Science.gov

Sample records for starr-edwards prosthetic aortic

  1. Thirty-Seven-Year Durability of a Starr-Edwards Aortic Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ozkokeli, Mehmet; Ates, Mehmet; Ekinci, Abdurrahman; Akcar, Murat

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus. He had undergone aortic valve replacement with a Starr-Edwards prosthesis 37 years earlier. Because of uncontrolled infection despite antibiotic treatment, the patient underwent successful surgical replacement of the prosthetic valve. PMID:15902834

  2. Haemolysis with Björk-Shiley and Starr-Edwards prosthetic heart valves: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Slater, S. D.; Sallam, I. A.; Bain, W. H.; Turner, M. A.; Lawrie, T. D. V.

    1974-01-01

    Slater, S. D., Sallam, I. A., Bain, W. H., Turner, M. A., and Lawrie, T. D. V. (1974).Thorax, 29, 624-632. Haemolysis with Björk-Shiley and Starr-Edwards prosthetic heart valves: a comparative study. A comparison was made of the haemolytic complications in 85 patients with two different types of Starr-Edwards cloth-covered ball and cage prosthesis with those in 44 patients with the Björk-Shiley tilting disc valve. Intravascular haemolysis, as detected by the presence of haemosiderinuria, occurred significantly less often with the Björk-Shiley than with the Starr-Edwards valve, the overall incidence with aortic, mitral or multiple replacements being 31%, 15%, and 20% for Björk-Shiley and 94%, 92%, and 88% for Starr-Edwards valves respectively. There was no significant difference in the frequency of haemolysis between each of the two types of Starr-Edwards prosthesis studied at either the aortic (2300 versus 2310 model) or mitral (6300 versus 6310) site. Haemolytic anaemia developed in only one patient with a Björk-Shiley valve but was common though usually mild with Starr-Edwards prostheses, particularly aortic valve replacements with the 2300 model and in aortic plus mitral (± tricuspid) replacements. The greater severity of haemolysis produced by Starr-Edwards valves, again especially of the latter types, was further demonstrated by higher serum lactate dehydrogenase and 24-hour urinary iron levels. It is concluded that the Björk-Shiley tilting disc valve represents a significant advance in the amelioration of the haemolytic complications of prosthetic valves. PMID:4450173

  3. Preserving a Well-Functioning 33-Year-Old Starr-Edwards Aortic Prosthesis in Repeat Aortic Root Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Alimov, Victor K.; Rousou, John A.; Pluchino, Fabrizio I.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old obese male patient in whom we found a well-functioning 33-year-old Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis during repeat aortic surgery. Rather than explant the prosthesis, we remodeled the aortic root, almost completely removing the aortic sinuses and leaving only a pillar of aortic tissue around the coronary ostia. The proximal end of a Hemashield tube-graft was then scalloped to accommodate the remaining aortic tissue. The patient's heart function was excellent after his weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. Simplifying the repeat aortic root repair, by preserving a well-functioning Starr-Edwards valve, might lead to a better outcome in similar cases. We also discuss other instances of this valve's durability. PMID:28100977

  4. Ten year clinical evaluation of Starr-Edwards 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, D; Fessatidis, I; Sapsford, R; Oakley, C

    1987-01-01

    The long term performance characteristics of the 2400 and 1260 series of Starr-Edwards aortic prostheses were investigated by a follow up study of clinical outcome of 327 patients discharged from hospital with isolated aortic valve replacement. Follow up lasted for up to 10 years and was based on 1616 patient-years. The 2400 series cloth covered tracked valve was implanted in 182 patients from 1974 to 1980 and the 1260 series bare strut silastic ball valve was inserted in 145 patients from 1979 to 1983. Total 10 year mortality and valve related morbidity were low and no cases of mechanical valve failure were recorded. There were no significant actuarial differences in mortality or valve related morbidity between the 2400 and 1260 valves. Starr-Edwards models 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses showed excellent durability without any mechanical failures over a 10 year period. The long term outcome of isolated aortic valve replacement with these models is associated with a low frequency of valve related complications. PMID:3580223

  5. Thrombo-embolic complications of the cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses No. 2300 aortic and No. 6300 mitral

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, J.; Molloy, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The thrombo-embolic complications of the cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses No. 2300 aortic and No. 6300 mitral followed for an average of 14 months in 155 patients are reviewed. There was a high incidence of early fatal and disabling thrombo-embolus in patients having mitral valve replacement. Late emboli were more common after aortic valve replacement. Anticoagulant control was unsatisfactory and not without hazards. PMID:4685210

  6. Twenty-four years' implant duration of the aortic Starr-Edwards Silastic ball prosthesis: a valve of the past?

    PubMed

    Mächler, H E; Schmidt, C H; Neuner, P; Iberer, F; Anelli-Monti, M; Dacar, D; Rigler, B; Kraft-Kinz, J

    1993-01-01

    Six years after the first aortic valve replacement with the Starr-Edwards Silastic ball prosthesis at Oregon Health Sciences University, the model 1260 was implanted in a 44-year-old patient at our department. During 24 years no signs of dysfunction, thromboembolism, thrombosis, periprosthetic leaks or hemolysis were observed. Material test showed no signs of fatigue. The dimension of the Silastic poppet was found to be one millimeter less than the original specifications of these poppets and there were some lipid infiltrations. Functionally the poppet was found to be nonvariant. Histologic findings detected focal hyalinization and giant cells without signs of acute inflammation or ulceration. With regard to its reliability and durability, the Starr-Edwards valve prosthesis should not be viewed with disfavor.

  7. Prosthetic Valve Dysfunction 35 Years after Mitral Valve Replacement with a Starr-Edwards Caged-disc Valve.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Ohara, Takahiro; Takashio, Seiji; Sakamoto, Mari; Wada, Yuko; Nakamura, Kenji; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Okamoto, Yoko; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of dyspnea. He had a history of mitral valve replacement (MVR) with a Starr-Edwards (SE) caged-disc valve at the age of 14. Echocardiography revealed elevated trans-valvular pressure gradient of the mitral prosthetic valve with neither disk motion abnormality nor abnormal structure. Catheterization confirmed an elevation of the mean diastolic gradient of the mitral valve to 12.3 mmHg. Re-MVR was performed, and abnormal tissue attached to the cage of the valve and proliferating beneath the valve was observed. Histologic examination revealed them as fibrinous tissue and mild pannus proliferation, respectively. This rare case report focuses on long-term follow-up and the complication of a SE caged-disc valve. A SE caged-disc valve may become stenotic, only detected with a trans-valvular pressure gradient without any disk motion abnormality or abnormal structure during a prolonged follow-up period.

  8. Late ball variance with the Model 1000 Starr-Edwards aortic valve prosthesis. Risk analysis and strategy of operative management.

    PubMed

    Grunkemeier, G L; Starr, A

    1986-06-01

    The first generation of aortic ball-valve prostheses, used until 1965, was associated with poppet damage owing to fatty infiltration of the silicone rubber ball, a phenomenon termed ball variance. For the Model 1000 Starr-Edwards valves, almost all cases were discovered before 8 years. However, a review of our patients still at risk with the original valve and poppet, prompted by other recent reports of late ball variance, has shown that severe variance can exist up to 20 years after implantation. There is a relationship between the year of valve implantation and the timing and severity of ball variance for the overall series of patients surviving operation, but for the subgroup currently at risk the sample sizes are too small to detect any difference, if one still exists. Only three of 12 patients in the current subset were found to have severe variance. Simple ball change has been the operation of choice. Prophylactic reoperation is not indicated in the current subset, but patients require careful follow-up and should be considered for reoperation should symptoms develop.

  9. Diastolic murmurs in the presence of Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, R A; McAnulty, J H; Starr, A; Rahimtoola, S H

    1975-03-01

    Diastolic murmurs associated with the Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis have not been described previously. In this report, five patients with mitral prostheses are described in whom apical mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs resulted from two different causes. Three patients had clots obstructing the prosthetic orifice. The other two had normally functioning protheses and moderately severe aortic insufficiency. The occurrence of mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs in the presence of a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve demonstrates that 1) the mid-diastolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete mitral valve opening, premature mitral valve closure, vibrating mitral leaflets, or relative mitral stenosis and 2) the presystolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete valve opening or presystolic mitral regurgitation. However, the presystolic murmur was associated with early closure movement of the presthetic poppet.

  10. The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, A M

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve marked a new era in the treatment of valvular heart disease. Until the development of the Starr-Edwards valve, there were no published reports of patients who had lived longer than 3 months with a prosthetic valve in the mitral position. This valve was the result of a unique partnership between a young surgeon, Dr. Albert Starr, and an experienced engineer, Mr. Lowell Edwards. Working as a team, these 2 men developed and successfully implanted the 1st Starr-Edwards valve within less than 2 years of their 1st meeting. Their key to success was their willingness and ability to make repeated modifications to their design to solve each clinical problem as it arose. Their constant focus on the clinical goal aided the rapid transformation of their design from a leaflet valve to a shielded ball valve, and finally to an unshielded ball valve suitable for implantation in a human being. Along the way, they abandoned the idea of imitating the appearance of native valves, in favor of developing valves that would be clinically successful. Their work has provided help and hope for patients who otherwise would have died from the complications of rheumatic heart disease and other valvular disorders for which valve replacement is the only treatment. Images PMID:9885105

  11. Malfunctioning Starr-Edwards mitral valve 21 years after installation.

    PubMed

    Sakata, K; Ishikawa, S; Ohtaki, A; Otani, Y; Suzuki, M; Kawashima, O; Morishita, Y

    1997-02-01

    Two cases of malfunctioning Starr-Edwards cloth-covered mitral valve prostheses requiring reoperation are presented. Both cases underwent successful surgical repair 21 years after the valve replacement. The causes were a disturbance of the poppet during the opening movement due to excessive tissue ingrowth and a paravalvular leak associated with a tear of the valve seat. Replacement of the Starr-Edwards valve prosthesis more than 20 years after the initial installation has not been reported.

  12. Valvular Hemolysis Masquerading as Prosthetic Valve Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Pooja; Murtaza, Ghulam; Rahman, Zia; Zaidi, Syed; Helton, Thomas; Paul, Timir

    2017-04-08

    The evaluation of prosthetic valves can provide a unique challenge, and a thoughtful approach is required. High output states like anemia should be kept in the differential when evaluating elevated gradients across prosthetic valves. We present the case of a 69-year-old man with a Starr-Edwards prosthetic aortic valve who presented with symptoms of congestive heart failure and high transvalvular pressure gradients. These symptoms indicate a potential prosthetic valve stenosis. His laboratory evaluation results were consistent with valve-related hemolysis. Resolving his anemia led to a resolution of the symptoms and lowered the pressure gradient on follow-up.

  13. Salutary swan song for the Starr Edwards valve.

    PubMed

    Masilonyane-Jones, Taolo Vijay; Blackham, Ruth; Alvarez, John

    2010-07-01

    The Starr-Edwards valve was the first manufactured valve to be used successfully as a cardiac valve replacement in 1960. Although superseded by newer valves over the decades it has achieved an excellent track record. It has unique features, namely a protective metal casing around the ball poppet and a large and thick sewing ring. We describe the last implant of this valve in Australia; it has now been withdrawn by the manufacturer. In this particular case, the unique features of this valve made the required surgery quite simple and avoided the need for complex mitral valve surgery in a very high-risk patient.

  14. Cloth destruction and haemolysis with totally cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schottenfeld, M.; Wisheart, J. D.; Ross, J. K.; Lincoln, J. C. R.; Ross, D. N.

    1971-01-01

    Four cases are described in which totally cloth-covered Starr-Edwards valves (model 2300) had to be removed. All were causing significant haemolysis, two in the absence of a peripheral leak. The principal operative finding was destruction of the Dacron covering the struts. Following replacement of these prostheses there was complete resolution of signs and symptoms. The possible causes of haemolysis and consequences of cloth destruction are discussed. Images PMID:5576531

  15. Aortic Valvular Replacement: Clinical Experience With 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Grondin, Pierre; Lepage, Gilles; Castonguay, Yves

    1964-01-01

    Acquired aortic disease is now currently corrected by total prosthetic replacement of the aortic valve. Aortic valve replacement was performed in 13 cases at the Montreal Heart Institute in 1963. In the first four cases, Bahnson aortic leaflets were used; in the remaining nine, the Starr-Edwards semirigid aortic valve prosthesis. The surgical technique employed is described. There were two operative deaths and two late deaths. The results have been excellent in all of the survivors but one. They have returned to full-time activities and four of them to strenuous physical work. It is the contention of the authors that aortic valve replacement is a surgical procedure with acceptable risks, offering hope for a near-normal life to patients crippled by severe aortic valvular lesions. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:14179061

  16. Bacillus licheniformis prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Santini, F; Borghetti, V; Amalfitano, G; Mazzucco, A

    1995-01-01

    A 73-year old man developed an acute prosthetic aortic valve dehiscence for which emergent operation was undertaken. The intraoperative evidence of an aortic annular disruption and of a subannular abscess led to the hypothesis that an endocarditis process was involved. The aortic valve was replaced with a stentless porcine bioprosthesis. Cultures taken intraoperatively from the aortic area had a pure growth of aerobic, spore-forming, gram-positive bacilli identified as Bacillus licheniformis. The patient responded to specific antibiotic therapy with no relapse at a 20-month follow-up. The potentiality of B. licheniformis as a pathogen should be reconsidered. PMID:8576381

  17. Fractured occluder disc: a previously unrecognized complication of the Starr-Edwards disc prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Malouf, J F; Hannoush, H M; Odell, J A

    2001-01-01

    Fracture of the occluder disc of a low-profile Starr-Edwards prosthesis is a hitherto unrecognized complication. We describe a patient who presented with right heart failure and severe pulmonary hypertension 27 years after mitral valve replacement with a model 6520 caged-disc prosthesis. At surgery, there was a longitudinal split in the occluder disc, and organized thrombus was lodged between the split segments. This case offers a unique opportunity to study the long-term effects of wear on the polyethylene poppet and Stellite cage.

  18. Long-term follow-up of cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses.

    PubMed

    Carey, J S

    1976-05-01

    One hundred patients in whom cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses were implanted have now been followed for 3 to 7 years. The hospital mortality rate was 5 per cent, and survival at five years was 70 per cent. Complications related to valve design occurred in 8 per cent (4 per cent fatal). The majority of late deaths and poor results were related to progressive cardiac disease rather than valve-related complications. The results indicate that cloth-covered prostheses have significantly lowered the incidence of thromboembolism and eliminated poppet dysfunction. The problem of strut cloth wear was clinically observed only twice in 500 patient-years of follow-up.

  19. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  20. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  1. Homograft and prosthetic aortic valve replacement: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pine, M; Hahn, G; Paton, B; Pappas, G; Davies, H; Steele, P; Pryor, R; Blount, S G

    1976-12-01

    Homograft aortic valve replacement was done in 103 patients and prosthetic aortic valve replacement in 106 between January 1962 and December 1973. Patients who received homograft and prosthetic valves were compared with respect to age, sex, preoperative functional impairment, infection, dyspnea, angina, hemodynamics, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, associated operations, early and late mortality, and valve failure. Combined total mortality was 28% (12% operative, 8% first postoperative year, 8% late). Ten percent of valve required replacement. One year after operation, 70% of survivors were asymptomatic, 27% were improved, and 3% were unchanged or between homograft and prosthetic valve replacement. Valve-related failure and infections were more common after homograft aortic valve replacement. Emboli, hemorrhage, and hemolysis were commoner after prosthetic valve replacement. Fungal infections occurred in five homograft patients but in no patient with a prosthetic aortic valve. Severe properative symptoms or recent endocarditis was associated with greater mortality and valve failure in both the homograft and the prosthetic series. Increased mortality and failure was also seen in patients with either preoperative aortic regurgitation with high left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and low cardiac index, or aortic stenosis with cardiomegaly or roentgenographic evidence of congestive heart failure. Therefore, in two series of patients at equal risk, mortality and valve failure were similar for homograft and prosthetic aortic valve replacement.

  2. Prosthetic aortic heart valves: modeling and design.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Mequanint, Kibret

    2011-03-01

    Although heart valve replacement is among the most common cardiovascular surgical procedures, their outcome is often difficult to predict. One of the reasons is the design and choice of the materials used for the fabrication of the prostheses. This review paper describes the use of modeling techniques in prosthetic heart valve (HV) design and aims at the justification and development of a polymer based trileaflet mechanical heart valve (MHV). The closing/opening phase behavior of the bileaflet MHV was investigated. The potential problem of valve failure due to crack propagation in the brittle pyrolytic carbon leaflet was also discussed. These studies suggest that although bileaflet MHV performs satisfactorily, there are justifications for improvement. Since the native aortic HV is trileaflet and made of anisotropic and hyperelastic tissue, one possible approach to a better MHV design is based on our ability to closely mimic the natural geometry and biomaterial properties.

  3. Major dehiscence of a prosthetic aortic valve: detection by echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Salem, B I; Pechacek, L W; Leachman, R D

    1979-04-01

    A 21-year-old man had acute aortic insufficiency three months after insertion of an aortic valve prosthesis. Chest roentgenography demonstrated abnormal orientation of the prosthesis. M-mode echocardiography showed dense, linear echoes from the prosthetic valve between the interventricular septum and the mitral valve, along with loss of normal poppet motion within the aortic root. At surgery, the prosthesis was found to be extensively disrupted, resulting in prolapse into the left ventricular outflow tract. Another valve replacement was performed with patient survival. Echocardiography appears to be a useful adjunct to established roentgenographic procedures in the diagnosis of major dehiscence of prosthetic aortic valves.

  4. [Surgical treatment for prosthetic valve endocarditis after aortic root replacement].

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Taro; Ichihara, Tetsuya; Sakaguchi, Hidehito; Inoue, Takehiko

    2014-05-01

    Aorto-left ventricular continuity destruction due to prosthetic valve endocarditis is rare, but it is one of the fatal complications after aortic root operation. We report a case of surgical treatment for prosthetic valve endocarditis after aortic root replacement. A 47-year-old man, who had undergone aortic root replacement with a composite graft was transferred to our hospital with sudden chest pain and high fever. Enhanced computed tomography showed a large space with contrast enhancement suggesting perivalvular leakage around the artificial composite graft. Emergency operation including aortic root re-replacement and reconstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract was performed successfully. We focused on its technical aspect.

  5. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  6. Prosthetic aortic valve selection: current patient experience, preferences and knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Korteland, Nelleke M; Bras, Frans J; van Hout, Fabienne M A; Kluin, Jolanda; Klautz, Robert J M; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current clinical practice guidelines advocate shared decision-making (SDM) in prosthetic valve selection. This study assesses among adult patients accepted for aortic valve replacement (AVR): (1) experience with current clinical decision-making regarding prosthetic valve selection, (2) preferences for SDM and risk presentation and (3) prosthetic valve knowledge and numeracy. Methods In a prospective multicentre cohort study, AVR patients were surveyed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results 132 patients (89 males/43 females; mean age 67 years (range 23–86)) responded preoperatively. Decisional conflict was observed in 56% of patients, and in 25% to such an extent that it made them feel unsure about the decision. 68% wanted to be involved in decision-making, whereas 53% agreed that they actually were. 69% were able to answer three basic knowledge questions concerning prosthetic valves correctly. 56% were able to answer three basic numeracy questions correctly. Three months postsurgery, 90% (n=110) were satisfied with their aortic valve prosthesis, with no difference between mechanical and bioprosthetic valve recipients. Conclusions In current clinical practice, many AVR patients experience decisional conflict and suboptimal involvement in prosthetic valve selection, and exhibit impaired knowledge concerning prosthetic valves and numeracy. Given the broad support for SDM among AVR patients and the obvious need for understandable information, to-be-developed tools to support SDM in the setting of prosthetic valve selection will help to improve quality of decision-making, better inform and actively involve patients, and reduce decisional conflict. Trial registration number NTR3618. PMID:25893105

  7. Risks and Challenges of Surgery for Aortic Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Grubitzsch, Herko; Tarar, Waharat; Claus, Benjamin; Gabbieri, Davide; Falk, Volkmar; Christ, Torsten

    2017-06-21

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis is the most severe form of infective endocarditis. This study assessed the risks and challenges of surgery for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. In total, 116 consecutive patients (98 males, age 65.2±12.7years), who underwent redo-surgery for active aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis between 2000 and 2014, were reviewed. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors for aortic root destructions as well as for morbidity and mortality. Median follow-up was 3.8 years (0-13.9 years). Aortic root destructions (42 limited and 29 multiple lesions) were associated with early prosthetic valve endocarditis and delayed diagnosis (≥14 d), but not with mortality. There were 16 (13.8%) early (≤30 d) and 32 (27.6%) late (>30 days) deaths. Survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 72±4.3%, 56±5.4%, and 46±6.4%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of death, reinfection, and reoperation was 19.0% at 30days and 36.2% at 1year. Delayed diagnosis, concomitant procedures, and EuroSCORE II >20% were predictors for early mortality and need for mechanical circulatory support, age >70years, and critical preoperative state were predictors for late mortality. In their absence, survival at 10 years was 70±8.4%. Reinfections and reoperations occurred more frequently if ≥1 risk factor for endocarditis and aortic root destructions were present. At 10 years, freedom from reinfection and reoperation was 89±4.2% and 91±4.0%. The risks of death, reinfection, and reoperation are significant within the first year after surgery for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. Early diagnosis and aortic root destructions are the most important challenges, but advanced age, critical preoperative state, and the need for mechanical circulatory support determine long-term survival. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B

  8. Computerized intraoperative calculation of instantaneous prosthetic aortic valve area.

    PubMed

    DiSesa, V J; Lachman, P; Collins, J J; Cohn, L H

    1988-01-01

    Improved assessment of valve area is essential to understanding the performance of prosthetic valves. The authors studied six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using mechanical (ME) or porcine (PO) prostheses. Instantaneous cardiac output (CO) (L/min) was measured in the aorta using an ultrasonic flow probe. Left ventricular and aortic pressures (mmHg) were measured using Millar catheters. Data were analyzed using an IBM PC-AT. Valve area (cm2) was determined using Gorlin's formula (AG) and a new formula for instantaneous area derived mathematically and using a theoretic constant. AG, mean (AI) and peak (Apk) instantaneous areas were compared to geometric measures of area (Aactual) in vitro. Peak instantaneous area correlates best with measured area. Intraoperative assessment using the ultrasonic flow probe and computer analysis is helpful in understanding the dynamic properties of prosthetic valves in vivo.

  9. Endovascular treatment of proximal arsastomotic aneurysms after aortic prosthetic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Hausegger, Klaus A.; Tauss, Josef; Amann, Wilfried; Koch, Guenter

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To describe the efficacy and value of endovascular stent-grafts for the treatment of aortic anastomotic pseudo-aneurysms.Methods: Three patients with proximal aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysms 8-15 years after prosthetic reconstruction were treated by transfemoral stent-graft implantation. In two patients the pseudoaneurysms were excluded by Talent prostheses [tube graft (n=1), bifurcated graft (n=s1)]. In one patient an uniiliac Zenith stent-graft was implanted and an extra-anatomic crossover bypass for revascularization of the contralateral lower extremity was performed.Results: All procedures were successful with primary exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms. During the follow-up (mean 16 months) one endoleak occurred due to migration of the tube stent-graft. The endoleak was sealed successfully by implanting an additional bifurcated stent-graft.Conclusion: Stent-graft exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysms offers a minimally invasive and safe alternative to open surgical reconstruction.

  10. Endovascular Treatment of Proximal Anastomotic Aneurysms After Aortic Prosthetic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Hausegger, Klaus A.; Tauss, Josef; Amann, Wilfried; Koch, Guenter

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To describe the efficacy and value of endovascular stent-grafts for the treatment of aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysms.Methods: Three patients with proximal aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysms 8-15 years after prosthetic reconstruction were treated by transfemoral stent-graft implantation. In two patients the pseudoaneurysms were excluded by Talent prostheses [tube graft (n = 1), bifurcated graft (n = 1)]. In one patient an uni iliac Zenith stent-graft was implanted and an extra-anatomic crossover bypass for revascularization of the contralateral lower extremity was performed.Results: All procedures were successful with primary exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms. During the follow-up (mean 16 months) one endoleak occurred due to migration of the tube stent-graft. The endoleak was sealed successfully by implanting an additional bifurcated stent-graft.Conclusion: Stent-graft exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysms offers a minimally invasive and safe alternative to open surgical reconstruction.

  11. Prosthetic aortic valves. Indications for and results of reoperation.

    PubMed

    Shemin, R J; Guadiani, V A; Conkle, D M; Morrow, A G

    1979-01-01

    During a 15-year period from January 1962 through December 1976, 42 patients who had undergone a previous aortic valve replacement underwent reoperation. The mean interval between operations was 4.4 years. The indications for reoperation were aortic regurgitation resulting from mechanical malfunction (12 patients), ball variance (15 patients), perivalvular leaks (five patients), prosthetic stenosis (eight patients), anemia (one patient), and recurrent emboli (one patient). The indications were characteristic of a specific valve series. The most common reoperation was aortic valve replacement (29/42), which had a 10.3% operative mortality. Poppet change (10/42) carried a 10% operative mortality and no operative deaths followed suture closure of perivalvular leaks. Eighty-eight percent of patients alive six months after reoperation were New York Heart Association functional class 1 or 2. At last follow-up, 95% of surviving patients were still functional class 1 or 2, with a mean cumulative survival of 4.7 years after reoperation. This experience demonstrates that those patients surviving long enough to undergo reoperation can expect a reasonable operative risk, long-term survival, and excellent clinical improvement.

  12. Detection of a prosthetic aortic valvular abscess with indium-111-labeled leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    An unsuspected annular abscess at the base of a prosthetic aortic valve in a patient with endocarditis was identified by indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy alone. This highly sensitive and specific technique expediently demonstrated the surgically proven inflammatory focus.

  13. [Redo Aortic and Mitral Valve Replacement by Manouguian's Procedure for Active Prosthetic Valve Infection].

    PubMed

    Kunitomo, Ryuji; Okamoto, Ken; Moriyama, Shuji; Sakaguchi, Hisashi; Tazume, Hirokazu; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Kawasuji, Michio

    2016-03-01

    The damage to the intervalvular fibrous trigone (IVFT) by infective endocarditis makes combined aortic and mitral valve replacement difficult. We performed Manouguian's double valve replacement for such a case and obtained a good result. A 81-year-old male underwent emergency operation due to active prosthetic valve endocarditis. He had a history of receiving combined aortic and mitral valve replacement because of active infective endocarditis at the age of 74 and redo aortic valve replacement 3 years after that. The infectious lesion extended from the mitral annulus to the IVFT and the aortic annulus, and it caused the prosthetic valve detachment from the aortic annulus. Manouguian's double valve replacement was required for radical resection and reconstruction of the IVFT. No recurrent infection or paravalvular leakage was observed during 49months follow up period. Manouguian's procedure is useful for complete resection of the infected IVFT and makes combined aortic and mitral valve replacement safer.

  14. Prosthetic aortic valve: a bone in the system.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vitor Hugo; Guardado, Joana; Fernandes, Marina; Lourenço, Mário; Machado, Inocência; Quelhas, Isabel; Azevedo, Olga; Lourenço, António

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of a 73-year-old female patient admitted to the surgical department for a splenic abscess. She had a history of a mechanical aortic valve implanted two years earlier. During the diagnostic work-up, the patient underwent a transesophageal echocardiogram that revealed the presence of multiple paravalvular abscesses, establishing the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis. A few days later, the echocardiogram was repeated due to a new-onset systolic-diastolic murmur. A large pseudoaneurysm and significant periprosthetic regurgitation were now noted and the patient was referred for cardiac surgery. The microbiologic exam revealed the presence of Streptococcus milleri, usually found in the gastrointestinal flora and a known pathogenic agent of endocarditis. Interestingly, the patient had had a foreign body (bone fragment) removed from her esophagus a few weeks earlier, which was the probable portal of entry for this infective endocarditis. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypoplasia of the aortic root 1

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Rowan; Cartmill, T.; Bernstein, L.

    1970-01-01

    We report a technique for the enlargement of a hypoplastic aortic root by an operation whereby the hypoplastic aortic root has been so enlarged by the insertion of a Dacron fabric gusset that it will accommodate a size 9A or larger Starr-Edwards prosthesis. Our experience in five patients is described. No matter what type of valve is used for replacement of a diseased aortic valve, and no matter what improved designs of valvular prosthesis are ultimately developed, it will be necessary (in the particular group described) to enlarge the aortic ring to accommodate a size which will function correctly without causing left ventricular outflow obstruction. Images PMID:5452289

  16. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  17. Dilation of woven and knitted aortic prosthetic grafts: CT scan evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Y; Juhan, C; Morati, N; Girard, N; Cohen, S

    1994-05-01

    Because there are few reports in the literature concerning short- and medium-term outcome of woven and knitted aortic prosthetic grafts, we conducted CT evaluations in 58 asymptomatic patients (53 males and five females with a mean age of 63.5 years) undergoing infrarenal aortic reconstruction between June 1988 and June 1991. Joined CT slices after contrast enhancement, centered on the proximal anastomoses, prosthetic bodies, and prosthetic limbs, were obtained in the early (mean 19 days) and late (mean 19 months, range 6 to 40 months) postoperative periods. In end-to-side aortoprosthetic anastomoses (n = 28), early and late CT examinations revealed that the anteroposterior diameter increased 1.9% (p = NS) and 8.8% (p < 0.0001) for woven and knitted grafts, respectively. In end-to-end aortoprosthetic anastomoses, the diameter of the prosthetic body on early CT scans increased 12.6% (p < 0.0001) and 28% (p < 0.0001) for woven and knitted prosthetic grafts, respectively, as compared with diameter values provided by the manufacturer. Dilation continued to progress 2.2% (p < 0.04) for woven and 6.2% (p < 0.0002) for knitted prosthetic grafts on late CT scans. The mean diameter of the prosthetic graft limbs (n = 96) increased 22.3% (p < 0.0001) and 34.6% (p < 0.0001) for woven and knitted prosthetic grafts, respectively, on early CT scans as compared with manufacturers' values. Secondary increases were 3.2% (p < 0.002) and 7.7% (p < 0.007) for woven and knitted prosthetic grafts, respectively. These data show that dilation of aortic prostheses occurs early in most cases, most likely soon after declamping of the graft, as shown by recent intraoperative measurements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation-diagnostic and surgical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Klaaborg, Kaj Erik; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Jensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Evald Høj; Terp, Kim Allan; Andersen, Gratien; Hvitfeldt, Steen; Andersen, Henning Rud

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is a potential life threatening complication. Better understanding of the incidence, predictors, clinical presentation, diagnostic measures, complications and management of PVE may help improve TAVI long-term outcome. We report a case of TAVI-PVE in an 80-year-old high risk patient in whom SAVR was successfully performed. We have reviewed literature regarding TAVI-PVE. PMID:27867590

  19. Early-onset Streptomyces endocarditis in a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Shehatha, Jaffar S; Taha, Abdulsalam Y

    2017-02-01

    A 66-year-old Australian man underwent elective replacement of a severely stenotic aortic valve with a 22-mm Medtronic-Hall valve. Six weeks later, he was readmitted with worsening dyspnea, fever, and mild anemia. Investigations confirmed pulmonary edema and moderate periprosthetic aortic regurgitation. The pulmonary edema was managed conservatively, and a second 22-mm Medtronic-Hall valve was implanted. Infective endocarditis was suspected in the aortic annulus below the orifice of the right coronary artery. A bacteriological study revealed a rare bacteria of Streptomyces species. The patient received intensive antibiotic therapy over a 6-week period of hospitalization, and the aortic regurgitation disappeared one week postoperatively.

  20. Surgery for fulminant prosthetic valve endocarditis after transapical transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Wilbring, Manuel; Tugtekin, Sems Malte; Matschke, Klaus; Kappert, Utz

    2014-02-01

    We report the clinical course of a patient with a history of transapical aortic "valve-in-valve" transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), actually suffering from prosthetic valve endocarditis. The patient now underwent cardiac surgery as a salvage procedure. The procedure itself was uneventful, but the patient died several days postoperative due to persisting sepsis. The present case raises the question, how to deal with high-risk patients, once considered unsuitable for cardiac surgery in presence of prosthetic valve infection? Up to now, there exists only insufficient knowledge about incidence, clinical course, and effectiveness of treatment strategies for prosthetic valve endocarditis after TAVI. A review of the available literature is given. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. [Choice of temperature extracorporeal circulation regimen during prosthetic repair of the aortic valve].

    PubMed

    Petrishchev, Iu I; levit, A L

    2007-01-01

    Hypo- and normothermal perfusions were compared during prosthetic repair in two patient groups matched by demographic indices, baseline severity, surgical intervention volume, anesthetic regimen, extracorporeal procedure, and cardioplegia mode. The findings suggest that there are no significant differences in the changes in central hemodynamic parameters and oxygen transport during hypo- and normothermal perfusion. During extracorporeal circulation, hypothermia is an additional stressor that causes the strain of compensatory mechanisms in the postoperative period. This leads to a more significant hyperglycemia, increases the usage of adrenomimetics, and prolongs the time of artificial ventilation. Thus, normothermal perfusion is a more preferable option of intraoperative protection during prosthetic repair of the aortic valve.

  2. Acute inferior myocardial infarction in a patient with a prosthetic aortic valve and high international normalized ratio

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Ibrahim; Delil, Kenan; Ileri, Cigdem; Samadov, Fuad

    2014-01-01

    ST elevation acute myocardial infarction in patients with a mechanical prosthetic valve is rare and usually due to inadequate anticoagulation. We present a case of acute inferior myocardial infarction in a patient with a prosthetic aortic valve and high international normalized ratio, which has not been reported previously. PMID:24799934

  3. Multidisciplinary Treatment Approach for Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infection in the Thoracic Aortic Area

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular graft infection in the thoracic aortic area is a rare but serious complication. Adequate management of the complication is essential to increase the chance of success of open surgery. While surgical site infection is suggested as the root cause of the complication, it is also related to decreased host tolerance, especially as found in elderly patients. The handling of prosthetic vascular graft infection has been widely discussed to date. This paper mainly provides a summary of literature reports published within the past 5 years to discuss issues related to multidisciplinary treatment approaches, including surgical site infection, timing of onset, diagnostic methods, causative pathogens, auxiliary diagnostic methods, antibiotic treatment, anti-infective structures of vascular prostheses, surgical treatment, treatment strategy against infectious aortic aneurysms, future surgical treatment, postoperative systemic therapy, and antimicrobial stewardship. A thorough understanding of these issues will enable us to prevent prosthetic vascular graft infection in the thoracic aortic area as far as possible. In the event of its occurrence, the early introduction of appropriate treatment is expected to cure the disease without worsening of the underlying pathological condition. PMID:26356686

  4. Quality of life and prosthetic aortic valve selection in non-elderly adult patients.

    PubMed

    Korteland, Nelleke M; Top, Derya; Borsboom, Gerard J J M; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2016-06-01

    This study assesses quality of life in relation to prosthetic aortic valve selection and preferences for shared decision-making among non-elderly adult patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR). A single-centre consecutive cohort of 497 AVR patients who underwent AVR between the age of 18 and 60 years was cross-sectionally surveyed 1-10 years after AVR. Health-related quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey, SF-36), valve-specific quality of life, patient experience with and preferences for involvement and final decision in prosthetic valve selection were investigated. Two-hundred and forty patients (48%) responded. The median age was 57 years (range 26-70). Compared with the general age-matched Dutch population, AVR patients reported worse physical health, but better mental health. Biological valve recipients reported lower general health than mechanical valve recipients. Mechanical valve recipients had more doubts about the decision to undergo surgery, were more bothered by valve sound, the frequency of doctor visits and blood tests, and possible bleeding, but were less afraid of a possible reoperation. Eighty-nine percent were of the opinion that it is important to be involved in prosthetic valve selection, whereas 64% agreed that they actually had been involved. A better patient experience with involvement in prosthetic valve selection was associated with better mental health (P = 0.036). Given the observed suboptimal patient involvement in prosthetic valve selection, the broad patient support for shared decision-making, and the positive association between patient involvement in prosthetic valve selection and mental health, tools to support shared decision-making would be useful in the setting of heart valve replacement. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. The performance of the Braunwald-Cutter aortic prosthetic valve.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, E H; Kirklin, J W; Pluth, J R; Turner, M E; Parr, G V

    1977-04-01

    Four hundred seventy-five patients underwent aortic valve replacement with the Braunwald-Cutter ball-valve prosthesis at two institutions. The early (30-day) hospital mortality was 4.7% for those with isolated aortic valve replacement and 6.9% for the entire group. For the former, 5-year actuarial survival of the hospital survivors was 72 +/- 5.7%; for the latter group it was 71 +/- 4.4%. Eleven patients (5 since the date of follow-up inquiry) have suffered poppet escape, 9 of whom died. The actuarial incidence of known poppet escape is 4 +/- 2.6% at 47 months; when the 5 patients suffering poppet escape since the date of follow-up inquiry are included, with certain assumptions, the incidence is 3.7 +/- 1.14%. The projected probability of poppet escape using all 11 patients is 12.2% at 5 years; the 70% confidence bands of projected probability of poppet escape separate from those of the risk of re-replacement at 61 months. This and other analyses indicate that in general, patients with the Braunwald-Cutter aortic prosthesis should have it replaced 4 1/2 to 5 years after its insertion.

  6. Phonocardiographic diagnosis of aortic ball variance.

    PubMed

    Hylen, J C; Kloster, F E; Herr, R H; Hull, P Q; Ames, A W; Starr, A; Griswold, H E

    1968-07-01

    Fatty infiltration causing changes in the silastic poppet of the Model 1000 series Starr-Edwards aortic valve prostheses (ball variance) has been detected with increasing frequency and can result in sudden death. Phonocardiograms were recorded on 12 patients with ball variance confirmed by operation and of 31 controls. Ten of the 12 patients with ball variance were distinguished from the controls by an aortic opening sound (AO) less than half as intense as the aortic closure sound (AC) at the second right intercostal space (AO/AC ratio less than 0.5). Both AO and AC were decreased in two patients with ball variance, with the loss of the characteristic high frequency and amplitude of these sounds. The only patient having a diminished AO/AC ratio (0.42) without ball variance at reoperation had a clot extending over the aortic valve struts. The phonocardiographic findings have been the most reliable objective evidence of ball variance in patients with Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis of the Model 1000 series.

  7. Prosthetic valve endocarditis 7 months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation diagnosed with 3D TEE.

    PubMed

    Sarı, Cenk; Durmaz, Tahir; Karaduman, Bilge Duran; Keleş, Telat; Bayram, Hüseyin; Baştuğ, Serdal; Özen, Mehmet Burak; Bayram, Nihal Akar; Bilen, Emine; Ayhan, Hüseyin; Kasapkara, Hacı Ahmet; Bozkurt, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced as an alternative treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis for whom surgery would be high-risk. Prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis is a serious complication of surgical AVR (SAVR) with high morbidity and mortality. According to recent cases, post-TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) seems to occur very rarely. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman who underwent TAVI (Edwards Saphien XT) with an uneventful postoperative stay. She was diagnosed with endocarditis using three dimensional (3D) echocardiography on the TAVI device 7 months later and she subsequently underwent surgical aortic valve replacement. Little experience of the interpretation of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and the clinical course and effectiveness of treatment strategies in post-TAVI endocarditis exists. We report a case of PVE in a TAVI patient which was diagnosed with three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE). Copyright © 2016 Hellenic Cardiological Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel solution to prosthetic valve dehiscence after aortic valve surgery in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yochun; Ahn, Byoung Hee; Lee, Kyo Seon; Jeong, In Seok; Kim, Kye Hun; Na, Kook Joo; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Oh, Sang Gi

    2017-03-01

    Prosthetic valve dehiscence after aortic valve surgery in Behçet's disease patients is common. We aimed to validate the usefulness of our new technique 'subannular endomyocardial implantation of valve prosthesis' designed to prevent prosthetic valve dehiscence. Subannular endomyocardial implantation of valve prosthesis involves suturing the sewing cuff of the valve prosthesis in the endomyocardium below the aortic annulus, which is based on the idea that annular tissue should be excluded from the suture line in Behçet's disease patients. Medical records of 7 patients in whom the new technique was performed between 2002 and 2014 were reviewed. Five men and two women were included (median age, 44 years). Aortic root replacement was performed in 6 cases, and aortic valve replacement in 1. No operative mortality occurred. Postoperatively, complete atrioventricular block developed in 3 cases, and permanent pacemakers were implanted in 2. No reoperation was performed for prosthetic valve dehiscence during the median 7.8-year follow-up. One late death occurred due to sudden cardiac arrest 8.4 years after surgery. One additional permanent pacemaker was implanted for complete atrioventricular block, which developed at 4.2 years postoperatively. The last echocardiography (median, 6.7 years after surgery) revealed no paravalvular leakages. Subannular endomyocardial implantation of valve prosthesis seems useful for preventing prosthetic valve dehiscence after aortic valve surgery for Behçet's disease. It poses a risk of complete atrioventricular block, but considering the high reoperation rate and mortality due to prosthetic valve dehiscence after conventional aortic valve surgery, this risk seems reasonable.

  9. Posterior thoracic echocardiography for assessment of native and prosthetic aortic valves in the presence of pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Sum; Naqvi, Tasneem Z

    2014-04-01

    Many patients with aortic stenosis have difficult imaging windows due to advanced age, kyphosis, prior chest surgeries, radiation-induced skin changes, or hyperinflated lungs from pulmonary disease. Here we describe 4 cases to illustrate that in a subset of patients with pleural effusion, a posterior imaging approach can be used to obtain diagnostic images for native and prosthetic aortic valves. In these cases, nondiagnostic transthoracic echocardiographic images were obtained from conventional imaging windows, leading to inaccurate or incomplete assessment of the aortic valve. In all cases, images obtained from a posterior thoracic approach provided important additional diagnostic information.

  10. Brief report: biomarkers of aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection in a porcine model with Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Langerhuus, S N; Tønnesen, E K; Jensen, K H; Damgaard, B M; Heegaard, P M H; Halekoh, U; Lauridsen, C

    2010-11-01

    Aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection (AVPGI) with Staphylococcus aureus is a feared post-operative complication. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical signs and potential biomarkers of infection in a porcine AVPGI model. The biomarkers evaluated were: C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, white blood cells (WBC), major histocompatibility complex II (MHC II) density, lymphocyte CD4:CD8 ratio and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in vitro responsiveness. Sixteen pigs were included in the study, and randomly assigned into four groups (n = 4): "SHAM" pigs had their infra-renal aorta exposed by laparotomy; "CLEAN" pigs had an aortic graft inserted; "LOW" and "HIGH" pigs had an aortic graft inserted and, subsequently, S. aureus were inoculated on the graft material (5 × 10(4) colony-forming units [CFU] and 1 × 10(6) CFU, respectively). Biomarkers were evaluated prior to surgery and on day 2, 5, 7, and 14 post-operatively in blood samples. Of all biomarkers evaluated, CRP was superior for diagnosing S. aureus AVPGI in pigs, with a sensitivity of 0.86 and a specificity of 0.75.

  11. Late leakage from four-branch prosthetic graft after total aortic arch repair.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Arudo; Chikazawa, Genta; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Yoshitaka, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We present two cases with late graft leakage of unknown aetiology after open total aortic arch repair (TAR). Case 1: a 73-year-old woman underwent TAR for arch aneurysm with 24-mm four-branch graft. She had a previous history of pacemaker implantation for sick sinus syndrome and warfarin therapy for atrial fibrillation. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) revealed increased low-density area around the graft 4 years after surgery and blood leakage was shown in delayed-phase CT. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was performed to cover the haematic leakage, and shrinkage of the lesion was achieved 1 month after TEVAR. Case 2: a 72-year-old man with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia was admitted to our institute for treatment of aortic arch aneurysm. TAR was successfully performed; however, leakage from the prosthetic graft was noticed by expert radiologists in follow-up delayed-phase CT scan 6 years after surgery. The leakage was resolved 1 month after TEVAR. Although the cause of late leakage was not determined, the slowly expanding haematoma proved to be treatable by additional TEVAR. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Fixation Study: 48 Replacement Valves Analyzed Using Digital Pressure Mapping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Candice Y; Wong, Joshua K; Ross, Ronald E; Liu, David C; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Martellaro, Angelo J; Gorea, Heather R; Sauer, Jude S; Knight, Peter A

    Prostheses attachment is critical in aortic valve replacement surgery, yet reliable prosthetic security remains a challenge. Accurate techniques to analyze prosthetic fixation pressures may enable the use of fewer sutures while reducing the risk of paravalvular leaks (PVL). Customized digital thin film pressure transducers were sutured between aortic annulus models and 21-mm bioprosthetic valves with 15 × 4-mm, 12 × 4-mm, or 9 × 6-mm-wide pledgeted mattress sutures. Simulating open and minimally invasive access, 4 surgeons, blinded to data acquisition, each secured 12 valves using manual knot-tying (hand-tied [HT] or knot-pusher [KP]) or automated titanium fasteners (TFs). Real-time pressure measurements and times were recorded. Two-dimensional (2D) and 3D pressure maps were generated for all valves. Pressures less than 80 mm Hg were considered at risk for PVL. Pressures under each knot (intrasuture) fell less than 80 mm Hg for 12 of 144 manual knots (5/144 HT, 7/144 KP) versus 0 of 288 TF (P < 0.001). Pressures outside adjacent sutures (extrasuture) were less than 80 mm Hg in 10 of 60 HT, zero of 60 KP, and zero of 120 TF sites for 15 × 4-mm valves; 17 of 48 HT, 25 of 48 KP, and 12 of 96 TF for 12 × 4-mm valves; and 15 of 36 HT, 17 of 36 KP, and 9 and 72 TF for 9 × 6-mm valves; P < 0.001 all manual versus TF. Annular areas with pressures less than 80 mm Hg ranged from 0% of the sewing-ring area (all open TF) to 31% (12 × 4 mm, KP). The average time per manual knot, 46 seconds (HT, 31 seconds; KP, 61 seconds), was greater than TF, 14 seconds (P < 0.005). Reduced operative times and PVL risk would fortify the advantages of surgical aortic valve replacement. This research encourages continued exploration of technical factors in optimizing prosthetic valve security.

  13. The additional value of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in complex aortic prosthetic heart valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tanis, Wilco; Teske, Arco J; van Herwerden, Lex A; Chamuleau, Steven; Meijboom, Folkert; Budde, Ricardo P J; Cramer, Maarten-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography (2DTTE and 2DTEE) may fail to detect signs of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) endocarditis due to acoustic shadowing. Three-dimensional (3D) TEE may have additional value; however, data are scarce. This study was performed to investigate the additional value of 3DTEE for the detection of aortic PHV endocarditis and the extent of the disease process. Retrospective analysis of complex aortic PHV endocarditis cases that underwent 2DTTE, 2DTEE, and 3DTEE before surgery. Echocardiograms were individually assessed by 2 cardiologists blinded for the outcome. Surgical and pathological inspection served as the reference standard for vegetations and peri-annular extensions (abscesses/mycotic aneurysms). To determine if the proximal coronary arteries were involved in the inflammatory process as well, computed tomography angiography findings were added to reference standard. Fifteen aortic PHV endocarditis cases were identified. According to the reference standard, all 15 cases had peri-annular extensions, 13 of which had a close relationship with the proximal right and/or left coronary artery. In 6 of 15 patients, a vegetation was present. Combined 2DTTE/TEE missed 1/6 vegetations and 1/15 peri-annular extensions. After addition of 3DTEE, all vegetations (6/6) and peri-annular extensions (15/15) were detected, without adding false positives. Compared to 2DTEE, in 3/15 cases, 3DTEE resulted in better delineation of the anatomical relationship of the proximal coronary arteries to the peri-annular extensions. As a result, 3DTEE had an additional value in 5/15 cases. In complex aortic, PHV endocarditis 3DTEE may have additional value compared to 2D echocardiography. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A rare case of spontaneous rectus sheath haematoma in a patient with mechanical prosthetic aortic and mitral valves.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Ahmet; Oguz, Ali; Yildiz, Mustafa; Özkan, Mehmet

    2012-07-12

    Every year nearly 300 000 patients have heart valve operations and mostly prosthetic valves are inserted. Coumadin is the mainstay of therapy in these individuals but it has many side effects, mostly related to its anticoagulant effect. Rectus sheath haematoma (RSH) is a rare complication of abdominal trauma, surgery and excessive strain, however, anticoagulant agents may predispose to this condition without any precipitating event. Reversal of anticoagulation and resuscitation with fluids and blood products are necessary but anticoagulation is crucial in patients with prosthetic valves, as they have acquired thrombotic diathesis. Herein we report on a case of spontaneous RSH in a patient with prosthetic mitral and aortic valves and a history of prosthetic valve thrombosis. He was successfully managed medically.

  15. In-vitro Measurements of the Synoptic Velocity Generated by a Prosthetic Aortic Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellings, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a precise means of evaluating the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic aortic and mitral valves. Particle Image Velocimetry is used to measure the in-plane velocity components in selected planes of the flow, from which the turbulent shear stress is derived. The experimental facility used in this study is made of plexiglas tube, and has a circular cross section with a diameter that matches that of the valve. To ensure optical access the test fluid used matches the refractive index of plexiglas and the test section incorporates a square housing filled with the same fluid. The fluid used in this experiment is a mixture of glycerol, water and sodium iodide. Pulsatile flow is achieved by means of a pump and monitored in real time by means of an electronic flowmeter. Dynamic similarity is ensured in these experiments as the viscosity of the fluid mixture closely approximates that of blood.

  16. Lagrangian coherent structures and turbulence characteristics downstream of prosthetic aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Tullio, Marco D.

    2015-11-01

    The flowfield through prosthetic heart valves is investigated by means of direct numerical simulations, considering the fully coupled fluid-structure interaction problem. Two different aortic valve models are modeled: a bileaflet mechanical and a biological one. In order to reveal fluid flow structures and to better understand the transport mechanics, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are used. LCS are distinguished material surfaces that can be identified as boundaries to regions with dynamically distinct behavior, and are revealed as hypersurfaces that locally maximize the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. Post-processing the flow simulation data, first FTLE fields are calculated integrating dense meshes of Lagrangian particles backward in time, and then attracting LCS are extracted. A three-jet configuration is distinctive of bi-leaflet mechanical valves, with higher turbulent shear stresses immediately distal to the valve leaflets, while a jet-like flow emerges from the central orifice of bio-prosthetic valves, with high turbulent shear stresses occurring at the edge of the jet. Details of the numerical methodology along with a thorough analysis of the different flow structures developing during the cardiac cycle for the two configurations will be provided.

  17. Combination of a Giant Dissected Ascending Aortic Aneurysm with Multiple Fistulae into the Cardiac Chambers Caused by Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2016-02-01

    The combination of a dissected ascending aortic aneurysm (AA) with multiple fistulae to the periaortic root structures is a life-threatening complication that occurs rarely after infective endocarditis of the prosthetic aortic valve. Many risk factors are potentially associated with this complication, including aortic diameter, connective tissue disease of the aortic wall, hypertension and infection. We report a rare case of dissected ascending AA with fistulae to the left atrium and pulmonary artery and a paravalvular leak in a 47-year-old woman with a history of an aortic valve replacement. The patient had presented to the Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, in January 2015 with clinical features of heart failure. After initially being treated for congestive heart failure, she underwent open-heart surgery via a classic Bentall procedure and double fistula closure. She was discharged 23 days after the operation in good condition. A six-month follow-up showed normal functioning of the composite conduit prosthetic valve and no fistulae recurrence.

  18. The impact of imperfect frame deployment and rotational orientation on stress within the prosthetic leaflets during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jonathon; Curzen, Nick; Bressloff, Neil W

    2017-02-28

    TAVI devices are manufactured with cylindrical frames. However, the frames are rarely cylindrical post-deployment since deformation due to localised under expansion can be induced by calcified material on the native valve leaflets exerting irregular forces upon the frame. Consequently, the leaflets within a deformed TAVI device may undergo elevated stress during operation, which may lead to premature device failure. Using computational analysis a complete TAVI device model was simulated undergoing deployment into an aortic root model derived from CT data for a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis, followed by a pressure simulated cardiac cycle. The complete analysis was performed eight times, each with the device at a different rotational orientation relative to the native valve, with an increment spacing of 15°. The TAVI device frames consistently featured significant distortions associated with bulky calcified material at the base of the non-coronary sinus. It was found that the average von Mises stress in the prosthetic valves was only increased in one of the cases relative to an idealised device. However, the maximum von Mises stress in the prosthetic valves was elevated in the majority of the cases. Furthermore, it was found that there were preferable orientations to deploy the prosthetic device, in this case, when the prosthetic leaflets were aligned with the native leaflets. As device orientation deviated from this orientation, the stresses in the valve increased because the distance between the prosthetic commissures decreased. This potentially could represent a sufficient increase in stress to induce variation in device lifespan.

  19. Disseminated mycobacteriosis affecting a prosthetic aortic valve: first case of Mycobacterium peregrinum type III reported in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Torres-Duque, Carlos A; Díaz, Claudia; Vargas, Leslie; Serpa, Elsa María; Mosquera, Walter; Garzón, María Consuelo; Mejía, Graciela; García, Luz Mary; González, Liliana Andrea; Castro, Claudia Marcela; Ribón, Wellman

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria are non-tuberculous mycobacteria amply present in the environment. Although they are not usually pathogenic for humans, they are opportunistic in that they can cause disease in people with disadvantageous conditions or who are immunocompromised. Mycobacterium peregrinum, an opportunistic, rapidly growing mycobacteria, belongs to the M. fortuitum group and has been reported as responsible for human cases of mycobacteriosis. A case of M. peregrinum type III is herein reported as the first in Colombia. It presented as a disseminated disease involving a prosthetic aortic valve (endocarditis) in a seventeen-year-old girl with a well-established diagnosis of prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis who was referred for a surgical replacement. Due to a congenital heart disease (subaortic stenosis with valve insufficiency), she had two previous aortic valve implantation surgeries. One year after the second implantation, the patient presented with respiratory symptoms and weight lost indicative of lung tuberculosis. A chest X-ray did not show parenchymal compromise but several Ziehl-Neelsen stains were positive. An echocardiography showed a vegetation on the prosthetic aortic valve. In blood and sputum samples, M. peregrinum type III was identified through culture, biochemical tests and hsp65 gene molecular analysis (PRA). The patient underwent a valve replacement and received a multidrug antimycobacterial treatment. Progressive recovery ensued and further samples from respiratory tract and blood were negative for mycobacteria.

  20. Limitations of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis of pannus formation in prosthetic aortic valve and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Soumoulou, Juan Bautista; Cianciulli, Tomás Francisco; Zappi, Andrea; Cozzarin, Alberto; Saccheri, María Cristina; Lax, Jorge Alberto; Guidoin, Robert; Zhang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Pannus formation is a rare complication and occurs almost exclusively in mechanical prosthetic valves. It consists of fibrous tissue that covers the surface of the prosthesis either concentrically or eccentrically, resulting in valve dysfunction. The pathophysiology seems to be associated to a chronic inflammatory process that explains the late and insidious clinical presentation. This diagnosis should be considered in patients with high transvalvular gradients on transthoracic echo, and workup should be completed with fluoroscopy and transesophageal echocardiography. Treatment is always surgical and recurrence is rare. We present a case of pannus formation in a prosthetic aortic valve and a review of the literature regarding this disorder. PMID:25914791

  1. Prosthetic Mitral Surgical Valve in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Recipients: A Multicenter Analysis.

    PubMed

    Amat-Santos, Ignacio J; Cortés, Carlos; Nombela Franco, Luis; Muñoz-García, Antonio J; Suárez De Lezo, Jose; Gutiérrez-Ibañes, Enrique; Serra, Vicenç; Larman, Mariano; Moreno, Raúl; De La Torre Hernandez, Jose M; Puri, Rishi; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Hernández García, José M; Alonso-Briales, Juan H; García, Bruno; Lee, Dae-Hyun; Rojas, Paol; Sevilla, Teresa; Goncalves, Renier; Vera, Silvio; Gómez, Itziar; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; San Román, José A

    2017-10-09

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognosis and specific complications of patients with prosthetic mitral valves (PMVs) undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). TAVR is performed relatively often in patients with PMVs, but specific risks are not well described. A multicenter analysis was conducted, including patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR at 10 centers. Patients' clinical characteristics and outcomes were evaluated according to the presence of a PMV. The mean age of the study population (n = 2,414) was 81 ± 8 years, and 48.8% were men. A total of 91 patients (3.77%) had PMVs. They were more commonly women, younger, and had higher surgical risk. PMVs were implanted a median of 14 years before TAVR, and most patients had mechanical prostheses (73.6%). Eighty-six patients (94.5%) were on long-term vitamin K inhibitor therapy, and bridging antithrombotic therapy was administered in 59 (64.8%). TAVR device embolization occurred in 6.7% (vs. 3.3% in the non-PMV group; p = 0.127), in all instances when distance between the PMV and the aortic annulus was <7 mm. Mortality rates did not show a difference, but the rate of bleeding was higher in patients with PMV (24.2% vs. 16.1%; p = 0.041), even in those treated via the transfemoral approach (22.2% vs. 13.9%; p = 0.048). Indeed, bleeding complications, prior atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, surgical risk, and New York Heart Association functional class were independent predictors of mortality. TAVR presents similar mortality irrespective of the presence of a PMV. However, patients with PMVs had higher bleeding risk that was independently associated with higher mortality. Risk for valve embolization was relatively high, but it occurred only in patients with PMV-to-aortic annulus distances <7 mm. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transfemoral implantation of CoreValve Evolut-R aortic prosthesis in patient with prior ball-cage mechanical mitral valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Maluenda, Gabriel; Caorsi, Carlos; Baeza, Cristian

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement remains challenge in patients with ball-cage-type mechanical valve in mitral position. Potential under-expansion of the percutaneous valve and interaction between the mitral ball-cage mechanical valve tilted towards the left ventricular outflow tract and the percutaneous valve adds risk during and after implantation. We report a successful implantation of the novel CoreValve Evolut-R self-expanding in a patient with severe aortic stenosis and a mitral Starr-Edwards mechanical valve implanted 28years ago.

  3. Healthcare-associated prosthetic heart valve, aortic vascular graft, and disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections subsequent to open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Philipp; Kuster, Stefan P; Bloemberg, Guido; Schulthess, Bettina; Frank, Michelle; Tanner, Felix C; Rössle, Matthias; Böni, Christian; Falk, Volkmar; Wilhelm, Markus J; Sommerstein, Rami; Achermann, Yvonne; Ten Oever, Jaap; Debast, Sylvia B; Wolfhagen, Maurice J H M; Brandon Bravo Bruinsma, George J; Vos, Margreet C; Bogers, Ad; Serr, Annerose; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Sax, Hugo; Böttger, Erik C; Weber, Rainer; van Ingen, Jakko; Wagner, Dirk; Hasse, Barbara

    2015-10-21

    We identified 10 patients with disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections subsequent to open-heart surgery at three European Hospitals. Infections originated from the heater-cooler unit of the heart-lung machine. Here we describe clinical aspects and treatment course of this novel clinical entity. Interdisciplinary care and follow-up of all patients was documented by the study team. Patients' characteristics, clinical manifestations, microbiological findings, and therapeutic measures including surgical reinterventions were reviewed and treatment outcomes are described. The 10 patients comprise a 1-year-old child and nine adults with a median age of 61 years (range 36-76 years). The median duration from cardiac surgery to diagnosis was 21 (range 5-40) months. All patients had prosthetic material-associated infections with either prosthetic valve endocarditis, aortic graft infection, myocarditis, or infection of the prosthetic material following banding of the pulmonary artery. Extracardiac manifestations preceded cardiovascular disease in some cases. Despite targeted antimicrobial therapy, M. chimaera infection required cardiosurgical reinterventions in eight patients. Six out of 10 patients experienced breakthrough infections, of which four were fatal. Three patients are in a post-treatment monitoring period. Healthcare-associated infections due to M. chimaera occurred in patients subsequent to cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation and implantation of prosthetic material. Infections became clinically apparent after a time lag of months to years. Mycobacterium chimaera infections are easily missed by routine bacterial diagnostics and outcome is poor despite long-term antimycobacterial therapy, probably because biofilm formation hinders eradication of pathogens. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. [Thrombolysis in mechanical prosthetic valve thrombosis. Its management with streptokinase].

    PubMed

    Solorio, S; Sánchez, H; Madrid, R; Badui, E; Valdespino, A; Murillo, H; Rangel, A; Enciso, R

    1994-01-01

    We present the first experience in Mexico in 10 patients, 9 female and 1 male with an average age of 42.5 years. All patients had clinical, echocardiographic and fluoroscopic criteria of dysfunctioning mechanical valvular prosthesis due to thrombosis (9 Sorin type and 1 Starr-Edwards). None of the patients had contraindications for thrombolytic therapy. All cases were treated with intravenous streptokinase: 250,000 U in 30 minutes followed by an infusion of 100,000 U per hour, always under clinical, echocardiographic and fluoroscopic control every 2 and 24 hours respectively until the normalization of the clinical and hemodynamic parameters with a top limit of 72 hour. The average duration of the thrombolysis was 54 +/- 6.1 hours with an average total doses of 5' 200,000 U of streptokinase. In 90% of the cases there was an increase in the valvular area: mitral (n = 7), from 1.02 +/- 0.21 to 1.75 +/- 0.36 cm2 (p < 0.001), while the mean transvalvular gradient decreased from 10.42 +/- 3.77 to 3.42 +/- 0.975 mmHg (p < 0.001); the systolic pulmonary artery pressure also decreased from 53.7 +/- 15.29 to 35 +/- 2 mmHg (p < 0.001). In the tricuspid prosthesis (n = 2) the average valvular area was increased from 0.8 +/- 0.44 to 1.55 +/- 0.77 cm2, decreasing proportionally the mean transvalvular gradient from 12.5 +/- 2 to 4.5 +/- 3.5 mmHg with no changes in the systolic pressure of the pulmonary artery. In the Starr-Edwards prosthesis in aortic position (n = 1), no hemodynamic changes were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Systolic closure of aortic valve in patients with prosthetic mitral valves.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar, M; Motro, M; Rath, S; Schy, N; Neufeld, H N

    1982-01-01

    Systolic closure of the aortic valve was found in 10 of 36 patients who underwent mitral valve replacement. Eight patients had early systolic closure, and two had mid-systolic closure. The left ventricular outflow tract dimension on M-mode and two dimensional echocardiograms, left ventricular posterior wall and septal thickness, left ventricular dimensions in systole and diastole, aortic valve opening, and mitral to aortic valve distance were not significantly different between patients with and without systolic closure of the aortic valve. Two of the 10 patients with systolic aortic valve closure were catheterised and in neither was there a gradient between the left ventricle and the aorta. The two patients with mid-systolic closure, however, were the patients who had the narrowest left ventricular outflow tract which could cause significant distortion of blood flow. Systolic closure of the aortic valve in patients with mitral valve replacement is probably not caused by left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, though abnormalities in laminar flow from the left ventricular outflow tract may be involved. Images PMID:7082513

  6. Topography of aortic heart valves. [applied to the development of a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    The cooperative effort towards the development of a tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valve is described. The photogrammetric studies were conducted on silicone rubber molds. Information on data acquisition and data reduction phases is given, and certain accuracy aspects of the project are explained. The various outputs which are discussed include digital models, profiles, and contour maps.

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation after transcatheter versus surgical prosthetic valve implantation for aortic stenosis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Russo, Nicola; Compostella, Leonida; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Setzu, Tiziana; Napodano, Massimo; Bottio, Tomaso; D'Onofrio, Augusto; Isabella, Gianbattista; Gerosa, Gino; Iliceto, Sabino; Bellotto, Fabio

    2014-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation plays a leading role in the management of aortic stenosis in patients with comorbidities but no data are available about cardiac rehabilitation in these subjects. This study aimed to compare safety and efficacy of an early, exercise-based, cardiac rehabilitation programme in octogenarians after a traditional surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Seventy-eight consecutive transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients were studied in order to evaluate the effect of an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programme in comparison to 80 of a similar age having surgical aortic valve replacement. Functional capacity was assessed by a 6 min walking test on admission and at the end of the programme. When possible, a cardiopulmonary exercise test was also performed before discharge. The two groups were similar in terms of gender and length of stay in cardiac rehabilitation; as expected, the transcatheter aortic valve implantation group had more comorbidities but no major complications occurred in either group during rehabilitation. All patients enhanced autonomy and mobility and were able to walk at least with the assistance of a stick. In those patients who were able to perform the 6 min walking test, the distance walked at discharge did not significantly differ between the groups (272.7 ± 108 vs. 294.2 ± 101 m, p = 0.42), neither did the exercise capacity assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise test (peak-VO2 12.5 ± 3.6 vs. 13.9 ± 2.7 ml/kg/min, p = 0.16). Cardiac rehabilitation is feasible, safe and effective in octogenarian patients after transcatheter aortic valve implantation as well as after traditional surgery. An early cardiac rehabilitation programme enhances independence, mobility and functional capacity and should be highly encouraged. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. )

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  9. Relapse of enterococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis with aortic root abscess following treatment with daptomycin in a patient not fit for surgery.

    PubMed

    Enoch, D A; Phillimore, N; Karas, J A; Horswill, L; Mlangeni, D A

    2010-04-01

    Daptomycin is a novel lipopeptide with activity against Gram-positive organisms including enterococci. It is licensed for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia and right-sided endocarditis, but not endocarditis due to Enterococcus spp. We report a case of enterococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis with an aortic root abscess in an elderly patient who was not fit for surgery. The patient's endocarditis relapsed 9 weeks after a 6 week course of daptomycin.

  10. Treatment of infected thoracic aortic prosthetic grafts with the in situ preservation strategy: a review of its history, surgical technique, and results.

    PubMed

    Tossios, Paschalis; Karatzopoulos, Avgerinos; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Sapalidis, Konstantinos; Grosomanidis, Vasilios; Kalogera, Anna; Kouskouras, Konstantinos; Foroulis, Christophoros N; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos

    2014-01-01

    For cardiothoracic surgeons prosthetic graft infection still represents a difficult diagnostic and treatment problem to manage. An aggressive surgical strategy involving removal and in situ replacement of all the prosthetic material combined with extensive removal of the surrounding mediastinal tissue remains technically challenging in any case. Mortality and morbidity rates following such a major and risky surgical procedure are high due to the nature of the aggressive surgical approach and multi-organ failure typically caused by sepsis. However, removal of the infected prosthetic graft in patients who had an operation to reconstruct the ascending aorta and/or the aortic arch is not always possible or necessary for selected patients according to current alternative treatment options. Rather than following the traditional surgical concept of aggressive graft replacement nowadays a more conservative surgical approach with in situ preservation and coverage of the prosthetic graft by vascular tissue flaps can result in a good outcome. In this article, we review the relevant literature on this specific topic, particularly in terms of graft-sparing surgery for infected ascending/arch prosthetic grafts with special emphasis on staged treatment and the use of omentum transposition. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Novel Technique for Prosthetic Valve Retrieval After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Embolization.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Francesco; Ruparelia, Neil; Del Furia, Francesca; Romano, Vittorio; Ancona, Marco; Mangieri, Antonio; Regazzoli, Damiano; Latib, Azeem; Godino, Cosmo; Ancona, Francesco; Candilio, Luciano; Jabbour, Richard; Colombo, Antonio; Montorfano, Matteo

    2017-07-01

    Although the rate of procedural complications during transcatheter aortic valve implantation has decreased because of technological advancement and increased operator experience, device embolization remains a rare but potentially fatal complication, even with new generation devices. We report, to our knowledge, the first case of Portico valve (St Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN) migration despite apparent optimal initial implantation depth, which was retrieved using a novel strategy after failure of a traditional retrieval technique. We also describe a mechanism of left coronary artery systolic perfusion with diastolic backflow, which led to myocardial ischemia. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Are homografts superior to conventional prosthetic valves in the setting of infective endocarditis involving the aortic valve?

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Bum; Ejiofor, Julius I; Yammine, Maroun; Camuso, Janice M; Walsh, Conor W; Ando, Masahiko; Melnitchouk, Serguei I; Rawn, James D; Leacche, Marzia; MacGillivray, Thomas E; Cohn, Lawrence H; Byrne, John G; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2016-05-01

    Surgical dogma suggests that homografts should be used preferentially, compared with conventional xenograft or mechanical prostheses, in the setting of infective endocarditis (IE), because they have greater resistance to infection. However, comparative data that support this notion are limited. From the prospective databases of 2 tertiary academic centers, we identified 304 consecutive adult patients (age ≥17 years) who underwent surgery for active IE involving the aortic valve (AV), in the period 2002 to 2014. Short- and long-term outcomes were evaluated using propensity scores and inverse-probability weighting to adjust for selection bias. Homografts, and xenograft and mechanical prostheses, were used in 86 (28.3%), 139 (45.7%), and 79 (26.0%) patients, respectively. Homografts were more often used in the setting of prosthetic valve endocarditis (58.1% vs 28.8%, P = .002) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (25.6% vs 12.1%, P = .002), compared with conventional prostheses. Early mortality occurred in 17 (19.8%) in the homograft group, and 20 (9.2%) in the conventional group (P = .019). During follow-up (median: 29.4 months; interquartile-range: 4.7-72.6 months), 60 (19.7%) patients died, and 23 (7.7%) experienced reinfection, with no significant differences in survival (P = .23) or freedom from reinfection rates (P = .65) according to the types of prostheses implanted. After adjustments for baseline characteristics, using propensity-score analyses, use of a homograft did not significantly affect early death (odds ratio 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-3.40, P = .23), overall death (hazard ratio 1.10; 95% CI, 0.62-1.94, P = .75), or reinfection (hazard ratio 1.04; 95% CI, 0.49-2.18, P = .93). No significant benefit to use of homografts was demonstrable with regard to resistance to reinfection in the setting of IE. The choice among prosthetic options should be based on technical and patient-specific factors. Lack of availability of homografts should

  13. Five-year echocardiographic follow-up after TAVI: structural and functional changes of a balloon-expandable prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Muratori, Manuela; Fusini, Laura; Tamborini, Gloria; Gripari, Paola; Ghulam Ali, Sarah; Mapelli, Massimo; Fabbiocchi, Franco; Trabattoni, Piero; Roberto, Maurizio; Agrifoglio, Marco; Alamanni, Francesco; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Pepi, Mauro

    2017-03-30

    Scarce data are available on the long-term structural and functional changes of prosthetic valves after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The objective was to evaluate with echocardiography the long-term structural and functional changes of prosthetic valves after TAVI. Structural valve deterioration (SVD) was defined as leaflet thickening ≥3mm, presence of calcification and abnormal leaflet motion. Five-year echocardiographic follow-up was available in 96 out of 318 patients who underwent TAVI with a balloon-expandable device between April 2008 and December 2011. At 1-year follow-up, no patient showed SVD. At 5-year follow-up, SVD were observed in 29 (30%) patients who showed also a significant reduction of aortic valve area (AVA) together with an increase of mean and peak aortic pressure gradients at the latest echocardiography evaluation. Moreover, rate of central aortic valve regurgitation ≥2 was higher in SVD patients as compared to those without SVD, while there was no difference in terms of paravalvular regurgitation. Despite SVD, one patient only reached the criteria for severe stenosis and no reintervention was needed at 5-year follow-up. Variables independently associated with SVD were female sex, small body surface area, use of a 23 mm valve, and small AVA at pre-discharge echocardiogram. At 5-year follow-up, 30% of patients who underwent TAVI with a balloon-expandable valve showed initial SVD. However, SVD was not associated with severe stenosis in most of the patients and had no significant impact on and clinical outcome.

  14. Successful application of a PressureWire retrogradely across an ATS prosthetic aortic valve to diagnose constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sonny; Mariani, Justin A; Newcomb, Andrew; Stokes, Michael B; Burns, Andrew T

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of the left ventricular pressure measured across an aortic valve prosthesis is occasionally necessary when noninvasive imaging and Doppler echocardiographic data are inconclusive or differ from the clinical findings for specific scenarios, such as diagnosing constrictive or restrictive physiology. We present a case in which we safely and effectively replicate the previous successful application of a PressureWire in diagnosing constrictive pericarditis in a patient with a bileafltet mechanical aortic and mitral valves.

  15. Early mortality after aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthetic vs bioprosthetic valves among Medicare beneficiaries: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongyi Tony; McKean, Stephen; Kelman, Jeffrey A; Laschinger, John; Johnson, Chris; Warnock, Rob; Worrall, Chris M; Sedrakyan, Art; Encinosa, William; MaCurdy, Thomas E; Izurieta, Hector S

    2014-11-01

    Early mortality for patients who undergo aortic valve replacement (AVR) may differ between mechanical and biological prosthetic (hereinafter referred to as bioprosthetic) valves. Clinical trials may have difficulty addressing this issue owing to limited sample sizes and low mortality rates. To compare early mortality after AVR between the recipients of mechanical and bioprosthetic aortic valves. A retrospective analysis of patients 65 years or older in the Medicare databases who underwent AVR from July 1, 2006, through December 31, 2011. In the mixed-effects models adjusting for physician and hospital random effects, we estimated odds ratios (OR) of early mortality to compare mechanical vs bioprosthetic valves. Mechanical or bioprostheticaortic valve replacement. Early mortality was measured as death on the date of surgery, death within 1 to 30 or 31 to 365 days after the date of surgery, death within 30 days after the date of hospital discharge, and operative mortality (death within 30 days after surgery or at discharge, whichever is longer). Of the 66 453 Medicare beneficiaries who met inclusion criteria, 19 190 (28.88%) received a mechanical valve and 47 263 (71.12%) received a bioprosthetic valve. The risk for death on the date of surgery was 60% higher for recipients of mechanical valves than recipients of bioprosthetic valves (OR, 1.61 [95% CI, 1.27-2.04; P < .001]; risk ratio [RR], 1.60). The risk difference decreased to 16% during the 30 days after the date of surgery (OR, 1.18 [95% CI, 1.09-1.28; P < .001]; RR, 1.16). We found no differences within 31 to 365 days after the date of surgery and within the 30 days after discharge. The risk for operative mortality was 19% higher for recipients of mechanical compared with bioprosthetic valves (OR, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.13-1.30; P < .001]; RR, 1.19). The number needed to treat with mechanical valves to observe 1 additional death on the surgery date was 290; to observe 1 additional death within 30

  16. Time-resolved PIV technique for high temporal resolution measurement of mechanical prosthetic aortic valve fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, R; Morbiducci, U; Rossi, M; Scalise, L; Verdonck, P; Grigioni, M

    2007-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) have been used to replace diseased native valves for more than five decades. Among these, mechanical PHVs are the most frequently implanted. Unfortunately, these devices still do not achieve ideal behavior and lead to many complications, many of which are related to fluid mechanics. The fluid dynamics of mechanical PHVs are particularly complex and the fine-scale characteristics of such flows call for very accurate experimental techniques. Adequate temporal resolution can be reached by applying time-resolved PIV, a high-resolution dynamic technique which is able to capture detailed chronological changes in the velocity field. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the evolution of the flow field in a detailed time domain of a commercial bileaflet PHV in a mock-loop mimicking unsteady conditions, by means of time-resolved 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The investigated flow field corresponded to the region immediately downstream of the valve plane. Spatial resolution as in "standard" PIV analysis of prosthetic valve fluid dynamics was used. The combination of a Nd:YLF high-repetition-rate double-cavity laser with a high frame rate CMOS camera allowed a detailed, highly temporally resolved acquisition (up to 10000 fps depending on the resolution) of the flow downstream of the PHV. Features that were observed include the non-homogeneity and unsteadiness of the phenomenon and the presence of large-scale vortices within the field, especially in the wake of the valve leaflets. Furthermore, we observed that highly temporally cycle-resolved analysis allowed the different behaviors exhibited by the bileaflet valve at closure to be captured in different acquired cardiac cycles. By accurately capturing hemodynamically relevant time scales of motion, time-resolved PIV characterization can realistically be expected to help designers in improving PHV performance and in furnishing comprehensive validation with experimental data

  17. Improved technique of transapical aortic valve implantation: "the Berlin addition".

    PubMed

    Pasic, Miralem; Dreysse, Stephan; Drews, Thorsten; Buz, Semih; Unbehaun, Axel; Kukucka, Marian; Mladenow, Alexandar; Hetzer, Roland

    2010-06-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation carries some degree of uncertainty regarding the definitive valve position. We added angiographic visualization of the aortic root while the prosthetic valve is being slowly deployed. It enables easy correction of the position of the valve so that perfect alignment can be achieved of the relationships between the prosthetic valve, aortic valve annulus, aortic cusps, and the coronary arteries.

  18. Textural features of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scanning in diagnosing aortic prosthetic graft infection.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ben R; Beukinga, Roelof J; Boellaard, Ronald; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Zeebregts, Clark J; Slart, Riemer H J A

    2017-05-01

    The clinical problem in suspected aortoiliac graft infection (AGI) is to obtain proof of infection. Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography scanning (PET) has been suggested to play a pivotal role, an evidence-based interpretation is lacking. The objective of this retrospective study was to examine the feasibility and utility of (18)F-FDG uptake heterogeneity characterized by textural features to diagnose AGI. Thirty patients with a history of aortic graft reconstruction who underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanning were included. Sixteen patients were suspected to have an AGI (group I). AGI was considered proven only in the case of a positive bacterial culture. Positive cultures were found in 10 of the 16 patients (group Ia), and in the other six patients, cultures remained negative (group Ib). A control group was formed of 14 patients undergoing (18)F-FDG PET for other reasons (group II). PET images were assessed using conventional maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), tissue-to-background ratio (TBR), and visual grading scale (VGS). Additionally, 64 different (18)F-FDG PET based textural features were applied to characterize (18)F-FDG uptake heterogeneity. To select candidate predictors, univariable logistic regression analysis was performed (α = 0.16). The accuracy was satisfactory in case of an AUC > 0.8. The feature selection process yielded the textural features named variance (AUC = 0.88), high grey level zone emphasis (AUC = 0.87), small zone low grey level emphasis (AUC = 0.80), and small zone high grey level emphasis (AUC = 0.81) most optimal for distinguishing between groups I and II. SUVmax, TBR, and VGS were also able to distinguish between these groups with AUCs of 0.87, 0.78, and 0.90, respectively. The textural feature named short run high grey level emphasis was able to distinguish group Ia from Ib (AUC = 0.83), while for the same task the TBR and VGS were not found to be predictive

  19. Prosthetic Engineering

    MedlinePlus

    ... torque adapter in the pylons of transtibial amputees. Energy Storage & Release Many ambulatory lower limb amputees exhibit ... Future Directions Current Project Summaries Development of Controlled Energy Storage and Release Prosthetic Foot Development of Inverting- ...

  20. Prosthetic Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... lightweight materials such as plastic, metal alloys and carbon-fiber composites. Prosthetic feet can be basic (unmoving), ... feet: store and release energy during the walking cycle give a sense of push-off, a more ...

  1. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Mean Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  2. Prosthetic valve endocarditis. A survey.

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ismail, M; Hannachi, N; Abid, F; Kaabar, Z; Rougé, J F

    1987-01-01

    Fifty eight patients (aged 8-59 years, mean 27) treated for prosthetic valve endocarditis from January 1966 to January 1985 were studied retrospectively by review of case notes. There were 12 cases of early and 46 cases of late prosthetic valve endocarditis. These developed in 28 patients with an isolated aortic valve, in 26 with an isolated mitral valve, and in four with both aortic and mitral prosthetic valves. Streptococci were the most commonly isolated microorganisms, followed by staphylococci, Gram negative bacteria, and fungi. A surgical (34 cases) or a necropsy specimen (10 cases) from 44 cases was examined. Eighty two per cent of the patients had congestive heart failure. Twenty four of the 58 patients were medically treated and 17 died (70% mortality). Combined medical and surgical treatment was used in 34 patients; the main indication for surgery was congestive heart failure. Fourteen patients on combined treatment died (40% mortality). Persistent sepsis and prosthetic valve dehiscence were the most common early and late operative complications. The most important influences on outcome were congestive heart failure, the type of micro-organism, the severity and extent of anatomical lesions, the time of onset of prosthetic valve endocarditis, and the type of treatment. This survey indicates that only patients without congestive heart failure or embolic complications and with sensitive micro-organism should be treated medically. In view of the poor prognosis patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis associated with congestive heart failure, persistent sepsis, and repeat arterial emboli should be treated by early surgical intervention. PMID:3620246

  3. Mid-term results of small-sized St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic valves (21 mm or less) for small aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Sakaki, Masayuki; Inoue, Kazushige; Iwata, Takashi; Tei, Keikou; Miura, Takuya

    2013-11-01

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is always of concern when performing aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus. Although bioprosthetic AVR is preferred in patients older than 65 years, we have experienced cases in elderly patients with a small aortic annulus whereby we could not implant small-sized bioprosthetic valves. We have implanted St. Jude Medical Regent (SJMR) mechanical valves (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) as necessary, even in elderly patients with no aortic annulus enlargement. We investigated our experiences of AVR with SJMR mechanical valves of 21 mm or less in size. Between January 2006 and December 2009, 40 patients underwent AVR with SJMR mechanical valves ≤21 mm in size: 9 patients received 21-mm valves, 19 received 19-mm valves, and 12 received 17-mm valves. The mean age was 65.9 ± 9.5 years, and 25 patients (62.5 %) were 65 years or older. We evaluated the clinical outcome and the echocardiographic data for each valve size. There was no operative or hospital mortality. The mean duration of clinical follow-up was 31.2 ± 17.6 months. During follow-up, there were no hospitalizations due to heart failure. The cumulative valve-related event-free survival was 93 % at 33 months, and the cumulative hemorrhagic event-free survival was 93 % at 33 months and 84 % at 43 months, using the Kaplan-Meier method. At follow-up, the mean values of the measured effective orifice area (EOA) for the 21-, 19-, and 17-mm prostheses were 2.00 ± 0.22, 1.74 ± 0.37, and 1.25 ± 0.26 cm(2), and the mean measured EOA index (EOAI) were 1.17 ± 0.12, 1.11 ± 0.21 and 0.90 ± 0.22 cm(2)/m(2), respectively. A PPM (EOAI ≤0.85) was documented in 5 patients, all of whom had received a 17-mm SJMR valve. AVR with SJMR valves of 21 mm or less in size appears to show satisfactory clinical and hemodynamic results.

  4. Percutaneous closure of a prosthetic pulmonary paravalvular leak.

    PubMed

    Seery, Thomas J; Slack, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Paravalvular leak following prosthetic valve surgery has the potential to cause serious complications such as hemolysis and congestive heart failure. Successful percutaneous closures of prosthetic mitral and aortic paravalvular leaks have been performed as an alternative to reoperation. This case represents the first known report of successful percutaneous closure of a prosthetic pulmonary paravalvular leak in an adult patient with a history of congenital heart disease using two muscular ventricular septal defect occluder devices. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation.

    PubMed

    Bavo, Alessandra M; Rocatello, Giorgia; Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations' outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results.

  6. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations’ outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  7. Echocardiographic assessment of prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Blauwet, Lori A; Miller, Fletcher A

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is a global health problem. It is estimated that more than 280,000 prosthetic heart valves are implanted worldwide each year. As the world's population is aging, the incidence of prosthetic heart valve implantation and the prevalence of prosthetic heart valves continue to increase. Assessing heart valve prosthesis function remains challenging, as prosthesis malfunction is unpredictable but not uncommon. Transthoracic two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is the preferred method for assessing prosthetic valve function. Clinically useful Doppler-derived measures for assessing prosthetic valve hemodynamic profiles have been reported for aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve prostheses, but echocardiographic data regarding pulmonary valve prostheses remain limited. Complete prosthetic valve evaluation by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is sometimes challenging due to acoustic shadowing and artifacts. In these cases, further imaging with transesophageal echocardiography, fluoroscopy and/or gated CT may be warranted, particularly if prosthetic valve dysfunction is suspected. Being able to differentiate pathologic versus functional obstruction of an individual prosthesis is extremely important, as this distinction affects management decisions. Transprosthetic and periprosthetic regurgitation may be difficult to visualize on TTE, so careful review of Doppler-derived data combined with a high index of suspicion is warranted, particularly in symptomatic patients. A baseline TTE soon after valve implantation is indicated in order to "fingerprint" the prosthesis hemodynamic profile. It remains unclear how frequently serial imaging should be performed in order to assess prosthetic valve function, as this issue has not been systematically studied.

  8. [Dehiscence of the Pericardial Patch, after Surgical Treatment of Active Infective Aortic Valve Endocarditis with Reconstruction of the Aortic Annulus Using a Glutaraldehyde-treated Autologous Pericardium].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazufumi; Fukunaga, Naoto; Koizumi, Shigeki; Nishiya, Kenta; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Ishigami, Masanosuke; Nagasawa, Atsushi; Sakata, Ryuzo; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2017-03-01

    A 50-year-old man was admitted with fever and chill sensation 6 months ago. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed left and right coronary cusp prolapses and a thickened tissue of the aortic curtain. Congestive heart failure due to active infective aortic valve endocarditis was diagnosed, and he underwent aortic valve replacement. The aortic annulus was reconstructed using a glutaraldehydetreated autologous pericardium. Six months after surgery, TTE showed severe aortic regurgitation and saccular change in the aortic annulus. Transesophageal echocargiography showed some echo free space from left to noncoronary cusp and abnormal movement of the prosthetic valve annulus. Intraoperative examination showed dehiscence of the pericardial patch from the aortic wall, but no finding of infection. Aortic valve rereplacement was performed with reconstruction of the aortic annulus using a bovine pericardium. To prevent the dehiscence of the pericardial patch from the aortic wall, sutures fixing the prosthetic valve were passed from outside of the aortic wall.

  9. Aortic Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries (atherosclerosis) Weakened and bulging artery (pre-existing aortic aneurysm) An aortic valve defect (bicuspid aortic valve) A ... valve, tell your doctor. If you have an aortic aneurysm, find out how often you need monitoring and ...

  10. Aortic root abscess resulting from endocarditis: spectrum of angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.W.; Dinsmore, R.E.

    1984-11-01

    Abscesses in the aortic root are a serious complication of infective endocarditis and require accurate diagnosis for antibiotic and surgical management. Nineteen cases of endocarditis of a native valve or prosthetic valve and adjacent abscess cavities were identified with angiography. Of 6 patients with endocarditis of a native valve, 5 had bicuspid aortic valves and all had severe aortic regurgitation. Of 13 patients with endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve, all had paravalvular regurgitation. Fistulas were detected into the mitral anulus in 8 patients, and into the right ventricle in 3 patients. No complications from the catheterization were recorded during the 48-hour follow-up.

  11. Valve-sparing replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic arch in a child with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozker, Emre; Vuran, Can; Saritas, Bülent; Türköz, Riza

    2012-05-01

    We describe a successful surgical treatment in a 2.5-year old boy with Loeys-Dietz syndrome, in whom we performed aortic arch and ascending aorta replacement with a valve-sparing operation (VSO) of the aortic root because of significant aortic insufficiency and dilation of the aortic root. We believe that VSO is ideal for treating young patients with aortic root aneurysm with normal or minimally diseased aortic cusps to avoid the disadvantages of prosthetic valve replacements.

  12. Exclusion of Complex Paraannular Aortic Abscess With the Freestyle Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Guihaire, Julien; Kloeckner, Martin; Deleuze, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Destructive aortic valve endocarditis is a serious condition that can result in aortoventricular disjunction. The appropriate surgical approach for severe excavating lesions remains a matter of debate. Homografts, prosthetic valves associated with a pericardial patch for annulus repair, and prosthetic valve conduits can be used. We report the technical issue of subcoronary inclusion of the full root Freestyle xenograft for complicated aortic endocarditis extending to the left ventricular outflow tract.

  13. Indium-111 leukocyte localization in infected prosthetic graft

    SciTech Connect

    Purnell, G.L.; Walker, C.W.; Allison, J.W.; Dalrymple, G.V. )

    1990-08-01

    Infective endocarditis can be difficult to prove, even in the face of strong clinical suspicion. A case in which standard methods of diagnosis failed to demonstrate endocarditis in a patient with recurrent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and porcine aortic valve is reported. An In-111 labelled leukocyte SPECT study demonstrated uptake in the aortic root and leaflets, and autopsy demonstrated vegetations on the leaflets. In-111 may prove useful in demonstrating endocarditis in patients with prosthetic valve infection.

  14. Unusual mechanism of myocardial infarction in prosthetic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Fernando A; Campos, Vanessa G; da Cunha, Claudio R; de Oliveira, Felipe Bezerra Martins; Otto, Maria Estefânia Bosco; Monte, Guilherme U

    2015-01-01

    A 46-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve and severe calcific aortic stenosis was submitted to aortic valve replacement with a stented bioprosthesis. He developed Staphylococcus epidermidis prosthetic valve endocarditis a month later, presenting in the emergency room with acute myocardial infarction. The mechanism of myocardial ischemia was a large aortic root abscess causing left main extrinsic compression. He was urgently taken to the operating room, and an aortic root replacement with cryopreserved homograft was performed, associated with autologous pericardium patch closure of aortic to right atrium fistula and coronary artery bypass grafting of the left anterior descending. After a difficult postoperative period with multiple problems, he was eventually discharged home. At 36-month follow-up, he is asymptomatic with no recurrent infection, and the left main coronary artery is widely patent on control chest computed tomography. PMID:26045678

  15. Aortic dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - dissection ... also cause abnormal widening or ballooning of the aorta ( aneurysm ). The exact cause is unknown, but more common ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  17. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  18. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis. PMID:27785132

  19. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device that...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device that...

  1. Proposed modification for valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Deville, Claude; Nashef, Samer

    2014-05-01

    Valve-sparing aortic root replacement (ARR) is the procedure of choice in young patients with aortic root aneurysm and preserved aortic valve leaflets; however, coronary ostial anastomoses remain an issue. Troublesome bleeding sometimes occurs during surgery, and in the long term, there is a risk of aneurysmal formation in the residual aortic wall of the ostial "button." We describe a technique of valve-sparing ARR wherein each coronary button along with its flange of aortic tissue is implanted within the prosthetic graft used for ARR, thereby eliminating the risk of both immediate surgical bleeding and late coronary button aneurysms.

  2. A rare case of prosthetic endocarditis and dehiscence in a mechanical valved conduit

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun; Smith, Cristy; Subramanian, Sreekumar; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    A middle-aged adult patient with a history of aortic root replacement with a mechanical valved conduit and remote chest trauma was referred to our institution with prosthetic endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiogram at our institution confirmed a near-complete dehiscence of the prosthetic aortic valve from the conduit, with significant perivalvular flow forming a pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent a high-risk re-operation, involving redo aortic root replacement with a homograft after extensive debridement of the infected tissue. The patient was discharged to an outside facility after an uncomplicated hospital course, and remains stable. PMID:24510692

  3. A rare case of prosthetic endocarditis and dehiscence in a mechanical valved conduit.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Arun; Smith, Cristy; Subramanian, Sreekumar; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-02-07

    A middle-aged adult patient with a history of aortic root replacement with a mechanical valved conduit and remote chest trauma was referred to our institution with prosthetic endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiogram at our institution confirmed a near-complete dehiscence of the prosthetic aortic valve from the conduit, with significant perivalvular flow forming a pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent a high-risk re-operation, involving redo aortic root replacement with a homograft after extensive debridement of the infected tissue. The patient was discharged to an outside facility after an uncomplicated hospital course, and remains stable.

  4. Apicoaortic conduit for severe hemolytic anemia after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Kyohei; Ohki, Satoshi; Obayashi, Tamiyuki; Koyano, Tetsuya; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hirai, Hanako

    2015-06-01

    We describe the case of an 82-year-old woman who had undergone aortic mechanical valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small annulus, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Four years after the operation, she began to experience hemolysis. Prosthetic valve obstruction was observed but there was no paravalvular leakage or aortic regurgitation through the mechanical valve. We elected to perform apicoaortic bypass in this patient with severe hemolytic anemia secondary to a mechanical valve malfunction.

  5. Threshold concepts in prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sophie

    2016-11-24

    Curriculum documents identify key concepts within learning prosthetics. Threshold concepts provide an alternative way of viewing the curriculum, focussing on the ways of thinking and practicing within prosthetics. Threshold concepts can be described as an opening to a different way of viewing a concept. This article forms part of a larger study exploring what students and staff experience as difficult in learning about prosthetics. To explore possible threshold concepts within prosthetics. Qualitative, interpretative phenomenological analysis. Data from 18 students and 8 staff at two universities with undergraduate prosthetics and orthotics programmes were generated through interviews and questionnaires. The data were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological analysis approach. Three possible threshold concepts arose from the data: 'how we walk', 'learning to talk' and 'considering the person'. Three potential threshold concepts in prosthetics are suggested with possible implications for prosthetics education. These possible threshold concepts involve changes in both conceptual and ontological knowledge, integrating into the persona of the individual. This integration occurs through the development of memories associated with procedural concepts that combine with disciplinary concepts. Considering the prosthetics curriculum through the lens of threshold concepts enables a focus on how students learn to become prosthetists. This study provides new insights into how prosthetists learn. This has implications for curriculum design in prosthetics education. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2016.

  6. Optimal Design of Aortic Leaflet Prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, Dhanjoo N.; Reul, Helmut; Ray, Gautam; Chandran, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The design criteria for an optimum prosthetic-aortic leaflet valve are a smooth washout in the valve cusps, minimal leaflet stress, minimal transmembrane pressure for the valve to open, an adequate lifetime (for a given blood-compatible leaflet material's fatigue data). A rigorous design analysis is presented to obtain the prosthetic tri-leaflet aortic valve leaflet's optimum design parameters. Four alternative optimum leaflet geometries are obtained to satisfy the criteria of a smooth washout and minimal leaflet stress. The leaflet thicknesses of these four optimum designs are determined by satisfying the two remaining design criteria for minimal transmembrane opening pressure and adequate fatigue lifetime, which are formulated in terms of the elastic and fatigue properties of the selected leaflet material - Avcothane-51 (of the Avco-Everett Co. of Massachusetts). Prosthetic valves are fabricated on the basis of the optimum analysis and the resulting detailed engineering drawings of the designs are also presented in the paper.

  7. Optimal Design of Aortic Leaflet Prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, Dhanjoo N.; Reul, Helmut; Ray, Gautam; Chandran, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The design criteria for an optimum prosthetic-aortic leaflet valve are a smooth washout in the valve cusps, minimal leaflet stress, minimal transmembrane pressure for the valve to open, an adequate lifetime (for a given blood-compatible leaflet material's fatigue data). A rigorous design analysis is presented to obtain the prosthetic tri-leaflet aortic valve leaflet's optimum design parameters. Four alternative optimum leaflet geometries are obtained to satisfy the criteria of a smooth washout and minimal leaflet stress. The leaflet thicknesses of these four optimum designs are determined by satisfying the two remaining design criteria for minimal transmembrane opening pressure and adequate fatigue lifetime, which are formulated in terms of the elastic and fatigue properties of the selected leaflet material - Avcothane-51 (of the Avco-Everett Co. of Massachusetts). Prosthetic valves are fabricated on the basis of the optimum analysis and the resulting detailed engineering drawings of the designs are also presented in the paper.

  8. Prosthetic valve endocarditis: clinical findings and management.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, D; Körfer, R; Loogen, F; Rosin, H; Bircks, W

    1984-10-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) was shown in 46 patients out of a group of 2163 carrying prosthetic heart valves. The cumulative rate of early PVE was 1.4% and 1.5% for PVE occurring between the 60th day and 10 years after surgery. In 37% of all cases this was caused by staphylococci, 20% by streptococci, and 13% Gram negative species. Fungi were found in 9% and mixed infections in 21%. The incidence of staphylococci, Gram negative pathogens and fungi was significantly higher in early PVE. In 5 patients, valve involvement consisted in echocardiographically shown vegetations and/or obstructive thromboendocarditis. In 90% of 37 patients who developed paravalvular leakages, there was high intravascular haemolysis uncharacteristic of the type of prosthesis implanted. In 70% fluoroscopy revealed disproportionate tilting of the prosthetic annulus, and in 75% there was a distinct echocardiographic pattern in the closing movement of the valve poppet. The cumulative survival rate after six months was 31% for the conservatively treated, and 66% for the medically plus surgically treated patients. Survival rates at the end of a maximum follow-up of 20 years was 15% with conservative treatment and 51% after primary surgical therapy. The prognosis was worse (P less than 0.01) in patients who, during aortic PVE, developed heart failure refractant to therapy due to haemodynamically significant prosthetic valve dysfunction, to sepsis that persisted for more than 72 h despite antibiotic therapy, to major septic embolism or to acute renal failure. The retrospective prognosis was more favourable for patients with early aortic (P less than 0.02) or mitral (P less than 0.05) valve re-replacement than for patients who had been treated medically only.

  9. The concept of aortic replacement based on computational fluid dynamic analysis: patient-directed aortic replacement†

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Laurant; Poole, Robert J.; Warwick, Richard; Poullis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Aortic replacement is based on the aortic diameter in the absence of dissection or connective tissue diseases. Frequently, a number of different aortic-to-prosthetic anastomotic positions are possible depending on patient factors and surgeon preferences. High stress on residual aortic tissue may result in aneurysm formation or aneurysmal dilatation. Utilizing a computational fluid dynamic evaluation, we aimed to define possible optimal operative interventions with regard to the extent of aortic replacement. METHODS For proof of principle, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, using Fluent 6.2 (Ansys UK Ltd, Sheffield, UK), was performed on a simplified ascending arch and descending aortic geometry. Wall shear stress in three dimensions was assessed for the standard operations: ascending aortic replacement, arch replacement and proximal descending aortic replacement. RESULTS Hermiarch replacement is superior to isolated ascending aortic replacement with regard to residual stress analysis on tissues (up to a 10-fold reduction). Aortic arch replacement with island implantation of the supra-aortic vessels may potentially result in high stress on the residual aorta (10-fold increase). Aortic arch replacement with individual supra-aortic vessel implantation may result in areas of high stress (10-fold increase) on native vessels if an inadequate length of supra-aortic tissue is not resected, regardless of it being aneurysmal. CONCLUSIONS Computational fluid dynamic evaluation, which will have to be patient-specific, 3D anatomical and physiological, potentially has enormous implications for operative strategy in aortic replacement surgery. CFD analysis may direct the replacement of normal-diameter aortas in the future. PMID:23407695

  10. [Surgical Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Sugaya, Akira; Kurumisawa, Soki; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Ohki, Shinichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-11-01

    Between 2003 and 2014, at Jichi Medical University Hospital, 11 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) underwent re-operation. There was 1 in-hospital death and 2 late deaths. The cause of death was cirrhosis, heart failure and sepsis, respectively. Emergency surgery, previous double valve replacement (DVR) and Staphylococcus infection were common risk factors for all 3 cases. Two cases of patients that survived who underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) and DVR for PVE after DVR were treated with multiple antibiotic courses for bacteremia associated with hemodialysis and colon cancer. One patient who underwent DVR after mitral valve plasty which was complicated with cerebral hemorrhage, had survived and was discharged. Of the aortic PVE patients, 2 cases of aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a mechanical valve, 1 case of aortic root replacement (ARR) using a mechanical valve, and 1 ARR using the homograft, were considered cured and never relapsed. A patient with aortic PVE, who underwent AVR after cesarean section for heart failure in birth period, has received ARR twice with the mechanical valve for recurrent pseudo-aneurysm of the left ventricular outflow tract. Since hemodialysis and colon cancer is a risk factor for recurrent PVE, it is necessary to consider the long-term administration of antibiotics after surgery.

  11. The aortic valve: structure, complications and implications for transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rozeik, Mm; Wheatley, Dj; Gourlay, T

    2014-07-01

    The aortic valve operates in a complex haemodynamic environment, opening and closing over 100,000 times a day. When complications arise, such as aortic stenosis, prognosis can be very poor, leading to death within the first few years. Surgical valve replacement is currently the standard treatment for aortic stenosis. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and function of the native valve is imperative when developing a prosthetic replacement that can withstand the complex demands of the heart. This review focuses on the anatomy, structure and disease of the aortic valve and the implications for a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Current complications with TAVR, such as major vascular bleeding, conduction disturbances and patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), can be overcome by reducing the delivery profile and through the use of more accurate imaging technologies to work towards a fully functional and durable prosthesis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Rehabilitation and Prosthetic Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide and Service Dogs Contact VA Central Office Prosthetic & Sensory Aids Service If you have a general question regarding artificial limbs/orthotics, automobile adaptive equipment, clothing allowance, durable medical ...

  13. Prosthetics and Related Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... percent faster. Garth Stewart, a 24-year-old Army veteran who lost his left leg below the ... with the Department of Defense and Walter Reed Army Medical Center on topics such as prosthetics, spinal ...

  14. Prosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Saima; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infections represent a major therapeutic challenge for both healthcare providers and patients. This paper reviews the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, microbiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of prosthetic joint infection. The most optimal management strategy should be identified based on a number of considerations including type and duration of infection, antimicrobial susceptibility of the infecting pathogen, condition of infected tissues and bone stock, patient wishes and functional status. PMID:22847032

  15. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM. PMID:27867654

  16. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L

    2016-10-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM.

  17. Late complication after repair of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Anaïs; Cuttone, Fabio; Desgué, Julien; Ivascau, Calin; Caprio, Sabino; Saplacan, Vladimir; Belin, Annette; Babatasi, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital malformation that has long been considered completely correctable with appropriate surgery in childhood. However, with the aging of these patients, many late complications have been reported, and this notion must be reevaluated. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent reoperation between 1992 and 2012 in our adult cardiac surgery department following surgical correction of coarctation in childhood; 18 patients over 15-years old were included in the study. The median time from coarctation repair to reoperation was 25 years. Patients were reoperated on for several late complications: aortic valve disease secondary to bicuspid aortic valve, ascending aortic aneurysm, recoarctation, aortic arch hypoplasia, pseudoaneurysm, associated recoarctation and pseudoaneurysm, subvalvular aortic obstruction, and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. One patient died due to an intraoperative complication. In the other cases, the surgical results were satisfactory at the 6-month follow-up. According to literature data, age at coarctation repair and surgical technique appear to be essential factors in late complications: older age and surgical repair with prosthesis interposition are associated with a higher rate of reintervention. Patients who have undergone repair of aortic coarctation frequently remain asymptomatic for a long time. Late complications can be appropriately treated when diagnosed early. Consequently, all coarctation patients need careful lifelong follow-up, especially those with congenital aortic valve disease or surgery in childhood with interposition of prosthetic material. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Aortic root replacement using a homograft for recurrent valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Abul Hasan Muhammad; Kazui, Teruhisa; Washiyama, Naoki; Yamashita, Katsushi; Terada, Hitoshi; Ohkura, Kazuhiro

    2002-09-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis is a relatively rare condition associated with high mortality. Endocarditis affecting 2 successive mechanical valves at the aortic position has not, to the best of our knowledge, been described. We reported such a patient whose condition was further complicated by mitral regurgitation, pulmonary hypertension, worsening heart failure, and cardiac conduction abnormalities. Considering the failure of 2 previous mechanical valves, we conducted a homograft replacement of the aortic root with coronary reattachment. Mitral regurgitation was treated by annuloplasty. The patient's early postoperative course was uneventful and he was doing well 16 months after surgery. We discuss the overall treatment strategy for recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis and potential homograft advantages.

  19. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis Caused by Bartonella henselae: A Case Report of Molecular Diagnostics Informing Nonsurgical Management

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Patricia; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Raoult, Didier; Sampath, Rangarajan; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the pathogen responsible for culture-negative valve endocarditis often depends on molecular studies performed on surgical specimens. A patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who had an aortic graft, a mechanical aortic valve, and a mitral anulloplasty ring presented with culture-negative prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic graft infection. Research-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry on peripheral blood samples identified Bartonella henselae. Quantitative PCR targeting the16S-23S ribonucleic acid intergenic region and Western immunoblotting confirmed this result. This, in turn, permitted early initiation of pathogen-directed therapy and subsequent successful medical management of B henselae prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic graft infection. PMID:27844027

  20. CREATION OF A SECONDARY VENTRICULAR OUTLET TO REVERSE HEMOLYSIS AFTER AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Ott, David A.; Cooley, Denton A.; Norman, John C.

    1979-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman developed severe hemolysis after undergoing aortic valve replacement. A diminutive annulus and extensive calcification of the aorta precluded further surgery of the aortic root. Hemolysis was completely reversed by the implantation of a woven Dacron apicoabdominal aortic conduit incorporating a Cooley-Cutter prosthetic valve. Fractionation of stroke volume by means of a second ventricular outlet can reduce shear stresses and turbulence associated with unfavorable hemodynamic conditions, thereby successfully correcting hemolysis. Images PMID:15216312

  1. Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Maria-Sînziana; Bedeleanu, Daniela; Kovacs, Emese; Ciumărnean, Lorena; Molnar, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction, a complication of mechanical prosthetic valve replacement, is rare, with a slowly progressive evolution, but it can be acute, severe, requiring surgical reintervention. We present the case of a patient with a mechanical single disc aortic prosthesis, with moderate prosthesis-patient mismatch, minor pannus found on previous ultrasound examinations, who presented to our service with angina pain with a duration of 1 hour, subsequently interpreted as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) syndrome. Coronarography showed normal epicardial coronary arteries, an ample movement of the prosthetic disc, without evidence of coronary thromboembolism, and Gated Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) with Technetium (Tc)-99m detected no perfusion defects. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) evidenced a dysfunctional prosthesis due to a subvalvular mass; transesophageal echocardiography (TOE) showed the interference of this mass, with a pannus appearance, with the closure of the prosthetic disc. Under conditions of repeated angina episodes, under anticoagulant treatment, surgery was performed, with the intraoperative confirmation of pannus and its removal. Postoperative evolution was favorable. This case reflects the diagnostic and therapeutic management problems of pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction.

  2. Electrically Driven Prosthetic Elbow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention relates to an improved electrically driven prosthetic elbow wherein the elbow is capable of being rigidly locked into place in any...desired position, and upon driving the arm to the fully extended position, the elbow is automatically unlocked.

  3. Prosthetic iris devices.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sathish; Ting, Darren S J; Snyder, Michael E; Prasad, Somdutt; Koch, Hans-Reinhard

    2014-02-01

    Congenital iris defects may usually present either as subtotal aniridia or colobomatous iris defects. Acquired iris defects are secondary to penetrating iris injury, iatrogenic after surgical excision of iris tumours, collateral trauma after anterior segment surgery, or can be postinflammatory in nature. These iris defects can cause severe visual disability in the form of glare, loss of contrast sensitivity, and loss of best corrected visual acuity. The structural loss of iris can be reconstructed with iris suturing, use of prosthetic iris implants, or by a combination of these, depending on the relative amount of residual iris stromal tissue and health of the underlying pigment epithelium. Since the first implant of a black iris diaphragm posterior chamber intraocular lens in 1994, advances in material and design technology over the last decade have led to advances in the prosthetic material, surgical technique, and instrumentation in the field of prosthetic iris implants. In this article, we review the classification of iris defects, types of iris prosthetic devices, implantation techniques, and complications.

  4. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  5. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  6. [A case report of aortic valvuloplasty by rasping technique for aortic stenosis with small annulus simultaneously performed with mitral valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Taniyasu, N; Kou, E; Hiramatsu, T; Yokoyama, S; Takenaka, A; Ikawa, O

    1997-02-01

    The patient was a 48-year-old woman with aortic stenosis and regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Preoperative cardiac catheterization revealed LV-Ao pressure gradient of 30 mmHg and regurgitation of Sellers III. The aortic annulus was measured less than 19 mm. As operative findings, the aortic annulus seemed to be too small to be replaced with 19 mm prosthetic valve. Aortic valvuloplasty (AVP) with rasping technique was performed for the aortic valve and valve replacement was carried out for the mitral valve. After aortic declamping and occurring her beat, the transesophageal echocardiographic evaluation for AVP was effective. Postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative cardiac catheterization have shown decreased transvalvular pressure gradient up to 10 mmHg and aortic regurgitation of Sellers I.

  7. The surgical treatment of aortic regurgitation secondary to aortitis.

    PubMed

    Isomura, T; Hisatomi, K; Yanagi, I; Shimada, S; Uraguchi, K; Aoyagi, S; Kosuga, K; Ohishi, K

    1988-02-01

    We describe the operative and perioperative management of 11 patients with aortic regurgitation due to aortitis. All patients required aortic valve replacement because of severely uncoapted cusps secondary to dilatation of the ascending aorta. The right coronary ostium was narrowed in 5 patients and consequently necessitated a smaller coronary tip for the administration of cardioplegic solution. To implant the prosthetic valve, pledgeted 2-0 Tevdek sutures were placed through the aortic valve annulus either from the ventricular side or from outside the aortic wall. Steroids were administered to 4 patients preoperatively and 8 patients postoperatively. Postoperative dehiscence of the prosthesis was seen in 1 of the 3 patients not given any steriods. We conclude that it is important to arrest the inflammatory reaction before operation and if the aortic valve must be replaced, to reinforce the implanted prosthesis with pledgeted sutures. Also, we suggest the possible importance of steroid therapy.

  8. [Aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Acute aortic dissection suddenly occurrs and results in a variety of catastrophic sequelae including cardiac tamponade, rupture, and organ malperfusion. In acute stage (< 2 weeks), according to the classifications on the region of aortic dissection, the condition of the false channel and the onset, appropriate medical, surgical, or endovascular treatments including endovascular aneurysm repair followed by the rapid and accurate diagnosis of aortic dissection using computed tomography and ultrasound should be performed without delay. In the chronic stage (> 2 weeks), the behavior of the chronic dissection or residual distal dissection after the initial treatment should be followed-up carefully with best medical treatment at the regular intervals. If necessary, appropriate surgical and endovascular treatment should be carried out in the proper timing before rupture.

  9. [Use of artificial circulation during prosthetic repair of the abdominal aorta in single-step operations (a meta-analysis)].

    PubMed

    Belov, Iu V; Bazylev, V V; Savichev, D D

    2009-01-01

    To assess the risk of complications during the use of extracorporeal circulation at the stage of prosthetic reconstruction of the abdominal aorta in single-step interventions we carried out a systemic analysis of 20 publications mentioning the use of artificial circulation during aortic reconstruction, as well as analysed the works wherein aortic prosthetic repair was performed after artificial circulation was discontinued. The postoperative mortality rate in single-step interventions with the use of artificial circulation at the stage of aortic prosthetic reconstructions ranges from 0 to 25%, and that without artificial circulation varies from 0- 6.7%. A meta-analysis of the publications showed that the cumulative relative risk for development of complications is 3.14 times greater in those patients who at the stage of aortic reconstruction continued receiving artificial circulation. The use of artificial circulation does not decrease the incidence rate of myocardial infarction neither does it influence the rate of development of haemorrhage or purulent complications. However, the use of artificial circulation at the stage of prosthetic reconstruction of the abdominal aorta considerably increases the incidence rate of respiratory, renal and neurological complications. Hence, the advantages of using artificial circulation are levelled by high incidence of complications, while the opinion that the use of artificial circulation at the stage of prosthetic repair of the abdominal aorta decreases the incidence of myocardial infarction was not confirmed in our systemic review, therefore the use of extracorporeal circulation in single-step operations should be well-grounded.

  10. Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis with aortic and tricuspid valve involvement using cryopreserved aortic and mitral valve allografts.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Yury; Spirydonau, Siarhei; Shchatsinka, Mikalai; Shket, Aliaksandr

    2015-05-01

    Surgical treatment of infective and prosthetic endocarditis using allografts gives good results. Aortic allograft implantation is a common technique, while tricuspid valve replacement with a mitral allograft is very rare. Multiple valve disease in case of infective endocarditis is a surgical challenge as such patients are usually in a grave condition and results of surgical treatment are often unsatisfactory. In this article we describe a clinical case of successful surgical treatment in a patient with active infective endocarditis of aortic and tricuspid valve, complicated by an aortic-right ventricular fistula. The aortic valve and ascending aorta were replaced with a cryopreserved aortic allograft; the tricuspid valve was replaced with a cryopreserved mitral allograft. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. [Aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  12. Cobotic architecture for prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Faulring, Eeic L; Colgate, J Edward; Peshkin, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    We envision cobotic infinitely-variable transmissions (IVTs) as an enabling technology for haptics and prosthetics that will allow for increases in the dynamic range of these devices while simultaneously permitting reductions in actuator size and power requirements. Use of cobotic IVTs eliminates the need to make compromises on output flow and effort, which are inherent to choosing a fixed transmission ratio drivetrain. The result is a mechanism with enhanced dynamic range that extends continuously from a completely clutched state to a highly backdrivable state. This high dynamic range allows cobotic devices to control impedance with a high level of fidelity. In this paper, we discuss these and other motivations for using parallel cobotic transmission architecture in prosthetic devices.

  13. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  14. Problems in Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Duncan

    1989-01-01

    In the ever-evolving scientific world of medicine, prostheses continue to fulfill a necessary function. Modern aggressive management of such diseases as diabetes, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease has been matched by new technology and attitudes in the world of prosthetics. The final common denominator continues to be the patient. The problems patients have continue to be the focus of the Rehabilitation physician. PMID:21248888

  15. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  16. Development of prosthetic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Rohit

    The objective of this research was to embed tactile sensors in polyimides. This novel method could be utilized to realize prosthetic skin for sensing different kinds of mechanical stimuli. Tactile sensors have an increasing demand in medical sectors: upper and lower-limb prosthetics and in the industrial sectors: robot end-effectors, grippers and manipulators. The sensors developed are targeted for prosthetic arm tactile sensing applications. Current work presents piezoresistive differential pressure sensors fabricated on flexible polyimide film or substrate. A unique technique to bond a flexible superstrate polyimide layer to a MEMS tactile sensor array is presented in this thesis. The sensor is made of aluminium oxide membrane layer with nichrome piezoresistors as the half-Wheatstone bridge elements. Four different types of sensor designs have been characterized to obtain gauge factor of thin film nichrome. The sensor arrays with and without the superstrate film were simulated for obtaining the maximum stress, average strain and deflection of the membrane. The maximum change in output voltage was 0.8 mV. The gauge factors calculated for tactile sensor with superstrate range between 2.2 to 7.8 and without superstrate range 1.5 to 5.7.

  17. Midface prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Vander Poorten, Vincent; Meulemans, Jeroen; Delaere, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Midfacial defects resulting from head and neck oncological resections can be addressed by microvascular reconstructive techniques using autologous tissue. In specific indications, however, prosthetic rehabilitation can give a superior aesthetic outcome, combined with a less intensive surgical strain on the patient. In other situations, the combination of both approaches can restore much extended defects satisfactorily. This review lists the indications, technical prerequisites for success, and outcome of midface prosthetic rehabilitation. With increasing numbers of patients treated, the optimal treatment protocol has become clear, and is now validated by long-term results in accumulating patient numbers. Modern three-dimensional planning techniques and three-dimensional printing of drill-guides, custom-made implants, abutments and epitheses further increase the predictability of success and the aesthetic outcome. Midface prosthetic rehabilitation nowadays has a definite place in the armamentarium of the head and neck oncologic surgeon and is invaluable in restoring quality of life and social functioning of patients with extensive midfacial defects following oncological resections.

  18. Upper Extremity Amputations and Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Ovadia, Steven A.; Askari, Morad

    2015-01-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions. PMID:25685104

  19. Upper extremity amputations and prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Ovadia, Steven A; Askari, Morad

    2015-02-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions.

  20. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0870 TITLE: Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool...Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0870 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Rajankumar...produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool to aid in the training of clinicians at military treatment facilities providing care for

  1. American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... to fellow requirements for affiliate fellow requirements for dental and/or maxillofacial prosthetic technicians requirements for life ... 2016 Member Survey Dr. Gordon Kent Mahanna Obituary Dr. ...

  2. Anterior longitudinal aortotomy in aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kanji; Kudo, Yohei; Ikeda, Akihiko; Konishi, Taisuke; Jikuya, Tomoaki

    2016-02-01

    We adopted an anterior longitudinal aortotomy in some cases of aortic valve replacement (AVR), and report them here. The potential of this method is also discussed. We analyzed the data on 24 patients (75.5 ± 7.8 years of age) who had undergone AVR through anterior longitudinal aortotomy. The indications for surgery were prosthetic valve complication in 5 patients, aortic stenosis (AS) with left ventricular outflow tract stenosis (LVOTS) in 16 patients, and aortic regurgitation with moderately dilated ascending aorta in 3 patients. The Konno procedure was performed in 6 cases with small aortic annuli. A longitudinal aortotomy was made at the aortic root along the left side of the right coronary ostium, and extended beyond the right coronary annulus to the interventricular septum as needed. Bioprostheses (21.1 ± 1.7 mm) were used in 23 patients and a 21-mm mechanical valve for one (a 59-year-old man). One high-risk patient died of low output syndrome, leading to a mortality rate of 4.2 %. All other patients recovered well, though atrioventricular block occurred in 2 cases. Anterior longitudinal aortotomy provides a good field of vision at the aortic annulus and the flexibility to develop into anterior annular enlargement. Major indications for this approach are small sino-tubular junction and very small aortic annulus. This approach could be an attractive option in AVR for cases of AS with small aortic annuli and LVOTS. It could also be useful for AVR cases with moderately dilated ascending aorta requiring aortoplasty.

  3. Reverse U aortotomy (Kırali incision) for aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kırali, Kaan

    2016-06-01

    The presence of patent vein grafts on the proximal aorta may cause technical difficulties during reoperations for aortic valve replacement after previous coronary artery bypass surgery. A 65-year-old man underwent reoperation for aortic valve replacement two years after his first open heart surgery (valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aorta-right coronary artery saphenous vein graft). The aortotomy incision was started approximately 2 cm above the proximal anastomosis and continued down at both sides until the prosthetic graft. The reverse U aortotomy prevents unnecessary and risky manipulations of proximal anastomoses, provides perfect exposure, and can be used securely during reoperative aortic valve surgery.

  4. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  5. Prosthetic elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  6. Complementary role of cardiac CT in the assessment of aortic valve replacement dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Alastair J; Dweck, Marc R; Dreisbach, John G; Williams, Michelle C; Mak, Sze Mun; Cartlidge, Timothy; Nicol, Edward D; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the second most common cardiothoracic procedure in the UK. With an ageing population, there are an increasing number of patients with prosthetic valves that require follow-up. Imaging of prosthetic valves is challenging with conventional echocardiographic techniques making early detection of valve dysfunction or complications difficult. CT has recently emerged as a complementary approach offering excellent spatial resolution and the ability to identify a range of aortic valve replacement complications including structural valve dysfunction, thrombus development, pannus formation and prosthetic valve infective endocarditis. This review discusses each and how CT might be incorporated into a multimodal cardiovascular imaging pathway for the assessment of aortic valve replacements and in guiding clinical management. PMID:27843568

  7. Thermoplastics for prosthetic applications.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, R B; Davies, R M

    1981-10-01

    The rapid and accurate thermoforming of plastics for prosthetic applications has been the subject of considerable research and development by the Bioengineering Centre. This paper outlines the progress in the general concepts that have been effected to date. The original below knee (B/K) socket vacuum forming technique has been extended to above knee (A/K) and supracondylar cases, and there have been developments in rotational casting technology. The work is necessarily based on a sound understanding of the properties of the materials concerned and of the associated manufacturing processes. The contribution of the Bioengineering Centre is outlined together with summaries of collaborative work carried out with other organizations.

  8. Pulsatile prosthetic valve flows.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W M; Snyder, A; Alchas, P; Rosenberg, G; Pierce, W S

    1980-01-01

    The laser Doppler system has been established as a useful tool for eliciting the properties of simulated cardiovascular flows, and thus for comparative studies of flow properties of prosthetic valves. Significant differences among valve types and between models of one type have been documented. The complex variations of velocity profiles with time show that comparisons must be made for unsteady pulsatile rather than steady flow, despite the volume and complexity of the data required. Future studies will include methods of compacting the data presentation and improving the details of the experimental stimulation.

  9. Prosthetic urinary sphincter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, C. R.; Smyly, H. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump/valve unit for controlling the inflation and deflation of a urethral collar in a prosthetic urinary sphincter device is described. A compressible bulb pump defining a reservoir was integrated with a valve unit for implantation. The valve unit includes a movable valve member operable by depression of a flexible portion of the valve unit housing for controlling fluid flow between the reservoir and collar; and a pressure sensing means which operates the valve member to relieve an excess pressure in the collar should too much pressure be applied by the patient.

  10. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  11. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve. Also, a narrowing of the aortic valve (aortic stenosis) can be associated with leaking. High blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure may stretch the root of the aorta where the aortic valve sits. The valve flaps ( ...

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of ... high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who smoke. ...

  13. Guide to prosthetic cardiac valves

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, D.; Steiner, R.M.; Fernandez, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The development of artificial heart valves: Introduction and historical perspective; The radiology of prosthetic heart valves; The evaluation of patients for prosthetic valve implantation; Pathology of cardiac valve replacement; and Bioengineering of mechanical and biological heart valve substitutes.

  14. Airway obstruction by an aortic false aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Taillandier, S; Guillon, A; Favelle, O; Garot, D; Perrotin, D

    2011-12-01

    Aortic false aneurysms are rare complications of aortic valve replacement and cardiac surgical procedures in general. Aortic false aneurysms can also presents as a mediastinal mass. A false aneurysm etiology should always be considered in mediastinal mass exploration of patients with a cardiac surgery history. Although, a computed tomography (CT) scan can detect a mediastinal mass, it can equally misdiagnose an aneurysm in the absence of tumour contrast enhancement. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman who was hospitalized for a laryngeal dyspnea. She had undergone aortic valve replacement 3 years earlier and had no other relevant medical history. In the last 3 months, she presented a progressively worsening dyspnea and cough. A chest radiograph showed a large mass in the superior mediastinum. A contrast-enhanced CT-scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass (9 cm × 8 cm × 9 cm) not enhanced by contrast product, suggestive of a tissue density tumour. The mass was in fact an aortic false aneurysm where the communication with the aorta was too narrow to be filled by the contrast product in arterial phase imaging. The aneurysm was excised and successfully replaced with a prosthetic graft during deep hypothermic and circulatory arrest. In this case report, we discuss the unusual clinical presentation of this pseudoaneurysm and the absence of contrast enhancement during CT-scan, which could have lead to a catastrophic error. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Rosengart, Todd K; Carabello, Blase A

    2017-01-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of aortic stenosis, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  16. Aortic valve leaflet replacement with bovine pericardium to preserve native dynamic capabilities of the aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-02-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations.

  17. Aortic Valve Leaflet Replacement with Bovine Pericardium to Preserve Native Dynamic Capabilities of the Aortic Annulus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-01-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations. PMID:24512414

  18. Automatic segmentation of the aortic root in CT angiography of candidate patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Elattar, M A; Wiegerinck, E M; Planken, R N; Vanbavel, E; van Assen, H C; Baan, J; Marquering, H A

    2014-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a minimal-invasive intervention for implanting prosthetic valves in patients with aortic stenosis. Accurate automated sizing for planning and patient selection is expected to reduce adverse effects such as paravalvular leakage and stroke. Segmentation of the aortic root in CTA is pivotal to enable automated sizing and planning. We present a fully automated segmentation algorithm to extract the aortic root from CTA volumes consisting of a number of steps: first, the volume of interest is automatically detected, and the centerline through the ascending aorta and aortic root centerline are determined. Subsequently, high intensities due to calcifications are masked. Next, the aortic root is represented in cylindrical coordinates. Finally, the aortic root is segmented using 3D normalized cuts. The method was validated against manual delineations by calculating Dice coefficients and average distance error in 20 patients. The method successfully segmented the aortic root in all 20 cases. The mean Dice coefficient was 0.95 ± 0.03, and the mean radial absolute error was 0.74 ± 0.39 mm, where the interobserver Dice coefficient was 0.95 ± 0.03 and the mean error was 0.68 ± 0.34 mm. The proposed algorithm showed accurate results compared to manual segmentations.

  19. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  20. Prosthetic inventory management.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, P; Seipel, C; Juers, A

    2001-01-01

    An improved approach to inventory management in the Operating Theatre has been initiated at Princess Alexandra Hospital. A Clinical Resource Co-ordinator (CRC) position was created to provide access to expertise in purchasing and materials management at the clinical level. A review of existing inventory management practices conducted by the CRC revealed reporting inadequacies, lack of product specialisation and inadequate control over pricing, stock levels and product usage. Through liaison with key stakeholders, a competitive tendering process was introduced which resulted in a standing offer arrangement being installed for three specialty orthopaedic areas. Outcomes of this arrangement are discussed. The importance of raising the area of prosthetic inventory management for debate in the Australian literature is also highlighted.

  1. Cognitive neural prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Richard A; Hwang, Eun Jung; Mulliken, Grant H

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive neural prosthetic (CNP) is a very versatile method for assisting paralyzed patients and patients with amputations. The CNP records the cognitive state of the subject, rather than signals strictly related to motor execution or sensation. We review a number of high-level cortical signals and their application for CNPs, including intention, motor imagery, decision making, forward estimation, executive function, attention, learning, and multi-effector movement planning. CNPs are defined by the cognitive function they extract, not the cortical region from which the signals are recorded. However, some cortical areas may be better than others for particular applications. Signals can also be extracted in parallel from multiple cortical areas using multiple implants, which in many circumstances can increase the range of applications of CNPs. The CNP approach relies on scientific understanding of the neural processes involved in cognition, and many of the decoding algorithms it uses also have parallels to underlying neural circuit functions.

  2. Cognitive Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Richard A.; Hwang, Eun Jung; Mulliken, Grant H.

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive neural prosthetic (CNP) is a very versatile method for assisting paralyzed patients and patients with amputations. The CNP records the cognitive state of the subject, rather than signals strictly related to motor execution or sensation. We review a number of high-level cortical signals and their application for CNPs, including intention, motor imagery, decision making, forward estimation, executive function, attention, learning, and multi-effector movement planning. CNPs are defined by the cognitive function they extract, not the cortical region from which the signals are recorded. However, some cortical areas may be better than others for particular applications. Signals can also be extracted in parallel from multiple cortical areas using multiple implants, which in many circumstances can increase the range of applications of CNPs. The CNP approach relies on scientific understanding of the neural processes involved in cognition, and many of the decoding algorithms it uses also have parallels to underlying neural circuit functions. PMID:19575625

  3. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image.

  4. Traumatic rupture of Ionescu-Shiley aortic valve after the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Passik, C S; Ackermann, D M; Piehler, J M; Edwards, W D

    1987-05-01

    A 74-year-old woman who had undergone aortic valve replacement with an Ionescu-Shiley bioprosthesis was evaluated and treated because aortic insufficiency developed after the application of the Heimlich maneuver. Pathologic examination of the explanted valve disclosed a cuspid perforation and an adjacent tear of a second cusp at its insertion into the valve strut. Patients with unexplained acute prosthetic insufficiency should be questioned as to whether the Heimlich maneuver has been previously performed.

  5. Antibiotic-impregnated beads for the treatment of aortic graft infection.

    PubMed

    Healy, Aaron H; Reid, Bruce B; Allred, Bryce D; Doty, John R

    2012-03-01

    Infection of a prosthetic graft after replacement of the ascending aorta is an uncommon but life-threatening complication of surgery. We report the use of antibiotic-impregnated calcium sulfate beads in a patient with ascending aortic graft infection to provide localized, high-dose therapy to the infected region. Perigraft placement of antibiotic beads provides an alternative method for the treatment of aortic graft infection.

  6. Repair of a penetrating ascending aortic ulcer with localized resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig R; Stamou, Sotiris C; Boeve, Theodore J; Hooker, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    Penetrating ascending aortic ulcers are rarely encountered, yet they present significant risk of hemorrhage and aortic dissection. Expedient recognition and repair is of vital importance. The current management of penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta includes replacement of the ascending aorta with a prosthetic graft. We describe our technique of repairing a penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta with localized ulcer resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

  7. Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Bordetella holmesii, an Acinetobacter lookalike.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Stijn; De Baere, Thierry; Schroeyers, Pascal; Soetens, Oriane; De Bel, Annelies; Surmont, Ignace

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of fulminant endocarditis on a prosthetic homograft aortic valve caused by Bordetella holmesii, which was successfully managed by surgical valve replacement and antibiotic treatment. B. holmesii, a strictly aerobic, small, Gram-negative coccobacillus, has been implicated as an infrequent cause of a pertussis-like syndrome and other respiratory illnesses. However, B. holmesii is also a rare cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis, mostly in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of B. holmesii endocarditis on a prosthetic aortic valve. Routine laboratory testing initially misidentified the strain as Acinetobacter sp. Correct identification was achieved by 16S rRNA gene and outer-membrane protein A (ompA) gene sequencing. Interestingly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry also produced an accurate species-level identification. Subsequent susceptibility testing and review of the literature revealed ceftazidime, cefepime, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline and colistin as possible candidates to treat infections caused by B. holmesii.

  8. [A rare case of two mechanisms of prosthetic valve dysfunction in the same patient].

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Gonçalo; Trabulo, Marisa; Andrade, Maria João; Ribeiras, Regina; Rodrigues, Rui; Neves, José Pedro; Queiróz e Melo, João; Mendes, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Prosthetic valve dysfunction is a significant clinical event. Determining its etiological mechanism and severity can be difficult. The authors present the case of a 50-year-old man, with two mechanical valve prostheses in aortic and mitral positions, hospitalized for decompensated heart failure. He had a long history of rheumatic multivalvular disease and had undergone three heart surgeries. On admission, investigation led to a diagnosis of severe dysfunction of both mechanical prostheses with different etiologies and mechanisms: pannus formation in the prosthetic aortic valve and intermittent dysfunction of the mitral prosthesis due to interference of a ruptured chorda tendinea in closure of the disks. The patient was reoperated, leading to significant improvement in functional class. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. [Historical aspects of eye prosthetics].

    PubMed

    Verigo, E N; Tuchin, V A; Priakhina, I A

    2012-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problems of eye prosthetics that develops since ancient times till today. Indications for eye prosthesis and its role in rehabilitation of anophthalmic patients are determined. The process of glass prostheses production is described in details, technology is discussed and illustrated. This article is of great interest for opthalmologists and prosthetic technicians as it is proved that glass prostheses are more physiologic and have a number of advantages compared to plasticones.

  10. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Devaki, Veeramalai Nadu; Balu, Kandasamy; Ramesh, Sadashiva Balakrishnapillai; Arvind, Ramraj Jayabalan; Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges. PMID:23066301

  11. Prosthetic aspects in adult osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yoichiro; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Tomita, Yoko; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Osteopetrosis (OP) is a rare condition characterized by skeletal sclerosis caused by dysfunctional osteoclasts. Though many reports have described severe infantile-malignant autosomal recessive OP, few have described the prosthetic management of adult OP. This report discusses the prosthetic treatment of adult OP. Although prosthodontists should try to reconstruct occlusal function as much as possible, a conservative prosthodontic approach may be a reasonable and recommended treatment option for minimizing the risk of further osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis.

  12. [Left Ventricular Rupture during Both Mitral and Aortic Valve Replacements].

    PubMed

    Kurumisawa, Soki; Aizawa, Kei; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Ohki, Shinnichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-05-01

    A 73-year-old woman on hemodialysis was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment of heart valve disease. She required both mitral and aortic valve replacement with mechanical valves, associated with tricuspid annuloplasty. After aortic de-clamping, a massive hemorrhage from the posterior atrioventricular groove was observed. Under repeated cardiac arrest, the left atrium was reopened, the implanted mitral prosthetic valve was removed and a type I left ventricular rupture (Treasure classification) was diagnosed. The lesion was directly repaired with mattress stitches and running sutures, using reinforcement materials such as a glutaraldehyde-treated bovine pericardium. To avoid mechanical stress by the prosthetic valve on the repaired site, a mechanical valve was implanted using a translocation method. The patient suffered from aspiration pneumonia and disuse atrophy for 3 months. However, she was doing well at 1 year post-operation.

  13. Long-term Follow-up After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Pablo; Moreno, Raúl; Calvo, Luis; Sánchez-Recalde, Ángel; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Galeote, Guillermo; López-Fernández, Teresa; Ramírez, Ulises; Riera, Luis; Plaza, Ignacio; Moreno, Isidro; Mesa, José María; López-Sendón, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is used as an alternative to surgical valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered high-surgical-risk or inoperable. Two of the main areas of uncertainty in this field are valve durability and long-term survival. This prospective single-center registry study from a tertiary hospital included all consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous aortic valve implantation between 2008 and 2012. Clinical follow-up lasted a minimum of 2.5 years and a maximum of 6.5 years. Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions were used. Seventy-nine patients were included, with an immediate success rate of 94.9%. The median survival was 47.6 months (95% confidence intervals, 37.4-57.9 months), ie, 4 years. One quarter of deaths occurred in the first month, and most were of cardiovascular cause. After the first month, most deaths were due to noncardiovascular causes. The mean values of valve gradients did not increase during follow-up. The cumulative rate of prosthetic valve dysfunction was 15.3%, with no cases of repeat valve replacement. Half of the patients with aortic stenosis who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation were alive 4 years after the procedure. There was a 15.3% prosthetic valve dysfunction rate in cumulative follow-up, with no cases of repeat valve replacement. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees, having a C-shaped clamping mechanism for grasping cylindrical objects, is described. The clamping mechanism is pivotally mounted to a cuff that fits on the amputee's lower arm. The present invention is utilized by placing an arm that has been amputated below the elbow into the cuff. The clamping mechanism then serves as a hand whenever it becomes necessary for the amputee to grasp a cylindrical object such as a handle, a bar, a rod, etc. To grasp the cylindrical object, the object is jammed against the opening in the C-shaped spring, causing the spring to open, the object to pass to the center of the spring, and the spring to snap shut behind the object. Various sizes of clamping mechanisms can be provided and easily interchanged to accommodate a variety of diameters. With the extension that pivots and rotates, the clamping mechanism can be used in a variety of orientations. Thus, this invention provides the amputee with a clamping mechanism that can be used to perform a number of tasks.

  15. Amputations and prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Pinzur, M S

    1999-01-01

    The author presents in a condensed way an overview of the principles of limb amputations and further treatment of patients who underwent such a procedure. The metabolic cost of walking, load transfer, and wound healing are reviewed in a concise manner. Particular attention is given to blood supply to the wound and methods to determine adequate perfusion with a clear analysis of the pro and cons of the Doppler method. Pediatric amputations, because of their specificity, are considered apart. Disarticulation of limbs is the method of choice in children, because of it retains growth potential of the bone and prevents bony overgrowth of the stump. The article discusses the main indications for limb amputations: trauma, peripheral vascular disease, musculoskeletal tumors and gas gangrene. In every case the specificity of the amputation is considered by the author. Postoperative care is also presented, with a short description of possible complications. Pain is the most common and treatment strategies should be similar to those used in treating patients with major reflex sympathetic causalgia. Edema, joint contracture, wound failure and dermatologic problems are all shortly reviewed. The last part of the article treats with the principles of prosthetics in both the upper and lower limb. These principles are presented basing on the level of amputation: for the upper limb hand, transradial, transhumeral amputations and shoulder disarticulation. For the lower limb foot and ankle, transtibial and transfemoral amputations are considered.

  16. [Immediate results of surgical reconstruction of the aortic arch in patients with proximal aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Liashenko, M M; Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Al'sov, S A; Sirota, D A; Khvan, D S

    2014-01-01

    Despite obvious progress of surgical technologies in correction of proximal aortic pathology, improvement of methods of protection of the brain, one of the main problems of this direction remains the development of postoperative cerebral ischaemia of various degree of manifestation: strokes, transitory ischaemic attacks, or hypoxic encephalopathy. Of special interest is studying the group of patients presenting with aortic dissection, since this pathology may be accompanied by a wide variety of combinations of occlusive and stenotic lesions of the branches of the ascending portion of the aorta and aortic arch (coronary and brachiocephalic basins) by the detached intima. Over the period from 1999 to 2011, we operated on a total of 124 patients presenting with DeBakey type I aortic dissection. Of these, 194 were men (75.8%) and 30 (24.2%) women. The mean age amounted to 48.7±11.0 years. Etiologically prevailing were systemic atherosclerosis (91 patients, 73.4% of cases) and Marfan's syndrome in 14 (11.3%) cases. In all patients operative intervention included reconstruction of the aortic arch according to one of the following techniques: prosthetic repair according to the type of an aggressive oblique anastomosis ("hemiarch repair") - 78 (62.9%) patients, prosthetic repair of the aortic arch using the multiple-branch prosthesis Plexus Vascutek - 37 (29.8%) patients, and nine patients underwent prosthetic repair of the aortic arch with a vascular graft with reimplantation of the brachiocephalic arteries with a single islet. The average duration of artificial circulation amounted to 230.1±70.0 minutes, the mean time of aortic occlusion was 167.2±44.2 minutes and that of circulatory arrest equalled 51.9±16.2 minutes. The brain during hypothermic circulatory arrest was protected according to the following techniques: 16 (12.9%) patients - isolated hypothermia with no cerebral perfusion, 76 (61.3 %) patients retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) through the superior

  17. Aortic valve replacement in rheumatoid aortic incompetence.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A B; Goldstraw, P; Caves, P K

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatoid aortic valve disease is uncommon. and there are few reports of valve replacement in this condition. Aortic valve replacement and partial pericardiectomy was performed in a patient with acute rheumatoid aortitis and aortic incompetence. Previous reports suggest that any patient with rheumatoid arthritis who develops cardiac symptoms should be carefully assessed for surgically treatable involvement of the pericardium or heart valves. Images PMID:725829

  18. Prosthetic valve endocarditis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gnann, J W; Dismukes, W E

    1983-12-01

    Infection of an intracardiac prosthesis, the incidence of which is about 2.5% among patients having undergone valve replacement, is a serious complication with considerable morbidity and mortality. Early prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE), with an onset within 60 days of valve replacement, accounts for approximately one-third of all cases, while the remaining two-thirds, occur more than two months postoperatively (late prosthetic valve endocarditis). Prosthetic valve endocarditis is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis, less frequently by viridans streptococci, Staphylococcus aureus, and gram-negative bacilli. The most likely pathogenetic mechanisms in prosthetic valve endocarditis are intraoperative contamination and postoperative infections at extracardiac sites. Prominent clinical features include fever, new or changing heart murmurs, leukocytosis, anemia and hematuria. The etiologic microorganism can be isolated in more than 90% of all cases. Patients with proven prosthetic valve endocarditis should be examined daily to detect signs of congestive heart failure and changes in murmurs; electrocardiographic monitoring is essential for documentation of arrhythmias. With limitations, echocardiography, especially two-dimensional, may help to demonstrate vegetations or valvular dehiscence. Cinefluoroscopy may reveal loosening or dehiscence of the sewing ring or impaired motion of a radio-opaque poppet due to thrombus or vegetation. Cardiac catheterization, not always necessary even when surgical intervention is anticipated, may provide valuable information on the degree of dysfunction, multiple valve involvement, left ventricular function and extent of concomitant coronary artery disease. In patients with mechanical valves, prosthetic valve endocarditis may be associated with a high incidence of valve ring and myocardial abscesses; the reported frequency of valve ring abscesses is lower with porcine heterografts. Infections on mechanical valves

  19. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  1. CT in aortic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1983-06-01

    A diagnosis of aortic transection was made at computed tomography (CT) in four of 10 patients with acute multiple trauma suspected of having thoracic aortic injuries. There were no false-negative or false-positive examinations. The CT findings of an injured aorta were (1) false aneurysm, (2) linear lucency within the opacified aortic lumen caused by the torn edge of the aortic wall, (3) marginal irregularity of the opacified aortic lumen, (4) periaortic or intramural aortic hematoma, and (5) dissection. The extent of associated mediastinal hemorrhage and the amount of blood in the pleural space were not useful as indicators of aortic injury. Similarly, shift of the trachea and esophagus or absence thereof was found in patients with or without aortic tear.

  2. Aortic dissection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic dissection is a condition in which there is bleeding into and along the wall of the aorta (the ... the inner wall of the artery. Although aortic dissection can affect anybody, it is most often seen ...

  3. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  4. Prosthetic Rehabilitation After Hip Disarticulation or Hemipelvectomy.

    PubMed

    Kralovec, Michael E; Houdek, Matthew T; Andrews, Karen L; Shives, Thomas C; Rose, Peter S; Sim, Franklin H

    2015-12-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation after pelvic-level amputation (hemipelvectomy/hip disarticulation) is difficult, and because of this, many patients are never fit with a prosthetic limb. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the characteristics of successful prosthetic users and to determine what factors are associated with successful prosthetic fitting and use. The authors identified 43 patients who underwent hip disarticulation/hemipelvectomy between 2000 and 2010 and were candidates for prosthetic fitting at the authors' institution. The medical records of these patients were then reviewed for pertinent demographic and medical characteristics to identify the profile of successful prosthetic users. Of 43 patients, 18 (43%) successfully used a prosthetic limb. The only preoperative factor associated with unsuccessful prosthetic fitting was coronary artery disease. Specifically, age, body mass index, other medical comorbidities, and demographic characteristics were not associated with successful or unsuccessful prosthetic fitting. Successful users wore their prosthesis an average of 5.8 hrs/day, and most ambulated with one or both hands free. Successful prosthetic rehabilitation after hemipelvectomy and hip disarticulation is possible. Increased body mass index, advanced age, depression, and other comorbidities should not discourage prosthetic rehabilitation. Most patients that undergo prosthetic rehabilitation enjoy long periods of survival and wear their prosthesis for most of the day.

  5. Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years there have been experimental efforts at catheter-based management of aortic valve regurgitation with the idea of extending treatment to nonsurgical candidates. A new catheter-based aortic valve design is described.Methods: The new catheter-delivered valve consists of a stent-based valve cage with locking mechanism and a prosthetic flexible tilting valve disc. The valve cage is delivered first followed by deployment and locking of the disc. In acute experiments, valve implantation was done in four dogs.Results: Valve implantation was successful in all four animals. The implanted valve functioned well for the duration of the experiments (up to 3 hr).Conclusion: The study showed the implantation feasibility and short-term function of the tested catheter-based aortic disc valve. Further experimental studies are warranted.

  6. Echocardiographic features of aortic ball valve prosthesis malfunction.

    PubMed

    Weisburst, M R; Singh, A K; Riley, R S

    1982-11-01

    A case of aortic ball valve prosthesis malfunction is described in which the poppet became alternately stuck in the open and closed position. The patient experienced chest pain followed by pulmonary edema and cardiac arrest. Malfunction of prosthetic valve was diagnosed on echocardiogram and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was carried out until a Bjork-Shiley valve could be inserted in place of the faulty prosthesis. At the time of the operation, poppet migration had occurred and the poppet could not be found. Subsequent Bjork-Shiley aortic valve prosthesis dysfunction was suggested by variation in the intensity of the aortic opening sound and in the duration of the systolic ejection period. Fluoroscopy revealed the missing poppet in the left ventricle. Following surgical removal of the poppet, "normal" Bjork-Shiley valve function was restored.

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully will restrict blood flow. This is called aortic stenosis. If there is also a leak, it is ... TAVR is used for people with severe aortic stenosis who aren't ... valve . In adults, aortic stenosis usually occurs due to calcium ...

  8. A Prosthetic Memory: An Application of the Prosthetic Environment Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Roy S., Jr.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A set of artifical reminders'' are developed to compensate for a profound memory deficit in a young brain damaged male. The prosthetic memory techniques are described, and his increase in functional level is documented. A report of a 15-month follow-up is included. (Author)

  9. A Prosthetic Memory: An Application of the Prosthetic Environment Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Roy S., Jr.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A set of artifical reminders'' are developed to compensate for a profound memory deficit in a young brain damaged male. The prosthetic memory techniques are described, and his increase in functional level is documented. A report of a 15-month follow-up is included. (Author)

  10. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  11. Robot assisted Aortic and Non-aortic Vascular Operations.

    PubMed

    Štádler, P; Dvořáček, L; Vitásek, P; Matouš, P

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical experience with 310 robot assisted vascular procedures. The da Vinci system has been used by a variety of disciplines for laparoscopic procedures but the use of robots in vascular surgery is still relatively uncommon. From November 2005 to May 2014, 310 robot assisted vascular operations were performed. Two hundred and twenty four patients were prospectively evaluated for occlusive disease, 61 patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm, four for a common iliac artery aneurysm, four for a splenic artery aneurysm, one for a internal mammary artery aneurysm, and after the unsuccessful endovascular treatment five for hybrid procedures, two patients for median arcuate ligament release and nine for endoleak II treatment post EVAR. Among these patients, 224 underwent robotic occlusive disease treatment (Group I), 65 robotic aorto-iliac aneurysm surgery (Group II) and 21 other robotic procedures (Group III). A total of 298 cases (96.1%) were successfully completed robotically. In 10 patients (3.2%) conversion was necessary. The 30 day mortality was 0.3%, and two (0.6%) late prosthetic infections were seen. Targeted Group I and Group II patients were compared. Robotic ilio-femoral bypass, aorto-femoral bypass, or aorto-iliac thrombo-endarterectomy with prosthetic patch (Group I) required an operative time of 194 (range, 127-315) minutes and robotic aorto-iliac aneurysm surgery (Group II), 253 (range, 185-360) minutes. The mean aortic cross clamping time was 37 minutes in Group I and 93 minutes in Group II. The mean blood loss was more significant in Group II (1,210 mL) than in Group I (320 mL). From a practical point of view, the greatest advantage of the robot assisted procedure has been the speed and relative simplicity of construction of the vascular anastomosis. This experience with robot assisted laparoscopic surgery has demonstrated the feasibility of this technique in different areas of vascular surgery. Copyright

  12. [Giant pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta following the aortic valve replacement;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yu; Inage, Yuichi; Masaki, Naoki; Toyama, Shuji; Fukasawa, Manabu

    2013-08-01

    56-year-old male, who had undergone re-aortic valve replacement (AVR) 33 years ago, received preoperative study for pancreatic surgery. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a giant pseudoaneurysm (7 cm diameter) of the ascending aorta. The ascending aorta was not dilated. A midline skin incision was performed, followed by full sternotomy. A tight pericardial adhesion was carefully dissected. Cardiopulmonary bypass was established by femoral arterial and bicaval venous cannulation. The pseudoaneurysm was incised under the retrograde cardioplegic protection. A communication between ascending aorta and aneurysm was found 1 cm distal to the previous aortic suture line. This communication coincided with the cardioplegic root cannulation site. The aortic prosthetic valve was intact. The ascending aorta was replaced with 26 mm prosthetic graft. Postoperative course was uneventful. In this case, CT was useful to select the approach to the complicated postoperative surgical site.

  13. [Long-term results of conventional aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Miyairi, T; Kitamura, T; Kigawa, I; Fukuda, S

    2006-04-01

    We studied cardiac function, clinical outcome and quality of life (QOL) long after aortic valve replacement for pure aortic stenosis. Forty-four patients in small group [St. Jude Medical (SJM) 17 HP, 19 A], and 69 patients in non-small group (19 HP, 21 A, 23 A) operated on from 1984 to 2004 were enrolled in this study. We assessed the clinical data, aortic pressure gradient, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and ejection fraction (EF) by preoperative and postoperative echocardiography. Moreover to evaluate QOL after the operation, we performed SF-36 used for the evaluation of health and QOL worldwide. Mean follow-up is 7.1 +/- 4.8 years in small group, and 6.8 +/- 4.6 years in non-small group. There were 2 hospital deaths in small group, and 1 in non-small group. The actual survival rate at 10-year were 89.2% in small group, and 85.6% in non-small group. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality, LVMI, long-term survival rate, and the scores of SF-36 between the 2 groups. The use of small sized prosthetic valves in patients with small aortic annulus might be justified when there is no patient-prosthesis mismatch.

  14. [Aortic arch and valve replacement in a hemodialysis patient with a porcelain aorta;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ban, Tetsuaki; Aizawa, Kei; Oki, Shin-ichi; Misawa, Yoshio

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. A 75-year-old man complained of back pain and hoarseness. He had been on dialysis for 15 years. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed marked calcification in the thoracic aortic arch, which is known as a porcelain aorta, and a distal arch aneurysm. Echocardiographic examination showed moderate aortic valve stenosis with calcification. An operation was scheduled, and both the aortic valve and the aortic arch aneurysm were successfully replaced with a mechanical valve and a prosthetic graft. Cardiovascular surgery for patients complicated by a porcelain aorta requires extra cares for the establishment of cardiopulmonary bypass and anastomoses of the aorta.

  15. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Oliemy, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease.

  16. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  17. Control method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  18. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  19. Rotational joint for prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.; Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Device is installed in standard 30 millimeter tubing used for lower leg prosthetics. Unit allows proper rotation (about 3 degrees) of foot relative to the hip, during normal walking or running. Limited rotational movement with restoring force results in a more natural gait.

  20. A definition of prosthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jokstad, A; Orstavik, J; Ramstad, T

    1998-01-01

    A more precise and up-to-date definition of prosthetic dentistry is warranted. The aim of the present review is to present a new core definition of the discipline on the basis of a discussion of existing definitions. Clinical textbooks in prosthetic dentistry and dental implantology, as well as medical and dental glossaries were reviewed. Two main categories of definitions of prosthetic dentistry were identified: first, definitions that emphasized the technologic aspects of the discipline, i.e., the fabrication of prostheses; and second, definitions that incorporated some reference to the objectives or aims of prosthetic treatment, i.e., the restoration of one or more aspects of oral function. Slightly more than half of the citations contained such aim-related references, and this aspect tended to be most pronounced in recent publications. The following definition is ventured: prosthodontics is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the consequences of congenital absence or acquired loss of oral tissues and with the methods for and assessment whether more good than harm is done by inserting artificial devices made from alloplastic materials.

  1. Rotational joint for prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.; Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Device is installed in standard 30 millimeter tubing used for lower leg prosthetics. Unit allows proper rotation (about 3 degrees) of foot relative to the hip, during normal walking or running. Limited rotational movement with restoring force results in a more natural gait.

  2. [Aortic Valve Replacement after Balloon Valvuloplasty for Aortic Valve Stenosis in a Dialysis Patient with Cardiogenic Shock;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Masanori; Hirotani, Takashi; Ohtsubo, Satoshi; Saito, Sumikatsu; Takeuchi, Shigeyuki; Hasegawa, Tasuku; Endo, Ayaka; Yamasaki, Yu; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2015-06-01

    A 67-year-old man on chronic hemodialysis was admitted with worsening congestive heart failure due to critical aortic stenosis. Echocardiography showed severe aortic stenosis with a valve area of 0.67 cm2 and an ejection fraction of 0.31. Cardiac catheterization revealed severe pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary artery pressures of 62/32 mmHg. In the middle of cardiac catheterization, the systolic pressure declined to 60 mmHg due to cardiogenic shock. Dopamine hydrochloride and dobutamine hydrochloride infusions were necessary to maintain a systolic pressure greater than 80 mmHg. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty was urgently performed. The patient's symptoms rapidly resolved except for angina on exertion. One month later, elective aortic valve replacement was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and the he was discharged on the 60th postoperative day. A follow-up echocardiogram 6 months postoperatively revealed normal prosthetic valve function and an ejection fraction of 0.6.

  3. Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis with mycotic aneurysm: Case report.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Mariana; Almeida, Jorge; Ferraz, Rita; Santos, Lurdes; Pinho, Paulo; Casanova, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is an extremely severe form of infective endocarditis, with poor prognosis and high mortality despite treatment. Candida albicans is the most common etiological agent for this rare but increasingly frequent condition. We present a case of fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis due to C. albicans following aortic and pulmonary valve replacement in a 38-year-old woman with a history of surgically corrected tetralogy of Fallot, prior infective endocarditis and acute renal failure with need for catheter-based hemodialysis. Antifungal therapy with liposomal amphotericin B was initiated prior to cardiac surgery, in which the bioprostheses were replaced by homografts, providing greater resistance to recurrent infection. During hospitalization, a mycotic aneurysm was diagnosed following an episode of acute arterial ischemia, requiring two vascular surgical interventions. Despite the complications, the patient's outcome was good and she was discharged on suppressive antifungal therapy with oral fluconazole for at least a year. The reported case illustrates multiple risk factors for fungal endocarditis, as well as complications and predictors of poor prognosis, demonstrating its complexity. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of different surgical techniques in 112 consecutive patients with aortic root operations: when should the valve be spared?

    PubMed

    Blehm, Alexander; Schurr, Paulus; Sorokin, Vitaly A; Zianikal, Ioanna; Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Albert, Alexander; Lichtenberg, Artur

    2014-01-01

    The benefit of valve-sparing aortic root replacement compared to conventional aortic root replacement surgery remains unclear. Between February 2009 and November 2010, a total of 112 patients underwent aortic root surgery at the Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Heinrich-Heine-University, Dusseldorf, Germany. The valve-sparing technique was used when leaflets were grossly normal. In cases where the valve could not be saved, a prosthetic or biological substitute was used for the aortic root, according to existing guidelines. The patients were allocated to three groups: (i) valve-sparing aortic root replacement group using the David technique (VSR-David; n = 47); (ii) valve-replacing aortic root surgery with a prosthetic conduit using the Bentall-Kuchucus technique (VRR-Prosthetic; n = 31); and (iii) valve-replacing aortic root surgery with a biological stentless valve with the full root technique (VRR-Bio; n = 34). Intraoperative data revealed that, in the VSR-David group, the cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp times were significantly longer (207 +/- 68 min and 140 +/- 38 min respectively; both p = 0.001). The VRR-Prosthetic patients were at highest risk (mean EuroSCORE 15.9%) compared to the VSR-David and VRR-Bio groups (10.8% and 10.4%, respectively). Postoperative analysis showed that patients in the VRR-Bio group had the lowest number of perioperative heart failures (p = 0.004). The perioperative 30-day mortality was significantly higher in the VRR-Prosthetic group (22.6%; p = 0.004). Transaortic flow velocities were significantly lower in the VSR-David group, followed by the VRR-Bio group and VRR-Prosthetic group (1.66 +/- 0.54, 1.98 +/- 0.45, and 2.29 +/- 0.39 m/s, respectively; p = 0.012). The univariate and multivariate analyses of perioperative risk factors showed that only open distal anastomosis was strongly associated with negative results, but not the valve-sparing technique. Aortic valve-sparing root replacement must be considered

  5. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  6. Mechanical Prosthetic Valves and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, Prashanth; El-Deeb, Mohammed; Jha, Chitra

    2014-01-01

    Choosing the best anticoagulant therapy for a pregnant patient with a mechanical prosthetic valve is controversial and the published international guidelines contain no clear-cut consensus on the best approach. This is due to the fact that there is presently no anticoagulant which can reliably decrease thromboembolic events while avoiding damage to the fetus. Current treatments include either continuing oral warfarin or substituting warfarin for subcutaneous unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in the first trimester (6–12 weeks) or at any point throughout the pregnancy. However, LMWH, while widely-prescribed, requires close monitoring of the blood anti-factor Xa levels. Unfortunately, facilities for such monitoring are not universally available, such as within hospitals in developing countries. This review evaluates the leading international guidelines concerning anticoagulant therapy in pregnant patients with mechanical prosthetic valves as well as proposing a simplified guideline which may be more relevant to hospitals in this region. PMID:25364545

  7. Evolution of penile prosthetic devices.

    PubMed

    Le, Brian; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-03-01

    Penile implant usage dates to the 16th century yet penile implants to treat erectile dysfunction did not occur until nearly four centuries later. The modern era of penile implants has progressed rapidly over the past 50 years as physicians' knowledge of effective materials for penile prostheses and surgical techniques has improved. Herein, we describe the history of penile prosthetics and the constant quest to improve the technology. Elements of the design from the first inflatable penile prosthesis by Scott and colleagues and the Small-Carrion malleable penile prosthesis are still found in present iterations of these devices. While there have been significant improvements in penile prosthesis design, the promise of an ideal prosthetic device remains elusive. As other erectile dysfunction therapies emerge, penile prostheses will have to continue to demonstrate a competitive advantage. A particular strength of penile prostheses is their efficacy regardless of etiology, thus allowing treatment of even the most refractory cases.

  8. Evolution of penile prosthetic devices

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Penile implant usage dates to the 16th century yet penile implants to treat erectile dysfunction did not occur until nearly four centuries later. The modern era of penile implants has progressed rapidly over the past 50 years as physicians' knowledge of effective materials for penile prostheses and surgical techniques has improved. Herein, we describe the history of penile prosthetics and the constant quest to improve the technology. Elements of the design from the first inflatable penile prosthesis by Scott and colleagues and the Small-Carrion malleable penile prosthesis are still found in present iterations of these devices. While there have been significant improvements in penile prosthesis design, the promise of an ideal prosthetic device remains elusive. As other erectile dysfunction therapies emerge, penile prostheses will have to continue to demonstrate a competitive advantage. A particular strength of penile prostheses is their efficacy regardless of etiology, thus allowing treatment of even the most refractory cases. PMID:25763121

  9. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart is reduced. This is called aortic stenosis. The aortic valve can be replaced using: Minimally ... RN, Wang A. Percutaneous heart valve replacement for aortic stenosis: state of the evidence. Ann Intern Med . 2010; ...

  10. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  11. Control System for Prosthetic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that of movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part through the full-shrg position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  12. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Schnell E, Wollenek G, Maurer G, Baumgartner H, Lang IM. Mechanisms underlying aortic dilatation in congenital aortic valve malformation . Circulation...1999; 99(16):2138-2143. 10. Roberts CS, Roberts WC. Dissection of the aorta associated with congenital malformation of the aortic valve. J Am Coll... congenital heart defect, often diagnosed incidentally or as a consequence of an associated condition. Patients with this anomaly are at increased risk

  13. Antibiotic therapy of aortic graft infection: treatment and prevention recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after aortic intervention, an uncommon but serious vascular condition, requires patient-specific antibiotic therapy. Effective treatment and prevention requires the vascular surgeon to be cognizant of changing SSI microbiology, advances in antibiotic delivery, and patient characteristics. The majority of aortic graft infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus now the prevalent pathogen. Nasal carriage of methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S aureus strains, diabetes mellitus, recent hospitalization, a failed arterial reconstruction, and the presence of a groin incision are important SSI risk factors. Overall, the aortic SSI rate is higher than predicted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk category system; ranging from 5% after open or endovascular aortic interventions to as high as 10% to 15% after aortofemoral bypass or uni-aortoiliac grafting with femorofemoral bypass. Perioperative measures to reduce S aureus nares and skin colonization, administration of antibiotic prophylaxis, meticulous wound closure/care, and therapy directed to optimize patient host defense regulation mechanisms (eg, temperature, oxygenation, blood sugar) can minimize SSI occurrence. Antibiotic therapy for aortic graft infection should utilize bactericidal drugs that penetrate bacteria biofilms and can be delivered to the surgical site both parenterally and locally in the form of antibiotic-impregnated beads or prosthetic grafts.

  14. Experimental Validation of a Cardiac Simulator for in vitro Evaluation of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Objective This work describes the experimental validation of a cardiac simulator for three heart rates (60, 80 and 100 beats per minute), under physiological conditions, as a suitable environment for prosthetic heart valves testing in the mitral or aortic position. Methods In the experiment, an aortic bileaflet mechanical valve and a mitral bioprosthesis were employed in the left ventricular model. A test fluid of 47.6% by volume of glycerin solution in water at 36.5ºC was used as blood analogue fluid. A supervisory control and data acquisition system implemented previously in LabVIEW was applied to induce the ventricular operation and to acquire the ventricular signals. The parameters of the left ventricular model operation were based on in vivo and in vitro data. The waves of ventricular and systemic pressures, aortic flow, stroke volume, among others, were acquired while manual adjustments in the arterial impedance model were also established. Results The acquired waves showed good results concerning some in vivo data and requirements from the ISO 5840 standard. Conclusion The experimental validation was performed, allowing, in future studies, characterizing the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic heart valves. PMID:27556315

  15. Experimental Validation of a Cardiac Simulator for in vitro Evaluation of Prosthetic Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the experimental validation of a cardiac simulator for three heart rates (60, 80 and 100 beats per minute), under physiological conditions, as a suitable environment for prosthetic heart valves testing in the mitral or aortic position. In the experiment, an aortic bileaflet mechanical valve and a mitral bioprosthesis were employed in the left ventricular model. A test fluid of 47.6% by volume of glycerin solution in water at 36.5ºC was used as blood analogue fluid. A supervisory control and data acquisition system implemented previously in LabVIEW was applied to induce the ventricular operation and to acquire the ventricular signals. The parameters of the left ventricular model operation were based on in vivo and in vitro data. The waves of ventricular and systemic pressures, aortic flow, stroke volume, among others, were acquired while manual adjustments in the arterial impedance model were also established. The acquired waves showed good results concerning some in vivo data and requirements from the ISO 5840 standard. The experimental validation was performed, allowing, in future studies, characterizing the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic heart valves.

  16. Effect of a combined anti-thrombotic therapy of thrombosis on prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Zheng, Zhichao; Huang, Shuping

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the curative effects and risks of a medical therapy with combined anti-thrombotic agents for thrombosis on prosthetic heart valves. Methods Twenty-two patients who suffered from thrombosis on prosthetic valves with stable hemodynamics were divided into the inpatient group and the outpatient group. Thrombosis on the valves were demonstrated by transesophageal echocardiographies (TEE). A combined anti-thrombotic therapy with clopidogrel and warfarin were prescribed for all the patients during the whole treatment. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was given twice daily during the first 5 days for the inpatients. The patients accepted regular follow-ups for observation of the functions of prosthetic valves, changes of thrombi, coagulation status and general clinical status. Results There were 5 men and 17 women. Thirteen patients suffered from thrombosis on the mechanical mitral valves (MVs), five on the mechanical tricuspid valves (TVs), one on the mechanical aortic valve and tricuspid bio-prosthetic valve, one on the mechanical aortic valve, one on the mitral bio-prosthetic valve, and one on the tricuspid bio-prosthetic valve. After an average of 36.4±23.1 days’ observation, 16 (73%) patients’ valvular function recovered normal without TTE detectable thrombi, 6 (27%) patients’ valvular function remained abnormal including three patients without TTE detectable thrombi during follow-ups. No significant differences of thrombi changes and period of thrombi disappearance were observed between the inpatient group and the outpatient group. For patients with mitral thrombosis, sizes of the left atriums (LAs) decreased an average of 4.1 mm after treatment (95% CI, 1.2-6.9 mm). No significant changes of other chambers and left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEF) were observed. For patients with tricuspid thrombosis, LVEF improved an average of 10.5% after treatment (95% CI, 0.1-17.9%). No significant changes of chambers were observed. None

  17. Effect of a combined anti-thrombotic therapy of thrombosis on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Dong, Taiming; Zheng, Zhichao; Huang, Shuping

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the curative effects and risks of a medical therapy with combined anti-thrombotic agents for thrombosis on prosthetic heart valves. Twenty-two patients who suffered from thrombosis on prosthetic valves with stable hemodynamics were divided into the inpatient group and the outpatient group. Thrombosis on the valves were demonstrated by transesophageal echocardiographies (TEE). A combined anti-thrombotic therapy with clopidogrel and warfarin were prescribed for all the patients during the whole treatment. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was given twice daily during the first 5 days for the inpatients. The patients accepted regular follow-ups for observation of the functions of prosthetic valves, changes of thrombi, coagulation status and general clinical status. There were 5 men and 17 women. Thirteen patients suffered from thrombosis on the mechanical mitral valves (MVs), five on the mechanical tricuspid valves (TVs), one on the mechanical aortic valve and tricuspid bio-prosthetic valve, one on the mechanical aortic valve, one on the mitral bio-prosthetic valve, and one on the tricuspid bio-prosthetic valve. After an average of 36.4±23.1 days' observation, 16 (73%) patients' valvular function recovered normal without TTE detectable thrombi, 6 (27%) patients' valvular function remained abnormal including three patients without TTE detectable thrombi during follow-ups. No significant differences of thrombi changes and period of thrombi disappearance were observed between the inpatient group and the outpatient group. For patients with mitral thrombosis, sizes of the left atriums (LAs) decreased an average of 4.1 mm after treatment (95% CI, 1.2-6.9 mm). No significant changes of other chambers and left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEF) were observed. For patients with tricuspid thrombosis, LVEF improved an average of 10.5% after treatment (95% CI, 0.1-17.9%). No significant changes of chambers were observed. None experienced major bleedings except

  18. Excessive strut wear allowing ball-poppet embolization in a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, R D; Guynes, W A; Nichols, C T; Martinez, H E

    1982-01-01

    Excessive cage strut wear allowing ball-poppet embolization caused the sudden death of a 47 year old lady in whom a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic prosthesis had been implanted nine years earlier. Patients with this type of prosthesis should have periodic valvular cine fluoroscopy with image intensification to allow visualization of significant strut wear or fracture, and appropriate prosthetic valve replacement.

  19. Prosthetic mesh materials used in hernia surgery.

    PubMed

    Sanders, David L; Kingsnorth, Andrew N

    2012-03-01

    It is estimated that 20 million prosthetic meshes are implanted each year worldwide. It is clear that the evolution of meshes is not yet complete and the ideal mesh is yet to be found. There is a vast array of prosthetics available for hernia repair. This review outlines the properties of available meshes and the evidence to be considered when choosing a prosthetic for hernia repair.

  20. Oral prosthetics from a Nordic perspective.

    PubMed

    Jokstad, Asbjørn

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe oral prosthetics in a context intended for other, primarily Nordic, health professionals and health authorities. An article describing oral prosthetics for the general public was formulated on the basis of recent data and publications in prosthodontics from Scandinavian authors. A draft was presented to the educational committee of the Scandinavian Society for Prosthetic Dentistry for verification and consensus. Following modifications and amendments by representatives from the 11 dental schools in the Nordic countries, the educational committee has approved the present article. The report consists of four sections describing oral prosthetics, prosthetic therapy, undergraduate teaching in oral prosthetics, and advanced oral prosthetics, from a Nordic perspective. The report appraises the various factors in context with demographic, cultural, and professional circumstances and suggests strategies for improvement of present conditions. The relationship between the undergraduate curriculum in oral prosthetics and the public need for advanced oral prosthetics must continuously be monitored so that patients can obtain optimal care from the profession.

  1. Circuit For Control Of Electromechanical Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed circuit for control of electromechanical prosthetic hand derives electrical control signals from shoulder movements. Updated, electronic version of prosthesis, that includes two hooklike fingers actuated via cables from shoulder harness. Circuit built around favored shoulder harness, provides more dexterous movement, without incurring complexity of computer-controlled "bionic" or hydraulically actuated devices. Additional harness and potentiometer connected to similar control circuit mounted on other shoulder. Used to control stepping motor rotating hand about prosthetic wrist to one of number of angles consistent with number of digital outputs. Finger-control signals developed by circuit connected to first shoulder harness transmitted to prosthetic hand via sliprings at prosthetic wrist joint.

  2. Circuit For Control Of Electromechanical Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed circuit for control of electromechanical prosthetic hand derives electrical control signals from shoulder movements. Updated, electronic version of prosthesis, that includes two hooklike fingers actuated via cables from shoulder harness. Circuit built around favored shoulder harness, provides more dexterous movement, without incurring complexity of computer-controlled "bionic" or hydraulically actuated devices. Additional harness and potentiometer connected to similar control circuit mounted on other shoulder. Used to control stepping motor rotating hand about prosthetic wrist to one of number of angles consistent with number of digital outputs. Finger-control signals developed by circuit connected to first shoulder harness transmitted to prosthetic hand via sliprings at prosthetic wrist joint.

  3. Dilatation and Dysfunction of the Neo-aortic Root and in 76 Patients After the Ross Procedure.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Corina A; Weber, Roland; Greutmann, Matthias; Dave, Hitendu; Müller, Christoph; Prêtre, René; Seifert, Burkhardt; Buechel, Emanuela Valsangiacomo; Kretschmar, Oliver; Attenhofer Jost, Christine H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary autograft replacement (Ross procedure) is used as an alternative to prosthetic aortic valve replacement patients with aortic valve disease. There are limited data on incidence and risk factors for dilatation and dysfunction of the neo-aortic after the Ross procedure. Ross procedure was performed in 100 patients at our institution between 1993 and 2011. In 76 patients, complete follow-up data were available. Their median age at surgery was 16 (0.4-58) years (76 % males; 95 % with congenital aortic valve disease). Median follow-up duration was 5.2 years (0.3-16.0 years). We analyzed their clinical and echocardiographic follow-up to identify possible risk factors for neo-aortic root dilatation and dysfunction. Ross procedure included reduction plasty of the native ascending aorta in 25 % of patients. During follow-up, 21 patients (28 %) developed neo-aortic root dilatation, 38 patients (50 %) dilatation oft the native ascending aorta and 7 patients (9 %) at least moderate neo-aortic regurgitation. Univariate risk factors for neo-aortic root dilatation were preoperative aortic regurgitation (p = 0.04), concomitant reduction plasty of the ascending aorta (p = 0.009) and a longer duration of follow-up (p = 0.005). Younger age at surgery was associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta (p = 0.03). Reoperation on the neo-aortic root because of severe dilatation was necessary in 6 patients (8 %), where 2 patients had at least moderate neo-aortic root regurgitation. Neo-aortic root and aortic dilatation are common after the Ross procedure. This is often combined with neo-aortic valve dysfunction. Close follow-up of these patients is mandatory.

  4. Surgical and Antimicrobial Treatment of Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infections at Different Surgical Sites: A Retrospective Study of Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Elzi, Luigia; Gurke, Lorenz; Battegay, Manuel; Widmer, Andreas F.; Weisser, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about optimal management of prosthetic vascular graft infections, which are a rare but serious complication associated with graft implants. The goal of this study was to compare and characterize these infections with respect to the location of the graft and to identify factors associated with outcome. Methods This was a retrospective study over more than a decade at a tertiary care university hospital that has an established multidisciplinary approach to treating graft infections. Cases of possible prosthetic vascular graft infection were identified from the hospital's infectious diseases database and evaluated against strict diagnostic criteria. Patients were divided into groups according to the locations of their grafts: thoracic-aortic, abdominal-aortic, or peripheral-arterial. Statistical analyses included evaluation of patient and infection characteristics, time to treatment failure, and factors associated specifically with cure rates in aortic graft infections. The primary endpoint was cure at one year after diagnosis of the infection. Results Characterization of graft infections according to the graft location did show that these infections differ in terms of their characteristics and that the prognosis for treatment seems to be influenced by the location of the infection. Cure rate and all-cause mortality at one year were 87.5% and 12.5% in 24 patients with thoracic-aortic graft infections, 37.0% and 55.6% in 27 patients with abdominal-aortic graft infections, and 70.0% and 30.0% in 10 patients with peripheral-arterial graft infections. In uni- and multivariate analysis, the type of surgical intervention used in managing infections (graft retention versus graft replacement) did not affect primary outcome, whereas a rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimen was associated with a higher cure rate. Conclusions We recommend that future prospective studies differentiate prosthetic vascular graft infections according to the location of the

  5. [Changes in left-ventricular contractility and diastolic rigidity and the dynamics of various indicators of blood circulation in patients after aortic valve prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, P V; Tskhovrebov, S V; Lishchuk, V A; Zhadin, M M; Mostkova, E V

    1988-04-01

    The relationship between the stroke output and parameters relating to left-ventricular contraction and relaxation was examined within the early hours after the implantation of prosthetic aortic valve. Quantitative analysis demonstrated a close correlation between left-ventricular performance and diastolic regidity. Left-ventricular diastolic regidity is shown to make a more important contribution than contractility to the formation of stroke output. For this reasons, a therapy aiming only to improve myocardial contractility in patients after prosthetic aortic valve implantation failed to effectively improve their clinical condition.

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Schramm, René; Kupatt, Christian; Becker, Christoph; Bombien, René; Reichart, Bruno; Sodian, Ralf; Schmitz, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    A 77-year-old male patient was scheduled for transcatheter aortic valve implantation for symptomatic and severe aortic valve stenosis. Severe multidirectional kinking of the aorta based on aortic coarctation did not allow for the transfemoral, but only for the transapical approach. The procedure was complicated because of the technically challenging retrograde passage of the transfemorally inserted pig-tail catheter required for intraoperative angiography of the aortic root. Correct positioning of the pig-tail catheter into the ascending aorta was accomplished by use of a loop snare, which was advanced into the descending aorta via the antegrade route, passing the cardiac apex, the stenotic aortic valve, and the coarctation-associated kinking. The pig-tail catheter tip was manipulated into the loop snare, pulled traverse the coarctation, and released within the proximal ascending aorta. Subsequent procedures were uneventful and followed the standardized protocol. A 29 mm Edwards Lifescience transcatheter Sapien bioprosthesis was successfully implanted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Watch the video below as Dr. Robbin Cohen describes aortic stenosis Video of Robbin G. Cohen, MD on Aortic Stenosis Causes and Symptoms Causes ... when having dental work. Reviewed by: Robbin G. Cohen, MD, with assistance from John Hallsten and Travis ...

  8. Marked discrepancy in pressure gradient between Doppler and catheter examinations on Medtronic Mosaic valve in aortic position.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiaki; Maekawa, Atsuo; Fujii, Genyo; Sawaki, Sadanari; Hoshino, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yasunari

    2012-12-01

    A 71-year-old woman underwent aortic valve replacement with 23 mm Medtronic Mosaic Ultra valve 4 years ago because of aortic stenosis. Although she had been asymptomatic since the operation, echocardiography showed 4 m/s of transprosthetic valve flow that implied early prosthetic valve failure. Catheter examination revealed that the mean transvalvular pressure gradient during systole was 15.1 mmHg on simultaneous pressure recording, and calculated valve area 1.82 cm(2). Her body surface area was 1.56 m(2). Prosthetic valve failure and prosthesis-patient mismatch were both denied. The discrepancy between Doppler study data and catheter data seemed to be due to fluid dynamical pressure recovery phenomenon. Net pressure difference between the left ventricle and the aorta may be significantly smaller than that estimated using Bernoulli's equation from transvalvular flow speed in some patients after aortic valve replacement.

  9. Novel Materials for Prosthetic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragolta, Carolina I.; Morford, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Existing materials for prosthetic liners tend to be thick and airtight, causing perspiration to accumulate inside the liner and potentially causing infection and injury that reduce quality of life. The purpose of this project was to examine the suitability of aerogel for prosthetic liner applications. Three tests were performed on several types of aerogel to assess the properties of each material. Moisture vapor permeability was tested by incubating four aerogel varieties with an artificial sweat solution at 37.0 C and less than 20% relative humidity for 24 hours. Two aerogel varieties were eliminated from the study due to difficulties in handling the material, and further testing proceeded with Pyrogel in 2.0 and 6.0 mm thicknesses. Force distribution was tested by compressing samples under a load of 4448 N at a rate of 2.5 mm/min. Biofilm formation was tested in a high-shear CDC Biofilm Reactor. Results showed that 2.0 mm Pyrogel blanket allowed 55.7 plus or minus 28.7% of an artificial sweat solution to transpire, and 35.5 plus or minus 27.8% transpired through 6.0 mm Pyrogel blanket. Samples also outperformed the load-bearing capabilities of existing liner materials. No statistically significant difference was found between the two Pyrogel thicknesses for either moisture vapor permeability or force distribution. In addition, biofilm formation results showed no change between the two Pyrogel thicknesses. The breathability and load bearing properties of aerogel make it a suitable material for application to prosthetic liners.

  10. Energy-storing prosthetic feet.

    PubMed

    Wing, D C; Hittenberger, D A

    1989-04-01

    At least six brands of energy-storing prosthetic feet (ESPF) are now commercially available in the US. These are designed to permit lower extremity amputees to participate in a wide variety of activities, such as running and jumping sports, as well as vigorous walking. Although kinesiologic studies of these devices have not been completed, clinical experience suggests that the Flex-Foot provides the highest performance, followed by the Carbon Copy II and the Seattle Foot. The S.A.F.E. Foot, the STEN Foot, and the Dynamic Foot provide less energy storage and may be suitable for less active patients or those with special needs such as walking on uneven ground. All of the ESPF except the Flex-Foot may be attached to a realigned conventional prosthesis. The Flex-Foot incorporates a pylon and foot in one unit and requires special fabrication technologies. The additional cost of most of the ESPF (compared to a Solid Ankle Cushion Heel Foot) may add little to the cost of a finished prosthesis although it provides greatly increased function. The Flex-Foot, however, is significantly more expensive. Advances in kinesiology and materials science are being applied in the design of prosthetic components that are lighter, stronger, and more resilient. Clinicians can now choose from a variety of innovative commercially available devices but have been hampered by a lack of published information. This paper will review the design philosophy, materials, and applications of ESPF, and will supplement the information available from individual manufacturers and the prosthetic literature.

  11. 18F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Fagman, Erika; van Essen, Martijn; Fredén Lindqvist, Johan; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Bech-Hanssen, Odd; Svensson, Gunnar

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown promising results using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). However, previous studies did not include negative controls. The aim of this study was to compare (18)F-FDG-uptake around prosthetic aortic valves in patients with and without PVE and to determine the diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of PVE. (18)F-FDG PET/CT examinations in patients with a prosthetic aortic valve performed 2008-2014 were retrieved. Eight patients with a final diagnosis of definite PVE were included in the analysis of the diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Examinations performed on suspicion of malignancy in patients without PVE (n = 19) were used as negative controls. Visual and semi-quantitative analysis was performed. Maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in the valve area was measured and SUVratio was calculated by dividing valve SUVmax by SUVmax in the descending aorta. The sensitivity was 75 %, specificity 84 %, positive likelihood ratio [LR(+)] 4.8 and negative likelihood ratio [LR(-)] 0.3 on visual analysis. Both SUVmax and SUVratio were significantly higher in PVE patients [5.8 (IQR 3.5-6.5) and 2.4 (IQR 1.7-3.0)] compared to non-PVE patients [3.2 (IQR 2.8-3.8) and 1.5 (IQR 1.3-1.6)] (p < 0.001). ROC-curve analysis of SUVratio yielded an area under the curve of 0.90 (95 % CI 0.74-1.0). (18)F-FDG-uptake around non-infected aortic prosthetic valves was low. The level of (18)F-FDG-uptake in the prosthetic valve area showed a good diagnostic performance in the diagnosis of PVE.

  12. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  13. Compliant Prosthetic Or Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J.; Eklund, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Rotation partly free and partly restrained by resilience and damping. Joint includes U-shaped x- and y-axis frames joined by cables that cross in at center piece. The y-axis frame rotates about y-axis on roller bearing within predetermined angular range. The y-axis frame rotates slightly farther when arm strikes stop, because cables can twist. This mimics compliant resistance of knee joint reaching limit of its forward or backward motion. Used in prosthetic device to replace diseased or damage human joint, or in robot linkage to limit movement and cushion overloads.

  14. [Facial prosthetics: grounds and techniques].

    PubMed

    Dirven, R; Lieben, G; Bouwman, S; Wolterink, R; van den Brekel, M W M; Lohuis, P J F M

    2017-09-01

    Surgical treatment of advanced facial tumours is often physically, functionally and emotionally debilitating. The resulting defects often give grounds for surgical reconstruction, prosthetic reconstruction or a combination of both. During the past two decades, huge advances have been achieved in the development of prostheses. This has led to improved rehabilitation of facial defects. In the clinic of the Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, both adhesive- and implant-retained facial prostheses are used. In recent decades, implant-retained prostheses have been used increasingly often. Patient satisfaction rates are very high for both types of prostheses.

  15. Compliant Prosthetic Or Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J.; Eklund, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Rotation partly free and partly restrained by resilience and damping. Joint includes U-shaped x- and y-axis frames joined by cables that cross in at center piece. The y-axis frame rotates about y-axis on roller bearing within predetermined angular range. The y-axis frame rotates slightly farther when arm strikes stop, because cables can twist. This mimics compliant resistance of knee joint reaching limit of its forward or backward motion. Used in prosthetic device to replace diseased or damage human joint, or in robot linkage to limit movement and cushion overloads.

  16. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  17. 3D Bioprinting of Heterogeneous Aortic Valve Conduits with Alginate/Gelatin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4±3.4% for SMC and 83.2±4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin when printed in stiff matrix, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin in soft matrix. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  18. A smart method of intraoperative explantation of an aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Can C; Park, Soon J

    2009-01-01

    Structural prosthetic valve deterioration and nonstructural dysfunction are two common causes of nonfatal valve events following implantation of a bioprosthetic valve. Using caution and skill, implantation of a bioprosthesis is relatively easy. On the other hand, explantation of a bioprosthesis is a challenging and time-consuming procedure. We have developed a surgical technique by which we were able to ameliorate this troublesome situation in a 79-year-old man with aortic stenosis in whom we had to intraoperatively explant the bioprosthesis that we have put in initially. Another bioprosthesis of the same kind was used to replace the old prosthesis with the rest of his postoperative course until dismissal being eventless.

  19. State of the Art: Amputation and Prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Westberry, David E

    2017-09-01

    Amputation is not a defeat or failure of treatment, but an effective management strategy for certain conditions in the pediatric population. The principles of management, especially in the pediatric population, have not changed. Current surgical strategies focus on providing an optimal residual limb for prosthetic fitting. New technology provides improvement in the design and fabrication of prosthetic devices.

  20. Prosthetics for pediatric and adolescent amputees.

    PubMed

    Muilenburg, Ted B

    2009-01-01

    This communication will provide an outline of the variety of prosthetics available to suit the functional (and cosmetic) needs of patients with upper and lower extremity amputations. It will also demonstrate that the prosthetist constitutes a vital role in the rehabilitation of the patient and will respond to his different needs as his requirements for external prosthetic devices change with age and circumstances.

  1. Easy Placement of Annular Sutures During Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Totsugawa, Toshinori; Hiraoka, Arudo; Tamura, Kentaro; Yoshitaka, Hidenori; Sakaguchi, Taichi

    Placing annular sutures at the right coronary cusp is difficult during minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. We propose the partial everting mattress method, whereby a prosthetic valve is implanted in a supra-annular position at the left coronary and noncoronary cusps, with pledgets on the left ventricular side, but in an intra-annular position at the right coronary cusp, with pledgets on the aortic side. Needles can be grasped in forehand pass at all three coronary cusps. Our method enables easy placement of annular stitches even in the small surgical field, without adversely influencing the hemodynamic performance of the prosthesis.

  2. An Unusual Complication of Surgery for Type A Dissection Treated by Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Petrilli, Giuseppe; Puppini, Giovanni; Torre, Salvo; Calzaferri, Daniele; Bugana, Antonella; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for massive swelling in an anterior cervical location. Nine years earlier, he underwent surgical repair of a complex type A aortic dissection. This procedure was complicated by a fistula between the anastomosis of the graft and the descending aorta, resulting in massive presternal swelling. Therefore, we performed thoracic endovascular repair with successful sealing of the prosthetic leak, achieving progressive reduction in the collection of fluid. We propose thoracic endovascular aortic repair as an alternative to open surgical repair for the treatment of complicated cases. PMID:26798686

  3. Usefulness of Cardiac Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Prosthetic Coronary Artery Graft with Interposition Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Ryotaro; Iwata, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masashi; Doi, Atsushi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Otsuka, Ryo; Hozumi, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Ehara, Shoichi; Hanatani, Akihisa; Muro, Takashi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    An 80-year-old Japanese man was admitted with orthopnea and pitting edema of both lower legs. We diagnosed congestive heart failure (CHF) on the basis of a chest X-ray and an echocardiogram. An electrocardiogram showed a heart rate of 120 beats/min with atrial fibrillation rhythm (Af). The patient developed aortic valve failure and destruction of the base of right coronary artery (RCA) due to infectious endocarditis at 71 years of age. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting with an interposed graft with polyester vascular graft to RCA. The patient recovered from CHF after the 6 days of treatment with diuretics and verapamil. We confirmed the patency of coronary arteries and bypass grafts using a 64-slice cardiac computed tomography scan (CT) and diagnosed CHF due to Af. Here we describe the estimation of the prosthetic coronary artery graft patency with the interposition procedure using 64-slice cardiac CT. PMID:21079753

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and large aortic annulus, using the self-expanding 31-mm Medtronic CoreValve prosthesis: first clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Nijhoff, Freek; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Amrane, Hafid; Latib, Azeem; Testa, Luca; Oreglia, Jacopo A; De Marco, Federico; Samim, Mariam; Bedogni, Francesco; Maisano, Francesco; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Antonio; Van Boven, Ad J; Stella, Pieter R

    2014-08-01

    With the introduction of the 31-mm Medtronic CoreValve prosthesis, patients with large aortic annulus have become eligible for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the 31-mm Medtronic CoreValve in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and large aortic annulus. Five institutions in the Netherlands and Italy participated in a retrospective multicenter registry. Clinical, procedural, and imaging data of patients treated with the 31-mm Medtronic CoreValve were retrospectively collected in accordance with the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 criteria. Between August 2011 and November 2012, 47 patients (44 men, mean age 77.6 ± 8.9 years) received the 31-mm Medtronic CoreValve prosthesis for severe aortic stenosis. Device success (correct positioning of a single valve with intended performance and no all-cause 30-day mortality) was achieved in 31 patients (66.0%). Reasons for failing the device success criteria were significant prosthetic aortic regurgitation in 3 patients (6.4%), second valve implantation in 10 patients (21.2%) (8 cases of malpositioning with high-grade aortic regurgitation, 1 acute valve dislocation, and 1 delayed valve dislocation), 1 of whom died intrahospital, and in-hospital mortality in a further 3 patients (6.4%). Peak and mean transaortic gradients decreased significantly (P < .01). The rate of new pacemaker implantations was 41.7%. In this retrospective multicenter registry, transcatheter treatment of severe aortic valve stenosis with the 31-mm Medtronic CoreValve seemed to be challenging, even in experienced hands. If the prosthesis is properly implanted, it offers adequate valve hemodynamics and proper functioning. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biological response to prosthetic debris

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Diana; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty had revolutionized the outcome of orthopaedic surgery. Extensive and collaborative work of many innovator surgeons had led to the development of durable bearing surfaces, yet no single material is considered absolutely perfect. Generation of wear debris from any part of the prosthesis is unavoidable. Implant loosening secondary to osteolysis is the most common mode of failure of arthroplasty. Osteolysis is the resultant of complex contribution of the generated wear debris and the mechanical instability of the prosthetic components. Roughly speaking, all orthopedic biomaterials may induce a universal biologic host response to generated wear débris with little specific characteristics for each material; but some debris has been shown to be more cytotoxic than others. Prosthetic wear debris induces an extensive biological cascade of adverse cellular responses, where macrophages are the main cellular type involved in this hostile inflammatory process. Macrophages cause osteolysis indirectly by releasing numerous chemotactic inflammatory mediators, and directly by resorbing bone with their membrane microstructures. The bio-reactivity of wear particles depends on two major elements: particle characteristics (size, concentration and composition) and host characteristics. While any particle type may enhance hostile cellular reaction, cytological examination demonstrated that more than 70% of the debris burden is constituted of polyethylene particles. Comprehensive understanding of the intricate process of osteolysis is of utmost importance for future development of therapeutic modalities that may delay or prevent the disease progression. PMID:25793158

  6. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  7. Wireless Microstimulators for Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Mesut; Pikov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    One of the roadblocks in the field of neural prosthetics is the lack of microelectronic devices for neural stimulation that can last a lifetime in the central nervous system. Wireless multi-electrode arrays are being developed to improve the longevity of implants by eliminating the wire interconnects as well as the chronic tissue reactions due to the tethering forces generated by these wires. An area of research that has not been sufficiently investigated is a simple single-channel passive microstimulator that can collect the stimulus energy that is transmitted wirelessly through the tissue and immediately convert it into the stimulus pulse. For example, many neural prosthetic approaches to intraspinal microstimulation require only a few channels of stimulation. Wired spinal cord implants are not practical for human subjects because of the extensive flexions and rotations that the spinal cord experiences. Thus, intraspinal microstimulation may be a pioneering application that can benefit from submillimetersize floating stimulators. Possible means of energizing such a floating microstimulator, such as optical, acoustic, and electromagnetic waves, are discussed. PMID:21488815

  8. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  9. Aortic root stiffness affects the kinematics of bioprosthetic aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Jahren, Silje Ekroll; Winkler, Bernhard Michael; Heinisch, Paul Philipp; Wirz, Jessica; Carrel, Thierry; Obrist, Dominik

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the influence of aortic root distensibility on the haemodynamic parameters and valve kinematics of a bioprosthetic aortic valve was investigated in a controlled in vitro experiment. An Edwards INTUITY Elite 21 mm sutureless aortic valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) was inserted in three transparent aortic root phantoms with different wall thicknesses (0.55, 0.85 and 1.50 mm) mimicking different physiological distensibilities. Haemodynamic measurements were performed in an in vitro flow loop at heart rates of 60, 80 and 100 bpm with corresponding cardiac outputs of 3.5, 4.0 and 5.0 l/min and aortic pressures of 100/60, 120/90 and 145/110 mmHg, respectively. Aortic valve kinematics were assessed using a high-speed camera. The geometric orifice area (GOA) was measured by counting pixels in the lumen of the open aortic valve. The effective orifice area (EOA) was calculated from the root-mean-square value of the systolic aortic valve flow rate and the mean systolic trans-valvular pressure gradient. The tested aortic root phantoms reproduce physiological distensibilities of healthy individuals in age groups ranging from 40 to 70 years (±10 years). The haemodynamic results show only minor differences between the aortic root phantoms: the trans-valvular pressure gradient tends to increase for stiffer aortic roots, whereas the systolic aortic valve flow rate remains constant. As a consequence, the EOA decreased slightly for less distensible aortic roots. The GOA and the aortic valve opening and closing velocities increase significantly with reduced distensibility for all haemodynamic measurements. The resulting mean systolic flow velocity in the aortic valve orifice is lower for the stiffer aortic root. Aortic root distensibility may influence GOA and aortic valve kinematics, which affects the mechanical load on the aortic valve cusps. Whether these changes have a significant effect on the onset of structural valve deterioration of bioprosthetic

  10. Clinical and morphologic observations after simultaneous replacement of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M F; Roberts, W C

    1986-10-01

    Clinical and morphologic observations are described in 12 patients who underwent simultaneous replacement of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. All 12 patients had mitral stenosis, 10 aortic valve stenosis and 2 pure aortic valve regurgitation; 5 had tricuspid valve stenosis and 7 pure tricuspid valve regurgitation. Of the 10 patients who died within 60 days of triple valve replacement, 7 had the low cardiac output syndrome, which in 4, and possibly 5, of the 7 was attributed to prosthetic aortic valve stenosis. In none of the 12 patients was the ascending aorta dilated, and in the 4 (possibly 5) patients with low cardiac output, the space between the surface of the caged poppet (4 patients) or margins of the tilting disc (1 patient) in the aortic valve position and the aortic endothelium appeared inadequate to allow unobstructed flow despite small-sized prostheses in all but 1 patient. Thus, aortic valve replacement in the setting of triple valve dysfunction is hazardous or potentially so. The relative small sizes of the hearts in these patients also make valve replacement more difficult (and hazardous) compared to hearts with larger ventricles and aortas.

  11. Cardiac Imaging for Assessing Low-Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Burwash, Ian G; Pibarot, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Up to 40% of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) harbor discordant Doppler-echocardiographic findings, the most common of which is the presence of a small aortic valve area (≤1.0 cm(2)) suggesting severe AS, but a low gradient (<40 mm Hg) suggesting nonsevere AS. The purpose of this paper is to present the role of multimodality imaging in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of this challenging entity referred to as low-gradient AS. Doppler-echocardiography is critical to determine the subtype of low-gradient AS: that is, classical low-flow, paradoxical low-flow, or normal-flow. Patients with low-flow, low-gradient AS generally have a worse prognosis compared with patients with high-gradient or with normal-flow, low-gradient AS. Patients with low-gradient AS and evidence of severe AS benefit from aortic valve replacement (AVR). However, confirmation of the presence of severe AS is particularly challenging in these patients and requires a multimodality imaging approach including low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography and aortic valve calcium scoring by multidetector computed tomography. Transcatheter AVR using a transfemoral approach may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with low-flow, low-gradient AS. Further studies are needed to confirm the best valve replacement procedure and prosthetic valve for each category of low-gradient AS and to identify patients with low-gradient AS in whom AVR is likely to be futile.

  12. Rapidly growing aortic arch aneurysm in Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Nozomi; Sakano, Yasuhito; Ohki, Shin-Ichi; Misawa, Yoshio

    2011-03-01

    We present a patient with a nine-year history of Behçet's disease (BD), who developed a rapidly expanding aneurysm of the aortic arch. Three-dimensional computed tomography demonstrated a saccular aortic arch aneurysm with a maximal diameter of 5 cm. No bacteria were detected by serial blood cultures. The aneurysm, however, showed a multi-lobular cavity, mimicking an infectious aneurysm. Therefore, we prescribed antibacterial agents for one week. The patient still had a high-fever and an elevated C-reactive protein level thereafter. Aortic arch replacement was performed emergently. Because we were unable to determine whether the aneurysm was caused by infection or BD, the implanted prosthetic graft and the anastomotic sites were covered with a pedicle graft of the greater omentum, and we continued to administer antibacterial agents for four weeks postoperatively. The pathological examination showed neither bacteria nor cystic medial necrosis in the resected aortic wall. Inflammatory changes with eosinophilic infiltration were recognized mainly around the adventitia near the aneurysm. The patient had a favorable postoperative course without any complications.

  13. Outcomes and safety of percutaneous aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Zajarias, Alan; Cribier, Alain G

    2009-05-19

    The concept of transcatheter aortic valve replacement was developed with the goal of offering a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not considered good candidates for surgical valve replacement. Initial attempts were complicated by vascular access problems and lack of appropriate tools. With time and experience, early problems were solved and the concepts of valve sizing, valve positioning, and patient selection were defined. Technological improvements allowed the use of smaller arterial sheaths to decrease vascular trauma, special catheters to facilitate valve delivery, and treatments on the valve prostheses that would ensure longer durability. After 5 years, the number of transcatheter aortic valve replacements has grown significantly, and will likely continue as this technology becomes increasingly available. Currently, 2 valve models, the Edwards SAPIEN valve (Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, California) and the CoreValve ReValving system (CoreValve Inc., Irvine, California), have been used in over 4,000 cases worldwide for the treatment of symptomatic aortic stenosis. Midterm follow-up shows no evidence of restenosis or prosthetic valve dysfunction. Transfemoral and transapical delivery routes can be selected depending on the quality of vascular access and the type of prosthesis used. Randomized trials that are currently underway will confirm procedural safety and guide the applicability of this technology.

  14. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  19. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... evaluation of aortic stenosis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 29, 2014. Mohty D, ... Valvular heart disease in elderly adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 2, 2014. Bonow RO, ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Aortic Aneurysm For ...

  1. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary valve and aortic valve. Each valve has flaps (cusps or leaflets) that open and close once ... valve consists of three tightly fitting, triangular-shaped flaps of tissue called cusps. Some children are born ...

  2. Role of transesophageal echocardiography in percutaneous aortic valve replacement with the CoreValve Revalving system.

    PubMed

    Berry, Colin; Oukerraj, Latifa; Asgar, Anita; Lamarche, Yoan; Marcheix, Bertrand; Denault, André Y; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Cartier, Raymond; Ducharme, Anique; Bonan, Raoul; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2008-09-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement (PAVR) is an emerging therapy for nonsurgical patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). We examined the role of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in PAVR. TEE was used initially to assess the native valve and aortic root, and served as a guide during PAVR. Following prosthetic valve deployment, TEE was used to assess valve function. Eleven patients aged 82 +/- 10 years with NYHA III-IV underwent PAVR. Periprocedural TEE gave immediate information on prosthetic position and function, LV function, mitral regurgitation, pericardium, and thoracic aorta anatomy. There was excellent visual agreement between fluoroscopic and TEE images of prosthetic positioning and deployment. TEE facilitated the detection and management of procedure-related complications. Compared with pre-PAVR, AV area (0.56 +/- 0.19 cm(2) vs. 1.3 +/- 0.4 cm(2); P < 0.001) and LVEF (49 +/- 17% vs. 56 +/- 11%; P < 0.001) increased. TEE provides key anatomical and functional information, and serves as a diagnostic guide for complications, which may arise during PAVR.

  3. Percutaneous stent-mounted valve for treatment of aortic or pulmonary valve disease.

    PubMed

    Webb, John G; Munt, Bradley; Makkar, Raj R; Naqvi, Tasneem Z; Dang, Ninh

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a prosthetic cardiac valve designed for percutaneous transcatheter implantation. Percutaneous catheter-based therapies play a limited role in the management of cardiac valve disease. Surgical implantation of prosthetic valves usually requires thoracotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass. The stent-valve is constructed of a rolled sheet of heat-treated nitinol. Although malleable when cooled, once released from a restraining sheath at body temperature the stent unrolls, becomes rigid, and assumes its predetermined cylindrical conformation. A ratcheting lock-out mechanism prevents recoil and external protrusions facilitate anchoring. Valve leaflets are constructed of bovine pericardium. The feasibility of catheter implantation, prosthetic valve function, and survival were investigated in an animal model. In vitro and pulse duplicator testing documented valve durability. Endovascular delivery of the prototype stent-valve to the aortic or pulmonary position was feasible. Accurate positioning was required to ensure exclusion of the native valve leaflets and, in the case of the aortic valve, to avoid compromise of the coronary ostia or mitral apparatus. Oversizing of the stent in relation to the valve annulus was desirable to facilitate anchoring and prevent paravalvular insufficiency. Stent-valve implantation proved feasible and compatible with survival in an animal model. Transcatheter implantation of prosthetic valves is possible. Further evolution of this technology will involve lower-profile devices with design features that facilitate vascular delivery, visualization, positioning, deployment, and valvular function.

  4. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  5. Medtronic Freestyle aortic bioprosthesis: a potential option for haemodialysis patients†.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Yasser Y; Rayan, Amr; Sodian, Ralf; Hassanein, Wael; Ennker, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    End-stage renal disease patients on regular haemodialysis are at higher risk of calcification. Therefore, many surgeons have concerns regarding the implantation of bioprostheses in such patients. The haemodynamic advantages of stentless aortic bioprostheses support their use; however, these have not been studied yet in end-stage renal disease patients. We studied accordingly the early and mid-term outcomes of aortic valve replacement (AVR) using Medtronic Freestyle stentless aortic bioprostheses in this subset of patients in comparison with stented aortic bioprostheses. We retrospectively studied two groups of consecutive patients on regular haemodialysis who required AVR between 2007 and 2013. Non-Freestyle (NFS) group received stented aortic bioprostheses (36 patients) and Freestyle (FS) group received Medtronic Freestyle aortic bioprostheses (48 patients). Follow-up ranged from 2 to 76 months with a mean follow-up of 36.3 ± 25 months. Patients in both groups showed similar demographic characters regarding age (76.4 ± 8.1 vs 74.9 ± 7.2 years; P = 0.35), male gender (58 vs 60%; P = 0.57) and diabetes mellitus (42 vs 48%; P = 0.57). Smaller aortic bioprostheses were implanted in the NFS (23.3 ± 1.2 vs 25.4 ± 2.1; P < 0.001) with consequently higher postoperative mean gradients (14.1 ± 4.1 vs 11.9 ± 5.3 mmHg; P = 0.004). No significant differences were noted regarding postoperative neurological disorder (8 vs 12%; P = 0.73), deep sternal wound infection (3 vs 4%; P = 0.68), re-exploration (8 vs 8%; P = 0.91) and in-hospital mortality (6 vs 4%; P = 0.92). Mid-term follow-up showed higher prosthetic valve calcification and/or sclerosis in NFS group (25 vs 6%; P = 0.015), whereas no significant differences were noticed between the two groups regarding stroke (0 vs 8%; P = 0.13), endocarditis (0 vs 4%; P = 0.50), 36- and 72-month survival (51 ± 2%, 14 ± 4% vs 55 ± 2%, 19 ± 3%, respectively; P = 0.45). Aortic bioprostheses are a good option for haemodialysis

  6. Development of prosthetic arm with pneumatic prosthetic hand and tendon-driven wrist.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Kan, Hiroto; Hirano, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    Recently, various prosthetic arms have been developed, but few are both attractive and functional. Considering human coexistence, prosthetic arms must be both safe and flexible. In this research, we developed a novel prosthetic arm with a five-fingered prosthetic hand using our original pneumatic actuators and a slender tendon-driven wrist using a wire drive and two small motors. Because the prosthetic hand's driving source is comprised of small pneumatic actuators, the prosthetic hand is safe when it makes contact with people; it can also operate flexibly. In addition, the arm has a tendon-driven wrist to expand its motion space and to perform many operations. First, we explain the pneumatic hand's drive mechanism and its tendon-driven wrist. Next, we identify the characteristics of the hand and the wrist and construct a control system for this arm and verify its control performance.

  7. Smart prosthetics based on magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, J. David; Matthis, Wilfried; Toscano, James R.

    2001-06-01

    One of the most exciting new applications for magnetorheological fluid technology is that of real-time controlled dampers for use in advanced prosthetic devices. In such systems a small magnetorheological fluid damper is used to control, in real-time, the motion of an artificial limb based on inputs from a group of sensors. A 'smart' prosthetic knee system based on a controllable magnetorheological fluid damper was commercially introduced to the orthopedics and prosthetics market in 2000. The benefit of such an artificial knee is a more natural gait that automatically adapts to changing gait conditions.

  8. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  9. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation.

  10. A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, C M; Liszka, E G; Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1994-11-01

    A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve has been developed. Cavitation of four blood analog fluids (distilled water, aqueous glycerin, aqueous polyacrylamide, and aqueous xanthan gum) has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve. This method employed a Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device in a mock circulatory loop that was operated in a partial filling mode associated with reduced atrial filling pressure. The observations were made on a valve that was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure on every cycle. Stroboscopic videography was used to document the cavity life cycle. Bubble cavitation was observed on the valve occluder face. Vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. For each fluid, cavity growth and collapse occurred in less than one millisecond, which provides strong evidence that the cavitation is vaporous rather than gaseous. The cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing atrial pressure at constant aortic pressure and beat rate. The area of cavitation was found to decrease with increasing delay time at a constant aortic pressure, atrial pressure, and beat rate. Cavitation was found to occur in each of the fluids, with the most cavitation seen in the Newtonian fluids (distilled water and aqueous glycerin).

  11. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  12. Aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Le Besnerais, Maëlle; Arnaud, Laurent; Boutémy, Jonathan; Bienvenu, Boris; Lévesque, Hervé; Amoura, Zahir; Marie, Isabelle

    2017-05-17

    To assess prevalence of aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis (RP) patients; to evaluate clinical features and long-term outcome of RP patients exhibiting aortitis, aortic ectasia and/or aneurysm. One hundred and seventy-two RP patients underwent aortic computed tomography (CT)-scan; they were seen in 3 medical centers. Eleven patients (6.4%) had aortic involvement, occurring within a median time of 2 years after RP diagnosis. CT-scan showed isolated aortitis (n=2); the 9 other patients exhibited: aortitis and aortic aneurysm (n=2) or ectasia (n=1), isolated aortic aneurysm (n=4) or ectasia (n=2); aortic localizations were as follows: thoracic (n=6), abdominal (n=2), thoracic and abdominal (n=4) aorta. Patients exhibited: resolution (n=3) improvement (n=3), stabilization (n=4) or deterioration (n=1) of aortic localization. Five patients experienced recurrence of aortic localization; one patient died of aortic abdominal aneurysm rupture. Predictive factors of death related to aortic complications were: aortitis on CT-scan, higher median levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Predictive parameters of aortic relapses were: aortitis on CT-scan and involvement of the abdominal aorta. This study underlines that aortic involvement is severe in RP. Furthermore, we suggest that RP patients exhibiting poor prognostic factors, including panaortitis and higher values of ESR, may require more aggressive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Creative mechanism design for a prosthetic hand.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Tung; Tseng, Ching-Huan; Wu, Long-Long

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, an auxiliary methodology called the creative mechanism design is introduced into the innovation of gripping devices for prosthetic hands. This methodology is a systematic approach based on modification of existing devices for the generation of all possible topological structures of mechanisms and mechanical devices. An existing gripping device (Teh Lin ATG-5F prosthetic hand) constructed by a planar six-bar linkage with one degree of freedom is dealt with by using this methodology. Through the processes of generalization, number synthesis, specialization and particularization for the existing design, five new mechanisms are created in this study to apply to anthropomorphic prosthetic hands. The results show that the methodology for creative mechanism design is a powerful tool for creating new categories of mechanisms to avoid existing designs that have patent protection and can help designers in the conceptual phase. Also, this methodology is validated as a useful way to improve prosthetic hands for amputees.

  14. Ultrasound imaging in lower limb prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Tania; Solomonidis, Stephan; Sandham, William; Spence, William

    2002-03-01

    The biomechanical interaction between the residual limb and the prosthetic socket determines the quality of fit of the socket in lower limb prosthetics. An understanding of this interaction and the development of quantitative measures to predict the quality of fit of the socket are important for optimal socket design. Finite-element modeling is used widely for biomechanical modeling of the limb/socket interaction and requires information on the internal and external geometry of the residual limb. Volumetric imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound have been used to obtain residual limb shape information. Of these modalities, ultrasound has been introduced most recently and its development for visualization in prosthetics is the least mature. This paper reviews ultrasound image acquisition and processing methods as they have been applied in lower limb prosthetics.

  15. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  16. Prosthetic Tool For Holding Small Ferromagnetic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Carden, James R.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Tool attached to prosthetic hand or arm enables user to hold nails, screws, nuts, rivets, and other small ferromagnetic objects on small magnetic tip. Device adjusted to hold nail or screw at proper angle for hammering or for use of screwdriver, respectively. Includes base connector with threaded outer surface and lower male member inserted in standard spring-action, quick-connect/quick-disconnect wrist adapter on prosthetic hand or arm.

  17. Prosthetic Tool For Holding Small Ferromagnetic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Carden, James R.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Tool attached to prosthetic hand or arm enables user to hold nails, screws, nuts, rivets, and other small ferromagnetic objects on small magnetic tip. Device adjusted to hold nail or screw at proper angle for hammering or for use of screwdriver, respectively. Includes base connector with threaded outer surface and lower male member inserted in standard spring-action, quick-connect/quick-disconnect wrist adapter on prosthetic hand or arm.

  18. A history of facial and ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Reisberg, D J; Habakuk, S W

    1990-01-01

    This article traces the history of facial and ocular prosthetics. Creative individuals who have made significant contributions are highlighted and the evolution of techniques and materials is presented. In view of the significance placed upon facial beauty in today's society, it becomes incumbent upon us to recognize the ingenuity and skill of those in the past to gain appreciation for the present state of the art and to provide incentive for improving facial and ocular prosthetic restorations in the future.

  19. Advances in lower-limb prosthetic technology.

    PubMed

    Laferrier, Justin Z; Gailey, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The boundaries once faced by individuals with amputations are quickly being overcome through biotechnology. Although there are currently no prosthetics capable of replicating anatomic function, there have been radical advancements in prosthetic technology, medical science, and rehabilitation in the past 30 years, vastly improving functional mobility and quality of life for individuals with lower-limb amputations. What once seemed impossible is rapidly becoming reality. The future seems limitless, and the replication of anatomic function now seems possible.

  20. Surgical and Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Combination Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carlino, Paolo; Pettini, Francesco; Cantore, Stefania; Grassi, Felice Roberto; Pepe, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this report is to analyze the clinical symptoms, ethologic factors, and prosthetic rehabilitation in a case of Combination Syndrome (CS). The treatment of CS can be conventional or surgical, with or without the bone reconstruction of maxilla. The correct prosthetic treatment helps this kind of patients to restore the physiologic occlusion plane to allow a correct masticatory and aesthetic function. Management of this kind of patients can be a challenge for a dental practitioner. PMID:24511397

  1. Rotational joint assembly for the prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.; Jones, W. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A rotational joint assembly for a prosthetic leg has been devised, which enables an artificial foot to rotate slightly when a person is walking, running or turning. The prosthetic leg includes upper and lower tubular members with the rotational joint assembly interposed between them. The assembly includes a restrainer mechanism which consists of a pivotably mounted paddle element. This device applies limiting force to control the rotation of the foot and also restores torque to return the foot back to its initial position.

  2. Implications of smart materials in advanced prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoe, Edward M.; Radicic, William N.; Knapp, Michael S.

    1994-05-01

    This research reviews common implant materials and suggests smart materials that may be used as substitutes. Current prosthetic technology, including artificial limbs, joints, and soft and hard tissue, falls short in comprehensive characterization of the chemo-mechanics and materials relationships of the natural tissues and their prosthetic materials counterparts. Many of these unknown chemo-mechanical properties in natural tissue systems maintain cooperative function that allows for optimum efficiency in performance and healing. Traditional prosthetic devices have not taken into account the naturally occurring electro-chemo-mechanical stress- strain relationships that normally exist in a tissue system. Direct mechanical deformation of tissue and cell membrane as a possible use of smart materials may lead to improved prosthetic devices once the mechanosensory systems in living tissues are identified and understood. Smart materials may aid in avoiding interfacial atrophy which is a common cause of prosthetic failure. Finally, we note that advanced composite materials have not received sufficient attention, they should be more widely used in prosthetics. Their structural efficiency allows design and construction of truly efficient bionic devices.

  3. Rechargeable wireless EMG sensor for prosthetic control.

    PubMed

    Lichter, P A; Lange, E H; Riehle, T H; Anderson, S M; Hedin, D S

    2010-01-01

    Surface electrodes in modern myoelectric prosthetics are often embedded in the prosthesis socket and make contact with the skin. These electrodes detect and amplify muscle action potentials from voluntary contractions of the muscle in the residual limb and are used to control the prosthetic's movement and function. There are a number of performance-related deficiencies associated with external electrodes including the maintenance of sufficient electromyogram (EMG) signal amplitude, extraneous noise acquisition, and proper electrode interface maintenance that are expected to be improved or eliminated using the proposed implanted sensors. This research seeks to investigate the design components for replacing external electrodes with fully-implantable myoelectric sensors that include a wireless interface to the prosthetic limbs. This implanted technology will allow prosthetic limb manufacturers to provide products with increased performance, capability, and patient-comfort. The EMG signals from the intramuscular recording electrode are amplified and wirelessly transmitted to a receiver in the prosthetic limb. Power to the implant is maintained using a rechargeable battery and an inductive energy transfer link from the prosthetic. A full experimental system was developed to demonstrate that a wireless biopotential sensor can be designed that meets the requirements of size, power, and performance for implantation.

  4. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  5. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  6. Long-term survival with a stentless free-hand Batista pericardial aortic valve prosthesis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Valentina; Labbé, Javier; Cataldo, Anthony; Becerra, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stented bovine pericardial prosthetic valves are a good option for older patients, except when there is a fragile small aortic annulus, when, if there is no contraindication to anticoagulation, a mechanical prosthesis may be indicated. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a 72 year-old man who underwent coronary bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement with a stentless valve fashioned from bovine pericardium using the Batista technique. Despite early sternal infection and dehiscence, and renal and respiratory failure during 15 years follow-up, he remains alive and self-sufficient. Echocardiography demonstrates a well-functioning aortic valve. DISCUSSION When Batista reported his first 60 patients, concerns were raised about the surgical feasibility of constructing the valve and its long-term durability. Our case perhaps addresses both concerns. CONCLUSION Replacement of the aortic valve with a free-hand Batista pericardial valve is a feasible option in a suitable and carefully selected patient. PMID:25524300

  7. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  8. [Doppler echocardiography in assessing mechanical and biological heart valve prostheses].

    PubMed

    Minardi, G; Di Segni, M; Boccardi, L; Ferrari, O; Giovannini, E

    1988-02-01

    The study was performed to assess Doppler echocardiographic features of mitral and aortic prosthetic valves of different types with both normal and abnormal function. Two hundred and twenty-three patients with 250 prostheses were studied. Two hundred eight valves (111 mitral, 95 aortic and 2 tricuspid) were considered to be functioning normally after clinical examination, phonocardiography and M-mode and 2D echocardiography. This group enabled us to define normal Doppler echocardiographic findings for different types of prosthesis. In mitral position, peak (p) and mean (m) gradients were lower for disc prostheses and higher for ball and biological prosthetic valves; values of effective orifice area (A), calculated by pressure half-time method, were lower for biological and ball prostheses and higher in disc valves. Results were as follows: St. Jude (p 10.6 mmHg, m 3.9 mmHg, A 2.7 cm2), Duromedics (p 10.6, m 4.3, A 2.8), Björk-Shiley (p 10.4, m 4, A 2.3), Omniscience (p 14.2, m 6.2, A 2.1), Starr-Edwards (p 15.9, m 5.4, A 2.1), Hancock (p 14.7, m 6, A 2), Carpentier (p 13.2, m 5.4, A 1.9). Mild regurgitation, considered "physiological", was found in 2/8 Carpentier valves and in 3/34 St. Jude prostheses. In aortic valves lower peak gradients were found in Lillehei (18.3 mmHg), St. Jude (23.8 mmHg), Björk-Shiley (26 mmHg), Duromedics (27 mmHg) and higher values in Starr-Edwards (30.2 mmHg), Hancock (30 mmHg) and Omniscience (35.5 mmHg) prostheses. Mild regurgitation, considered "physiological", was found in 17% of Omniscience valves, 21% of Hancock, 33% of Duromedics, 45% of St. Jude, 60% of Björk-Shiley prostheses. Hancock mitral valves implanted for over 7 years had a mean gradient higher than valves with a shorter period of implantation (7.6 vs 4.85 mmHg, p less than 0.1), whereas the effective orifice area was similar. Hancock aortic valves implanted for over 7 years had a peak gradient slightly higher than the other group (implantation less than 7 years

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infective Endocarditis Following Aortic Valve Implantation: A Note of Caution

    PubMed Central

    Dapás, Juan Ignacio; Rivero, Cynthia; Burgos, Pablo; Vila, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) in patients with prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a rare complication of this relatively novel procedure and current guidelines do not include specific recommendations for its treatment. We report a case of PVE due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after TAVI that required SAVR, with successful outcome. PVE usually occurs during the first year after TAVI and entails a high mortality risk because patients eligible for this min-imally invasive procedure are fragile (i.e. advanced age and/or severe comorbidities). Additionally, clinical presentation may be atypical or subtle and transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) may not be conclusive, which delays diagnosis and treatment worsening the prognosis. This case highlights that open SAVR might be ultimately indicated as part of treatment for TAVI-PVE despite a high-risk surgery score. PMID:27014375

  10. Biocor No- React stentless aortic valve--short-term results.

    PubMed

    Von Oppell, U O; Stemmet, F; Levetan, B; Heijke, S A; Brink, J

    2001-01-01

    Short-term results of the bioprosthetic Biocor No-React composite porcine stentless aortic valve (Biocor Industria e Pesquisas LTDA, Belo Horizonte, Brazil) implanted in patients in whom anticoagulation was thought to be contraindicated or expected to be non-compliant. Retrospective review of 52 consecutive prospective patients in whom this valve was implanted, between September 1994 and May 1998. Average age was 44 +/- 17 years; 75% of patients were operated on for rheumatic heart disease and combined procedures were done in 40% of cases. Early mortality was 5.8%, and related to pre-operative ejection fraction ( P < 0.03), New York Heart Association (NYHA) class (P < 0.01), and bacterial endocarditis (P < 0.04). On discharge, 84% of survivors were in NYHA class I and 16% in class II. The average postoperative prosthetic valve peak gradient on echocardiography was 19.9 +/- 11 mmHg and was related to pre-operative ejection fraction and smaller valve sizes. Postoperative residual trivial or mild aortic regurgitation was seen in 19 patients (36.6%), resolved on follow-up in 10 cases, and did not correlate with structural deterioration, re-operation, mortality, or widening of the non-coronary sinus. The non-coronary aortic sinus was widened on closure, because of perceived crowding of the adjacent stentless valve commisures, in 52% of cases. This was thought to be related to the use of an oblique as opposed to transverse aortotomy. Patient survival, inclusive of operative deaths, was 88.5%, and event-free survival was 80.0% at 4 years. The short-term results of this stentless aortic valve in a young predominantly third-world population group are acceptable, and appear to be superior to the results for mechanical valves in a similar patient group. We would recommend a transverse aortotomy above the sinotubular ridge to be the more appropriate aortotomy incision when using stentless aortic valves.

  11. Robotic aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  12. Aortic hammer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Komen, Niels; Vercauteren, Sven; de Roover, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    To present a case of penetrating aortic ulcer with extraordinary etiology. A 57-year-old man was admitted with acute retrosternal and interscapular pain. He was a demolition worker and often used a pneumatic drill to which he pressed his chest as he drilled. Clinical examination showed previously undiagnosed hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography disclosed a penetrating aortic ulcer in the descending thoracic aorta without any sign of atherosclerosis. Initial treatment consisted of blood pressure control. However, due to progression of the lesion, endovascular treatment was performed to implant a covered endoprosthesis. We hypothesize that the etiology of the ulcer was the shear forces developed by incorrect, repetitive use of the pneumatic hammer in combination with the untreated hypertension. This is analogous to the hypothenar hammer syndrome, and we propose naming this the "aortic hammer syndrome."

  13. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  14. Cortical control for prosthetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Andrew B.; Kipke, D. W.; Perepelkin, P. D.

    1996-05-01

    The work presented in this session is part of a project to develop an arm-control system based on neuronal activity recorded from the cerebral cortex. This will make it possible for amputees or paralyzed individuals to move a prosthetic arm or, using functional neural stimulation, their own limbs as effortlessly and with as much skill as intact individuals. We are developing and testing this system in monkeys and hope to have a prototype working in the next couple of years. This project has been made more feasible because we have been able, in the last 15 years to extract, from the brain, a signal that represents arm trajectory accurately. In this paper, we describe how this technique was developed and how we use this as the basis for our control signal. An alternative approach using a self-organizing feature map, an algorithm to deduce arm configuration given an endpoint trajectory and the development of a telemetry system to transmit the neuronal data is described in subsequent papers.

  15. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  16. Choice of prosthetic heart valve in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Talwar, Sachin; Airan, Balram

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical prostheses and stented xenografts (bioprosthesis) are most commonly used substitutes for aortic and mitral valve replacement. The mechanical valves have the advantage of durability but are accompanied with the risk of thromboembolism, problems of long-term anticoagulation, and associated risk of bleeding. In contrast, bioprosthetic valves do not require long-term anticoagulation, but carry the risk of structural valve degeneration and re-operation. A mechanical valve is favoured in young patients (<40 years) if reliable anticoagulation is ensured. In elderly patients (>60 years), a bioprosthesis is a suitable substitute. In middle-aged patients (40–60 years), risk of re-operation in a bioprosthesis is equal to that of bleeding in a mechanical valve. Traditionally, a bioprosthesis is opted in patients with limited life expectancy. Calculation of life expectancy, based solely upon chronological age, is erroneous. In developing countries, the calculated life expectancy is much lower than that of Western population, hence age related Western cut-offs are not valid in developing countries. Besides age, cardiac condition of the patient, systemic illnesses, socio-economic status, gender and geographical location also decide the life expectancy of the patients. Selection of the prosthetic valve substitute should be based on: aspiration of the patient, life expectancy, socio-economic and educational background, occupation of the patient, availability, cost, monitoring of anti-coagulation, monitoring of valve function and other valve related complications, and possibility of re-operation. PMID:27326237

  17. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection and Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm After Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Andrés Enríquez; Rodríguez, Sara Castaño; Pañero, Blanca Mateos; Moreira, Beatriz Castaño; López Almodóvar, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with a giant aortic root aneurysm associated with chronic aortic Type A dissection. The patient had been operated on 16 years before due to aortic annuloectasia with mechanical valve replacement. The patient underwent revision aortic surgery with a Bentall-De Bono operation with Svensson modification, using a #21 On-X Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:28097190

  18. In vitro assessment of flow patterns and turbulence intensity in prosthetic heart valves using generalized phase-contrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Franzén, Stefan; Wigström, Lars; Bolger, Ann F; Ebbers, Tino

    2010-05-01

    To assess in vitro the three-dimensional mean velocity field and the extent and degree of turbulence intensity (TI) in different prosthetic heart valves using a generalization of phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI). Four 27-mm aortic valves (Björk-Shiley Monostrut tilting-disc, St. Jude Medical Standard bileaflet, Medtronic Mosaic stented and Freestyle stentless porcine valve) were tested under steady inflow conditions in a Plexiglas phantom. Three-dimensional PC-MRI data were acquired to measure the mean velocity field and the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), a direction-independent measure of TI. Velocity and TI estimates could be obtained up- and downstream of the valves, except where metallic structure in the valves caused signal void. Distinct differences in the location, extent, and peak values of velocity and TI were observed between the valves tested. The maximum values of TKE varied between the different valves: tilting disc, 100 J/m(3); bileaflet, 115 J/m(3); stented, 200 J/m(3); stentless, 145 J/m(3). The TI downstream from a prosthetic heart valve is dependent on the specific valve design. Generalized PC-MRI can be used to quantify velocity and TI downstream from prosthetic heart valves, which may allow assessment of these aspects of prosthetic valvular function in postoperative patients. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Three-Dimensional Echocardiography of the Aortic Valve: Feasibility, Clinical Potential, and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Jaroslaw D.; Salustri, Alessandro; Roelandt, Jos R.T.C.; Ten Cate, Folkert J.

    1998-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of our study was to assess the feasibility and potential clinical utility of three-dimensional echocardiography for evaluation of the aortic valve. BACKGROUND: The value of three-dimensional echocardiographic assessment of the aortic valve has not been established yet. METHODS: The study group comprised 32 patients (11 women, 21 men), mean age 56.1 (range 20-82). Seven morphologically normal valves, 5 homografts, 6 mechanical prostheses, and 14 valves of abnormal morphology were evaluated. Images were acquired during a routine multiplane transesophageal echocardiographic examination (rotational scan with 2 degrees interval, respiration, and electrocardiogram [ECG] gating) and postprocessed off-line. A selection of reconstructed cutplanes (anyplane mode) and volume-rendered three-dimensional views of aortic valve anatomy were analyzed by two observers and compared with two-dimensional echocardiography findings. RESULTS: The quality of reconstructions was scored excellent when permitting unrestricted assessment of aortic valve anatomy with optimized planimetric measurements (19 patients, 59%), adequate when aortic valve was partially visualized (7 patients, 22%), or inadequate when no assessment was possible (6 patients, 19%, including 5 with prosthetic valves). Three-dimensional echocardiography provided additional information in ten (31%) patients as compared with the two-dimensional echocardiographic findings. CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that three-dimensional echocardiographic reconstruction of the aortic valve is feasible, with excellent or adequate quality in 81% of patients, more frequently in native than in prosthetic valves, P < 0.05. Morphologic information additional to that provided by two-dimensional echocardiography is obtained in a significant proportion of patients.

  20. Percutaneous management of prosthetic valve thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hariram, Vuppaladadhiam

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis of a prosthetic valve is a serious complication in patients with prosthetic heart valves. Thrombolysis is the initial choice of treatment. Patients who do not respond to thrombolysis are subjected to surgery which carries a high risk. We report a case series of 5 patients with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis who did not respond to thrombolysis and were subjected to percutaneous manipulation of the prosthetic valves successfully and improved. Five patients who were diagnosed to have prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and failed to respond to a minimum of 36 h of thrombolysis (persistent symptoms with increased gradients, abnormal findings on fluoroscopy),were subjected to percutaneous treatment after receiving proper consent. None of them had a visible thrombus on transthoracic echocardiogram. All patients underwent transseptal puncture following which a 6F JR4 guiding catheter was passed into the left atrium. The valve leaflets were repeatedly hit gently under fluoroscopic guidance till they regained their normal mobility. Mean age was 38.8 years. Average peak and mean gradients prior to the procedure were 38 and 25 and after the procedure were 12 and 6 mm of Hg respectively. All patients had successful recovery of valve motion on fluoroscopy with normalization of gradients and complete resolution of symptoms. None of the patients had any focal neurological deficits, embolic manifestations or bleeding complications. Percutaneous manipulation of prosthetic valves in selected patients with prosthetic valve thrombosis who do not respond to thrombolytic therapy is feasible and can be used as an alternative to surgery. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Aortic Valve Adaptation to Aortic Root Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hee; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Levine, Robert A.; Sun, Byung Joo; Jang, Jeong Yoon; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Background The 3-dimensional relationship between aortic root and cusp is essential to understand the mechanism of aortic regurgitation (AR) because of aortic root dilatation (ARD). We sought to test the hypothesis that the stretched cusps in ARD enlarge to compensate for ARD. Methods and Results Computed tomography imaged 92 patients (57 with ARD, 29 with moderate to severe AR, 28 without significant AR) and 35 normal controls. Specialized 3-dimensional software measured individual cusp surface areas relative to maximal mid-sinus cross-sectional area and minimal 3-dimensional annular area, coaptation area fraction, and asymmetry of sinus volumes and intercommissural distances. Total open cusp surface area increased (P<0.001) from 7.6±1.4 cm2/m2 in normals to 12.9±2.2 cm2/m2 in AR-negative and 15.2±3.3 cm2/m2 in AR-positive patients. However, the ratio of closed cusp surface area to maximal mid-sinus area, reflecting cusp adaptation, decreased from normals to AR-negative to AR-positive patients (1.38±0.20, 1.15±0.15, 0.88±0.15; P<0.001), creating the lowest coaptation area fraction. Cusp distensibility (closed diastolic versus open area) decreased from 20% in controls and AR-negative patients to 5% in AR-positive patients (P<0.001). Multivariate determinants of AR and coaptation area fraction reflected both sinus size and cusp-to-annular adaptation. ARD was also progressively asymmetrical with root size, and individual cusp surface areas failed to match this asymmetry. Conclusions Aortic cusp enlargement occurs in ARD, but cusp adaptation and distensibility become limited in prominent, asymmetrical ARD, leading to AR. Optimal AR repair tailored to individual patient anatomy can benefit from appreciating valve adaptation and 3-dimensional relationships; understanding cusp adaptation mechanisms may ultimately provide therapeutic opportunities to improve such compensation. PMID:25051951

  2. Robot-assisted aortic valve replacement using a novel sutureless bovine pericardial prosthesis: proof of concept as an alternative to percutaneous implantation.

    PubMed

    Suri, Rakesh M; Burkhart, Harold M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2010-11-01

    : Percutaneous aortic valve implantation within native valve calcium has progressed to clinical use despite the absence of data proving equivalence to complete surgical excision and prosthetic valve replacement. A novel self-expanding sutureless bovine pericardial prosthesis (Sorin Perceval) derived from a proven stented valve has been successfully used in humans recently through an open transaortic approach. We sought to develop a minimally invasive technique for native aortic valve excision and sutureless prosthetic aortic valve replacement using robot assistance. : The da Vinci S-HD system was used to open and suspend the pericardium anterior to the phrenic nerve in cadavers. A transthoracic cross-clamp was placed across the midascending aorta, following which a transverse aortotomy was made. The native aortic valve cusps were excised, and annular calcium was removed with robotic instruments. After placement of three guide sutures, the Perceval self-expanding pericardial prosthesis mounted on a flexible delivery system was inserted through a working port and lowered into the aortic annulus. : Successful implantation of all valves was possible using a 3-cm right second intercostal space working port, along with two additional 1-cm instrument ports. A standard transverse aortotomy was sufficient for examination/debridement of the native aortic valve cusps, sizing of the annulus, and deployment of the nitinol-stented, bovine pericardial prosthesis. Delivery, seating, and stability of the device were easily confirmed above and below the aortic valve annulus using the robotic camera. : Complete excision of diseased native aortic valve cusps with robot assistance facilitates accurate and reproducible aortic valve replacement using a novel self-expanding sutureless version of a proven bovine pericardial prosthesis. This approach is comparable to the current surgical gold standard and is ready for clinical use as an alternative to percutaneous aortic valve implantation.

  3. Endovascular Exclusion of Aortobronchial Fistula and Distal Anastomotic Aneurysm after Extra-Anatomic Bypass for Aortic Coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Arici, Vittorio; Rodolico, Giuseppe; Brunetto, Massimo Borri; Argenteri, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of choice for aortic coarctation in adults remains open surgical repair. Aortobronchial fistula is a rare but potentially fatal late sequela of surgical correction of isthmic aortic coarctation via the interposition of a graft. The endovascular treatment of aortobronchial fistula is still under discussion because of its high risk for infection, especially if the patient has a history of cardiovascular prosthetic implantation. Patients need close monitoring, most notably those with secondary aortobronchial fistula. We discuss the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with the combined conditions, and we briefly review the relevant medical literature. PMID:28265214

  4. Radi pressurewire rupture and embolization to the right common carotid artery after crossing a bjork-shiley mechanical aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2013-10-01

    Direct measurement of the left ventricular pressure in patients with mechanical prosthetic aortic valve is an important technical challenge. In the past, transseptal puncture or direct left ventricular accesses were the only available methods. The use of a pressure wire through mechanical aortic prosthesis has been described to be feasible and safe. We report the first case report of pressure guidewire entrapment through a single tilting disk valve (Bjork-Shiley), which resulted in hemodynamic collapse, rupture, and embolization of the pressure wire tip to the right common carotid artery and its successful snaring.

  5. [New technologies in the prosthetic management after amputations].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, M; Gawron, O

    2015-06-01

    In Germany around 70,000 amputations are carried out on extremities each year. Modern prosthetic functional components have become more and more sophisticated and must be understood and applied by their users to be of beneficial use in everyday life. The prosthetic socket is the most important component of modern extremity prosthetics. Which demands have to be met by a modern prosthetic socket so that innovative function-improving components in prosthetics can be successfully applied? Complex prosthetic technologies are rarely compatible with a lower overall weight of the prosthesis. The increase in functionality also produces differentiated force effects on the human body. Modern socket technologies, therefore, have to compensate for the increased strain and counteract the increasing dynamics between the stump and the prosthesis. This can be achieved through the application of adhesive socket materials and through new adhesive mechanisms. Form variants can also improve the connection between stump and prosthetic socket. The improvements in prosthetic socket technology presented here have a lasting positive effect on the daily routine of many amputees. Not only do they improve the control and application of modern prosthetic components, but also clearly enhance the wearing comfort. The prosthetic socket is crucial for the success of exoskeletal prosthetic management. The better we succeed in making the human body and the prosthetic socket an entity, the more usefully and comfortably innovative prosthetic methods can be applied.

  6. Adaptive prosthetics for the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Carroll, K

    2001-06-01

    The potential for lifestyle recovery is tremendous for most lower extremity amputees. The amazing and ever-expanding array of adaptive prosthetics can help make the devastating loss of amputation more bearable for patients, their families, and their health care team. The new amputee, in a state of shock and grief, does not know what his or her prosthetic options are. It is crucial that the surgeon is knowledgeable about what the patient can have and what the patient needs to ask for. Dana Bowman stated: Ideally, the new amputee should say to their doctor, "I'd like my leg to be lightweight, flexible, durable, comfortable. I want to do sports or I want to ride bikes with my kids." Whatever it is they like to do. I was told I would never be able to wear two dynamic feet and that my sky diving days were over. I said, "Well how do you know? Can't I try?" It took years to find out what I could have and then to find people to help me get it. The prosthetic prescription the physician writes is the patient's gateway to the kind of prosthetics that will enable him or her to pursue the activities of their life. Often, new amputees end up with the bare minimum prosthesis, which can cause problems with comfort and mobility. A poorly designed or badly fitting prosthesis is as disabling as the actual amputation. When the surgeon can help the amputee and his or her family understand what kind of prosthetic choices are available, it establishes an optimistic outlook that is highly beneficial to the entire recovery process physically and mentally. "When I lost my leg, if someone would have told me that I could at least try to run again, that would have meant a lot," said Brian Frasure. "Getting that positive mental attitude is every bit as important as having good medical and prosthetic care." By asking probing questions about the patient's preamputation lifestyle and postamputation goals, the physician can write a prescription for truly adaptive prosthetics. The surgeon should

  7. Different techniques for aortic valve repair and the associated root reconstruction – prospective long-term follow-up of the first 100 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gocol, Radosław; Malinowski, Marcin; Hudziak, Damian; Duraj, Piotr; Frackiewicz, Joanna; Kargul, Tomasz; Deja, Marek A.; Woś, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The advantages of aortic valve and aortic root reconstructive surgery include the provision of natural postoperative valve hemodynamics and the avoidance of prosthetic valve-related complications. A systematic approach based on functional classification of aortic regurgitation allows standardization and reproducibility. Its potential applicability, however, is limited by the relative lack of long-term follow-up data. Aim To achieve the long term results of aortic valve and root repair in prospectively recruited group of 100 patients operated on during first seven years. Material and methods Between the years 2003 and 2013, 225 consecutive patients (175 male, 50 female, mean age 51.3 years) with severe aortic regurgitation and aortic root enlargement underwent aortic valve repair or sparing surgery. The first 100 patients operated between 2003 and 2009 were prospectively enrolled in the study in order to achieve a 105-month follow-up. They underwent aortic valve repair and associated aortic root reconstruction. This prospective study is aimed at assessing the major endpoints of overall survival and freedom from reoperation. Additionally, log-rank testing for the risk factors associated with overall mortality, reoperation, and aortic valve repair failure was performed. Results Among 225 patients, early mortality occurred in the case of 5 patients (2.2%), while 6 (2.5%) patients experienced early valve failure. In a prospective analysis performed on the first 100 patients, long-term results achieved with Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a survival rate of 93% and freedom from reoperation at the level of 91.3%. The risk factors for overall mortality included NYHA class, creatinine level, and perioperative root replacement as reimplantation. Redo operation was associated with bicuspid aortic valve and perioperative leaflet resection with pericardial patch repair. Conclusions One hundred and five month follow-up data from this prospectively analyzed cohort of

  8. [Ocular prosthetics. Fitting, daily use and complications].

    PubMed

    Koch, K R; Trester, W; Müller-Uri, N; Trester, M; Cursiefen, C; Heindl, L M

    2016-02-01

    Ocular prosthetics make a decisive contribution to the functional, esthetic and psychosomatic rehabilitation of patients after ocular extirpation. This article provides an overview of the fitting, daily care and complications of ocular prosthetics. The study comprised a PubMed literature review and own clinical results. Ocular prosthetics made from cryolite glass or perspex can be manufactured and fitted 5-8 weeks after removal of the eye. During this period a conformer is placed within the conjunctival sac in order to prevent scar formation and shrinking of the socket. Artificial eyes can be worn continuously, only interrupted by a short but regular cleaning procedure. Artificial tears and lid hygiene improve the comfort of wearing. Glass prostheses have to be renewed every 1-2 years, while perspex prostheses need to be polished once a year. Complications, such as giant papillary conjunctivitis or blepharoconjunctivitis sicca are facilitated by poor fit, increased age and inappropriate care of the prosthetic device. In the case of socket shrinkage or anophthalmic socket syndrome, surgical interventions are needed to re-enable the use of an artificial eye. Adequate fitting, daily care of ocular prosthetics and therapeutic management of associated complications are mandatory for a durable functional, esthetic and psychosomatic rehabilitation after ocular extirpation.

  9. Current Clinical Evidence on Rapid Deployment Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Glenn R.; Shrestha, Malakh Lal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the Western world. It is caused primarily by age-related degeneration and progressive calcification typically detected in patients 65 years and older. In patients presenting with symptoms of heart failure, the average survival rate is only 2 years without appropriate treatment. Approximately one half of all patients die within the first 2 to 3 years of symptom onset. In addition, the age of the patients presenting for aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increased along with the demographic changes. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) database shows that the number of patients older than 80 years has increased from 12% to 24% during the past 20 years. At the same time, the percentage of candidates requiring AVR as well as concomitant coronary bypass surgery has increased from 5% to 25%. Surgical AVR continues to be the criterion standard for treatment of aortic stenosis, improving survival and quality of life. Recent advances in prosthetic valve technology, such as transcatheter AVR, have expanded the indication for AVR to the extreme high-risk population, and the most recent surgical innovation, rapid deployment AVR, provides an additional tool to the surgeons’ armamentarium. PMID:26918310

  10. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  11. Late entrapment of ball and cage valve in mitral position.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Jayesh G; Varma, Praveen K; Gadhinglajkar, Shrinivas V; Neelakandhan, Kurur S

    2006-02-01

    A 32-year-old female underwent mitral valve replacement with total chordal preservation (Miki's technique) using 26 mm (1M) Starr-Edward prosthesis (SEP) in 1988. The patient was in NYHA class-I until 2001. She progressed to NYHA class-III with paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed increased prosthetic valve gradient, and cardiac catheterization confirmed the findings. Intraoperatively, the poppet movement in the cage was found to be restricted due to the preserved subvalvular apparatus entrapping the poppet inside the prosthetic valve cage.

  12. Prosthetic status and prosthetic needs amongst geriatric fishermen population of Kutch coast, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dola Rama Venkata; Raju, Datla Srinivasa; Naidu, Lakshmu; Deshpande, Sumit; Chadha, Manish; Agarwal, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Literature among fishermen of India is scanty. The external factors like diet, quality of dental hygiene and environmental factors have an effect on oral health. Moreover elderly age group offer very little importance towards their oral health. To assess the prosthetic status and prosthetic treatment needs among the geriatric fishermen population of Kutch coast, Gujarat, India. A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted among 1200 elderly people (above 60 years) of Kutch coast, Gujarat, India. They were interviewed and examined using a proforma designed with the help of WHO Oral Health Survey 1997. Chi square test was used for comparisons. Confidence level and p-value were set at 95% and 5% respectively. Out of 1200 elderly people, 836 were males and 364 were females. Considering the prosthetic status, majority (76.7%) had no prosthesis followed by full removable dentures (12.3%). An insight into the prosthetic needs showed that majority (27.3%) had a need for multiunit prosthesis. In this study, it was seen that overall prosthetic status was low and prosthetic need was high. Therefore new avenues have to be discovered to make the prosthetic treatment readily available to the elderly.

  13. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: prosthetics.

    PubMed

    De Luigi, Arthur Jason; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-08-01

    With the technologic advances in medicine and an emphasis on maintaining physical fitness, the population of athletes with impairments is growing. It is incumbent upon health care practitioners to make every effort to inform these individuals of growing and diverse opportunities and to encourage safe exercise and athletic participation through counseling and education. Given the opportunities for participation in sports for persons with a limb deficiency, the demand for new, innovative prosthetic designs is challenging the clinical and technical expertise of the physician and prosthetist. When generating a prosthetic prescription, physicians and prosthetists should consider the needs and preferences of the athlete with limb deficiency, as well as the functional demands of the chosen sporting activity. The intent of this article is to provide information regarding the current advancements in the adaptive sports technology and biomechanics in the field of prosthetics, and to assist clinicians and their patients in facilitating participation in sporting activities.

  14. Ten questions on prosthetic shoulder infection.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Elizabeth M; Ong, Joshua Cy; Bale, R Stephen; Trail, Ian A

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic shoulder infection can cause significant morbidity secondary to pain and stiffness. Symptoms may be present for years before diagnosis because clinical signs are often absent and inflammatory markers may be normal. An emerging common culprit, Propionibacterium acnes, is hard to culture and so prolonged incubation is necessary. A negative culture result does not always exclude infection and new synovial fluid biochemical markers such as α defensin are less sensitive than for lower limb arthroplasty. A structured approach is necessary when assessing patients for prosthetic shoulder joint infection. This includes history, examination, serum inflammatory markers, plain radiology and aspiration and/or biopsy. A classification for the likelihood of prosthetic shoulder infection has been described based on culture, pre-operative and intra-operative findings. Treatment options include antibiotic suppression, debridement with component retention, one-stage revision, two-stage revision and excision arthroplasty. Revision arthroplasty is associated with the best outcomes.

  15. Ten questions on prosthetic shoulder infection

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Elizabeth M; Ong, Joshua CY; Bale, R Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic shoulder infection can cause significant morbidity secondary to pain and stiffness. Symptoms may be present for years before diagnosis because clinical signs are often absent and inflammatory markers may be normal. An emerging common culprit, Propionibacterium acnes, is hard to culture and so prolonged incubation is necessary. A negative culture result does not always exclude infection and new synovial fluid biochemical markers such as α defensin are less sensitive than for lower limb arthroplasty. A structured approach is necessary when assessing patients for prosthetic shoulder joint infection. This includes history, examination, serum inflammatory markers, plain radiology and aspiration and/or biopsy. A classification for the likelihood of prosthetic shoulder infection has been described based on culture, pre-operative and intra-operative findings. Treatment options include antibiotic suppression, debridement with component retention, one-stage revision, two-stage revision and excision arthroplasty. Revision arthroplasty is associated with the best outcomes. PMID:27583013

  16. [Prosthetic rehabilitation: needs in Senegalese dental offices].

    PubMed

    Mbodj, E B; Diouf, M; Faye, D; Ndiaye, A; Seck, M T; Ndiaye, C; Diallo, P D

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of dental prosthetic needs will develop strategies for prevention and treatment through a package of individual, community and professional policies. The aim of this study was to evaluate prosthetic needs in Senegalese dental offices. The survey was conducted among people aged 15 years and more attending Senegalese dental clinics. The mean number of missing teeth was 4.4. Only 55.3% of the sample expressed the need for dentures and 81.8% had a diagnosed need for prosthesis. A statistically significant difference was noticed between the needs diagnosed and the expressed needs (p < 0.0001). Finally, this study reveals that the need for prosthetic treatment is real in the Senegalese dental offices.

  17. Changes in lower extremity prosthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Trower, Ted A

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to the revolution in new materials for prosthetics and the components that they have made possible. The average weight of a delivered prosthesis has decreased, currently available components offer improved function and superior symmetry of gait, and limb interfaces provide superior skin protection and comfort. The focus on the features of these components sometimes has led to neglect of the basic elements of prosthetic design--the fit and the alignment. If the fit and alignment are on the mark, an amputee can function at remarkably high levels with rudimentary components. This article discusses the basics of lower extremity prosthetic practice and addresses challenges for the future.

  18. Comparison of hemodynamics after aortic root replacement using valve-sparing or bioprosthetic valved conduit

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Jeremy D; Semaan, Edouard; Barker, Alex; McCarthy, Patrick; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael; Malaisrie, S. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose is to compare aortic hemodynamics and blood flow patterns using in-vivo 4D flow MRI in patients following valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSARR) and aortic root replacement with bio-prosthetic valves (BIO-ARR). Methods In-vivo 4D flow MRI was performed in 11 patients after VSARR (47±18 years, 6 BAV, 5 TAV), 16 patients after BIO-ARR (52±14 years), and 10 healthy controls (47±16 years). Analysis included 3D blood flow visualization and grading of helix flow in the ascending aorta (AAo) and arch. Peak systolic velocity was quantified in 9 analysis planes in the AAo, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Flow profile uniformity was evaluated in the aortic root and ascending aorta. Results Peak systolic velocity (2.0–2.5m/s) in the aortic root and AAo in both VSARR and BIO-ARR were elevated compared to controls (1.1–1.3m/s, p < 0.005). Flow asymmetry in BIO-ARR was increased compared to VSARR, evidenced by more AAo outflow jets (9 of 16 BIO-ARR, 0 of 11 in VSARR). BIO-ARR exhibited significantly (p<0.001) increased helix flow in the AAo as a measure of increased flow derangement. Finally, peak systolic velocities were elevated at the aortic root for BIO-ARR (2.5 vs 2.0m/s, p < 0.05) but lower in the distal AAo when compared to VSARR.. Conclusion VSARR results in improved hemodynamic outcomes when compared with BIO-ARR as indicated by reduced peak velocities in the aortic root and less helix flow in the AAo by 4D flow MRI. Longitudinal research assessing the clinical impact of these differences in hemodynamic outcomes is warranted. PMID:26212514

  19. Prosthesis/annulus discongruence assessed by three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography: a predictor of significant paravalvular aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ninel; de Agustín, José Alberto; Almería, Carlos; Gonçalves, Alejandra; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; García, Eulogio; Hernández-Antolín, Rosana; de Isla, Leopoldo Pérez; Macaya, Carlos; Zamorano, José

    2012-11-01

    Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) is common after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to assess the prosthesis/aortic annulus discongruence by three-dimensional (3D) transoesophageal (TOE) planimetry of aortic annulus and its impact on the occurrence of significant AR after TAVI. We included 33 patients who underwent TAVI with a balloon expandable device for severe aortic stenosis. To appraise the prosthesis/annulus discongruence, we defined a 'mismatch index' expressed as: annulus area - prosthesis area. The aortic annulus area was planimetered with 3D TOE, and approximated by circular area formula (π r(2)) using annulus diameter obtained by two-dimensional (2D) TOE. After TAVI, 13 patients (39.3%) developed significant AR (≥2/4). The occurrence of significant AR was associated to the 3D planimetered annulus area (P = 0.04), and the 'mismatch index' obtained through 3D planimetered annulus area (P = 0.03), but not to 'mismatch index' derived of 2D annulus diameter. In multivariate analysis, 'mismatch index' for 3D planimetered annulus area was the only independent predictor of significant AR (odds ratio: 10.614; 95% CI: 1.044-17.21; P = 0.04). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the 'mismatch index' by the 3D planimetered annulus area was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.54-0.92), whereas for 'mismatch index' obtained by the 2D circular area was 0.36 (95% CI: 0.17-0.55). Using the 3D planimetered annulus area as the reference parameter to decide the prosthetic size, the choice would have been different in 21 patients (63%). Three-dimensional TOE planimetry of aortic annulus improves the assessment of prosthesis/annulus discongruence and predicts the appearance of significant AR after TAVI.

  20. Efficacy of Stentless Aortic Bioprosthesis Implantation for Aortic Stenosis with Small Aortic Annulus.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Takashi; Okada, Yukikatsu; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Fukunaga, Naoto; Konishi, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Ken; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2015-09-01

    In patients with small aortic annulus, sufficient size of stented aortic bioprosthesis cannot be implanted without additional procedures. In such cases, we use stentless aortic bioprosthesis to obtain sufficient effective orifice area. In this study, we investigated long-term impact of stentless aortic bioprosthesis on clinical outcomes, compared with stented aortic bioprosthesis. We retrospectively investigated 140 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with porcine bioprosthesis for severe aortic stenosis between 1999 and 2010. Patients who had moderate or more aortic regurgitation and who underwent concomitant mitral procedures were excluded. A total of 69 patients (49%) were implanted stentless bioprosthesis (Freestyle group; Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States) and 71 patients (51%) were implanted stented bioprosthesis (Mosaic group; Medtronic Inc). Follow-up was complete in 97.9% patients. Median follow-up period was 4.2 years. Patients in Freestyle group had smaller body surface area, smaller aortic annulus diameter, smaller aortic valve area, larger mean pressure gradient, higher peak velocity across aortic valve, larger left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Mean size of implanted prosthesis was larger in Freestyle group. In-hospital mortality was 1.4% in Freestyle group and 2.8% in Mosaic group (p = 0.980). Five-year survival rate was not different between two groups (5-year survival rate was 87.5 ± 4.7% in Freestyle group and 84.1 ± 7.5% in Mosaic group; log rank, p = 0.619). Late New York Heart Association functional class was lower in Freestyle group. Late LVMI and LVEF became similar between two groups. Stentless aortic bioprosthesis is superior in left ventricular remodeling after AVR for aortic stenosis and is especially effective for small aortic annulus. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Validation of a numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction model for a prosthetic valve based on experimental PIV measurements.

    PubMed

    Guivier-Curien, Carine; Deplano, Valérie; Bertrand, Eric

    2009-10-01

    A numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of a prosthetic aortic valve was developed, based on a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program using an Arbitrary Eulerian Lagrangian (ALE) formulation. To make sure of the validity of this numerical model, an equivalent experimental model accounting for both the geometrical features and the hydrodynamic conditions was also developed. The leaflet and the flow behaviours around the bileaflet valve were investigated numerically and experimentally by performing particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Through quantitative and qualitative comparisons, it was shown that the leaflet behaviour and the velocity fields were similar in both models. The present study allows the validation of a fully coupled 3-D FSI numerical model. The promising numerical tool could be therefore used to investigate clinical issues involving the aortic valve.

  2. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  3. 38 CFR 17.150 - Prosthetic and similar appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prosthetic and similar appliances. 17.150 Section 17.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.150 Prosthetic and similar...

  4. 38 CFR 17.150 - Prosthetic and similar appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prosthetic and similar appliances. 17.150 Section 17.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.150 Prosthetic and similar...

  5. 38 CFR 17.150 - Prosthetic and similar appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prosthetic and similar appliances. 17.150 Section 17.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.150 Prosthetic and similar...

  6. 38 CFR 17.150 - Prosthetic and similar appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prosthetic and similar appliances. 17.150 Section 17.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.150 Prosthetic and similar...

  7. 38 CFR 17.150 - Prosthetic and similar appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Prosthetic and similar appliances. 17.150 Section 17.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.150 Prosthetic and similar...

  8. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or conceal...

  9. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or conceal...

  10. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or...

  11. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or...

  12. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or...

  13. Aortic coarctation with persistent fifth left aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Caianiello, Giuseppe; Palladino, Maria Teresa; Iacono, Carola; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-08-14

    A neonate with severe aortic coarctation showed a double lumen transverse aorta (persistent fifth aortic arch) with both channels joining at the isthmus where the obstruction was confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Surgical repair was performed with a pantaloon-shaped patch. Persistent fifth aortic arch does not result in a vascular ring and, per se, is not hemodynamically significant unless associated with other cardiac malformations.

  14. Unsteady fluid dynamics of several mechanical prosthetic heart valves using a two component laser Doppler anemometer system.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, T; Modi, V J

    1997-10-01

    Five typical mechanical heart valves (Starr-Edwards, Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (c-c), Björk-Shiley monostrut, Bicer-Val, and St. Jude Medical) were tested in the mitral position under the pulsatile flow condition. The test program included measurements of velocity and turbulent stresses at 5 downstream locations. The study was carried out using a sophisticated cardiac simulator in conjunction with a highly sensitive 2 component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) system. The continuous monitoring of parametric time histories revealed useful details about the complex flow and helped to establish the locations and times of the peak parameter values. Based upon the nondimensional presentation of data, the following general conclusions can be made. First, all the 5 valve designs created elevated turbulent stresses during the accelerating and peak flow phases, presenting the possibility of thromboembolism and perhaps hemolysis. Second, the difference in valve configuration seemed to affect the flow characteristics; third, the bileaflet design of the St. Jude valve appeared to create a lower turbulence stress level.

  15. Aortic compressor for aortic occlusion in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, B D; Gerdes, D; Roller, B; Ruiz, E

    1984-01-01

    The aortic compressor is a device that allows rapid, simple, immediately reversible occlusion of the thoracic aorta, without the aortic dissection required to use an aortic cross-clamp. We evaluated the aortic compressor in a controlled study using a canine hemorrhagic shock model. Twelve mongrel dogs were exsanguinated to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 47 mm Hg and maintained at that level for 20 minutes. At that point, all animals had a left lateral thoracotomy. Six study animals had the thoracic aorta occluded at the diaphragm using the compressor. Five minutes after thoracotomy, with or without occlusion, the shed blood was reinfused. Application of the aortic compressor was the only variable. Use of the aortic compressor led to an immediate and statistically significant doubling of the study animals' MAP. The increased afterload of aortic occlusion did not impair cardiac output. The cardiac index of the study animals rose slightly, while that of the control animals fell. At the same time the compressor prevented blood flow to the abdominal aorta. If the canine model can be extrapolated to human application, then the aortic compressor would be expected to enhance perfusion of the heart and brain during hemorrhagic shock, prevent further arterial blood loss from intra-abdominal injury or ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, and preserve already diminished cardiac output. Because the aorta does not need to be dissected out to use the compressor, there is no risk of injury to nearby vascular structures.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions supravalvular aortic stenosis supravalvular aortic stenosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before ...

  17. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection.

  18. Rapid Deployment Aortic Replacement (RADAR) Registry in Spain: a protocol

    PubMed Central

    Cal-Purriños, Natalia; Arribas-Leal, Jose M; Carnero-Alcazar, Manuel; Gutierrez-Diez, Jose F; Cuenca-Castillo, Jose J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rapid deployment valves (RDV) represent a newly introduced approach to aortic valve replacement which facilitates surgical implantation and minimally invasive techniques, shortens surgical times and shows excellent haemodynamic performance. However, evidence on their safety, efficacy and potential complications is mostly fitted with small-volume and retrospective studies. Moreover, no current guidelines exist. To improve our knowledge on this technology, The Rapid Deployment Aortic Replacement (RADAR) Registry will be established across Spain with the aim of assessing RDV outcomes in the real-world setting. Methods and analysis The RADAR Registry is designed as a product registry that would provide information on its use and outcomes in clinical practice. This multicentre, prospective, national effort will initially involve 4 centres in Spain. Any patient undergoing cardiac surgery for aortic valve replacement and receiving an RDV as an isolated operation or in combination with other cardiac procedures may be included. Participation is voluntary. Data collection is equal to information obtained during standard care and is prospectively entered by the participating physicians perioperatively and during subsequent follow-up visits. The primary outcome assessed is in-hospital and up to 5 years of follow-up, prosthetic valve functioning and clinical status. Secondary outcomes are to perform subgroup analysis, to compare outcomes with other existing approaches and to develop future clinical guidelines. The follow-up assessments are timed with routine clinical appointments. Dissociated data will be extracted and collectively analysed. Initial target sample size for the registry is 500 participants entered with complete follow-up information. Different substudies will be implemented within the registry to investigate specific populations undergoing aortic valve replacement. Ethics and dissemination The protocol is approved by all local institutional ethics

  19. Symetis Acurate Neo transfemoral aortic bioprosthesis - initial Polish experience.

    PubMed

    Zembala, Michał; Hawranek, Michał; Wacławski, Jacek; Niklewski, Tomasz; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Koba, Rafał; Przybylski, Roman; Walas, Ryszard; Głowacki, Jan; Jazwiec, Tomasz; Garbacz, Marcin; Gąsior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has proven to be a valuable alternative to conventional surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk and surgically inoperable patients who suffer from severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. With the second generation of TAVI devices improvements in both handling and performance are highly demanded. This brief clinical communication reports the first Polish experience with the second generation of transfemoral TAVI device--Symetis Acurate Neo. From November 19th 2014 until February 18th 2015 nine (n = 9) patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis have been operated on using the Symetis Acurate Neo. Patients were subject to seven-day evaluation and 30-day phone follow-up. The procedure was safely and successfully performed in all patients. A SMALL (S) valve (21-23 mm equivalent) was used in two patients, MEDIUM valve (M; 23-25 mm equivalent) in five patients, and a LARGE valve (L; 25-26 mm equivalent) in two patients. In three cases post-release balloon dilatation was required. There were no intraoperative complications and no major adverse events (as per VARC classification) during initial hospitalisation, including conduction or rhythm disturbances. In all cases, the mean gradient on the prosthetic valves was 7.8 mm Hg (10.2 mm Hg on the "S" valves). Rapid improvement in patients' functional class was noted. Perivalvular leak was evaluated as "mild" in three cases, "trace" in one, and "not existing" in five. This initial experience with the Symetis Acurate Neo demonstrates its good safety profile and excellent haemodynamics. Low radial stress of the valve results in minimal incidence of atrioventricular rhythm disturbances, and a sealing crown for nearly non-existent paravalvular leak.

  20. Factors affecting left ventricular remodeling after valve replacement for aortic stenosis. An overview

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Emmanuel; Troise, Giovanni; Cirillo, Marco; Brunelli, Federico; Tomba, Margherita Dalla; Mhagna, Zen; Tasca, Giordano; Quaini, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    Although a small percentage of patients with critical aortic stenosis do not develop left ventricle hypertrophy, increased ventricular mass is widely observed in conditions of increased afterload. There is growing epidemiological evidence that hypertrophy is associated with excess cardiac mortality and morbidity not only in patients with arterial hypertension, but also in those undergoing aortic valve replacement. Valve replacement surgery relieves the aortic obstruction and prolongs the life of many patients, but favorable or adverse left ventricular remodeling is affected by a large number of factors whose specific roles are still a subject of debate. Age, gender, hemodynamic factors, prosthetic valve types, myocyte alterations, interstitial structures, blood pressure control and ethnicity can all influence the process of left ventricle mass regression, and myocardial metabolism and coronary artery circulation are also involved in the changes occurring after aortic valve replacement. The aim of this overview is to analyze these factors in the light of our experience, elucidate the important question of prosthesis-patient mismatch by considering the method of effective orifice area, and discuss surgical timings and techniques that can improve the management of patients with aortic valve stenosis and maximize the probability of mass regression. PMID:16803632

  1. Long-term evaluation of direct repair of traumatic isthmic aortic transection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, G; Fontan, F; Deville, C; Madonna, F; Thibaud, D

    1989-01-01

    Direct repair of traumatic aortic isthmic transection eliminates the late complications of prosthetic graft repair. This study evaluates the long-term fate of direct aortic repair to which little attention has been paid. Among 32 patients operated upon from 1965 to 1987, 27 (84%) underwent direct repair. The tear was circumferential in 15 patients and partial in 12. Multiple traumatic lesions were present in 26 patients, including intracranial injury in 19. Partial cardiopulmonary bypass was used in 15 patients and simple aortic cross-clamping in 12. No paraplegia was observed. There were 4 deaths from associated lesions among the 14 patients operated upon for acute traumatic isthmic transection and no deaths in the others. Among the 23 survivors, 4 were lost to follow-up; the other 19 patients have excellent clinical results. Intravenous digital aortic angiography performed in 14 patients at a mean delay of 5 years 3 months showed excellent aortic reconstruction in all cases. Technically more demanding and faster than a graft interposition, direct repair is recommended as the procedure of choice in the surgical treatment of traumatic isthmic transection, particularly in young patients, the group most at risk from this lesion.

  2. Ruptured Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Infected with Listeria Monocytogenes: A Case Report and a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shigeki; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Takada, Masanori; Fujita, Koichi; Nishibori, Yoshiharu; Maruyama, Takao

    2013-01-01

    A 75-year-old male with a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, sigmoid colon cancer, and metastatic liver cancer was admitted to our institution with a complaint of a prickly feeling in his chest. On admission, a chest radiograph revealed a normal cardio-thoracic ratio of 47%. Echocardiography revealed pericardial effusion and blood chemical analyses revealed elevated C-reactive protein levels (14.7 mg/dL). On day 3, chest radiography revealed cardiomegaly with a cardio-thoracic ratio of 58% and protrusion of the left first arch. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography revealed a saccular aneurysm in the aortic arch with surrounding hematoma; thus, a ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm was suspected. Emergency surgery was performed, which revealed a ruptured aortic aneurysm with extensive local inflammation. The diagnosis of an infected aortic rupture was therefore confirmed. The aneurysm and abscess were resected, followed by prosthetic graft replacement and omental packing. Histopathology of the resected aneurysm revealed gram-positive bacilli; and Listeria monocytogenes was confirmed as the causative organism by culture. Postoperative course was uneventful; on postoperative day 60, the patient was ambulatory and was discharged. Here we report the case of a male with a ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm infected with L. monocytogenes. PMID:25512697

  3. Modern Use of Echocardiography in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: an Up-Date.

    PubMed

    Caldararu, Cristina; Balanescu, Serban

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiography is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of any valvular heart disease. The accurate diagnosis of aortic stenosis, the left ventricle function and the other heart valves evaluation are currently done by ultrasound alone. Prosthetic valve choice and dimensions prior to implantation can be done solely by proper use of echocardiography. The emergence of new methods to cure aortic stenosis such as trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) emphasized the diagnostic value of cardiac ultrasound. The usefulness of echocardiography in TAVR can be divided in the baseline assessment (common to patients treated by conventional surgery), intra-procedural guidance of valve deployment and post-procedural follow-up. In the baseline diagnostic work-up echocardiography should allow proper assessment of low-gradient severe aortic stenosis and especially of "low-flow, low-gradient" aortic stenosis, as far the benefit of any valve intervention in these cases may be overshadowed by persistent ventricular dysfunction. "Classic" TAVR is performed with a trans-esophageal echocardiography probe in place, but recently intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) was advocated to reduce the need for general anesthesia. "Minimalist TAVR approach" recommends no echo-guidance and valve implantation by angiography alone. Post-TAVR echo assessment should allow prompt recognition of early complications and the severity of para-valvular leaks. Long term follow-up by echocardiography assesses prosthetic valve function, left ventricular functional recovery and the impact of the procedure on associated conditions (mitral regurgitation, pulmonary hypertension or tricuspid regurgitation). This article emphasizes the role of the cardiologist with ultrasound skills in the assessment of patients addressed to TAVR.

  4. Effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation on intraoperative left ventricular end-diastolic pressure.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kosaku; Ota, Takashi; Nagamine, Katsutoshi; Koide, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Shishido, Koki; Tanaka, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for patients with aortic stenosis is a less invasive alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement. Despite this, careful anesthetic management, especially strict control of blood pressure and fluid management, is necessary. During TAVI, normalization of left ventricular afterload due to aortic balloon valvuloplasty and prosthetic valve deployment is expected to result in rapid improvement of systolic function and consequent improvement in diastolic function. However, the early effect of TAVI on left ventricular diastolic function is less clear. We hypothesized that TAVI induces a rapid decrease in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) after valve deployment. This retrospective observational study included 71 patients who had undergone TAVI using the transfemoral approach with a balloon-expandable valve under general anesthesia. Intraoperative LVEDP was measured using an intracardiac catheter. The severity of residual aortic regurgitation (AR) was assessed using the Sellers criteria. The mean (SD) LVEDP was 17.8 (5.3) mmHg just before TAVI and increased significantly to 27.3 (8.2) mmHg immediately after prosthetic valve deployment (p < 0.0001). The change in LVEDP was 8.7 (8.6) mmHg in patients with low residual AR (Sellers ≤1) and 11.0 (7.1) mmHg in those with high residual AR (Sellers ≥2); however, this difference was not significant. No correlation was found between the LVEDP change and intraoperative fluid balance. In conclusion, LVEDP increased significantly in the early period after valve deployment during TAVI, regardless of residual AR severity. It was suggested that the tolerability of fluid load could be reduced at that time.

  5. Prosthetic rehabilitation issues in the diabetic and dysvascular amputee.

    PubMed

    Uustal, Heikki

    2009-11-01

    Evaluation and management of diabetic and dysvascular patients with lower limb amputation begins with a thorough history and physical examination. A pre-prosthetic and prosthetic program of physical therapy, pain management, psychological assessment, and education helps patients resume functional mobility and gain acceptance of the limb loss. Physicians and prosthetic teams work together to design and prescribe the most appropriate prosthetic device for patients to reach maximal functional level. Careful monitoring of patients and a full understanding of patients' medical conditions help avoid complications and falls during rehabilitation. Long-term follow-up is necessary to assess fit and function of prosthetic devices.

  6. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  7. Diagnosis and management of prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Peel, Trisha N; Buising, Kirsty L; Choong, Peter F M

    2012-12-01

    Prosthetic joint infection remains a devastating complication of arthroplasty associated with significant patient morbidity. The demand for arthroplasty is rapidly growing with a corresponding increase in the number of infections involving the prosthesis. The diagnosis and treatment of prosthetic joint infections presents a significant challenge to orthopaedic and infectious diseases clinicians. The underlying pathogenesis of prosthetic joint infections is due to the ability of the microorganisms to form a biofilm. The biofilm provides protection against host immune responses and antimicrobial therapy. In addition, it impedes standard laboratory diagnostic techniques. This review will examine new investigations to improve the diagnostic yield and rapidity of diagnosis of infections, including the use of sonication to disrupt the biofilm, new molecular tests to improve the detection of infecting microorganisms and new imaging techniques such as (18)F-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET. The successful treatment of prosthetic joint infections is dependent on eliminating the biofilm dwelling microorganisms whilst maintaining patient mobility and quality of life. This review will examine current understanding of management approaches for these infections, with a particular focus on antimicrobial therapy with activity against the biofilm, such as rifampicin and fluoroquinolones.

  8. Bulletin of Prosthetics Research, Fall 1970.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Self-containment and self-suspension of externally powered prostheses for the forearm; Below- elbow control of an externally powered hand...An experiment with the control of a hybrid prosthetic system: electric elbow , body-powered hook; Interfacial couplings for man-machine systems--a

  9. Proceedings, 1972 Carahan Conference on Electronic Prosthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, John S., Ed.; DeVore, R. William, Ed.

    Presented are 28 papers given at a 1972 conference on electronic prosthetics for the handicapped. Among the papers are the following titles: "Therapy for Cerebral Palsy Employing Artifician Sense Organs for Alternatives to Proprioceptive Feedback"; "Excessive Neuromuscular Time Delay as a Possible Cause of Poor Hand-Eye Coordination and…

  10. Mechanical behavior of provisional implant prosthetic abutments

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Pastor, Blanca; Roig-Vanaclocha, Ana; Román-Rodriguez, Juan-Luis; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Implant-supported prostheses have to overcome a major difficulty presented by the morphology and esthetics of peri-implant tissues in the anterior sector. Diverse therapeutic techniques are used for managing the mucosa adjacent to the implant and the most noteworthy is immediate/deferred fixed provisionalization. Objectives: In vitro testing of strength and deformation of implant prosthetic abutments made from different materials (Titanium/PEEK/methacrylate). Material and Methods: Forty Sweden&Martina® implant prosthetic abutments (n=40) were divided into five groups: Group MP: methacrylate provisional abutments with machined titanium base; Group PP: Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) provisional abutments; Group TP: titanium provisional abutments; Group TAD: titanium anti-rotational definitive abutments; Group TRD: titanium rotational definitive abutments. Their mechanical behavior under static loading was analyzed. Samples were examined under a microscope to determine the type of fracture produced. Results and Conclusions: Definitive anti-rotational titanium abutments and definitive rotational titanium abutments achieved the best mean compression strength, while PEEK resin provisional abutments obtained the lowest. The group that showed the greatest elastic deformation was the group of titanium provisional abutments. Key words:Immediate loading, immediate provisionalization, implant prosthetic abutment, definitive implant prosthetic abutment. PMID:25129253

  11. Promoting prosthetics in the Latino community.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, R; Barabe, J G; Cupp, D

    1995-01-01

    This article describes an effective approach to informing the Latino community about prosthetics. Unlike English, little information on this subject is available in Spanish. The process of obtaining, fabricating, and wearing a prosthesis was interwoven into the teleplay "Milagros." The story concept, video production, and the Latino population's cultural characteristics are discussed. The audience welcomed the opportunity to share the information with others.

  12. Prosthetic rehabilitation of elderly bilateral amputees.

    PubMed

    Wolf, E; Lilling, M; Ferber, I; Marcus, J

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective evaluation of vascular amputees, all over 55 years of age, found that 18 underwent bilateral lower limb amputation. The ages of patients ranged from 55 to 83 years, mean age at the time of second amputation was 65.9 years, 13 men and 5 women. Out of the 18 patients, 12 underwent bilateral below knee amputation (BK-BK), 3 below knee and above knee (BK-AK), and 3 bilateral above knee (AK-AK). Six patients (50%) of the 12 with BK-BK were fitted with prostheses. They therefore became users of two prostheses and have achieved a high functional level of rehabilitation despite a high mean age of 67.8 years. Five of these patients had been successful prosthetic users after the first leg amputation. The sixth patient underwent double BK amputation almost at the same time. He was fitted and rehabilitated with two prostheses simultaneously. Patients with BK-AK and AK-AK amputations had not been fitted with two prostheses. Deciding about prosthetic prescription and type of rehabilitation of elderly bilateral amputees is very difficult. Age alone is not a factor in success or failure of prosthetic rehabilitation. The type of rehabilitation for these patients is related mainly to the level of amputation, associated diseases and successful prosthetic use after the first leg amputation. Careful evaluation by a multidisciplinary team is the key for the right treatment decision and successful rehabilitation of this group of patients.

  13. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A diagnostic dilemma: does peri stent-graft air after thoracic aortic endografting necessarily imply infection?

    PubMed

    Leon, Luis R

    2007-01-01

    The radiographic finding of air bubbles around a surgically placed prosthetic graft is traditionally assumed to be a sign of infection until proven otherwise. Direct delivery of atmospheric air bubbles, shown in an imaging study performed very soon after a surgical intervention, or percutaneously introduced during an endovascular procedure could be possible causes of air bubble presence and not necessarily infection. However, if air around a prosthetic aortic graft is identified in an imaging study after a previous one did not document its presence, or if the amount of air is increasing on serial imaging studies, the suspicion level should increase. The case presented here is of a 49-year-old male who underwent an endovascular repair of a possible symptomatic penetrating aortic ulcer, who was found to have peri stent-graft air 3 weeks after intervention. Previous imaging postoperative studies did not reveal air around the aortic prosthesis. The diagnosis of endovascular stent-graft infection was very difficult due to several challenging factors that are herein presented.

  15. Polymeric trileaflet prosthetic heart valves: evolution and path to clinical reality

    PubMed Central

    Claiborne, Thomas E; Slepian, Marvin J; Hossainy, Syed; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Present prosthetic heart valves, while hemodynamically effective, remain limited by progressive structural deterioration of tissue valves or the burden of chronic anticoagulation for mechanical valves. An idealized valve prosthesis would eliminate these limitations. Polymeric heart valves (PHVs), fabricated from advanced polymeric materials, offer the potential of durability and hemocompatibility. Unfortunately, the clinical realization of PHVs to date has been hampered by findings of in vivo calcification, degradation and thrombosis. Here, the authors review the evolution of PHVs, evaluate the state of the art of this technology and propose a pathway towards clinical reality. In particular, the authors discuss the development of a novel aortic PHV that may be deployed via transcatheter implantation, as well as its optimization via device thrombogenicity emulation. PMID:23249154

  16. In vivo degradation of silicone rubber poppets in prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Cuddihy, E F; Moacanin, J; Roschke, E J; Harrison, E C

    1976-05-01

    Dynamic shear modulus G' was measured throughout the volume of three nonvariant silicone rubber poppets which were recovered from aortic prosthetic heart valves that had been implanted for 4 days, 52 days, and 8 years. Similar measurements were obtained for two unused silicone rubber poppets. Although the recovered poppets exhibited no obvious physical evidence of damage, the silicone rubber had undergone in vivo degradation throughout the poppet volume as indicated by decreases in modulus. The measurements also indicate that the poppet surface degrades at a rate faster than the core. Further, comparison with data reported in the literature suggests that the surfaces of variant poppets degrade at a rate faster than the surfaces of nonvariant poppets.

  17. Valve-in-Valve Replacement Using a Sutureless Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Borger, Michael A.; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 61 Final Diagnosis: Tissue degeneration Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Redo valve replacement Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: We present a unique case of a 61-year-old female patient with homograft deterioration after redo surgery for prosthetic valve endocarditis with root abscess. Case Report: The first operation was performed for type A dissection with root, arch, and elephant trunk replacement of the thoracic aorta. The present re-redo surgery was performed as valve-in-valve with a sutureless aortic biopros-thesis. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 6. Conclusions: The current case report demonstrates that sutureless bioprostheses are an attractive option for surgical valve-in-valve procedures, which can reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27694795

  18. Repair of Chronic Aneurysmal Aortic Dissection Using a Stent Graft and an Amplatzer(®) Vascular Plug: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Ozawa, Hirotsugu

    2017-02-01

    We report a case in which a stent graft and an Amplatzer(®) vascular plug (AVP) were effective for the treatment of chronic aneurysmal aortic dissection. The patient was a 52-year-old man. At 45 years of age, he developed acute aortic dissection, for which he underwent surgery 4 times with prosthetic graft replacement in the abdominal aorta, descending thoracic, ascending aorta (without neck branch reconstruction), and thoracoabdominal aorta with the reconstruction of the celiac, superior mesenteric, and bilateral renal arteries. At the time of thoracoabdominal aortic surgery, strong adhesion was evident, particularly in the thoracoabdominal area. The adhesion was dissected in a part of the chest, and prosthetic graft replacement was performed the following day. Subsequently, the dissection of the residual distal aortic arch enlarged, and the patient was examined at our hospital. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a small intimal tear at the site of anastomosis distal to the graft in the ascending aorta and a large intimal tear in the descending thoracic aorta with a maximum diameter of 67 mm. Furthermore, open repair by prosthetic graft replacement seemed difficult; therefore, treatment with stent grafting was considered. Because the prosthetic graft in the abdomen was extremely tortuous, stent-graft insertion via the femoral artery seemed to be impossible. The planned treatment involved the placement of a thoracic stent graft using the chimney technique which included reconstruction of the brachiocephalic artery and left common carotid arteries using chimney stent graft and coverage of the left subclavian artery. The thoracic stent graft was planned to be inserted via the abdominal prosthetic graft site because the abdominal prosthetic graft was crooked and was located close to the body surface. However, a small intimal tear distal to the graft in the ascending aorta which had not been revealed by intraoperative aortography was detected by the selective

  19. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  20. Replacement of the aortic valve with a bioprosthesis at the time of continuous flow ventricular assist device implantation for preexisting aortic valve dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles; Mountis, Maria; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation has become a mainstay of therapy for advanced heart failure patients who are either ineligible for, or awaiting, cardiac transplantation. Controversy remains over the optimal therapeutic strategy for preexisting aortic valvular dysfunction in these patients at the time of LVAD implant. In patients with moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, surgical approaches are center specific and range from variable leaflet closure techniques to concomitant aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a bioprosthesis. In the present study, we retrospectively analyzed our outcomes in patients who underwent simultaneous AVR and LVAD implantation secondary to antecedent aortic valve pathology. Between January 2004 and June 2010, 144 patients underwent LVAD implantation at a single institution. Of these, 7 patients (4.8%) required concomitant AVR. Five of the 7 patients (71%) survived to hospital discharge and suffered no adverse events in the perioperative period. One-year survival for the discharged patients was 80%, and no prosthetic valve-related adverse events were observed in long-term follow-up. Given our experience, we conclude that bioprosthetic AVR is a plausible alternative for end-stage heart failure patients at the time of LVAD implantation. PMID:26424939

  1. Spectrum of aortic valve abnormalities associated with aortic dilation across age groups in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Laura J; Baba, Ridhwan Y; Arai, Andrew E; Bandettini, W Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A

    2013-11-01

    Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm, and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome. Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with Turner syndrome and to determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular MRI in 208 subjects with Turner syndrome in an institutional review board-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve, 64% (n=133); partially fused aortic valve, 12% (n=25); bicuspid aortic valve, 23% (n=47); and unicuspid aortic valve, 1% (n=3). Age and body surface area were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, toward larger body surface area-indexed ascending aortic diameters with increasing valve fusion. Ascending aortic diameters were (mean±SD) 16.9±3.3, 18.3±3.3, and 19.8±3.9 mm/m(2) (P<0.0001) for tricuspid aortic valve, partially fused aortic valve, and bicuspid aortic valve+unicuspid aortic valve, respectively. Partially fused aortic valve, bicuspid aortic valve, and unicuspid aortic valve were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Aortic valve abnormalities in Turner syndrome occur with a spectrum of severity and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased ascending aortic diameters.

  2. Late outcome analysis of the Braile Biomédica® pericardial valve in the aortic position

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Lisandro Gonçalves; Veronese, Elinthon Tavares; Santiago, José Augusto Duncan; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aortic valve replacement with Braile bovine pericardial prosthesis has been routinely done at the Heart Institute of the Universidade de São Paulo Medical School since 2006. The objective of this study is to analyze the results of Braile Biomédica® aortic bioprosthesis in patients with aortic valve disease. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 196 patients with aortic valve disease submitted to aortic valve replacement with Braile Biomédica® bovine pericardial prosthesis, between 2006 and 2010. Mean age was 59.41±16.34 years and 67.3% were male. Before surgery, 73.4% of patients were in NYHA functional class III or IV. Results Hospital mortality was 8.16% (16 patients). Linearized rates of mortality, endocarditis, reintervention, and structural dysfunction were 1.065%, 0.91%, 0.68% and 0.075% patients/year, respectively. Actuarial survival was 90.59±2.56% in 88 months. Freedom from reintervention, endocarditis and structural dysfunction was respectively 91.38±2.79%, 89.84±2.92% and 98.57±0.72% in 88 months. Conclusion The Braile Biomédica® pericardial aortic valve prosthesis demonstrated actuarial survival and durability similar to that described in the literature, but further follow up is required to assess the incidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis and structural dysfunction in the future. PMID:25372903

  3. Late outcome analysis of the Braile Biomédica® pericardial valve in the aortic position.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Lisandro Gonçalves; Veronese, Elinthon Tavares; Santiago, José Augusto Duncan; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement with Braile bovine pericardial prosthesis has been routinely done at the Heart Institute of the Universidade de São Paulo Medical School since 2006. The objective of this study is to analyze the results of Braile Biomédica® aortic bioprosthesis in patients with aortic valve disease. We retrospectively evaluated 196 patients with aortic valve disease submitted to aortic valve replacement with Braile Biomédica® bovine pericardial prosthesis, between 2006 and 2010. Mean age was 59.41±16.34 years and 67.3% were male. Before surgery, 73.4% of patients were in NYHA functional class III or IV. Hospital mortality was 8.16% (16 patients). Linearized rates of mortality, endocarditis, reintervention, and structural dysfunction were 1.065%, 0.91%, 0.68% and 0.075% patients/year, respectively. Actuarial survival was 90.59±2.56% in 88 months. Freedom from reintervention, endocarditis and structural dysfunction was respectively 91.38±2.79%, 89.84±2.92% and 98.57±0.72% in 88 months. The Braile Biomédica® pericardial aortic valve prosthesis demonstrated actuarial survival and durability similar to that described in the literature, but further follow up is required to assess the incidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis and structural dysfunction in the future.

  4. In vitro investigation of a novel elastic vascular prosthesis for valve-sparing aortic root and ascending aorta replacement.

    PubMed

    Scharfschwerdt, Michael; Leonhard, Moritz; Lehmann, Judith; Richardt, Doreen; Goldmann, Helmut; Sievers, Hans-Hinrich

    2016-05-01

    Prosthetic replacement of the thoracic aorta with common Dacron prostheses impairs the aortic 'windkessel' and, in valve-sparing procedures, also aortic valve function. Elastic graft material may overcome these deficiencies. Fresh porcine aortas including the root were set up in a mock circulation before and after replacement of the ascending part with a novel vascular prosthesis providing elastic behaviours. In a first series (n = 14), haemodynamics and leaflet motions of the aortic valve were investigated and also cyclic changes of aortic dimensions at different levels of the root. In a second series (n = 7), intravascular pressure and dimensions of the proximal descending aorta were measured and the corresponding wall tension was calculated. Haemodynamics of the aortic valve remain comparable after replacement. Though the novel prosthesis does not feature such high distensibility as the native aorta, the dynamic of the root was significantly increased compared with common Dacron prostheses at the commissural level, preserving 'windkessel' function. Thus, wall tension of the residual aorta remained unchanged; nevertheless, maximum pressure-time differential dp/dt increased by 13%. The use of the novel elastic prosthesis for replacement of the ascending aorta seems to be beneficial, especially with regard to the preservation of the aortic windkessel. Further studies will be needed to clarify long-term utilization of the material in vivo. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Prosthetic vascular graft infection and prosthetic joint infection caused by Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Bonares, Michael J; Vaisman, Alon; Sharkawy, Abdu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is infrequently isolated from clinical specimens, and if isolated, more likely represents colonization or contamination rather than infection. Despite this, there are dozens of case reports which describe clinically significant P. stutzeri infections at variable sites. A 69-year-old man had a P. stutzeri infection of a prosthetic vascular graft infection, which he received in Panama City. He was successfully treated with a single antipseudomonal agent for 6 weeks and the removal of the infected vascular graft. A 70-year-old man had a P. stutzeri infection of a prosthetic joint, which was successfully treated with a single anti-pseudomonal agent for 6 weeks. There is only one other documented case of a prosthetic vascular graft infection secondary to P. stutzeri. There are 5 documented cases of P. stutzeri prosthetic joint infections. The previous cases were treated with antibiotics and variably, source control with the removal of prosthetic material. Most cases of P. stutzeri infection are due to exposure in health care settings. Immunocompromised states such as HIV or hematological and solid tumor malignancies are risk factors for P. stutzeri infection. Infections caused by P. stutzeri are far less frequent and less fatal than those caused by P. aeruginosa. The etiology of a P. stutzeri infection could be exposure to soil and water, but also contaminated material in the health care setting or an immunocompromised state. Iatrogenic infections that are secondary to health care tourism are a potential cause of fever in the returned traveler.

  6. Matching prosthetics order records in VA National Prosthetics Patient Database to healthcare utilization databases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark W; Su, Pon; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2010-01-01

    The National Prosthetics Patient Database (NPPD) is the national Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) dataset that records characteristics of individual prosthetic and assistive devices. It remains unknown how well NPPD records can be matched to encounter records for the same individuals in major VA utilization databases. We compared the count of prosthetics records in the NPPD with the count of prosthetics-related procedures for the same individuals recorded in major VA utilization databases. We then attempted to match the NPPD records to the utilization records by person and date. In general, 40% to 60% of the NPPD records could be matched to outpatient utilization records within a 14-day window around the NPPD dataset entry date. Match rates for inpatient data were lower: 10% to 16% within a 14-day window. The NPPD will be particularly important for studies of certain veteran groups, such as those with spinal cord injury or blast-related polytraumatic injury. Health services researchers should use both the NPPD and utilization databases to develop a full understanding of prosthetics use by individual patients.

  7. Post traumatic malocclusion and its prosthetic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Phill; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young

    2010-01-01

    Mandible fractures belong to the most common fractures encountered in maxillofacial trauma. Because mandible is such a unique structure with hinge joint and masticatory muscles attached to the body of mandible, attention must be paid to avoid displacement during treatment. Displacement during fracture reduction leads to malocclusion. Many TMJs function with complete comfort and apparent normalcy in adapted centric posture, even though they have undergone deformation caused by trauma. This clinical report describes the patient with post traumatic malocclusion and its prosthetic treatment. His fractured mandible was openly reduced in changed position, as a result his occlusion has been changed. He was treated by prosthetic method in so-called adapted centric posture. PMID:21165275

  8. Cognitive Control Signals for Neural Prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musallam, S.; Corneil, B. D.; Greger, B.; Scherberger, H.; Andersen, R. A.

    2004-07-01

    Recent development of neural prosthetics for assisting paralyzed patients has focused on decoding intended hand trajectories from motor cortical neurons and using this signal to control external devices. In this study, higher level signals related to the goals of movements were decoded from three monkeys and used to position cursors on a computer screen without the animals emitting any behavior. Their performance in this task improved over a period of weeks. Expected value signals related to fluid preference, the expected magnitude, or probability of reward were decoded simultaneously with the intended goal. For neural prosthetic applications, the goal signals can be used to operate computers, robots, and vehicles, whereas the expected value signals can be used to continuously monitor a paralyzed patient's preferences and motivation.

  9. Targeted Muscle Reinnervation and Advanced Prosthetic Arms

    PubMed Central

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E.; Smith, Lauren H.; Kuiken, Todd A.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure used to improve the control of upper limb prostheses. Residual nerves from the amputated limb are transferred to reinnervate new muscle targets that have otherwise lost their function. These reinnervated muscles then serve as biological amplifiers of the amputated nerve motor signals, allowing for more intuitive control of advanced prosthetic arms. Here the authors provide a review of surgical techniques for TMR in patients with either transhumeral or shoulder disarticulation amputations. They also discuss how TMR may act synergistically with recent advances in prosthetic arm technologies to improve prosthesis controllability. Discussion of TMR and prosthesis control is presented in the context of a 41-year-old man with a left-side shoulder disarticulation and a right-side transhumeral amputation. This patient underwent bilateral TMR surgery and was fit with advanced pattern-recognition myoelectric prostheses. PMID:25685105

  10. [Aortic valve replacement for the small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Oshima, H; Usui, A; Akita, T; Ueda, Y

    2006-04-01

    Aortic valve surgery for the small aortic annulus is still challenging for surgeons. Recently, the new types of high performance prosthesis have been developed and the chance of an aortic root enlargement (ARE) is decreasing. In this study, we propose the ideal strategy of the aortic surgery for the small aortic annulus. We analyzed the clinical records of 158 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement from August 1999 to October 2005 in our institution. The small aortic annulus was observed in 38 patients (24%). Fourteen patients of this group underwent ARE. Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) was less frequently observed in patients with ARE compared to those without ARE. The additional time required for ARE was not considerable, and neither ischemic time nor cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly prolonged by ARE. In conclusion, we have to select a prosthesis with sufficient orifice area to avoid PPM, otherwise we should choose an option of ARE. For this consideration, we definitely need the chart that demonstrates the relationship between the nominal size of various types of prostheses and the size of a patient's annulus that those prostheses actually fit.

  11. Pentacuspid aortic valve diagnosed by transoesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cemri, M; Cengel, A; Timurkaynak, T

    2000-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are quite a rare finding in echocardiographic examinations. A case of a 19 year old man with a pentacuspid aortic valve without aortic stenosis and regurgitation, detected by transoesophageal echocardiography, is presented.


Keywords: pentacuspid aortic valve; echocardiography PMID:10995427

  12. Descending aorta-external iliac artery bypass for middle aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Tsutomu; Asami, Fuyuki; Nagasawa, Ayako; Shiraiwa, Satoru; Nakamura, Norihito; Yoshii, Shinpei

    2014-11-01

    We encountered a surgical case of middle aortic syndrome (MAS) in a 56-year-old man who had resistant hypertension. Computed tomography showed severe stenosis of the abdominal aorta from below the superior mesenteric artery to above the inferior mesenteric artery. Although bilateral renal artery stenosis was confirmed, renal function was within normal limits. A 10-mm vascular prosthetic graft was used to perform a descending aorta to left external iliac artery bypass. His hypertension was well controlled without medication. This extra-anatomic bypass may be a simple and useful approach for treating MAS if it is not necessary to reconstruct the renal artery or visceral artery.

  13. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Swinkels, B M; Jaarsma, W; Wely, L Relik-van; van Swieten, H A; Ernst, J M P G; Plokker, H W M

    2003-03-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high.

  14. DESIGN OF AN ELECTRICALLY POWERED PROSTHETIC ELBOW.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The electrically powered elbow design effort was initiated to develop a useful prosthetic component for severely handicapped persons. Preliminary...minimum static capacity of 300 pound-inches, and a no-load lifting velocity of ten revolutions per minute. In addition, the elbow was to provide continuous...the design criteria were not fulfilled but several elbow units were built for clinical evaluation. Recommendations for future design efforts are given. (Author)

  15. Smart Prosthetic Hand Technology - Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Prosthetic Hand Human Hand Anatomy Figure 2 (a) shows a normal human hand composed of thumb (t), index (i), middle (m), ring (r), little (l) fingers and...MSMS software is used for this purpose. MSMS ( Musculoskeletal Modeling Software) MSMS is a software application for modeling and simulation of...by constraints referred to the limits of the range of finger motions as a result of hand anatomy , and by constraints due to the limits imposed on

  16. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  17. Retinal prosthetics, optogenetics, and chemical photoswitches.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert; Pfeiffer, Rebecca; Jones, Bryan

    2014-10-15

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  18. Control system and method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the movable body part through the full-shrug position of the movable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the movable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective movable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  19. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  20. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  1. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The latest designs in prosthetic feet.

    PubMed

    Nassan, S

    2000-08-01

    There are a great number of feet to choose from, some simple and nonadjustable, some more technically sophisticated and adjustable by prosthetist or patient. A foot must meet the lifestyle and prosthetic needs of the patient. One also must consider the maintenance requirements and how they are impacted by the amputees' living environment, distance from a prosthetic facility, and the patient's gadget tolerance. On the practical side, the manufacturer must stand behind their foot and offer a reasonable trial period. Today the physician, prosthetist, and physical therapist must be familiar with Medicare guidelines and K levels. Being informed enables the rehabilitation team to agree upon the componentry best suited for the amputee when generating the prescription. This approach also avoids unnecessary inquiries and helps assure payment. In closing, two statements are added: (1) a well-informed prosthetist with good communication skills and dedication to the details of socket fit and alignment is for the patient the best source of information concerning componentry; and (2) appropriateness, reliability, and convenience are good, general guidelines to follow when helping an amputee choose a prosthetic foot.

  3. Wettability of silicone rubber maxillofacial prosthetic materials.

    PubMed

    Waters, M G; Jagger, R G; Polyzois, G L

    1999-04-01

    Maxillofacial prosthetic materials that contact skin or mucosa should have good wettability. A material that is easily wetted will form a superior lubricating layer between the supporting tissues and, thus, reduce friction and patient discomfort. The surface energy of a maxillofacial prosthetic material will give an indication of the amount of energy available for adhesion and of the susceptibility of the material to bacterial adhesion. This study evaluated the wettability and surface energies of a range of commercially available silicone rubber maxillofacial prosthetic materials. Contact angles and surface energies were measured by using a dynamic contact angle measuring technique. Four commonly used silicone maxillofacial materials were tested and their properties compared with those of an acrylic resin denture base material and a widely used denture soft lining material. There were no significant differences in the wettability of the silicone rubber materials. All materials were significantly less wetted than the denture acrylic resin material. There were no significant differences in the surface energies of the silicone rubber materials, but all were significantly lower than denture acrylic resin material. The Cahn dynamic contact angle analyzer was a quick and reproducible method for determining the contact angles and surface energies of maxillofacial materials. Further work is needed to improve the wettability of silicone rubber materials used for maxillofacial prostheses, thus, reducing their potential to produce friction with tissues.

  4. [Optogenetics and prosthetic treatment of retinal degeneration].

    PubMed

    Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovskiy, M A

    2015-01-01

    This is a review of the current state of optogenetics-based research in the field of ophthalmology and physiology of vision. Optogenetics employs an interdisciplinary approach that amalgamates gene engineering, optics, and physiology. It involves exogenous expression of a light-activated protein in a very particular retinal cell enabling regulation (stimulation vs. inhibition) of its physiological activity. The experience with gene therapy came in very useful for optogenetics. However, unlike gene therapy, which is aimed at repairing damaged genes or replacing them with healthy ones, optogenetics is focused on protein genes delivery for further molecular control of the cell. In retina, the loss of photoreceptors is not necessarily followed by neuronal loss (at least ganglion cells remain intact), which determines the practicability of prosthetic treatment. Clinical trials can now be considered, owing to the first successful conversion of ganglion cells of mouse degenerative retinas into artificial photoreceptive cells with ON and OFF receptive fields, which is crucial for spatial vision. The following issues are reviewed here in detail: 1. Choice of cell targets within the degenerative retina. 2. Strategy of utilizing the existing light-sensitive agents and development of new optogenetic tools. 3. Gene delivery and expression in retinal cells. 4. Methods of evaluating the treatment success. 5. Selection criteria for optogenetic prosthetics. The conclusion discusses currently unsolved problems and prospects for optogenetic approaches to retinal prosthetics.

  5. Prosthesis-preserving aortic root repair after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Taira; Kodama, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We describe a new technique of prosthesis-preserving aortic root replacement for patients who have previously undergone aortic valve replacement. With preservation of the mechanical prosthesis, we implant a Gelweave Valsalva graft using double suture lines. The first suture line is made between the sewing cuff of the mechanical valve and the graft, with mattress sutures of 2/0 braided polyester with pledgets. After the first sutures are tied, the second suture line is created between the graft collar and the aortic root remnant with continuous 4/0 polypropylene sutures.

  6. The excluder aortic endograft.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Daniel M; Stevens, Scott L

    2008-06-01

    Since its introduction, more than 59000 patients have been treated with Gore Excluder endoprosthesis (GORE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the past 11 years. It has become clearer that differences in device delivery and design provide certain advantages that may favor one anatomical milieu over another. Behavior of the aneurysm sac also seems to be graft dependent as more long-term data become available. The currently available low-permeability GORE seems to have addressed the problem of endotension noted with previous designs. Cumulative data are reviewed, and the data demonstrate very low perioperative morbidity and mortality and excellent protection from aneurysm-related complications with the GORE device. Superior ease of use, excellent trackability, and rare failures requiring acute open conversion characterize the GORE device. By addressing clinical demands of aortic endografting, Gore has eclipsed other endografts in the industry to now dominate the US market. The aim of this review is to describe the history, experience, advantages, and future goals with the GORE for the treatment of AAA.

  7. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  8. A Rare Case of Aortic Valve Thrombosis in Patient with Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Grolla, Elisabetta; Dalla Vestra, Michele; Bonanni, Luca; Cutolo, Ada; Rigo, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is characterized by persistent eosinophilia and eosinophil-mediated organ-system damage. Cardiac thrombosis and thromboembolic complications represent common causes of morbidity and mortality and usually involve cardiac ventricles or mitral and prosthetic valves, while the involvement of the aortic valve is extremely rare in HES. Here we report peculiar multimodality images of an atypical case of extended thrombosis of the aortic valve, complicated by myocardial ischemia and asymptomatic cerebral ischemia, likely due to thrombus embolization, occurring in a 48-year-old man with HES. Prompt anticoagulant and steroid therapy lead to rapid and complete resolution of the thrombotic lesions, allowing preserving the native valve and preventing further embolic events. PMID:26435854

  9. Robotic total endoscopic sutureless aortic valve replacement: proof of concept for a future surgical setting.

    PubMed

    Vola, Marco; Maureira, Pablo; Kassir, Radwan; Fuzellier, Jean-François; Campisi, Salvatore; Doguet, Fabien; Albertini, Jean-Noel; Ruggieri, Vito Giovanni; Folliguet, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Sutureless valves have recently enabled closed chest aortic valve replacement. This paper evaluates the feasibility of a robotic telemanipulation during thoracoscopic sutureless aortic valve implantation in cadavers. Cadavers were prepared with a five thoracosopic trocar setting, with a transthoracic clamp inserted in the first right intercostal space and the optics inserted in the second. Seven sutureless valve implantations were scheduled using 5 Sorin Perceval and 2 Medtronic 3f Enable valves. In all cases performance of pericardial suspension, aortotomy and root exposure required less than 20 min. Native valve excision and sutureless bioprosthesis implantation was technically feasible in all cases. A satisfactory prosthesis sealing was ascertained visually and the absence of paravalvular leakages was assessed with a nerve hook test around the prosthetic flange. Closed chest and robot assisted sutureless valve implantation is feasible in cadavers. Robotic technology can enhance reproducibility of the technique. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Insidious strut fractures in a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Scott, S M; Sethi, G K; Paulson, D M; Takaro, T

    1978-04-01

    Recent reports of cage wear occurring in DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses prompted us to examine with image intensification all our patients who have had this type of prosthesis implanted. One patient, who was asymptomatic, was discovered to have a prosthesis with two fractured struts. This patient's prosthetic valve was replaced successfully with a stented porcine heterograft prosthesis. Including the valve removed from this patient, 8 DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valves with structural defects have been reported to the manufacturer. In the absence of a catastrophic event, patients with valves having fractured or worn struts may be totally asymptomatic, and routine periodic roentgenographic examination may be the only way of detecting strut wear or fracture.

  11. Twenty-two year experience with the omniscience prosthetic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Yoshio; Taguchi, Masanobu; Aizawa, Kei; Takahashi, Hideki; Sakano, Yasuhito; Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Oki, Shin-Ichi; Konishi, Hiroaki; Saito, Tsutomu; Kato, Morito

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the long-term clinical results of the Omniscience tilting disc valve. Omniscience valves were implanted in 51 patients (mean age, 50 +/- 10 years); 18 had aortic valve, 24 had mitral valve, and 9 had both aortic and mitral valve replacements. Oral warfarin potassium and dipyridamole were prescribed as our anticoagulant therapy. Preoperatively, 42 patients were in New York Heart Association class III or IV, and 23 of 25 surviving patients were in class I or II after operation. There were 2 (3.9%) early deaths and 23 late deaths (3.5 +/- 0.7% per patient-year). Cardiac related mortality including congestive heart failure, sudden death, and thromboembolism, and hemorrhagic complications were seen in 16 patients. Overall survival at 10, 15, and 20 years was 77 +/- 6%, 62 +/- 7%, and 46 +/- 7%, respectively. Thromboembolic complications were seen in 5 patients, for a rate of 0.8 +/- 0.3% per patient-year; similarly, hemorrhagic complications were also seen in 5 patients. Nonstructural prosthetic valve dysfunction was seen in 4 patients, for a rate of 0.6 +/- 0.3% per patient-year, and sudden death was seen in 2, a rate of 0.3 +/- 0.2% per patient-year. The Omniscience prosthesis demonstrated excellent postoperative clinical status with low rates of valve related complications.

  12. Single-center experience with the bicarbon bileaflet prosthetic heart valve in Japan.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Yoshio; Saito, Tsutomu; Konishi, Hiroaki; Oki, Shin-ichi; Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Tezuka, Yasuhiro; Aizawa, Kei; Takahashi, Hideki; Hasegawa, Nobuyuki; Kamisawa, Osamu; Kato, Morito; Fuse, Katsuo

    2002-10-01

    We analyzed midterm results using the Bicarbon valve in a single center. Forty-four patients had aortic valve replacement (AVR), 48 had mitral valve replacement (MVR), and 13 had both aortic and mitral valve replacement (DVR). The mean age of the 105 patients was 61.2 +/- 11.3 years. The mean follow-up was 1.8 +/- 1.1 years with a cumulative follow-up of 188 patient-years. There were 5 early deaths (4.7%: 4 in the AVR group and 1 in the MVR group) and 5 late deaths (2.7% per patient-year: 3 malignancy, 1 cerebral hemorrhage, 1 myocardial infarction). Survival at 3 years was 91 +/- 4% in the AVR group, 92 +/- 5% in the MVR group, and 66 +/- 23% in the DVR group. The linearized incidence of thromboembolic complications, hemorrhagic complications, and paravalvular leaks in all patients was 1.06 +/- 2.34%, 1.60 +/- 2.53%, and 0.53 +/- 2.22% per patient-year, respectively. No other complications were observed. In conclusion, the Bicarbon prosthetic heart valve has shown excellent clinical results associated with a low incidence of valve-related complications.

  13. Prosthetic status and prosthetic needs among institutionalized geriatric individuals in Nashik City, Maharashtra: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Chaware, Sachin; Ghodpage, S L; Sinha, Manish; Chauhan, Vishal; Thakare, Vrushali

    2011-05-01

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among institutionalized geriatric individuals in Nashik city, Maharashtra, to assess their prosthetic status and needs. The oral examination of the study subjects was carried out using Basic Oral Health Surveys, WHO 1997 criteria. A total of 160 individuals were included in the study of which 40 were females and 120 were males. A total of 55 (34.37%) study participants had some prosthesis at the time of examination, whereas 136 (85%) were in need of prosthesis. A total of 49 subjects (30.62%) needed complete dentures in both jaws. Around 26 (16.25%) of the subjects needed combination prosthesis. The study concludes that the prosthetic status of the institutionalized geriatric individuals in Nashik city is poor with a higher unfulfilled prosthetic needs. A systematic strategy planning is needed to address these needs. There exists a higher unfulfilled prosthodontic need among institutionalized geriatric individuals in Nashik city.

  14. Asymptomatic Strut Fracture in DeBakey-Surgitool Aortic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Von Der Emde, Jürgen; Eberlein, Ulrich; Breme, Jürgen

    1990-01-01

    From August 1971 through November 1972, we implanted 62 Model 2 DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses in 62 patients, 4 of whom later had clinically asymptomatic strut fractures. In 1 case, the patient died suddenly, and autopsy revealed detachment of the ball-cage; in each of the other 3 cases, fractures of 2 struts close to the base of the prosthesis were diagnosed fluoroscopically, and the patients underwent successful reoperation. The interval between implantation and reoperation ranged from 11 months to 16 years, 9 months. In 1 patient, retrospective study of chest radiographs revealed that the fracture had been present for 2½ years. Larger valves (≥ A6) were affected significantly more often than smaller ones. We performed metallurgic analysis of 1 prosthesis: results revealed strut wear from fatigue cracking and secondary abrasion. Strut fracture was also promoted by suspension of the cage at right angles to the prosthetic ring and by use of a pyrolytic carbon ball in a titanium cage (i.e., an occluder harder than its holder). Patients with DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses should undergo annual radiologic examinations to enable early detection of strut fractures. Prophylactic valve replacement is not indicated. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:223-7) Images PMID:15227175

  15. Case Report: Prothesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ospina, Luis; Garcia-Morell, Juan; Rodriguez-Monserrate, Carla P; Valentin-Nieves, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Valve replacement is the standard surgical treatment of diseased valves that cannot be repaired. The main goal of replacement is to exchange the diseased valve with one that has the engineering and hemodynamics as close as possible to the disease free native valve. However due to mechanical and fluid dynamic constraints all prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) are smaller than normal and thus are inherently stenotic. This represents a challenge when it comes time to replace a valve. The correct valve with the correct and matching profile has to be selected before the procedure to avoid possible complications. It is well recognized that patients are also prone to patient-prosthesis mismatch at long term which could have consequences in the clinical outcomes (1). The evaluation of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) has not been sufficiently emphasized in common practice. Failure to recognize this fact may lead to significant hemodynamic impairment and worsening of the clinical status over the time. Making efforts to identifying patients at risk may decrease the prevalence of PPM, the economic impact to our health system, the morbidity and mortality involved in these cases as well as creates efforts to standardized pre-operative protocols to minimized risk of PPM. We present a case of a 78 years old male patient who underwent aortic valve replacement due severe aortic stenosis, afterwards his clinical course got complicated with several admissions for shortness of breath and decompensated congestive heart failure (CHF).

  16. An Important but Forgotten Technique: Aortic Fenestration.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Mihriban; Tayfur, Kaptan Derya; Urkmez, Melih

    2016-10-01

    Aortic fenestration is a technique that treats organ ischemia in descending aortic dissection. Open surgical aortic fenestration is an effective yet uncommonly used and widely forgotten procedure. Here, we describe 2 patients suffering from chronic thoracoabdominal aortic dissection, and we aimed to identify under what circumstances surgical aortic fenestration should be applied, to assess its safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  18. Prosthetic options available for the diabetic lower limb amputee.

    PubMed

    Chitragari, Gautham; Mahler, David B; Sumpio, Brandon J; Blume, Peter A; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2014-01-01

    Although the rate of lower limb amputation in patients with diabetes is decreasing, amputation still remains a major complication of diabetes. Prosthetics have been long used to help amputees ambulate. The last decade has seen many advances in prostheses with the enhanced understanding of the mechanics of ambulation and improved use of technology. This review describes the different types of prosthetic options available for below knee, ankle, and foot amputees, emphasizing the latest advances in prosthetic design.

  19. Transapical implantation of a self-expandable aortic valve prosthesis utilizing a novel designed positioning element.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Yue; Luo, Fuliang; Tian, Yi; Li, Kai; Sun, Jiakang; Jia, Liujun; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate a new transapical system which utilizes a novel designed positioning element and a two-step positioning mechanism for easy and accurate implantation of transcatheter valves. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an important treatment option for non-surgical patients with severe aortic stenosis. However, accurate placement of the transcatheter valve remains challenging. Self-expandable aortic valve prosthesis with a flexibly connected, annulus-like positioning element was implanted through a transapical approach in 12 pigs. The positioning element was separated and can be released independent of the valve prosthesis. During valve implantation, firstly, the positioning element was unsheathed and fixed into the aortic sinus. Then, the prosthetic valve was guided to an anatomically oriented position and deployed. Six animals were followed up to 180 days. With the help of the positioning element, all 12 valves were successfully deployed at the anticipated site. The valve release procedure took an average of 7.3 ± 2.5 min. The mean transvalvular pressure gradient was 2.8 ± 1.1 mm Hg at valve deployment. Of the six chronic animals, the mean transvalvular pressure gradient was 3.0 ± 1.0 mm Hg on day 7, and 2.9 ± 1.6 mm Hg on day 180 (P = 0.91). No migration, embolization, or coronary obstruction was observed during surgery and at necropsy. Pathological examination showed anatomically correct positioning of the prosthetic valve without signs of thrombosis or calcification. In this study, we confirmed the feasibility of the J-Valve transapical system for transapical implantation through a two-step process. Satisfactory hemodynamic and pathological performance during a follow-up of 180 days was demonstrated. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The role of osteoblasts in peri-prosthetic osteolysis.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, S C; Queally, J M; Devitt, B M; Doran, P P; O'Byrne, J M

    2013-08-01

    Peri-prosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening is the most common reason for revising total hip replacements. Wear particles originating from the prosthetic components interact with multiple cell types in the peri-prosthetic region resulting in an inflammatory process that ultimately leads to peri-prosthetic bone loss. These cells include macrophages, osteoclasts, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. The majority of research in peri-prosthetic osteolysis has concentrated on the role played by osteoclasts and macrophages. The purpose of this review is to assess the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis. In peri-prosthetic osteolysis, wear particles may affect osteoblasts and contribute to the osteolytic process by two mechanisms. First, particles and metallic ions have been shown to inhibit the osteoblast in terms of its ability to secrete mineralised bone matrix, by reducing calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity and its ability to proliferate. Secondly, particles and metallic ions have been shown to stimulate osteoblasts to produce pro inflammatory mediators in vitro. In vivo, these mediators have the potential to attract pro-inflammatory cells to the peri-prosthetic area and stimulate osteoclasts to absorb bone. Further research is needed to fully define the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis and to explore its potential role as a therapeutic target in this condition.

  1. Design of a prosthetic hand with remote actuation.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kurt; Perez-Gracia, Alba

    2012-01-01

    One of the main issues of prosthetic hands is to be able to fulfill all the specifications about speed, torque, weight and inertia while placing all the components within the prosthetic hand. This is especially true when full dexterity is required in the prosthesis. In this paper, a new design for a prosthetic hand is presented, which uses remote actuation in order to satisfy most of those requirements. The actuators are to be located in the back of the subject and the transmission is implemented via cables. Other characteristics of this new prosthetic hand include torque limitation and the possibility of switching between underactuated and fully actuated functions.

  2. In vitro study of biofilm growth on biologic prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Bellows, Charles; Smith, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Biologic prosthetics are increasingly used for the repair of abdominal wall hernia defects but can become infected as a result of peri- or early post-operative bacterial contamination. Data evaluating biofilm formation on biologic prosthetics is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different biologic prosthetics on the growth behavior of two different bacterial species and their ability to form biofilms. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Pseudomrnonas aeruginosa were incubated on disks of two biologic prosthetics-human acellular dermis (ADM), and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). The bacteria were allowed to attach to the prosthetics and propagate into mature biofilms for 24 hours at 370C. Images of biofilms were obtained using confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of viable cells and the biofilm biomass were quantified by colony forming units (CFUs) and crystal violet staining respectively. Analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean values for the different prosthetics. Each biologic matrix had a distinct surface characteristic. SEM visualized mature biofilms characterized by highly organized multi-cellular structures on surface of both biologic prosthetics. Quantification of bacterial growth over time showed that ADM had the lowest CFUs and biofilm biomass at 24 hours post-inoculation compared to SIS for both bacterial strains. MRSA and P. aeruginosa can form mature biofilms on biologic prosthetics but the relative abundance of the biofilm varies on different prosthetic constructs. Biologic material composition and manufacturing methods may influence bacterial adherence.

  3. Factors Associated with Prosthetic Looseness in Lower Limb Amputees.

    PubMed

    Phonghanyudh, Thong; Sutpasanon, Taweesak; Hathaiareerug, Chanasak; Devakula, M L Buddhibongsa; Kumnerddee, Wipoo

    2015-12-01

    To determine the factors associated with prosthetic looseness in lower limb amputees in Sisaket province. The present was a cross-sectional descriptive study. Subjects were lower limb amputees who previously obtained prostheses and required prosthetic replacements at the mobile prosthetic laboratory unit under the Prostheses Foundation of H.R.H. the Princess Mother at Khun Han Hospital, Sisaket province, in February 2013. Data including participant characteristics, prosthetic looseness data, and various variables were collected by direct semi-structured interview. Energy expenditures in physical activities were measured using the Thai version of the short format international physical activity questionnaire. Data between participants with and without prosthetic looseness were compared to determine prosthetic loosening associated factors. Among 101 participants enrolled, 33 (32.7%) had prosthetic looseness with average onset of 1.76 ± 1.67 years. Diabetes mellitus was the only significant factor associated with prosthetic looseness from both univariate and multivariate analyses (HR = 7.05, p = 0.002 and HR = 5.93, p = 0.007 respectively). Among the lower limb amputees in Sisaket province, diabetes mellitus was the only factor associated with prosthetic looseness. Therefore, diabetic screening should be supplemented in lower limb amputee assessment protocol. In addition, we recommend that amputees with diabetes mellitus should receive prosthesis check out at approximately

  4. An extremely lightweight fingernail worn prosthetic interface device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetkin, Oguz; Ahluwalia, Simranjit; Silva, Dinithi; Kasi-Okonye, Isioma; Volker, Rachael; Baptist, Joshua R.; Popa, Dan O.

    2016-05-01

    Upper limb prosthetics are currently operated using several electromyography sensors mounted on an amputee's residual limb. In order for any prosthetic driving interface to be widely adopted, it needs to be responsive, lightweight, and out of the way when not being used. In this paper we discuss the possibility of replacing such electrodes with fingernail optical sensor systems mounted on the sound limb. We present a prototype device that can detect pinch gestures and communicate with the prosthetic system. The device detects the relative position of fingers to each other by measuring light transmitted via tissue. Applications are not limited to prosthetic control, but can be extended to other human-machine interfaces.

  5. Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with a Prosthetic Mechanical Heart Valve

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Sherif W.; Hassanein, Mahmoud M.; Mohamed, Elsayed A.; Gohar, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pregnancy is associated with several cardiocirculatory changes that can significantly impact underlying cardiac disease. These changes include an increase in cardiac output, sodium, and water retention leading to blood volume expansion, and reductions in systemic vascular resistance and systemic blood pressure. In addition, pregnancy results in a hypercoagulable state that increases the risk of thromboembolic complications. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study is to assess the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves (PHVs). METHODS This is a prospective observational study that included 100 pregnant patients with cardiac mechanical valve prostheses on anticoagulant therapy. The main maternal outcomes included thromboembolic or hemorrhagic complications, prosthetic valve thrombosis, and acute decompensated heart failure. Fetal outcomes included miscarriage, fetal death, live birth, small-for-gestational age, and warfarin embryopathy. The relationship between the following were observed: – Maternal and fetal complications and the site of the replaced valve (mitral, aortic, or double)– Maternal and fetal complications and warfarin dosage (≤5 mg, >5 mg)– Maternal and fetal complications and the type of anticoagulation administered during the first trimester RESULTS This study included 60 patients (60%) with mitral valve replacement (MVR), 22 patients (22%) with aortic valve replacement (AVR), and 18 patients (18%) with double valve replacement (DVR). A total of 65 patients (65%) received >5 mg of oral anticoagulant (warfarin), 33 patients (33%) received ≤5 mg of warfarin, and 2 patients (2%) received low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH; enoxaparin sodium) throughout the pregnancy. A total of 17 patients (17%) received oral anticoagulant (warfarin) during the first trimester: 9 patients received a daily warfarin dose of >5 mg while the remaining 8 patients received a daily dose of ≤5 mg. Twenty

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation for severe bioprosthetic stenosis after Bentall operation using a homograft in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Hong, Soon Jun; Yu, Cheol Woong

    2015-03-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with severe aortic stenosis. Eight years previously, he had undergone primary surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic regurgitation, but one year later developed cardiac arrest and complete atrioventricular block as a result of non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis with severe valvular dehiscence. Following the diagnosis of prosthetic valve failure caused by Behçet's disease, the patient underwent a Bentall operation using 23 mm aortic homograft with permanent pacemaker implantation and coronary artery bypass grafting. Subsequently, he was stable with steroid administration and azathioprine for seven years after the second operation, but recently suffered from severe dyspnea and chest pain. Echocardiography revealed the development of severe aortic stenosis. A preprocedural evaluation demonstrated a porcelain aorta with severe calcification in the previous homograft valve on computed tomography, and critical stenosis at the ostium of the left circumflex artery on coronary angiography. After percutaneous coronary intervention for the ostium of the left circumflex artery, a transcatheter AVR was successfully performed using a 26 mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve. The patient recovered without any complications after the procedure. This is the first report of a successful transcatheter aortic valve-in valve implantation for severe homograft aortic stenosis after a Bentall operation, using a homograft, in a patient with Behçet's disease.

  7. Does the Use of a Decision Aid Improve Decision Making in Prosthetic Heart Valve Selection? A Multicenter Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Korteland, Nelleke M; Ahmed, Yunus; Koolbergen, David R; Brouwer, Marjan; de Heer, Frederiek; Kluin, Jolanda; Bruggemans, Eline F; Klautz, Robert J M; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Bucx, Jeroen J J; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Polak, Peter; Markou, Thanasie; van den Broek, Inge; Ligthart, Rene; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2017-02-01

    A Dutch online patient decision aid to support prosthetic heart valve selection was recently developed. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess whether use of the patient decision aid results in optimization of shared decision making in prosthetic heart valve selection. In a 5-center randomized controlled trial, patients were allocated to receive either standard preoperative care (control group) or additional access to the patient decision aid (intervention group). Legally capable adult patients accepted for elective isolated or combined aortic and mitral valve replacement were included. Primary outcome was preoperative decisional conflict (Decisional Conflict Scale); secondary outcomes included patient knowledge, involvement in valve selection, anxiety and depression, (valve-specific) quality of life, and regret. Out of 306 eligible patients, 155 were randomized (78 control and 77 intervention). Preoperative decisional conflict did not differ between the groups (34% versus 33%; P=0.834). Intervention patients felt better informed (median Decisional Conflict Scale informed subscore: 8 versus 17; P=0.046) and had a better knowledge of prosthetic valves (85% versus 68%; P=0.004). Intervention patients experienced less anxiety and depression (median Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score: 6 versus 9; P=0.015) and better mental well-being (mean Short Form Health Survey score: 54 versus 50; P=0.032). Three months postoperatively, valve-specific quality of life and regret did not differ between the groups. A patient decision aid to support shared decision making in prosthetic heart valve selection does not lower decisional conflict. It does result in more knowledgeable, better informed, and less anxious and depressed patients, with a better mental well-being. http://www.trialregister.nl. Unique identifier: NTR4350. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Aortocaval fistula in ruptured inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm. A report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Farid, A; Sullivan, T M

    1996-12-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) occur infrequently in clinical practice. The reported incidence varies from 2.5-15% of all abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Four percent of all AAA rupture into the vena cava. IAAA rupturing into the vena cava is exceedingly rare. To date, four such cases have been reported. IAAA are associated with a thick, rigid aortic wall which may be thin posteriorly and posterolaterally, where they are likely to rupture. A dense, fibrotic, desmoplastic reaction is found in the periaortic tissues often involving the duodenum, the inferior vena cava, the left renal vein, and ureters. IAAA may present with abdominal, back, or flank pain even in the absence of rupture. The diagnosis of IAAA can be made preoperatively by CT scan and at the time of laparotomy. Aortocaval fistula (ACF) can occur as a complication of AAA. The triad of low back pain, a palpable AAA, and a machinery murmur is diagnostic. ACF in association with IAAA is even more rare. It is amenable to surgical correction using a standard technique of fistula repair from within the aneurysm and prosthetic aortic graft replacement. Two cases of AAA with aortocaval fistula (ACF) are presented. In both, the diagnosis of ACF was made preoperatively. Repair of ACF was performed from within the aneurysm, with subsequent graft replacement. Despite complicated postoperative courses, both patients survived.

  9. Feature-based US to CT registration of the aortic root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Doug L.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Chu, Michael W.; Drangova, Maria; Hata, Noby; Jain, Ameet; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    A feature-based registration was developed to align biplane and tracked ultrasound images of the aortic root with a preoperative CT volume. In transcatheter aortic valve replacement, a prosthetic valve is inserted into the aortic annulus via a catheter. Poor anatomical visualization of the aortic root region can result in incorrect positioning, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Registration of pre-operative CT to transesophageal ultrasound and fluoroscopy images is a major step towards providing augmented image guidance for this procedure. The proposed registration approach uses an iterative closest point algorithm to register a surface mesh generated from CT to 3D US points reconstructed from a single biplane US acquisition, or multiple tracked US images. The use of a single simultaneous acquisition biplane image eliminates reconstruction error introduced by cardiac gating and TEE probe tracking, creating potential for real-time intra-operative registration. A simple initialization procedure is used to minimize changes to operating room workflow. The algorithm is tested on images acquired from excised porcine hearts. Results demonstrate a clinically acceptable accuracy of 2.6mm and 5mm for tracked US to CT and biplane US to CT registration respectively.

  10. A Case of Acute Aortic Dissection Type B Associated with Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petramala, Luigi; Cotesta, Dario; Sapienza, Paolo; Zinnamosca, Laura; Moroni, Enrico; di Marzio, Luca; De Toma, Giorgio; Letizia, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old man, with a previous history of hypertension and glucose intolerance associated troncular obesity that was emergently admitted to our Institution for evaluation of a severe, constant posterior chest pain which radiated anteriorly and dyspnoea with a suspected diagnosis of acute aortic dissection. A CT scan of thorax and abdomen demonstrated a dissection starting just below left succlavian artery and extending downward to the left renal artery, involving the celiac tripod and superior mesenteric artery. The dissection was classified as Stanford B, De Bakey III. Moreover, CT scan of abdomen revealed incidentally a left adrenal tumor of 25 mm of diameter. An emergent prosthetic graft was placed just below the origin of the left succlavian artery up-to the diaphragmatic hiatus. Furthermore, a diagnostic evaluation of the mass revealed an increase of cortisol production, and a diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome was done and the patient underwent an adrenalectomy via laparotomic approach. We report an association of acute aortic dissection of acute aortic dissection type B associated to Cushing's syndrome. Keywords Cushing's syndrome; Adrenocortical adenoma; Aortic dissection type B PMID:22505966

  11. [Surgical treatment for aortic arch aneurysm: newly developed procedures and their outcomes].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The surgical treatment of aortic arch aneurysm including newly developed procedures and their outcomes is reviewed. Major advances in aortic arch repair have been made by meticulous brain protection with antegrade-selective and retrograde cerebral perfusion in addition to hypothermia circulatory arrest and refinement of surgical techniques. Total arch replacement using a multibranched prosthetic graft with antegrade-selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) under hypothermia through a median sternotomy has been standardized, resulting in lower mortality and cerebral mortality rates. In particular, the impact of the use of the axillary artery for cardiopulmonary bypass and of the stepwise or elephant trunk technique for distal anastomosis has recently been assessed. In addition, arch repair under moderate hypothermia in conjunction with SCP has been attempted without any serious problems. The surgical strategy for extended aortic aneurysms is also of concern. A two-stage approach with an elephant trunk procedure is employed predominantly for high-risk patients, while one-stage repair is aggressively applied for relatively young, low-risk patients. In contrast, there has been great progress in stent graft therapy for aortic arch lesions. Arch stent graft repairs including hybrid procedures have been attempted in elderly, high-risk patients. Consequently, these comorbid procedures can be used satisfactorily.

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open ... Open surgery to repair an AAA is sometimes done as an emergency procedure when there is bleeding inside your body from the aneurysm. You may have an ...

  13. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  14. Achromobacter xylosoxidans, an emerging pathogen in catheter-related infection in dialysis population causing prosthetic valve endocarditis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M S; Nistal, C; Jayan, R; Kuduvalli, M; Anijeet, H K I

    2009-03-01

    Dialysis catheter-related infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients on dialysis. In recent years, there have been reported cases of infections with opportunistic environmental organism, Achromobacter xylosoxidans (AX) causing bacteremia in patients on dialysis. However, no previous such reports on prosthetic valve endocarditis in a dialysis patient with Achromobacter xylosoxidans were found after a Medline search. We report such a case and review the literature. A 69-year-old diabetic man with bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement developed end-stage renal disease following infective endocarditis with Staphylococcus epidermidis. Even though he was treated successfully for his endocarditis, he developed further bacteremia with AX from his peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) and the line was removed. He had further episodes of bacteremia with AX while having dialysis with tunneled line and the line was also removed. He was re-admitted with pyrexia and vegetations both in mitral and prosthetic aortic valve confirmed with transesophageal echo. His antimicrobial therapy with etrapenum, tigecycline and cotrimoxazole failed. He had both mitral and prosthetic aortic valve replacements but postoperatively developed multiorgan failure and died despite the intensive support. Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, Gram-negative bacillus and considered to be an opportunistic pathogen with low virulence. Infective endocarditis is a potentially lethal complication of bacteremia. The choice of appropriate antibiotic is crucial in these cases. AX strains are highly resistant to antibiotics. The organism is usually susceptible to antipseudomonal penicillins, carbapenems and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. AX is an emerging pathogen in catheter-related infection in the dialysis population and, therefore, needs vigilance and prompt treatment. Antimicrobial treatment should include susceptibility and synergy testing. Removal of central intravenous

  15. Misconceptions and Facts About Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Windecker, Stephan; Messerli, Franz H

    2017-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease leading to intervention, and it is typically a disease of the elderly. Recent clinical advances have expanded the role of transcatheter aortic valve intervention in patients with severe aortic stenosis, making aortic valve intervention feasible and effective even in patients at intermediate, high, and prohibitive surgical risk. With the rapid advances in treatment, proper diagnosis becomes crucial for a wide range of patients with aortic stenosis: from "concordant" high-gradient aortic stenosis to "discordant" low-gradient aortic stenosis. The latter group commonly presents a clinical challenge requiring thoughtful and comprehensive evaluation to determine eligibility for aortic valve intervention. Providers at all levels should be familiar with basic diagnostic caveats and misconceptions when evaluating patients with possible aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neoaortic Xenoprosthetic Grafts for Treatment of Mycotic Aneurysms and Infected Aortic Grafts.

    PubMed

    Anibueze, Chukwudubem; Sankaran, Visesh; Sadat, Umar; Tan, Kelvin; Wilson, Yvonne G; Brightwell, Robert E; Delbridge, Michael S; Stather, Philip W

    2017-10-01

    There is no international consensus regarding the optimum management of infected aortae (mycotic aneurysms, infected aortic grafts). Neoaortoiliac reconstruction has advantages over extra-anatomical bypass grafting; however, the use of autologous vein is associated with venous hypertension and compartment syndrome, alternatively cadaveric homografts are associated with high rates of perianastomotic hemorrhage, limb occlusion, and pseudoaneurysm. Arterial repair using xenoprosthetic patches is associated with lower infection rates compared to the use of prosthetic material. The aim of this case series and literature review is to report the use of xenoprosthetic bovine biomaterial for neoaortic repair of mycotic aneurysmal disease and infected aortic grafts. Patients with evidence of infected aortic grafts or mycotic aneurysms who were suitable for open aortic surgery were included. Following removal of the graft/excision of the aneurysmal sac, a 10 × 16 cm XenoSure Biologic Surgical Patch (LeMaitre, Germany) was rolled into a tube, or bifurcated tube graft, and secured with prolene sutures. Proximal and distal anastomoses were conducted as per standard aortic anastomoses. Patients were continued on long-term antibiotics and surveyed with computerized tomography at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Six patients underwent bovine aortic repair between 2013 and 2015: an infected Dacron aortobi-iliac graft causing iliac pseudoaneurysm, an infected Dacron aortic graft from open repair later relined with endovascular stent graft, a mycotic iliac aneurysm, and 3 mycotic aortic aneurysms. All were treated with bovine reconstructed aortic grafts or patches. Patients had a median age of 69.5 years (range 67-75), with perioperative and 30-day mortality of 0%. Median follow-up was 13 months (range 2-23). Postoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed no evidence of infection at the operative site in all patients. Freedom from reinfection and reintervention was 100

  17. Tomographic PIV behind a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, D.; Landolt, A.; Obrist, D.

    2016-05-01

    The instantaneous three-dimensional velocity field past a bioprosthetic heart valve was measured using tomographic particle image velocimetry. Two digital cameras were used together with a mirror setup to record PIV images from four different angles. Measurements were conducted in a transparent silicone phantom with a simplified geometry of the aortic root. The refraction indices of the silicone phantom and the working fluid were matched to minimize optical distortion from the flow field to the cameras. The silicone phantom of the aorta was integrated in a flow loop driven by a piston pump. Measurements were conducted for steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Results of the instantaneous, ensemble and phase-averaged flow field are presented. The three-dimensional velocity field reveals a flow topology, which can be related to features of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  18. Tactile sensing means for prosthetic limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An improved prosthetic device characterized by a frame and a socket for mounting on the stump of a truncated human appendage is described. Flexible digits extend from the distal end and transducers located within the digits act as sensing devices for detecting tactile stimuli. The transducers are connected through a power circuit with a slave unit supported by a strap and fixed to the stump. The tactile stimuli detected at the sensing devices are reproduced and applied to the skin of the appendage in order to stimulate the sensory organs located therein.

  19. Prosthetic joint infection caused by Trueperella bernardiae.

    PubMed

    Gilarranz, Raul; Chamizo, Francisco; Horcajada, Iballa; Bordes-Benítez, Ana

    2016-09-01

    Trueperella bernardiae is a Gram-positive coryneform bacilli which role as human pathogen is unknown because it has been usually considered a contaminant. Furthermore its identification by biochemical test was difficult. We describe a prosthetic joint infection in a women who years ago underwent a total knee replacement with superinfection and necrosis of the patellar tendon as major complications. In the sample of synovial fluid collected grew a gram-positive bacilli which was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) as T. bernardiae. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin and currently preserves the prosthesis without signs of infection.

  20. Salvage of Infected Prosthetic Breast Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Amy S.; Kania, Katarzyna E.; Brown, Rodger H.; Bullocks, Jamal M.; Hollier, Larry H.; Izaddoost, Shayan A.

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection is a major complication in breast reconstruction, leading to implant loss and delayed and sometimes abandoned reconstruction. Traditional management of persistent infections requires explantation followed by secondary reconstruction after 6 months of delay. Although effective in treating the infection, this approach often leads to distortion and/or loss of tissue envelope, making secondary reconstruction very difficult. As a result, there is significant interest in salvaging infected prosthetic breast reconstructions. Recent studies reported variable success through systemic antibiotic therapy and surgical interventions. The aim of this article is to review the management of periprosthetic infection and to provide a potential salvage algorithm. PMID:27152096

  1. Devising the prosthetic prescription and typical examples.

    PubMed

    Passero, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Limb deficiency has a significant impact on the involved person, with upper limb absence presenting a materially different set of issues than lower limb absence. The primary objectives in fitting a patient with a prosthesis are to enhance their independence in performing daily activities, and to improve their quality of life. For lower limb absence, the primary issues are safety, stability, and the ability to ambulate in a manner consistent with their overall health. The primary objectives in prescribing upper limb prosthetics are function, durability, appearance, comfort, and usability of the device. This article discusses the nuances associated with managing these patients.

  2. Injectible bodily prosthetics employing methacrylic copolymer gels

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Anderson, Brian C.

    2007-02-27

    The present invention provides novel block copolymers as structural supplements for injectible bodily prosthetics employed in medical or cosmetic procedures. The invention also includes the use of such block copolymers as nucleus pulposus replacement materials for the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and spinal injuries. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of a tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic.RTM. polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether polymer.

  3. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  4. Current strategies with 2-staged prosthetic breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harless, Christin

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, prosthetic-based breast reconstruction has been revolutionized with technological advancements. Reconstructive surgeons now have a multitude of prosthetic devices and tissue expanders, tools for intraoperative perfusion analysis, implantable bioprosthetic materials and a technique for autoaugmentation within their armamentarium to reconstruct natural breasts today like never before. PMID:26161305

  5. Orthotic and prosthetic devices in partial foot amputations.

    PubMed

    Philbin, T M; Leyes, M; Sferra, J J; Donley, B G

    2001-06-01

    With advanced surgical techniques and orthotic, as well as prosthetic devices, partial foot amputations have become a viable alternative. Orthotics can help restore stability, maintain support, and protect function of the residual limb. The authors discuss orthotic and prosthetic management of patients who have undergone toe amputations; ray amputations; transmetatarsal, Lisfranc-, or Chopart-level amputations.

  6. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External limb prosthetic component. 890.3420 Section 890.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  7. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  8. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External limb prosthetic component. 890.3420 Section 890.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  10. National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for Orthotic and Prosthetic Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Orthotic and Prosthetic Association, Washington, DC.

    The booklet sets forth the National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for the one-year apprenticeship program for orthotic and/or prosthetic technicians, as developed and recommended by the American Orthotic and Prosthetic Association. Standards in various areas--such as qualifications for apprenticeship, hours of work, salaries, records,…

  11. [Arterial pressure dynamics in patients during prosthetic stomatological reception].

    PubMed

    Serov, P G

    2009-01-01

    During prosthetic stomatological reception with the help of portable arterial pressure monitor Kardiotechnika-04AD-01 there were examined patients with normal blood pressure and arterial hypertension. The data were received confirming dependence of arterial pressure lifting with personal anxiety level. Conclusion was drown that close patient's examination was necessary before prosthetic stomatological reception.

  12. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  17. Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Children: An Alternative Clinical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira Marques, Nádia Carolina; Gurgel, Carla Vecchione; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Lima, Marta Cunha; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Soares, Simone; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2013-01-01

    Complete and partial removable dentures have been used successfully in numerous patients with oligodontia and/or anodontia. However, there is little information in the literature regarding the principles and guidelines to prosthetic rehabilitation for growing children. This case report describes the management of a young child with oligodontia as well as the treatment planning and the prosthetic rehabilitation technique. PMID:24175103

  18. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a maxillofacial defect in a chondrosarcoma patient.

    PubMed

    Katyayan, Preeti Agarwal; Katyayan, Manish; Kalavathy, N

    2011-09-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor in which the tumor cells produce cartilage but not bone. The recommended management is wide local or radical excision, followed by surgical and prosthetic reconstruction. This article explains postsurgical prosthetic rehabilitation of a chondrosarcoma patient by means of intraoral acrylic, and extraoral silicone prosthesis for restoration of normal orofacial function and appearance.

  19. Prosthetic rehabilitation in children: an alternative clinical technique.

    PubMed

    Teixeira Marques, Nádia Carolina; Gurgel, Carla Vecchione; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Lima, Marta Cunha; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Soares, Simone; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2013-01-01

    Complete and partial removable dentures have been used successfully in numerous patients with oligodontia and/or anodontia. However, there is little information in the literature regarding the principles and guidelines to prosthetic rehabilitation for growing children. This case report describes the management of a young child with oligodontia as well as the treatment planning and the prosthetic rehabilitation technique.

  20. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  1. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  2. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  3. Modified 'candy-plug' technique for chronic type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal dilatation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Sohsyu; Inoue, Yoshito; Kasai, Mio; Suzuki, Satoru; Hachiya, Takashi

    2017-09-05

    The original 'candy-plug' technique has been reported to be beneficial for the treatment of residual perfused false lumen in patients with aortic dissection. However, this technique is also associated with several problems, such as narrowing of the true lumen and damage to the flap or vessel wall. Therefore, we modified the procedure to overcome these problems. Here we report a case in which the patient was successfully treated using the modified procedure. A 59-year-old man presented with chronic type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal dilatation. The patient had undergone prosthetic graft replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A aortic dissection 3 years previously and replacement of the descending aorta for residual type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal dilatation 1 year previously. After these procedures, the residual false lumen aneurysm of the distal descending aorta expanded to 57-mm in diameter. Endovascular stent grafting was successfully performed using the modified 'candy-plug' technique with relining of the true lumen and occlusion of the false lumen. The patient was discharged 10 days after the procedure. Follow-up imaging at 1 year showed a completely thrombosed false lumen aneurysm. The modified 'candy-plug' technique is useful for treatment of residual type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal dilatation.

  4. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  5. Ross procedure is a safe treatment option for aortic valve endocarditis: Long-term follow-up of 42 patients.

    PubMed

    Ringle, A; Richardson, M; Juthier, F; Rousse, N; Polge, A S; Coisne, A; Duva-Pentiah, A; Ben Abda, A; Banfi, C; Montaigne, D; Vincentelli, A; Prat, A

    2016-01-15

    Aortic root replacement with a pulmonary autograft (Ross procedure) can be performed as a treatment of aortic valve endocarditis, avoiding prosthetic valve implantation in septic context. We sought to assess long-term outcomes of the Ross procedure in this indication. From April 1992 to March 2009, the intervention was performed in 42 patients (mean age 34 ± 8 years) suffering from an active or ancient aortic valve endocarditis. 36% of the patients had extensive perivalvular involvement, and surgery was urgent in 18 patients (43%). We performed a prospective clinical and echocardiographic follow-up of this population. Median follow-up was 10 years (4-21 years). Overall survival at 10 and 15 years was respectively 87 ± 5% and 81 ± 8%. Perioperative mortality was 4.7% (2 patients) and no late cardiac death was reported. Eight patients (19%) underwent repeat surgery for autograft and/or homograft dysfunction at a median time of 8.4 years (3 months-18 years). Rate of recurrent endocarditis was low (7%-3 patients), including 1 in a context of persistent intravenous drug abuse. Clinical follow-up showed good functional status for all patients with NYHA ≤ II, and less than 25% of patients requiring cardiovascular medication. Late echocardiographic follow-up demonstrated well-functioning autograft and homograft, with only one severe aortic regurgitation, and one significant increase in pulmonary mean gradient. The Ross procedure in aortic valve endocarditis is an interesting alternative to prosthetic valvular replacement in a selected population, with a high rate of survival free from any cardiovascular event or medication requirement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rare or unusual causes of chronic, isolated, pure aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, B.F.; Taliercio, C.P.; Dickos, D.K.; Howard, J.; Adlam, J.H.; Jolly, W. )

    1990-08-01

    Six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement had rare or unusual causes of isolated, pure aortic regurgitation. Two patients had congenitally bicuspid aortic valves with a false commissure (raphe) displaced to the aortic wall (tethered bicuspid aortic valve), two had floppy aortic valves, one had a congenital quadricuspid valve, and one had radiation-induced valve damage.

  7. Is the Prosthetic Homologue Necessary for Embodiment?

    PubMed Central

    Dornfeld, Chelsea; Swanston, Michelle; Cassella, Joseph; Beasley, Casey; Green, Jacob; Moshayev, Yonatan; Wininger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of five hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology) is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered) set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures). Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation. PMID:28066228

  8. Prosthetic implantation of the human vestibular system

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Justin S.; Ling, Leo; Nie, Kaibao; Nowack, Amy; Shepherd, Sarah J.; Bierer, Steven M.; Jameyson, Elyse; Kaneko, Chris R. S.; Phillips, James O.; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis A functional vestibular prosthesis can be implanted in human such that electrical stimulation of each semicircular canal produces canal-specific eye movements while preserving vestibular and auditory function. Background A number of vestibular disorders could be treated with prosthetic stimulation of the vestibular end organs. We have previously demonstrated in rhesus monkeys that a vestibular neurostimulator, based on the Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant, can produce canal-specific electrically evoked eye movements while preserving auditory and vestibular function. An investigational device exemption has been obtained from the FDA to study the feasibility of treating uncontrolled Ménière’s disease with the device. Methods The UW/Nucleus vestibular implant was implanted in the perilymphatic space adjacent to the three semicircular canal ampullae of a human subject with uncontrolled Ménière’s disease. Pre and postoperative vestibular and auditory function were assessed. Electrically evoked eye movements were measured at two time points postoperatively. Results Implantation of all semicircular canals was technically feasible. Horizontal canal and auditory function were largely, but not totally, lost. Electrode stimulation in two of three canals resulted in canal-appropriate eye movements. Over time, stimulation thresholds increased. Conclusions Prosthetic implantation of the semicircular canals in humans is technically feasible. Electrical stimulation resulted in canal-specific eye movements, although thresholds increased over time. Preservation of native auditory and vestibular function, previously observed in animals, was not demonstrated in a single subject with advanced Ménière’s disease. PMID:24317220

  9. Nitinol for Prosthetic and Orthotic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Emma; Buis, Arjan

    2011-07-01

    As global populations age, conditions such as stroke and diabetes require individuals to use rehabilitation technology for many years to come due to chronic musculoskeletal, sensory, and other physical impairments. One in four males currently aged 45 will experience a stroke within 40 years and will often require access to prolonged rehabilitation. In addition, worldwide, one individual loses a limb every 30 s due to the complications of diabetes. As a result, innovative ideas are required to devise more effective prosthetic and orthotic devices to enhance quality of life. While Nitinol has already found much favor within the biomedical industry, one area, which has not yet exploited its unique properties, is in the field of physical rehabilitation, ranging from prosthetic and orthotic devices to assistive technology such as wheelchairs. Improved intervention capabilities based on materials such as Nitinol have the potential to vastly improve patients' quality of life and in the case of orthoses, may even reduce the severity of the condition over time. It is hoped that this study will spark discussion and interest for the materials community in a field which has yet to be fully exploited.

  10. Prosthetic metal implants and airport metal detectors.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Dancey, A; Titley, O G

    2013-04-01

    Metal detectors have been present in airports and points of departure for some time. With the introduction of heightened security measures in response to fears of an increased threat of terrorism, they may become more prevalent in other public locations. The aim of this study was to ascertain which prosthetic devices activated metal detector devices used for security purposes. A range of prosthetic devices used commonly in orthopaedic and plastic surgery procedures were passed through an arch metal detector at Birmingham Airport in the UK. Additionally, each item was passed under a wand detector. Items tested included expandable breast prostheses, plates used in wrist and hand surgery, screws, K-wires, Autosuture™ ligation clips and staples. No prostheses were detected by the arch detector. The expandable implants and wrist plates were the only devices detected by passing the wand directly over them. No device was detected by the wand when it was under cover of the axillary soft tissue. Screws, K-wires, Autosuture™ clips and staples were not detected under any of the study conditions. Although unlikely to trigger a detector, it is possible that an expandable breast prosthesis or larger plate may do so. It is therefore best to warn patients of this so they can anticipate detection and further examination.

  11. Prosthetic metal implants and airport metal detectors

    PubMed Central

    Dancey, A; Titley, OG

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Metal detectors have been present in airports and points of departure for some time. With the introduction of heightened security measures in response to fears of an increased threat of terrorism, they may become more prevalent in other public locations. The aim of this study was to ascertain which prosthetic devices activated metal detector devices used for security purposes. Methods A range of prosthetic devices used commonly in orthopaedic and plastic surgery procedures were passed through an arch metal detector at Birmingham Airport in the UK. Additionally, each item was passed under a wand detector. Items tested included expandable breast prostheses, plates used in wrist and hand surgery, screws, K-wires, Autosuture™ ligation clips and staples. Results No prostheses were detected by the arch detector. The expandable implants and wrist plates were the only devices detected by passing the wand directly over them. No device was detected by the wand when it was under cover of the axillary soft tissue. Screws, K-wires, Autosuture™ clips and staples were not detected under any of the study conditions. Conclusions Although unlikely to trigger a detector, it is possible that an expandable breast prosthesis or larger plate may do so. It is therefore best to warn patients of this so they can anticipate detection and further examination. PMID:23827294

  12. The Prosthetic Workflow in the Digital Era

    PubMed Central

    De Franco, Michele; Bosetti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to clinically evaluate the benefits of adopting a full digital workflow for the implementation of fixed prosthetic restorations on natural teeth. To evaluate the effectiveness of these protocols, treatment plans were drawn up for 15 patients requiring rehabilitation of one or more natural teeth. All the dental impressions were taken using a Planmeca PlanScan® (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland) intraoral scanner, which provided digital casts on which the restorations were digitally designed using Exocad® (Exocad GmbH, Germany, 2010) software and fabricated by CAM processing on 5-axis milling machines. A total of 28 single crowns were made from monolithic zirconia, 12 vestibular veneers from lithium disilicate, and 4 three-quarter vestibular veneers with palatal extension. While the restorations were applied, the authors could clinically appreciate the excellent match between the digitally produced prosthetic design and the cemented prostheses, which never required any occlusal or proximal adjustment. Out of all the restorations applied, only one exhibited premature failure and was replaced with no other complications or need for further scanning. From the clinical experience gained using a full digital workflow, the authors can confirm that these work processes enable the fabrication of clinically reliable restorations, with all the benefits that digital methods bring to the dentist, the dental laboratory, and the patient. PMID:27829834

  13. Management of prosthetic patch infection after CEA.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ross

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that 0.5-1% of patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy with prosthetic patch closure of the arteriotomy will develop patch infection. One third occur within the first 2 months after surgery, while two-thirds occur after >6 months have elapsed. Wound infection and abscess formation is the commonest mode of presentation in early cases, while chronic sinus discharge and false aneurysm formation are the commonest presentations in late cases. The commonest infecting organisms are Staphylococci/Streptococci (90%) and this should be borne in mind when planning antibiotic therapy before cultures are available. Most patch infections present (semi)-electively and patch rupture is relatively rare (10%), thereby enabling the surgeon to undertake careful evaluation of the patients overall clinical and anatomical status, whilst planning the optimal treatment strategy. If necessary, the patient should be transferred to a tertiary center for treatment. This is not an operation to be undertaken by an inexperienced surgeon. Operative planning should involve checking the original operation note (did the patient tolerate carotid clamping under locoregional anesthesia and therefore might tolerate carotid ligation), is there evidence of contralateral cranial nerve lesions (a contraindication to major open surgery) and has the surgeon planned for adequate distal exposure of the internal carotid artery. Patch excision and autologous reconstruction (usually vein) is the current 'gold standard' treatment, but highly selected patients can be successfully treated by less invasive surgery (including insertion of a covered stent). Patch excision and prosthetic reconstruction should be avoided.

  14. Prevention of Adhesion to Prosthetic Mesh

    PubMed Central

    van ’t Riet, Martijne; de Vos van Steenwijk, Peggy J.; Bonthuis, Fred; Marquet, Richard L.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jeekel, Johannes; Bonjer, H. Jaap

    2003-01-01

    Objective To assess whether use of antiadhesive liquids or coatings could prevent adhesion formation to prosthetic mesh. Summary Background Data Incisional hernia repair frequently involves the use of prosthetic mesh. However, concern exists about development of adhesions between viscera and the mesh, predisposing to intestinal obstruction or enterocutaneous fistulas. Methods In 91 rats, a defect in the muscular abdominal wall was created, and mesh was fixed intraperitoneally to cover the defect. Rats were divided in five groups: polypropylene mesh only (control group), addition of Sepracoat or Icodextrin solution to polypropylene mesh, Sepramesh (polypropylene mesh with Seprafilm coating), and Parietex composite mesh (polyester mesh with collagen coating). Seven and 30 days postoperatively, adhesions were assessed and wound healing was studied by microscopy. Results Intraperitoneal placement of polypropylene mesh was followed by bowel adhesions to the mesh in 50% of the cases. A mean of 74% of the mesh surface was covered by adhesions after 7 days, and 48% after 30 days. Administration of Sepracoat or Icodextrin solution had no influence on adhesion formation. Coated meshes (Sepramesh and Parietex composite mesh) had no bowel adhesions. Sepramesh was associated with a significant reduction of the mesh surface covered by adhesions after 7 and 30 days. Infection was more prevalent with Parietex composite mesh, with concurrent increased mesh surface covered by adhesions after 30 days (78%). Conclusions Sepramesh significantly reduced mesh surface covered by adhesions and prevented bowel adhesion to the mesh. Parietex composite mesh prevented bowel adhesions as well but increased infection rates in the current model. PMID:12496539

  15. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis. Initial experience].

    PubMed

    Careaga-Reyna, Guillermo; Lázaro-Castillo, José Luis; Lezama-Urtecho, Carlos Alberto; Macías-Miranda, Enriqueta; Dosta-Herrera, Juan José; Galván Díaz, José

    2016-12-09

    Aortic stenosis is a frequent disease in the elderly, and is associated with other systemic pathologies that may contraindicate the surgical procedure. Another option for these patients is percutaneous aortic valve implantation, which is less invasive. We present our initial experience with this procedure. Patients with aortic stenosis were included once selection criteria were accomplished. Under general anaesthesia and echocardiographic and fluosocopic control, a transcatheter aortic valve was implanted following s valvuloplasty. Once concluded the procedure, angiographic and pressure control was realized in order to confirm the valve function. Between November 2014 and May 2015, 6 patients were treated (4 males and 2 females), with a mean age of 78.83±5.66 years-old. The preoperative transvalvular gradient was 90.16±28.53mmHg and posterior to valve implant was 3.33±2.92mmHg (P<.05). Two patients had concomitant coronary artery disease which had been treated previously. One patient presented with acute right coronary artery occlusion which was immediately treated. However due to previous renal failure, postoperative sepsis and respiratory failure, the patient died one month later. It was concluded that our preliminary results showed that in selected patients percutaneous aortic valve implantation is a safe procedure with clinical improvement for treated patients. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Coronary Flow Impacts Aortic Leaflet Mechanics and Aortic Sinus Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon L; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical stresses on aortic valve leaflets are well-known mediators for initiating processes leading to calcific aortic valve disease. Given that non-coronary leaflets calcify first, it may be hypothesized that coronary flow originating from the ostia significantly influences aortic leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus blood flow and leaflet motion with and without physiological coronary flow in a well-controlled in vitro setup. The in vitro setup consists of a porcine aortic valve mounted in a physiological aorta sinus chamber with dynamically controlled coronary resistance to emulate physiological coronary flow. Results were analyzed using qualitative streak plots illustrating the spatiotemporal complexity of blood flow patterns, and quantitative velocity vector and shear stress contour plots to show differences in the mechanical environments between the coronary and non-coronary sinuses. It is shown that the presence of coronary flow pulls the classical sinus vorticity deeper into the sinus and increases flow velocity near the leaflet base. This creates a beneficial increase in shear stress and washout near the leaflet that is not seen in the non-coronary sinus. Further, leaflet opens approximately 10% farther into the sinus with coronary flow case indicating superior valve opening area. The presence of coronary flow significantly improves leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics in a manner that would reduce low wall shear stress conditions while improving washout at the base of the leaflet.

  17. Aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique for quadricuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    A 67-year old man with ascending aortic aneurysm was referred because of a quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique. Under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, replacement of the ascending aorta was successfully performed. The postoperative course was uneventful without recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  18. Spontaneous aortic dissection within an infrarenal AAA.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Kathryn J; Bailey, Marc A; McAree, Barry; Mekako, Anthony; Berridge, David C; Nicholson, Tony; Scott, D Julian A

    2012-12-01

    Aortic dissection occurring in the infrarenal abdominal aorta is uncommon. We present the case of a patient presenting with an enlarging abdominal aortic aneurysm and concurrent dissection (with associated radiological imaging) and briefly discuss the literature relating to this phenomenon.

  19. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. Aortic Arch Interruption and Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch in Phace Syndrome: Prenatal Diagnosis and Postnatal Course.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Enrico; Greco, Antonella; Fainardi, Valentina; Passantino, Silvia; Serranti, Daniele; Favilli, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    PHACE is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome where posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, cerebrovascular anomalies, aortic arch anomalies, cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities are variably associated. We describe the prenatal detection and the postnatal course of a child with PHACE syndrome with a unique type of aortic arch anomaly consisting of proximal interruption of the aortic arch and persistence of the fifth aortic arch. The fifth aortic arch represented in this case a vital systemic-to-systemic connection between the ascending aorta and the transverse portion of the aortic arch allowing adequate forward flow through the aortic arch without surgical treatment.

  1. Current aortic endografts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Colvard, Benjamin; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Swanstrom, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular Aneurysm Repair is a widely adopted method of treatment for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The minimally invasive approach offered with EVAR has become popular not only among physicians and patients, but in the medical device industry as well. Over the past 25 years the global market for aortic endografts has increased rapidly, resulting in a wide range of devices from various companies. Currently, there are seven endografts approved by the FDA for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. These devices offer a wide range of designs intended to increase inclusion criteria while decreasing technical complications such as endoleak and migration. Despite advances in device design, secondary interventions and follow-up requirements remain a significant issue. New devices are currently being studied in the U.S. and abroad and may significantly reduce complications and secondary interventions.

  2. Preliminary in vivo study of an intra-aortic impeller pump driven by an extracorporeal whirling magnet.

    PubMed

    Li, Guorong; Zhao, Hong; Zhu, Xiaodong; Ren, Bing

    2002-10-01

    To achieve the aim of long-term heart-assist with a simple implantable device, we have been trying to develop a minimal intra-aortic impeller blood pump driven by an extracorporeal magnetic device. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate its feasibility by acute in vivo animal tests. The minimal intra-aortic pump was a cage-supported rotor-impeller, 17 mm in diameter with a total length of 30 mm. The driving magnet, mounted extracorporeally, was 55 mm in diameter and 50 mm in length. Seventeen dogs weighing from 28-34 kg were used in the study. After thoracic incision, heparin (50 U/kg) was infused. The impeller pump was inserted into the aortic chamber via a prosthetic vessel and fastened. Thin tubes were inserted into the left ventricular apex and the femoral artery to monitor the left ventricular (LV) and the aortic pressure. After closing the thoracic cavity, the extracorporeal whirling magnet, turned by an electric motor, was placed tightly against the thoracic wall parallel to the intra-aortic pump. The experiments, each lasting for about 40 min, were successful in 7 animals; the other 10 animals died of bleeding during pump implantation and were excluded from the experiment. The peak systolic pressure of the left ventricle could be considerably decreased by the pump and was reduced to as low as 28 mm Hg at a rotational speed of 9,000 rpm, showing that the simple intra-aortic impeller was effective in unloading the natural heart. The novel left ventricular assist device (LVAD) concept of an intra-aortic impeller pump, driven by an extracorporeal magnetic device, is feasible.

  3. Management of bicuspid aortic valve with or without involvement of ascending aorta and aortic root.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, S

    2014-06-01

    Patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) constitute a heterogeneous population with variable clinical presentation and complications. More than 50% of the patients who require aortic valve replacement have a BAV, a condition that may be associated with dilation of ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency caused by cusp disease or aortic root pathology. Of the potential BAV-related complications, dilation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are among the most serious. The dilation of ascending aorta and aortic root have been the subject of controversy. Whereas some surgeons believe that the dilation of the aorta is caused by the hemodynamic properties of the BAV, others believe that the dilation of the aortic root is secondary to genetic defects associated with the BAV. Management of a BAV should be tailored to each patient's clinical condition. The surgical approach varies from aortic valve replacement to combined aortic valve and root replacement to aortic-valve-sparing root replacement.

  4. Colour atlas of first pass functional imaging of the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, N.; Andrews, E.J.; Fleming, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 21 chapters. Some of the titles are: Functional imaging; Fist pass radionuclide studies in evaluation of mitral valve replacement in chronic insufficiency using Bjork-Shiley tilting disc valves; First pass radionuclide studies in evaluation of left and right ventricular function in patients with bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement after 9-11 years; and First pass radionuclide studies in the evaluation of long term (up to about 15 years) follow up of aortic valve replacement using Starr-Edwards ball prosthesis.

  5. Incremental Prognostic Use of Left Ventricular Global Longitudinal Strain in Asymptomatic/Minimally Symptomatic Patients With Severe Bioprosthetic Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Redo Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Naji, Peyman; Shah, Shailee; Svensson, Lars G; Gillinov, A Marc; Johnston, Douglas R; Rodriguez, L Leonardo; Grimm, Richard A; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2017-06-01

    With improved survival of patients undergoing primary bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR), reoperation to relieve severe prosthetic aortic stenosis (PAS) is increasing. Timing of redo surgery in asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic patients remains controversial. Left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) is a marker of subclinical LV dysfunction. In asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic patients with severe PAS undergoing redo AVR, we sought to determine whether LV-GLS provides incremental prognostic use. We studied 191 patients with severe bioprosthetic PAS (63±16 years, 58% men) who underwent redo AVR between 2000 and 2012 (excluding mechanical PAS, severe other valve disease transcatheter AVR, and LV ejection fraction <50%). Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was calculated. Standard echocardiography data were obtained. LV-GLS was measured on 2-, 3-, and 4-chamber views using velocity vector imaging. Severe PAS was defined as aortic valve area <0.8 cm(2), mean aortic valve gradient ≥40 mm Hg, and dimensionless index <0.25. A composite outcome of death and congestive heart failure admission was recorded. At baseline, mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score, LV ejection fraction, mean aortic valve gradients, and right ventricular systolic pressure were 7±6, 58±6%, 54±10 mm Hg and 40±14 mm Hg, whereas 50% had >2+ aortic regurgitation. Median LV-GLS was -14.2% (-11.4, -17.1%). At 4.2±3 years, 41 (22%) patients met the composite end point (2.5% deaths and 1% strokes at 30 days postoperatively). On multivariable Cox survival analysis, LV-GLS was independently associated with longer-term composite events (hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.33), P<0.01. The C statistic for the clinical model (Society of Thoracic Surgeons score, degree of aortic regurgitation, and right ventricular systolic pressure) was 0.64 (95% confidence interval 0.54-0.79), P<0.001. Addition of LV-GLS to the clinical model increased the C statistic

  6. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm from Chronic Antiestrogen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rishi; Sainathan, Sandeep; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common but often undetected pathology prevalent in the population. They are often detected as incidental findings on imaging studies performed for unrelated pathologies. Estrogens have been shown to exert a protective influence on aortic tissue. Pharmacological agents blocking the actions of estrogens may thus be implicated in causing aortic pathologies. We present the case of an elderly woman with breast carcinoma treated for 18 years with antiestrogen therapy who subsequently developed acute thoracic aortic deterioration (enlargement and wall disruption).

  7. Surgical treatment of culture-negative aortic infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Polat, Adil; Tuncer, Altug; Tuncer, Eylem Yayla; Mataraci, Ilker; Aksoy, Eray; Donmez, Arzu Antal; Balkanay, Mehmet; Zeybek, Rahmi; Yakut, Cevat

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the results of operations done for culture-negative aortic infective endocarditis at a single center over a period of 26 years. From June 1985 to January 2011, we operated on 82 patients with infective endocarditis of the aortic valve for which the results of culture were negative. Sixty-five of the patients (79.3%) were male and the patients' mean age was 38.0±14.4 years (range, 9 to 73 years). Nineteen of the patients (23.2%) had a history of previous cardiac surgery, and 16 of the patients (19.5%) had endocarditis of a prosthetic valve. Two patients (2.4%) had conduction blocks. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.1±4.3 years (range, 0.1 to 16.9 years), yielding a total of 477.0 patient-years for the study population. One hundred and thirty-eight procedures were done on the 82 patients in the study. The most common procedure was aortic valve replacement, which was done on 67 patients (81.7%). Thirty-nine patients (47.6%) had concomitant procedures done on the mitral valve. In-hospital death occurred in 14 patients (17.1%). Postoperatively, 17 patients (20.7%) had a low cardiac output and 9 patients (11.0%) had heart block, of whom 3 required implantation of a permanent pacemaker. The actuarial rate of survival of the patient population at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years was 92.5%±3.2%, 85.6%±4.5%, 82.5±5.3%, and 72.2±10.7% respectively. Culture-negative infective endocarditis is a major problem in the diagnosis and treatment of a significant proportion of cases of endocarditis. Most of the affected patients are in a healed state, which could be a cause of negative culture results. In-hospital mortality in patients with culture-negative infective aortic endocarditis is associated with a history of previous cardiac surgery, whereas long-term mortality in this patient population is associated with nonaortic procedures. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  9. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  10. Viability of Controlling Prosthetic Hand Utilizing Electroencephalograph (EEG) Dataset Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskon, Azizi; A/L Thanakodi, Suresh; Raihan Mazlan, Mohd; Mohd Haziq Azhar, Satria; Nooraya Mohd Tawil, Siti

    2016-11-01

    This project presents the development of an artificial hand controlled by Electroencephalograph (EEG) signal datasets for the prosthetic application. The EEG signal datasets were used as to improvise the way to control the prosthetic hand compared to the Electromyograph (EMG). The EMG has disadvantages to a person, who has not used the muscle for a long time and also to person with degenerative issues due to age factor. Thus, the EEG datasets found to be an alternative for EMG. The datasets used in this work were taken from Brain Computer Interface (BCI) Project. The datasets were already classified for open, close and combined movement operations. It served the purpose as an input to control the prosthetic hand by using an Interface system between Microsoft Visual Studio and Arduino. The obtained results reveal the prosthetic hand to be more efficient and faster in response to the EEG datasets with an additional LiPo (Lithium Polymer) battery attached to the prosthetic. Some limitations were also identified in terms of the hand movements, weight of the prosthetic, and the suggestions to improve were concluded in this paper. Overall, the objective of this paper were achieved when the prosthetic hand found to be feasible in operation utilizing the EEG datasets.

  11. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p < 0.001). African American race, longer length of hospital stay, older age, congestive heart failure, paralysis, other neurological disease, renal failure, and admission from a nursing facility were negatively associated with prosthetic prescription. Being married was positively associated. After adjusting for patient characteristics, people with ankle amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  12. Passive prosthetic hands and tools: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Maat, Bartjan; Smit, Gerwin; Plettenburg, Dick; Breedveld, Paul

    2017-02-01

    The group of passive prostheses consists of prosthetic hands and prosthetic tools. These can either be static or adjustable. Limited research and development on passive prostheses has been performed although many people use these prosthesis types. Although some publications describe passive prostheses, no recent review of the peer-reviewed literature on passive prostheses is available. Review the peer-reviewed literature on passive prostheses for replacement of the hand. Literature review. Four electronic databases were searched using a Boolean combination of relevant keywords. English-language articles relevant to the objective were selected. In all, 38 papers were included in the review. Publications on passive prosthetic hands describe their users, usage, functionality, and problems in activities of daily living. Publications on prosthetic tools mostly focus on sport, recreation, and vehicle driving. Passive hand prostheses receive little attention in prosthetic research and literature. Yet one out of three people with a limb deficiency uses this type of prosthesis. Literature indicates that passive prostheses can be improved on pulling and grasping functions. In the literature, ambiguous names are used for different types of passive prostheses. This causes confusion. We present a new and clear classification of passive prostheses. Clinical relevance This review provides information on the users of passive prosthetic hands and tools, their usage and the functionality. Passive prostheses receive very little attention and low appreciation in literature. Passive prosthetic hands and tools show to be useful to many unilateral amputees and should receive more attention and higher acceptance.

  13. A laboratory model of the aortic root flow including the coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Fortini, Stefania; Espa, Stefania; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular flows have been extensively investigated by means of in vitro models to assess the prosthetic valve performances and to provide insight into the fluid dynamics of the heart and proximal aorta. In particular, the models for the study of the flow past the aortic valve have been continuously improved by including, among other things, the compliance of the vessel and more realistic geometries. The flow within the sinuses of Valsalva is known to play a fundamental role in the dynamics of the aortic valve since they host a recirculation region that interacts with the leaflets. The coronary arteries originate from the ostia located within two of the three sinuses, and their presence may significantly affect the fluid dynamics of the aortic root. In spite of their importance, to the extent of the authors' knowledge, coronary arteries were not included so far when modeling in vitro the transvalvular aortic flow. We present a pulse duplicator consisting of a passively pulsing ventricle, a compliant proximal aorta, and coronary arteries connected to the sinuses of Valsalva. The coronary flow is modulated by a self-regulating device mimicking the physiological mechanism, which is based on the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle during the cardiac cycle. Results show that the model reproduces satisfyingly the coronary flow. The analysis of the time evolution of the velocity and vorticity fields within the aortic root reveals the main characteristics of the backflow generated through the aorta in order to feed the coronaries during the diastole. Experiments without coronary flow have been run for comparison. Interestingly, the lifetime of the vortex forming in the sinus of Valsalva during the systole is reduced by the presence of the coronaries. As a matter of fact, at the end of the systole, that vortex is washed out because of the suction generated by the coronary flow. Correspondingly, the valve closure is delayed and faster compared to the case with

  14. Acute obstruction by Pannus in patients with aortic medtronic-hall valves: 30 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Ellensen, Vegard Skalstad; Andersen, Knut Sverre; Vitale, Nicola; Davidsen, Einar Skulstad; Segadal, Leidulf; Haaverstad, Rune

    2013-12-01

    Acute dysfunction of mechanical aortic valve prostheses is a life-threatening adverse event. Pannus overgrowth, which is fibroelastic hyperplasia originating from the periannular area, is one cause of dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the annual incidence of readmittance resulting from acute obstruction caused by pannus during 30 years of observation in patients with Medtronic-Hall aortic valve prostheses and to analyze the risk factors associated with pannus development. From 1982 to 2004, 1,187 patients in our department underwent aortic valve replacement with Medtronic-Hall mechanical monoleaflet valve prostheses. As of December 31, 2012, 27 of these patients (2.3%) had presented with acute valve dysfunction caused by pannus obstruction. The annual incidence of pannus was 0.7 per 1,000. The median time from the primary operation to prosthetic dysfunction was 11.1 years (range, 1.2 to 26.8 years). Of the 20 patients who underwent reoperation, 2 died. Seven patients died before reoperation. Women had a higher risk for the development of obstructing pannus, and patients with pannus obstruction were younger. Valve size was not an independent risk factor. Women and younger patients are at higher risk for pannus development. When acute dysfunction by pannus is suspected in a mechanical aortic valve, an immediate echocardiogram and an emergency aortic valve replacement should be carried out because of the potential of a fatal outcome. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitral valve repair versus replacement in simultaneous aortic and mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Marian; Pirk, Jan; Szarszoi, Ondrej; Skalsky, Ivo; Maly, Jiri; Netuka, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Double valve replacement for concomitant aortic and mitral valve disease is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Excellent results with valve repair in isolated mitral valve lesions have been reported; therefore, whether its potential benefits would translate into better outcomes in patients with combined mitral-aortic disease was investigated. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was performed involving 341 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with either mitral valve repair (n=42) or double valve replacement (n=299). Data were analyzed for early mortality, late valve-related complications and survival. RESULTS: The early mortality rate was 11.9% for valve repair and 11.0% for replacement (P=0.797). Survival (± SD) was 67±11% in mitral valve repair with aortic valve replacement and 81±3% in double valve replacement at five years of follow-up (P=0.187). The percentage of patients who did not experience major adverse valve-related events at five years of follow-up was 83±9% in those who underwent mitral valve repair with aortic valve replacement and 89±2% in patients who underwent double valve replacement (P=0.412). Age >70 years (HR 2.4 [95% CI 1.1 to 4.9]; P=0.023) and renal dysfunction (HR 1.9 [95% CI 1.2 to 3.7]; P=0.01) were independent predictors of decreased survival. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with double valve disease, both mitral valve repair and replacement provided comparable early outcomes. There were no significant differences in valve-related reoperations, anticoagulation-related complications or prosthetic valve endocarditis. Patient-related factors appear to be the major determinant of late survival, irrespective of the type of operation. PMID:24294032

  16. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Swinkels, B.M.; Jaarsma, W.; Wely, L. Relik-van; van Swieten, H.A.; Ernst, J.M.P.G.; Plokker, H.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696195

  17. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  18. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  19. Effect of the sinus of valsalva on the closing motion of bileaflet prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y; Kikuta, Y; Shimooka, T; Mitamura, Y; Yuhta, T; Dohi, T

    2000-04-01

    Conventional bileaflet prosthetic mechanical heart valves close passively with backflow. Naturally, the valve has problems associated with closure, such as backflow, water hammer effect, and fracture of the leaflet. On the other hand, in the case of the natural aortic valve, the vortex flow in the sinus of Valsalva pushes the leaflet to close, and the valve starts the closing motion earlier than the prosthetic valve as the forward flow decelerates. This closing mechanism is thought to decrease backflow at valve closure. In this study, we propose a new bileaflet mechanical valve resembling a drawbridge in shape, and the prototype valve was designed so that the leaflet closes with the help of the vortex flow in the sinus. The test valve was made of aluminum alloy, and its closing motion was compared to that of the CarboMedics (CM) valve. Both valves were driven by a computer controlled hydraulic mock circulator and were photographed at 648 frames/s by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Each frame of the valve motion image was analyzed with a personal computer, and the opening angles were measured. The flow rate was set as 5.0 L/min. The system was pulsed with 70 bpm, and the systolic/diastolic ratio was 0.3. Glycerin water was used as the circulation fluid at room temperature, and polystyrene particles were used to visualize the streamline. The model of the sinus of Valsalva was made of transparent silicone rubber. As a result, high speed video analysis showed that the test valve started the closing motion 41 ms earlier than the CM valve, and streamline analysis showed that the test valve had a closing mechanism similar to the natural one with the effect of vortex flow. The structure of the test valve was thought to be effective for soft closure and could solve problems associated with closure.

  20. Atrioventricular Conduction Changes After CoreValve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    López-Aguilera, José; Segura Saint-Gerons, José María; Mazuelos Bellido, Francisco; Suárez de Lezo, Javier; Ojeda Pineda, Soledad; Pan Álvarez-Ossorio, Manuel; Romero Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Pavlovic, Djordje; Espejo Pérez, Simona; Suárez de Lezo, José

    2016-01-01

    Conduction disturbances often occur after CoreValve transcatheter aortic valve implantation. The aim was to analyze which cardiac conduction changes occur in patients with aortic stenosis treated with this type of prosthesis. A total of 181 patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with this prosthesis and studied by electrocardiography between April 2008 and December 2013 were selected. A subgroup of 137 (75.7%) consecutive patients was studied by intracardiac electrocardiogram before and after prosthesis implantation. The primary endpoint of the study was the need for a permanent pacemaker within 72 hours after prosthesis implantation. Numerous variables to predict this possibility were analyzed. Following implantation, PR and QRS intervals were increased from 173±47 ms to 190±52ms (P < .01) and from 98±22ms to 129±24 ms (P < .01), whereas the A-H and H-V intervals were prolonged from 95±39ms to 108±41ms (P < .01) and from 54±10ms to 66±23ms (P < .01). A total of 89 (49%) patients had new-onset left bundle-branch block, and 33 (25%) required a pacemaker within the first 72hours. The independent predictors for a pacemaker were baseline right bundle-branch block and prosthetic depth. Intracardiac intervals had no predictive value. In addition, 13 patients required a pacemaker after 72 hours. CoreValve prosthesis implantation has a high incidence of conduction disturbance, with left bundle-branch block being the most common. A total of 25% of patients required a permanent pacemaker. The need for a pacemaker was related to baseline right bundle-branch block and prosthetic depth. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Orthopedic Prosthetic Infections: Diagnosis and Orthopedic Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Matthew G.; Meaike, Jesse D.; Izaddoost, Shayan A.

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic hardware infections are much feared and costly complications that can occur when these devices are implemented both in traumatic cases as well as in joint replacement surgery. Because these infections can lead to great morbidity, it is important to understand their pathophysiology as well as the principles behind their diagnosis and initial treatment. Plastic surgeons are frequently consulted as part of a multidisciplinary team to provide stable soft tissue coverage of the associated defects that result from these infections. A review of the existing literature was performed to identify the potential causes of these infections, to provide established diagnostic criteria guidelines, and to explain how these prosthetic infections are managed from an orthopedic surgery perspective prior to consulting the plastic surgery team. PMID:27152098

  2. A Miniature Force Sensor for Prosthetic Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert; Chu, Mars; Diftler, Myron; Martin, Toby; Valvo, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Tactile sensing is an important part of the development of new prosthetic hands. A number of approaches to establishing an afferent pathway back to the patient for tactile information are becoming available including tactors and direct stimulation of the afferent nerves. Tactile information can also be used by low-level control systems that perform simple tasks for the patient such as establishing a stable grasp and maintaining the grasping forces needed to hold an object. This abstract reports on the design of a small fingertip load cell based on semi-conductor strain gauges. Since this load cell is so small (measuring only 8.5mm in diameter and 6.25 mm in height), it easily fits into the tip of an anthropomorphic mechatronic hand. This load cell is tested by comparing a time series of force and moment data with reference data acquired from a much larger high-precision commercial load cell.

  3. Hydroxyapatite motility implants in ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Cowper, T R

    1995-03-01

    For the past 5 years, an increasing number of ophthalmologists have been using hydroxyapatite (HA) motility implants after uncomplicated enucleation or evisceration of the eye. Unlike previous implant materials, HA promotes fibrovascular ingrowth and seemingly true integration of the motility implant to the residual ocular structures. As a result, a more stable defect and greater movement of the overlying prosthesis is produced. In addition, the problems of long-term orbital implant migration and the vexing postenucleation socket syndrome are thought to be minimized. This article briefly reviews the history and development of orbital implants and HA implant surgical and prosthetic procedures. It is concluded that HA implant rehabilitation is indicated after most uncomplicated enucleations or eviscerations where there is small likelihood of complication.

  4. Memory plastics for prosthetic and orthotic applications.

    PubMed

    Coombes, A G; Greenwood, C D

    1988-12-01

    Shrink forming prosthetic sockets from memory plastics offers several advantages over existing techniques. The manual skill requirement is reduced relative to drapeforming flat sheet while compared with the Rapidform process, the requirement for a purpose built vacuum forming machine is eliminated. Two methods for producing thermoplastic sockets from heat shrinkable preforms are described. One uses established heat shrink technology and crosslinked thermoplastics. The second based on blowmoulding simplifies preform manufacture relative to existing techniques by reducing it to a single stage operation. Shrink formed sockets have been produced for three application areas concerned with the lower limb namely load bearing sockets, flexible ISNY type and rigid transparent check sockets. Static testing has demonstrated the ability of shrink formed, load bearing sockets to surpass Philadelphia Static Load Levels (ISPO, 1978) while fatigue testing has indicated a capability for long service life.

  5. [Improving the speech with a prosthetic construction].

    PubMed

    Stalpers, M J; Engelen, M; van der Stappen, J A A M; Weijs, W L J; Takes, R P; van Heumen, C C M

    2016-03-01

    A 12-year-old boy had problems with his speech due to a defect in the soft palate. This defect was caused by the surgical removal of a synovial sarcoma. Testing with a nasometer revealed hypernasality above normal values. Given the size and severity of the defect in the soft palate, the possibility of improving the speech with speech therapy was limited. At a centre for special dentistry an attempt was made with a prosthetic construction to improve the performance of the palate and, in that way, the speech. This construction consisted of a denture with an obturator attached to it. With it, an effective closure of the palate could be achieved. New measurements with acoustic nasometry showed scores within the normal values. The nasality in the speech largely disappeared. The obturator is an effective and relatively easy solution for palatal insufficiency resulting from surgical resection. Intrusive reconstructive surgery can be avoided in this way.

  6. Maxillofacial Prosthetic Materials- An Inclination Towards Silicones

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Sunita; Garg, Hemlata; H.G., Jagadeesh

    2014-01-01

    There have been constant searches and researches which are taking place in the field of dental materials to best suit the ideal selection criteria to satisfy the functionality, biocompatibility, aesthetics as well as the durability as a maxillofacial material. Among all the different materials, Silicone is the most popularly used, but still studies are carried out to overcome their weaknesses and to come out with a material which can be labeled as the “ideal maxillofacial prosthetic material”. This article comprises the materials which were and are in use and the reason for their unpopularity. It also gives us a scope to understand the major fields where the materials lack and thus needs improvement to render an individual with the best maxillo-facial prosthesis. PMID:25654054

  7. A computerized physiologic pulse duplicator for in-vitro hydrodynamic and ultrasonic studies of prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Arabia, F A; Talbot, T L; Stewart, S F; Nast, E P; Clark, R E

    1989-01-01

    A physiologic pulse duplicator for the simultaneous in-vitro hydrodynamic and ultrasonic evaluation of aortic prosthetic heart valves is described. The system is interfaced to a personal computer, which provides greater efficiency over manual techniques in system calibration, data acquisition, and analysis. The data analysis program aids selection of start and end systole and calculates pressure difference across the valve, the closing and regurgitant volumes, flow rates, and the Gabbay and Swanson performance indices. The pulse duplicator is designed to accommodate the ultrasonic measurement of fluid velocities, including pressure difference via the Bernoulli equation, and color-flow imaging. In tests of 19-mm, 23-mm, and 27-mm Bjork-Shiley spherical occluder valves, continuous-wave Doppler ultrasound was found to overestimate by about 50% the pressure difference measured directly by pressure transducers, a finding that is clinically important.

  8. Successful treatment of Listeria monocytogenes prosthetic valve endocarditis using rifampicin and benzylpenicillin in combination with valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Chik, William; Chen, Sharon; Kok, Jen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Listeria monocytogenes is an uncommon cause of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). Recommended antimicrobial therapy typically includes intravenous β-lactams with or without synergistic aminoglycosides. In vitro studies have previously identified antagonism when rifampicin has been used in combination with β-lactams. However, in vivo data of rifampicin use are limited despite its enhanced anti-biofilm activity. Case presentation. A 63-year-old male presented with fever and back pain. L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and bioprosthetic aortic valve endocarditis was confirmed, along with spinal discitis and osteomyelitis. He was successfully treated with benzylpenicillin and rifampicin, in conjunction with valve replacement. Conclusion. Rifampicin remains an alternate agent to use, when there are contraindications to traditional aminoglycoside therapy. Further data on rifampicin use in L. monocytogenes PVE are awaited. PMID:28348807

  9. Gait analysis in lower-limb amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Esquenazi, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Gait analysis combined with sound clinical judgment plays an important role in elucidating the factors involved in the pathologic prosthetic gait and the selection and effects of available interventions to optimize it. Detailed clinical evaluation of walking contributes to the analysis of the prosthetic gait, but evaluation in the gait laboratory using kinetic and kinematic data is often necessary to quantify and identify the particular contributions of the variables impacting the gait with confidence and assess the results of such intervention. The same approach can be considered when selecting prosthetic components and assessing leg length in this patient population.

  10. Genitourinary Prosthetics: A Primer for the Non-urologic Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Lavien, Garjae; Zaid, Uwais; Peterson, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary prosthetics are used for correction of functional deficits and to improve the quality of lives of affected patients. General surgeons must evaluate patients scheduled for nonurologic surgery with urologic devices that can impact their perioperative management. Lack of recognition of these prosthetics preoperatively can lead to unnecessary morbidity for the patient and have legal implications for the surgeon. Close consultation with a urologist may avoid common complications associated with these devices and allows for surgical assistance when operative misadventures do occur. This article reviews 3 common urologic prosthetics: testicular prosthesis, artificial urinary sphincter, and penile prosthesis.

  11. [Basic trends in the organization of ocular prosthetics service].

    PubMed

    Gundorova, R A; Verigo, E N; Sadovskaia, E P; Pimenova, T I

    2003-01-01

    The key issues related with rendering the ocular prosthetic aid to patients with anophthalmos and with cosmetically inferior, i.e. a smaller-size, blind eye, are in the focus of attention. Around 320,000 persons need ocular prostheses in the territory of the Russian Federation, hence adequate prosthetic measures are taken to cope with the cosmetic, medical and social rehabilitation of patients. The ocular prosthetics service deals with issues related with prostheses manufacturing technologies as well as with other therapeutic and surgical aspects which call for working out a unified policy with its subsequent commissioning into the practice of ophthalmologic institutions.

  12. Prosthetic management of soft palate cleft--a case report.

    PubMed

    Dosumu, O O; Ogunrinde, T J; Ogundipe, O T

    2006-09-01

    The treatment of cleft in the soft palate can be achieved essentially by surgical reconstruction or prosthetic obturation. The goals of prosthetic intervention are to prevent food and liquid leakage into the nose and to improve speech intelligibility by ensuring functional velopharyngeal port closure. In this report, the prosthetic management of a 5-year-old child with soft palatal cleft is presented. The impression of the cleft was taken with tissue conditioner, Visco -gel, TM (De Trey, Amalgamated Dental London) and the pharyngeal obturator (speech bulb) was made in clear acrylic resin. Patient tolerated the appliance well and was referred to speech therapist for speech articulation.

  13. In vitro hydrodynamics, cusp-bending deformation, and root distensibility for different types of aortic valve-sparing operations: remodeling, sinus prosthesis, and reimplantation.

    PubMed

    Erasmi, Armin; Sievers, Hans-H; Scharfschwerdt, Michael; Eckel, Thorsten; Misfeld, Martin

    2005-10-01

    Preserving aortic valve cusps during operations for aortic root pathology theoretically offers several advantages over alternative prosthetic valve-bearing conduits. Functional properties of different valve-sparing techniques under defined conditions are not well studied. Fresh porcine aortic roots were investigated in a pulsatile flow simulator, either native root or after different types of valve-sparing procedures (remodeling, sinus prosthesis, and reimplantation). Functional parameters, such as transvalvular pressure gradient, closing volume, cusp-bending deformation, and distensibility at different levels of the root were analyzed. The mean pressure gradient was highest in reimplantation techniques (8.4 +/- 1.8 mm Hg) compared with sinus prostheses (7.2 +/- 0.9 mm Hg, P = .01) and remodeling techniques (6.8 +/- 1.0 mm Hg, P = .002), mirror imaging the closing volume (reimplantation, 1.5 +/- 0.4 mL; sinus prostheses, 2.3 +/- 0.7 mL [P < .001]; remodeling, 3.4 +/- 1.1 mL [P < .001]). Bending deformation indices increased significantly from remodeling (0.45 +/- 0.05) and sinus prostheses (0.58 +/- 0.06) to reimplantation techniques (0.73 +/- 0.09). Dynamic changes in area of all techniques were decreased at the sinotubular junction and the commissural and sinus levels when compared with those seen in native roots but increased at the annular level for techniques with unfixed annulus (remodeling and modified sinus prosthesis). In vitro the various aortic valve-sparing operations differed characteristically in their ability to spare valve function, none of them completely meeting native valve behavior. The remodeling techniques exhibited valve dynamics closest to those of the native aortic root. The more the aortic valve is fixed with noncompliant prosthetic material, the more the native root dynamics are impaired.

  14. Severe aortic stenosis: forgotten associations.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Amorim, Sandra; Campelo, Manuel; Martins, Elisabete; Lopez Rodriguez, Elisa; Coelho, Rosa; Macedo, Guilherme; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 68-year-old man with predominantly right heart failure in the context of severe aortic stenosis associated with pulmonary hypertension. Anemia was diagnosed which, after endoscopic study, was considered to be secondary to angiodysplasia and a diagnosis of Heyde syndrome was made. After valve replacement surgery the patient's heart failure improved and hemoglobin levels stabilized. We present this case to show the need to recognize less common associations of severe aortic stenosis, in order to provide immediate and appropriate treatment.

  15. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-05-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved.

  16. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-01-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved. Images Fig. 11. Fig. 13. PMID:1130881

  17. The CarboMedics prosthetic heart valve: experience with 180 implants.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu; Misawa, Yoshio; Fuse, Katsuo; Konishi, Hiroaki

    2005-01-01

    At Jichi Medical School Hospital, three types of mechanical prosthetic valves (CarboMedics, Omnicarbon, Bicarbon) were used without randomization from 1991 to 2000. A retrospective study of valve replacements done between June 1991 and November 2000 utilizing 180 CarboMedics valves in 145 patients who had not previously undergone prosthetic valve replacement or aortic root and/or arch replacement was conducted to evaluate midterm patient outcomes to assess the future continuous use of CarboMedics valves. Women made up 47.6% of the patients and the mean age was 57.5 years (range 12-80 years). Preoperative New York Heart Association functional class was III or IV in 92.4% (134/145) of patients. Mean follow-up of 4.5 years (range 0-10.0 years) was 95.9% complete, with a total of 628 patient-years (PY). Early (within 30 postoperative days) mortality was 5.5% (8 of 145): 3 from hemorrhage, 3 from nonvalve-related heart failure, 1 from infection, and 1 from arrhythmia. There were 16 late deaths (2.54%/PY): 1 from hemorrhage, 4 from unknown causes/sudden death, 4 from nonvalve-related heart failure, and 7 from other noncardiac causes. A total of 121 patients (83.0%) were alive at the last follow-up, done in November 2000. The linearized death rate was 3.82%/year (including 1.11%/year for valve-related deaths). Linearized death rates from various causes were: bleeding, 0.96%/year; thromboembolism, 1.11%/year; thrombosis, 0.39%/year; perivalvular leak, 0.96%/year; endocarditis, 0%/year; hemolysis, 0%/year; and reoperation, 0.63%/year. No structural valve failure was observed. Comparative early mortality rates of valve replacement without aortic root replacement or arch replacement, excluding repeat valve replacement operations, in our institute, were 3.5% (12/307) for all valve types used contemporaneously, 2.6% (2/76) for Omnicarbon valves, and 2.3% (2/86) for Bicarbon valves. Although the CarboMedics valve had a rather high mortality rate of 5.5% (8/145) compared with the

  18. Predictive risk models for proximal aortic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rocío; Pascual, Isaac; Álvarez, Rubén; Alperi, Alberto; Rozado, Jose; Morales, Carlos; Silva, Jacobo; Morís, César

    2017-01-01

    Predictive risk models help improve decision making, information to our patients and quality control comparing results between surgeons and between institutions. The use of these models promotes competitiveness and led to increasingly better results. All these virtues are of utmost importance when the surgical operation entails high-risk. Although proximal aortic surgery is less frequent than other cardiac surgery operations, this procedure itself is more challenging and technically demanding than other common cardiac surgery techniques. The aim of this study is to review the current status of predictive risk models for patients who undergo proximal aortic surgery, which means aortic root replacement, supracoronary ascending aortic replacement or aortic arch surgery. PMID:28616348

  19. Predictive risk models for proximal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Díaz, Rocío; Pascual, Isaac; Álvarez, Rubén; Alperi, Alberto; Rozado, Jose; Morales, Carlos; Silva, Jacobo; Morís, César

    2017-05-01

    Predictive risk models help improve decision making, information to our patients and quality control comparing results between surgeons and between institutions. The use of these models promotes competitiveness and led to increasingly better results. All these virtues are of utmost importance when the surgical operation entails high-risk. Although proximal aortic surgery is less frequent than other cardiac surgery operations, this procedure itself is more challenging and technically demanding than other common cardiac surgery techniques. The aim of this study is to review the current status of predictive risk models for patients who undergo proximal aortic surgery, which means aortic root replacement, supracoronary ascending aortic replacement or aortic arch surgery.

  20. Acute aortic dissection at two extreme ages.

    PubMed

    Ramzisham, A R M; Arief, H; Ngoo, K S; Zamrin, D M; Joanna, O S M

    2011-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition, warranting prompt diagnosis and treatment. Management of which incorporates multidisciplinary expertise from the medical, surgical and intensive care. If left untreated, the mortality rate of acute aortic disease exceeds 50% within 48 hours and 80% within two weeks, with a 5-year survival rate of 19%. The most common cause of death in untreated acute aortic dissection, regardless of aetiology, is aortic rupture. We would like to share our successful experience of cases at the two extreme ages of acute aortic dissection. Literature review with their pathogenesis are discussed.