiotic drug (Nebacitin) to suppress hindgut fermentation. Experiments in rats with intact hindgut microflora allowed determination of resistant starch fermentability. The small intestinal digestibility of starch in dent corn arepas was close to 96% (total starch basis), whereas the starch in high amylose arepas was poorly digested (approximately 68%, total starch basis), as calculated from the fecal recovery of resistant starch in Nebacitin-treated animals. The main resistant starch fraction required solubilization in alkali to render it available to the analytical amylases (nonhydrated fraction). The total amount of resistant starch as well as the nonhydrated starch fraction delivered to the hindgut could be accurately predicted from analysis of starch remnants in an enzymatic gravimetric dietary fiber residue. Resistant starch present in dent corn arepas was fermented approximately 63%, whereas the fermentability of resistant starch from the high amylose product was remarkably low (< 11%).

  8. Characterizations of Pickering emulsions stabilized by starch nanoparticles: Influence of starch variety and particle size.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shengju; Xiong, Liu; Li, Man; Liu, Jing; Yang, Jie; Chang, Ranran; Liang, Caifeng; Sun, Qingjie

    2017-11-01

    Pickering emulsions were first successfully fabricated by different types and sizes of corn, tapioca, sweet potato, and waxy corn starch nanoparticles as stabilizers. Photography, optical microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and rheology measurements were used to characterize Pickering emulsions stabilized by various starch nanoparticles. The results showed that tapioca, sweet potato, and corn starch nanoparticles were appropriate for Pickering emulsion stabilization because the three nanoparticles have nearly neutral wettability (θow ∼90°). Confocal microscopy revealed that intact and thick nanoparticle shells coated the surface of oil droplets. The Pickering emulsions stabilized by sweet potato and corn starch nanoparticles with a diameter that ranged from 100 to 220nm had better stability than those with a diameter either less than 100nm or more than 220nm. These results suggested that starch nanoparticles could be used as promising particulate emulsifiers to fulfill the demands of Pickering emulsions with stable characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  10. Effects of cooking methods and starch structures on starch hydrolysis rates of rice.

    PubMed

    Reed, Michael O; Ai, Yongfeng; Leutcher, Josh L; Jane, Jay-lin

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to understand effects of different cooking methods, including steamed, pilaf, and traditional stir-fried, on starch hydrolysis rates of rice. Rice grains of 3 varieties, japonica, indica, and waxy, were used for the study. Rice starch was isolated from the grain and characterized. Amylose contents of starches from japonica, indica, and waxy rice were 13.5%, 18.0%, and 0.9%, respectively. The onset gelatinization temperature of indica starch (71.6 °C) was higher than that of the japonica and waxy starch (56.0 and 56.8 °C, respectively). The difference was attributed to longer amylopectin branch chains of the indica starch. Starch hydrolysis rates and resistant starch (RS) contents of the rice varieties differed after they were cooked using different methods. Stir-fried rice displayed the least starch hydrolysis rate followed by pilaf rice and steamed rice for each rice variety. RS contents of freshly steamed japonica, indica, and waxy rice were 0.7%, 6.6%, and 1.3%, respectively; those of rice pilaf were 12.1%, 13.2%, and 3.4%, respectively; and the stir-fried rice displayed the largest RS contents of 15.8%, 16.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. Mechanisms of the large RS contents of the stir-fried rice were studied. With the least starch hydrolysis rate and the largest RS content, stir-fried rice would be a desirable way of preparing rice for food to reduce postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses and to improve colon health of humans.

  11. Grain processing effects on starch utilization by ruminants.

    PubMed

    Theurer, C B

    1986-11-01

    Starch utilization may be markedly enhanced by proper grain processing; however, extent of improvement is primarily dependent upon the ruminant species, grain source and method of processing. Grain processing has less impact on starch digestion by sheep than cattle. The magnitude of improvement is inverse to the starch digestion values for nonprocessed (or minimally processed) grains. Utilization of sorghum grain starch is improved most by extensive processing, and then corn, with little improvement in barley starch digestion. Studies comparing processing effects on barley or wheat starch utilization by cattle were not found. Steam-flaking consistently improves digestibility of starch by cattle fed corn- or sorghum grain-based diets over whole, ground or dry-rolled processes. Other extensive processing methods appear to enhance starch digestibility of corn and sorghum grain to a similar extent as steam-flaking, but comparative data are too limited to quantitate adequately effects of these methods. This improvement in starch utilization appears to be the primary reason for enhanced feed conversion of cattle fed diets high in these processed grains. The major site of cereal grain starch digestion is usually the rumen. Processing increases microbial degradation of starch in the rumen and decreases amounts of starch digested post-ruminally. Rates of in vitro amylolytic attack of starch in cereal grains by both ruminal microbial and pancreatic enzyme sources are improved by processing methods employing proper combinations of moisture, heat and pressure. In vitro and in situ studies suggest that much of the increase in ruminal starch fermentation with steam-flaking is due to changes in starch granular structure, which produces additive effects beyond those of decreasing particle size. Thus, efficiency of ruminal starch fermentation by cattle appears to be improved by proper processing of corn and sorghum grain. Processing and grain source studies both suggest that

  12. Starches of varied digestibilities differentially modify intestinal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Lajvardi, A; Mazarin, G I; Gillespie, M B; Satchithanandam, S; Calvert, R J

    1993-12-01

    Starches of different digestibilities may enter the colon to different extents and alter colonic function. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed diets containing 25% cooked potato starch, arrowroot starch, high amylose cornstarch or raw potato starch for 6 wk. Fecal weight, transit time, colonic thymidine kinase activity (a marker for cell proliferation), and weight, starch content and pH of the cecum and proximal and distal colon were measured. Raw potato starch was much less completely digested than high amylose cornstarch, resulting in a 32-fold greater amount of undigested starch entering the cecum in the raw potato starch group. Both the high amylose cornstarch and raw potato starch diets significantly enhanced fecal weight and produced large intestinal hypertrophy, effects that were greatest in the raw potato starch group. Raw potato starch feeding was associated with the highest level of thymidine kinase activity, although the differences in thymidine kinase activity among the four groups were not significant. This diet also produced a 50% longer transit time. Entry of a large amount of raw potato starch into the colon resulted in greater luminal acidity, greater luminal bulk and slower transit. A much smaller amount of starch entered the colon in the high amylose cornstarch group and resulted in fecal bulking but no alteration in transit.

  13. Polyester synthases: natural catalysts for plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biopolyesters composed of hydroxy fatty acids, which represent a complex class of storage polyesters. They are synthesized by a wide range of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as by some Archaea, and are deposited as insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions. Polyester synthases are the key enzymes of polyester biosynthesis and catalyse the conversion of (R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA thioesters to polyesters with the concomitant release of CoA. These soluble enzymes turn into amphipathic enzymes upon covalent catalysis of polyester-chain formation. A self-assembly process is initiated resulting in the formation of insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions with a phospholipid monolayer and covalently attached polyester synthases at the surface. Surface-attached polyester synthases show a marked increase in enzyme activity. These polyester synthases have only recently been biochemically characterized. An overview of these recent findings is provided. At present, 59 polyester synthase structural genes from 45 different bacteria have been cloned and the nucleotide sequences have been obtained. The multiple alignment of the primary structures of these polyester synthases show an overall identity of 8-96% with only eight strictly conserved amino acid residues. Polyester synthases can been assigned to four classes based on their substrate specificity and subunit composition. The current knowledge on the organization of the polyester synthase genes, and other genes encoding proteins related to PHA metabolism, is compiled. In addition, the primary structures of the 59 PHA synthases are aligned and analysed with respect to highly conserved amino acids, and biochemical features of polyester synthases are described. The proposed catalytic mechanism based on similarities to alpha/beta-hydrolases and mutational analysis is discussed. Different threading algorithms suggest that polyester synthases belong to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily, with

  14. Field Evaluation of Improved MRE (Meal, Ready-to-Eat), MRE VII, and MRE IV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    least amount of water to their food (MRE IV does not have the fruit -flavored beverages), but drank more plain water . A statistical analysis (ANOVA) of...SAUCE POTATO PATTY SPREADS CHEESE SPREAD PEANUT BUTTER JELLY FRUITS APPLESAUCE MIXED FRUITS PEACHES PEARS DESSERTS BROI,NIE CHERRY NUT CAKE...SAUSAGE PATTIES TURKEY W/GRAVY STARCHES CRACKERS BEANS W/TOMATO SAUCE POTATO PATTY SPREADS CHEESE SPREAD JELLY PEANUT BUTTER FRUITS

  15. Concerted suppression of all starch branching enzyme genes in barley produces amylose-only starch granules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Starch is stored in higher plants as granules composed of semi-crystalline amylopectin and amorphous amylose. Starch granules provide energy for the plant during dark periods and for germination of seeds and tubers. Dietary starch is also a highly glycemic carbohydrate being degraded to glucose and rapidly absorbed in the small intestine. But a portion of dietary starch, termed “resistant starch” (RS) escapes digestion and reaches the large intestine, where it is fermented by colonic bacteria producing short chain fatty acids (SCFA) which are linked to several health benefits. The RS is preferentially derived from amylose, which can be increased by suppressing amylopectin synthesis by silencing of starch branching enzymes (SBEs). However all the previous works attempting the production of high RS crops resulted in only partly increased amylose-content and/or significant yield loss. Results In this study we invented a new method for silencing of multiple genes. Using a chimeric RNAi hairpin we simultaneously suppressed all genes coding for starch branching enzymes (SBE I, SBE IIa, SBE IIb) in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), resulting in production of amylose-only starch granules in the endosperm. This trait was segregating 3:1. Amylose-only starch granules were irregularly shaped and showed peculiar thermal properties and crystallinity. Transgenic lines retained high-yield possibly due to a pleiotropic upregualtion of other starch biosynthetic genes compensating the SBEs loss. For gelatinized starch, a very high content of RS (65 %) was observed, which is 2.2-fold higher than control (29%). The amylose-only grains germinated with same frequency as control grains. However, initial growth was delayed in young plants. Conclusions This is the first time that pure amylose has been generated with high yield in a living organism. This was achieved by a new method of simultaneous suppression of the entire complement of genes encoding starch branching enzymes. We

  16. Genetic Evidence That Chain Length and Branch Point Distributions Are Linked Determinants of Starch Granule Formation in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Barbara; Lu, Kuan-Jen; Eicke, Simona; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John E.; Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    The major component of starch is the branched glucan amylopectin. Structural features of amylopectin, such as the branching pattern and the chain length distribution, are thought to be key factors that enable it to form semicrystalline starch granules. We varied both structural parameters by creating Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants lacking combinations of starch synthases (SSs) SS1, SS2, and SS3 (to vary chain lengths) and the debranching enzyme ISOAMYLASE1-ISOAMYLASE2 (ISA; to alter branching pattern). The isa mutant accumulates primarily phytoglycogen in leaf mesophyll cells, with only small amounts of starch in other cell types (epidermis and bundle sheath cells). This balance can be significantly shifted by mutating different SSs. Mutation of SS1 promoted starch synthesis, restoring granules in mesophyll cell plastids. Mutation of SS2 decreased starch synthesis, abolishing granules in epidermal and bundle sheath cells. Thus, the types of SSs present affect the crystallinity and thus the solubility of the glucans made, compensating for or compounding the effects of an aberrant branching pattern. Interestingly, ss2 mutant plants contained small amounts of phytoglycogen in addition to aberrant starch. Likewise, ss2ss3 plants contained phytoglycogen, but were almost devoid of glucan despite retaining other SS isoforms. Surprisingly, glucan production was restored in the ss2ss3isa triple mutants, indicating that SS activity in ss2ss3 per se is not limiting but that the isoamylase suppresses glucan accumulation. We conclude that loss of only SSs can cause phytoglycogen production. This is readily degraded by isoamylase and other enzymes so it does not accumulate and was previously unnoticed. PMID:24965177

  17. The heteromultimeric debranching enzyme involved in starch synthesis in Arabidopsis requires both isoamylase1 and isoamylase2 subunits for complex stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Maria; Pfister, Barbara; Fulton, Daniel; Bischof, Sylvain; Delatte, Thierry; Eicke, Simona; Stettler, Michaela; Smith, Steven M; Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2013-01-01

    Isoamylase-type debranching enzymes (ISAs) play an important role in determining starch structure. Amylopectin - a branched polymer of glucose - is the major component of starch granules and its architecture underlies the semi-crystalline nature of starch. Mutants of several species lacking the ISA1-subclass of isoamylase are impaired in amylopectin synthesis. Consequently, starch levels are decreased and an aberrant soluble glucan (phytoglycogen) with altered branch lengths and branching pattern accumulates. Here we use TAP (tandem affinity purification) tagging to provide direct evidence in Arabidopsis that ISA1 interacts with its homolog ISA2. No evidence for interaction with other starch biosynthetic enzymes was found. Analysis of the single mutants shows that each protein is destabilised in the absence of the other. Co-expression of both ISA1 and ISA2 Escherichia coli allowed the formation of the active recombinant enzyme and we show using site-directed mutagenesis that ISA1 is the catalytic subunit. The presence of the active isoamylase alters glycogen biosynthesis in E. coli, resulting in colonies that stain more starch-like with iodine. However, analysis of the glucans reveals that rather than producing an amylopectin like substance, cells expressing the active isoamylase still accumulate small amounts of glycogen together with a population of linear oligosaccharides that stain strongly with iodine. We conclude that for isoamylase to promote amylopectin synthesis it needs to act on a specific precursor (pre-amylopectin) generated by the combined actions of plant starch synthase and branching enzyme isoforms and when presented with an unsuitable substrate (i.e. E. coli glycogen) it simply degrades it.

  18. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  19. Enzymatic modification of cassava starch by bacterial lipase.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Akhila; Abraham, T Emilia

    2006-06-01

    Enzymatic modification of starch using long chain fatty acid makes it thermoplastic suitable for a myriad of industrial applications. An industrial lipase preparation produced by Burkholderia cepacia (lipase PS) was used for modification of cassava starch with two acyl donors, lauric acid and palmitic acid. Reactions performed with palmitic acid by liquid-state and microwave esterification gave a degree of substitution (DS) of 62.08% (DS 1.45) and 42.06% (DS 0.98), respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that onset of decomposition is at a higher temperature (above 600 degrees Celsius) for modified starch than the unmodified starch (280 degrees Celsius). Modified starch showed reduction in alpha-amylase digestibility compared to native starch (76.5-18%). Swelling power lowered for modified starch as esterification renders starch more hydrophobic, making it suitable for biomedical applications as materials for bone fixation and replacements, carriers for controlled release of drugs and bioactive agents. Thus enzymatic esterification is ecofriendly.

  20. Fermentation of corn starch to ethanol with genetically engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Inlow, D; McRae, J; Ben-Bassat, A

    1988-07-05

    Expression of the glucoamylase gene from Aspergillus awamori by laboratory and distiller's strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae allowed them to ferment soluble starch. Approximately 95% of the carbohydrates in the starch were utilized. Glycerol production was significantly decreased when soluble starch was used instead of glucose. Ethanol yield on soluble starch was higher than that on glucose. The rate of starch fermentation was directly related to the level of glucoamylase activity. Strains with higher levels of glucoamylase expression fermented starch faster. The decline in starch fermentation rates toward the end of the fermentation was associated with accumulation of disaccharides and limit dextrins, poor substrates for glucoamylase. The buildup of these products in continuous fermentations inhibited glucoamylase activity and complete utilization of the starch. Under these conditions maltose-fermenting strains had a significant advantage over nonfermenting strains. The synthesis and secretion of glucoamylase showed no deleterious effects on cell growth rates, fermetation rates, and fermentation products.

  1. Initiator Effects in Reactive Extrusion of Starch Graft Copolymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Graft copolymers of starch with water-soluble polymers such as polyacrylamide have potential applications including hydrogels, superabsorbents, and thickening agents. Reactive extrusion is a rapid, continuous method for production of starch graft copolymers with high reaction and grafting efficienc...

  2. Ultrasonic modification of starch - Impact on granules porosity.

    PubMed

    Sujka, Monika

    2017-07-01

    Rice, corn, wheat, and potato starch granules suspended in water or ethanol were treated with ultrasounds at frequency of 20kHz and power 170W for 30min. Porosity of starch was investigated in terms of specific surface area (SBET), average pore size and pore size distribution using low-temperature nitrogen adsorption method. The significant increase of SBET was noted for all the studied starches sonicated in water and for potato starch modified in ethanol. Ultrasonic treatment influenced the average diameter of mesopores (2nmstarches suspended in ethanol and for potato starch granules suspended in water, but in the case of corn starch, the obtained value was slightly lower after sonication in water. Modification of starch with ultrasounds resulted in the formation of new pores in the studied range of diameter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular structure, functionality and applications of oxidized starches: A review.

    PubMed

    Vanier, Nathan Levien; El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; da Rosa Zavareze, Elessandra

    2017-04-15

    During oxidation, the hydroxyl groups of starch molecules are first oxidized to carbonyl groups, then to carboxyl groups. The contents of the carbonyl and carboxyl groups in a starch molecule therefore indicate the extent of starch oxidation. The mechanisms of starch oxidation with different oxidizing agents, including sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, ozone and sodium periodate, are described in this review. The effects of these oxidizing agents on the molecular, physicochemical, thermal, pasting and morphological properties of starch are described as well. In addition, the main industrial applications of oxidized starches are presented. The present review is important for understanding the effects of oxidation on starch properties, and this information may facilitate the development of novel oxidized starches for both food and non-food applications.

  4. Molecular evolution and sequence divergence of plant chalcone synthase and chalcone synthase-Like genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingying; Zhao, Wenwen; Wang, Zhicui; Zhu, Jingying; Liu, Qisong

    2014-06-01

    Plant chalcone synthase (CHS) and CHS-Like (CHSL) proteins are polyketide synthases. In this study, we evaluated the molecular evolution of this gene family using representative types of CHSL genes, including stilbene synthase (STS), 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS), bibenzyl synthase (BBS), acridone synthase (ACS), biphenyl synthase (BIS), benzalacetone synthase, coumaroyl triacetic acid synthase (CTAS), and benzophenone synthase (BPS), along with their CHS homologs from the same species of both angiosperms and gymnosperms. A cDNA-based phylogeny indicated that CHSLs had diverse evolutionary patterns. STS, ACS, and 2-PS clustered with CHSs from the same species (late diverged pattern), while CTAS, BBS, BPS, and BIS were distant from their CHS homologs (early diverged pattern). The amino-acid phylogeny suggested that CHS and CHSL proteins formed clades according to enzyme function. The CHSs and CHSLs from Polygonaceae and Arachis had unique evolutionary histories. Synonymous mutation rates were lower in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones, indicating that gene duplications occurred more recently in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones. Relative rate tests proved that late diverged CHSLs had unequal rates to CHSs from the same species when using fatty acid synthase, which evolved from the common ancestor with the CHS superfamily, as the outgroup, while the early diverged lineages had equal rates. This indicated that late diverged CHSLs experienced more frequent mutation than early diverged CHSLs after gene duplication, allowing obtaining new functions in relatively short period of time.

  5. A sputnik IV saga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  6. Probing starch-iodine interaction by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiongwei; An, Hongjie; Liu, Zhongdong; Yang, Hongshun; Wei, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    We explored the interaction of iodine with three crystalline type starches, corn, potato, and sweet potato starches using atomic force microscopy. Results revealed that starch molecules aggregated through interaction with iodine solution as well as iodine vapor. Detailed fine structures such as networks, chains, and super-helical structures were found in iodide solution tests. The nanostructures formed due to iodine adsorption could help to understand the formation and properties of the starch-iodine complex. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The starch granule associated proteomes of commercially purified starch reference materials from rice and maize.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Adam G; Marquez, Benazir K; Huebsch, Matthew P; Smith, Jeffrey C; Altosaar, Illimar

    2012-01-04

    Commercially available reference materials are integral components of many experimental protocols, as it is critical to compare one's results to those derived from well-characterized standards. Most reference materials are well defined, with all their components being cataloged. However, certain reference materials, such as commercially prepared starch samples, can have undefined components, potentially limiting their usefulness as standards. The proteome of commercially prepared starch has not been documented, and to that end, we initiated a mass spectrometry-based survey of the proteins associated with starch granules in commercially prepared rice and maize starch samples. We performed direct trypsin treatments of starch samples and sequenced both the water-soluble peptides liberated into the aqueous supernatant and the peptides released from the starch granule surface by isopropanol solvent washing. We discovered that the majority of proteins, in both rice and maize samples, were involved in either carbohydrate metabolism or storage. We also documented proteins that are markers for seed maturity and for starch mobilization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of resistant starch on hydrolysis and fermentation of corn starch for ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Rausch, Kent D; Graeber, James V; Schmidt, Shelly J; Buriak, Philip; Tumbleson, M E; Singh, Vijay

    2010-03-01

    Starch samples with 0% or 30% amylose were subjected to four different liquefaction enzyme treatments (at various temperature and pH conditions) followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Resistant starch (RS) measurements were conducted for the initial starch sample, after liquefaction and after SSF. Initial RS was higher for 30% amylose starch samples (16.53 g/100 g sample) compared with 0% amylose (0.76 g/100 g sample). Higher initial RS resulted in lower conversion of starch into sugars and lower final ethanol yields. The four enzymes hydrolyzed RS, but in varying amounts. Higher temperature liquefaction hydrolyzed a larger portion of RS, resulting in higher ethanol concentrations and lower final residual solids (non-fermentables), whereas lower temperature liquefaction hydrolyzed a smaller portion of RS and resulted in lower ethanol concentrations and higher final residual solids. Decreases in resistant starch after high temperature liquefaction were 55% to 74%, whereas low temperature liquefaction decreases were 11% to 43%. For all enzyme treatments, RS content of starch samples decreased further after SSF.

  9. Gluten-free starch noodles from sweet potato with reduced starch digestibility and enhanced protein content.

    PubMed

    Menon, Renjusha; Padmaja, G; Jyothi, A N; Asha, V; Sajeev, M S

    2016-09-01

    Sweet potato starch (SPS) noodles despite being gluten-free, has low nutritional value as it lacks proteins, minerals, vitamins etc. The objective of this study was to develop gluten-free starch noodles from sweet potato with enhanced protein content through fortification with whey protein concentrate (WPC) and to study the effect of protein fortification and blending SPS with banana (BS), cassava (CS) and mung bean (MBS) starches and annealed cassava starch (ACS) in reducing the starch digestibility. The highest protein retention in cooked noodles was obtained for 20 % WPC fortification, while the lowest starch digestibility was observed for 40 % BS fortified noodles followed by 50 % ACS fortified noodles. The highest resistant starch (RS) retention was for BS and ACS fortified noodles, which also had medium glycemic index of 66.3 (BS) and 67.2 (ACS). High sensory scores were obtained for the BS and 20 % WPC fortified noodles. The study showed that protein and/or BS fortification with SPS could enhance the acceptability as well as functional value of SPS noodles.

  10. Production of resistant starch by extrusion cooking of acid-modified normal-maize starch.

    PubMed

    Hasjim, Jovin; Jane, Jay-Lin

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize extrusion cooking and hydrothermal treatment to produce resistant starch (RS) as an economical alternative to a batch-cooking process. A hydrothermal treatment (110 degrees C, 3 d) of batch-cooked and extruded starch samples facilitated propagation of heat-stable starch crystallites and increased the RS contents from 2.1% to 7.7% up to 17.4% determined using AOAC Method 991.43 for total dietary fiber. When starch samples were batch cooked and hydrothermally treated at a moisture content below 70%, acid-modified normal-maize starch (AMMS) produced a greater RS content than did native normal-maize starch (NMS). This was attributed to the partially hydrolyzed, smaller molecules in the AMMS, which had greater mobility and freedom than the larger molecules in the NMS. The RS contents of the batch-cooked and extruded AMMS products after the hydrothermal treatment were similar. A freezing treatment of the AMMS samples at -20 degrees C prior to the hydrothermal treatment did not increase the RS content. The DSC thermograms and the X-ray diffractograms showed that retrograded amylose and crystalline starch-lipid complex, which had melting temperatures above 100 degrees C, accounted for the RS contents.

  11. Acetylated adipate of retrograded starch as RS 3/4 type resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Kapelko-Żeberska, M; Zięba, T; Spychaj, R; Gryszkin, A

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at producing acetylated adipate of retrograded starch (ADA-R) with various degrees of substitution with functional groups and at determining the effect of esterification degree on resistance and pasting characteristics of the produced preparations. Paste was prepared from native potato starch, and afterwards frozen and defrosted. After drying and disintegration, the paste was acetylated and crosslinked using various doses of reagents. An increase in the total degree of esterification of the produced ADA-R-preparation caused an increase in its resistance to the action of amyloglucosidase. Viscosity of the paste produced from ADA-R-preparation in a wide range of acetylation degrees was increasing along with increasing crosslinking of starch. The study demonstrated that acetylated adipate of retrograded starch may be classified as a preparation of RS 3/4 type resistant starch (retrograded starch/chemically-modified starch) with good texture-forming properties. The conducted modification offers the possibility of modeling the level of resistance of the produced preparation.

  12. Comparison of starch granule development and physicochemical properties of starches in wheat pericarp and endosperm.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xurun; Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Heng; Xiong, Fei; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (i) to characterize structural development of starch granule in pericarp and endosperm during wheat caryopsis growth; (ii) to compare physicochemical properties of starches in pericarp and endosperm; (iii) to further discover the relationships between pericarp starches and endosperm starches. Wheat pericarp and endosperm at different development stages were observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Structural properties of starches were determined using X-ray power diffraction and (13) C solid nuclear magnetic resonance. Pericarp starch granules (PSG) accumulated in amyloplasts and chloroplasts, and showed a typical accumulation peak at 5 days after fertilization (DAF), and then gradually decomposed during 5-22 DAF. PSG in the abdominal region showed a higher rate of decomposition compared to the dorsal region of pericarp. Endosperm starch granules (ESG) accumulated in amyloplasts, and occurred in endosperm cells at 5 DAF, then rapidly enriched the endosperm cells until 22 DAF. Compared with ESG, PSG were compound granules of irregular shape and small size distribution. The results also suggested lower amylose content and V-type single-helix content and higher proportions of double helices for PSG compared to ESG. Based on the structural development of PSG and ESG, we speculated that the saccharides resulting from decomposition of PSG, on one hand, enabled the pericarp to survive before maturity of wheat caryopsis and, on the other hand, provided extra nutrition for the growth of ESG. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  14. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  15. Alterations in Carbohydrate Intermediates in the Endosperm of Starch-Deficient Maize (Zea mays L.) Genotypes 1

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Rowel B.; Boyer, Charles D.; Shannon, Jack C.

    1992-01-01

    Metabolite levels in kernels of selected starch-deficient mutants of maize (Zea mays L.) were investigated to gain insight into partitioning of carbohydrate metabolism during kernel development. Several free sugars, hexose phosphates, triose phosphates, fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, and pyrophosphate were measured in normal, shrunken, shrunken-2, amylose extender dull waxy, and brittle genotypes, which were in a near-isogenic W64A background. These mutants were selected to include at least one lesion in both the cytosolic (shrunken) and amyloplastic (shrunken-2) compartments. All the starch-deficient genotypes contained elevated levels of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate and triose phosphates but reduced levels of pyrophosphate, indicating an enhanced glycolytic utilization of carbohydrates in response to the reduced utilization of sugars for starch synthesis. The shrunken kernels (sucrose synthase deficient) contained reduced levels of glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, and fructose-6-phosphate, and this reduction paralleled the reduction in starch accumulation, but levels of triose phosphates were elevated. In shrunken-2 kernels, glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, and fructose-6-phosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate were increased, but fructose-1,6-bisphosphate was lower. These findings support the view that hexose phosphate transport across the amyloplast envelope is more important for starch biosynthesis than transport of triose phosphates. The amylose extender dull waxy mutation showed less dramatic effects on hexose phosphates, but the triose phosphates were greatly increased. The brittle mutation, which has an unknown lesion, showed distinctly similar changes in metabolite levels with shrunken-2, suggesting that the lesion may be associated with the amyloplast. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668842

  16. Physical characterisation of high amylose maize starch and acylated high amylose maize starches.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ya-Mei; Hoobin, Pamela; Ying, DanYang; Burgar, Iko; Gooley, Paul R; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2015-03-06

    The particle size, water sorption properties and molecular mobility of high amylose maize starch (HAMS) and high amylose maize starch acylated with acetate (HAMSA), propionate (HAMSP) and butyrate (HAMSB) were investigated. Acylation increased the mean particle size (D(4,3)) and lowered the specific gravity (G) of the starch granules with an inverse relationship between the length of the fatty acid chain and particle size. Acylation of HAMS with fatty acids lowered the monolayer moisture content with the trend being HAMSBstarch granules by NMR spectroscopy with Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CMPG) experiments showed that T2 long was reduced in acylated starches and that drying and storage of the starch granules further reduced T2 long. Analysis of the Free Induction Decay (FID) focussing on the short components of T2 (correlated to the solid matrix), indicated that drying and subsequent storage resulted in alterations of starch at 0.33a(w) and that these changes were reduced with acylation. In vitro enzymatic digestibility of heated starch dispersions by bacterial α-amylase was increased by acylation (HAMSstarch. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cloricromene inhibits the induction of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Zingarelli, B; Carnuccio, R; Di Rosa, M

    1993-10-19

    The effect of cloricromene, a coumarin derivative, was investigated on the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) synthase induction in intact aortas from endotoxin shocked rats and in the murine macrophage cell line J774. Rings of thoracic aortas from lipopolysaccharide (4 mg/kg, i.v.)-shocked rats, contracted with phenylephrine, showed a progressive decrease in tone, that was of a greater magnitude than that of aortas from naive rats. Moreover, a decreased response to the constrictor effect of phenylephrine was observed in aortas from shocked rats. In vivo treatment with cloricromene (2 mg/kg, i.v.) 30 min before lipopolysaccharide administration partially prevented the loss in tone of aortic rings and improved their reactivity to phenylephrine. Murine J774 macrophages activated with lipopolysaccharide (100 ng/ml) produced significant amounts of nitrites (NO2-; 28.2 +/- 3.5 nmol/10(6) cells per 24 h). Cloricromene (2, 20 or 200 microM) added to the cells concomitantly with lipopolysaccharide inhibited NO2- production in a concentration-dependent manner. Maximum inhibition (84.0 +/- 8.0%) was observed when cloricromene (200 microM) was added to the cells 6 h before lipopolysaccharide, whereas it was ineffective when given 6 h after endotoxin. These results demonstrate that cloricromene inhibits the expression but not the activity of the inducible NO synthase.

  18. Thermoplastic starch films reinforced with talc nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Luciana; López, Olivia; López, Cintia; Zaritzky, Noemí; García, M Alejandra; Barbosa, Silvia; Villar, Marcelo

    2013-06-20

    Nanocomposite films of thermoplastic corn starch (TPS) with talc particles were obtained by thermo-compression in order to study the effect of filler on structure, optical, and thermal properties. Talc increased the films rigid phase, thus their cross-sections resulted more irregular. Talc preferential orientation within matrix and good compatibility between particles and TPS was observed by SEM. Slight crystalline structure changes in TPS matrix were measured by XRD and DSC, due to talc nucleating effect. Randomly dispersed talc nanoagglomerates and individual platelets were assessed by TEM. Laminar morphology and nano-sized particles allowed that nanocomposite films were optically transparent. TPS-talc films resulted heterogeneous materials, presenting domains rich in glycerol and others rich in starch. Talc incorporation higher than 3%, w/w increased softening resistance of the nanocomposites as stated by DMA. Relaxation temperatures of glycerol-rich phase shifted to higher values since talc reduces the mobility of starch chains.

  19. Retention of Cationic Starch onto Cellulose Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missaoui, Mohamed; Mauret, Evelyne; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2008-08-01

    Three methods of cationic starch titration were used to quantify its retention on cellulose fibres, namely: (i) the complexation of CS with iodine and measurement of the absorbency of the ensuing blue solution by UV-vis spectroscopy; (ii) hydrolysis of the starch macromolecules followed by the conversion of the resulting sugars to furan-based molecules and quantifying the ensuing mixture by measuring their absorbance at a Ι of 490 nm, using the same technique as previous one and; finally (iii) hydrolysis of starch macromolecules by trifluoro-acetic acid and quantification of the sugars in the resulting hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography. The three methods were found to give similar results within the range of CS addition from 0 to 50 mg per g of cellulose fibres.

  20. Starch: Structure, Properties, Chemistry, and Enzymology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robyt, John F.

    Starch is a very important and widely distributed natural product, occurring in the leaves of green plants, seeds, fruits, stems, roots, and tubers. It serves as the chemical storage form of the energy of the sun and is the primary source of energy for the organisms on the Earth. Starch is composed of two kinds of polysaccharides, amylose and amylopectin, exclusively composed of D-glucose residues with α-(1→4) linkages in a linear amylose and α-(1→4) linkages and ˜5% α-(1→6) branch linkages in amylopectin, both combined in a water-insoluble granule that is partially crystalline and whose size, shape, and morphology are dependent on its biological source. The properties, isolation, fractionation, enzymatic degradation, biosynthesis, chemical modification, and specific methods of analysis of starch are presented.

  1. Extrusion and characterization of thermoplastic starch sheets from "macho" banana.

    PubMed

    Alanís-López, P; Pérez-González, J; Rendón-Villalobos, R; Jiménez-Pérez, A; Solorza-Feria, J

    2011-08-01

    Starch isolated from macho banana was oxidized by using 2.5% and 3.5% (w/w) of sodium hypochlorite. Native and oxidized starches with glycerol were processed using a conical twin screw extruder to obtain thermoplastic laminates or sheets, which were partially characterized. Oxidized banana starches presented higher moisture and total starch but lower ash, protein, lipids, and apparent amylose content than the native starch. Micrographs of sheets from oxidized starches showed wrinkles and cavities presumably caused by the plasticizer, but with less free glycerol and unplasticized starch granules than those from native starch. Sheets from oxidized starch showed a notorious increase in all thermal parameters (To, Tp, and ΔH), mechanical properties (tensile strength, elongation at break, and elasticity), and solubility. Banana starch X-ray diffraction patterns corresponded to a mixture of the A- and B-type polymorphs, with apparently slightly higher crystallinity in oxidized specimens than in native starch. A similar trend was observed in the corresponding sheets. Due to the pollution problem caused by the conventional plastics, there has been a renewed interest in biodegradable sheets, because they may have the potential to replace conventional packaging materials. Banana starch might be an interesting raw material to be used as edible sheet, coating or in food packaging, and preservation, because it is biodegradable, cheap, innocuous, and abundant. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Amylose Content in Tuber Starch of Potato Cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato tuber is mostly water and starch. Approximately 20% of fresh tuber weight is the starch and the remainder is water. Most of the starch in the tuber, approximately 75%, is amylopectin and 25% amylose, but can vary depending on the cultivar. A total of 162 American (85) and foreign (77) potato ...

  3. Extraction of starch from wheat flour by alkaline solution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Separation of starch from wheat flour with high purity is very important for the analysis of starch such as amylose and amylopectin determination by size exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC). A procedure that extracts starch from flour by ethanol precipitation after dissolving flour in KOH and urea solution wa...

  4. Effect of hydrocolloids on functional properties of navy bean starch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of hydrocolloid replacement on the pasting properties of navy bean starch and on the properties of navy bean starch gels were studied. Navy bean starch was isolated, and blends were prepared with beta-glucan, guar gum, pectin and xanthan gum solutions. The total solids concentration was ...

  5. Starch-based Foam Composite Materials: processing and bioproducts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch is an abundant, biodegradable, renewable and low-cost commodity that has been explored as a replacement for petroleum-based plastics. By itself, starch is a poor replacement for plastics because of its moisture sensitivity and brittle properties. Efforts to improve starch properties and funct...

  6. Starch as a feedstock for bioproducts and packaging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Much progress has been achieved in developing starch-based feedstocks as a partial replacement for petroleum-based feedstocks. Although starch remains a poor direct substitute for plastics, composite starch-based materials have useful functional properties and are in commercial production as a repla...

  7. Composition, structure, physicochemical properties, and modifications of cassava starch.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan

    2015-05-20

    Cassava is highly tolerant to harsh climatic conditions and has great productivity on marginal lands. The supply of cassava starch, the major component of the root, is thus sustainable and cheap. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the composition, physical and chemical structures, physicochemical properties, nutritional quality, and modifications of cassava starch. Research opportunities to better understand this starch are provided.

  8. Evaluation of sorghum starch as a tablet disintegrant and binder.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A V; Panya, L B

    1987-06-01

    The starch prepared from the seeds of Sorghum bicolor, Moench has been evaluated as a disintegrant and binder in tablets of magnesium sulphate, calcium carbonate, sulphadimidine, and chloroquine phosphate to represent soluble and insoluble inorganic and organic substances. The starch performed as well as maize starch in binding and disintegrating properties and better than acacia as binder.

  9. Amylose Content in Tuber Starch of Wild Potato Species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Approximately 20% of potato tuber fresh weight is starch, which is composed of amylose (straight chains of glucose) and amylopectin (branched chains). Potato starch is low in amylose (~25%), but high amylose starch has superior nutritional qualities. Amylose content has been determined in tuber samp...

  10. HRP-Mediated Synthesis of Starch-Polyacrylamide Graft Copolymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Modified starch-based polymers can be engineered for specific properties by combining starch with synthetic polymers through graft copolymerization. Polyacrylamide grafted starches have received a great deal of applications in areas such as superabsorbent paper-making additives, drag reduction and ...

  11. HRP-Mediated Synthesis of Starch-Polyacrylamide Graft Copolymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Modified starch-based polymers can be engineered for specific properties by combining starch with synthetic polymers through graft copolymerization. Polyacrylamide grafted starch have received a great deal of applications in areas such as superabsorbent paper-making additives, drag reduction and te...

  12. Characterization of rice starches extracted from Indian cultivars.

    PubMed

    Gani, Adil; Wani, S M; Masoodi, F A; Salim, Rehana

    2013-04-01

    Physicochemical, morphological and pasting properties of starches isolated from four rice cultivars grown in India were studied. The amylose content ranged between 4.7 and 30.2% of starch, highest in K332 starch and lowest in SR1 starch. Swelling power, water solubility and water absorption capacity of starches increased with increase in temperature from 50 to 90 °C at 10 °C intervals. Highest swelling and water absorption was found in SR1 and lowest in K332 starches but reverse was observed in case of solubility that was highest for K332 and lowest for SR1 starch. The microstructure of starch granules from different rice cultivars showed the presence of mainly polyhedral granules having average size in the range of 4.0-5.2 µm. K332 showed the presence of smallest granules, whereas SR1 starch showed the presence of largest granules. X-ray diffraction pattern of rice starch from different cultivars showed typical A-type crystallinity. Pasting properties of starches differed significantly. Pasting temperature was highest for K332 and lowest for SR1, while peak viscosity was highest for aromatic rice and lowest for K448 starches. Higher setback was observed in K332 and lowest in SR1.

  13. Adsorption of Polyethylene from Solution onto Starch Film Surfaces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch films were prepared by jet cooking aqueous dispersions of high-amylose starch and then allowing the jet cooked dispersions to air-dry on Teflon surfaces. When the starch films were immersed in 1 % solutions of PE in 1-dodecanol, dodecane and xylene at 120º C and the solutions were allowed to...

  14. Starch Grain Distribution in Taproots of Defoliated Medicago sativa L.

    PubMed

    Habben, J E; Volenec, J J

    1990-11-01

    Defoliation of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) results in a cyclic pattern of starch degradation followed by reaccumulation in taproots. Characterization of changes in anatomical distribution of starch grains in taproots will aid our understanding of biochemical and physiological mechanisms involved in starch metabolism in taproots of this species. Our objectives were to determine the influence of defoliation on starch grain distribution and size variation in taproots of two alfalfa lines selected for contrasting concentrations of taproot starch. In addition, we used electron microscopy to examine the cellular environment of starch grains, and computer-based image optical analysis to determine how cross-sectional area of tissues influenced starch accumulation. Taproots of field-grown plants were sampled at defoliation and weekly thereafter over a 28-day period. Taproot segments were fixed in glutaraldehyde and prepared for either light or electron microscopy. Transverse sections were examined for number and size of starch grains and tissue areas were measured. Starch grains were located throughout bark tissues, but were confined primarily to ray parenchyma cells in wood tissues. During the first week of foliar regrowth after defoliation, starch grains in ray cells near the cambium disappeared first, while degradation of those near the center of the taproot was delayed. During the third and fourth weeks of regrowth, there was a uniform increase in number of starch grains per cell profile across the rays, but by 28 days after defoliation there were more starch grains in ray cells near the cambium than in cells near the center of the taproot (low starch line only). Bark tissues from both lines showed synchronous degradation and synthesis of starch grains that was not influenced greatly by cell location. Diameter of starch grains varied with cell location in medullary rays during rapid starch degradation, but was not influenced by cell position in bark tissues. Therefore

  15. Starch Granule Re-Structuring by Starch Branching Enzyme and Glucan Water Dikinase Modulation Affects Caryopsis Physiology and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Shahnoor S.; Obata, Toshihiro; Hebelstrup, Kim H.; Schwahn, Kevin; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Mateiu, Ramona V.; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Starch is of fundamental importance for plant development and reproduction and its optimized molecular assembly is potentially necessary for correct starch metabolism. Re-structuring of starch granules in-planta can therefore potentially affect plant metabolism. Modulation of granule micro-structure was achieved by decreasing starch branching and increasing starch-bound phosphate content in the barley caryopsis starch by RNAi suppression of all three Starch Branching Enzyme (SBE) isoforms or overexpression of potato Glucan Water Dikinase (GWD). The resulting lines displayed Amylose-Only (AO) and Hyper-Phosphorylated (HP) starch chemotypes, respectively. We studied the influence of these alterations on primary metabolism, grain composition, starch structural features and starch granule morphology over caryopsis development at 10, 20 and 30 days after pollination (DAP) and at grain maturity. While HP showed relatively little effect, AO showed significant reduction in starch accumulation with re-direction to protein and β-glucan (BG) accumulation. Metabolite profiling indicated significantly higher sugar accumulation in AO, with re-partitioning of carbon to accumulate amino acids, and interestingly it also had high levels of some important stress-related metabolites and potentially protective metabolites, possibly to elude deleterious effects. Investigations on starch molecular structure revealed significant increase in starch phosphate and amylose content in HP and AO respectively with obvious differences in starch granule morphology at maturity. The results demonstrate that decreasing the storage starch branching resulted in metabolic adjustments and re-directions, tuning to evade deleterious effects on caryopsis physiology and plant performance while only little effect was evident by increasing starch-bound phosphate as a result of overexpressing GWD. PMID:26891365

  16. Starch Granule Re-Structuring by Starch Branching Enzyme and Glucan Water Dikinase Modulation Affects Caryopsis Physiology and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Shahnoor S; Obata, Toshihiro; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Schwahn, Kevin; Fernie, Alisdair R; Mateiu, Ramona V; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Starch is of fundamental importance for plant development and reproduction and its optimized molecular assembly is potentially necessary for correct starch metabolism. Re-structuring of starch granules in-planta can therefore potentially affect plant metabolism. Modulation of granule micro-structure was achieved by decreasing starch branching and increasing starch-bound phosphate content in the barley caryopsis starch by RNAi suppression of all three Starch Branching Enzyme (SBE) isoforms or overexpression of potato Glucan Water Dikinase (GWD). The resulting lines displayed Amylose-Only (AO) and Hyper-Phosphorylated (HP) starch chemotypes, respectively. We studied the influence of these alterations on primary metabolism, grain composition, starch structural features and starch granule morphology over caryopsis development at 10, 20 and 30 days after pollination (DAP) and at grain maturity. While HP showed relatively little effect, AO showed significant reduction in starch accumulation with re-direction to protein and β-glucan (BG) accumulation. Metabolite profiling indicated significantly higher sugar accumulation in AO, with re-partitioning of carbon to accumulate amino acids, and interestingly it also had high levels of some important stress-related metabolites and potentially protective metabolites, possibly to elude deleterious effects. Investigations on starch molecular structure revealed significant increase in starch phosphate and amylose content in HP and AO respectively with obvious differences in starch granule morphology at maturity. The results demonstrate that decreasing the storage starch branching resulted in metabolic adjustments and re-directions, tuning to evade deleterious effects on caryopsis physiology and plant performance while only little effect was evident by increasing starch-bound phosphate as a result of overexpressing GWD.

  17. Starch Biosynthesis in Developing Wheat Grain 1

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Peter L.; Wood, John R.; Tyson, R. Huw; Bridges, Ian G.

    1988-01-01

    We have used 13C-labeled sugars and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry to study the metabolic pathway of starch biosynthesis in developing wheat grain (Triticum aestivum cv Mardler). Our aim was to examine the extent of redistribution of 13C between carbons atoms 1 and 6 of [1-13C] or [6-13C]glucose (or fructose) incorporated into starch, and hence provide evidence for or against the involvement of triose phosphates in the metabolic pathway. Starch synthesis in the endosperm tissue was studied in two experimental systems. First, the 13C sugars were supplied to isolated endosperm tissue incubated in vitro, and second the 13C sugars were supplied in vivo to the intact plant. The 13C starch produced by the endosperm tissue of the grain was isolated and enzymically degraded to glucose using amyloglucosidase, and the distribution of 13C in all glucosyl carbons was quantified by 13C-NMR spectrometry. In all of the experiments, irrespective of the incubation time or incubation conditions, there was a similar pattern of partial (between 15 and 20%) redistribution of label between carbons 1 and 6 of glucose recovered from starch. There was no detectable increase over background 13C incidence in carbons 2 to 5. Within each experiment, the same pattern of partial redistribution of label was found in the glucosyl and fructosyl moieties of sucrose extracted from the tissue. Since it is unlikely that sucrose is present in the amyloplast, we suggest that the observed redistribution of label occurred in the cytosolic compartment of the endosperm cells and that both sucrose and starch are synthesized from a common pool of intermediates, such as hexose phosphate. We suggest that redistribution of label occurs via a cytosolic pathway cycle involving conversion of hexose phosphate to triose phosphate, interconversion of triose phosphate by triose phosphate isomerase, and resynthesis of hexose phosphate in the cytosol. A further round of triose phosphate interconversion in

  18. Deformation mechanisms of plasticized starch materials.

    PubMed

    Mikus, P-Y; Alix, S; Soulestin, J; Lacrampe, M F; Krawczak, P; Coqueret, X; Dole, P

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this paper is to understand the influence of plasticizer and plasticizer amount on the mechanical and deformation behaviors of plasticized starch. Glycerol, sorbitol and mannitol have been used as plasticizers. After extrusion of the various samples, dynamic mechanical analyses and video-controlled tensile tests have been performed. It was found that the nature of plasticizer, its amount as well as the aging of the material has an impact on the involved deformation mechanism. The variations of volume deformation could be explained by an antiplasticization effect (low plasticizer amount), a phase-separation phenomenon (excess of plasticizer) and/or by the retrogradation of starch.

  19. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  20. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  1. Activities of respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase influenced by pharmacologically different antidepressants and mood stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Hroudova, Jana; Fisar, Zdenek

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions, impaired bioenergetics and dysfunction of neurotrophins are included in many neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. We investigated in vitro effects of pharmacologically different antidepressants and mood stabilizers on mitochondrial enzymes to discover, which mitochondrial functions could be involved in pathophysiology of mood disorders. In vitro effects of eight pharmacologically different antidepressants (desipramine, amitriptyline, imipramine, citalopram, venlafaxine, mirtazapine, tianeptine, and moclobemide) and three mood stabilizers (lithium, valproate, and olanzapine) on the activities of mitochondrial enzymes (citrate synthase and enzymes in electron transport chain, i.e. complexes I, II, IV) were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Most of the antidepressants and mood stabilizers inhibited the activities of respiratory electron transport chain complexes, complexes I and IV were the most affected. Statistically significant decrease of the complex I activity was caused by desipramine, amitriptyline, imipramine, citalopram, mirtazapine, valproate and olanzapine. Complex II was significantly inhibited only by amitriptyline, imipramine, citalopram and venlafaxine. Complex IV was significantly inhibited by all tested drugs except for citalopram and moclobemide. Unchanged or slightly increased citrate synthase activity was observed; significant activation of the enzyme was observed after citalopram, tianeptine and olanzapine. Our results indicate that antidepressants may act generally as inhibitors of complex I and complex IV of the electron transport chain. These mitochondrial enzymes are suggested as proper candidates in searching of new biological markers of mood disorders, targets of new antidepressants or predictors of response to pharmacotherapy.

  2. Characterization of Maize Amylose-Extender (ae) Mutant Starches. Part I: Relationship Between Resistant Starch Contents and Molecular Structures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endosperm starches were isolated from kernels of seven maize amylose-extender (ae) lines. The resistant starch (RS) contents, measured using AOAC method 991.43, showed that three new ae-mutant starch lines developed by the USDA-ARS Germplasm Enhancement (GEM) and Truman State University had larger R...

  3. Slowly digestible starch from heat-moisture treated waxy potato starch: preparation, structural characteristics, and glucose response in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat-moisture treatment (HMT) was optimized to increase the formation of slowly digestible starch (SDS) in waxy potato starch, and the structural and physiological properties of this starch were investigated. A maximum SDS content (41.8%) consistent with the expected value (40.1%) was obtained after...

  4. Properties of thermoplastic starch from cassave bagasse and cassava starch and their blends with poly (lactic acid).

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cassava bagasse is an inexpensive and broadly available waste byproduct from cassava starch production. It contains roughly 50% cassava starch along with mostly fiber and could be a valuable feedstock for various bioproducts. Cassava bagasse and cassava starch were used in this study to make fiber-r...

  5. Morphological and mechanical characterization of thermoplastic starch and its blends with polylactic acid using cassava starch and bagasse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study aims the use of an agro waste coming from the industrialization of cassava starch, known as cassava bagasse (BG). This material contains residual starch and cellulose fibers which can be used to obtain thermoplastic starch (TPS) and /or blends reinforced with fibers. In this context, it w...

  6. Reinforcement of injectable calcium phosphate cement by gelatinized starches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiling; Guan, Ying; Wei, Donglei; Gao, Chunxia; Yang, Huilin; Yang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Current injectable calcium phosphate bone cements (CPC) encounter the problems of low strength, high brittleness, and low cohesion in aqueous environment, which greatly hinder their clinical applications for loading-bearing bone substitution and minimally invasive orthopedic surgeries. Here, a strategy of using gelatinized starches to reinforce injectable CPC was investigated. Four types of starches, namely corn starch, crosslinked starch, cationic starch, and Ca-modified starch, were studied for their influence on CPC mechanical properties, injectability, setting times, anticollapsibility, and cytocompatibility. Gelatinized starch significantly improved compressive strength and modulus as well as strain energy density of CPC to different extents. Specifically, both corn starch and Ca-modified starch revealed sixfold and more than twofold increases in the compressive strength and modulus of CPC, respectively. The addition of gelatinized starches with proper contents increased the injectability and anticollapsibility of CPC. In addition, osteoblast proliferation tests on leaching solution of modified cements showed that gelatinized starches had no adverse effect on cell proliferation, and all cement samples resulted in better osteoblast proliferation compared to phosphate-buffered solution control. The mechanisms behind the reinforcing effect of different starches were preliminarily studied. Two possible mechanisms, reinforcement by the second phase of gelatinized starch and strong interlocking of apatite crystals, were proposed based on the results of starch zeta potential and viscosity, cement microstructure, and resultant mechanical properties. In conclusion, incorporating gelatinized starches could be an effective, facile, and bio-friendly strategy to reinforce injectable CPC and improve its mechanical stability, and thus, should be further studied and developed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Structural characteristics of slowly digestible starch and resistant starch isolated from heat-moisture treated waxy potato starch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Joo; Moon, Tae Wha

    2015-07-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the structural characteristics of slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS) fractions isolated from heat-moisture treated waxy potato starch. The waxy potato starch with 25.7% moisture content was heated at 120°C for 5.3h. Scanning electron micrographs of the cross sections of RS and SDS+RS fractions revealed a growth ring structure. The branch chain-length distribution of debranched amylopectin from the RS fraction had a higher proportion of long chains (DP ≥ 37) than the SDS+RS fraction. The X-ray diffraction intensities of RS and SDS+RS fractions were increased compared to the control. The SDS+RS fraction showed a lower gelatinization enthalpy than the control while the RS fraction had a higher value than the SDS+RS fraction. In this study we showed the RS fraction is composed mainly of crystalline structure and the SDS fraction consists of weak crystallites and amorphous regions.

  8. Synthesis, Acetylation, and Phosphorylation of Histone IV and Its Binding to DNA During Spermatogenesis in Trout*

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Andrew J.; Dixon, Gordon H.

    1972-01-01

    During spermatogenesis in trout testis, histone IV is extensively modified by acetylation and phosphorylation. To examine the relationship of synthesis of histone IV to its modification, histone IV labeled with [3H]aminoacids and inorganic [32P]phosphate was prepared from testis cells by acid extraction and column chromatography. Purified histone IV was resolved by starch gel electrophoresis into 10 bands, of which nine are modified by acetylation and/or phosphorylation. In the first 4 hr of labeling, the diacetyl-histone IV band showed the highest proportion of [3H]aminoacid label. After 12 hr of incorporation, more label was found in the triacetyl and tetraacetyl bands. A significant amount of amino-acid label in the two major bands (the unsubstituted and monoacetyl bands) of histone IV was not seen until 16 hr of incubation. From 1 to 12 days, the proportion of label in the unsubstituted and monoacetylated bands increased, while that in the tetra-, tri-, and monoacetyl bands decreased. Very little [3H]aminoacid was found in the phosphorylated bands of histone IV in the first 12 hr. However, after 16 hr about 20% of the total 3H was found in the phosphorylated bands. The proportion increased to 33% and remained at this level between 1 and 8 days, but, by 16 days, had decreased to 12% of the total. These data suggest that an “obligatory” acetylation of recently synthesized histone IV is involved in the correct binding of newly synthesized histone IV to DNA. We propose that ε-amino acetylation of lysyl residues 5, 8, 12, and 16 neutralizes their positive charges and allows the NH2-terminal region of histone IV to assume the correct conformation (in this case, an α-helix), and fit into the major groove of DNA. Deacetylation then “locks” histone IV to DNA by ionic linkages. The biological significance of phosphorylation of histone IV is not known. Images PMID:4505675

  9. Thermal properties of barley starch and its relation to starch characteristics.

    PubMed

    Källman, Anna; Vamadevan, Varatharajan; Bertoft, Eric; Koch, Kristine; Seetharaman, Koushik; Åman, Per; Andersson, Roger

    2015-11-01

    Amylopectin fine structure and starch gelatinization and retrogradation were studied in 10 different barley cultivars/breeding lines. Clusters and building blocks were isolated from the amylopectin by α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and their structure was characterized. Gelatinization was studied at a starch:water ratio of 1:3, and retrogradation was studied on gelatinized starch at starch:water ratio of 1:2, by differential scanning calorimetry. Three barley cultivars/breeding lines possessed the amo1 mutation, and they all had a lower molar proportion of chains of DP ≥38 and more of large building blocks. The amo1 mutation also resulted in a higher gelatinization temperature and a broader temperature interval during gelatinization. Overall, small clusters with a dense structure resulted in a higher gelatinization temperature while retrogradation was promoted by short chains in the amylopectin and many large building blocks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Starch nanocrystals and starch nanoparticles from waxy maize as nanoreinforcement: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bel Haaj, Sihem; Thielemans, Wim; Magnin, Albert; Boufi, Sami

    2016-06-05

    The morphological, structural and thermal behavior of starch nanocrystals (SNCs) extracted from waxy maize starch through an acid hydrolysis were compared with those of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) obtained through an ultrasound treatment starting from the same waxy maize starch. The SNPs were found to be completely amorphous, slightly smaller and had no surface charge, whereas the SNCs had the expected platelet-like morphology with a negative surface charge introduced as a result of the use of sulphuric acid in the acid hydrolysis step. SNCs also showed better thermal stability than SNPs in the presence of water. As a result of their platelet-like morphology, the SNCs performed better in reinforcing a polymer film. On the other hand, SNPs reduced the transparency of the nanocomposite films to a lesser extent than the SNCs due to their smaller size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Step-reduced synthesis of starch-silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Gownolla Malegowd; Jung, Jeyoung; Kim, Dowan; Seo, Jongchul

    2016-05-01

    In the present process, silver nanoparticles were directly synthesized in a single step by microwave irradiation of a mixture of starch, silver nitrate, and deionized water. This is different from the commonly adopted procedure for starch-silver nanoparticle synthesis in which silver nanoparticles are synthesized by preparing a starch solution as a reaction medium first. Thus, the additional step associated with the preparation of the starch solution was eliminated. In addition, no additional reducing agent was utilized. The adopted method was facile and straight forward, affording spherical silver nanoparticles with diameter below 10nm that exhibited good antibacterial activity. Further, influence of starch on the size of the silver nanoparticles was noticed.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Isotactic Polypropylene Modified with Thermoplastic Potato Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knitter, M.; Dobrzyńska-Mizera, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper selected mechanical properties of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) modified with potato starch have been presented. Thermoplastic starch (TPS) used as a modifier in the study was produced from potato starch modified with glycerol. Isotactic polypropylene/thermoplastic potato starch composites (iPP/TPS) that contained 10, 30, 50 wt.% of modified starch were examined using dynamic mechanical-thermal analysis, static tensile, Brinell hardness, and Charpy impact test. The studies indicated a distinct influence of a filler content on the mechanical properties of composites in comparison with non-modified polypropylene.

  13. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  14. Effects of chemical modification on in vitro rate and extent of food starch digestion: an attempt to discover a slowly digested starch.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B W; Bauer, L L; Fahey, G C

    1999-10-01

    Differences in glycemic and insulinemic responses to dietary starch are directly related to the rate of starch digestion. Chemical modification of starch may allow for the production of a slowly digested starch that could be used for the treatment of certain medical modalities. An in vitro method was utilized to evaluate the effects of chemical modification on the rate and extent of raw and cooked starch digestion. The extent of starch digestion was significantly reduced by dextrinization, etherification, and oxidation. However, the rate of starch digestion was not significantly affected by chemical modification. For most modified starches, as the degree of modification increased, the extent of digestion decreased, suggesting an increase in the amount of resistant starch. The results of this study suggest that chemically modified starch has a metabolizable energy value of <16.7 kJ/g. Chemically modified starch ingredients may serve as a good source of resistant starch in human and animal diets.

  15. Evaluation of a high throughput starch analysis optimised for wood.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Fini, Alessio; Ferrini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Starch is the most important long-term reserve in trees, and the analysis of starch is therefore useful source of physiological information. Currently published protocols for wood starch analysis impose several limitations, such as long procedures and a neutralization step. The high-throughput standard protocols for starch analysis in food and feed represent a valuable alternative. However, they have not been optimised or tested with woody samples. These have particular chemical and structural characteristics, including the presence of interfering secondary metabolites, low reactivity of starch, and low starch content. In this study, a standard method for starch analysis used for food and feed (AOAC standard method 996.11) was optimised to improve precision and accuracy for the analysis of starch in wood. Key modifications were introduced in the digestion conditions and in the glucose assay. The optimised protocol was then evaluated through 430 starch analyses of standards at known starch content, matrix polysaccharides, and wood collected from three organs (roots, twigs, mature wood) of four species (coniferous and flowering plants). The optimised protocol proved to be remarkably precise and accurate (3%), suitable for a high throughput routine analysis (35 samples a day) of specimens with a starch content between 40 mg and 21 µg. Samples may include lignified organs of coniferous and flowering plants and non-lignified organs, such as leaves, fruits and rhizomes.

  16. Evaluation of a High Throughput Starch Analysis Optimised for Wood

    PubMed Central

    Bellasio, Chandra; Fini, Alessio; Ferrini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Starch is the most important long-term reserve in trees, and the analysis of starch is therefore useful source of physiological information. Currently published protocols for wood starch analysis impose several limitations, such as long procedures and a neutralization step. The high-throughput standard protocols for starch analysis in food and feed represent a valuable alternative. However, they have not been optimised or tested with woody samples. These have particular chemical and structural characteristics, including the presence of interfering secondary metabolites, low reactivity of starch, and low starch content. In this study, a standard method for starch analysis used for food and feed (AOAC standard method 996.11) was optimised to improve precision and accuracy for the analysis of starch in wood. Key modifications were introduced in the digestion conditions and in the glucose assay. The optimised protocol was then evaluated through 430 starch analyses of standards at known starch content, matrix polysaccharides, and wood collected from three organs (roots, twigs, mature wood) of four species (coniferous and flowering plants). The optimised protocol proved to be remarkably precise and accurate (3%), suitable for a high throughput routine analysis (35 samples a day) of specimens with a starch content between 40 mg and 21 µg. Samples may include lignified organs of coniferous and flowering plants and non-lignified organs, such as leaves, fruits and rhizomes. PMID:24523863

  17. Resistant Starch: Promise for Improving Human Health12

    PubMed Central

    Birt, Diane F.; Boylston, Terri; Hendrich, Suzanne; Jane, Jay-Lin; Hollis, James; Li, Li; McClelland, John; Moore, Samuel; Phillips, Gregory J.; Rowling, Matthew; Schalinske, Kevin; Scott, M. Paul; Whitley, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing research to develop digestion-resistant starch for human health promotion integrates the disciplines of starch chemistry, agronomy, analytical chemistry, food science, nutrition, pathology, and microbiology. The objectives of this research include identifying components of starch structure that confer digestion resistance, developing novel plants and starches, and modifying foods to incorporate these starches. Furthermore, recent and ongoing studies address the impact of digestion-resistant starches on the prevention and control of chronic human diseases, including diabetes, colon cancer, and obesity. This review provides a transdisciplinary overview of this field, including a description of types of resistant starches; factors in plants that affect digestion resistance; methods for starch analysis; challenges in developing food products with resistant starches; mammalian intestinal and gut bacterial metabolism; potential effects on gut microbiota; and impacts and mechanisms for the prevention and control of colon cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Although this has been an active area of research and considerable progress has been made, many questions regarding how to best use digestion-resistant starches in human diets for disease prevention must be answered before the full potential of resistant starches can be realized. PMID:24228189

  18. Prospects for increasing starch and sucrose yields for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alison M

    2008-05-01

    In the short term, the production of bioethanol as a liquid transport fuel is almost entirely dependent on starch and sugars from existing food crops. The sustainability of this industry would be enhanced by increases in the yield of starch/sugar per hectare without further inputs into the crops concerned. Efforts to achieve increased yields of starch over the last three decades, in particular via manipulation of the enzyme ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, have met with limited success. Other approaches have included manipulation of carbon partitioning within storage organs in favour of starch synthesis, and attempts to manipulate source-sink relationships. Some of the most promising results so far have come from manipulations that increase the availability of ATP for starch synthesis. Future options for achieving increased starch contents could include manipulation of starch degradation in organs in which starch turnover is occurring, and introduction of starch synthesis into the cytosol. Sucrose accumulation is much less well understood than starch synthesis, but recent results from research on sugar cane suggest that total sugar content can be greatly increased by conversion of sucrose into a non-metabolizable isomer. A better understanding of carbohydrate storage and turnover in relation to carbon assimilation and plant growth is required, both for improvement of starch and sugar crops and for attempts to increase biomass production in second-generation biofuel crops.

  19. [Inheritance analysis of resistant starch content in kernels of wheat].

    PubMed

    Pang, Huan; Li, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Lin; Yin, Yong-An; Yuan, Hui-Gong; Wang, Zi-Bu

    2010-02-01

    In this study, three wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars with high and low levels of resistant starch contents each were selected to obtain 15 F1 combinations from a diallel cross without reciprocals to be used to study the inheritance of resistant starch content. The results of this study are useful to select new wheat cultivar with high level of resistant starch content. Annong 90202 and D68-20 were the best among the wheat cultivars tested for general combining ability of resistant starch content, which significantly increased the resistant starch content in its progenies. The specific combining ability of Annong 90202 x 04 Dan 28 and 06-5 x D68-20 were the best among the F1 combinations, and the values of specific combining ability effects were significantly higher than other combinations. The inheritance of resistant starch content fitted the additive-dominance model, and the degree of dominance was super dominance. The alleles for increasing resistant starch content were recessive. The distribution of alleles for increasing and reducing resistant starch contents in the parental lines was not even. The number of recessive alleles for resistant starch content was greater than the dominant alleles. Annong 90202 and 04 Dan 28 had more recessive genes controlling resistant starch content, while Ningchun 18 and Xinchun 5 had more dominant genes. The narrow sense heritability of resistant starch content was 36.49%.

  20. Water dynamics and retrogradation of ultrahigh pressurized wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2006-09-06

    The water dynamics and retrogradation kinetics behavior of gelatinized wheat starch by either ultrahigh pressure (UHP) processing or heat are investigated. Wheat starch completely gelatinized in the condition of 90, 000 psi at 25 degrees C for 30 min (pressurized gel) or 100 degrees C for 30 min (heated gel). The physical properties of the wheat starches were characterized in terms of proton relaxation times (T2 times) measured using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluated using commercially available continuous distribution modeling software. Different T2 distributions in both micro- and millisecond ranges between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels suggest distinctively different water dynamics between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels. Smaller water self-diffusion coefficients were observed for pressurized wheat starch gels and are indicative of more restricted translational proton mobility than is observed with heated wheat starch gels. The physical characteristics associated with changes taking place during retrogradation were evaluated using melting curves obtained with differential scanning calorimetry. Less retrogradation was observed in pressurized wheat starch, and it may be related to a smaller quantity of freezable water in pressurized wheat starch. Starches comprise a major constituent of many foods proposed for commercial potential using UHP, and the present results furnish insight into the effect of UHP on starch gelatinization and the mechanism of retrogradation during storage.

  1. C-type starches and their derivatives: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zebin; Jia, Xiangze; Zhao, Beibei; Zeng, Shaoxiao; Xiao, Jianbo; Zheng, Baodong

    2017-06-01

    The C-type starches are widely distributed in seeds or rhizomes of various legumes, medicinal plants, and crops. These carbohydrate polymers directly affect the application of starchy plant resources. The structural and crystal properties of starches are crucial parameters of starch granules, which significantly influence their physicochemical and mechanical properties. The unique crystal structure consisting of both A- and B-type polymorphs endows C-type starches with specific crystal adjustability. Furthermore, large proportions of resistant starches and slowly digestible starches are C-type starches, which contribute to benign glycemic response and proliferation of gut microflora. Here, we review the distribution of C-type starches in various plant sources, the structural models and crystal properties of C-type starches, and the behavior and functionality relevant to modified C-type starches. We outline recent advances, potential applications, and limitations of C-type starches in industry, aiming to provide a theoretical basis for further research and to broaden the prospects of its applications. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Slowly digestible starch: concept, mechanism, and proposed extended glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genyi; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2009-11-01

    Starch is the major glycemic carbohydrate in foods, and its nutritional property is related to its rate and extent of digestion and absorption in the small intestine. A classification of starch into rapidly digestible starch (RDS), slowly digestible starch (SDS), and resistant starch (RS) based on the in vitro Englyst test is used to specify the nutritional quality of starch. Both the RDS and RS fractions have been extensively studied while there are only limited studies on the intermediate starch fraction of SDS, particularly regarding its structural basis and slow digestion mechanism. The current understanding of SDS including its concept, measurement method, structural basis and mechanism, physiological consequences, and approaches to make SDS is reviewed. An in vivo method of extended glycemic index (EGI) is proposed to evaluate its metabolic effect and related health consequences.

  3. Resistant Starch Regulates Gut Microbiota: Structure, Biochemistry and Cell Signalling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoping; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Huang, Yanjun; He, Caimei; Yang, Huansheng; He, Shanping; Li, Jianzhong; Li, Jian; Hocher, Berthold; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Starch is one of the most popular nutritional sources for both human and animals. Due to the variation of its nutritional traits and biochemical specificities, starch has been classified into rapidly digestible, slowly digestible and resistant starch. Resistant starch has its own unique chemical structure, and various forms of resistant starch are commercially available. It has been found being a multiple-functional regulator for treating metabolic dysfunction. Different functions of resistant starch such as modulation of the gut microbiota, gut peptides, circulating growth factors, circulating inflammatory mediators have been characterized by animal studies and clinical trials. In this mini-review, recent remarkable progress in resistant starch on gut microbiota, particularly the effect of structure, biochemistry and cell signaling on nutrition has been summarized, with highlights on its regulatory effect on gut microbiota. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Drying and cracking mechanisms in a starch slurry.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Lucas

    2009-09-01

    Starch-water slurries are commonly used to study fracture dynamics. Drying starch cakes benefit from being simple, economical, and reproducible systems, and have been used to model desiccation fracture in soils, thin-film fracture in paint, and columnar joints in lava. In this paper, the physical properties of starch-water mixtures are studied, and used to interpret and develop a multiphase transport model of drying. Starch cakes are observed to have a nonlinear elastic modulus, and a desiccation strain that is comparable to that generated by their maximum achievable capillary pressure. It is shown that a large material porosity is divided between pore spaces between starch grains, and pores within starch grains. This division of pore space leads to two distinct drying regimes, controlled by liquid and vapor transport of water, respectively. The relatively unique ability for drying starch to generate columnar fracture patterns is shown to be linked to the unusually strong separation of these two transport mechanisms.

  5. Pressure-induced gelatinization of starch in excess water.

    PubMed

    Vallons, Katleen J R; Ryan, Liam A M; Arendt, Elke K

    2014-01-01

    High pressure processing is a promising non-thermal technology for the development of fresh-like, shelf-stable foods. The effect of high pressure on starch has been explored by many researchers using a wide range of techniques. In general, heat and pressure have similar effects: if sufficiently high, they both induce gelatinization of starch in excess water, resulting in a transition of the native granular structure to a starch paste or gel. However, there are significant differences in the structural and rheological properties between heated and pressurized starches. These differences offer benefits with respect to new product development. However, in order to implement high-pressure technology to starch and starch-containing products, a good understanding of the mechanism of pressure-induced gelatinization is necessary. Studies that are published in this area are reviewed, and the similarities and differences between starches gelatinized by pressure and by temperature are summarized.

  6. Genetic variation in the physical properties of sweet potato starch.

    PubMed

    Collado, L S; Mabesa, R C; Corke, H

    1999-10-01

    Sweet potato starch, prepared from 44 genotypes adapted to Philippine conditions, showed wide variation and distinctly different pasting profiles in Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA) analysis at 11% and 7% starch concentration. At 11% starch concentration, the pasting profiles were type A, characterized by high to moderate peak with a major breakdown and low cold paste viscosity. At 7%, the pasting profile was generally type C, characterized by the absence of a distinct peak with none to very slight breakdown and high cold paste viscosity. However, differentiation among genotypes was better achieved from RVA pasting profiles at 11% starch concentration. Peak viscosity (PV) and hot paste viscosity (HPV) at 11% starch paste concentration had significant negative correlation with amylose content. PV, HPV, and setback ratio were significantly correlated to adhesiveness of the starch gel. Sweet potato starch generally had high swelling volume but low solubilities at 92.5 degrees C.

  7. Characterization of normal and waxy corn starch for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Yangcheng, Hanyu; Jiang, Hongxin; Blanco, Michael; Jane, Jay-lin

    2013-01-16

    Objectives of this study were to compare ethanol production between normal and waxy corn using a cold fermentation process and to understand effects of starch structures and properties on ethanol production. Ethanol yields positively correlated (p < 0.01) with starch contents of kernels of the normal and waxy corn. The average starch-ethanol conversion efficiency of waxy corn (93.0%) was substantially greater than that of normal corn (88.2%). Waxy corn starch consisted of very little amylose and mostly amylopectin that had a shorter average branch chain length than normal corn amylopectin. Regression analyses showed that average amylopectin branch chain lengths and percentage of long branch chains (DP > 37) of waxy corn starch negatively correlated with the starch hydrolysis rate and the ethanol yield. These results indicated that starch structures and properties of the normal and waxy corn had significant effects on the ethanol yield using a cold fermentation process.

  8. Sedimentation field flow fractionation monitoring of rice starch amylolysis.

    PubMed

    Morelon, X; Battu, S; Salesse, C; Begaud-Grimaud, G; Cledat, D; Cardot, P J P

    2005-11-04

    Enzymatic starch granule hydrolysis is one of the most important reactions in many industrial processes. In this work, we investigated the capacity of SdFFF to monitor the native rice starch amylolysis. In order to determine if fractogram changes observed were correlated to granule biophysical modifications which occurred during amylolysis, SdFFF separation was associated with particle size distribution analysis. The results showed that SdFFF is an effective tool to monitor amylolysis of native rice starch. SdFFF analysis was a rapid (less than 10 min), simple and specific method to follow biophysical modifications of starch granules. These results suggested many different applications such as testing series of enzymes and starches. By using sub-population sorting, SdFFF could be also used to better understand starch hydrolysis mechanisms or starch granule structure.

  9. Preparation, physicochemical characterization and application of acetylated lotus rhizome starches.

    PubMed

    Sun, Suling; Zhang, Ganwei; Ma, Chaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Acetylated lotus rhizome starches were prepared, physicochemically characterized and used as food additives in puddings. The percentage content of the acetyl groups and degree of substitution increased linearly with the amount of acetic anhydride used. The introduction of acetyl groups was confirmed via Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The values of the pasting parameters were lower for acetylated starch than for native starch. Acetylation was found to increase the light transmittance (%), the freeze-thaw stability, the swelling power and the solubility of the starch. Sensorial scores for puddings prepared using native and acetylated lotus rhizome starches as food additives indicated that puddings produced from the modified starches with superior properties over those prepared from native starch. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Drying and cracking mechanisms in a starch slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, Lucas

    2009-09-01

    Starch-water slurries are commonly used to study fracture dynamics. Drying starch cakes benefit from being simple, economical, and reproducible systems, and have been used to model desiccation fracture in soils, thin-film fracture in paint, and columnar joints in lava. In this paper, the physical properties of starch-water mixtures are studied, and used to interpret and develop a multiphase transport model of drying. Starch cakes are observed to have a nonlinear elastic modulus, and a desiccation strain that is comparable to that generated by their maximum achievable capillary pressure. It is shown that a large material porosity is divided between pore spaces between starch grains, and pores within starch grains. This division of pore space leads to two distinct drying regimes, controlled by liquid and vapor transport of water, respectively. The relatively unique ability for drying starch to generate columnar fracture patterns is shown to be linked to the unusually strong separation of these two transport mechanisms.

  11. Amyloplast Membrane Protein SUBSTANDARD STARCH GRAIN6 Controls Starch Grain Size in Rice Endosperm1

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Ryo; Maekawa, Masahiko; Kusano, Miyako; Tomita, Katsura; Kondo, Hideki; Nishimura, Hideki; Crofts, Naoko; Fujita, Naoko; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Starch is a biologically and commercially important polymer of glucose. Starch is organized into starch grains (SGs) inside amyloplasts. The SG size differs depending on the plant species and is one of the most important factors for industrial applications of starch. There is limited information on genetic factors regulating SG sizes. In this study, we report the rice (Oryza sativa) mutant substandard starch grain6 (ssg6), which develops enlarged SGs in endosperm. Enlarged SGs are observed starting at 3 d after flowering. During endosperm development, a number of smaller SGs appear and coexist with enlarged SGs in the same cells. The ssg6 mutation also affects SG morphologies in pollen. The SSG6 gene was identified by map-based cloning and microarray analysis. SSG6 encodes a protein homologous to aminotransferase. SSG6 differs from other rice homologs in that it has a transmembrane domain. SSG6-green fluorescent protein is localized in the amyloplast membrane surrounding SGs in rice endosperm, pollen, and pericarp. The results of this study suggest that SSG6 is a novel protein that controls SG size. SSG6 will be a useful molecular tool for future starch breeding and applications. PMID:26792122

  12. Analysis of octenylsuccinate rice and tapioca starches: Distribution of octenylsuccinic anhydride groups in starch granules.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Kristin; Reuhs, Bradley L; Ovando Martinez, Maribel; Simsek, Senay

    2016-11-15

    Characterization of the fine structure of octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) starch would lead to a better understanding of functional properties. OSA rice and tapioca starches were analyzed using microscopy, liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Chain length distribution of amylopectin changed significantly (P<0.05) after OSA esterification. Weight averaged degree of polymerization (DPw) decreased significantly (P<0.05) from 16.47 to 13.29 and from 14.87 to 12.47 in native and OSA rice and tapioca starches, respectively. The chain length distribution of pure amylopectin fractions suggested that OSA groups were not present in the amylopectin portion of the starch. (1)H NMR analysis of pure amylose and amylopectin fractions indicated that OSA substitution was present only in amylose fractions of rice and tapioca starches. Esterification with 3% OSA results in starch that has OSA substituted mainly on amylose chains or possibly on amylopectin chains that have been hydrolyzed from the amylopectin molecules during esterification. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Design of starch coated seed cotton dryers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A model was developed for the design and analysis of a high temperature tunnel dryer, primarily used with a new cotton ginning product, EASIflo ® cottonseed (starch-coated cottonseed). This form of cottonseed has emerged as a viable, value-added product for the cotton ginning industry. Currently, li...

  14. Reactions of Starch in Ionic Liquids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We found that starches are found to be soluble at 80 ºC in ionic liquids such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (BMIMdca) in concentration up to 10% (w/w). Higher concentrations of biopolymers in these novel solvents resulted in solutions w...

  15. Iodine catalyzed acetylation of starch and cellulose

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch and cellulose, earth's most abundant biopolymers, are of tremendous economic importance. Over 90% of cotton and 50% of wood are made of cellulose. Wood and cotton are the major resources for all cellulose products such as paper, textiles, construction materials, cardboard, as well as such c...

  16. Resistant starch in food: a review.

    PubMed

    Raigond, Pinky; Ezekiel, Rajarathnam; Raigond, Baswaraj

    2015-08-15

    The nutritional property of starch is related to its rate and extent of digestion and absorption in the small intestine. For nutritional purposes, starch is classified as rapidly available, slowly available and resistant starch (RS). The exact underlying mechanism of relative resistance of starch granules is complicated because those factors are often interconnected. The content of RS in food is highly influenced by food preparation manner and processing techniques. Physical or chemical treatments also alter the level of RS in a food. Commercial preparations of RS are now available and can be added to foods as an ingredient for lowering the calorific value and improving textural and organoleptic characteristics along with increasing the amount of dietary fiber. RS has assumed great importance owing to its unique functional properties and health benefits. The beneficial effects of RS include glycemic control and control of fasting plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels and absorption of minerals. This review attempts to analyze the information published, especially in the recent past, on classification, structure, properties, applications and health benefits of RS.

  17. Breadmaking with zein-starch dough

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mixtures of maize prolamins (zein) and starch form a cohesive, extensible, viscoelastic dough when mixed above zein's glass transition temperature, e.g. at 35-40 degrees Celsius. Although this phenomenon has long been known, it has not yet been successfully used for gluten-free breadmaking. We fou...

  18. Starch digestion and absorption in nonruminants.

    PubMed

    Gray, G M

    1992-01-01

    Starch digestion and absorption is augmented appreciably by physical processing of grain or legume and by heating to 100 degrees C for several minutes before its ingestion. Starch, a polysaccharide composed of alpha 1,4-linked glucose units (amylose) and alpha 1,4-1,6-linked branched structure (amylopectin), is cleaved in the duodenal cavity by secreted pancreatic alpha-amylase to a disaccharide (maltose), trisaccharide (maltotriose), and branched alpha-dextrins. These final oligosaccharides are hydrolyzed efficiently by complimentary action of three integral brush border enzymes at the intestinal surface: glucoamylase (maltase-glucoamylase, amyloglucosidase), sucrase (maltase-sucrase) and alpha-dextrinase (isomaltase). The final monosaccharide glucose product is then cotransported into the enterocyte along with Na+ by a specific brush border 75-kDa transport protein in the rate-limiting step for overall starch assimilation. By virtue of this sequential luminal and membrane digestion followed by glucose transport, starch is assimilated in a very efficient manner in nonruminants.

  19. Novel products from starch based feedstocks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There has been progress in the utilization of starch as a partial replacement for petroleum based plastics, but it remains a poor direct substitute for plastics, and a moderate one for composites. Our research focuses on using polymers produced from direct fermentation such as poly(lactic acid) or m...

  20. Starch-lipid composites containing cimmamaldehyde

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The formulation of a starch-lipid composite containing cinnamaldehyde as antimicrobial agent has been studied. Cinnamaldehyde was incorporated as an emulsion using Acetem 90-50K as a carrier and Tween 60 as the emulsifier. Oil in water emulsions were prepared by direct emulsification using a high sh...

  1. Continuous enzymatic liquefaction of starch for saccharification

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.E.; Black, L.T.; Bagby, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    A process was explored for continuous enzymatic liquefaction of corn starch at high concentration and subsequent saccharification to glucose. The process appears to be quite efficient for conversion of starch to glucose and enzymatic liquefaction and should be readily adaptable to industrial fermentation processes. Preliminary work indicated that milled corn or other cereal grains also can be suitably converted by such a process. Essentially, the process involved incorporation of a thermostable, bacterial alpha-amylase for liquefaction and, subsequently, of a glucoamylase into the continuous mixer under conditions conductive to rapid enzymatic hydrolyses. Also studied was the effect on substrate liquefaction of variables such as starch concentration (40-70%), level of alpha-amylase (0.14-0.4%, dry starch basis), temperature (70-100 degrees C), pH (5.8-7.1), and residence time (6 and 12 minutes). The degree of liquefaction was assessed by determining 1) the Brookfield viscosity, 2) the amount of reducing groups, and 3) the rate and extent of glucose formed after glucoamylase treatment. Best liquefaction processing conditions were achieved by using 50-60% starch concentration, at 95 degrees C, with 0.4% alpha-amylase, and a 6 minute residence period in the mixer. Under these conditions, rates and extents of glucose obtained after glucoamylase treatment approached those obtained in longer laboratory batch liquefactions. The amount of glucose formed in 24 hours with the use of 0.4% glucoamylase was 86% of theory after a 6-min continuous liquefaction, compared to 90% for a 30-min laboratory batch liquefaction (95 degrees C, 0.4% alpha-amylase). (Refs. 15).

  2. Continuous enzymatic liquefaction of starch for saccharification.

    PubMed

    Carr, M E; Black, L T; Bagby, M O

    1982-11-01

    A process was explored for continuous enzymatic liquefaction of corn starch at high concentration and subsequently saccharification to glucose. The process appears to be quite efficient for conversion of starch to glucose and enzymatic liquefaction and should be readily adaptable to industrial fermentation processes. Preliminary work indicated that milled corn or other cereal grains also can be suitably converted by such a process. Essentially, the process involved incorporation of a thermostable, bacterial alpha-amylase for liquefaction and, subsequently, of a glucoamylase into the continuous mixer under conditions conductive to rapid enzymatic hydrolyses. Also studied was the effect on substrate liquefaction of variable such as starch concentration (40-70 degrees ), level of alpha-amylase (0.14-0.4%, dry starch basis), temperature (70-100 degrees C), pH (5.8-7.1), and residence time (6 and 12 min). The degree of liquefaction was assessed by determining (1) the Brookfield viscosity, (2) the amount of reducing groups, and (3) the rate and extent of glucose formed after glucoamylase treatment. Best liquefaction process conditions were achieved by using 50-60% starch concentration, at 95 degrees C, with 0.4% alpha-amylase, and a 6-min residence period in the mixture. Under these conditions, rate and extents of glucose obtained after glucoamylase treatment approached those obtained in longer laboratory batch liquefactions. The amount of glucose formed in 24h with the use of 0.4% glucoamylase was 86% of theory after a 6-min continuous liquefaction, compared to 90% for a 30-min laboratory batch liquefaction (95 degrees C, 0.4% alpha-amylase).

  3. C-type starch from high-amylose rice resistant starch granules modified by antisense RNA inhibition of starch branching enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cunxu; Xu, Bin; Qin, Fengling; Yu, Huaguang; Chen, Chong; Meng, Xianglen; Zhu, Lijia; Wang, Youping; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan

    2010-06-23

    High-amylose starch is a source of resistant starch (RS) which has a great benefit on human health. A transgenic rice line (TRS) enriched amylose and RS had been developed by antisense RNA inhibition of starch branching enzymes. In this study, the native starch granules were isolated from TRS grains as well as the wild type, and their crystalline type was carefully investigated before and after acid hydrolysis. In high-amylose TRS rice, the C-type starch, which might result from the combination of both A-type and B-type starch, was observed and subsequently confirmed by multiple physical techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and Fourier transform infrared. Moreover, the change of starch crystalline structure from C- to B-type during acid hydrolysis was also observed in this RS-rich rice. These data could add to our understanding of not only the polymorph structure of cereal starch but also why high-amylose starch is more resistant to digestion.

  4. 78 FR 2390 - CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint Take notice... IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC and CSOLAR IV North, LLC (collectively...

  5. Hydrolysis of native and heat-treated starches at sub-gelatinization temperature using granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Uthumporn, U; Shariffa, Y N; Karim, A A

    2012-03-01

    The effect of heat treatment below the gelatinization temperature on the susceptibility of corn, mung bean, sago, and potato starches towards granular starch hydrolysis (35°C) was investigated. Starches were hydrolyzed in granular state and after heat treatment (50°C for 30 min) by using granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme for 24 h. Hydrolyzed heat-treated starches showed a significant increase in the percentage of dextrose equivalent compared to native starches, respectively, with corn 53% to 56%, mung bean 36% to 47%, sago 15% to 26%, and potato 12% to 15%. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed the presence of more porous granules and surface erosion in heat-treated starch compared to native starch. X-ray analysis showed no changes but with sharper peaks for all the starches, suggested that hydrolysis occurred on the amorphous region. The amylose content and swelling power of heat-treated starches was markedly altered after hydrolysis. Evidently, this enzyme was able to hydrolyze granular starches and heat treatment before hydrolysis significantly increased the degree of hydrolysis.

  6. Analysis of protein complexes in wheat amyloplasts reveals functional interactions among starch biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tetlow, Ian J; Beisel, Kim G; Cameron, Scott; Makhmoudova, Amina; Liu, Fushan; Bresolin, Nicole S; Wait, Robin; Morell, Matthew K; Emes, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions among enzymes of amylopectin biosynthesis were investigated in developing wheat (Triticum aestivum) endosperm. Physical interactions between starch branching enzymes (SBEs) and starch synthases (SSs) were identified from endosperm amyloplasts during the active phase of starch deposition in the developing grain using immunoprecipitation and cross-linking strategies. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments using peptide-specific antibodies indicate that at least two distinct complexes exist containing SSI, SSIIa, and either of SBEIIa or SBEIIb. Chemical cross linking was used to identify protein complexes containing SBEs and SSs from amyloplast extracts. Separation of extracts by gel filtration chromatography demonstrated the presence of SBE and SS forms in protein complexes of around 260 kD and that SBEII forms may also exist as homodimers. Analysis of cross-linked 260-kD aggregation products from amyloplast lysates by mass spectrometry confirmed SSI, SSIIa, and SBEII forms as components of one or more protein complexes in amyloplasts. In vitro phosphorylation experiments with gamma-(32)P-ATP indicated that SSII and both forms of SBEII are phosphorylated. Treatment of the partially purified 260-kD SS-SBE complexes with alkaline phosphatase caused dissociation of the assembly into the respective monomeric proteins, indicating that formation of SS-SBE complexes is phosphorylation dependent. The 260-kD SS-SBEII protein complexes are formed around 10 to 15 d after pollination and were shown to be catalytically active with respect to both SS and SBE activities. Prior to this developmental stage, SSI, SSII, and SBEII forms were detectable only in monomeric form. High molecular weight forms of SBEII demonstrated a higher affinity for in vitro glucan substrates than monomers. These results provide direct evidence for the existence of protein complexes involved in amylopectin biosynthesis.

  7. Shedding of hyaluronate synthase from streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Mausolf, A; Jungmann, J; Robenek, H; Prehm, P

    1990-01-01

    Hyaluronate synthase was shed into the culture medium from growing streptococci (group C) together with nascent hyaluronate. The mechanism of solubilization was analysed using isolated protoplast membranes. Solubilization increased when membranes were suspended in larger volumes, but it was temperature-independent and was not inhibited by protease inhibitors. Increased hyaluronate chain length enhanced solubilization. The soluble synthase could re-integrate into Streptococcal membranes in a saturable manner. The soluble synthase behaved like an integral membrane protein, although it was not integrated into phospholipid vesicles. In sucrose velocity centrifugation the synthase had a higher sedimentation rate in detergent-free solution, indicating that it existed in an aggregated state. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2109602

  8. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 s