Science.gov

Sample records for state image analysis

  1. Determining of combustion process state based on flame images analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents comparison image classification method of combustion biomass and pulverized coal. Presented research is related with 10% and 20% weight fraction of the biomass. Defined two class of combustion: stable and unstable for nine variants with different power, secondary air value parameters and fixed amount biomass. Used artificial neural networks and support vector machine to classify flame image which correspond with the state of the. combustion process.

  2. Cytological image analysis with a genetic fuzzy finite state machine.

    PubMed

    Estévez, J; Alayón, S; Moreno, L; Sigut, J; Aguilar, R

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this research is to design a pattern recognition system based on a Fuzzy Finite State Machine (FFSM). We try to find an optimal FFSM with Genetic Algorithms (GA). In order to validate this system, the classifier has been applied to a real problem: distinction between normal and abnormal cells in cytological breast fine needle aspirate images and cytological peritoneal fluid images. The characteristic used in the discrimination between normal and abnormal cells is a texture measurement of the chromatin distribution in cellular nuclei. Furthermore, the effectiveness of this method as a pattern classifier is compared with other existing supervised and unsupervised methods and evaluated with Receiver Operating Curves (ROC) methodology.

  3. Sea state monitoring over Socotra Rock (Ieodo) by dual polarization SAR image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Kim, J.; Yun, H.; yun, H.

    2013-12-01

    The application SAR in sea state monitoring have been conducted in the large number of fields such as the vessel tracing using the wake in SAR amplitude, the measurement of sea wave height and the oil spill detection. The true merit of SAR application in sea state monitoring is the full independence from the climate conditions. Hence, it is highly useful to secure safety of the anthropogenic activities in ocean and the understanding of the marine environment. Especially the dual and full polarization modes of new L band and X band SAR such as Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR)'s Fine Beam double Polarization (FDB) and Polarimetry mode (PLR) and terraSAR-X polarization mode provided innovative means to extract sea state information exploiting the different amplitude and phase angle responses by electromagnetic and sea wave interactions. Thus a sample projects for mining the maximum possible sea state information from the ALOS PLASAR FDB SAR/InSAR pairs compared with the in-suit observation of sea state is being conducted. Test site was established over Socotra Rock (Ieodo in Korean), which is located at the Western Sea of Korea. At first, it aimed the measurement of sea waves using ALOS PLASAR multi-polarization images and its doppler-shift analysis. Together with sea state monitoring, auxiliary data analyses to combine the sea state outputs with the other in-orbital sensing image and non image information to trace the influence of sea states in the marine environment are actively undergoing. For instance, MERIS chlorophyll-a products are under investigation to identify the correlation with sea state. However, an significant obstacles to apply SAR interpretation scheme for mining sea state is the temporal gap between SAR image acquisitions in spite of the improved revising time of contemporary in-orbital SAR sensors. To tackle this problem, we are also introducing the multi view angle optical sensor

  4. Automated Chromosome Analysis: A State-Of-The-Art Approach To Knowledge Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschul, J.

    1986-11-01

    This paper describes a completely automated chromosome analysis system. It comprises of an automated microscope, an image analysis system for evaluation of the microscopic fields, and peripheral equipment for user dialogue and control of the procedures. Photo-quality hard copies of the completed karyograms are output via a special printer. Metaphases are found fully automatically by the system. A research quality microscope is used for automatic screening of up to 16 slides in one metaphase finding run. The metaphase finding is based on a special cluster analysis. By resetting the metaphase models, the system can be adapted to different staining techniques. Metaphase coordinates are stored in the system enabling automatic repositioning under high magnification. The system can be used for counting the chromosomes of all metaphases as well as for karyotyping, based on banding analysis. The karyotyping algorithm is based on classification of the banding pattern of each chromosome. The knowledge base is derived from a banding pattern analysis of 4000 chromosomes.

  5. Evaluation of the crystalline and amorphous states of drug products by nanothermal analysis and Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Keizo; Urasaki, Tetsuhiko; Hondo, Satoko; Murahashi, Naokazu; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katuhide

    2013-03-05

    In recent years, amorphous formulations and other special dosage forms of drug products have been investigated to achieve adequate solubility and disintegration. We have evaluated the distribution of crystalline and amorphous states of a drug product using Nanothermal analysis (Nano-TA) and Raman imaging methods. Compared to conventional differential scanning calorimetry, Nano-TA can be used to more rapidly characterize the crystalline and amorphous states of model formulations, including their ingredient distributions, without any sample preparation. In the current study, imaging maps obtained for specific model formulations were evaluated on the basis of their visual appearance and the physicochemical properties of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In addition, the crystalline and amorphous states of the model formulations were distinguished by Raman mapping. Nano-TA was found to be useful for the characterization of crystalline and amorphous states of APIs and the distribution of other ingredients. This technology could be used to monitor the changes in crystalline forms of drug substances and dosage forms during processing. In addition, Nano-TA can be used to characterize amorphous states.

  6. Solid-state fluoroscopic imager for high-resolution angiography: Parallel-cascaded linear systems analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded linear systems based modeling techniques have been used in the past to predict important system parameters that have a direct impact on image quality. Such models are also useful in optimizing system parameters to improve image quality. In this work, detailed analysis of a solid-state fluoroscopic imaging system intended for high-resolution angiography is presented with the use of such a model. The imaging system analyzed through this model uses four 8×8 cm three-side buttable interlined charge-coupled devices (CCDs) specifically designed for high-resolution angiography and tiled in a seamless fashion to achieve a field of view (FOV) of 16×16 cm. Larger FOVs can be achieved by tiling more CCDs in a similar manner. The system employs a CsI:Tl scintillator coupled to the CCDs by straight (nontapering) fiberoptics and can potentially be operated in 78, 156, or 234 μm pixel pitch modes. The system parameters analyzed through this model include presampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The results of the simulations performed indicate that DQE(0) in excess of 0.6 is achievable, with the imager operating at 156 μm pixel pitch, 30 frames/s, and employing a 450-μm-thick CsI:Tl scintillator, even at a low fluoroscopic exposure rate of 1 μR/frame. Further, at a nominal fluoroscopic exposure rate of 2.5 μR/frame there was no noticeable degradation of the DQE even at the 78 μm pixel pitch mode suggesting that it is feasible to perform high-resolution angiography hitherto unattainable in clinical practice. PMID:15191318

  7. Solid-state fluoroscopic imager for high-resolution angiography: parallel-cascaded linear systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman

    2004-05-01

    Cascaded linear systems based modeling techniques have been used in the past to predict important system parameters that have a direct impact on image quality. Such models are also useful in optimizing system parameters to improve image quality. In this work, detailed analysis of a solid-state fluoroscopic imaging system intended for high-resolution angiography is presented with the use of such a model. The imaging system analyzed through this model uses four 8 x 8 cm three-side buttable interlined charge-coupled devices (CCDs) specifically designed for high-resolution angiography and tiled in a seamless fashion to achieve a field of view (FOV) of 16 x 16 cm. Larger FOVs can be achieved by tiling more CCDs in a similar manner. The system employs a CsI:Tl scintillator coupled to the CCDs by straight (nontapering) fiberoptics and can potentially be operated in 78, 156, or 234 microm pixel pitch modes. The system parameters analyzed through this model include presampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The results of the simulations performed indicate that DQE(0) in excess of 0.6 is achievable, with the imager operating at 156 microm pixel pitch, 30 frames/s, and employing a 450-microm-thick CsI:Tl scintillator, even at a low fluoroscopic exposure rate of 1 microR/frame. Further, at a nominal fluoroscopic exposure rate of 2.5 microR/frame there was no noticeable degradation of the DQE even at the 78 microm pixel pitch mode suggesting that it is feasible to perform high-resolution angiography hitherto unattainable in clinical practice.

  8. Frequency Clustering Analysis for Resting State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based on Hilbert-Huang Transform

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Wu, Tong; Liu, Chenghua; Wen, Xiaotong; Yao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Exploring resting-state functional networks using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a hot topic in the field of brain functions. Previous studies suggested that the frequency dependence between blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals may convey meaningful information regarding interactions between brain regions. Methods: In this article, we introduced a novel frequency clustering analysis method based on Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) and a label-replacement procedure. First, the time series from multiple predefined regions of interest (ROIs) were extracted. Second, each time series was decomposed into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by using HHT. Third, the improved k-means clustering method using a label-replacement method was applied to the data of each subject to classify the ROIs into different classes. Results: Two independent resting-state fMRI dataset of healthy subjects were analyzed to test the efficacy of method. The results show almost identical clusters when applied to different runs of a dataset or to different datasets, indicating a stable performance of our framework. Conclusions and Significance: Our framework provided a novel measure for functional segregation of the brain according to time-frequency characteristics of resting state BOLD activities. PMID:28261074

  9. State-of-the-art in retinal optical coherence tomography image analysis.

    PubMed

    Baghaie, Ahmadreza; Yu, Zeyun; D'Souza, Roshan M

    2015-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality that has been widely used in the field of biomedical imaging. In the recent past, it has found uses as a diagnostic tool in dermatology, cardiology, and ophthalmology. In this paper we focus on its applications in the field of ophthalmology and retinal imaging. OCT is able to non-invasively produce cross-sectional volumetric images of the tissues which can be used for analysis of tissue structure and properties. Due to the underlying physics, OCT images suffer from a granular pattern, called speckle noise, which restricts the process of interpretation. This requires specialized noise reduction techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving image details. Another major step in OCT image analysis involves the use of segmentation techniques for distinguishing between different structures, especially in retinal OCT volumes. The outcome of this step is usually thickness maps of different retinal layers which are very useful in study of normal/diseased subjects. Lastly, movements of the tissue under imaging as well as the progression of disease in the tissue affect the quality and the proper interpretation of the acquired images which require the use of different image registration techniques. This paper reviews various techniques that are currently used to process raw image data into a form that can be clearly interpreted by clinicians.

  10. State-of-the-art in retinal optical coherence tomography image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zeyun; D’Souza, Roshan M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality that has been widely used in the field of biomedical imaging. In the recent past, it has found uses as a diagnostic tool in dermatology, cardiology, and ophthalmology. In this paper we focus on its applications in the field of ophthalmology and retinal imaging. OCT is able to non-invasively produce cross-sectional volumetric images of the tissues which can be used for analysis of tissue structure and properties. Due to the underlying physics, OCT images suffer from a granular pattern, called speckle noise, which restricts the process of interpretation. This requires specialized noise reduction techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving image details. Another major step in OCT image analysis involves the use of segmentation techniques for distinguishing between different structures, especially in retinal OCT volumes. The outcome of this step is usually thickness maps of different retinal layers which are very useful in study of normal/diseased subjects. Lastly, movements of the tissue under imaging as well as the progression of disease in the tissue affect the quality and the proper interpretation of the acquired images which require the use of different image registration techniques. This paper reviews various techniques that are currently used to process raw image data into a form that can be clearly interpreted by clinicians. PMID:26435924

  11. Can state-of-the-art HVS-based objective image quality criteria be used for image reconstruction techniques based on ROI analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostal, P.; Krasula, L.; Klima, M.

    2012-06-01

    Various image processing techniques in multimedia technology are optimized using visual attention feature of the human visual system. Spatial non-uniformity causes that different locations in an image are of different importance in terms of perception of the image. In other words, the perceived image quality depends mainly on the quality of important locations known as regions of interest. The performance of such techniques is measured by subjective evaluation or objective image quality criteria. Many state-of-the-art objective metrics are based on HVS properties; SSIM, MS-SSIM based on image structural information, VIF based on the information that human brain can ideally gain from the reference image or FSIM utilizing the low-level features to assign the different importance to each location in the image. But still none of these objective metrics utilize the analysis of regions of interest. We solve the question if these objective metrics can be used for effective evaluation of images reconstructed by processing techniques based on ROI analysis utilizing high-level features. In this paper authors show that the state-of-the-art objective metrics do not correlate well with subjective evaluation while the demosaicing based on ROI analysis is used for reconstruction. The ROI were computed from "ground truth" visual attention data. The algorithm combining two known demosaicing techniques on the basis of ROI location is proposed to reconstruct the ROI in fine quality while the rest of image is reconstructed with low quality. The color image reconstructed by this ROI approach was compared with selected demosaicing techniques by objective criteria and subjective testing. The qualitative comparison of the objective and subjective results indicates that the state-of-the-art objective metrics are still not suitable for evaluation image processing techniques based on ROI analysis and new criteria is demanded.

  12. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C.; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B.

    2004-12-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  13. Machine Learning Applications to Resting-State Functional MR Imaging Analysis.

    PubMed

    Billings, John M; Eder, Maxwell; Flood, William C; Dhami, Devendra Singh; Natarajan, Sriraam; Whitlow, Christopher T

    2017-11-01

    Machine learning is one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields within computer science. Academic and commercial research entities are investing in machine learning methods, especially in personalized medicine via patient-level classification. There is great promise that machine learning methods combined with resting state functional MR imaging will aid in diagnosis of disease and guide potential treatment for conditions thought to be impossible to identify based on imaging alone, such as psychiatric disorders. We discuss machine learning methods and explore recent advances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A testing method for the machine details state by means of the speckle image parameters analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malov, A. N.; Pavlov, P. V.; Neupokoeva, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Non destructive testing method, allowing to define a residual resource of power details of mechanical engineering designs under the analysis of registered speckle-image parameters, it is discussed. The "chessboard" algorithm based on calculation of correlation between the given speckle-image and the a chessboard image is considered. Experimental research results of an offered non destructive testing method are presented. It is established, that to increase in quantity of a power detail tests cycles there is an increase in roughness parameters that conducts to reduction of correlation factor between reference and to resultants the image at the given stage of test. Knowing of correlation factor change dynamics, it is possible to define a residual resource of power details while in exploitation.

  15. A testing method for the machine details state by means of the speckle image parameters analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Pavel V.; Malov, Alexander N.; Neupokoeva, Anna V.; Popov, Fedor N.

    2016-11-01

    Non destructive testing method, allowing defining a residual resource of power details of mechanical engineering designs under the analysis of registered speckle-image parameters, it is discussed. The "chessboard" algorithm based on calculation of correlation between the given speckle-image and a chessboard image is considered. Experimental research results of an offered non destructive testing method are presented. It is established, that to increase in quantity of a power detail tests cycles there is an increase in roughness parameters that conducts to reduction of correlation factor between reference and to resultants the image at the given stage of test. Knowing of correlation factor change dynamics, it is possible to define a residual resource of power details while in exploitation.

  16. Scanning single quantum emitter fluorescence lifetime imaging: quantitative analysis of the local density of photonic states.

    PubMed

    Schell, Andreas W; Engel, Philip; Werra, Julia F M; Wolff, Christian; Busch, Kurt; Benson, Oliver

    2014-05-14

    Their intrinsic properties render single quantum systems as ideal tools for quantum enhanced sensing and microscopy. As an additional benefit, their size is typically on an atomic scale that enables sensing with very high spatial resolution. Here, we report on utilizing a single nitrogen vacancy center in nanodiamond for performing three-dimensional scanning-probe fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. By measuring changes of the single emitter's lifetime, information on the local density of optical states is acquired at the nanoscale. Three-dimensional ab initio discontinuous Galerkin time-domain simulations are used in order to verify the results and to obtain additional insights. This combination of experiment and simulations to gather quantitative information on the local density of optical states is of direct relevance for the understanding of fundamental quantum optical processes as well as for the engineering of novel photonic and plasmonic devices.

  17. Health policy analysis and magnetic resonance imaging. The case of the New York State Demonstration Project.

    PubMed

    Milliren, J W

    1989-03-01

    In the absence of controlled clinical trials, the diffusion of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been driven by market forces and the perceived benefits of this technology. To date, all projective needs for MRI use are based on a consensus impression of a medical panel on the role of MRI for DRG or International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes. Since an impression of future utilization is not particularly precise, the focus of The New York State MRI Demonstration Project, which approved the acquisition of MRIs at 14 medical centers in 1983, was to determine the actual use of MRI in a medical setting. In a 3-year period, all sites performed 16,095 MRI examinations with 6647 subjects also receiving computed tomography (CT). The results of this study were as follows: (1) 88% of MRIs performed were of the central nervous system (CNS), (2) low level of utilization in the chest and abdomen reflects both a problem with MRI motion artifacts and the failure of MRI to compete with established diagnostic modalities such as mammography, CT scanning, and ultrasonography, (3) for the CNS 18% (1037/5876) studies were positive on MRI but negative by CT, (4) only 1.4% (n = 85) of cases were lesions detected by CT and missed by MRI, and (5) for 81% of the 4754 examinations, MRI and CT were in agreement. Based on the number of lesions observed, the image contrast, and the overall radiologist's impression, MRI was rated superior to CT in 50-60% of the CNS cases. The projected need, based on this study, is for one MRI per 430,000 population in New York State. Also as newer MR imaging protocols evolve, patient use should increase, with the technical cost per study becoming approximately +250 for a scanner performing 3900 studies per year with a +1 million operating expense. At the present time, the best predictive index of MRI utilization is the need for CNS examinations.

  18. Interactive Image Analysis System Design,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    This report describes a design for an interactive image analysis system (IIAS), which implements terrain data extraction techniques. The design... analysis system. Additionally, the system is fully capable of supporting many generic types of image analysis and data processing, and is modularly...employs commercially available, state of the art minicomputers and image display devices with proven software to achieve a cost effective, reliable image

  19. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  20. Independent component analysis of localized resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals specific motor subnetworks.

    PubMed

    Sohn, William Seunghyun; Yoo, Kwangsun; Jeong, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that blood oxygen level-dependent low-frequency (<0.1 Hz) fluctuations (LFFs) during a resting-state exhibit a high degree of correlation with other regions that share cognitive function. Initial studies of resting-state network mapping have focused primarily on major networks such as the default mode network, primary motor, somatosensory, visual, and auditory networks. However, more specific or subnetworks, including those associated with specific motor functions, have yet to be properly addressed. We performed independent component analysis (ICA) in a specific target region of the brain, a process we name, "localized ICA." We demonstrated that when ICA is applied to localized fMRI data, it can be used to distinguish resting-state LFFs associated with specific motor functions (e.g., finger tapping, foot movement, or bilateral lip pulsing) in the primary motor cortex. These ICA components generated from localized data can then be used as functional regions of interest to map whole-brain connectivity. In addition, this method can be used to visualize inter-regional connectivity by expanding the localized region and identifying components that show connectivity between the two regions.

  1. Independent Component Analysis of Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pedophiles.

    PubMed

    Cantor, J M; Lafaille, S J; Hannah, J; Kucyi, A; Soh, D W; Girard, T A; Mikulis, D J

    2016-10-01

    Neuroimaging and other studies have changed the common view that pedophilia is a result of childhood sexual abuse and instead is a neurologic phenomenon with prenatal origins. Previous research has identified differences in the structural connectivity of the brain in pedophilia. To identify analogous differences in functional connectivity. Functional magnetic resonance images were recorded from three groups of participants while they were at rest: pedophilic men with a history of sexual offenses against children (n = 37) and two control groups: non-pedophilic men who committed non-sexual offenses (n = 28) and non-pedophilic men with no criminal history (n = 39). Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were subjected to independent component analysis to identify known functional networks of the brain, and groups were compared to identify differences in connectivity with those networks (or "components"). The pedophilic group demonstrated wide-ranging increases in functional connectivity with the default mode network compared with controls and regional differences (increases and decreases) with the frontoparietal network. Of these brain regions (total = 23), 20 have been identified by meta-analytic studies to respond to sexually relevant stimuli. Conversely, of the brain areas known to be those that respond to sexual stimuli, nearly all emerged in the present data as significantly different in pedophiles. This study confirms the presence of significant differences in the functional connectivity of the brain in pedophilia consistent with previously reported differences in structural connectivity. The connectivity differences detected here and elsewhere are opposite in direction from those associated with anti-sociality, arguing against anti-sociality and for pedophilia as the source of the neuroanatomic differences detected. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Localized connectivity in depression: a meta-analysis of resting state functional imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Sarina J; Krishnadas, Rajeev; Li, Chunbo; Auer, Dorothee P; Radua, Joaquim; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Resting-state fMRI studies investigating the pathophysiology of depression have identified prominent abnormalities in large-scale brain networks. However, it is unclear if localized dysfunction of specialized brain regions contribute to network-level abnormalities. We employed a meta-analytical procedure and reviewed studies conducted in China investigating changes in regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measure of localized intraregional connectivity, from resting-state fMRI in depression. Exploiting the statistical power gained from pooled analysis, we also investigated the effects of age, gender, illness duration and treatment on ReHo. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) showed the most robust and reliable increase in ReHo in depression, with greater abnormality in medication-free patients with multiple episodes. Brain networks that relate to this region have been identified previously to show aberrant connectivity in depression, and we propose that the localized neuronal inefficiency of MPFC exists alongside wider network level disruptions involving this region.

  3. Dye Tracer Technique and Color Image Analysis For Describing Saturation State and 3d Axi-symmetrical Flow Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriak, N. E.; Gandola, F.; Haverkamp, R.

    Dye tracer techniques have been widely used for visualising water flow pattern in soils and particularly, for determining the volumetric water content in a one dimensional and two dimensional laboratory experiments. The present study deals a 3 dimensional laboratory experiment (axi-symmetrical condition) using color visualisation technique and the image analysis technique for determining the spatial distribution of the water content. The infiltration of a dye (fluorescein) mixed with water is achieved under ax- isymmetrical condition in a Plexiglas tank (50t'50t'60cm) filled with a low saturated sand. Both infiltration and drainage processes are visualised under blue light condi- tion and recorded on videotape. The image analysis technique used for determining the saturation state is based on the use of a limited colors palette which allows to quan- tify the evolution of the saturation state in the sand. Simultaneously, nine tensiometers connected to a data acquisition system, are used to determine the negative water pres- sure in the sand. The measurement of the succion values confirms the existence of a second water wetting front (after the dye flow) due to the initial mobile water content in the sand.

  4. Technique based on LED multispectral imaging and multivariate analysis for monitoring the conservation state of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Emilio; Manfredi, Marcello; Zerbinati, Orfeo; Robotti, Elisa; Mazzucco, Eleonora; Gosetti, Fabio; Bearman, Greg; France, Fenella; Shor, Pnina

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this project is the development of a noninvasive technique based on LED multispectral imaging (MSI) for monitoring the conservation state of the Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS) collection. It is well-known that changes in the parchment reflectance drive the transition of the scrolls from legible to illegible. Capitalizing on this fact, we will use spectral imaging to detect changes in the reflectance before they become visible to the human eye. The technique uses multivariate analysis and statistical process control theory. The present study was carried out on a "sample" parchment of calfskin. The monitoring of the surface of a commercial modern parchment aged consecutively for 2 h and 6 h at 80 °C and 50% relative humidity (ASTM) was performed at the Imaging Lab of the Library of Congress (Washington, DC, U.S.A.). MSI is here carried out in the vis-NIR range limited to 1 μm, with a number of bands of 13 and bandwidths that range from about 10 nm in UV to 40 nm in IR. Results showed that we could detect and locate changing pixels, on the basis of reflectance changes, after only a few "hours" of aging.

  5. Image Analysis and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research program on Image Analysis and Modeling supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency...The objective is to achieve a better understanding of image structure and to use this knowledge to develop improved image models for use in image ... analysis and processing tasks such as information extraction, image enhancement and restoration, and coding. The ultimate objective of this research is

  6. Adapted polarization state contrast image.

    PubMed

    Richert, Michael; Orlik, Xavier; De Martino, Antonello

    2009-08-03

    We propose a general method to maximize the polarimetric contrast between an object and its background using a predetermined illumination polarization state. After a first estimation of the polarimetric properties of the scene by classical Mueller imaging, we evaluate the incident polarized field that induces scattered polarization states by the object and background, as opposite as possible on the Poincar e sphere. With a detection method optimized for a 2-channel imaging system, Monte Carlo simulations of low flux coherent imaging are performed with various objects and backgrounds having different properties of retardance, dichroism and depolarization. With respect to classical Mueller imaging, possibly associated to the polar decomposition, our results show a noticeable increase in the Bhattacharyya distance used as our contrast parameter.

  7. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals distinct brain activity in heavy cannabis users - a multi-voxel pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Skosnik, P D; Pruce, B J; Brumbaugh, M S; Vollmer, J M; Fridberg, D J; O'Donnell, B F; Hetrick, W P; Newman, S D

    2014-11-01

    Chronic cannabis use can cause cognitive, perceptual and personality alterations, which are believed to be associated with regional brain changes and possible changes in connectivity between functional regions. This study aims to identify the changes from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. A two-level multi-voxel pattern analysis was proposed to classify male cannabis users from normal controls. The first level analysis works on a voxel basis and identifies clusters for the input of a second level analysis, which works on the functional connectivity between these regions. We found distinct clusters for male cannabis users in the middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, cerebellum and some other regions. Based on the functional connectivity of these clusters, a high overall accuracy rate of 84-88% in classification accuracy was achieved. High correlations were also found between the overall classification accuracy and Barrett Barrett Impulsiveness Scale factor scores of attention and motor. Our result suggests regional differences in the brains of male cannabis users that span from the cerebellum to the prefrontal cortex, which are associated with differences in functional connectivity. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Histopathological Image Analysis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gurcan, Metin N.; Boucheron, Laura; Can, Ali; Madabhushi, Anant; Rajpoot, Nasir; Yener, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, dramatic increases in computational power and improvement in image analysis algorithms have allowed the development of powerful computer-assisted analytical approaches to radiological data. With the recent advent of whole slide digital scanners, tissue histopathology slides can now be digitized and stored in digital image form. Consequently, digitized tissue histopathology has now become amenable to the application of computerized image analysis and machine learning techniques. Analogous to the role of computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) algorithms in medical imaging to complement the opinion of a radiologist, CAD algorithms have begun to be developed for disease detection, diagnosis, and prognosis prediction to complement to the opinion of the pathologist. In this paper, we review the recent state of the art CAD technology for digitized histopathology. This paper also briefly describes the development and application of novel image analysis technology for a few specific histopathology related problems being pursued in the United States and Europe. PMID:20671804

  9. Image-analysis library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    MATHPAC image-analysis library is collection of general-purpose mathematical and statistical routines and special-purpose data-analysis and pattern-recognition routines for image analysis. MATHPAC library consists of Linear Algebra, Optimization, Statistical-Summary, Densities and Distribution, Regression, and Statistical-Test packages.

  10. Comparative analysis of iterative reconstruction algorithms with resolution recovery and new solid state cameras dedicated to myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Marco; Lecchi, Michela; Matheoud, Roberta; Leva, Lucia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Marcassa, Claudio; Zoccarato, Orazio

    2017-03-23

    New technologies are available in myocardial perfusion imaging. They include new software that recovers image resolution and limits image noise, multifocal collimators and dedicated cardiac cameras in which solid-state detectors are used and all available detectors are constrained to imaging just the cardiac field of view. These innovations resulted in shortened study times or reduced administered activity to patients, while preserving image quality. Many single center and some multicenter studies have been published during the introduction of these innovations in the clinical practice. Most of these studies were lead in the framework of "agreement studies" between different methods of clinical measurement. They aimed to demonstrate that these new software/hardware solutions allow the acquisition of images with reduced acquisition time or administered activity with comparable results (as for image quality, image interpretation, perfusion defect quantification, left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction) to the standard-time or standard-dose SPECT acquired with a conventional gamma camera and reconstructed with the traditional FBP method, considered as the gold standard. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of the pro and cons of the different approaches summarizing the achievements reached so far and the issues that need further investigations.

  11. Basics of image analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hyperspectral imaging technology has emerged as a powerful tool for quality and safety inspection of food and agricultural products and in precision agriculture over the past decade. Image analysis is a critical step in implementing hyperspectral imaging technology; it is aimed to improve the qualit...

  12. Brain Imaging Analysis

    PubMed Central

    BOWMAN, F. DUBOIS

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of brain imaging technologies has led to intense neuroscientific inquiry into the human brain. Studies often investigate brain function related to emotion, cognition, language, memory, and numerous other externally induced stimuli as well as resting-state brain function. Studies also use brain imaging in an attempt to determine the functional or structural basis for psychiatric or neurological disorders and, with respect to brain function, to further examine the responses of these disorders to treatment. Neuroimaging is a highly interdisciplinary field, and statistics plays a critical role in establishing rigorous methods to extract information and to quantify evidence for formal inferences. Neuroimaging data present numerous challenges for statistical analysis, including the vast amounts of data collected from each individual and the complex temporal and spatial dependence present. We briefly provide background on various types of neuroimaging data and analysis objectives that are commonly targeted in the field. We present a survey of existing methods targeting these objectives and identify particular areas offering opportunities for future statistical contribution. PMID:25309940

  13. Forensic video image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Thomas R.

    1997-02-01

    Forensic video image analysis is a new scientific tool for perpetrator enhancement and identification in poorly recorded crime scene situations. Forensic video image analysis is emerging technology for law enforcement, industrial security and surveillance addressing the following problems often found in these poor quality video recorded incidences.

  14. Skin temperature evaluation by infrared thermography: Comparison of two image analysis methods during the nonsteady state induced by physical exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, Damiano; Ludwig, Nicola; Rossi, Alessio; Trecroci, Athos; Alberti, Giampietro; Gargano, Marco; Merla, Arcangelo; Ammer, Kurt; Caumo, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The most common method to derive a temperature value from a thermal image in humans is the calculation of the average of the temperature values of all the pixels confined within a demarcated boundary defined region of interest (ROI). Such summary measure of skin temperature is denoted as Troi in this study. Recently, an alternative method for the derivation of skin temperature from the thermal image has been developed. Such novel method (denoted as Tmax) is based on an automated (software-driven) selection of the warmest pixels within the ROI. Troi and Tmax have been compared under basal, steady-state conditions, resulting very well correlated and characterized by a bias of approximately 1 °C (Tmax > Troi). Aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between Tmax and Troi under the nonsteady-state conditions induced by physical exercise. Thermal images of quadriceps of 13 subjects performing a squat exercise were recorded for 120 s before (basal steady state) and for 480 s after the initiation of the exercise (nonsteady state). The thermal images were then analysed to extract Troi and Tmax. Troi and Tmax changed almost in parallel during the nonstead -state. At a closer inspection, it was found that during the nonsteady state the bias between the two methods slightly increased (from 0.7 to 1.1 °C) and the degree of association between them slightly decreased (from Pearson's r = 0.96 to 0.83). Troi and Tmax had different relationships with the skin temperature histogram. Whereas Tmax was the mean, which could be interpreted as the centre of gravity of the histogram, Tmax was related with the extreme upper tail of the histogram. During the nonsteady state, the histogram increased its spread and became slightly more asymmetric. As a result, Troi deviated a little from the 50th percentile, while Tmax remained constantly higher than the 95th percentile. Despite their differences, Troi and Tmax showed a substantial agreement in assessing the changes in skin

  15. Multisensor Image Analysis System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    AD-A263 679 II Uli! 91 Multisensor Image Analysis System Final Report Authors. Dr. G. M. Flachs Dr. Michael Giles Dr. Jay Jordan Dr. Eric...or decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 93-09739 *>ft s n~. now illlllM3lMVf Multisensor Image Analysis System Final...Multisensor Image Analysis System 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED FINAL: LQj&tt-Z JZOfVL 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 93 > 6. AUTHOR(S) Drs. Gerald

  16. State Analysis Database Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert; Bennett, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The State Analysis Database Tool software establishes a productive environment for collaboration among software and system engineers engaged in the development of complex interacting systems. The tool embodies State Analysis, a model-based system engineering methodology founded on a state-based control architecture (see figure). A state represents a momentary condition of an evolving system, and a model may describe how a state evolves and is affected by other states. The State Analysis methodology is a process for capturing system and software requirements in the form of explicit models and states, and defining goal-based operational plans consistent with the models. Requirements, models, and operational concerns have traditionally been documented in a variety of system engineering artifacts that address different aspects of a mission s lifecycle. In State Analysis, requirements, models, and operations information are State Analysis artifacts that are consistent and stored in a State Analysis Database. The tool includes a back-end database, a multi-platform front-end client, and Web-based administrative functions. The tool is structured to prompt an engineer to follow the State Analysis methodology, to encourage state discovery and model description, and to make software requirements and operations plans consistent with model descriptions.

  17. Multivariate image analysis in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-10-01

    In recent years, multivariate imaging techniques are developed and applied in biomedical research in an increasing degree. In research projects and in clinical studies as well m-dimensional multivariate images (MVI) are recorded and stored to databases for a subsequent analysis. The complexity of the m-dimensional data and the growing number of high throughput applications call for new strategies for the application of image processing and data mining to support the direct interactive analysis by human experts. This article provides an overview of proposed approaches for MVI analysis in biomedicine. After summarizing the biomedical MVI techniques the two level framework for MVI analysis is illustrated. Following this framework, the state-of-the-art solutions from the fields of image processing and data mining are reviewed and discussed. Motivations for MVI data mining in biology and medicine are characterized, followed by an overview of graphical and auditory approaches for interactive data exploration. The paper concludes with summarizing open problems in MVI analysis and remarks upon the future development of biomedical MVI analysis.

  18. Louisiana State University Libraries' Electronic Imaging Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Faye; Condrey, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Describes Louisiana State University Libraries' Electronic Imaging Laboratory for preservation. The project uses digital imaging technology to reformat rare book materials for access. This technology can exist with traditional conservation procedures. (JLB)

  19. Bridging the Gap: Dynamic Causal Modeling and Granger Causality Analysis of Resting State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Sahil; Adhikari, Bhim M; Friston, Karl J; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2016-09-16

    Granger causality (GC) and dynamic causal modeling (DCM) are the two key approaches used to determine the directed interactions among brain areas. Recent discussions have provided a constructive account of the merits and demerits. GC, on one side, considers dependencies among measured responses, whereas DCM, on the other, models how neuronal activity in one brain area causes dynamics in another. In this study, our objective was to establish construct validity between GC and DCM in the context of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We first established the face validity of both approaches using simulated fMRI time series, with endogenous fluctuations in two nodes. Crucially, we tested both unidirectional and bidirectional connections between the two nodes to ensure that both approaches give veridical and consistent results, in terms of model comparison. We then applied both techniques to empirical data and examined their consistency in terms of the (quantitative) in-degree of key nodes of the default mode. Our simulation results suggested a (qualitative) consistency between GC and DCM. Furthermore, by applying nonparametric GC and stochastic DCM to resting-state fMRI data, we confirmed that both GC and DCM infer similar (quantitative) directionality between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), the medial prefrontal cortex, the left middle temporal cortex, and the left angular gyrus. These findings suggest that GC and DCM can be used to estimate directed functional and effective connectivity from fMRI measurements in a consistent manner.

  20. Whole brain high-resolution functional imaging at ultra high magnetic fields: an application to the analysis of resting state networks.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Federico; Esposito, Fabrizio; van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Harel, Noam; Formisano, Elia; Goebel, Rainer; Ugurbil, Kamil; Yacoub, Essa

    2011-08-01

    Whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows measuring brain dynamics at all brain regions simultaneously and is widely used in research and clinical neuroscience to observe both stimulus-related and spontaneous neural activity. Ultrahigh magnetic fields (7T and above) allow functional imaging with high contrast-to-noise ratios and improved spatial resolution and specificity compared to clinical fields (1.5T and 3T). High-resolution 7T fMRI, however, has been mostly limited to partial brain coverage with previous whole-brain applications sacrificing either the spatial or temporal resolution. Here we present whole-brain high-resolution (1, 1.5 and 2mm isotropic voxels) resting state fMRI at 7T, obtained with parallel imaging technology, without sacrificing temporal resolution or brain coverage, over what is typically achieved at 3T with several fold larger voxel volumes. Using Independent Component Analysis we demonstrate that high resolution images acquired at 7T retain enough sensitivity for the reliable extraction of typical resting state brain networks and illustrate the added value of obtaining both single subject and group maps, using cortex based alignment, of the default-mode network (DMN) with high native resolution. By comparing results between multiple resolutions we show that smaller voxels volumes (1 and 1.5mm isotropic) data result in reduced partial volume effects, permitting separations of detailed spatial features within the DMN patterns as well as a better function to anatomy correspondence.

  1. Analysis of central mechanism of cognitive training on cognitive impairment after stroke: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhi-cheng; Tao, Jing; Gao, Yan-lin; Yin, Da-zhi; Chen, A-zhen; Chen, Li-dian

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the central mechanism of cognitive training in patients with stroke, using resting state (RS) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Patients with stroke and executive function and memory deficit were randomized to receive computer-assisted cognitive training (treatment group; total 60 h training over 10 weeks) or no training (control group). All participants received neuropsychological assessment and RS fMRI at baseline and 10 weeks. Patients in the treatment group (n = 16) showed increased functional connectivity (FC) of the hippocampus with the frontal lobe (right inferior, right middle, left middle, left inferior and left superior frontal gyrus) and left parietal lobe at 10 weeks compared with baseline. Patients in the control group (n = 18) showed decreased FC of the left hippocampus-right occipital gyrus, and right hippocampus-right posterior lobe of cerebellum and left superior temporal gyrus. Significant correlations were found between improved neuropsychological scores and increased FC of the hippocampus with the frontal lobe and left parietal lobe in the treatment group only. Increased RS FC of the hippocampus with the frontal and parietal lobes may be an important mechanism of cognitive recovery after stroke. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Image analysis library software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guseman, L. F., Jr.; Bryant, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Image Analysis Library consists of a collection of general purpose mathematical/statistical routines and special purpose data analysis/pattern recognition routines basic to the development of image analysis techniques for support of current and future Earth Resources Programs. Work was done to provide a collection of computer routines and associated documentation which form a part of the Image Analysis Library.

  3. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  4. Digital Image Analysis of Cereals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Image analysis is the extraction of meaningful information from images, mainly digital images by means of digital processing techniques. The field was established in the 1950s and coincides with the advent of computer technology, as image analysis is profoundly reliant on computer processing. As t...

  5. Solid state image sensing arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadasiv, G.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of a photodiode transistor image sensor array in silicon, and tests on individual elements of the array are described along with design for a scanning system for an image sensor array. The spectral response of p-n junctions was used as a technique for studying the optical-absorption edge in silicon. Heterojunction structures of Sb2S3- Si were fabricated and a system for measuring C-V curves on MOS structures was built.

  6. Ultrasonic image analysis and image-guided interventions

    PubMed Central

    Noble, J. Alison; Navab, Nassir; Becher, H.

    2011-01-01

    The fields of medical image analysis and computer-aided interventions deal with reducing the large volume of digital images (X-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography and ultrasound (US)) to more meaningful clinical information using software algorithms. US is a core imaging modality employed in these areas, both in its own right and used in conjunction with the other imaging modalities. It is receiving increased interest owing to the recent introduction of three-dimensional US, significant improvements in US image quality, and better understanding of how to design algorithms which exploit the unique strengths and properties of this real-time imaging modality. This article reviews the current state of art in US image analysis and its application in image-guided interventions. The article concludes by giving a perspective from clinical cardiology which is one of the most advanced areas of clinical application of US image analysis and describing some probable future trends in this important area of ultrasonic imaging research. PMID:22866237

  7. A new analysis of archival images of comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 to constrain the rotation state of and active regions on its nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schambeau, C.; Fernández, Y.; Samarasinha, N.; Mueller, B.; Woodney, L.; Lisse, C.; Kelley, M.; Meech, K.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (SW1) is a unique comet (and Centaur) with an almost circular orbit just outside the orbit of Jupiter. This orbit results in SW1 receiving a nearly constant insolation, thus giving a simpler environment in which to study thermal properties and behaviors of this comet's nucleus. Such knowledge is crucial for improving our understanding of coma morphology, nuclear thermal evolution, and nuclear structure. To this end, our overarching goal is to develop a thermophysical model of SW1's nucleus that makes use of realistic physical and structural properties as inputs. This model will help to explain the highly variable gas- and dust-production rates of this comet; SW1 is well known for its frequent but stochastic outbursts of mass loss [1,2,3]. Here we will report new constraints on the effective radius, beaming parameter, spin state, and location of active regions on the nucleus of SW1. Results: The analysis completed so far consists of a re-analysis of Spitzer Space Telescope thermal-IR images of SW1 from UT 2003 November 21 and 24, when SW1 was observed outside of outburst. The images are from Spitzer's IRAC 5.8-μm and 8.0-μm bands and MIPS 24.0-μm and 70-μm bands. This analysis is similar to that of Stansberry et al. [4, 5], but with data products generated from the latest Spitzer pipeline. Also, analysis of the 5.8-μm image had not been reported before. Coma removal techniques (e.g., Fernández et al. [6]) were applied to each image letting us measure the nuclear point-source contribution to each image. The measured flux densities for each band were fit with a Near Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM, [7]) and resulted in values for the effective radius of SW1's nucleus, constraints on the thermal inertia, and an IR beaming-parameter value. Current efforts have shifted to constraining the spin properties of SW1's nucleus and surface areas of activity through use of an existing Monte Carlo model [8, 9] to reproduce

  8. Parallel Algorithms for Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    8217 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 4. TITLE (aid Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED PARALLEL ALGORITHMS FOR IMAGE ANALYSIS TECHNICAL 6. PERFORMING O4G. REPORT NUMBER TR-1180...Continue on reverse side it neceesary aid Identlfy by block number) Image processing; image analysis ; parallel processing; cellular computers. 20... IMAGE ANALYSIS TECHNICAL 6. PERFORMING ONG. REPORT NUMBER TR-1180 - 7. AUTHOR(&) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Azriel Rosenfeld AFOSR-77-3271 9

  9. Component analysis of a new Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) using photon transfer and Instrumentation Noise Equivalent Exposure (INEE) measurements.

    PubMed

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The SSXII is a novel x-ray imager designed to improve upon the performance limitations of conventional dynamic radiographic/fluoroscopic imagers related to resolution, charge-trapping, frame-rate, and instrumentation-noise. The SSXII consists of a CsI:Tl phosphor coupled via a fiber-optic taper (FOT) to an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD). To facilitate investigational studies, initial designs enable interchangeability of such imaging components. Measurements of various component and configuration characteristics enable an optimization analysis with respect to overall detector performance. Photon transfer was used to characterize the EMCCD performance including ADC sensitivity, read-noise, full-well capacity and quantum efficiency. X-ray sensitivity was measured using RQA x-ray spectra. Imaging components were analyzed in terms of their MTF and transmission efficiency. The EMCCD was measured to have a very low effective read-noise of less than 1 electron rms at modest EMCCD gains, which is more than two orders-of-magnitude less than flat panel (FPD) and CMOS-based detectors. The variable signal amplification from 1 to 2000 times enables selectable sensitivities ranging from 8.5 (168) to over 15k (300k) electrons per incident x-ray photon with (without) a 4:1 FOT; these sensitivities could be readily increased with further component optimization. MTF and DQE measurements indicate the SSXII performance is comparable to current state-of-the-art detectors at low spatial frequencies and far exceeds them at higher spatial frequencies. The instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) was measured to be less than 0.3 μR out to 10 cycles/mm, which is substantially better than FPDs. Component analysis suggests that these improvements can be substantially increased with further detector optimization.

  10. Component analysis of a new solid state x-ray image intensifier (SSXII) using photon transfer and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2009-02-01

    The SSXII is a novel x-ray imager designed to improve upon the performance limitations of conventional dynamic radiographic/fluoroscopic imagers related to resolution, charge-trapping, frame-rate, and instrumentation-noise. The SSXII consists of a CsI:Tl phosphor coupled via a fiber-optic taper (FOT) to an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD). To facilitate investigational studies, initial designs enable interchangeability of such imaging components. Measurements of various component and configuration characteristics enable an optimization analysis with respect to overall detector performance. Photon transfer was used to characterize the EMCCD performance including ADC sensitivity, read-noise, full-well capacity and quantum efficiency. X-ray sensitivity was measured using RQA x-ray spectra. Imaging components were analyzed in terms of their MTF and transmission efficiency. The EMCCD was measured to have a very low effective read-noise of less than 1 electron rms at modest EMCCD gains, which is more than two orders-ofmagnitude less than flat panel (FPD) and CMOS-based detectors. The variable signal amplification from 1 to 2000 times enables selectable sensitivities ranging from 8.5 (168) to over 15k (300k) electrons per incident x-ray photon with (without) a 4:1 FOT; these sensitivities could be readily increased with further component optimization. MTF and DQE measurements indicate the SSXII performance is comparable to current state-of-the-art detectors at low spatial frequencies and far exceeds them at higher spatial frequencies. The instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) was measured to be less than 0.3 μR out to 10 cycles/mm, which is substantially better than FPDs. Component analysis suggests that these improvements can be substantially increased with further detector optimization.

  11. Moving Image Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifley, Loren A.

    1989-02-01

    The recent introduction of a two dimensional interactive software package provides a new technique for quantitative analysis. Integrated with its corresponding peripherals, the same software offers either film or video data reduction. Digitized data points measured from the images are stored in the computer. With is data, a variety of information can be displayed, printed or plotted in a graphical form. The resultant graphs could determine such factors as: displacement, force, velocity, momentum, angular acceleration, center of gravity, energy, leng, , angle and time to name a few. Simple, efficient and precise analysis can now be quantified and documented. This paper will describe the detailed capabilities of the software along with a variety of applications where it might be used.

  12. Moving image analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifley, Loren A.

    1990-08-01

    The recent introduction of a two dimensional interactive software package provides a new technique for quantitative analysis. Integrated with its corresponding peripherals, the same software offers either film or video data reduction. Digitized data points measured from the images are stored in the computer. With this data, a variety of information can be displayed, printed or plotted in a graphical form. The resultant graphs could determine such factors as: displacement, force, velocity, momentum, angular acceleration, center of gravity, energy, length, angle and time to name a few. Simple, efficient and precise analysis can now be quantified and documented. This paper will describe the detailed capabilities of the software along with a variety of applications where it might be used.

  13. Environmental, scanning electron and optical microscope image analysis software for determining volume and occupied area of solid-state fermentation fungal cultures.

    PubMed

    Osma, Johann F; Toca-Herrera, José L; Rodríguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Here we propose a software for the estimation of the occupied area and volume of fungal cultures. This software was developed using a Matlab platform and allows analysis of high-definition images from optical, electronic or atomic force microscopes. In a first step, a single hypha grown on potato dextrose agar was monitored using optical microscopy to estimate the change in occupied area and volume. Weight measurements were carried out to compare them with the estimated volume, revealing a slight difference of less than 1.5%. Similarly, samples from two different solid-state fermentation cultures were analyzed using images from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an environmental SEM (ESEM). Occupied area and volume were calculated for both samples, and the results obtained were correlated with the dry weight of the cultures. The difference between the estimated volume ratio and the dry weight ratio of the two cultures showed a difference of 10%. Therefore, this software is a promising non-invasive technique to determine fungal biomass in solid-state cultures.

  14. Penn State's Visual Image User Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry A.; Dooris, Michael J.; Frost, James; Halm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Visual Image User Study (VIUS), an extensive needs assessment project at Penn State University, describes academic users of pictures and their perceptions. These findings outline the potential market for digital images and list the likely determinates of whether or not a system will be used. They also explain some key user requirements for…

  15. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Dieckman, Stephen L.; Ellingson, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  16. Penn State's Visual Image User Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry A.; Dooris, Michael J.; Frost, James; Halm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Visual Image User Study (VIUS), an extensive needs assessment project at Penn State University, describes academic users of pictures and their perceptions. These findings outline the potential market for digital images and list the likely determinates of whether or not a system will be used. They also explain some key user requirements for…

  17. Detection of local chemical states of lithium and their spatial mapping by scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy and hyperspectral image analysis.

    PubMed

    Muto, Shunsuke; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi

    2017-02-08

    Advancements in the field of renewable energy resources have led to a growing demand for the analysis of light elements at the nanometer scale. Detection of lithium is one of the key issues to be resolved for providing guiding principles for the synthesis of cathode active materials, and degradation analysis after repeated use of those materials. We have reviewed the different techniques currently used for the characterization of light elements such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). In the present study, we have introduced a methodology to detect lithium in solid materials, particularly for cathode active materials used in lithium-ion battery. The chemical states of lithium were isolated and analyzed from the overlapping multiple spectral profiles, using a suite of STEM, EELS and hyperspectral image analysis. The method was successfully applied in the chemical state analyses of hetero-phases near the surface and grain boundary regions of the active material particles formed by chemical reactions between the electrolyte and the active materials. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. DIDA - Dynamic Image Disparity Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-31

    Understanding, Dynamic Image Analysis , Disparity Analysis, Optical Flow, Real-Time Processing ___ 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revere side If necessary aid identify...three aspects of dynamic image analysis must be studied: effectiveness, generality, and efficiency. In addition, efforts must be made to understand the...environment. A better understanding of the need for these Limiting constraints is required. Efficiency is obviously important if dynamic image analysis is

  19. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belton, M.J.S.; Klaasen, K.P.; Clary, M.C.; Anderson, J.L.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Greeley, R.; Anderson, D.; Bolef, L.K.; Townsend, T.E.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J. W.; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.; Veverka, J.; Gierasch, P.J.; Fanale, F.P.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Masursky, H.; Morrison, D.; Pollack, James B.

    1992-01-01

    . The dynamic range is spread over 3 gain states and an exposure range from 4.17 ms to 51.2 s. A low-level of radial, third-order, geometric distortion has been measured in the raw images that is entirely due to the optical design. The distortion is of the pincushion type and amounts to about 1.2 pixels in the corners of the images. It is expected to be very stable. We discuss the measurement objectives of the SSI experiment in the Jupiter system and emphasize their relationships to those of other experiments in the Galileo project. We outline objectives for Jupiter atmospheric science, noting the relationship of SSI data to that to be returned by experiments on the atmospheric entry Probe. We also outline SSI objectives for satellite surfaces, ring structure, and 'darkside' (e.g., aurorae, lightning, etc.) experiments. Proposed cruise measurement objectives that relate to encounters at Venus, Moon, Earth, Gaspra, and, possibly, Ida are also briefly outlined. The article concludes with a description of a 'fully distributed' data analysis system (HIIPS) that SSI team members intend to use at their home institutions. We also list the nature of systematic data products that will become available to the scientific community. Finally, we append a short 'historical' note outlining the responsibilities and roles of institutions and individuals that have been involved in the 14 year development of the SSI experiment so far. ?? 1992 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  20. Children's Precocious Anticipatory Images of End States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Anne L.; Deist, Steven

    1980-01-01

    The processes by which children construct images of anticipated end states of a transposition movement were examined on two tasks. Results support Piaget's (1977) hypothesis that reasoning on the basis of state correspondence defines a developmental level which precedes the development of transformational thought. (Author/MP)

  1. Reflections on ultrasound image analysis.

    PubMed

    Alison Noble, J

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) image analysis has advanced considerably in twenty years. Progress in ultrasound image analysis has always been fundamental to the advancement of image-guided interventions research due to the real-time acquisition capability of ultrasound and this has remained true over the two decades. But in quantitative ultrasound image analysis - which takes US images and turns them into more meaningful clinical information - thinking has perhaps more fundamentally changed. From roots as a poor cousin to Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) image analysis, both of which have richer anatomical definition and thus were better suited to the earlier eras of medical image analysis which were dominated by model-based methods, ultrasound image analysis has now entered an exciting new era, assisted by advances in machine learning and the growing clinical and commercial interest in employing low-cost portable ultrasound devices outside traditional hospital-based clinical settings. This short article provides a perspective on this change, and highlights some challenges ahead and potential opportunities in ultrasound image analysis which may both have high impact on healthcare delivery worldwide in the future but may also, perhaps, take the subject further away from CT and MR image analysis research with time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Digital-image processing and image analysis of glacier ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Joan J.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides a methodology for extracting grain statistics from 8-bit color and grayscale images of thin sections of glacier ice—a subset of physical properties measurements typically performed on ice cores. This type of analysis is most commonly used to characterize the evolution of ice-crystal size, shape, and intercrystalline spatial relations within a large body of ice sampled by deep ice-coring projects from which paleoclimate records will be developed. However, such information is equally useful for investigating the stress state and physical responses of ice to stresses within a glacier. The methods of analysis presented here go hand-in-hand with the analysis of ice fabrics (aggregate crystal orientations) and, when combined with fabric analysis, provide a powerful method for investigating the dynamic recrystallization and deformation behaviors of bodies of ice in motion. The procedures described in this document compose a step-by-step handbook for a specific image acquisition and data reduction system built in support of U.S. Geological Survey ice analysis projects, but the general methodology can be used with any combination of image processing and analysis software. The specific approaches in this document use the FoveaPro 4 plug-in toolset to Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended but it can be carried out equally well, though somewhat less conveniently, with software such as the image processing toolbox in MATLAB, Image-Pro Plus, or ImageJ.

  3. Spreadsheet-Like Image Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    1 " DTIC AD-A254 395 S LECTE D, ° AD-E402 350 Technical Report ARPAD-TR-92002 SPREADSHEET-LIKE IMAGE ANALYSIS Paul Willson August 1992 U.S. ARMY...August 1992 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS SPREADSHEET-LIKE IMAGE ANALYSIS 6. AUTHOR(S) Paul Willson 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Image analysis , nondestructive inspection, spreadsheet, Macintosh software, 14 neural network, signal processing

  4. Knowledge-Based Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    UNCLASSIF1 ED ETL-025s N IIp ETL-0258 AL Ai01319 S"Knowledge-based image analysis u George C. Stockman Barbara A. Lambird I David Lavine Laveen N. Kanal...extraction, verification, region classification, pattern recognition, image analysis . 3 20. A. CT (Continue on rever.. d. It necessary and Identify by...UNCLgSTFTF n In f SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Date Entered) .L1 - I Table of Contents Knowledge Based Image Analysis I Preface

  5. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals distinct brain activity in heavy cannabis users – a multi-voxel pattern analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H; Skosnik, PD; Pruce, BJ; Brumbaugh, MS; Vollmer, JM; Fridberg, DJ; O’Donnell, BF; Hetrick, WP; Newman, SD

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cannabis use can cause cognitive, perceptual and personality alterations, which are believed to be associated with regional brain changes and possible changes in connectivity between functional regions. This study aims to identify the changes from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. A two-level multi-voxel pattern analysis was proposed to classify male cannabis users from normal controls. The first level analysis works on a voxel basis and identifies clusters for the input of a second level analysis, which works on the functional connectivity between these regions. We found distinct clusters for male cannabis users in the middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, cerebellum and some other regions. Based on the functional connectivity of these clusters, a high overall accuracy rate of 84–88% in classification accuracy was achieved. High correlations were also found between the overall classification accuracy and Barrett Barrett Impulsiveness Scale factor scores of attention and motor. Our result suggests regional differences in the brains of male cannabis users that span from the cerebellum to the prefrontal cortex, which are associated with differences in functional connectivity. PMID:25237118

  6. Abnormalities of localized connectivity in schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives: a meta-analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Jianbo; Meng, Tiantian; He, Yuqiong; Luo, Xuerong

    2017-01-01

    Objective The localized dysfunction of specialized brain regions in schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives has been identified in a large-scale brain network; however, evidence is inconsistent. We aimed to identify abnormalities in the localized connectivity in schizophrenia patients and their relatives by conducting a meta-analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) studies. Methods Fourteen studies on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, with 316 schizophrenia patients, 342 healthy controls, and 66 unaffected relatives, were included in the meta-analysis. This analysis was performed using anisotropic effect-size-based signed differential mapping software. Results Schizophrenia patients showed increased ReHo in right superior frontal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus, as well as decreased ReHo in left fusiform gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, left postcentral gyrus, and right precentral gyrus. Unaffected relatives showed decreased ReHo in right insula and right superior temporal gyrus. These results remained widely unchanged in both sensitivity and subgroup analyses. Conclusion Schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives had extensive abnormal localized connectivity in cerebrum, especially in superior temporal gyrus, which were the potential diagnostic markers and expounded the pathophysiological hypothesis for the disorder. PMID:28243099

  7. Total Mini-Mental State Examination score and regional cerebral blood flow using Z score imaging and automated ROI analysis software in subjects with memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Eiji; Shiozaki, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Nobukazu; Togo, Takashi; Odawara, Toshinari; Oka, Takashi; Inoue, Tomio; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2008-07-01

    The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is considered a useful supplementary method to diagnose dementia and evaluate the severity of cognitive disturbance. However, the region of the cerebrum that correlates with the MMSE score is not clear. Recently, a new method was developed to analyze regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using a Z score imaging system (eZIS). This system shows changes of rCBF when compared with a normal database. In addition, a three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest (ROI) template (3DSRT), fully automated ROI analysis software was developed. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between rCBF changes and total MMSE score using these new methods. The association between total MMSE score and rCBF changes was investigated in 24 patients (mean age +/- SD 71.5 +/- 9.2 years; 6 men and 18 women) with memory impairment using eZIS and 3DSRT. Step-wise multiple regression analysis was used for multivariate analysis, with the total MMSE score as the dependent variable and rCBF change in 24 areas as the independent variable. Total MMSE score was significantly correlated only with the reduction of left hippocampal perfusion but not with right (P < 0.01). Total MMSE score is an important indicator of left hippocampal function.

  8. Full analytical solution of Adapted Polarisation State Contrast Imaging.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Debajyoti; Mondal, Sugata; Lacot, Eric; Orlik, Xavier

    2011-12-05

    We have earlier proposed a 2-channel imaging technique: Adapted Polarisation State Contrast Imaging (APSCI), which noticeably enhances the polarimetric contrast between an object and its background using fully polarised incident state adapted to the scene, such that the polarimetric responses of those regions are located as far as possible on the Poincaré sphere. We address here the full analytical and graphical analysis of the ensemble of solutions of specific incident states, by introducing 3-Distance Eigen Space and explain the underlying physical structure of APSCI and the effect of noise over the measurements.

  9. Excited-state imaging of cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheludko, David V.; Bell, Simon C.; Vredenbregt, Edgar J. D.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2007-09-01

    We have investigated state-selective diffraction contrast imaging (DCI) of cold 85Rb atoms in the first excited (52P3/2) state. Excited-state DCI requires knowledge of the complex refractive index of the atom cloud, which was calculated numerically using a semi-classical model. The Autler-Townes splitting predicted by the model was verified experimentally, showing excellent agreement. 780 nm lasers were used to cool and excite atoms within a magneto-optical trap, and the atoms were then illuminated by a 776 nm imaging laser. Several excited-state imaging techniques, including blue cascade fluorescence, on-resonance absorption, and DCI have been demonstrated. Initial results show that improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) will be required to accurately determine the excited state fraction. We have demonstrated magnetic field gradient compression of the cold atom cloud, and expect that further progress on compression and additional cooling will achieve sufficient diffraction contrast for quantitative state-selective imaging.

  10. State-selective imaging of cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheludko, David V.; Bell, Simon C.; Anderson, Russell; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Vredenbregt, Edgar J. D.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2008-03-01

    Atomic coherence phenomena are usually investigated using single beam techniques without spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate state-selective imaging of cold R85b atoms in a three-level ladder system, where the atomic refractive index is sensitive to the quantum coherence state of the atoms. We use a phase-sensitive diffraction contrast imaging (DCI) technique which depends on the complex refractive index of the atom cloud. A semiclassical model allows us to analytically calculate the detuning-dependent refractive index of the system. The predicted Autler-Townes splitting and our experimental measurements are in excellent agreement. DCI provided a quantitative image of the distribution of the excited-state fraction, and compared with on-resonance absorption and blue cascade fluorescence techniques, was found to be experimentally simple and robust.

  11. Spotlight-8 Image Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimek, Robert; Wright, Ted

    2006-01-01

    Spotlight is a cross-platform GUI-based software package designed to perform image analysis on sequences of images generated by combustion and fluid physics experiments run in a microgravity environment. Spotlight can perform analysis on a single image in an interactive mode or perform analysis on a sequence of images in an automated fashion. Image processing operations can be employed to enhance the image before various statistics and measurement operations are performed. An arbitrarily large number of objects can be analyzed simultaneously with independent areas of interest. Spotlight saves results in a text file that can be imported into other programs for graphing or further analysis. Spotlight can be run on Microsoft Windows, Linux, and Apple OS X platforms.

  12. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; Clary, Maurice C.; Anderson, James L.; Anger, Clifford D.; Carr, Michael H.; Chapman, Clark R.; Davies, Merton E.; Greeley, Ronald; Anderson, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Galileo Orbiter's Solid-State Imaging (SSI) experiment uses a 1.5-m focal length TV camera with 800 x 800 pixel, virtual-phase CCD detector in order to obtain images of Jupiter and its satellites which possess a combination of sensitivity levels, spatial resolutions, geometric fidelity, and spectral range that are unmatched by earlier imaging data. After describing the performance of this equipment on the basis of ground calibrations, attention is given to the SSI experiment's Jupiter system observation objectives; these encompass atmospheric science, satellite surfaces, ring structure, and 'darkside' experiments.

  13. Oncological image analysis: medical and molecular image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Michael

    2007-03-01

    This paper summarises the work we have been doing on joint projects with GE Healthcare on colorectal and liver cancer, and with Siemens Molecular Imaging on dynamic PET. First, we recall the salient facts about cancer and oncological image analysis. Then we introduce some of the work that we have done on analysing clinical MRI images of colorectal and liver cancer, specifically the detection of lymph nodes and segmentation of the circumferential resection margin. In the second part of the paper, we shift attention to the complementary aspect of molecular image analysis, illustrating our approach with some recent work on: tumour acidosis, tumour hypoxia, and multiply drug resistant tumours.

  14. Analysis of Forest Fire Disturbance in the Western United States Using Landsat Time Series Images: 1985 to 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicklein, H. F.; Collatz, G. J.; Masek, J.; Williams, C.

    2008-12-01

    In this study we used two different disturbance maps (both utilizing 30 m resolution Landsat imagery) to assess disturbance trends in Western US forests. The first are maps developed by the NAFD project (North American Forest Dynamics). Each NAFD data cube contains an annual-biennial record of forest disturbance events from 1984-2005. We complimented the NAFD maps with MTBS maps (Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity). MTBS solely maps fire disturbance, recording historical (1985-2005) and contemporary burn severity and fire perimeter across the United States. We used Landsat time series stacks for four locations: Oregon (Landsat path 45 row 29), California (p43r33), Idaho (p41r29), and Utah (p32r37). In all four stacks, fire was a relatively small percentage of the total forest disturbance (ranging from 8% in Utah to 27% in Oregon for the entire 20 year period). We also found that the years with greatest burned area were years with a high aridity index (lower precipitation and higher temperatures), a condition necessary, but not sufficient for fire activity. To assess post-disturbance vegetation regrowth we used two spectral indices, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR). Both indices are sensitive to well-defined spectral paths that forests follow during and after disturbance. As expected, NDVI and NBR were lowest (highest) for the highest (lowest) severity class burned area. However, NBR and NDVI only appear to respond to vegetative reflectance in the first decade after a burn. Therefore, they give useful information on location, timing, and magnitude of disturbance, but direct measurement of biomass with other sensors would be necessary to obtain additional ecological information.

  15. Image potential states at metal-dielectric interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Merry, Jr., Walter Richardson

    1992-04-01

    Angle-resolved two-photon laser photoemission was used to observe the image potential electronic states on the (111) face of a silver single crystal. The transient image potential states were excited from the occupied bulk bands with photons whose energy was tunable around 4 eV. Photoemission of the image potential states was accomplished with photons of energy tunable around 2 eV. Image potential states were found to persist in the presence of physisorbed adlayers of xenon and cyclohexane. On clean Ag(111), the effective mass of the n=1 image potential state was found to be 1.4±0.1 times the mass of a free electron (me). A binding energy of 0.77 eV, measured by earlier workers, was assumed in analysis of the data for the clean surface. On Ag(111), at 75 K covered by one monolayer of xenon, the binding energy of the n=1 image potential state was unchanged relative to its value on the clean surface. An effective mass of (1.00±0.05) • me was obtained. On Ag(111) at 167 K, covered by one monolayer of cyclohexane, the binding energy of the n=2 member of the image potential series was 0.30±0.05 eV. The energy of the n=1 state was again unchanged by deposition of the adsorbate. The effective masses of both states were (0.90±0.1) • me.

  16. Image potential states at metal-dielectric interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Merry, W.R. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Angle-resolved two-photon laser photoemission was used to observe the image potential electronic states on the (111) face of a silver single crystal. The transient image potential states were excited from the occupied bulk bands with photons whose energy was tunable around 4 eV. Photoemission of the image potential states was accomplished with photons of energy tunable around 2 eV. Image potential states were found to persist in the presence of physisorbed adlayers of xenon and cyclohexane. On clean Ag(111), the effective mass of the n=1 image potential state was found to be 1.4{plus minus}0.1 times the mass of a free electron (m{sub e}). A binding energy of 0.77 eV, measured by earlier workers, was assumed in analysis of the data for the clean surface. On Ag(111), at 75 K covered by one monolayer of xenon, the binding energy of the n=1 image potential state was unchanged relative to its value on the clean surface. An effective mass of (1.00{plus minus}0.05) {center dot} m{sub e} was obtained. On Ag(111) at 167 K, covered by one monolayer of cyclohexane, the binding energy of the n=2 member of the image potential series was 0.30{plus minus}0.05 eV. The energy of the n=1 state was again unchanged by deposition of the adsorbate. The effective masses of both states were (0.90{plus minus}0.1) {center dot} m{sub e}.

  17. Paraxial ghost image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Maksoud, Rania H.; Sasian, José M.

    2009-08-01

    This paper develops a methodology to model ghost images that are formed by two reflections between the surfaces of a multi-element lens system in the paraxial regime. An algorithm is presented to generate the ghost layouts from the nominal layout. For each possible ghost layout, paraxial ray tracing is performed to determine the ghost Gaussian cardinal points, the size of the ghost image at the nominal image plane, the location and diameter of the ghost entrance and exit pupils, and the location and diameter for the ghost entrance and exit windows. The paraxial ghost irradiance point spread function is obtained by adding up the irradiance contributions for all ghosts. Ghost simulation results for a simple lens system are provided. This approach provides a quick way to analyze ghost images in the paraxial regime.

  18. Osteoporosis Imaging: State of the Art and Advanced Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is becoming an increasingly important public health issue, and effective treatments to prevent fragility fractures are available. Osteoporosis imaging is of critical importance in identifying individuals at risk for fractures who would require pharmacotherapy to reduce fracture risk and also in monitoring response to treatment. Dual x-ray absorptiometry is currently the state-of-the-art technique to measure bone mineral density and to diagnose osteoporosis according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Motivated by a 2000 National Institutes of Health consensus conference, substantial research efforts have focused on assessing bone quality by using advanced imaging techniques. Among these techniques aimed at better characterizing fracture risk and treatment effects, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (CT) currently plays a central role, and a large number of recent studies have used this technique to study trabecular and cortical bone architecture. Other techniques to analyze bone quality include multidetector CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and quantitative ultrasonography. In addition to quantitative imaging techniques measuring bone density and quality, imaging needs to be used to diagnose prevalent osteoporotic fractures, such as spine fractures on chest radiographs and sagittal multidetector CT reconstructions. Radiologists need to be sensitized to the fact that the presence of fragility fractures will alter patient care, and these fractures need to be described in the report. This review article covers state-of-the-art imaging techniques to measure bone mineral density, describes novel techniques to study bone quality, and focuses on how standard imaging techniques should be used to diagnose prevalent osteoporotic fractures. © RSNA, 2012 PMID:22438439

  19. Radiologist and automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    1999-07-01

    Significant advances are being made in the area of automated medical image analysis. Part of the progress is due to the general advances being made in the types of algorithms used to process images and perform various detection and recognition tasks. A more important reason for this growth in medical image analysis processes, may be due however to a very different reason. The use of computer workstations, digital image acquisition technologies and the use of CRT monitors for display of medical images for primary diagnostic reading is becoming more prevalent in radiology departments around the world. With the advance in computer- based displays, however, has come the realization that displaying images on a CRT monitor is not the same as displaying film on a viewbox. There are perceptual, cognitive and ergonomic issues that must be considered if radiologists are to accept this change in technology and display. The bottom line is that radiologists' performance must be evaluated with these new technologies and image analysis techniques in order to verify that diagnostic performance is at least as good with these new technologies and image analysis procedures as with film-based displays. The goal of this paper is to address some of the perceptual, cognitive and ergonomic issues associated with reading radiographic images from digital displays.

  20. Quantitative analysis of an enlarged area Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) detector based on Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Device (EMCCD) technology.

    PubMed

    Swetadri, Vasan S N; Sharma, P; Singh, V; Jain, A; Ionita, Ciprian N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2013-03-06

    Present day treatment for neurovascular pathological conditions involves the use of devices with very small features such as stents, coils, and balloons; hence, these interventional procedures demand high resolution x-ray imaging under fluoroscopic conditions to provide the capability to guide the deployment of these fine endovascular devices. To address this issue, a high resolution x-ray detector based on EMCCD technology is being developed. The EMCCD field-of-view is enlarged using a fiber-optic taper so that the detector features an effective pixel size of 37 µm giving it a Nyquist frequency of 13.5 lp/mm, which is significantly higher than that of the state of the art Flat Panel Detectors (FPD). Quantitative analysis of the detector, including gain calibration, instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) and modulation transfer function (MTF) determination, are presented in this work. The gain of the detector is a function of the detector temperature; with the detector cooled to 5° C, the highest relative gain that could be achieved was calculated to be 116 times. At this gain setting, the lowest INEE was measured to be 0.6 µR/frame. The MTF, measured using the edge method, was over 2% up to 7 cycles/ mm. To evaluate the performance of the detector under clinical conditions, an aneurysm model was placed over an anthropomorphic head phantom and a coil was guided into the aneurysm under fluoroscopic guidance using the detector. Image sequences from the procedure are presented demonstrating the high resolution of this SSXII.

  1. Multispectral analysis of multimodal images.

    PubMed

    Kvinnsland, Yngve; Brekke, Njål; Taxt, Torfinn M; Grüner, Renate

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of multimodal images represent a valuable increase in available image information, but at the same time it complicates the extraction of diagnostic information across the images. Multispectral analysis (MSA) has the potential to simplify this problem substantially as unlimited number of images can be combined, and tissue properties across the images can be extracted automatically. We have developed a software solution for MSA containing two algorithms for unsupervised classification, an EM-algorithm finding multinormal class descriptions and the k-means clustering algorithm, and two for supervised classification, a Bayesian classifier using multinormal class descriptions and a kNN-algorithm. The software has an efficient user interface for the creation and manipulation of class descriptions, and it has proper tools for displaying the results. The software has been tested on different sets of images. One application is to segment cross-sectional images of brain tissue (T1- and T2-weighted MR images) into its main normal tissues and brain tumors. Another interesting set of images are the perfusion maps and diffusion maps, derived images from raw MR images. The software returns segmentations that seem to be sensible. The MSA software appears to be a valuable tool for image analysis with multimodal images at hand. It readily gives a segmentation of image volumes that visually seems to be sensible. However, to really learn how to use MSA, it will be necessary to gain more insight into what tissues the different segments contain, and the upcoming work will therefore be focused on examining the tissues through for example histological sections.

  2. Abnormalities of regional brain function in Parkinson’s disease: a meta-analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, PingLei; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Yi; Zhang, He; Guan, DeNing; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    There is convincing evidence that abnormalities of regional brain function exist in Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, many resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) studies using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) have reported inconsistent results about regional spontaneous neuronal activity in PD. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis using the Seed-based d Mapping and several complementary analyses. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases for eligible whole-brain rs-fMRI studies that measured ALFF differences between patients with PD and healthy controls published from January 1st, 2000 until June 24, 2016. Eleven studies reporting 14 comparisons, comparing 421 patients and 381 healthy controls, were included. The most consistent and replicable findings in patients with PD compared with healthy controls were identified, including the decreased ALFFs in the bilateral supplementary motor areas, left putamen, left premotor cortex, and left inferior parietal gyrus, and increased ALFFs in the right inferior parietal gyrus. The altered ALFFs in these brain regions are related to motor deficits and compensation in PD, which contribute to understanding its neurobiological underpinnings and could serve as specific regions of interest for further studies. PMID:28079169

  3. Analysis of spatial pseudodepolarizers in imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of a number of optical instruments is to measure the intensity accurately without bias as to the incident polarization state. One method to overcome polarization bias in optical systems is the insertion of a spatial pseudodepolarizer. Both the degree of depolarization and image degradation (from the polarization aberrations of the pseudodepolarizer) are analyzed for two depolarizer designs: (1) the Cornu pseudodepolarizer, effective for linearly polarized light, and (2) the dual Babinet compensator pseudodepolarizer, effective for all incident polarization states. The image analysis uses a matrix formalism to describe the polarization dependence of the diffraction patterns and optical transfer function.

  4. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  5. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    PubMed

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts grown in

  6. Flightspeed Integral Image Analysis Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The Flightspeed Integral Image Analysis Toolkit (FIIAT) is a C library that provides image analysis functions in a single, portable package. It provides basic low-level filtering, texture analysis, and subwindow descriptor for applications dealing with image interpretation and object recognition. Designed with spaceflight in mind, it addresses: Ease of integration (minimal external dependencies) Fast, real-time operation using integer arithmetic where possible (useful for platforms lacking a dedicated floatingpoint processor) Written entirely in C (easily modified) Mostly static memory allocation 8-bit image data The basic goal of the FIIAT library is to compute meaningful numerical descriptors for images or rectangular image regions. These n-vectors can then be used directly for novelty detection or pattern recognition, or as a feature space for higher-level pattern recognition tasks. The library provides routines for leveraging training data to derive descriptors that are most useful for a specific data set. Its runtime algorithms exploit a structure known as the "integral image." This is a caching method that permits fast summation of values within rectangular regions of an image. This integral frame facilitates a wide range of fast image-processing functions. This toolkit has applicability to a wide range of autonomous image analysis tasks in the space-flight domain, including novelty detection, object and scene classification, target detection for autonomous instrument placement, and science analysis of geomorphology. It makes real-time texture and pattern recognition possible for platforms with severe computational restraints. The software provides an order of magnitude speed increase over alternative software libraries currently in use by the research community. FIIAT can commercially support intelligent video cameras used in intelligent surveillance. It is also useful for object recognition by robots or other autonomous vehicles

  7. Deep Learning in Medical Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Guorong; Suk, Heung-Il

    2016-01-01

    The computer-assisted analysis for better interpreting images have been longstanding issues in the medical imaging field. On the image-understanding front, recent advances in machine learning, especially, in the way of deep learning, have made a big leap to help identify, classify, and quantify patterns in medical images. Specifically, exploiting hierarchical feature representations learned solely from data, instead of handcrafted features mostly designed based on domain-specific knowledge, lies at the core of the advances. In that way, deep learning is rapidly proving to be the state-of-the-art foundation, achieving enhanced performances in various medical applications. In this article, we introduce the fundamentals of deep learning methods; review their successes to image registration, anatomical/cell structures detection, tissue segmentation, computer-aided disease diagnosis or prognosis, and so on. We conclude by raising research issues and suggesting future directions for further improvements. PMID:28301734

  8. Image analysis for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Kannappan; Huang, Thomas S.

    1991-07-01

    There is a great deal of interest in automating the process of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequencing to support the analysis of genomic DNA such as the Human and Mouse Genome projects. In one class of gel-based sequencing protocols autoradiograph images are generated in the final step and usually require manual interpretation to reconstruct the DNA sequence represented by the image. The need to handle a large volume of sequence information necessitates automation of the manual autoradiograph reading step through image analysis in order to reduce the length of time required to obtain sequence data and reduce transcription errors. Various adaptive image enhancement, segmentation and alignment methods were applied to autoradiograph images. The methods are adaptive to the local characteristics of the image such as noise, background signal, or presence of edges. Once the two-dimensional data is converted to a set of aligned one-dimensional profiles waveform analysis is used to determine the location of each band which represents one nucleotide in the sequence. Different classification strategies including a rule-based approach are investigated to map the profile signals, augmented with the original two-dimensional image data as necessary, to textual DNA sequence information.

  9. Errors from Image Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, William Monford

    2015-02-23

    Presenting a systematic study of the standard analysis of rod-pinch radiographs for obtaining quantitative measurements of areal mass densities, and making suggestions for improving the methodology of obtaining quantitative information from radiographed objects.

  10. Retinal imaging analysis based on vessel detection.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Arshad; Hazim Alkawaz, Mohammed; Rehman, Amjad; Saba, Tanzila

    2017-03-13

    With an increase in the advancement of digital imaging and computing power, computationally intelligent technologies are in high demand to be used in ophthalmology cure and treatment. In current research, Retina Image Analysis (RIA) is developed for optometrist at Eye Care Center in Management and Science University. This research aims to analyze the retina through vessel detection. The RIA assists in the analysis of the retinal images and specialists are served with various options like saving, processing and analyzing retinal images through its advanced interface layout. Additionally, RIA assists in the selection process of vessel segment; processing these vessels by calculating its diameter, standard deviation, length, and displaying detected vessel on the retina. The Agile Unified Process is adopted as the methodology in developing this research. To conclude, Retina Image Analysis might help the optometrist to get better understanding in analyzing the patient's retina. Finally, the Retina Image Analysis procedure is developed using MATLAB (R2011b). Promising results are attained that are comparable in the state of art.

  11. Anmap: Image and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Paul; Waldram, Elizabeth; Titterington, David; Rees, Nick

    2014-11-01

    Anmap analyses and processes images and spectral data. Originally written for use in radio astronomy, much of its functionality is applicable to other disciplines; additional algorithms and analysis procedures allow direct use in, for example, NMR imaging and spectroscopy. Anmap emphasizes the analysis of data to extract quantitative results for comparison with theoretical models and/or other experimental data. To achieve this, Anmap provides a wide range of tools for analysis, fitting and modelling (including standard image and data processing algorithms). It also provides a powerful environment for users to develop their own analysis/processing tools either by combining existing algorithms and facilities with the very powerful command (scripting) language or by writing new routines in FORTRAN that integrate seamlessly with the rest of Anmap.

  12. Multispectral Imaging Broadens Cellular Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Amnis Corporation, a Seattle-based biotechnology company, developed ImageStream to produce sensitive fluorescence images of cells in flow. The company responded to an SBIR solicitation from Ames Research Center, and proposed to evaluate several methods of extending the depth of field for its ImageStream system and implement the best as an upgrade to its commercial products. This would allow users to view whole cells at the same time, rather than just one section of each cell. Through Phase I and II SBIR contracts, Ames provided Amnis the funding the company needed to develop this extended functionality. For NASA, the resulting high-speed image flow cytometry process made its way into Medusa, a life-detection instrument built to collect, store, and analyze sample organisms from erupting hydrothermal vents, and has the potential to benefit space flight health monitoring. On the commercial end, Amnis has implemented the process in ImageStream, combining high-resolution microscopy and flow cytometry in a single instrument, giving researchers the power to conduct quantitative analyses of individual cells and cell populations at the same time, in the same experiment. ImageStream is also built for many other applications, including cell signaling and pathway analysis; classification and characterization of peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations; quantitative morphology; apoptosis (cell death) assays; gene expression analysis; analysis of cell conjugates; molecular distribution; and receptor mapping and distribution.

  13. Data analysis for GOPEX image frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. M.; Shaik, K. S.; Yan, T.-Y.

    1993-01-01

    The data analysis based on the image frames received at the Solid State Imaging (SSI) camera of the Galileo Optical Experiment (GOPEX) demonstration conducted between 9-16 Dec. 1992 is described. Laser uplink was successfully established between the ground and the Galileo spacecraft during its second Earth-gravity-assist phase in December 1992. SSI camera frames were acquired which contained images of detected laser pulses transmitted from the Table Mountain Facility (TMF), Wrightwood, California, and the Starfire Optical Range (SOR), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Laser pulse data were processed using standard image-processing techniques at the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL) for preliminary pulse identification and to produce public release images. Subsequent image analysis corrected for background noise to measure received pulse intensities. Data were plotted to obtain histograms on a daily basis and were then compared with theoretical results derived from applicable weak-turbulence and strong-turbulence considerations. Processing steps are described and the theories are compared with the experimental results. Quantitative agreement was found in both turbulence regimes, and better agreement would have been found, given more received laser pulses. Future experiments should consider methods to reliably measure low-intensity pulses, and through experimental planning to geometrically locate pulse positions with greater certainty.

  14. Deep Learning in Medical Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Guorong; Suk, Heung-Il

    2017-03-09

    This review covers computer-assisted analysis of images in the field of medical imaging. Recent advances in machine learning, especially with regard to deep learning, are helping to identify, classify, and quantify patterns in medical images. At the core of these advances is the ability to exploit hierarchical feature representations learned solely from data, instead of features designed by hand according to domain-specific knowledge. Deep learning is rapidly becoming the state of the art, leading to enhanced performance in various medical applications. We introduce the fundamentals of deep learning methods and review their successes in image registration, detection of anatomical and cellular structures, tissue segmentation, computer-aided disease diagnosis and prognosis, and so on. We conclude by discussing research issues and suggesting future directions for further improvement. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering Volume 19 is June 4, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  15. Quantitative histogram analysis of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Oliver; Ferreira, Sérgio T.

    2006-11-01

    A routine for histogram analysis of images has been written in the object-oriented, graphical development environment LabVIEW. The program converts an RGB bitmap image into an intensity-linear greyscale image according to selectable conversion coefficients. This greyscale image is subsequently analysed by plots of the intensity histogram and probability distribution of brightness, and by calculation of various parameters, including average brightness, standard deviation, variance, minimal and maximal brightness, mode, skewness and kurtosis of the histogram and the median of the probability distribution. The program allows interactive selection of specific regions of interest (ROI) in the image and definition of lower and upper threshold levels (e.g., to permit the removal of a constant background signal). The results of the analysis of multiple images can be conveniently saved and exported for plotting in other programs, which allows fast analysis of relatively large sets of image data. The program file accompanies this manuscript together with a detailed description of two application examples: The analysis of fluorescence microscopy images, specifically of tau-immunofluorescence in primary cultures of rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and the quantification of protein bands by Western-blot. The possibilities and limitations of this kind of analysis are discussed. Program summaryTitle of program: HAWGC Catalogue identifier: ADXG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXG_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: Mobile Intel Pentium III, AMD Duron Installations: No installation necessary—Executable file together with necessary files for LabVIEW Run-time engine Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: WindowsME/2000/XP Programming language used: LabVIEW 7.0 Memory required to execute with typical data:˜16MB for starting and ˜160MB used for

  16. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  17. Curvelet Based Offline Analysis of SEM Images

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Syed Hamad; Haq, Nuhman ul; Hayat, Khizar; Naz, Saeeda; Haque, Ihsan ul

    2014-01-01

    Manual offline analysis, of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image, is a time consuming process and requires continuous human intervention and efforts. This paper presents an image processing based method for automated offline analyses of SEM images. To this end, our strategy relies on a two-stage process, viz. texture analysis and quantification. The method involves a preprocessing step, aimed at the noise removal, in order to avoid false edges. For texture analysis, the proposed method employs a state of the art Curvelet transform followed by segmentation through a combination of entropy filtering, thresholding and mathematical morphology (MM). The quantification is carried out by the application of a box-counting algorithm, for fractal dimension (FD) calculations, with the ultimate goal of measuring the parameters, like surface area and perimeter. The perimeter is estimated indirectly by counting the boundary boxes of the filled shapes. The proposed method, when applied to a representative set of SEM images, not only showed better results in image segmentation but also exhibited a good accuracy in the calculation of surface area and perimeter. The proposed method outperforms the well-known Watershed segmentation algorithm. PMID:25089617

  18. A Unified Mathematical Approach to Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    describes four instances of the paradigm in detail. Directions for ongoing and future research are also indicated. Keywords: Image processing; Algorithms; Segmentation; Boundary detection; tomography; Global image analysis .

  19. Multifluorescence 2D gel imaging and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Vormbrock, Ingo; Hartwig, Sonja; Lehr, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Although image acquisition and analysis are crucial steps within the multifluorescence two-dimensional gel electrophoresis workflow, some basics are frequently not carried out with the necessary diligence. This chapter should help to prevent easily avoidable failures during imaging and image preparation for comparative protein analysis.

  20. UV imaging in pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Jesper

    2017-08-01

    UV imaging provides spatially and temporally resolved absorbance measurements, which are highly useful in pharmaceutical analysis. Commercial UV imaging instrumentation was originally developed as a detector for separation sciences, but the main use is in the area of in vitro dissolution and release testing studies. The review covers the basic principles of the technology and summarizes the main applications in relation to intrinsic dissolution rate determination, excipient compatibility studies and in vitro release characterization of drug substances and vehicles intended for parenteral administration. UV imaging has potential for providing new insights to drug dissolution and release processes in formulation development by real-time monitoring of swelling, precipitation, diffusion and partitioning phenomena. Limitations of current instrumentation are discussed and a perspective to new developments and opportunities given as new instrumentation is emerging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A computational image analysis glossary for biologists.

    PubMed

    Roeder, Adrienne H K; Cunha, Alexandre; Burl, Michael C; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in biological imaging have resulted in an explosion in the quality and quantity of images obtained in a digital format. Developmental biologists are increasingly acquiring beautiful and complex images, thus creating vast image datasets. In the past, patterns in image data have been detected by the human eye. Larger datasets, however, necessitate high-throughput objective analysis tools to computationally extract quantitative information from the images. These tools have been developed in collaborations between biologists, computer scientists, mathematicians and physicists. In this Primer we present a glossary of image analysis terms to aid biologists and briefly discuss the importance of robust image analysis in developmental studies.

  2. Image Correlation: Part 1. Simulation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    prepared for UNITED STATES AIR FORCE PROJECT RAND D D Or,• Illnel lSANT Dr-- CA. 90 ft M A R . . . . . -- a .02 .0. The research described In this...Analysis, Deputy Chief of Staff, Research and Development, Hq USAF. Reports of The Rand Corporation do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of...the sponsors of Rand research , 4. . . , * R-2057/1-PR Novem-ber 1976 Image Correlation: Part I Simulation and Analysis H. H. Bailey, F. W. Blackwell

  3. Image analysis in medical imaging: recent advances in selected examples

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, G

    2010-01-01

    Medical imaging has developed into one of the most important fields within scientific imaging due to the rapid and continuing progress in computerised medical image visualisation and advances in analysis methods and computer-aided diagnosis. Several research applications are selected to illustrate the advances in image analysis algorithms and visualisation. Recent results, including previously unpublished data, are presented to illustrate the challenges and ongoing developments. PMID:21611048

  4. Uncooled thermal imaging and image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyun; Chang, Benkang; Yu, Chunyu; Zhang, Junju; Sun, Lianjun

    2006-09-01

    Thermal imager can transfer difference of temperature to difference of electric signal level, so can be application to medical treatment such as estimation of blood flow speed and vessel 1ocation [1], assess pain [2] and so on. With the technology of un-cooled focal plane array (UFPA) is grown up more and more, some simple medical function can be completed with un-cooled thermal imager, for example, quick warning for fever heat with SARS. It is required that performance of imaging is stabilization and spatial and temperature resolution is high enough. In all performance parameters, noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) is often used as the criterion of universal performance. 320 x 240 α-Si micro-bolometer UFPA has been applied widely presently for its steady performance and sensitive responsibility. In this paper, NETD of UFPA and the relation between NETD and temperature are researched. several vital parameters that can affect NETD are listed and an universal formula is presented. Last, the images from the kind of thermal imager are analyzed based on the purpose of detection persons with fever heat. An applied thermal image intensification method is introduced.

  5. Quantitative multi-image analysis for biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Martin A B; Bergholt, Mads S; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-05-01

    Imaging by Raman spectroscopy enables unparalleled label-free insights into cell and tissue composition at the molecular level. With established approaches limited to single image analysis, there are currently no general guidelines or consensus on how to quantify biochemical components across multiple Raman images. Here, we describe a broadly applicable methodology for the combination of multiple Raman images into a single image for analysis. This is achieved by removing image specific background interference, unfolding the series of Raman images into a single dataset, and normalisation of each Raman spectrum to render comparable Raman images. Multivariate image analysis is finally applied to derive the contributing 'pure' biochemical spectra for relative quantification. We present our methodology using four independently measured Raman images of control cells and four images of cells treated with strontium ions from substituted bioactive glass. We show that the relative biochemical distribution per area of the cells can be quantified. In addition, using k-means clustering, we are able to discriminate between the two cell types over multiple Raman images. This study shows a streamlined quantitative multi-image analysis tool for improving cell/tissue characterisation and opens new avenues in biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Imaging analysis of LDEF craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radicatidibrozolo, F.; Harris, D. W.; Chakel, J. A.; Fleming, R. H.; Bunch, T. E.

    1991-01-01

    Two small craters in Al from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment tray A11E00F (no. 74, 119 micron diameter and no. 31, 158 micron diameter) were analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS), low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM), and SEM energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). High resolution images and sensitive elemental and molecular analysis were obtained with this combined approach. The result of these analyses are presented.

  7. Planning applications in image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boddy, Mark; White, Jim; Goldman, Robert; Short, Nick, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    We describe two interim results from an ongoing effort to automate the acquisition, analysis, archiving, and distribution of satellite earth science data. Both results are applications of Artificial Intelligence planning research to the automatic generation of processing steps for image analysis tasks. First, we have constructed a linear conditional planner (CPed), used to generate conditional processing plans. Second, we have extended an existing hierarchical planning system to make use of durations, resources, and deadlines, thus supporting the automatic generation of processing steps in time and resource-constrained environments.

  8. Grid computing in image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Klaus; Görtler, Jürgen; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Kayser, Gian

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic surgical pathology or tissue–based diagnosis still remains the most reliable and specific diagnostic medical procedure. The development of whole slide scanners permits the creation of virtual slides and to work on so-called virtual microscopes. In addition to interactive work on virtual slides approaches have been reported that introduce automated virtual microscopy, which is composed of several tools focusing on quite different tasks. These include evaluation of image quality and image standardization, analysis of potential useful thresholds for object detection and identification (segmentation), dynamic segmentation procedures, adjustable magnification to optimize feature extraction, and texture analysis including image transformation and evaluation of elementary primitives. Grid technology seems to possess all features to efficiently target and control the specific tasks of image information and detection in order to obtain a detailed and accurate diagnosis. Grid technology is based upon so-called nodes that are linked together and share certain communication rules in using open standards. Their number and functionality can vary according to the needs of a specific user at a given point in time. When implementing automated virtual microscopy with Grid technology, all of the five different Grid functions have to be taken into account, namely 1) computation services, 2) data services, 3) application services, 4) information services, and 5) knowledge services. Although all mandatory tools of automated virtual microscopy can be implemented in a closed or standardized open system, Grid technology offers a new dimension to acquire, detect, classify, and distribute medical image information, and to assure quality in tissue–based diagnosis.

  9. Determining optimal medical image compression: psychometric and image distortion analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Storage issues and bandwidth over networks have led to a need to optimally compress medical imaging files while leaving clinical image quality uncompromised. Methods To determine the range of clinically acceptable medical image compression across multiple modalities (CT, MR, and XR), we performed psychometric analysis of image distortion thresholds using physician readers and also performed subtraction analysis of medical image distortion by varying degrees of compression. Results When physician readers were asked to determine the threshold of compression beyond which images were clinically compromised, the mean image distortion threshold was a JPEG Q value of 23.1 ± 7.0. In Receiver-Operator Characteristics (ROC) plot analysis, compressed images could not be reliably distinguished from original images at any compression level between Q = 50 and Q = 95. Below this range, some readers were able to discriminate the compressed and original images, but high sensitivity and specificity for this discrimination was only encountered at the lowest JPEG Q value tested (Q = 5). Analysis of directly measured magnitude of image distortion from subtracted image pairs showed that the relationship between JPEG Q value and degree of image distortion underwent an upward inflection in the region of the two thresholds determined psychometrically (approximately Q = 25 to Q = 50), with 75 % of the image distortion occurring between Q = 50 and Q = 1. Conclusion It is possible to apply lossy JPEG compression to medical images without compromise of clinical image quality. Modest degrees of compression, with a JPEG Q value of 50 or higher (corresponding approximately to a compression ratio of 15:1 or less), can be applied to medical images while leaving the images indistinguishable from the original. PMID:22849336

  10. Determining optimal medical image compression: psychometric and image distortion analysis.

    PubMed

    Flint, Alexander C

    2012-07-31

    Storage issues and bandwidth over networks have led to a need to optimally compress medical imaging files while leaving clinical image quality uncompromised. To determine the range of clinically acceptable medical image compression across multiple modalities (CT, MR, and XR), we performed psychometric analysis of image distortion thresholds using physician readers and also performed subtraction analysis of medical image distortion by varying degrees of compression. When physician readers were asked to determine the threshold of compression beyond which images were clinically compromised, the mean image distortion threshold was a JPEG Q value of 23.1 ± 7.0. In Receiver-Operator Characteristics (ROC) plot analysis, compressed images could not be reliably distinguished from original images at any compression level between Q = 50 and Q = 95. Below this range, some readers were able to discriminate the compressed and original images, but high sensitivity and specificity for this discrimination was only encountered at the lowest JPEG Q value tested (Q = 5). Analysis of directly measured magnitude of image distortion from subtracted image pairs showed that the relationship between JPEG Q value and degree of image distortion underwent an upward inflection in the region of the two thresholds determined psychometrically (approximately Q = 25 to Q = 50), with 75 % of the image distortion occurring between Q = 50 and Q = 1. It is possible to apply lossy JPEG compression to medical images without compromise of clinical image quality. Modest degrees of compression, with a JPEG Q value of 50 or higher (corresponding approximately to a compression ratio of 15:1 or less), can be applied to medical images while leaving the images indistinguishable from the original.

  11. Automated image analysis of uterine cervical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Gu, Jia; Ferris, Daron; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality of women in developing countries. If detected early and treated adequately, cervical cancer can be virtually prevented. Cervical precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician with a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system. In colposcopy, epithelium that turns white after application of acetic acid is called acetowhite epithelium. Acetowhite epithelium is one of the major diagnostic features observed in detecting cancer and pre-cancerous regions. Automatic extraction of acetowhite regions from cervical images has been a challenging task due to specular reflection, various illumination conditions, and most importantly, large intra-patient variation. This paper presents a multi-step acetowhite region detection system to analyze the acetowhite lesions in cervical images automatically. First, the system calibrates the color of the cervical images to be independent of screening devices. Second, the anatomy of the uterine cervix is analyzed in terms of cervix region, external os region, columnar region, and squamous region. Third, the squamous region is further analyzed and subregions based on three levels of acetowhite are identified. The extracted acetowhite regions are accompanied by color scores to indicate the different levels of acetowhite. The system has been evaluated by 40 human subjects' data and demonstrates high correlation with experts' annotations.

  12. Raman imaging of the diverse states of the filamentous cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, J.; Tachikawa, M.; Mochizuki, A.; Sako, Y.; Iwasaki, H.; Morita, S.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of our research was to predict cell fates of a multicellular system, accompanied by cellular differentiation. To fulfill this objective, we sought to distinguish the differentiated and undifferentiated cells of filamentous cyanobacteria (Anabaena sp. PCC 7120) using Raman imaging. This technique indicated Raman bands of the cellular system, in which several bands were assigned to vibrations of β-carotene and scytonemin. We applied principal component analysis (PCA) to the Raman spectra to determine the PC1 and PC2 loading plots and their scores. The data points obtained for heterocyst tended to converge along the bottom of the scatterplot whereas those for vegetative cells were more widely distributed in the PC plane. This indicates that the chemical compositions of a heterocyst were relatively stable. As vegetative cells are capable of proliferation or differentiation, they may transit and exist in several states including the pseudo-differentiated state. The results suggest that the chemical compositions of a vegetative cell fluctuated according to its cellular condition. In conclusion, the results of Raman imaging indicate that the diverse states of vegetative cells are localized in a specific state through differentiation.

  13. Object-Based Image Analysis of WORLDVIEW-2 Satellite Data for the Classification of Mangrove Areas in the City of SÃO LUÍS, MARANHÃO State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kux, H. J. H.; Souza, U. D. V.

    2012-07-01

    Taking into account the importance of mangrove environments for the biodiversity of coastal areas, the objective of this paper is to classify the different types of irregular human occupation on the areas of mangrove vegetation in São Luis, capital of Maranhão State, Brazil, considering the OBIA (Object-based Image Analysis) approach with WorldView-2 satellite data and using InterIMAGE, a free image analysis software. A methodology for the study of the area covered by mangroves at the northern portion of the city was proposed to identify the main targets of this area, such as: marsh areas (known locally as Apicum), mangrove forests, tidal channels, blockhouses (irregular constructions), embankments, paved streets and different condominiums. Initially a databank including information on the main types of occupation and environments was established for the area under study. An image fusion (multispectral bands with panchromatic band) was done, to improve the information content of WorldView-2 data. Following an ortho-rectification was made with the dataset used, in order to compare with cartographical data from the municipality, using Ground Control Points (GCPs) collected during field survey. Using the data mining software GEODMA, a series of attributes which characterize the targets of interest was established. Afterwards the classes were structured, a knowledge model was created and the classification performed. The OBIA approach eased mapping of such sensitive areas, showing the irregular occupations and embankments of mangrove forests, reducing its area and damaging the marine biodiversity.

  14. Common feature discriminant analysis for matching infrared face images to optical face images.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhifeng; Gong, Dihong; Qiao, Yu; Tao, Dacheng

    2014-06-01

    In biometrics research and industry, it is critical yet a challenge to match infrared face images to optical face images. The major difficulty lies in the fact that a great discrepancy exists between the infrared face image and corresponding optical face image because they are captured by different devices (optical imaging device and infrared imaging device). This paper presents a new approach called common feature discriminant analysis to reduce this great discrepancy and improve optical-infrared face recognition performance. In this approach, a new learning-based face descriptor is first proposed to extract the common features from heterogeneous face images (infrared face images and optical face images), and an effective matching method is then applied to the resulting features to obtain the final decision. Extensive experiments are conducted on two large and challenging optical-infrared face data sets to show the superiority of our approach over the state-of-the-art.

  15. Digital image processing and analysis for activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Lee, Xue Yong; Nisar, Humaira; Ng, Choon Aun; Yeap, Kim Ho; Malik, Aamir Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Activated sludge system is generally used in wastewater treatment plants for processing domestic influent. Conventionally the activated sludge wastewater treatment is monitored by measuring physico-chemical parameters like total suspended solids (TSSol), sludge volume index (SVI) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) etc. For the measurement, tests are conducted in the laboratory, which take many hours to give the final measurement. Digital image processing and analysis offers a better alternative not only to monitor and characterize the current state of activated sludge but also to predict the future state. The characterization by image processing and analysis is done by correlating the time evolution of parameters extracted by image analysis of floc and filaments with the physico-chemical parameters. This chapter briefly reviews the activated sludge wastewater treatment; and, procedures of image acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation and analysis in the specific context of activated sludge wastewater treatment. In the latter part additional procedures like z-stacking, image stitching are introduced for wastewater image preprocessing, which are not previously used in the context of activated sludge. Different preprocessing and segmentation techniques are proposed, along with the survey of imaging procedures reported in the literature. Finally the image analysis based morphological parameters and correlation of the parameters with regard to monitoring and prediction of activated sludge are discussed. Hence it is observed that image analysis can play a very useful role in the monitoring of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants.

  16. Multispectral Image Analysis of Hurricane Gilbert

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-19

    Classification) Multispectral Image Analysis of Hurrican Gilbert (unclassified) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kleespies, Thomas J. (GL/LYS) 13a. TYPE OF REPORT...cloud top height. component, of tle image in the red channel, and similarly for the green and blue channels. Multispectral Muti.pectral image analysis can...However, there seems to be few references to the human range of vision, the selection as to which mllti.pp.tral image analysis of scenes or

  17. Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2005-09-01

    The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

  18. Statistical analysis of biophoton image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Susheng

    1998-08-01

    A photon count image system has been developed to obtain the ultra-weak bioluminescence image. The photon images of some plant, animal and human hand have been detected. The biophoton image is different from usual image. In this paper three characteristics of biophoton image are analyzed. On the basis of these characteristics the detected probability and detected limit of photon count image system, detected limit of biophoton image have been discussed. These researches provide scientific basis for experiments design and photon image processing.

  19. Abnormal regional homogeneity as potential imaging biomarker for psychosis risk syndrome: a resting-state fMRI study and support vector machine analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Guodong; Lv, Hailong; Wu, Renrong; Zhao, Jingping; Guo, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Subjects with psychosis risk syndrome (PRS) have structural and functional abnormalities in several brain regions. However, regional functional synchronization of PRS has not been clarified. We recruited 34 PRS subjects and 37 healthy controls. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) of resting-state functional magnetic resonance scans was employed to analyze regional functional synchronization in these participants. Receiver operating characteristic curves and support vector machines were used to detect whether abnormal regional functional synchronization could be utilized to separate PRS subjects from healthy controls. We observed that PRS subjects showed significant ReHo decreases in the left inferior temporal gyrus and increases in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right putamen compared with the controls. No correlations between abnormal regional functional synchronization in these brain regions and clinical characteristics existed. A combination of the ReHo values in the three brain regions showed sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 88.24%, 91.89%, and 90.14%, respectively, for discriminating PRS subjects from healthy controls. We inferred that abnormal regional functional synchronization exists in the cerebrum of PRS subjects, and a combination of ReHo values in these abnormal regions could be applied as potential image biomarker to identify PRS subjects from healthy controls. PMID:27272341

  20. Abnormal regional homogeneity as a potential imaging biomarker for adolescent-onset schizophrenia: A resting-state fMRI study and support vector machine analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Luxian; Wu, Renrong; Fan, Xiaoduo; Zhao, Jingping; Guo, Wenbin

    2017-06-03

    Structural and functional abnormalities have been reported in the brain of patients with adolescent-onset schizophrenia (AOS). The brain regional functional synchronization in patients with AOS remains unclear. We analyzed resting-state functional magnetic resonance scans in 48 drug-naive patients with AOS and 31 healthy controls by using regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measurement that reflects brain local functional connectivity or synchronization and indicates regional integration of information processing. Then, receiver operating characteristic curves and support vector machines were used to evaluate the effect of abnormal regional homogeneity in differentiating patients from controls. Patients with AOS showed significantly increased ReHo values in the bilateral superior medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and significantly decreased ReHo values in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG), right precentral lobule, right inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and left paracentral lobule when compared with controls. A combination of the ReHo values in bilateral superior MPFC, left STG, and right IPL was able to discriminate patients from controls with the sensitivity of 88.24%, specificity of 91.89%, and accuracy of 90.14%. The brain regional functional synchronization abnormalities exist in drug-naive patients with AOS. A combination of ReHo values in these abnormal regions might serve as potential imaging biomarker to identify patients with AOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormal regional homogeneity as potential imaging biomarker for psychosis risk syndrome: a resting-state fMRI study and support vector machine analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Guodong; Lv, Hailong; Wu, Renrong; Zhao, Jingping; Guo, Wenbin

    2016-06-08

    Subjects with psychosis risk syndrome (PRS) have structural and functional abnormalities in several brain regions. However, regional functional synchronization of PRS has not been clarified. We recruited 34 PRS subjects and 37 healthy controls. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) of resting-state functional magnetic resonance scans was employed to analyze regional functional synchronization in these participants. Receiver operating characteristic curves and support vector machines were used to detect whether abnormal regional functional synchronization could be utilized to separate PRS subjects from healthy controls. We observed that PRS subjects showed significant ReHo decreases in the left inferior temporal gyrus and increases in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right putamen compared with the controls. No correlations between abnormal regional functional synchronization in these brain regions and clinical characteristics existed. A combination of the ReHo values in the three brain regions showed sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 88.24%, 91.89%, and 90.14%, respectively, for discriminating PRS subjects from healthy controls. We inferred that abnormal regional functional synchronization exists in the cerebrum of PRS subjects, and a combination of ReHo values in these abnormal regions could be applied as potential image biomarker to identify PRS subjects from healthy controls.

  2. Lineaments derived from analysis of linear features mapped from Landsat images of the Four Corners region of the Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, Daniel H.

    1982-01-01

    Linear features are relatively short, distinct, non-cultural linear elements mappable on Landsat multispectral scanner images (MSS). Most linear features are related to local topographic features, such as cliffs, slope breaks, narrow ridges, and stream valley segments that are interpreted as reflecting directed aspects of local geologic structure including faults, zones of fracturing (joints), and the strike of tilted beds. 6,050 linear features were mapped on computer-enhanced Landsat MSS images of 11 Landsat scenes covering an area from the Rio Grande rift zone on the east to the Grand Canyon on the west and from the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, on the north to the Mogollon Rim on the south. Computer-aided statistical analysis of the linear feature data revealed 5 statistically important trend intervals: 1.) N. 10W.-N.16E., 2.) N.35-72E., 3.) N.33-59W., 4.) N. 74-83W., and 5.) N.89-9-W. and N. 89-90E. Subsequent analysis of the distribution of the linear features indicated that only the first three trend intervals are of regional geologic significance. Computer-generated maps of the linear features in each important trend interval were prepared, as well as contour maps showing the relative concentrations of linear features in each trend interval. These maps were then analyzed for patterns suggestive of possible regional tectonic lines. 20 possible tectonic lines, or lineaments, were interpreted from the maps. One lineament is defined by an obvious change in overall linear feature concentrations along a northwest-trending line cutting across northeastern Arizona. Linear features are abundant northeast of the line and relatively scarce to the southwest. The remaining 19 lineaments represent the axes of clusters of parallel linear features elongated in the direction of the linear feature trends. Most of these lineaments mark previously known structural zones controlled by linear features in the Precambrian basement or show newly recognized relationships to

  3. Principles and clinical applications of image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kisner, H J

    1988-12-01

    Image processing has traveled to the lunar surface and back, finding its way into the clinical laboratory. Advances in digital computers have improved the technology of image analysis, resulting in a wide variety of medical applications. Offering improvements in turnaround time, standardized systems, increased precision, and walkaway automation, digital image analysis has likely found a permanent home as a diagnostic aid in the interpretation of microscopic as well as macroscopic laboratory images.

  4. FFDM image quality assessment using computerized image texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Rachelle; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative measures of image quality (IQ) are routinely obtained during the evaluation of imaging systems. These measures, however, do not necessarily correlate with the IQ of the actual clinical images, which can also be affected by factors such as patient positioning. No quantitative method currently exists to evaluate clinical IQ. Therefore, we investigated the potential of using computerized image texture analysis to quantitatively assess IQ. Our hypothesis is that image texture features can be used to assess IQ as a measure of the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To test feasibility, the "Rachel" anthropomorphic breast phantom (Model 169, Gammex RMI) was imaged with a Senographe 2000D FFDM system (GE Healthcare) using 220 unique exposure settings (target/filter, kVs, and mAs combinations). The mAs were varied from 10%-300% of that required for an average glandular dose (AGD) of 1.8 mGy. A 2.5cm2 retroareolar region of interest (ROI) was segmented from each image. The SNR was computed from the ROIs segmented from images linear with dose (i.e., raw images) after flat-field and off-set correction. Image texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, and fractal dimension were computed from the Premium ViewTM postprocessed image ROIs. Multiple linear regression demonstrated a strong association between the computed image texture features and SNR (R2=0.92, p<=0.001). When including kV, target and filter as additional predictor variables, a stronger association with SNR was observed (R2=0.95, p<=0.001). The strong associations indicate that computerized image texture analysis can be used to measure image SNR and potentially aid in automating IQ assessment as a component of the clinical workflow. Further work is underway to validate our findings in larger clinical datasets.

  5. Imaging of vasculitis: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Francesco; Pipitone, Nicolò; Salvarani, Carlo; Schmidt, Wolfgang A

    2016-08-01

    The increasing availability and improvement of imaging techniques are making a profound impact in the evaluation and management of patients with vasculitis, particularly for those with large vessel vasculitis, and will most likely play an ever more important role in the future. Deep, large vessels can be examined by CT or MRI, while ultrasound is the method of choice for the evaluation of superficial vessels (such as temporal, carotid, and axillary arteries). PET is very sensitive in detecting large vessel inflammation, but it does not delineate the vessel wall. Imaging studies can also be used to monitor the disease course and the development of late vascular complication. This review will focus on the role of imaging studies in diagnosing and monitoring LVV, but will also mention their principal applications in medium and small-sized vessel vasculitis. Indications and limitations of the available imaging modalities will be discussed as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Image analysis: a consumer's guide.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F

    1983-01-01

    The last years have seen an explosion of systems in image analysis. It is hard for the pathologist or the cytologist to make the right choice of equipment. All machines are stupid, and the only valuable thing is the human work put into it. So make your benefit of the work other people have done for you. Chose a method largely used on many systems and which has proved fertile in many domains and not only for your specific to day's application: Mathematical Morphology, to which are to be added the linear convolutions present on all machines is a strong candidate for becoming such a method. The paper illustrates a working day of an ideal system: research and diagnostic directed work during the working hours, automatic screening of cervical (or other) smears during night.

  7. Spreadsheet-like image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Paul

    1992-08-01

    This report describes the design of a new software system being built by the Army to support and augment automated nondestructive inspection (NDI) on-line equipment implemented by the Army for detection of defective manufactured items. The new system recalls and post-processes (off-line) the NDI data sets archived by the on-line equipment for the purpose of verifying the correctness of the inspection analysis paradigms, of developing better analysis paradigms and to gather statistics on the defects of the items inspected. The design of the system is similar to that of a spreadsheet, i.e., an array of cells which may be programmed to contain functions with arguments being data from other cells and whose resultant is the output of that cell's function. Unlike a spreadsheet, the arguments and the resultants of a cell may be a matrix such as a two-dimensional matrix of picture elements (pixels). Functions include matrix mathematics, neural networks and image processing as well as those ordinarily found in spreadsheets. The system employs all of the common environmental supports of the Macintosh computer, which is the hardware platform. The system allows the resultant of a cell to be displayed in any of multiple formats such as a matrix of numbers, text, an image, or a chart. Each cell is a window onto the resultant. Like a spreadsheet if the input value of any cell is changed its effect is cascaded into the resultants of all cells whose functions use that value directly or indirectly. The system encourages the user to play what-of games, as ordinary spreadsheets do.

  8. Clock Scan Protocol for Image Analysis: ImageJ Plugins.

    PubMed

    Dobretsov, Maxim; Petkau, Georg; Hayar, Abdallah; Petkau, Eugen

    2017-06-19

    The clock scan protocol for image analysis is an efficient tool to quantify the average pixel intensity within, at the border, and outside (background) a closed or segmented convex-shaped region of interest, leading to the generation of an averaged integral radial pixel-intensity profile. This protocol was originally developed in 2006, as a visual basic 6 script, but as such, it had limited distribution. To address this problem and to join similar recent efforts by others, we converted the original clock scan protocol code into two Java-based plugins compatible with NIH-sponsored and freely available image analysis programs like ImageJ or Fiji ImageJ. Furthermore, these plugins have several new functions, further expanding the range of capabilities of the original protocol, such as analysis of multiple regions of interest and image stacks. The latter feature of the program is especially useful in applications in which it is important to determine changes related to time and location. Thus, the clock scan analysis of stacks of biological images may potentially be applied to spreading of Na(+) or Ca(++) within a single cell, as well as to the analysis of spreading activity (e.g., Ca(++) waves) in populations of synaptically-connected or gap junction-coupled cells. Here, we describe these new clock scan plugins and show some examples of their applications in image analysis.

  9. Resting-state Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis of Brain Functional Activity in Rats with Ischemic Stroke Treated by Electro-acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shengxiang; Lin, Yunjiao; Lin, Bingbing; Li, Jianhong; Liu, Weilin; Chen, Lidian; Zhao, Shujun; Tao, Jing

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate whether electro-acupuncture (EA) treatment at acupoints of Zusanli (ST 36) and Quchi (LI 11) could reduce motor impairments and enhance brain functional recovery in rats with ischemic stroke. A rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was established. EA at ST 36 and LI 11was started at 24 hours (MCAO + EA group) after ischemic stroke. The nontreatment (MCAO) and sham-operated control (SC) groups were included as controls. The neurologic deficits of all groups were assessed by Zea Longa scores and the modified neurologic severity scores on 24 hours and 8 days after MCAO. To further investigate the effect of EA on infract volume and brain function, magnetic resonance imaging was used to estimate the brain lesion and brain neural activities of each group at 8 days after ischemic stroke. Within 1 week after EA treatment, the neurologic deficits were significantly alleviated, and the cerebral infarctions were improved, including visual cortex, motor cortex, striatum, dorsal thalamus, and hippocampus. Furthermore, whole brain neural activities of auditory cortex, lateral nucleus group of dorsal thalamus, hippocampus, motor cortex, orbital cortex, sensory cortex, and striatum were decreased in MCAO group, whereas that of brain neural activities were increased after EA treatment, suggesting these brain regions are in accordance with the brain structure analysis. EA at ST 36 and LI 11 could enhance the neural activity of motor function-related brain regions, including motor cortex, dorsal thalamus, and striatum in rats, which is a potential treatment for ischemia stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Naval Signal and Image Analysis Conference Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-26

    Arlington Hilton Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. The meeting was by invitation only and consisted of investigators in the ONR Signal and Image Analysis Program...in signal and image analysis . The conference provided an opportunity for technical interaction between academic researchers and Naval scientists and...plan future directions for the ONR Signal and Image Analysis Program as well as informal recommendations to the Program Officer.

  11. Image analysis applications for grain science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayas, Inna Y.; Steele, James L.

    1991-02-01

    Morphometrical features of single grain kernels or particles were used to discriminate two visibly similar wheat varieties foreign material in wheat hardsoft and spring-winter wheat classes and whole from broken corn kernels. Milled fractions of hard and soft wheat were evaluated using textural image analysis. Color image analysis of sound and mold damaged corn kernels yielded high recognition rates. The studies collectively demonstrate the potential for automated classification and assessment of grain quality using image analysis.

  12. Satellite image analysis using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    The tremendous backlog of unanalyzed satellite data necessitates the development of improved methods for data cataloging and analysis. Ford Aerospace has developed an image analysis system, SIANN (Satellite Image Analysis using Neural Networks) that integrates the technologies necessary to satisfy NASA's science data analysis requirements for the next generation of satellites. SIANN will enable scientists to train a neural network to recognize image data containing scenes of interest and then rapidly search data archives for all such images. The approach combines conventional image processing technology with recent advances in neural networks to provide improved classification capabilities. SIANN allows users to proceed through a four step process of image classification: filtering and enhancement, creation of neural network training data via application of feature extraction algorithms, configuring and training a neural network model, and classification of images by application of the trained neural network. A prototype experimentation testbed was completed and applied to climatological data.

  13. Altered amygdala and hippocampus effective connectivity in mild cognitive impairment patients with depression: a resting-state functional MR imaging study with granger causality analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li Juan; Yang, Gui Fen; Zhang, Xin Yuan; Wang, Yun Fei; Liu, Ya; Zheng, Gang; Lu, Guang Ming; Zhang, Long Jiang; Han, Ying

    2017-02-15

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that the major depression disorder would increase the risk of dementia in the older with amnestic cognitive impairment. We used granger causality analysis algorithm to explore the amygdala- and hippocampus-based directional connectivity patterns in 12 patients with major depression disorder and amnestic cognitive impairment (mean age: 69.5 ± 10.3 years), 13 amnestic cognitive impairment patients (mean age: 72.7 ± 8.5 years) and 14 healthy controls (mean age: 64.7 ± 7.0 years). Compared with amnestic cognitive impairment patients and control groups respectively, the patients with both major depression disorder and amnestic cognitive impairment displayed increased effective connectivity from the right amygdala to the right lingual and calcarine gyrus, as well as to the bilateral supplementary motor areas. Meanwhile, the patients with both major depression disorder and amnestic cognitive impairment had enhanced effective connectivity from the left superior parietal gyrus, superior and middle occipital gyrus to the left hippocampus, the z values of which was also correlated with the scores of mini-mental state examination and auditory verbal learning test-immediate recall. Our findings indicated that the directional effective connectivity of right amygdala - occipital-parietal lobe - left hippocampus might be the pathway by which major depression disorder inhibited the brain activity in patients with amnestic cognitive impairment.

  14. Control of multiple excited image states around segmented carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Knörzer, J. Fey, C.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Schmelcher, P.

    2015-11-28

    Electronic image states around segmented carbon nanotubes can be confined and shaped along the nanotube axis by engineering the image potential. We show how several such image states can be prepared simultaneously along the same nanotube. The inter-electronic distance can be controlled a priori by engineering tubes of specific geometries. High sensitivity to external electric and magnetic fields can be exploited to manipulate these states and their mutual long-range interactions. These building blocks provide access to a new kind of tailored interacting quantum systems.

  15. PIZZARO: Forensic analysis and restoration of image and video data.

    PubMed

    Kamenicky, Jan; Bartos, Michal; Flusser, Jan; Mahdian, Babak; Kotera, Jan; Novozamsky, Adam; Saic, Stanislav; Sroubek, Filip; Sorel, Michal; Zita, Ales; Zitova, Barbara; Sima, Zdenek; Svarc, Petr; Horinek, Jan

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces a set of methods for image and video forensic analysis. They were designed to help to assess image and video credibility and origin and to restore and increase image quality by diminishing unwanted blur, noise, and other possible artifacts. The motivation came from the best practices used in the criminal investigation utilizing images and/or videos. The determination of the image source, the verification of the image content, and image restoration were identified as the most important issues of which automation can facilitate criminalists work. Novel theoretical results complemented with existing approaches (LCD re-capture detection and denoising) were implemented in the PIZZARO software tool, which consists of the image processing functionality as well as of reporting and archiving functions to ensure the repeatability of image analysis procedures and thus fulfills formal aspects of the image/video analysis work. Comparison of new proposed methods with the state of the art approaches is shown. Real use cases are presented, which illustrate the functionality of the developed methods and demonstrate their applicability in different situations. The use cases as well as the method design were solved in tight cooperation of scientists from the Institute of Criminalistics, National Drug Headquarters of the Criminal Police and Investigation Service of the Police of the Czech Republic, and image processing experts from the Czech Academy of Sciences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microscopy image segmentation tool: robust image data analysis.

    PubMed

    Valmianski, Ilya; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K

    2014-03-01

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  17. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Ilya Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-03-15

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  18. State-of-the-art imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marko, Jamie; Gould, C Frank; Bonavia, Grant H; Wolfman, Darcy J

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Modern medical imaging is intimately involved in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Ultrasound is primarily used to guide prostate biopsy to establish the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging uses a multiparametric approach, including anatomic and functional imaging sequences. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging can be used for detection and localization of prostate cancer and to evaluate for disease recurrence. Computed tomography and scintigraphic imaging are primarily used to detect regional lymph node spread and distant metastases. Recent advancements in ultrasound, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic imaging have the potential to change the way prostate cancer is diagnosed and managed. This article addresses the major imaging modalities involved in the evaluation of prostate cancer and updates the reader on the state of the art for each modality.

  19. Image registration with uncertainty analysis

    DOEpatents

    Simonson, Katherine M [Cedar Crest, NM

    2011-03-22

    In an image registration method, edges are detected in a first image and a second image. A percentage of edge pixels in a subset of the second image that are also edges in the first image shifted by a translation is calculated. A best registration point is calculated based on a maximum percentage of edges matched. In a predefined search region, all registration points other than the best registration point are identified that are not significantly worse than the best registration point according to a predetermined statistical criterion.

  20. Image processing software for imaging spectrometry data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazer, Alan; Martin, Miki; Lee, Meemong; Solomon, Jerry E.

    1988-01-01

    Imaging spectrometers simultaneously collect image data in hundreds of spectral channels, from the near-UV to the IR, and can thereby provide direct surface materials identification by means resembling laboratory reflectance spectroscopy. Attention is presently given to a software system, the Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) for the analysis of imaging spectrometer data. SPAM requires only modest computational resources and is composed of one main routine and a set of subroutine libraries. Additions and modifications are relatively easy, and special-purpose algorithms have been incorporated that are tailored to geological applications.

  1. Image processing software for imaging spectrometry data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazer, Alan; Martin, Miki; Lee, Meemong; Solomon, Jerry E.

    1988-02-01

    Imaging spectrometers simultaneously collect image data in hundreds of spectral channels, from the near-UV to the IR, and can thereby provide direct surface materials identification by means resembling laboratory reflectance spectroscopy. Attention is presently given to a software system, the Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) for the analysis of imaging spectrometer data. SPAM requires only modest computational resources and is composed of one main routine and a set of subroutine libraries. Additions and modifications are relatively easy, and special-purpose algorithms have been incorporated that are tailored to geological applications.

  2. Information granules in image histogram analysis.

    PubMed

    Wieclawek, Wojciech

    2017-05-10

    A concept of granular computing employed in intensity-based image enhancement is discussed. First, a weighted granular computing idea is introduced. Then, the implementation of this term in the image processing area is presented. Finally, multidimensional granular histogram analysis is introduced. The proposed approach is dedicated to digital images, especially to medical images acquired by Computed Tomography (CT). As the histogram equalization approach, this method is based on image histogram analysis. Yet, unlike the histogram equalization technique, it works on a selected range of the pixel intensity and is controlled by two parameters. Performance is tested on anonymous clinical CT series. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cryo-FIB-SEM serial milling and block face imaging: Large volume structural analysis of biological tissues preserved close to their native state.

    PubMed

    Vidavsky, Netta; Akiva, Anat; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Rechav, Katya; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Schertel, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Many important biological questions can be addressed by studying in 3D large volumes of intact, cryo fixed hydrated tissues (⩾10,000μm(3)) at high resolution (5-20nm). This can be achieved using serial FIB milling and block face surface imaging under cryo conditions. Here we demonstrate the unique potential of the cryo-FIB-SEM approach using two extensively studied model systems; sea urchin embryos and the tail fin of zebrafish larvae. We focus in particular on the environment of mineral deposition sites. The cellular organelles, including mitochondria, Golgi, ER, nuclei and nuclear pores are made visible by the image contrast created by differences in surface potential of different biochemical components. Auto segmentation and/or volume rendering of the image stacks and 3D reconstruction of the skeleton and the cellular environment, provides a detailed view of the relative distribution in space of the tissue/cellular components, and thus of their interactions. Simultaneous acquisition of secondary and back-scattered electron images adds additional information. For example, a serial view of the zebrafish tail reveals the presence of electron dense mineral particles inside mitochondrial networks extending more than 20μm in depth in the block. Large volume imaging using cryo FIB SEM, as demonstrated here, can contribute significantly to the understanding of the structures and functions of diverse biological tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fractal analysis for reduced reference image quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Liu, Delei; Quan, Yuhui; Le Callet, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, multifractal analysis is adapted to reduced-reference image quality assessment (RR-IQA). A novel RR-QA approach is proposed, which measures the difference of spatial arrangement between the reference image and the distorted image in terms of spatial regularity measured by fractal dimension. An image is first expressed in Log-Gabor domain. Then, fractal dimensions are computed on each Log-Gabor subband and concatenated as a feature vector. Finally, the extracted features are pooled as the quality score of the distorted image using l1 distance. Compared with existing approaches, the proposed method measures image quality from the perspective of the spatial distribution of image patterns. The proposed method was evaluated on seven public benchmark data sets. Experimental results have demonstrated the excellent performance of the proposed method in comparison with state-of-the-art approaches.

  5. State-space based modeling for imaging system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Hixson, Jonathan G.

    2017-05-01

    State-space (SS) based modeling for imaging electro-optical (EO) systems representing various states facilitates a method for system estimation. Traditionally linear shift-invariant (LSI) systems are modeled using Fourier analysis (FA). However, models based on FA may not have a clear insight too the instability reasons, whereas SS based models with system poles and zeros have a clear insight to the system stability information. In this paper, we introduce three methods to estimate system parameters for LSI EO imaging systems using SS based modeling. These methods include batch processing version of least squares (LS) estimation, recursive version of LS estimation, and sliding window LS estimation. The accuracy of the developed methods was tested using input and output signals of simulated LSI systems. First, LSI systems with various system parameters (poles and zeros) were simulated, which were then used to generate output signals for a set of random input signals, with each input signal value representing the average of an image. Then, these input and output signals were used to estimate systems employing SS and FA based modeling. Further, the estimated systems were used to generate output signals for a new set of input signals. For any given input signal, output signals generated by both systems were compared for similarities and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Results show that SS based models generate output signals that have higher SNR values. In addition, developed methods were tested against the simulated data and results show promise for development of models for estimating more complicated systems (e.g., non-linear system).

  6. Electronic aperture control devised for solid state imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, R. A.; Callahan, D. E.; Mc Cann, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Electronic means of performing the equivalent of automatic aperture control has been devised for the new class of television cameras that incorporates a solid state imaging device in the form of phototransistor mosaic sensors.

  7. Spectroscopic Imaging of Strongly Correlated Electronic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Ali; da Silva Neto, Eduardo H.; Aynajian, Pegor

    2016-03-01

    The study of correlated electronic systems from high-Tc cuprates to heavy-fermion systems continues to motivate the development of experimental tools to probe electronic phenomena in new ways and with increasing precision. In the past two decades, spectroscopic imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a powerful experimental technique. The combination of high energy and spatial resolutions provided by this technique reveals unprecedented detail of the electronic properties of strongly correlated metals and superconductors. This review examines specific experiments, theoretical concepts, and measurement methods that have established the application of these techniques to correlated materials. A wide range of applications, such as the study of collective responses to single atomic impurities, the characterization of quasiparticle-like excitations through their interference, and the identification of competing electronic phases using spectroscopic imaging, are discussed.

  8. Pathology imaging informatics for quantitative analysis of whole-slide images

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Sonal; Phan, John H; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives With the objective of bringing clinical decision support systems to reality, this article reviews histopathological whole-slide imaging informatics methods, associated challenges, and future research opportunities. Target audience This review targets pathologists and informaticians who have a limited understanding of the key aspects of whole-slide image (WSI) analysis and/or a limited knowledge of state-of-the-art technologies and analysis methods. Scope First, we discuss the importance of imaging informatics in pathology and highlight the challenges posed by histopathological WSI. Next, we provide a thorough review of current methods for: quality control of histopathological images; feature extraction that captures image properties at the pixel, object, and semantic levels; predictive modeling that utilizes image features for diagnostic or prognostic applications; and data and information visualization that explores WSI for de novo discovery. In addition, we highlight future research directions and discuss the impact of large public repositories of histopathological data, such as the Cancer Genome Atlas, on the field of pathology informatics. Following the review, we present a case study to illustrate a clinical decision support system that begins with quality control and ends with predictive modeling for several cancer endpoints. Currently, state-of-the-art software tools only provide limited image processing capabilities instead of complete data analysis for clinical decision-making. We aim to inspire researchers to conduct more research in pathology imaging informatics so that clinical decision support can become a reality. PMID:23959844

  9. Histology image analysis for carcinoma detection and grading

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Long, L. Rodney; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the image analysis techniques in the domain of histopathology, specifically, for the objective of automated carcinoma detection and classification. As in other biomedical imaging areas such as radiology, many computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) systems have been implemented to aid histopathologists and clinicians in cancer diagnosis and research, which have been attempted to significantly reduce the labor and subjectivity of traditional manual intervention with histology images. The task of automated histology image analysis is usually not simple due to the unique characteristics of histology imaging, including the variability in image preparation techniques, clinical interpretation protocols, and the complex structures and very large size of the images themselves. In this paper we discuss those characteristics, provide relevant background information about slide preparation and interpretation, and review the application of digital image processing techniques to the field of histology image analysis. In particular, emphasis is given to state-of-the-art image segmentation methods for feature extraction and disease classification. Four major carcinomas of cervix, prostate, breast, and lung are selected to illustrate the functions and capabilities of existing CAD systems. PMID:22436890

  10. Multiscale Analysis of Solar Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. A.; Myers, D. C.

    2001-12-01

    It is often said that the blessing and curse of solar physics is that there is too much data. Solar missions such as Yohkoh, SOHO and TRACE have shown us the Sun with amazing clarity but have also cursed us with an increased amount of higher complexity data than previous missions. We have improved our view of the Sun yet we have not improved our analysis techniques. The standard techniques used for analysis of solar images generally consist of observing the evolution of features in a sequence of byte scaled images or a sequence of byte scaled difference images. The determination of features and structures in the images are done qualitatively by the observer. There is little quantitative and objective analysis done with these images. Many advances in image processing techniques have occured in the past decade. Many of these methods are possibly suited for solar image analysis. Multiscale/Multiresolution methods are perhaps the most promising. These methods have been used to formulate the human ability to view and comprehend phenomena on different scales. So these techniques could be used to quantitify the imaging processing done by the observers eyes and brains. In this work we present a preliminary analysis of multiscale techniques applied to solar image data. Specifically, we explore the use of the 2-d wavelet transform and related transforms with EIT, LASCO and TRACE images. This work was supported by NASA contract NAS5-00220.

  11. A Mathematical Framework for Image Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    The results reported here were derived from the research project ’A Mathematical Framework for Image Analysis ’ supported by the Office of Naval...Research, contract N00014-88-K-0289 to Brown University. A common theme for the work reported is the use of probabilistic methods for problems in image ... analysis and image reconstruction. Five areas of research are described: rigid body recognition using a decision tree/combinatorial approach; nonrigid

  12. The Impact of State Tort Reforms on Imaging Utilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Suhui; Dor, Avi; Deyo, Darwyyn; Hughes, Danny R

    2017-02-01

    Defensive medicine, broadly defined as medical practices that protect physicians from malpractice lawsuits without providing benefits to patients, can lead to wasteful use of health care resources and higher cost. Although physicians cite malpractice liability as an important factor driving their decisions to order imaging tests, little research has been done to examine the systematic impact of liability pressure on overall imaging. The authors examined the extent to which radiography use is influenced by malpractice liability pressure among office-based physicians. Using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 1999 to 2010, the authors used multivariate difference-in-difference logistic regression to examine the effects of different types of state tort reforms on the probability of radiography orders by primary care physicians (PCPs) and specialists. The probability that a PCP ordered radiography decreased when states enacted permanent caps on noneconomic damages (-1.0%, P < .01), periodic payment reforms (-1.6%, P < .05), and the total number of tort reforms (-0.5%, P < .05). Specialist physicians were responsive to two reforms: caps on punitive damages (-6.1%, P < .01) and the total number of medical tort laws (-1.2%, P < .01). The passage of new indirect reforms was found to reduce radiography orders for PCPs (-1.8%, P < .05), and the repeal of indirect reforms was found to increase radiography orders for specialists (+3.4%, P < .01). State tort reform seems to reduce physicians' ordering of radiography. This analysis also suggests that reforms that make it harder to sue physicians have a stronger impact than reforms that directly reduce physicians' malpractice claim payments. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nonlinear analysis for image stabilization in IR imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhan-lei; Lu, Jin; Luo, Yong-hong; Zhang, Mei-sheng

    2009-07-01

    In order to acquire stabilization image for IR imaging system, an image stabilization system is required. Linear method is often used in current research on the system and a simple PID controller can meet the demands of common users. In fact, image stabilization system is a structure with nonlinear characters such as structural errors, friction and disturbances. In up-grade IR imaging system, although conventional PID controller is optimally designed, it cannot meet the demands of higher accuracy and fast responding speed when disturbances are present. To get high-quality stabilization image, nonlinear characters should be rejected. The friction and gear clearance are key factors and play an important role in the image stabilization system. The friction induces static error of system. When the system runs at low speed, stick-slip and creeping induced by friction not only decrease resolution and repeating accuracy, but also increase the tracking error and the steady state error. The accuracy of the system is also limited by gear clearance, and selfexcited vibration is brought on by serious clearance. In this paper, effects of different nonlinear on image stabilization precision are analyzed, including friction and gear clearance. After analyzing the characters and influence principle of the friction and gear clearance, a friction model is established with MATLAB Simulink toolbox, which is composed of static friction, Coulomb friction and viscous friction, and the gear clearance non-linearity model is built, providing theoretical basis for the future engineering practice.

  14. Image Reconstruction Using Analysis Model Prior

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Du, Huiqian; Lam, Fan; Mei, Wenbo; Fang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The analysis model has been previously exploited as an alternative to the classical sparse synthesis model for designing image reconstruction methods. Applying a suitable analysis operator on the image of interest yields a cosparse outcome which enables us to reconstruct the image from undersampled data. In this work, we introduce additional prior in the analysis context and theoretically study the uniqueness issues in terms of analysis operators in general position and the specific 2D finite difference operator. We establish bounds on the minimum measurement numbers which are lower than those in cases without using analysis model prior. Based on the idea of iterative cosupport detection (ICD), we develop a novel image reconstruction model and an effective algorithm, achieving significantly better reconstruction performance. Simulation results on synthetic and practical magnetic resonance (MR) images are also shown to illustrate our theoretical claims. PMID:27379171

  15. Image Analysis in Plant Sciences: Publish Then Perish.

    PubMed

    Lobet, Guillaume

    2017-07-01

    Image analysis has become a powerful technique for most plant scientists. In recent years dozens of image analysis tools have been published in plant science journals. These tools cover the full spectrum of plant scales, from single cells to organs and canopies. However, the field of plant image analysis remains in its infancy. It still has to overcome important challenges, such as the lack of robust validation practices or the absence of long-term support. In this Opinion article, I: (i) present the current state of the field, based on data from the plant-image-analysis.org database; (ii) identify the challenges faced by its community; and (iii) propose workable ways of improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of state Superfund programs: 50 state study. 1998 update

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    States have remediated over 40,000 contaminated sites not on the federal Superfund list. ELI`s latest analysis of state Superfund programs examines the cleanup programs of all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. The study provides the most current data on state statutes, program organization, staffing, funding, expenditures, cleanup standards, and cleanup activities, voluntary cleanup programs and brownfields programs. State and federal policymakers and attorneys working on non-NPL sites should find this study useful.

  17. Strongly Localized Image States of Spherical Graphitic Particles

    PubMed Central

    Gumbs, Godfrey

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the localization of charged particles by the image potential of spherical shells, such as fullerene buckyballs. These spherical image states exist within surface potentials formed by the competition between the attractive image potential and the repulsive centripetal force arising from the angular motion. The image potential has a power law rather than a logarithmic behavior. This leads to fundamental differences in the nature of the effective potential for the two geometries. Our calculations have shown that the captured charge is more strongly localized closest to the surface for fullerenes than for cylindrical nanotube. PMID:24587747

  18. Merging Panchromatic and Multispectral Images for Enhanced Image Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Multispectral Images for Enhanced Image Analysis I, Curtis K. Munechika grant permission to the Wallace Memorial Library of the Rochester Institute of...0.0 ()0 (.0(%C’ trees 3. 5 2.5% 0.0%l 44. 1% 5 (.()0th ,crass .1 ().W 0.0% 0).0% 97. overall classification accuracy: 87.5%( T-able DlIb . Confusion

  19. Description, Recognition and Analysis of Biological Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Donggang; Jin, Jesse S.; Luo Suhuai; Pham, Tuan D.; Lai Wei

    2010-01-25

    Description, recognition and analysis biological images plays an important role for human to describe and understand the related biological information. The color images are separated by color reduction. A new and efficient linearization algorithm is introduced based on some criteria of difference chain code. A series of critical points is got based on the linearized lines. The series of curvature angle, linearity, maximum linearity, convexity, concavity and bend angle of linearized lines are calculated from the starting line to the end line along all smoothed contours. The useful method can be used for shape description and recognition. The analysis, decision, classification of the biological images are based on the description of morphological structures, color information and prior knowledge, which are associated each other. The efficiency of the algorithms is described based on two applications. One application is the description, recognition and analysis of color flower images. Another one is related to the dynamic description, recognition and analysis of cell-cycle images.

  20. Program for Analysis and Enhancement of Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yun-Chi

    1987-01-01

    Land Analysis System (LAS) is collection of image-analysis computer programs designed to manipulate and analyze multispectral image data. Provides user with functions ingesting various sensor data, radiometric and geometric corrections, image registration, training site selection, supervised and unsupervised classification, Fourier domain filtering, and image enhancement. Sufficiently modular and includes extensive library of subroutines to permit inclusion of new algorithmic programs. Commercial package International Mathematical & Statistical Library (IMSL) required for full implementation of LAS. Written in VAX FORTRAN 77, C, and Macro assembler for DEC VAX operating under VMS 4.0.

  1. Rashba Spin-Orbit Coupling in Image Potential States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognolini, S.; Achilli, S.; Longetti, L.; Fava, E.; Mariani, C.; Trioni, M. I.; Pagliara, S.

    2015-07-01

    The search in two-dimensional condensed matter systems of Rashba-type spin-polarized electronic states is aimed by the possibility to control and manipulate the spin orientation. In this Letter, for the first time, we report on the experimental evidence of a Rashba-type spin splitting in the n =1 image potential state. The image potential state Rashba splitting here measured at the graphene/Ir(111) interface, as confirmed by theoretical considerations, can be detectable to any metal surface with a significant spin-orbit coupling.

  2. Optical Analysis of Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Jonathan R.

    Microscope images were analyzed with coherent and incoherent light using analog optical techniques. These techniques were found to be useful for analyzing large numbers of nonsymbolic, statistical microscope images. In the first part phase coherent transparencies having 20-100 human multiple myeloma nuclei were simultaneously photographed at 100 power magnification using high resolution holographic film developed to high contrast. An optical transform was obtained by focussing the laser onto each nuclear image and allowing the diffracted light to propagate onto a one dimensional photosensor array. This method reduced the data to the position of the first two intensity minima and the intensity of successive maxima. These values were utilized to estimate the four most important cancer detection clues of nuclear size, shape, darkness, and chromatin texture. In the second part, the geometric and holographic methods of phase incoherent optical processing were investigated for pattern recognition of real-time, diffuse microscope images. The theory and implementation of these processors was discussed in view of their mutual problems of dimness, image bias, and detector resolution. The dimness problem was solved by either using a holographic correlator or a speckle free laser microscope. The latter was built using a spinning tilted mirror which caused the speckle to change so quickly that it averaged out during the exposure. To solve the bias problem low image bias templates were generated by four techniques: microphotography of samples, creation of typical shapes by computer graphics editor, transmission holography of photoplates of samples, and by spatially coherent color image bias removal. The first of these templates was used to perform correlations with bacteria images. The aperture bias was successfully removed from the correlation with a video frame subtractor. To overcome the limited detector resolution it is necessary to discover some analog nonlinear intensity

  3. Scale-Specific Multifractal Medical Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Fractal geometry has been applied widely in the analysis of medical images to characterize the irregular complex tissue structures that do not lend themselves to straightforward analysis with traditional Euclidean geometry. In this study, we treat the nonfractal behaviour of medical images over large-scale ranges by considering their box-counting fractal dimension as a scale-dependent parameter rather than a single number. We describe this approach in the context of the more generalized Rényi entropy, in which we can also compute the information and correlation dimensions of images. In addition, we describe and validate a computational improvement to box-counting fractal analysis. This improvement is based on integral images, which allows the speedup of any box-counting or similar fractal analysis algorithm, including estimation of scale-dependent dimensions. Finally, we applied our technique to images of invasive breast cancer tissue from 157 patients to show a relationship between the fractal analysis of these images over certain scale ranges and pathologic tumour grade (a standard prognosticator for breast cancer). Our approach is general and can be applied to any medical imaging application in which the complexity of pathological image structures may have clinical value. PMID:24023588

  4. Segmentation and learning in the quantitative analysis of microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Christy; Ross, Amy; Porter, Reid

    2015-02-01

    In material science and bio-medical domains the quantity and quality of microscopy images is rapidly increasing and there is a great need to automatically detect, delineate and quantify particles, grains, cells, neurons and other functional "objects" within these images. These are challenging problems for image processing because of the variability in object appearance that inevitably arises in real world image acquisition and analysis. One of the most promising (and practical) ways to address these challenges is interactive image segmentation. These algorithms are designed to incorporate input from a human operator to tailor the segmentation method to the image at hand. Interactive image segmentation is now a key tool in a wide range of applications in microscopy and elsewhere. Historically, interactive image segmentation algorithms have tailored segmentation on an image-by-image basis, and information derived from operator input is not transferred between images. But recently there has been increasing interest to use machine learning in segmentation to provide interactive tools that accumulate and learn from the operator input over longer periods of time. These new learning algorithms reduce the need for operator input over time, and can potentially provide a more dynamic balance between customization and automation for different applications. This paper reviews the state of the art in this area, provides a unified view of these algorithms, and compares the segmentation performance of various design choices.

  5. Imaging flow cytometry for phytoplankton analysis.

    PubMed

    Dashkova, Veronika; Malashenkov, Dmitry; Poulton, Nicole; Vorobjev, Ivan; Barteneva, Natasha S

    2017-01-01

    This review highlights the concepts and instrumentation of imaging flow cytometry technology and in particular its use for phytoplankton analysis. Imaging flow cytometry, a hybrid technology combining speed and statistical capabilities of flow cytometry with imaging features of microscopy, is rapidly advancing as a cell imaging platform that overcomes many of the limitations of current techniques and contributed significantly to the advancement of phytoplankton analysis in recent years. This review presents the various instrumentation relevant to the field and currently used for assessment of complex phytoplankton communities' composition and abundance, size structure determination, biovolume estimation, detection of harmful algal bloom species, evaluation of viability and metabolic activity and other applications. Also we present our data on viability and metabolic assessment of Aphanizomenon sp. cyanobacteria using Imagestream X Mark II imaging cytometer. Herein, we highlight the immense potential of imaging flow cytometry for microalgal research, but also discuss limitations and future developments.

  6. Digital Image Analysis for DETCHIP® Code Determination

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Marcus; Wilson, Mark V.; Rouhier, Kerry A.; Symonsbergen, David J.; Bastola, Kiran; Thapa, Ishwor; Holmes, Andrea E.

    2013-01-01

    DETECHIP® is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP® used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP®. Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the measurement of red-green-blue (RGB) values using software such as GIMP, Photoshop and ImageJ. Several different techniques were used to evaluate these color changes. It was determined that the flatbed scanner produced in the clearest and more reproducible images. Furthermore, codes obtained using a macro written for use within ImageJ showed improved consistency versus pervious methods. PMID:25267940

  7. Two-color excited-state absorption imaging of melanins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dan; Ye, Tong; Matthews, Thomas E.; Yurtsever, Gunay; Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.; Warren, Warren S.

    2007-02-01

    We have demonstrated a new method for imaging melanin with two-color excited state absorption microscopy. If one of two synchronized mode-locked pulse trains at different colors is intensity modulated, the modulation transfers to the other pulse train when nonlinear absorption takes place in the medium. We can easily measure 10 -6 absorption changes caused by either instantaneous two-photon absorption or relatively long lived excited state absorption with a RF lock-in amplifier. Eumelanin and pheomelanin exhibit similar excited state dynamics. However, their difference in excited state absorption and ground state absorption leads to change in the phase of the transient absorption signal. Scanning microscopic imaging is performed with B16 cells, melanoma tissue to demonstrate the 3D high resolution imaging capability. Different melanosome samples are also imaged to illustrate the differences between eumelanin and pheomelanin signals. These differences could enable us to image their respective distribution in tissue samples and provide us with valuable information in diagnosing malignant transformation of melanocytes.

  8. Materials characterization through quantitative digital image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Philliber; B. Antoun; B. Somerday; N. Yang

    2000-07-01

    A digital image analysis system has been developed to allow advanced quantitative measurement of microstructural features. This capability is maintained as part of the microscopy facility at Sandia, Livermore. The system records images digitally, eliminating the use of film. Images obtained from other sources may also be imported into the system. Subsequent digital image processing enhances image appearance through the contrast and brightness adjustments. The system measures a variety of user-defined microstructural features--including area fraction, particle size and spatial distributions, grain sizes and orientations of elongated particles. These measurements are made in a semi-automatic mode through the use of macro programs and a computer controlled translation stage. A routine has been developed to create large montages of 50+ separate images. Individual image frames are matched to the nearest pixel to create seamless montages. Results from three different studies are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system.

  9. Theory of Image Analysis and Recognition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-24

    Narendra Ahuja Image models Ramalingam Chellappa Image models Matti Pietikainen * Texture analysis b David G. Morgenthaler’ 3D digital geometry c Angela Y. Wu...Restoration Parameter Choice A Quantitative Guide," TR-965, October 1980. 70. Matti Pietikainen , "On the Use of Hierarchically Computed ’Mexican Hat...81. Matti Pietikainen and Azriel Rosenfeld, "Image Segmenta- tion by Texture Using Pyramid Node Linking," TR-1008, February 1981. 82. David G. 1

  10. Analysis of dynamic brain imaging data.

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, P P; Pesaran, B

    1999-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques for probing brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, intrinsic and extrinsic contrast optical imaging, and magnetoencephalography, generate large data sets with complex content. In this paper we develop appropriate techniques for analysis and visualization of such imaging data to separate the signal from the noise and characterize the signal. The techniques developed fall into the general category of multivariate time series analysis, and in particular we extensively use the multitaper framework of spectral analysis. We develop specific protocols for the analysis of fMRI, optical imaging, and MEG data, and illustrate the techniques by applications to real data sets generated by these imaging modalities. In general, the analysis protocols involve two distinct stages: "noise" characterization and suppression, and "signal" characterization and visualization. An important general conclusion of our study is the utility of a frequency-based representation, with short, moving analysis windows to account for nonstationarity in the data. Of particular note are 1) the development of a decomposition technique (space-frequency singular value decomposition) that is shown to be a useful means of characterizing the image data, and 2) the development of an algorithm, based on multitaper methods, for the removal of approximately periodic physiological artifacts arising from cardiac and respiratory sources. PMID:9929474

  11. Comparative Analysis of Reconstructed Image Quality in a Simulated Chromotomographic Imager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Ryan L. Tervo, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENP- 14 -M-35 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright...This material is declared work of the United States Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP- 14 -M-35...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENP- 14 -M-35 COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RECONSTRUCTED IMAGE QUALITY IN A

  12. Identifying local structural states in atomic imaging by computer vision

    DOE PAGES

    Laanait, Nouamane; Ziatdinov, Maxim; He, Qian; ...

    2016-11-02

    The availability of atomically resolved imaging modalities enables an unprecedented view into the local structural states of materials, which manifest themselves by deviations from the fundamental assumptions of periodicity and symmetry. Consequently, approaches that aim to extract these local structural states from atomic imaging data with minimal assumptions regarding the average crystallographic configuration of a material are indispensable to advances in structural and chemical investigations of materials. Here, we present an approach to identify and classify local structural states that is rooted in computer vision. This approach introduces a definition of a structural state that is composed of both localmore » and non-local information extracted from atomically resolved images, and is wholly untethered from the familiar concepts of symmetry and periodicity. Instead, this approach relies on computer vision techniques such as feature detection, and concepts such as scale-invariance. We present the fundamental aspects of local structural state extraction and classification by application to simulated scanning transmission electron microscopy images, and analyze the robustness of this approach in the presence of common instrumental factors such as noise, limited spatial resolution, and weak contrast. Finally, we apply this computer vision-based approach for the unsupervised detection and classification of local structural states in an experimental electron micrograph of a complex oxides interface, and a scanning tunneling micrograph of a defect engineered multilayer graphene surface.« less

  13. Digital image processing in cephalometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Jäger, A; Döler, W; Schormann, T

    1989-01-01

    Digital image processing methods were applied to improve the practicability of cephalometric analysis. The individual X-ray film was digitized by the aid of a high resolution microscope-photometer. Digital processing was done using a VAX 8600 computer system. An improvement of the image quality was achieved by means of various digital enhancement and filtering techniques.

  14. State estimation and absolute image registration for geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nankervis, R.; Koch, D. W.; Sielski, H.

    1980-01-01

    Spacecraft state estimation and the absolute registration of Earth images acquired by cameras onboard geosynchronous satellites are described. The basic data type of the procedure consists of line and element numbers of image points called landmarks whose geodetic coordinates, relative to United States Geodetic Survey topographic maps, are known. A conventional least squares process is used to estimate navigational parameters and camera pointing biases from observed minus computed landmark line and element numbers. These estimated parameters along with orbit and attitude dynamic models are used to register images, using an automated grey level correlation technique, inside the span represented by the landmark data. In addition, the dynamic models can be employed to register images outside of the data span in a near real time mode. An important application of this mode is in support of meteorological studies where rapid data reduction is required for the rapid tracking and predicting of dynamic phenomena.

  15. An Imaging And Graphics Workstation For Image Sequence Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, Hassan

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an application-specific engineering workstation designed and developed to analyze imagery sequences from a variety of sources. The system combines the software and hardware environment of the modern graphic-oriented workstations with the digital image acquisition, processing and display techniques. The objective is to achieve automation and high throughput for many data reduction tasks involving metric studies of image sequences. The applications of such an automated data reduction tool include analysis of the trajectory and attitude of aircraft, missile, stores and other flying objects in various flight regimes including launch and separation as well as regular flight maneuvers. The workstation can also be used in an on-line or off-line mode to study three-dimensional motion of aircraft models in simulated flight conditions such as wind tunnels. The system's key features are: 1) Acquisition and storage of image sequences by digitizing real-time video or frames from a film strip; 2) computer-controlled movie loop playback, slow motion and freeze frame display combined with digital image sharpening, noise reduction, contrast enhancement and interactive image magnification; 3) multiple leading edge tracking in addition to object centroids at up to 60 fields per second from both live input video or a stored image sequence; 4) automatic and manual field-of-view and spatial calibration; 5) image sequence data base generation and management, including the measurement data products; 6) off-line analysis software for trajectory plotting and statistical analysis; 7) model-based estimation and tracking of object attitude angles; and 8) interface to a variety of video players and film transport sub-systems.

  16. Object based image analysis for the classification of the growth stages of Avocado crop, in Michoacán State, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Marpu, Prashanth; Morales Manila, Luis M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper assesses the suitability of 8-band Worldview-2 (WV2) satellite data and object-based random forest algorithm for the classification of avocado growth stages in Mexico. We tested both pixel-based with minimum distance (MD) and maximum likelihood (MLC) and object-based with Random Forest (RF) algorithm for this task. Training samples and verification data were selected by visual interpreting the WV2 images for seven thematic classes: fully grown, middle stage, and early stage of avocado crops, bare land, two types of natural forests, and water body. To examine the contribution of the four new spectral bands of WV2 sensor, all the tested classifications were carried out with and without the four new spectral bands. Classification accuracy assessment results show that object-based classification with RF algorithm obtained higher overall higher accuracy (93.06%) than pixel-based MD (69.37%) and MLC (64.03%) method. For both pixel-based and object-based methods, the classifications with the four new spectral bands (overall accuracy obtained higher accuracy than those without: overall accuracy of object-based RF classification with vs without: 93.06% vs 83.59%, pixel-based MD: 69.37% vs 67.2%, pixel-based MLC: 64.03% vs 36.05%, suggesting that the four new spectral bands in WV2 sensor contributed to the increase of the classification accuracy.

  17. Machine learning applications in cell image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kan, Andrey

    2017-04-04

    Machine learning (ML) refers to a set of automatic pattern recognition methods that have been successfully applied across various problem domains, including biomedical image analysis. This review focuses on ML applications for image analysis in light microscopy experiments with typical tasks of segmenting and tracking individual cells, and modelling of reconstructed lineage trees. After describing a typical image analysis pipeline and highlighting challenges of automatic analysis (for example, variability in cell morphology, tracking in presence of clutters) this review gives a brief historical outlook of ML, followed by basic concepts and definitions required for understanding examples. This article then presents several example applications at various image processing stages, including the use of supervised learning methods for improving cell segmentation, and the application of active learning for tracking. The review concludes with remarks on parameter setting and future directions.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 4 April 2017; doi:10.1038/icb.2017.16.

  18. Analysis of imaging quality under the systematic parameters for thermal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Jin, Weiqi

    2009-07-01

    The integration of thermal imaging system and radar system could increase the range of target identification as well as strengthen the accuracy and reliability of detection, which is a state-of-the-art and mainstream integrated system to search any invasive target and guard homeland security. When it works, there is, however, one defect existing of what the thermal imaging system would produce affected images which could cause serious consequences when searching and detecting. In this paper, we study and reveal the reason why and how the affected images would occur utilizing the principle of lightwave before establishing mathematical imaging model which could meet the course of ray transmitting. In the further analysis, we give special attentions to the systematic parameters of the model, and analyse in detail all parameters which could possibly affect the imaging process and the function how it does respectively. With comprehensive research, we obtain detailed information about the regulation of diffractive phenomena shaped by these parameters. Analytical results have been convinced through the comparison between experimental images and MATLAB simulated images, while simulated images based on the parameters we revised to judge our expectation have good comparability with images acquired in reality.

  19. Imaging of flank pain: readdressing state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Jha, Priyanka; Bentley, Brian; Behr, Spencer; Yee, Judy; Zagoria, Ronald

    2017-02-01

    Pain resulting from renal and ureteral stones is a common cause for patients presenting in the acute setting. Since the late 1990s, computed tomography (CT) has been the initial imaging method of choice to evaluate patients with suspected ureteral stones; however, concerns regarding both radiation dose and cost-effectiveness have prompted investigations into a different imaging algorithm. Studies utilizing ultrasound have provided evidence indicating that it may be a more appropriate first step, with selective use of CT in selected cases, in the diagnostic work-up. Techniques have evolved with low-dose CT, dual-energy CT, and magnetic resonance urography emerging as useful in imaging of renal colic patients. This manuscript reviews the current literature on state-of-the-art imaging for acute flank pain and proposes a new imaging algorithm in the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain and suspected ureteral stones.

  20. On image analysis in fractography (Methodological Notes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtremel', M. A.

    2015-10-01

    As other spheres of image analysis, fractography has no universal method for information convolution. An effective characteristic of an image is found by analyzing the essence and origin of every class of objects. As follows from the geometric definition of a fractal curve, its projection onto any straight line covers a certain segment many times; therefore, neither a time series (one-valued function of time) nor an image (one-valued function of plane) can be a fractal. For applications, multidimensional multiscale characteristics of an image are necessary. "Full" wavelet series break the law of conservation of information.

  1. Retinal image analysis: concepts, applications and potential.

    PubMed

    Patton, Niall; Aslam, Tariq M; MacGillivray, Thomas; Deary, Ian J; Dhillon, Baljean; Eikelboom, Robert H; Yogesan, Kanagasingam; Constable, Ian J

    2006-01-01

    As digital imaging and computing power increasingly develop, so too does the potential to use these technologies in ophthalmology. Image processing, analysis and computer vision techniques are increasing in prominence in all fields of medical science, and are especially pertinent to modern ophthalmology, as it is heavily dependent on visually oriented signs. The retinal microvasculature is unique in that it is the only part of the human circulation that can be directly visualised non-invasively in vivo, readily photographed and subject to digital image analysis. Exciting developments in image processing relevant to ophthalmology over the past 15 years includes the progress being made towards developing automated diagnostic systems for conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and retinopathy of prematurity. These diagnostic systems offer the potential to be used in large-scale screening programs, with the potential for significant resource savings, as well as being free from observer bias and fatigue. In addition, quantitative measurements of retinal vascular topography using digital image analysis from retinal photography have been used as research tools to better understand the relationship between the retinal microvasculature and cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, advances in electronic media transmission increase the relevance of using image processing in 'teleophthalmology' as an aid in clinical decision-making, with particular relevance to large rural-based communities. In this review, we outline the principles upon which retinal digital image analysis is based. We discuss current techniques used to automatically detect landmark features of the fundus, such as the optic disc, fovea and blood vessels. We review the use of image analysis in the automated diagnosis of pathology (with particular reference to diabetic retinopathy). We also review its role in defining and performing quantitative measurements of vascular topography

  2. Multiresolution morphological analysis of document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomberg, Dan S.

    1992-11-01

    An image-based approach to document image analysis is presented, that uses shape and textural properties interchangeably at multiple scales. Image-based techniques permit a relatively small number of simple and fast operations to be used for a wide variety of analysis problems with document images. The primary binary image operations are morphological and multiresolution. The generalized opening, a morphological operation, allows extraction of image features that have both shape and textural properties, and that are not limited by properties related to image connectivity. Reduction operations are necessary due to the large number of pixels at scanning resolution, and threshold reduction is used for efficient and controllable shape and texture transformations between resolution levels. Aspects of these techniques, which include sequences of threshold reductions, are illustrated by problems such as text/halftone segmentation and word-level extraction. Both the generalized opening and these multiresolution operations are then used to identify italic and bold words in text. These operations are performed without any attempt at identification of individual characters. Their robustness derives from the aggregation of statistical properties over entire words. However, the analysis of the statistical properties is performed implicitly, in large part through nonlinear image processing operations. The approximate computational cost of the basic operations is given, and the importance of operating at the lowest feasable resolution is demonstrated.

  3. Malware analysis using visualized image matrices.

    PubMed

    Han, KyoungSoo; Kang, BooJoong; Im, Eul Gyu

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel malware visual analysis method that contains not only a visualization method to convert binary files into images, but also a similarity calculation method between these images. The proposed method generates RGB-colored pixels on image matrices using the opcode sequences extracted from malware samples and calculates the similarities for the image matrices. Particularly, our proposed methods are available for packed malware samples by applying them to the execution traces extracted through dynamic analysis. When the images are generated, we can reduce the overheads by extracting the opcode sequences only from the blocks that include the instructions related to staple behaviors such as functions and application programming interface (API) calls. In addition, we propose a technique that generates a representative image for each malware family in order to reduce the number of comparisons for the classification of unknown samples and the colored pixel information in the image matrices is used to calculate the similarities between the images. Our experimental results show that the image matrices of malware can effectively be used to classify malware families both statically and dynamically with accuracy of 0.9896 and 0.9732, respectively.

  4. Edge enhanced morphology for infrared image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiangzhi; Liu, Haonan

    2017-01-01

    Edge information is one of the critical information for infrared images. Morphological operators have been widely used for infrared image analysis. However, the edge information in infrared image is weak and the morphological operators could not well utilize the edge information of infrared images. To strengthen the edge information in morphological operators, the edge enhanced morphology is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the edge enhanced dilation and erosion operators are given and analyzed. Secondly, the pseudo operators which are derived from the edge enhanced dilation and erosion operators are defined. Finally, the applications for infrared image analysis are shown to verify the effectiveness of the proposed edge enhanced morphological operators. The proposed edge enhanced morphological operators are useful for the applications related to edge features, which could be extended to wide area of applications.

  5. Image Analysis of the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Mark C; Johnson, Joseph O; Kasprzak, Agnieszka; Bui, Marilyn M

    2016-01-01

    In the field of pathology it is clear that molecular genomics and digital imaging represent two promising future directions, and both are as relevant to the tumor microenvironment as they are to the tumor itself (Beck AH et al. Sci Transl Med 3(108):108ra113-08ra113, 2011). Digital imaging, or whole slide imaging (WSI), of glass histology slides facilitates a number of value-added competencies which were not previously possible with the traditional analog review of these slides under a microscope by a pathologist. As an important tool for investigational research, digital pathology can leverage the quantification and reproducibility offered by image analysis to add value to the pathology field. This chapter will focus on the application of image analysis to investigate the tumor microenvironment and how quantitative investigation can provide deeper insight into our understanding of the tumor to tumor microenvironment relationship.

  6. Topological image texture analysis for quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaad, Aras T.; Rashid, Rasber Dh.; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2017-05-01

    Image quality is a major factor influencing pattern recognition accuracy and help detect image tampering for forensics. We are concerned with investigating topological image texture analysis techniques to assess different type of degradation. We use Local Binary Pattern (LBP) as a texture feature descriptor. For any image construct simplicial complexes for selected groups of uniform LBP bins and calculate persistent homology invariants (e.g. number of connected components). We investigated image quality discriminating characteristics of these simplicial complexes by computing these models for a large dataset of face images that are affected by the presence of shadows as a result of variation in illumination conditions. Our tests demonstrate that for specific uniform LBP patterns, the number of connected component not only distinguish between different levels of shadow effects but also help detect the infected regions as well.

  7. Image texture analysis of crushed wheat kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayas, Inna Y.; Martin, C. R.; Steele, James L.; Dempster, Richard E.

    1992-03-01

    The development of new approaches for wheat hardness assessment may impact the grain industry in marketing, milling, and breeding. This study used image texture features for wheat hardness evaluation. Application of digital imaging to grain for grading purposes is principally based on morphometrical (shape and size) characteristics of the kernels. A composite sample of 320 kernels for 17 wheat varieties were collected after testing and crushing with a single kernel hardness characterization meter. Six wheat classes where represented: HRW, HRS, SRW, SWW, Durum, and Club. In this study, parameters which characterize texture or spatial distribution of gray levels of an image were determined and used to classify images of crushed wheat kernels. The texture parameters of crushed wheat kernel images were different depending on class, hardness and variety of the wheat. Image texture analysis of crushed wheat kernels showed promise for use in class, hardness, milling quality, and variety discrimination.

  8. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Tax Incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Doris, E.

    2009-10-01

    As a policy tool, state tax incentives can be structured to help states meet clean energy goals. Policymakers often use state tax incentives in concert with state and federal policies to support renewable energy deployment or reduce market barriers. This analysis used case studies of four states to assess the contributions of state tax incentives to the development of renewable energy markets. State tax incentives that are appropriately paired with complementary state and federal policies generally provide viable mechanisms to support renewable energy deployment. However, challenges to successful implementation of state tax incentives include serving project owners with limited state tax liability, assessing appropriate incentive levels, and differentiating levels of incentives for technologies with different costs. Additionally, state tax incentives may result in moderately higher federal tax burdens. These challenges notwithstanding, state tax incentives that consider certain policy design characteristics can support renewable energy markets and state clean energy goals.The scale of their impact though is directly related to the degree to which they support the renewable energy markets for targeted sectors and technologies. This report highlights important policy design considerations for policymakers using state tax incentives to meet clean energy goals.

  9. Single-image molecular analysis for accelerated fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Mei

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a new single-molecule fluorescence imaging analysis method, SIMA, to improve the temporal resolution of single-molecule localization and tracking studies to millisecond timescales without compromising the nanometer range spatial resolution [1,2]. In this method, the width of the fluorescence intensity profile of a static or mobile molecule, imaged using submillisecond to milliseconds exposure time, is used for localization and dynamics analysis. We apply this method to three single-molecule studies: (1) subdiffraction molecular separation measurements, (2) axial localization precision measurements, and (3) protein diffusion coefficient measurements in free solution. Applications of SIMA in flagella IFT particle analysis, localizations of UgtP (a cell division regulator protein) in live cells, and diffusion coefficient measurement of LacI in vitro and in vivo will be discussed.

  10. Hybrid Expert Systems In Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mark J.; Gregory, Paul J.

    1987-04-01

    Vision systems capable of inspecting industrial components and assemblies have a large potential market if they can be easily programmed and produced quickly. Currently, vision application software written in conventional high-level languages such as C or Pascal are produced by experts in program design, image analysis, and process control. Applications written this way are difficult to maintain and modify. Unless other similar inspection problems can be found, the final program is essentially one-off redundant code. A general-purpose vision system targeted for the Visual Machines Ltd. C-VAS 3000 image processing workstation, is described which will make writing image analysis software accessible to the non-expert both in programming computers and image analysis. A significant reduction in the effort required to produce vision systems, will be gained through a graphically-driven interactive application generator. Finally, an Expert System will be layered on top to guide the naive user through the process of generating an application.

  11. Diagnostic imaging rates for head injury in the ED and states' medical malpractice tort reforms.

    PubMed

    Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; McCulloch, Charles E; Ding, Alexander; Ding, Alex; Quale, Christopher; Chu, Philip W

    2011-07-01

    Physicians' fears of being sued may lead to defensive medical practices, such as ordering nonindicated medical imaging. We investigated the association between states' medical malpractice tort reforms and neurologic imaging rates for patients seen in the emergency department with mild head trauma. We assessed neurologic imaging among a national sample of 8588 women residing in 10 US states evaluated in an emergency setting for head injury between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2001. We assessed the odds of imaging as it varied by the enactment of medical liability reform laws. The medical liability reform laws were significantly associated with the likelihood of imaging. States with laws that limited monetary damages (odds ratio [OR], 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.99), mandated periodic award payments (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.43-0.97), or specified collateral source offset rules (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40-0.96) had an approximately 40% lower odds of imaging, whereas states that had laws that limited attorney's contingency fees had significantly higher odds of imaging (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.99-2.4), compared to states without these laws. When we used a summation of the number of laws in place, the greater the number of laws, the lower the odds of imaging. In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for individual and community factors, the total number of laws remained significantly associated with the odds of imaging, and the effect of the individual laws was attenuated, but not eliminated. The tort reforms we examined were associated with the propensity to obtain neurologic imaging. If these results are confirmed in larger studies, tort reform might mitigate defensive medical practices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Image analysis in comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lundsteen, C.; Maahr, J.; Christensen, B.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a new technique by which genomic imbalances can be detected by combining in situ suppression hybridization of whole genomic DNA and image analysis. We have developed software for rapid, quantitative CGH image analysis by a modification and extension of the standard software used for routine karyotyping of G-banded metaphase spreads in the Magiscan chromosome analysis system. The DAPI-counterstained metaphase spread is karyotyped interactively. Corrections for image shifts between the DAPI, FITC, and TRITC images are done manually by moving the three images relative to each other. The fluorescence background is subtracted. A mean filter is applied to smooth the FITC and TRITC images before the fluorescence ratio between the individual FITC and TRITC-stained chromosomes is computed pixel by pixel inside the area of the chromosomes determined by the DAPI boundaries. Fluorescence intensity ratio profiles are generated, and peaks and valleys indicating possible gains and losses of test DNA are marked if they exceed ratios below 0.75 and above 1.25. By combining the analysis of several metaphase spreads, consistent findings of gains and losses in all or almost all spreads indicate chromosomal imbalance. Chromosomal imbalances are detected either by visual inspection of fluorescence ratio (FR) profiles or by a statistical approach that compares FR measurements of the individual case with measurements of normal chromosomes. The complete analysis of one metaphase can be carried out in approximately 10 minutes. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Cnn Based Retinal Image Upscaling Using Zero Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasonov, A.; Chesnakov, K.; Krylov, A.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the paper is to obtain high quality of image upscaling for noisy images that are typical in medical image processing. A new training scenario for convolutional neural network based image upscaling method is proposed. Its main idea is a novel dataset preparation method for deep learning. The dataset contains pairs of noisy low-resolution images and corresponding noiseless highresolution images. To achieve better results at edges and textured areas, Zero Component Analysis is applied to these images. The upscaling results are compared with other state-of-the-art methods like DCCI, SI-3 and SRCNN on noisy medical ophthalmological images. Objective evaluation of the results confirms high quality of the proposed method. Visual analysis shows that fine details and structures like blood vessels are preserved, noise level is reduced and no artifacts or non-existing details are added. These properties are essential in retinal diagnosis establishment, so the proposed algorithm is recommended to be used in real medical applications.

  14. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  15. Spectral mixture analysis of EELS spectrum-images.

    PubMed

    Dobigeon, Nicolas; Brun, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in detectors and computer science have enabled the acquisition and the processing of multidimensional datasets, in particular in the field of spectral imaging. Benefiting from these new developments, Earth scientists try to recover the reflectance spectra of macroscopic materials (e.g., water, grass, mineral types…) present in an observed scene and to estimate their respective proportions in each mixed pixel of the acquired image. This task is usually referred to as spectral mixture analysis or spectral unmixing (SU). SU aims at decomposing the measured pixel spectrum into a collection of constituent spectra, called endmembers, and a set of corresponding fractions (abundances) that indicate the proportion of each endmember present in the pixel. Similarly, when processing spectrum-images, microscopists usually try to map elemental, physical and chemical state information of a given material. This paper reports how a SU algorithm dedicated to remote sensing hyperspectral images can be successfully applied to analyze spectrum-image resulting from electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). SU generally overcomes standard limitations inherent to other multivariate statistical analysis methods, such as principal component analysis (PCA) or independent component analysis (ICA), that have been previously used to analyze EELS maps. Indeed, ICA and PCA may perform poorly for linear spectral mixture analysis due to the strong dependence between the abundances of the different materials. One example is presented here to demonstrate the potential of this technique for EELS analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Remote sensing image denoising application by generalized morphological component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chong; Chen, Xiong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we introduced a remote sensing image denoising method based on generalized morphological component analysis (GMCA). This novel algorithm is the further extension of morphological component analysis (MCA) algorithm to the blind source separation framework. The iterative thresholding strategy adopted by GMCA algorithm firstly works on the most significant features in the image, and then progressively incorporates smaller features to finely tune the parameters of whole model. Mathematical analysis of the computational complexity of GMCA algorithm is provided. Several comparison experiments with state-of-the-art denoising algorithms are reported. In order to make quantitative assessment of algorithms in experiments, Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) index and Structural Similarity (SSIM) index are calculated to assess the denoising effect from the gray-level fidelity aspect and the structure-level fidelity aspect, respectively. Quantitative analysis on experiment results, which is consistent with the visual effect illustrated by denoised images, has proven that the introduced GMCA algorithm possesses a marvelous remote sensing image denoising effectiveness and ability. It is even hard to distinguish the original noiseless image from the recovered image by adopting GMCA algorithm through visual effect.

  17. MRI Image Processing Based on Fractal Analysis

    PubMed

    Marusina, Mariya Y; Mochalina, Alexandra P; Frolova, Ekaterina P; Satikov, Valentin I; Barchuk, Anton A; Kuznetcov, Vladimir I; Gaidukov, Vadim S; Tarakanov, Segrey A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cancer is one of the most common causes of human mortality, with about 14 million new cases and 8.2 million deaths reported in in 2012. Early diagnosis of cancer through screening allows interventions to reduce mortality. Fractal analysis of medical images may be useful for this purpose. Materials and Methods: In this study, we examined magnetic resonance (MR) images of healthy livers and livers containing metastases from colorectal cancer. The fractal dimension and the Hurst exponent were chosen as diagnostic features for tomographic imaging using Image J software package for image processings FracLac for applied for fractal analysis with a 120x150 pixel area. Calculations of the fractal dimensions of pathological and healthy tissue samples were performed using the box-counting method. Results: In pathological cases (foci formation), the Hurst exponent was less than 0.5 (the region of unstable statistical characteristics). For healthy tissue, the Hurst index is greater than 0.5 (the zone of stable characteristics). Conclusions: The study indicated the possibility of employing fractal rapid analysis for the detection of focal lesions of the liver. The Hurst exponent can be used as an important diagnostic characteristic for analysis of medical images.

  18. Knowledge based imaging for terrain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Rick; Westrom, George; Rossman, David; Kurrasch, Ellie

    1992-01-01

    A planetary rover will have various vision based requirements for navigation, terrain characterization, and geological sample analysis. In this paper we describe a knowledge-based controller and sensor development system for terrain analysis. The sensor system consists of a laser ranger and a CCD camera. The controller, under the input of high-level commands, performs such functions as multisensor data gathering, data quality monitoring, and automatic extraction of sample images meeting various criteria. In addition to large scale terrain analysis, the system's ability to extract useful geological information from rock samples is illustrated. Image and data compression strategies are also discussed in light of the requirements of earth bound investigators.

  19. Rock fracture image acquisition and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Zongpu, Jia; Chen, Liwan

    2007-12-01

    As a cooperation project between Sweden and China, this paper presents: rock fracture image acquisition and analysis. Rock fracture images are acquired by using UV light illumination and visible optical illumination. To present fracture network reasonable, we set up some models to characterize the network, based on the models, we used Best fit Ferret method to auto-determine fracture zone, then, through skeleton fractures to obtain endpoints, junctions, holes, particles, and branches. Based on the new parameters and a part of common parameters, the fracture network density, porosity, connectivity and complexities can be obtained, and the fracture network is characterized. In the following, we first present a basic consideration and basic parameters for fractures (Primary study of characteristics of rock fractures), then, set up a model for fracture network analysis (Fracture network analysis), consequently to use the model to analyze fracture network with different images (Two dimensional fracture network analysis based on slices), and finally give conclusions and suggestions.

  20. Discussion about Correlation of Walking and Psychosomatic State by Using Motion Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Akio; Mori, Naoki; Ide, Hideto

    It is said that the physical and mental state is reflected on the walking motion well. The walking motion shows the psychosomatic state in other words. The purpose of this study is to consider correlation of walking motion and the psychosomatic state. The walking motion is defined by the fixed point observation of the legs using the motion image of front view. The Measuring points are four points in all, which are both knees and both tiptoes. The features of the walking motion was extracted from time series data of the length between measuring points which was measured from the motion images. Principal component analysis was conducted with those charecteristics. Then multiple linear regression analysis was also conducted with principal component scores. As a result, psychosmatic state of each subject was estimated by walking movement.

  1. Quantitative analysis of qualitative images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockney, David; Falco, Charles M.

    2005-03-01

    We show optical evidence that demonstrates artists as early as Jan van Eyck and Robert Campin (c1425) used optical projections as aids for producing their paintings. We also have found optical evidence within works by later artists, including Bermejo (c1475), Lotto (c1525), Caravaggio (c1600), de la Tour (c1650), Chardin (c1750) and Ingres (c1825), demonstrating a continuum in the use of optical projections by artists, along with an evolution in the sophistication of that use. However, even for paintings where we have been able to extract unambiguous, quantitative evidence of the direct use of optical projections for producing certain of the features, this does not mean that paintings are effectively photographs. Because the hand and mind of the artist are intimately involved in the creation process, understanding these complex images requires more than can be obtained from only applying the equations of geometrical optics.

  2. Single particle raster image analysis of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Longfils, M; Schuster, E; Lorén, N; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M

    2017-04-01

    As a complement to the standard RICS method of analysing Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy images with estimation of the image correlation function, we introduce the method SPRIA, Single Particle Raster Image Analysis. Here, we start by identifying individual particles and estimate the diffusion coefficient for each particle by a maximum likelihood method. Averaging over the particles gives a diffusion coefficient estimate for the whole image. In examples both with simulated and experimental data, we show that the new method gives accurate estimates. It also gives directly standard error estimates. The method should be possible to extend to study heterogeneous materials and systems of particles with varying diffusion coefficient, as demonstrated in a simple simulation example. A requirement for applying the SPRIA method is that the particle concentration is low enough so that we can identify the individual particles. We also describe a bootstrap method for estimating the standard error of standard RICS.

  3. Imaging of HCC—Current State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Schraml, Christina; Kaufmann, Sascha; Rempp, Hansjoerg; Syha, Roland; Ketelsen, Dominik; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is crucial for optimizing treatment outcome. Ongoing advances are being made in imaging of HCC regarding detection, grading, staging, and also treatment monitoring. This review gives an overview of the current international guidelines for diagnosing HCC and their discrepancies as well as critically summarizes the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques for imaging in HCC. The diagnostic performance of MRI with nonspecific and hepatobililiary contrast agents and the role of functional imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging will be discussed. On the other hand, CT as a fast, cheap and easily accessible imaging modality plays a major role in the clinical routine work-up of HCC. Technical advances in CT, such as dual energy CT and volume perfusion CT, are currently being explored for improving detection, characterization and staging of HCC with promising results. Cone beam CT can provide a three-dimensional analysis of the liver with tumor and vessel characterization comparable to cross-sectional imaging so that this technique is gaining an increasing role in the peri-procedural imaging of HCC treated with interventional techniques. PMID:26854169

  4. Particle Pollution Estimation Based on Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenbin; Tsow, Francis; Zou, Yi; Tao, Nongjian

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to fine particles can cause various diseases, and an easily accessible method to monitor the particles can help raise public awareness and reduce harmful exposures. Here we report a method to estimate PM air pollution based on analysis of a large number of outdoor images available for Beijing, Shanghai (China) and Phoenix (US). Six image features were extracted from the images, which were used, together with other relevant data, such as the position of the sun, date, time, geographic information and weather conditions, to predict PM2.5 index. The results demonstrate that the image analysis method provides good prediction of PM2.5 indexes, and different features have different significance levels in the prediction.

  5. Image Processing for Galaxy Ellipticity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankus, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Shape analysis of statistically large samples of galaxy images can be used to reveal the imprint of weak gravitational lensing by dark matter distributions. As new, large-scale surveys expand the potential catalog, galaxy shape analysis suffers the (coupled) problems of high noise and uncertainty in the prior morphology. We investigate a new image processing technique to help mitigate these problems, in which repeated auto-correlations and auto-convolutions are employed to push the true shape toward a universal (Gaussian) attractor while relatively suppressing uncorrelated pixel noise. The goal is reliable reconstruction of original image moments, independent of image shape. First test evaluations of the technique on small control samples will be presented, and future applicability discussed. Supported by the US-DOE.

  6. Particle Pollution Estimation Based on Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenbin; Tsow, Francis; Zou, Yi; Tao, Nongjian

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to fine particles can cause various diseases, and an easily accessible method to monitor the particles can help raise public awareness and reduce harmful exposures. Here we report a method to estimate PM air pollution based on analysis of a large number of outdoor images available for Beijing, Shanghai (China) and Phoenix (US). Six image features were extracted from the images, which were used, together with other relevant data, such as the position of the sun, date, time, geographic information and weather conditions, to predict PM2.5 index. The results demonstrate that the image analysis method provides good prediction of PM2.5 indexes, and different features have different significance levels in the prediction. PMID:26828757

  7. Functional data analysis in brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian Siva

    2010-01-01

    Functional data analysis (FDA) considers the continuity of the curves or functions, and is a topic of increasing interest in the statistics community. FDA is commonly applied to time-series and spatial-series studies. The development of functional brain imaging techniques in recent years made it possible to study the relationship between brain and mind over time. Consequently, an enormous amount of functional data is collected and needs to be analyzed. Functional techniques designed for these data are in strong demand. This paper discusses three statistically challenging problems utilizing FDA techniques in functional brain imaging analysis. These problems are dimension reduction (or feature extraction), spatial classification in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, and the inverse problem in magneto-encephalography studies. The application of FDA to these issues is relatively new but has been shown to be considerably effective. Future efforts can further explore the potential of FDA in functional brain imaging studies.

  8. Integral-geometry morphological image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.

    2001-07-01

    This paper reviews a general method to characterize the morphology of two- and three-dimensional patterns in terms of geometrical and topological descriptors. Based on concepts of integral geometry, it involves the calculation of the Minkowski functionals of black-and-white images representing the patterns. The result of this approach is an objective, numerical characterization of a given pattern. We briefly review the basic elements of morphological image processing, a technique to transform images to patterns that are amenable to further morphological image analysis. The image processing technique is applied to electron microscope images of nano-ceramic particles and metal-oxide precipitates. The emphasis of this review is on the practical aspects of the integral-geometry-based morphological image analysis but we discuss its mathematical foundations as well. Applications to simple lattice structures, triply periodic minimal surfaces, and the Klein bottle serve to illustrate the basic steps of the approach. More advanced applications include random point sets, percolation and complex structures found in block copolymers.

  9. Chromatic Image Analysis For Quantitative Thermal Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1995-01-01

    Chromatic image analysis system (CIAS) developed for use in noncontact measurements of temperatures on aerothermodynamic models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Based on concept of temperature coupled to shift in color spectrum for optical measurement. Video camera images fluorescence emitted by phosphor-coated model at two wavelengths. Temperature map of model then computed from relative brightnesses in video images of model at those wavelengths. Eliminates need for intrusive, time-consuming, contact temperature measurements by gauges, making it possible to map temperatures on complex surfaces in timely manner and at reduced cost.

  10. Classifying affective states using thermal infrared imaging of the human face.

    PubMed

    Nhan, Brian R; Chau, Tom

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, time, frequency, and time-frequency features derived from thermal infrared data are used to discriminate between self-reported affective states of an individual in response to visual stimuli drawn from the International Affective Pictures System. A total of six binary classification tasks were examined to distinguish baseline and affect states. Affect states were determined from subject-reported levels of arousal and valence. Mean adjusted accuracies of 70% to 80% were achieved for the baseline classifications tasks. Classification accuracies between high and low ratings of arousal and valence were between 50% and 60%, respectively. Our analysis showed that facial thermal infrared imaging data of baseline and other affective states may be separable. The results of this study suggest that classification of facial thermal infrared imaging data coupled with affect models can be used to provide information about an individual's affective state for potential use as a passive communication pathway.

  11. Advanced automated char image analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Wu; Edward Lester; Michael Cloke

    2006-05-15

    Char morphology is an important characteristic when attempting to understand coal behavior and coal burnout. In this study, an augmented algorithm has been proposed to identify char types using image analysis. On the basis of a series of image processing steps, a char image is singled out from the whole image, which then allows the important major features of the char particle to be measured, including size, porosity, and wall thickness. The techniques for automated char image analysis have been tested against char images taken from ICCP Char Atlas as well as actual char particles derived from pyrolyzed char samples. Thirty different chars were prepared in a drop tube furnace operating at 1300{sup o}C, 1% oxygen, and 100 ms from 15 different world coals sieved into two size fractions (53-75 and 106-125 {mu}m). The results from this automated technique are comparable with those from manual analysis, and the additional detail from the automated sytem has potential use in applications such as combustion modeling systems. Obtaining highly detailed char information with automated methods has traditionally been hampered by the difficulty of automatic recognition of individual char particles. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Computer assisted analysis of microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, M.; Munhutu, P.; DaPonte, J.; Caragianis-Broadbridge, C.; Lehman, A.; Sadowski, T.; Garcia, E.; Heyden, C.; Mirabelle, L.; Benjamin, P.

    2009-01-01

    The use of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to characterize the microstructure of a material continues to grow in importance as technological advancements become increasingly more dependent on nanotechnology1 . Since nanoparticle properties such as size (diameter) and size distribution are often important in determining potential applications, a particle analysis is often performed on TEM images. Traditionally done manually, this has the potential to be labor intensive, time consuming, and subjective2. To resolve these issues, automated particle analysis routines are becoming more widely accepted within the community3. When using such programs, it is important to compare their performance, in terms of functionality and cost. The primary goal of this study was to apply one such software package, ImageJ to grayscale TEM images of nanoparticles with known size. A secondary goal was to compare this popular open-source general purpose image processing program to two commercial software packages. After a brief investigation of performance and price, ImageJ was identified as the software best suited for the particle analysis conducted in the study. While many ImageJ functions were used, the ability to break agglomerations that occur in specimen preparation into separate particles using a watershed algorithm was particularly helpful4.

  13. VAICo: visual analysis for image comparison.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Johanna; Gröller, M Eduard; Bruckner, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Scientists, engineers, and analysts are confronted with ever larger and more complex sets of data, whose analysis poses special challenges. In many situations it is necessary to compare two or more datasets. Hence there is a need for comparative visualization tools to help analyze differences or similarities among datasets. In this paper an approach for comparative visualization for sets of images is presented. Well-established techniques for comparing images frequently place them side-by-side. A major drawback of such approaches is that they do not scale well. Other image comparison methods encode differences in images by abstract parameters like color. In this case information about the underlying image data gets lost. This paper introduces a new method for visualizing differences and similarities in large sets of images which preserves contextual information, but also allows the detailed analysis of subtle variations. Our approach identifies local changes and applies cluster analysis techniques to embed them in a hierarchy. The results of this process are then presented in an interactive web application which allows users to rapidly explore the space of differences and drill-down on particular features. We demonstrate the flexibility of our approach by applying it to multiple distinct domains.

  14. On Two-Dimensional ARMA Models for Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-24

    2-D ARMA models for image analysis . Particular emphasis is placed on restoration of noisy images using 2-D ARMA models. Computer results are...is concluded that the models are very effective linear models for image analysis . (Author)

  15. Semi-supervised Cluster Analysis of Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Filipovych, Roman; Resnick, Susan M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a semi-supervised clustering-based framework for discovering coherent subpopulations in heterogeneous image sets. Our approach involves limited supervision in the form of labeled instances from two distributions that reflect a rough guess about subspace of features that are relevant for cluster analysis. By assuming that images are defined in a common space via registration to a common template, we propose a segmentation-based method for detecting locations that signify local regional differences in the two labeled sets. A PCA model of local image appearance is then estimated at each location of interest, and ranked with respect to its relevance for clustering. We develop an incremental k-means-like algorithm that discovers novel meaningful categories in a test image set. The application of our approach in this paper is in analysis of populations of healthy older adults. We validate our approach on a synthetic dataset, as well as on a dataset of brain images of older adults. We assess our method’s performance on the problem of discovering clusters of MR images of human brain, and present a cluster-based measure of pathology that reflects the deviation of a subject’s MR image from normal (i.e. cognitively stable) state. We analyze the clusters’ structure, and show that clustering results obtained using our approach correlate well with clinical data. PMID:20933091

  16. Selecting an image analysis minicomputer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, R.

    1981-01-01

    Factors to be weighed when selecting a minicomputer system as the basis for an image analysis computer facility vary depending on whether the user organization procures a new computer or selects an existing facility to serve as an image analysis host. Some conditions not directly related to hardware or software should be considered such as the flexibility of the computer center staff, their encouragement of innovation, and the availability of the host processor to a broad spectrum of potential user organizations. Particular attention must be given to: image analysis software capability; the facilities of a potential host installation; the central processing unit; the operating system and languages; main memory; disk storage; tape drives; hardcopy output; and other peripherals. The operational environment, accessibility; resource limitations; and operational supports are important. Charges made for program execution and data storage must also be examined.

  17. Direct Imaging of Electron States in Open Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, N.; Brunner, R.; Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Meisels, R.; Ferry, D. K.; Ochiai, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We use scanning gate microscopy to probe the ballistic motion of electrons within an open GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot. Conductance maps are recorded by scanning a biased tip over the open quantum dot while a magnetic field is applied. We show that, for specific magnetic fields, the measured conductance images resemble the classical transmitted and backscattered trajectories and their quantum mechanical analogue. In addition, we prove experimentally, with this direct measurement technique, the existence of pointer states. The demonstrated direct imaging technique is essential for the fundamental understanding of wave function scarring and quantum decoherence theory.

  18. Vortex Images, q-Calculus and Entangled Coherent States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashaev, Oktay K.

    2012-02-01

    The two circles theorem for hydrodynamic flow in annular domain bounded by two concentric circles is derived. Complex potential and velocity of the flow are represented as q-periodic functions and rewritten in terms of the Jackson q-integral. This theorem generalizes the Milne-Thomson one circle theorem and reduces to the last on in the limit q → ∞. By this theorem problem of vortex images in annular domain between coaxial cylinders is solved in terms of q-elementary functions. An infinite set of images, as symmetric points under two circles, is determined completely by poles of the q-logarithmic function, where dimensionless parameter q = r22/r21 is given by square ratio of the cylinder radii. Motivated by Möbius transformation for symmetrical points under generalized circle in complex plain, the system of symmetric spin coherent states corresponding to antipodal qubit states is introduced. By these states we construct the maximally entangled orthonormal two qubit spin coherent state basis, in the limiting case reducible to the Bell basis. Average energy of XYZ model in these states, describing finite localized structure with characteristic extremum points, appears as an energy surface in maximally entangled two qubit space. Generalizations to three and higher multiple qubits are found. We show that our entangled N qubit states are determined by set of complex Fibonacci and Lucas polynomials and corresponding Binet-Fibonacci q-calculus.

  19. State-Space Formulation for Circuit Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Marin, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new state-space approach for temporal analysis of electrical circuits. The method systematically obtains the state-space formulation of nondegenerate linear networks without using concepts of topology. It employs nodal/mesh systematic analysis to reduce the number of undesired variables. This approach helps students to…

  20. State-Space Formulation for Circuit Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Marin, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new state-space approach for temporal analysis of electrical circuits. The method systematically obtains the state-space formulation of nondegenerate linear networks without using concepts of topology. It employs nodal/mesh systematic analysis to reduce the number of undesired variables. This approach helps students to…

  1. Image analysis of insulation mineral fibres.

    PubMed

    Talbot, H; Lee, T; Jeulin, D; Hanton, D; Hobbs, L W

    2000-12-01

    We present two methods for measuring the diameter and length of man-made vitreous fibres based on the automated image analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The fibres we want to measure are used in materials such as glass wool, which in turn are used for thermal and acoustic insulation. The measurement of the diameters and lengths of these fibres is used by the glass wool industry for quality control purposes. To obtain reliable quality estimators, the measurement of several hundred images is necessary. These measurements are usually obtained manually by operators. Manual measurements, although reliable when performed by skilled operators, are slow due to the need for the operators to rest often to retain their ability to spot faint fibres on noisy backgrounds. Moreover, the task of measuring thousands of fibres every day, even with the help of semi-automated image analysis systems, is dull and repetitive. The need for an automated procedure which could replace manual measurements is quite real. For each of the two methods that we propose to accomplish this task, we present the sample preparation, the microscope setting and the image analysis algorithms used for the segmentation of the fibres and for their measurement. We also show how a statistical analysis of the results can alleviate most measurement biases, and how we can estimate the true distribution of fibre lengths by diameter class by measuring only the lengths of the fibres visible in the field of view.

  2. From Image Analysis to Computer Vision: Motives, Methods, and Milestones.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    images. Initially, work on digital image analysis dealt with specific classes of images such as text, photomicrographs, nuclear particle tracks, and aerial...photographs; but by the 1960’s, general algorithms and paradigms for image analysis began to be formulated. When the artificial intelligence...scene, but eventually from image sequences obtained by a moving camera; at this stage, image analysis had become scene analysis or computer vision

  3. Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2003-11-25

    AXSIA performs automated factor analysis of hyperspectral images. In such images, a complete spectrum is collected an each point in a 1-, 2- or 3- dimensional spatial array. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques have proven effective for extracting the essential information from high dimensional data sets into a limted number of factors that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the pure components comprising the sample. AXSIA provides tools to estimate different types of factor models including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), PCA with factor rotation, and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR-ALS). As part of the analysis process, AXSIA can automatically estimate the number of pure components that comprise the data and can scale the data to account for Poisson noise. The data analysis methods are fundamentally based on eigenanalysis of the data crossproduct matrix coupled with orthogonal eigenvector rotation and constrained alternating least squares refinement. A novel method for automatically determining the number of significant components, which is based on the eigenvalues of the crossproduct matrix, has also been devised and implemented. The data can be compressed spectrally via PCA and spatially through wavelet transforms, and algorithms have been developed that perform factor analysis in the transform domain while retaining full spatial and spectral resolution in the final result. These latter innovations enable the analysis of larger-than core-memory spectrum-images. AXSIA was designed to perform automated chemical phase analysis of spectrum-images acquired by a variety of chemical imaging techniques. Successful applications include Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence

  4. Objective facial photograph analysis using imaging software.

    PubMed

    Pham, Annette M; Tollefson, Travis T

    2010-05-01

    Facial analysis is an integral part of the surgical planning process. Clinical photography has long been an invaluable tool in the surgeon's practice not only for accurate facial analysis but also for enhancing communication between the patient and surgeon, for evaluating postoperative results, for medicolegal documentation, and for educational and teaching opportunities. From 35-mm slide film to the digital technology of today, clinical photography has benefited greatly from technological advances. With the development of computer imaging software, objective facial analysis becomes easier to perform and less time consuming. Thus, while the original purpose of facial analysis remains the same, the process becomes much more efficient and allows for some objectivity. Although clinical judgment and artistry of technique is never compromised, the ability to perform objective facial photograph analysis using imaging software may become the standard in facial plastic surgery practices in the future.

  5. Motion Analysis From Television Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberberg, George G.; Keller, Patrick N.

    1982-02-01

    The Department of Defense ranges have relied on photographic instrumentation for gathering data of firings for all types of ordnance. A large inventory of cameras are available on the market that can be used for these tasks. A new set of optical instrumentation is beginning to appear which, in many cases, can directly replace photographic cameras for a great deal of the work being performed now. These are television cameras modified so they can stop motion, see in the dark, perform under hostile environments, and provide real time information. This paper discusses techniques for modifying television cameras so they can be used for motion analysis.

  6. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Evaluation of Model-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Analysis With Pyramid Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Image Analysis aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging technique 18,5,17,6. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images for ventilation analysis. We have further extended the method for ventilation analysis to pulmonary perfusion. This paper focuses on the clinical evaluation of our method for

  7. Medical image analysis with artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Trundle, P; Ren, J

    2010-12-01

    Given that neural networks have been widely reported in the research community of medical imaging, we provide a focused literature survey on recent neural network developments in computer-aided diagnosis, medical image segmentation and edge detection towards visual content analysis, and medical image registration for its pre-processing and post-processing, with the aims of increasing awareness of how neural networks can be applied to these areas and to provide a foundation for further research and practical development. Representative techniques and algorithms are explained in detail to provide inspiring examples illustrating: (i) how a known neural network with fixed structure and training procedure could be applied to resolve a medical imaging problem; (ii) how medical images could be analysed, processed, and characterised by neural networks; and (iii) how neural networks could be expanded further to resolve problems relevant to medical imaging. In the concluding section, a highlight of comparisons among many neural network applications is included to provide a global view on computational intelligence with neural networks in medical imaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Image Analysis Technique for Material Behavior Evaluation in Civil Structures.

    PubMed

    Speranzini, Emanuela; Marsili, Roberto; Moretti, Michele; Rossi, Gianluca

    2017-07-08

    The article presents a hybrid monitoring technique for the measurement of the deformation field. The goal is to obtain information about crack propagation in existing structures, for the purpose of monitoring their state of health. The measurement technique is based on the capture and analysis of a digital image set. Special markers were used on the surface of the structures that can be removed without damaging existing structures as the historical masonry. The digital image analysis was done using software specifically designed in Matlab to follow the tracking of the markers and determine the evolution of the deformation state. The method can be used in any type of structure but is particularly suitable when it is necessary not to damage the surface of structures. A series of experiments carried out on masonry walls of the Oliverian Museum (Pesaro, Italy) and Palazzo Silvi (Perugia, Italy) have allowed the validation of the procedure elaborated by comparing the results with those derived from traditional measuring techniques.

  9. Fourier analysis: from cloaking to imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kedi; Cheng, Qiluan; Wang, Guo Ping

    2016-04-01

    Regarding invisibility cloaks as an optical imaging system, we present a Fourier approach to analytically unify both Pendry cloaks and complementary media-based invisibility cloaks into one kind of cloak. By synthesizing different transfer functions, we can construct different devices to realize a series of interesting functions such as hiding objects (events), creating illusions, and performing perfect imaging. In this article, we give a brief review on recent works of applying Fourier approach to analysis invisibility cloaks and optical imaging through scattering layers. We show that, to construct devices to conceal an object, no constructive materials with extreme properties are required, making most, if not all, of the above functions realizable by using naturally occurring materials. As instances, we experimentally verify a method of directionally hiding distant objects and create illusions by using all-dielectric materials, and further demonstrate a non-invasive method of imaging objects completely hidden by scattering layers.

  10. Quantum imaging with N-photon states in position space.

    PubMed

    Brainis, E

    2011-11-21

    We investigate the physics of quantum imaging with N > 2 entangled photons in position space. It is shown that, in paraxial approximation, the space-time propagation of the quantum state can be described by a generalized Huygens-Fresnel principle for the N-photon wave function. The formalism allows the initial conditions to be set on multiple reference planes, which is very convenient to describe the generation of multiple photon pairs in separate thin crystals. Applications involving state shaping and spatial entanglement swapping are developed.

  11. A simple method for labeling CT images with respiratory states

    SciTech Connect

    Berlinger, Kajetan; Sauer, Otto; Vences, Lucia; Roth, Michael

    2006-09-15

    A method is described for labeling CT images with their respiratory state by a needle, connected to the patient's chest/abdomen. By means of a leverage the needle follows the abdominal respiratory motion. The needle is visible as a blurred spot in every CT slice. The method was tested with nine patients. A series of volume scans during free breathing was performed. The detected positions of the moving needle in every single slice were compared to each other thus enabling respiratory state assignment. The tool is an inexpensive alternative to complex respiratory measuring tools for four dimensional (4D) CT and was greatly accepted in the clinic due to its simplicity.

  12. Imaging the local density of states of optical corrals.

    PubMed

    Chicanne, C; David, T; Quidant, R; Weeber, J C; Lacroute, Y; Bourillot, E; Dereux, A; Colas Des Francs, G; Girard, C

    2002-03-04

    This paper reports the experimental observation, at optical frequencies, of the electromagnetic local density of states established by nanostructures corresponding to the recently introduced concept of optical corral [G. Colas des Francs et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 4950 (2001)]. The images obtained by a scanning near-field optical microscope under specific operational conditions are found in agreement with the theoretical maps of the optical local density of states. A clear functionality of detection by the scanning near-field optical microscope is thereby identified since the theoretical maps are computed without including any specific tip model.

  13. AMA Statistical Information Based Analysis of a Compressive Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, D.; Prasad, S.

    -based analysis of a compressive imaging system based on a new highly efficient and robust method that enables us to evaluate statistical entropies. Our method is based on the notion of density of states (DOS), which plays a major role in statistical mechanics by allowing one to express macroscopic thermal averages in terms of the number of configuration states of a system for a certain energy level. Instead of computing the number of states at a certain energy level, however, we compute the number of possible configurations (states) of a particular image scene that correspond to a certain probability value. This allows us to compute the probability for each possible state, or configuration, of the scene being imaged. We assess the performance of a single pixel compressive imaging system based on the amount of information encoded and transmitted in parameters that characterize the information in the scene. Amongst many examples, we study the problem of faint companion detection. Here, we show how information in the recorded images depends on the choice of basis for representing the scene and the amount of measurement noise. The noise creates confusion when associating a recorded image with the correct member of the ensemble that produced the image. We show that multiple measurements enable one to mitigate this confusion noise.

  14. Measuring toothbrush interproximal penetration using image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayworth, Mark S.; Lyons, Elizabeth K.

    1994-09-01

    An image analysis method of measuring the effectiveness of a toothbrush in reaching the interproximal spaces of teeth is described. Artificial teeth are coated with a stain that approximates real plaque and then brushed with a toothbrush on a brushing machine. The teeth are then removed and turned sideways so that the interproximal surfaces can be imaged. The areas of stain that have been removed within masked regions that define the interproximal regions are measured and reported. These areas correspond to the interproximal areas of the tooth reached by the toothbrush bristles. The image analysis method produces more precise results (10-fold decrease in standard deviation) in a fraction (22%) of the time as compared to our prior visual grading method.

  15. Piecewise flat embeddings for hyperspectral image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Tyler L.; Meinhold, Renee T.; Hamilton, John F.; Cahill, Nathan D.

    2017-05-01

    Graph-based dimensionality reduction techniques such as Laplacian Eigenmaps (LE), Local Linear Embedding (LLE), Isometric Feature Mapping (ISOMAP), and Kernel Principal Components Analysis (KPCA) have been used in a variety of hyperspectral image analysis applications for generating smooth data embeddings. Recently, Piecewise Flat Embeddings (PFE) were introduced in the computer vision community as a technique for generating piecewise constant embeddings that make data clustering / image segmentation a straightforward process. In this paper, we show how PFE arises by modifying LE, yielding a constrained ℓ1-minimization problem that can be solved iteratively. Using publicly available data, we carry out experiments to illustrate the implications of applying PFE to pixel-based hyperspectral image clustering and classification.

  16. Unsupervised hyperspectral image analysis using independent component analysis (ICA)

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Chiang; I. W. Ginsberg

    2000-06-30

    In this paper, an ICA-based approach is proposed for hyperspectral image analysis. It can be viewed as a random version of the commonly used linear spectral mixture analysis, in which the abundance fractions in a linear mixture model are considered to be unknown independent signal sources. It does not require the full rank of the separating matrix or orthogonality as most ICA methods do. More importantly, the learning algorithm is designed based on the independency of the material abundance vector rather than the independency of the separating matrix generally used to constrain the standard ICA. As a result, the designed learning algorithm is able to converge to non-orthogonal independent components. This is particularly useful in hyperspectral image analysis since many materials extracted from a hyperspectral image may have similar spectral signatures and may not be orthogonal. The AVIRIS experiments have demonstrated that the proposed ICA provides an effective unsupervised technique for hyperspectral image classification.

  17. Solid state high resolution multi-spectral imager CCD test phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The program consisted of measuring the performance characteristics of charge coupled linear imaging devices, and a study defining a multispectral imaging system employing advanced solid state photodetection techniques.

  18. Digital image analysis of haematopoietic clusters.

    PubMed

    Benzinou, A; Hojeij, Y; Roudot, A-C

    2005-02-01

    Counting and differentiating cell clusters is a tedious task when performed with a light microscope. Moreover, biased counts and interpretation are difficult to avoid because of the difficulties to evaluate the limits between different types of clusters. Presented here, is a computer-based application able to solve these problems. The image analysis system is entirely automatic, from the stage screening, to the statistical analysis of the results of each experimental plate. Good correlations are found with measurements made by a specialised technician.

  19. ImageJ: Image processing and analysis in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasband, W. S.

    2012-06-01

    ImageJ is a public domain Java image processing program inspired by NIH Image. It can display, edit, analyze, process, save and print 8-bit, 16-bit and 32-bit images. It can read many image formats including TIFF, GIF, JPEG, BMP, DICOM, FITS and "raw". It supports "stacks", a series of images that share a single window. It is multithreaded, so time-consuming operations such as image file reading can be performed in parallel with other operations.

  20. Visualization of parameter space for image analysis.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, A Johannes; Bray, Mark-Anthony P; Carpenter, Anne E; Ruddle, Roy A

    2011-12-01

    Image analysis algorithms are often highly parameterized and much human input is needed to optimize parameter settings. This incurs a time cost of up to several days. We analyze and characterize the conventional parameter optimization process for image analysis and formulate user requirements. With this as input, we propose a change in paradigm by optimizing parameters based on parameter sampling and interactive visual exploration. To save time and reduce memory load, users are only involved in the first step--initialization of sampling--and the last step--visual analysis of output. This helps users to more thoroughly explore the parameter space and produce higher quality results. We describe a custom sampling plug-in we developed for CellProfiler--a popular biomedical image analysis framework. Our main focus is the development of an interactive visualization technique that enables users to analyze the relationships between sampled input parameters and corresponding output. We implemented this in a prototype called Paramorama. It provides users with a visual overview of parameters and their sampled values. User-defined areas of interest are presented in a structured way that includes image-based output and a novel layout algorithm. To find optimal parameter settings, users can tag high- and low-quality results to refine their search. We include two case studies to illustrate the utility of this approach.

  1. Visualization of Parameter Space for Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pretorius, A. Johannes; Bray, Mark-Anthony P.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Ruddle, Roy A.

    2013-01-01

    Image analysis algorithms are often highly parameterized and much human input is needed to optimize parameter settings. This incurs a time cost of up to several days. We analyze and characterize the conventional parameter optimization process for image analysis and formulate user requirements. With this as input, we propose a change in paradigm by optimizing parameters based on parameter sampling and interactive visual exploration. To save time and reduce memory load, users are only involved in the first step - initialization of sampling - and the last step - visual analysis of output. This helps users to more thoroughly explore the parameter space and produce higher quality results. We describe a custom sampling plug-in we developed for CellProfiler - a popular biomedical image analysis framework. Our main focus is the development of an interactive visualization technique that enables users to analyze the relationships between sampled input parameters and corresponding output. We implemented this in a prototype called Paramorama. It provides users with a visual overview of parameters and their sampled values. User-defined areas of interest are presented in a structured way that includes image-based output and a novel layout algorithm. To find optimal parameter settings, users can tag high- and low-quality results to refine their search. We include two case studies to illustrate the utility of this approach. PMID:22034361

  2. COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF PLANAR GAMMA CAMERA IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory



    COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF PLANAR GAMMA CAMERA IMAGES

    T Martonen1 and J Schroeter2

    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 USA and 2Curriculum in Toxicology, Unive...

  3. Using Image Analysis to Build Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sarah Drake; Swope, John

    2010-01-01

    Content area reading remains a primary concern of history educators. In order to better prepare students for encounters with text, the authors propose the use of two image analysis strategies tied with a historical theme to heighten student interest in historical content and provide a basis for improved reading comprehension.

  4. Scale Free Reduced Rank Image Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horst, Paul

    In the traditional Guttman-Harris type image analysis, a transformation is applied to the data matrix such that each column of the transformed data matrix is the best least squares estimate of the corresponding column of the data matrix from the remaining columns. The model is scale free. However, it assumes (1) that the correlation matrix is…

  5. PET image reconstruction: a robust state space approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huafeng; Tian, Yi; Shi, Pengcheng

    2005-01-01

    Statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms have shown improved image quality over conventional nonstatistical methods in PET by using accurate system response models and measurement noise models. Strictly speaking, however, PET measurements, pre-corrected for accidental coincidences, are neither Poisson nor Gaussian distributed and thus do not meet basic assumptions of these algorithms. In addition, the difficulty in determining the proper system response model also greatly affects the quality of the reconstructed images. In this paper, we explore the usage of state space principles for the estimation of activity map in tomographic PET imaging. The proposed strategy formulates the organ activity distribution through tracer kinetics models, and the photon-counting measurements through observation equations, thus makes it possible to unify the dynamic reconstruction problem and static reconstruction problem into a general framework. Further, it coherently treats the uncertainties of the statistical model of the imaging system and the noisy nature of measurement data. Since H(infinity) filter seeks minimummaximum-error estimates without any assumptions on the system and data noise statistics, it is particular suited for PET image reconstruction where the statistical properties of measurement data and the system model are very complicated. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated using Shepp-Logan simulated phantom data and real phantom data with favorable results.

  6. Texture Analysis of Medical Images Using the Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Margarita; Mavilio, Adriana

    2002-08-01

    Texture analysis of images can contribute to a better interpretation of medical images. This type of analysis provides not only qualitative but also quantitative information about tissue affection degree. In this work an algorithm is developed which uses the wavelet transform to carry out the supervised segmentation of echographic images corresponding to injured Achilles tendon of athletes. To construct the pattern, the image corresponding to healthy tendon tissue of the athlete, is taken as a reference based upon the duplicity of this structure. Texture features are calculated on the expansion wavelet coefficients of the images. The Mahalanobis distance between texture samples of the injured tissue and pattern texture is computed and used as the discriminating function. It is concluded that this distance, after appropriate medical calibrations, can offer quantitative information about the injury degree in every point along the damaged tissue. Further, its behavior along the segmented image can serve as a measure of the degree of change in tissue properties. The parameter, similarity degree, is defined and obtained by taking into account the correlation between distance histograms for the healthy tissue and the damaged one. It is also shown that this parameter, when properly calibrated, can offer a quantitative global evaluation of the state of the injured tissue.

  7. EEG source imaging of brain states using spatiotemporal regression.

    PubMed

    Custo, Anna; Vulliemoz, Serge; Grouiller, Frederic; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Michel, Christoph

    2014-08-01

    Relating measures of electroencephalography (EEG) back to the underlying sources is a long-standing inverse problem. Here we propose a new method to estimate the EEG sources of identified electrophysiological states that represent spontaneous activity, or are evoked by a stimulus, or caused by disease or disorder. Our method has the unique advantage of seamlessly integrating a statistical significance of the source estimate while efficiently eliminating artifacts (e.g., due to eye blinks, eye movements, bad electrodes). After determining the electrophysiological states in terms of stable topographies using established methods (e.g.: ICA, PCA, k-means, epoch average), we propose to estimate these states' time courses through spatial regression of a General Linear Model (GLM). These time courses are then used to find EEG sources that have a similar time-course (using temporal regression of a second GLM). We validate our method using both simulated and experimental data. Simulated data allows us to assess the difference between source maps obtained by the proposed method and those obtained by applying conventional source imaging of the state topographies. Moreover, we use data from 7 epileptic patients (9 distinct epileptic foci localized by intracranial EEG) and 2 healthy subjects performing an eyes-open/eyes-closed task to elicit activity in the alpha frequency range. Our results indicate that the proposed EEG source imaging method accurately localizes the sources for each of the electrical brain states. Furthermore, our method is particularly suited for estimating the sources of EEG resting states or otherwise weak spontaneous activity states, a problem not adequately solved before.

  8. Real-time video-image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskenazi, R.; Rayfield, M. J.; Yakimovsky, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Digitizer and storage system allow rapid random access to video data by computer. RAPID (random-access picture digitizer) uses two commercially-available, charge-injection, solid-state TV cameras as sensors. It can continuously update its memory with each frame of video signal, or it can hold given frame in memory. In either mode, it generates composite video output signal representing digitized image in memory.

  9. XANES: Solid state mineral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Researchers in the field of mineral physics have become aware of new analytical techniques for studying the electronic structure of solids; one such technique is the X ray absorption fine structure (XFAS) method. In this technique the fine structure of the X ray K-edge, for example, can b e employed as a critical probe of t h e intricacies of a crystal structure (P. A. Lee, P. H. Citrin, P. Eisenberger, and B. M. Kincaid, Rev. Mod. Phys., 53, 799, 1981).A similar, related technique, X ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), is a relatively unknown method of studying the electronic structure of solids. XANES is new, and due to its complex nature, data on all but very simple solids have not yet been applied rigorously. Among the first XANES results on minerals is the recent study reported by G. Knapp, B. Veal, H. Pan, and T. Klipper (Solid State Comm. 44, 1343, 1982) on perovskites, magnesiowustites, and other 3d oxides in the zircon and spinel groups. The interpretation of these results is still semiquantitative, being based on ground state and basic selection rule considerations. The results show, however, a strong correlation between near-edge spectra and crystal structure.

  10. Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics

    SciTech Connect

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Kamezawa, Hidemi; Jin, Ze; Nakamoto, Takahiro; Soufi, Mazen

    2015-09-30

    Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics have been constructed for increasing the accuracy of medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy in radiological physics. Computational image analysis has been established based on applied mathematics, physics, and engineering. This review paper will introduce how computational image analysis is useful in radiation therapy with respect to radiological physics.

  11. Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Kamezawa, Hidemi; Jin, Ze; Nakamoto, Takahiro; Soufi, Mazen

    2015-09-01

    Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics have been constructed for increasing the accuracy of medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy in radiological physics. Computational image analysis has been established based on applied mathematics, physics, and engineering. This review paper will introduce how computational image analysis is useful in radiation therapy with respect to radiological physics.

  12. Automated retinal image analysis over the internet.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ling; Madore, Benjamin; Leotta, Matthew J; Sofka, Michal; Yang, Gehua; Majerovics, Anna; Tanenbaum, Howard L; Stewart, Charles V; Roysam, Badrinath

    2008-07-01

    Retinal clinicians and researchers make extensive use of images, and the current emphasis is on digital imaging of the retinal fundus. The goal of this paper is to introduce a system, known as retinal image vessel extraction and registration system, which provides the community of retinal clinicians, researchers, and study directors an integrated suite of advanced digital retinal image analysis tools over the Internet. The capabilities include vasculature tracing and morphometry, joint (simultaneous) montaging of multiple retinal fields, cross-modality registration (color/red-free fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms), and generation of flicker animations for visualization of changes from longitudinal image sequences. Each capability has been carefully validated in our previous research work. The integrated Internet-based system can enable significant advances in retina-related clinical diagnosis, visualization of the complete fundus at full resolution from multiple low-angle views, analysis of longitudinal changes, research on the retinal vasculature, and objective, quantitative computer-assisted scoring of clinical trials imagery. It could pave the way for future screening services from optometry facilities.

  13. State-correlated DC slice imaging of formaldehyde photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suits, Arthur G.; Chambreau, Steven D.; Lahankar, Sridhar A.

    High-resolution slice imaging methods allow for detection of single product quantum states with sufficient velocity resolution to infer the full correlated product state distribution of the undetected fragment. This is a level of detail not available in previous studies of formaldehyde photodissociation, and in this application it reveals startling new aspects of unimolecular decomposition. The CO rotational distributions from near ultraviolet dissociation of formaldehyde are bimodal, and the imaging experiments allow us to decompose these into two dynamically distinct components: the conventional molecular dissociation over a high exit barrier, and a novel `roaming atom' reaction in which frustrated radical dissociation events lead to intramolecular H abstraction, bypassing the transition state entirely. In probing the dynamics of the conventional molecular dissociation over the barrier, we use the complete vH2-jCO correlation to model the exit channel dynamics in new detail. Furthermore, these state-correlated measurements provide insight into radical-radical reactions and the underlying dynamics and energy dependence of the roaming pathway.

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of the excited state lifetime of fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Laufer, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging using pump-probe excitation has been shown to allow the detection and visualization of fluorescent contrast agents. The technique relies upon inducing stimulated emission using pump and probe pulses at excitation wavelengths that correspond to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. By changing the time delay between the pulses, the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore is modulated to vary the amount of thermalized energy, and hence PA signal amplitude, to provide fluorophore-specific PA contrast. In this study, this approach was extended to the detection of differences in the excited state lifetime of fluorophores. PA waveforms were measured in solutions of a near-infrared fluorophore using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. The lifetime of the fluorophore solutions was varied by using different solvents and quencher concentrations. By calculating difference signals and by plotting their amplitude as a function of pump-probe time delay, a correlation with the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore was observed. The results agreed with the output of a forward model of the PA signal generation in fluorophores. The application of this method to tomographic PA imaging of differences in the excited state lifetime was demonstrated in tissue phantom experiments.

  15. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F; Moreno Uribe, Lina M; Baum, Christian L; Hamilton, Grant S; Wehby, George L; Dunnwald, Martine

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive, and unbiased assessments of postsurgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue digital images of postsurgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD imaging system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software, and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with intraclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (p ranging from 1.20(-05) to 1.95(-14) ). Physicians' clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high interobserver variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome.

  16. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian J.; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F.; Moreno, Lina M.; Baum, Christian L.; Hamilton, Grant S.; Wehby, George L.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive and unbiased assessments of post-surgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue (RGB) digital images of post-surgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD image system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with interclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (P ranging from 1.20−05 to 1.95−14). Physicians’ clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high inter-observer variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome. PMID:24635173

  17. ALISA: adaptive learning image and signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Peter

    1999-01-01

    ALISA (Adaptive Learning Image and Signal Analysis) is an adaptive statistical learning engine that may be used to detect and classify the surfaces and boundaries of objects in images. The engine has been designed, implemented, and tested at both the George Washington University and the Research Institute for Applied Knowledge Processing in Ulm, Germany over the last nine years with major funding from Robert Bosch GmbH and Lockheed-Martin Corporation. The design of ALISA was inspired by the multi-path cortical- column architecture and adaptive functions of the mammalian visual cortex.

  18. Characterization of microrod arrays by image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, Reinald; Grimm, Silko; Giesa, Reiner; Schmidt, Hans-Werner; Mathwig, Klaus; Gösele, Ulrich; Steinhart, Martin

    2009-04-01

    The uniformity of the properties of array elements was evaluated by statistical analysis of microscopic images of array structures, assuming that the brightness of the array elements correlates quantitatively or qualitatively with a microscopically probed quantity. Derivatives and autocorrelation functions of cumulative frequency distributions of the object brightnesses were used to quantify variations in object properties throughout arrays. Thus, different specimens, the same specimen at different stages of its fabrication or use, and different imaging conditions can be compared systematically. As an example, we analyzed scanning electron micrographs of microrod arrays and calculated the percentage of broken microrods.

  19. High-resolution slice imaging of quantum state-to-state photodissociation of methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Lipciuc, M. Laura; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2007-12-14

    The photodissociation of rotationally state-selected methyl bromide is studied in the wavelength region between 213 and 235 nm using slice imaging. A hexapole state selector is used to focus a single (JK=11) rotational quantum state of the parent molecule, and a high speed slice imaging detector measures directly the three-dimensional recoil distribution of the methyl fragment. Experiments were performed on both normal (CH{sub 3}Br) and deuterated (CD{sub 3}Br) parent molecules. The velocity distribution of the methyl fragment shows a rich structure, especially for the CD{sub 3} photofragment, assigned to the formation of vibrationally excited methyl fragments in the {nu}{sub 1} and {nu}{sub 4} vibrational modes. The CH{sub 3} fragment formed with ground state Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) is observed to be rotationally more excited, by some 230-340 cm{sup -1}, compared to the methyl fragment formed with spin-orbit excited Br({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}). Branching ratios and angular distributions are obtained for various methyl product states and they are observed to vary with photodissociation energy. The nonadiabatic transition probability for the {sup 3}Q{sub 0+}{yields}{sup 1}Q{sub 1} transition is calculated from the images and differences between the isotopes are observed. Comparison with previous non-state-selected experiments indicates an enhanced nonadiabatic transition probability for state-selected K=1 methyl bromide parent molecules. From the state-to-state photodissociation experiments the dissociationenergy for both isotopes was determined, D{sub 0}(CH{sub 3}Br)=23 400{+-}133 cm{sup -1} and D{sub 0}(CD{sub 3}Br)=23 827{+-}94 cm{sup -1}.

  20. A UML Profile for State Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Alex; Rasmussen, Robert

    2010-01-01

    State Analysis is a systems engineering methodology for the specification and design of control systems, developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The methodology emphasizes an analysis of the system under control in terms of States and their properties and behaviors and their effects on each other, a clear separation of the control system from the controlled system, cognizance in the control system of the controlled system's State, goal-based control built on constraining the controlled system's States, and disciplined techniques for State discovery and characterization. State Analysis (SA) introduces two key diagram types: State Effects and Goal Network diagrams. The team at JPL developed a tool for performing State Analysis. The tool includes a drawing capability, backed by a database that supports the diagram types and the organization of the elements of the SA models. But the tool does not support the usual activities of software engineering and design - a disadvantage, since systems to which State Analysis can be applied tend to be very software-intensive. This motivated the work described in this paper: the development of a preliminary Unified Modeling Language (UML) profile for State Analysis. Having this profile would enable systems engineers to specify a system using the methods and graphical language of State Analysis, which is easily linked with a larger system model in SysML (Systems Modeling Language), while also giving software engineers engaged in implementing the specified control system immediate access to and use of the SA model, in the same language, UML, used for other software design. That is, a State Analysis profile would serve as a shared modeling bridge between system and software models for the behavior aspects of the system. This paper begins with an overview of State Analysis and its underpinnings, followed by an overview of the mapping of SA constructs to the UML metamodel. It then delves into the details of these mappings and the

  1. A UML Profile for State Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Alex; Rasmussen, Robert

    2010-01-01

    State Analysis is a systems engineering methodology for the specification and design of control systems, developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The methodology emphasizes an analysis of the system under control in terms of States and their properties and behaviors and their effects on each other, a clear separation of the control system from the controlled system, cognizance in the control system of the controlled system's State, goal-based control built on constraining the controlled system's States, and disciplined techniques for State discovery and characterization. State Analysis (SA) introduces two key diagram types: State Effects and Goal Network diagrams. The team at JPL developed a tool for performing State Analysis. The tool includes a drawing capability, backed by a database that supports the diagram types and the organization of the elements of the SA models. But the tool does not support the usual activities of software engineering and design - a disadvantage, since systems to which State Analysis can be applied tend to be very software-intensive. This motivated the work described in this paper: the development of a preliminary Unified Modeling Language (UML) profile for State Analysis. Having this profile would enable systems engineers to specify a system using the methods and graphical language of State Analysis, which is easily linked with a larger system model in SysML (Systems Modeling Language), while also giving software engineers engaged in implementing the specified control system immediate access to and use of the SA model, in the same language, UML, used for other software design. That is, a State Analysis profile would serve as a shared modeling bridge between system and software models for the behavior aspects of the system. This paper begins with an overview of State Analysis and its underpinnings, followed by an overview of the mapping of SA constructs to the UML metamodel. It then delves into the details of these mappings and the

  2. Recent Advances in Morphological Cell Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shengyong; Zhao, Mingzhu; Wu, Guang; Yao, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent advances in image processing methods for morphological cell analysis. The topic of morphological analysis has received much attention with the increasing demands in both bioinformatics and biomedical applications. Among many factors that affect the diagnosis of a disease, morphological cell analysis and statistics have made great contributions to results and effects for a doctor. Morphological cell analysis finds the cellar shape, cellar regularity, classification, statistics, diagnosis, and so forth. In the last 20 years, about 1000 publications have reported the use of morphological cell analysis in biomedical research. Relevant solutions encompass a rather wide application area, such as cell clumps segmentation, morphological characteristics extraction, 3D reconstruction, abnormal cells identification, and statistical analysis. These reports are summarized in this paper to enable easy referral to suitable methods for practical solutions. Representative contributions and future research trends are also addressed. PMID:22272215

  3. Autonomous Image Analysis for Future Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Morris, R. L.; Ruzon, M. A.; Bandari, E.; Roush, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    To explore high priority landing sites and to prepare for eventual human exploration, future Mars missions will involve rovers capable of traversing tens of kilometers. However, the current process by which scientists interact with a rover does not scale to such distances. Specifically, numerous command cycles are required to complete even simple tasks, such as, pointing the spectrometer at a variety of nearby rocks. In addition, the time required by scientists to interpret image data before new commands can be given and the limited amount of data that can be downlinked during a given command cycle constrain rover mobility and achievement of science goals. Experience with rover tests on Earth supports these concerns. As a result, traverses to science sites as identified in orbital images would require numerous science command cycles over a period of many weeks, months or even years, perhaps exceeding rover design life and other constraints. Autonomous onboard science analysis can address these problems in two ways. First, it will allow the rover to preferentially transmit "interesting" images, defined as those likely to have higher science content. Second, the rover will be able to anticipate future commands. For example, a rover might autonomously acquire and return spectra of "interesting" rocks along with a high-resolution image of those rocks in addition to returning the context images in which they were detected. Such approaches, coupled with appropriate navigational software, help to address both the data volume and command cycle bottlenecks that limit both rover mobility and science yield. We are developing fast, autonomous algorithms to enable such intelligent on-board decision making by spacecraft. Autonomous algorithms developed to date have the ability to identify rocks and layers in a scene, locate the horizon, and compress multi-spectral image data. We are currently investigating the possibility of reconstructing a 3D surface from a sequence of images

  4. Fast image analysis in polarization SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Artigas, David

    2010-08-02

    Pixel resolution polarization-sensitive second harmonic generation (PSHG) imaging has been recently shown as a promising imaging modality, by largely enhancing the capabilities of conventional intensity-based SHG microscopy. PSHG is able to obtain structural information from the elementary SHG active structures, which play an important role in many biological processes. Although the technique is of major interest, acquiring such information requires long offline processing, even with current computers. In this paper, we present an approach based on Fourier analysis of the anisotropy signature that allows processing the PSHG images in less than a second in standard single core computers. This represents a temporal improvement of several orders of magnitude compared to conventional fitting algorithms. This opens up the possibility for fast PSHG information with the subsequent benefit of potential use in medical applications.

  5. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging.

  6. Multiport solid-state imager characterization at variable pixel rates

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.A.; Turko, B.T.

    1993-08-01

    The imaging performance of an 8-port Full Frame Transfer Charge Coupled Device (FFT CCD) as a function of several parameters including pixel clock rate is presented. The device, model CCD- 13, manufactured by English Electric Valve (EEV) is a 512 {times} 512 pixel array designed with four individual programmable bidirectional serial registers and eight output amplifiers permitting simultaneous readout of eight segments (128 horizontal {times} 256 vertical pixels) of the array. The imager was evaluated in Los Alamos National Laboratory`s High-Speed Solid-State Imager Test Station at true pixel rates as high as 50 MHz for effective imager pixel rates approaching 400 MHz from multiporting. Key response characteristics measured include absolute responsivity, Charge-Transfer-Efficiency (CTE), dynamic range, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and electronic and optical crosstalk among the eight video channels. Preliminary test results and data obtained from the CCD-13 will be presented and the versatility/capabilities of the test station will be reviewed.

  7. Prostate cancer: state of the art imaging and focal treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodrum, D A; Kawashima, A; Gorny, K R; Mynderse, L A

    2017-08-01

    In 2016, it is estimated 180,890 men are newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 3,306,760 men live with prostate cancer in the United States. The introduction of multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate, standardised interpretation guidelines such as Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS version 2), and MRI-based targeted biopsy has improved detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. Accurate risk stratification (Gleason grade/score and tumour stage) using imaging and image-guided targeted biopsy has become critical for the management of patients with prostate cancer. Recent advances in MRI-guided minimally invasive ablative treatment (MIAT) utilising cryoablation, laser ablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation, have allowed accurate focal or regional delivery of optimal thermal energy to the biopsy proven, MRI-detected tumour, under real-time or near simultaneous MRI monitoring of the ablation zone. A contemporary review on prostate mpMRI, MRI-based targeted biopsy, and MRI-guided ablation techniques is presented. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Automated quantitative image analysis of nanoparticle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Chaitanya R.; Gao, Bo; Tao, Andrea R.; Arya, Gaurav

    2015-05-01

    The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated manner. The software outputs averages and distributions in the size, radius of gyration, fractal dimension, backbone length, end-to-end distance, anisotropic ratio, and aspect ratio of NP clusters as a function of time along with bootstrapped error bounds for all calculated properties. The polydispersity in the NP building blocks and biases in the sampling of NP clusters are accounted for through the use of probabilistic weights. This software, named Particle Image Characterization Tool (PICT), has been made publicly available and could be an invaluable resource for researchers studying NP assembly. To demonstrate its practical utility, we used PICT to analyze scanning electron microscopy images taken during the assembly of surface-functionalized metal NPs of differing shapes and sizes within a polymer matrix. PICT is used to characterize and analyze the morphology of NP clusters, providing quantitative information that can be used to elucidate the physical mechanisms governing NP assembly.The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated

  9. Endoscopic image analysis in semantic space.

    PubMed

    Kwitt, R; Vasconcelos, N; Rasiwasia, N; Uhl, A; Davis, B; Häfner, M; Wrba, F

    2012-10-01

    A novel approach to the design of a semantic, low-dimensional, encoding for endoscopic imagery is proposed. This encoding is based on recent advances in scene recognition, where semantic modeling of image content has gained considerable attention over the last decade. While the semantics of scenes are mainly comprised of environmental concepts such as vegetation, mountains or sky, the semantics of endoscopic imagery are medically relevant visual elements, such as polyps, special surface patterns, or vascular structures. The proposed semantic encoding differs from the representations commonly used in endoscopic image analysis (for medical decision support) in that it establishes a semantic space, where each coordinate axis has a clear human interpretation. It is also shown to establish a connection to Riemannian geometry, which enables principled solutions to a number of problems that arise in both physician training and clinical practice. This connection is exploited by leveraging results from information geometry to solve problems such as (1) recognition of important semantic concepts, (2) semantically-focused image browsing, and (3) estimation of the average-case semantic encoding for a collection of images that share a medically relevant visual detail. The approach can provide physicians with an easily interpretable, semantic encoding of visual content, upon which further decisions, or operations, can be naturally carried out. This is contrary to the prevalent practice in endoscopic image analysis for medical decision support, where image content is primarily captured by discriminative, high-dimensional, appearance features, which possess discriminative power but lack human interpretability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Method of images applied to driven solid-state emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scerri, Dale; Santana, Ted S.; Gerardot, Brian D.; Gauger, Erik M.

    2017-04-01

    Increasing the collection efficiency from solid-state emitters is an important step towards achieving robust single-photon sources, as well as optically connecting different nodes of quantum hardware. A metallic substrate may be the most basic method of improving the collection of photons from quantum dots, with predicted collection efficiency increases of up to 50%. The established "method-of-images" approach models the effects of a reflective surface for atomic and molecular emitters by replacing the metal surface with a second fictitious emitter which ensures appropriate electromagnetic boundary conditions. Here, we extend the approach to the case of driven solid-state emitters, where exciton-phonon interactions play a key role in determining the optical properties of the system. We derive an intuitive polaron master equation and demonstrate its agreement with the complementary half-sided cavity formulation of the same problem. Our extended image approach offers a straightforward route towards studying the dynamics of multiple solid-state emitters near a metallic surface.

  11. Rydberg and valence state excitation dynamics: a velocity map imaging study involving the E-V state interaction in HBr.

    PubMed

    Zaouris, Dimitris; Kartakoullis, Andreas; Glodic, Pavle; Samartzis, Peter C; Rafn Hróðmarsson, Helgi; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2015-04-28

    Photoexcitation dynamics of the E((1)Σ(+)) (v' = 0) Rydberg state and the V((1)Σ(+)) (v') ion-pair vibrational states of HBr are investigated by velocity map imaging (VMI). H(+) photoions, produced through a number of vibrational and rotational levels of the two states were imaged and kinetic energy release (KER) and angular distributions were extracted from the data. In agreement with previous work, we found the photodissociation channels forming H*(n = 2) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) to be dominant. Autoionization pathways leading to H(+) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) via either HBr(+)((2)Π3/2) or HBr(+)*((2)Π1/2) formation were also present. The analysis of KER and angular distributions and comparison with rotationally and mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra revealed the excitation transition mechanisms and characteristics of states involved as well as the involvement of the E-V state interactions and their v' and J' dependence.

  12. Brain imaging of pain: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Debbie L; Sandhu, Javin S; Jones, Anthony KP

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a complex sensory and emotional experience that is heavily influenced by prior experience and expectations of pain. Before the development of noninvasive human brain imaging, our grasp of the brain’s role in pain processing was limited to data from postmortem studies, direct recording of brain activity, patient experience and stimulation during neurosurgical procedures, and animal models of pain. Advances made in neuroimaging have bridged the gap between brain activity and the subjective experience of pain and allowed us to better understand the changes in the brain that are associated with both acute and chronic pain. Additionally, cognitive influences on pain such as attention, anticipation, and fear can now be directly observed, allowing for the interpretation of the neural basis of the psychological modulation of pain. The use of functional brain imaging to measure changes in endogenous neurochemistry has increased our understanding of how states of increased resilience and vulnerability to pain are maintained. PMID:27660488

  13. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  14. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  15. A survey on deep learning in medical image analysis.

    PubMed

    Litjens, Geert; Kooi, Thijs; Bejnordi, Babak Ehteshami; Setio, Arnaud Arindra Adiyoso; Ciompi, Francesco; Ghafoorian, Mohsen; van der Laak, Jeroen A W M; van Ginneken, Bram; Sánchez, Clara I

    2017-07-26

    Deep learning algorithms, in particular convolutional networks, have rapidly become a methodology of choice for analyzing medical images. This paper reviews the major deep learning concepts pertinent to medical image analysis and summarizes over 300 contributions to the field, most of which appeared in the last year. We survey the use of deep learning for image classification, object detection, segmentation, registration, and other tasks. Concise overviews are provided of studies per application area: neuro, retinal, pulmonary, digital pathology, breast, cardiac, abdominal, musculoskeletal. We end with a summary of the current state-of-the-art, a critical discussion of open challenges and directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The synthesis and analysis of color images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for performing the synthesis and analysis of digital color images. The method is based on two principles. First, image data are represented with respect to the separate physical factors, surface reflectance and the spectral power distribution of the ambient light, that give rise to the perceived color of an object. Second, the encoding is made efficient by using a basis expansion for the surface spectral reflectance and spectral power distribution of the ambient light that takes advantage of the high degree of correlation across the visible wavelengths normally found in such functions. Within this framework, the same basic methods can be used to synthesize image data for color display monitors and printed materials, and to analyze image data into estimates of the spectral power distribution and surface spectral reflectances. The method can be applied to a variety of tasks. Examples of applications include the color balancing of color images, and the identification of material surface spectral reflectance when the lighting cannot be completely controlled.

  17. Radar image with color as height, Bahia State, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This radar image is the first to show the full 240-kilometer-wide (150 mile)swath collected by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The area shown is in the state of Bahia in Brazil. The semi-circular mountains along the leftside of the image are the Serra Da Jacobin, which rise to 1100 meters (3600 feet) above sea level. The total relief shown is approximately 800 meters (2600 feet). The top part of the image is the Sertao, a semi-arid region, that is subject to severe droughts during El Nino events. A small portion of the San Francisco River, the longest river (1609 kilometers or 1000 miles) entirely within Brazil, cuts across the upper right corner of the image. This river is a major source of water for irrigation and hydroelectric power. Mapping such regions will allow scientists to better understand the relationships between flooding cycles, drought and human influences on ecosystems.

    This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. The three dark vertical stripes show the boundaries where four segments of the swath are merged to form the full scanned swath. These will be removed in later processing. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to reddish at the highest elevations.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space

  18. Radar image with color as height, Bahia State, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This radar image is the first to show the full 240-kilometer-wide (150 mile)swath collected by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The area shown is in the state of Bahia in Brazil. The semi-circular mountains along the leftside of the image are the Serra Da Jacobin, which rise to 1100 meters (3600 feet) above sea level. The total relief shown is approximately 800 meters (2600 feet). The top part of the image is the Sertao, a semi-arid region, that is subject to severe droughts during El Nino events. A small portion of the San Francisco River, the longest river (1609 kilometers or 1000 miles) entirely within Brazil, cuts across the upper right corner of the image. This river is a major source of water for irrigation and hydroelectric power. Mapping such regions will allow scientists to better understand the relationships between flooding cycles, drought and human influences on ecosystems.

    This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. The three dark vertical stripes show the boundaries where four segments of the swath are merged to form the full scanned swath. These will be removed in later processing. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to reddish at the highest elevations.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space

  19. Image analysis for measuring rod network properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjae; Choi, Jungkyu; Nam, Jaewook

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, metallic nanowires have been attracting significant attention as next-generation flexible transparent conductive films. The performance of films depends on the network structure created by nanowires. Gaining an understanding of their structure, such as connectivity, coverage, and alignment of nanowires, requires the knowledge of individual nanowires inside the microscopic images taken from the film. Although nanowires are flexible up to a certain extent, they are usually depicted as rigid rods in many analysis and computational studies. Herein, we propose a simple and straightforward algorithm based on the filtering in the frequency domain for detecting the rod-shape objects inside binary images. The proposed algorithm uses a specially designed filter in the frequency domain to detect image segments, namely, the connected components aligned in a certain direction. Those components are post-processed to be combined under a given merging rule in a single rod object. In this study, the microscopic properties of the rod networks relevant to the analysis of nanowire networks were measured for investigating the opto-electric performance of transparent conductive films and their alignment distribution, length distribution, and area fraction. To verify and find the optimum parameters for the proposed algorithm, numerical experiments were performed on synthetic images with predefined properties. By selecting proper parameters, the algorithm was used to investigate silver nanowire transparent conductive films fabricated by the dip coating method.

  20. Evidential Reasoning in Expert Systems for Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    techniques to image analysis (IA). There is growing evidence that these techniques offer significant improvements in image analysis , particularly in the...2) to provide a common framework for analysis, (3) to structure the ER process for major expert-system tasks in image analysis , and (4) to identify...approaches to three important tasks for expert systems in the domain of image analysis . This segment concluded with an assessment of the strengths

  1. Positron emission tomography: physics, instrumentation, and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Porenta, G

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that permits reconstruction of cross-sectional images of the human body which depict the biodistribution of PET tracer substances. A large variety of physiological PET tracers, mostly based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine is available and allows the in vivo investigation of organ perfusion, metabolic pathways and biomolecular processes in normal and diseased states. PET cameras utilize the physical characteristics of positron decay to derive quantitative measurements of tracer concentrations, a capability that has so far been elusive for conventional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging techniques. Due to the short half lives of most PET isotopes, an on-site cyclotron and a radiochemistry unit are necessary to provide an adequate supply of PET tracers. While operating a PET center in the past was a complex procedure restricted to few academic centers with ample resources, PET technology has rapidly advanced in recent years and has entered the commercial nuclear medicine market. To date, the availability of compact cyclotrons with remote computer control, automated synthesis units for PET radiochemistry, high-performance PET cameras, and user-friendly analysis workstations permits installation of a clinical PET center within most nuclear medicine facilities. This review provides simple descriptions of important aspects concerning physics, instrumentation, and image analysis in PET imaging which should be understood by medical personnel involved in the clinical operation of a PET imaging center.

  2. Pain related inflammation analysis using infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Bardhan, Shawli; Das, Kakali; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Nath, Satyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Medical Infrared Thermography (MIT) offers a potential non-invasive, non-contact and radiation free imaging modality for assessment of abnormal inflammation having pain in the human body. The assessment of inflammation mainly depends on the emission of heat from the skin surface. Arthritis is a disease of joint damage that generates inflammation in one or more anatomical joints of the body. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent appearing form of arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most threatening form of them. In this study, the inflammatory analysis has been performed on the infrared images of patients suffering from RA and OA. For the analysis, a dataset of 30 bilateral knee thermograms has been captured from the patient of RA and OA by following a thermogram acquisition standard. The thermograms are pre-processed, and areas of interest are extracted for further processing. The investigation of the spread of inflammation is performed along with the statistical analysis of the pre-processed thermograms. The objectives of the study include: i) Generation of a novel thermogram acquisition standard for inflammatory pain disease ii) Analysis of the spread of the inflammation related to RA and OA using K-means clustering. iii) First and second order statistical analysis of pre-processed thermograms. The conclusion reflects that, in most of the cases, RA oriented inflammation affects bilateral knees whereas inflammation related to OA present in the unilateral knee. Also due to the spread of inflammation in OA, contralateral asymmetries are detected through the statistical analysis.

  3. Vibration signature analysis of AFM images

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, G.A.; Fu, J.; Pandit, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    Vibration signature analysis has been commonly used for the machine condition monitoring and the control of errors. However, it has been rarely employed for the analysis of the precision instruments such as an atomic force microscope (AFM). In this work, an AFM was used to collect vibration data from a sample positioning stage under different suspension and support conditions. Certain structural characteristics of the sample positioning stage show up as a result of the vibration signature analysis of the surface height images measured using an AFM. It is important to understand these vibration characteristics in order to reduce vibrational uncertainty, improve the damping and structural design, and to eliminate the imaging imperfections. The choice of method applied for vibration analysis may affect the results. Two methods, the data dependent systems (DDS) analysis and the Welch`s periodogram averaging method were investigated for application to this problem. Both techniques provide smooth spectrum plots from the data. Welch`s periodogram provides a coarse resolution as limited by the number of samples and requires a choice of window to be decided subjectively by the user. The DDS analysis provides sharper spectral peaks at a much higher resolution and a much lower noise floor. A decomposition of the signal variance in terms of the frequencies is provided as well. The technique is based on an objective model adequacy criterion.

  4. Principle component analysis based hyperspectral image fusion in imaging spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenyi; Wu, Dan; Jiang, Jiangang; Yang, Guoan; Zhang, Chunmin

    2017-02-01

    Image fusion is of great importance in object detection. A PCA based image fusion method was proposed. A pixel-level average method and a wavelet-based methods have been implemented for a comparison study. Different performance metrics without reference image are implemented to evaluate the performance of image fusion algorithms. It has been concluded that image fusion using PCA based method showed better performance.

  5. Retinal image analysis for automated glaucoma risk evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyúl, László G.

    2009-10-01

    Images of the eye ground not only provide an insight to important parts of the visual system but also reflect the general state of health of the entire human body. Automatic retina image analysis is becoming an important screening tool for early detection of certain risks and diseases. Glaucoma is one of the most common causes of blindness and is becoming even more important considering the ageing society. Robust mass-screening may help to extend the symptom-free life of affected patients. Our research is focused on a novel automated classification system for glaucoma, based on image features from fundus photographs. Our new data-driven approach requires no manual assistance and does not depend on explicit structure segmentation and measurements. First, disease independent variations, such as nonuniform illumination, size differences, and blood vessels are eliminated from the images. Then, the extracted high-dimensional feature vectors are compressed via PCA and combined before classification with SVMs takes place. The technique achieves an accuracy of detecting glaucomatous retina fundus images comparable to that of human experts. The "vessel-free" images and intermediate output of the methods are novel representations of the data for the physicians that may provide new insight into and help to better understand glaucoma.

  6. BioImage Suite: An integrated medical image analysis suite: An update.

    PubMed

    Papademetris, Xenophon; Jackowski, Marcel P; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; DiStasio, Marcello; Okuda, Hirohito; Constable, R Todd; Staib, Lawrence H

    2006-01-01

    BioImage Suite is an NIH-supported medical image analysis software suite developed at Yale. It leverages both the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) and the Insight Toolkit (ITK) and it includes many additional algorithms for image analysis especially in the areas of segmentation, registration, diffusion weighted image processing and fMRI analysis. BioImage Suite has a user-friendly user interface developed in the Tcl scripting language. A final beta version is freely available for download.

  7. Computerized image analysis of digitized infrared images of breasts from a scanning infrared imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, Jonathan F.; Lipari, Charles A.; Elliot, Robert L.

    1998-10-01

    Infrared imaging of the breasts has been shown to be of value in risk assessment, detection, diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer. However, infrared imaging has not been widely accepted for a variety of reasons, including the lack of standardization of the subjective visual analysis method. The subjective nature of the standard visual analysis makes it difficult to achieve equivalent results with different equipment and different interpreters of the infrared patterns of the breasts. Therefore, this study was undertaken to develop more objective analysis methods for infrared images of the breasts by creating objective semiquantitative and quantitative analysis of computer assisted image analysis determined mean temperatures of whole breasts and quadrants of the breasts. When using objective quantitative data on whole breasts (comparing differences in means of left and right breasts), semiquantitative data on quadrants of the breast (determining an index by summation of scores for each quadrant), or summation of quantitative data on quadrants of the breasts there was a decrease in the number of abnormal patterns (positives) in patients being screen for breast cancer and an increases in the number of abnormal patterns (true positives) in the breast cancer patients. It is hoped that the decrease in positives in women being screened for breast cancer will translate into a decrease in the false positives but larger numbers of women with longer follow-up will be needed to clarify this. Also a much larger group of breast cancer patients will need to be studied in order to see if there is a true increase in the percentage of breast cancer patients presenting with abnormal infrared images of the breast with these objective image analysis methods.

  8. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; ...

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. Themore » remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.« less

  9. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bin

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. The remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.

  10. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bin

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. The remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.

  11. Machine learning for medical images analysis.

    PubMed

    Criminisi, A

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the application of machine learning for the analysis of medical images. Specifically: (i) We show how a special type of learning models can be thought of as automatically optimized, hierarchically-structured, rule-based algorithms, and (ii) We discuss how the issue of collecting large labelled datasets applies to both conventional algorithms as well as machine learning techniques. The size of the training database is a function of model complexity rather than a characteristic of machine learning methods.

  12. Global Methods for Image Motion Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    including the time for reviewing instructions , searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing...thanks go to Pankaj who inspired me in research , to Prasad from whom I have learned so much, and to Ronie and Laureen, the memories of whose company...of images to determine egomotion and to extract information from the scene. Research in motion analysis has been focussed on the problems of

  13. Nonlinear denoising and analysis of neuroimages with kernel principal component analysis and pre-image estimation.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Abrahamsen, Trine Julie; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2012-04-15

    We investigate the use of kernel principal component analysis (PCA) and the inverse problem known as pre-image estimation in neuroimaging: i) We explore kernel PCA and pre-image estimation as a means for image denoising as part of the image preprocessing pipeline. Evaluation of the denoising procedure is performed within a data-driven split-half evaluation framework. ii) We introduce manifold navigation for exploration of a nonlinear data manifold, and illustrate how pre-image estimation can be used to generate brain maps in the continuum between experimentally defined brain states/classes. We base these illustrations on two fMRI BOLD data sets - one from a simple finger tapping experiment and the other from an experiment on object recognition in the ventral temporal lobe. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Teleseismic receiver function imaging of the Pacific Northwest, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eager, Kevin Charles

    The origins of widespread Cenozoic tectonomagmatism in the Pacific Northwest, United States likely involve complex dynamics including subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate and mantle upwelling processes, all of which are reflected in the crust and upper mantle. To provide an improved understanding of these processes, I analyze P-to- S converted phases using the receiver function method to image topographic variations on regional seismic discontinuities in the upper mantle, which provides constraints on mantle thermal structure, and the crust-mantle interface, which provides constraints on crustal thickness and composition. My results confirm complexity in the Juan de Fuca slab structure as found by regional tomographic studies, including limited evidence of the slab penetrating the transition zone between the 410 and 660 km discontinuities. Evidence is inconclusive for a simple mantle plume beneath the central Oregon High Lava Plains, but indicates a regional increase in mantle temperatures stretching to the east. This result implies the inflow of warm material, either from around the southern edge of the Juan de Fuca plate as it descends into the mantle, or from a regional upwelling to the east related to the Yellowstone hotspot. Results for regional crustal structure reveal thin (˜31 km) crust beneath the High Lava Plains relative to surrounding regions that exhibit thicker (35+ km) crust. The thick (≥ 40 km) crust of the Owyhee Plateau has a sharp western boundary and normal Poisson's ratio, a measure of crustal composition. I find a slightly thickened crust and low Poisson's ratio between Steens Mountain and the Owyhee Plateau, consistent with residuum from source magma of the Steens flood basalts. Central and southern Oregon exhibit very high Poisson's ratios and low velocity zones within the crust, suggesting a degree of intracrustal partial melt not seen along the center of the age-progressive High Lava Plains magmatic track, perhaps due to crustal melt

  15. Tomographic spectral imaging: analysis of localized corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2005-02-01

    Microanalysis is typically performed to analyze the near surface of materials. There are many instances where chemical information about the third spatial dimension is essential to the solution of materials analyses. The majority of 3D analyses however focus on limited spectral acquisition and/or analysis. For truly comprehensive 3D chemical characterization, 4D spectral images (a complete spectrum from each volume element of a region of a specimen) are needed. Furthermore, a robust statistical method is needed to extract the maximum amount of chemical information from that extremely large amount of data. In this paper, an example of the acquisition and multivariate statistical analysis of 4D (3-spatial and 1-spectral dimension) x-ray spectral images is described. The method of utilizing a single- or dual-beam FIB (w/o or w/SEM) to get at 3D chemistry has been described by others with respect to secondary-ion mass spectrometry. The basic methodology described in those works has been modified for comprehensive x-ray microanalysis in a dual-beam FIB/SEM (FEI Co. DB-235). In brief, the FIB is used to serially section a site-specific region of a sample and then the electron beam is rastered over the exposed surfaces with x-ray spectral images being acquired at each section. All this is performed without rotating or tilting the specimen between FIB cutting and SEM imaging/x-ray spectral image acquisition. The resultant 4D spectral image is then unfolded (number of volume elements by number of channels) and subjected to the same multivariate curve resolution (MCR) approach that has proven successful for the analysis of lower-dimension x-ray spectral images. The TSI data sets can be in excess of 4Gbytes. This problem has been overcome (for now) and images up to 6Gbytes have been analyzed in this work. The method for analyzing such large spectral images will be described in this presentation. A comprehensive 3D chemical analysis was performed on several corrosion specimens

  16. Image analysis from root system pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaroli, D.; Jong van Lier, Q.; Metselaar, K.

    2009-04-01

    Root research has been hampered by a lack of good methods and by the amount of time involved in making measurements. In general the studies from root system are made with either monolith or minirhizotron method which is used as a quantitative tool but requires comparison with conventional destructive methods. This work aimed to analyze roots systems images, obtained from a root atlas book, to different crops in order to find the root length and root length density and correlate them with the literature. Five crops images from Zea mays, Secale cereale, Triticum aestivum, Medicago sativa and Panicum miliaceum were divided in horizontal and vertical layers. Root length distribution was analyzed for horizontal as well as vertical layers. In order to obtain the root length density, a cuboidal volume was supposed to correspond to each part of the image. The results from regression analyses showed root length distributions according to horizontal or vertical layers. It was possible to find the root length distribution for single horizontal layers as a function of vertical layers, and also for single vertical layers as a function of horizontal layers. Regression analysis showed good fits when the root length distributions were grouped in horizontal layers according to the distance from the root center. When root length distributions were grouped according to soil horizons the fits worsened. The resulting root length density estimates were lower than those commonly found in literature, possibly due to (1) the fact that the crop images resulted from single plant situations, while the analyzed field experiments had more than one plant; (2) root overlapping may occur in the field; (3) root experiments, both in the field and image analyses as performed here, are subject to sampling errors; (4) the (hand drawn) images used in this study may have omitted some of the smallest roots.

  17. Image analysis applied to luminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Eric; Lelievre-Berna, Eddy; Fafeur, Veronique; Vandenbunder, Bernard

    1998-04-01

    We have developed a novel approach to study luminescent light emission during migration of living cells by low-light imaging techniques. The equipment consists in an anti-vibration table with a hole for a direct output under the frame of an inverted microscope. The image is directly captured by an ultra low- light level photon-counting camera equipped with an image intensifier coupled by an optical fiber to a CCD sensor. This installation is dedicated to measure in a dynamic manner the effect of SF/HGF (Scatter Factor/Hepatocyte Growth Factor) both on activation of gene promoter elements and on cell motility. Epithelial cells were stably transfected with promoter elements containing Ets transcription factor-binding sites driving a luciferase reporter gene. Luminescent light emitted by individual cells was measured by image analysis. Images of luminescent spots were acquired with a high aperture objective and time exposure of 10 - 30 min in photon-counting mode. The sensitivity of the camera was adjusted to a high value which required the use of a segmentation algorithm dedicated to eliminate the background noise. Hence, image segmentation and treatments by mathematical morphology were particularly indicated in these experimental conditions. In order to estimate the orientation of cells during their migration, we used a dedicated skeleton algorithm applied to the oblong spots of variable intensities emitted by the cells. Kinetic changes of luminescent sources, distance and speed of migration were recorded and then correlated with cellular morphological changes for each spot. Our results highlight the usefulness of the mathematical morphology to quantify kinetic changes in luminescence microscopy.

  18. Quantifying biodiversity using digital cameras and automated image analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roadknight, C. M.; Rose, R. J.; Barber, M. L.; Price, M. C.; Marshall, I. W.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring the effects on biodiversity of extensive grazing in complex semi-natural habitats is labour intensive. There are also concerns about the standardization of semi-quantitative data collection. We have chosen to focus initially on automating the most time consuming aspect - the image analysis. The advent of cheaper and more sophisticated digital camera technology has lead to a sudden increase in the number of habitat monitoring images and information that is being collected. We report on the use of automated trail cameras (designed for the game hunting market) to continuously capture images of grazer activity in a variety of habitats at Moor House National Nature Reserve, which is situated in the North of England at an average altitude of over 600m. Rainfall is high, and in most areas the soil consists of deep peat (1m to 3m), populated by a mix of heather, mosses and sedges. The cameras have been continuously in operation over a 6 month period, daylight images are in full colour and night images (IR flash) are black and white. We have developed artificial intelligence based methods to assist in the analysis of the large number of images collected, generating alert states for new or unusual image conditions. This paper describes the data collection techniques, outlines the quantitative and qualitative data collected and proposes online and offline systems that can reduce the manpower overheads and increase focus on important subsets in the collected data. By converting digital image data into statistical composite data it can be handled in a similar way to other biodiversity statistics thus improving the scalability of monitoring experiments. Unsupervised feature detection methods and supervised neural methods were tested and offered solutions to simplifying the process. Accurate (85 to 95%) categorization of faunal content can be obtained, requiring human intervention for only those images containing rare animals or unusual (undecidable) conditions, and

  19. Automated regional behavioral analysis for human brain images

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Jack L.; Laird, Angela R.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Martinez, Michael J.; Fox, P. Mickle; Fox, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral categories of functional imaging experiments along with standardized brain coordinates of associated activations were used to develop a method to automate regional behavioral analysis of human brain images. Behavioral and coordinate data were taken from the BrainMap database (http://www.brainmap.org/), which documents over 20 years of published functional brain imaging studies. A brain region of interest (ROI) for behavioral analysis can be defined in functional images, anatomical images or brain atlases, if images are spatially normalized to MNI or Talairach standards. Results of behavioral analysis are presented for each of BrainMap's 51 behavioral sub-domains spanning five behavioral domains (Action, Cognition, Emotion, Interoception, and Perception). For each behavioral sub-domain the fraction of coordinates falling within the ROI was computed and compared with the fraction expected if coordinates for the behavior were not clustered, i.e., uniformly distributed. When the difference between these fractions is large behavioral association is indicated. A z-score ≥ 3.0 was used to designate statistically significant behavioral association. The left-right symmetry of ~100K activation foci was evaluated by hemisphere, lobe, and by behavioral sub-domain. Results highlighted the classic left-side dominance for language while asymmetry for most sub-domains (~75%) was not statistically significant. Use scenarios were presented for anatomical ROIs from the Harvard-Oxford cortical (HOC) brain atlas, functional ROIs from statistical parametric maps in a TMS-PET study, a task-based fMRI study, and ROIs from the ten “major representative” functional networks in a previously published resting state fMRI study. Statistically significant behavioral findings for these use scenarios were consistent with published behaviors for associated anatomical and functional regions. PMID:22973224

  20. Automated regional behavioral analysis for human brain images.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Jack L; Laird, Angela R; Eickhoff, Simon B; Martinez, Michael J; Fox, P Mickle; Fox, Peter T

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral categories of functional imaging experiments along with standardized brain coordinates of associated activations were used to develop a method to automate regional behavioral analysis of human brain images. Behavioral and coordinate data were taken from the BrainMap database (http://www.brainmap.org/), which documents over 20 years of published functional brain imaging studies. A brain region of interest (ROI) for behavioral analysis can be defined in functional images, anatomical images or brain atlases, if images are spatially normalized to MNI or Talairach standards. Results of behavioral analysis are presented for each of BrainMap's 51 behavioral sub-domains spanning five behavioral domains (Action, Cognition, Emotion, Interoception, and Perception). For each behavioral sub-domain the fraction of coordinates falling within the ROI was computed and compared with the fraction expected if coordinates for the behavior were not clustered, i.e., uniformly distributed. When the difference between these fractions is large behavioral association is indicated. A z-score ≥ 3.0 was used to designate statistically significant behavioral association. The left-right symmetry of ~100K activation foci was evaluated by hemisphere, lobe, and by behavioral sub-domain. Results highlighted the classic left-side dominance for language while asymmetry for most sub-domains (~75%) was not statistically significant. Use scenarios were presented for anatomical ROIs from the Harvard-Oxford cortical (HOC) brain atlas, functional ROIs from statistical parametric maps in a TMS-PET study, a task-based fMRI study, and ROIs from the ten "major representative" functional networks in a previously published resting state fMRI study. Statistically significant behavioral findings for these use scenarios were consistent with published behaviors for associated anatomical and functional regions.

  1. Automatic dirt trail analysis in dermoscopy images.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Beibei; Joe Stanley, R; Stoecker, William V; Osterwise, Christopher T P; Stricklin, Sherea M; Hinton, Kristen A; Moss, Randy H; Oliviero, Margaret; Rabinovitz, Harold S

    2013-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in the US. Dermatoscopes are devices used by physicians to facilitate the early detection of these cancers based on the identification of skin lesion structures often specific to BCCs. One new lesion structure, referred to as dirt trails, has the appearance of dark gray, brown or black dots and clods of varying sizes distributed in elongated clusters with indistinct borders, often appearing as curvilinear trails. In this research, we explore a dirt trail detection and analysis algorithm for extracting, measuring, and characterizing dirt trails based on size, distribution, and color in dermoscopic skin lesion images. These dirt trails are then used to automatically discriminate BCC from benign skin lesions. For an experimental data set of 35 BCC images with dirt trails and 79 benign lesion images, a neural network-based classifier achieved a 0.902 are under a receiver operating characteristic curve using a leave-one-out approach. Results obtained from this study show that automatic detection of dirt trails in dermoscopic images of BCC is feasible. This is important because of the large number of these skin cancers seen every year and the challenge of discovering these earlier with instrumentation. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Hyperspectral imaging technology for pharmaceutical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Sara J.; Lodder, Robert A.

    2002-06-01

    The sensitivity and spatial resolution of hyperspectral imaging instruments are tested in this paper using pharmaceutical applications. The first experiment tested the hypothesis that a near-IR tunable diode-based remote sensing system is capable of monitoring degradation of hard gelatin capsules at a relatively long distance. Spectra from the capsules were used to differentiate among capsules exposed to an atmosphere containing imaging spectrometry of tablets permits the identification and composition of multiple individual tables to be determined simultaneously. A near-IR camera was used to collect thousands of spectra simultaneously from a field of blister-packaged tablets. The number of tablets that a typical near-IR camera can currently analyze simultaneously form a field of blister- packaged tablets. The number of tablets that a typical near- IR camera can currently analyze simultaneously was estimated to be approximately 1300. The bootstrap error-adjusted single-sample technique chemometric-imaging algorithm was used to draw probability-density contour plots that revealed tablet composition. The single-capsule analysis provides an indication of how far apart the sample and instrumentation can be and still maintain adequate S/N, while the multiple- sample imaging experiment gives an indication of how many samples can be analyzed simultaneously while maintaining an adequate S/N and pixel coverage on each sample.

  3. Image analysis of Renaissance copperplate prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, S. Blair

    2008-02-01

    From the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, prints were a common form of visual communication, analogous to photographs. Copperplate prints have many finely engraved black lines which were used to create the illusion of continuous tone. Line densities generally are 100-2000 lines per square centimeter and a print can contain more than a million total engraved lines 20-300 micrometers in width. Because hundreds to thousands of prints were made from a single copperplate over decades, variation among prints can have historical value. The largest variation is plate-related, which is the thinning of lines over successive editions as a result of plate polishing to remove time-accumulated corrosion. Thinning can be quantified with image analysis and used to date undated prints and books containing prints. Print-related variation, such as over-inking of the print, is a smaller but significant source. Image-related variation can introduce bias if images were differentially illuminated or not in focus, but improved imaging technology can limit this variation. The Print Index, the percentage of an area composed of lines, is proposed as a primary measure of variation. Statistical methods also are proposed for comparing and identifying prints in the context of a print database.

  4. Multispectral laser imaging for advanced food analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senni, L.; Burrascano, P.; Ricci, M.

    2016-07-01

    A hardware-software apparatus for food inspection capable of realizing multispectral NIR laser imaging at four different wavelengths is herein discussed. The system was designed to operate in a through-transmission configuration to detect the presence of unwanted foreign bodies inside samples, whether packed or unpacked. A modified Lock-In technique was employed to counterbalance the significant signal intensity attenuation due to transmission across the sample and to extract the multispectral information more efficiently. The NIR laser wavelengths used to acquire the multispectral images can be varied to deal with different materials and to focus on specific aspects. In the present work the wavelengths were selected after a preliminary analysis to enhance the image contrast between foreign bodies and food in the sample, thus identifying the location and nature of the defects. Experimental results obtained from several specimens, with and without packaging, are presented and the multispectral image processing as well as the achievable spatial resolution of the system are discussed.

  5. Quantitative color analysis for capillaroscopy image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Goffredo, Michela; Schmid, Maurizio; Conforto, Silvia; Amorosi, Beatrice; D'Alessio, Tommaso; Palma, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    This communication introduces a novel approach for quantitatively evaluating the role of color space decomposition in digital nailfold capillaroscopy analysis. It is clinically recognized that any alterations of the capillary pattern, at the periungual skin region, are directly related to dermatologic and rheumatic diseases. The proposed algorithm for the segmentation of digital capillaroscopy images is optimized with respect to the choice of the color space and the contrast variation. Since the color space is a critical factor for segmenting low-contrast images, an exhaustive comparison between different color channels is conducted and a novel color channel combination is presented. Results from images of 15 healthy subjects are compared with annotated data, i.e. selected images approved by clinicians. By comparison, a set of figures of merit, which highlights the algorithm capability to correctly segment capillaries, their shape and their number, is extracted. Experimental tests depict that the optimized procedure for capillaries segmentation, based on a novel color channel combination, presents values of average accuracy higher than 0.8, and extracts capillaries whose shape and granularity are acceptable. The obtained results are particularly encouraging for future developments on the classification of capillary patterns with respect to dermatologic and rheumatic diseases.

  6. Simple Low Level Features for Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcoz, Paolo

    As human beings, we perceive the world around us mainly through our eyes, and give what we see the status of “reality”; as such we historically tried to create ways of recording this reality so we could augment or extend our memory. From early attempts in photography like the image produced in 1826 by the French inventor Nicéphore Niépce (Figure 2.1) to the latest high definition camcorders, the number of recorded pieces of reality increased exponentially, posing the problem of managing all that information. Most of the raw video material produced today has lost its memory augmentation function, as it will hardly ever be viewed by any human; pervasive CCTVs are an example. They generate an enormous amount of data each day, but there is not enough “human processing power” to view them. Therefore the need for effective automatic image analysis tools is great, and a lot effort has been put in it, both from the academia and the industry. In this chapter, a review of some of the most important image analysis tools are presented.

  7. Nursing image: an evolutionary concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Rezaei-Adaryani, Morteza; Salsali, Mahvash; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2012-12-01

    A long-term challenge to the nursing profession is the concept of image. In this study, we used the Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis approach to analyze the concept of nursing image (NI). The aim of this concept analysis was to clarify the attributes, antecedents, consequences, and implications associated with the concept. We performed an integrative internet-based literature review to retrieve English literature published from 1980-2011. Findings showed that NI is a multidimensional, all-inclusive, paradoxical, dynamic, and complex concept. The media, invisibility, clothing style, nurses' behaviors, gender issues, and professional organizations are the most important antecedents of the concept. We found that NI is pivotal in staff recruitment and nursing shortage, resource allocation to nursing, nurses' job performance, workload, burnout and job dissatisfaction, violence against nurses, public trust, and salaries available to nurses. An in-depth understanding of the NI concept would assist nurses to eliminate negative stereotypes and build a more professional image for the nurse and the profession.

  8. Intra voxel analysis in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ambrosanio, Michele; Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Lenti, Flavia; Pascazio, Vito

    2017-04-01

    A technique for analyzing the composition of each voxel, in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) framework, is presented. By combining different acquisitions, a novel methodology, called intra voxel analysis (IVA), for the detection of multiple tissues and the estimation of their spin-spin relaxation times is proposed. The methodology exploits the sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) approach in order to solve a highly underdetermined problem imposing the solution sparsity. IVA, developed for spin echo imaging sequence, can be easily extended to any acquisition scheme. For validating the approach, simulated and real data sets are considered. Monte Carlo simulations have been implemented for evaluating the performances of IVA compared to methods existing in literature. Two clinical datasets acquired with a 3T scanner have been considered for validating the approach. With respect to other approaches presented in literature, IVA has proved to be more effective in the voxel composition analysis, in particular in the case of few acquired images. Results are interesting and very promising: IVA is expected to have a remarkable impact on the research community and on the diagnostic field. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Markov Random Fields, Stochastic Quantization and Image Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Markov random fields based on the lattice Z2 have been extensively used in image analysis in a Bayesian framework as a-priori models for the...of Image Analysis can be given some fundamental justification then there is a remarkable connection between Probabilistic Image Analysis , Statistical Mechanics and Lattice-based Euclidean Quantum Field Theory.

  10. Covariance of lucky images: performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagigal, Manuel P.; Valle, Pedro J.; Cagigas, Miguel A.; Villó-Pérez, Isidro; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Seeliger, M.

    2017-01-01

    The covariance of ground-based lucky images is a robust and easy-to-use algorithm that allows us to detect faint companions surrounding a host star. In this paper, we analyse the relevance of the number of processed frames, the frames' quality, the atmosphere conditions and the detection noise on the companion detectability. This analysis has been carried out using both experimental and computer-simulated imaging data. Although the technique allows us the detection of faint companions, the camera detection noise and the use of a limited number of frames reduce the minimum detectable companion intensity to around 1000 times fainter than that of the host star when placed at an angular distance corresponding to the few first Airy rings. The reachable contrast could be even larger when detecting companions with the assistance of an adaptive optics system.

  11. PAMS photo image retrieval prototype alternatives analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, M.L.

    1996-04-30

    Photography and Audiovisual Services uses a system called the Photography and Audiovisual Management System (PAMS) to perform order entry and billing services. The PAMS system utilizes Revelation Technologies database management software, AREV. Work is currently in progress to link the PAMS AREV system to a Microsoft SQL Server database engine to provide photograph indexing and query capabilities. The link between AREV and SQLServer will use a technique called ``bonding.`` This photograph imaging subsystem will interface to the PAMS system and handle the image capture and retrieval portions of the project. The intent of this alternatives analysis is to examine the software and hardware alternatives available to meet the requirements for this project, and identify a cost-effective solution.

  12. Analysis on enhanced depth of field for integral imaging microscope.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Tae; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Kim, Nam

    2012-10-08

    Depth of field of the integral imaging microscope is studied. In the integral imaging microscope, 3-D information is encoded as a form of elemental images Distance between intermediate plane and object point decides the number of elemental image and depth of field of integral imaging microscope. From the analysis, it is found that depth of field of the reconstructed depth plane image by computational integral imaging reconstruction is longer than depth of field of optical microscope. From analyzed relationship, experiment using integral imaging microscopy and conventional microscopy is also performed to confirm enhanced depth of field of integral imaging microscopy.

  13. Developing behavior analysis at the state level

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, J. M.; Shook, Gerald L.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, behavior analysts in Florida have worked together to develop the discipline with a multifaceted system of contingencies. Basing their effort in the area of retardation and with the cooperation of the state's Developmental Services Program Office, they have gradually developed a regulatory manual of programming policy and procedures, a hierarchical system of responsibilities for programming approval and monitoring, a state-sponsored certification program, a professional association, and an active university community. These components are described and discussed in terms of suggested principles for developing the field of behavior analysis within a state. PMID:22477979

  14. Machine Learning Interface for Medical Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi C; Kagen, Alexander C

    2016-10-11

    TensorFlow is a second-generation open-source machine learning software library with a built-in framework for implementing neural networks in wide variety of perceptual tasks. Although TensorFlow usage is well established with computer vision datasets, the TensorFlow interface with DICOM formats for medical imaging remains to be established. Our goal is to extend the TensorFlow API to accept raw DICOM images as input; 1513 DaTscan DICOM images were obtained from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) database. DICOM pixel intensities were extracted and shaped into tensors, or n-dimensional arrays, to populate the training, validation, and test input datasets for machine learning. A simple neural network was constructed in TensorFlow to classify images into normal or Parkinson's disease groups. Training was executed over 1000 iterations for each cross-validation set. The gradient descent optimization and Adagrad optimization algorithms were used to minimize cross-entropy between the predicted and ground-truth labels. Cross-validation was performed ten times to produce a mean accuracy of 0.938 ± 0.047 (95 % CI 0.908-0.967). The mean sensitivity was 0.974 ± 0.043 (95 % CI 0.947-1.00) and mean specificity was 0.822 ± 0.207 (95 % CI 0.694-0.950). We extended the TensorFlow API to enable DICOM compatibility in the context of DaTscan image analysis. We implemented a neural network classifier that produces diagnostic accuracies on par with excellent results from previous machine learning models. These results indicate the potential role of TensorFlow as a useful adjunct diagnostic tool in the clinical setting.

  15. Uses of software in digital image analysis: a forensic report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mukesh; Jha, Shailendra

    2010-02-01

    Forensic image analysis is required an expertise to interpret the content of an image or the image itself in legal matters. Major sub-disciplines of forensic image analysis with law enforcement applications include photo-grammetry, photographic comparison, content analysis and image authentication. It has wide applications in forensic science range from documenting crime scenes to enhancing faint or indistinct patterns such as partial fingerprints. The process of forensic image analysis can involve several different tasks, regardless of the type of image analysis performed. Through this paper authors have tried to explain these tasks, which are described in to three categories: Image Compression, Image Enhancement & Restoration and Measurement Extraction. With the help of examples like signature comparison, counterfeit currency comparison and foot-wear sole impression using the software Canvas and Corel Draw.

  16. Union operation image processing of data cubes separately processed by different objective filters and its application to void analysis in an all-solid-state lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuta; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Muto, Shunsuke

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we propose a smart image-analysis method suitable for extracting target features with hierarchical dimension from original data. The method was applied to three-dimensional volume data of an all-solid lithium-ion battery obtained by the automated sequential sample milling and imaging process using a focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope to investigate the spatial configuration of voids inside the battery. To automatically fully extract the shape and location of the voids, three types of filters were consecutively applied: a median blur filter to extract relatively larger voids, a morphological opening operation filter for small dot-shaped voids and a morphological closing operation filter for small voids with concave contrasts. Three data cubes separately processed by the above-mentioned filters were integrated by a union operation to the final unified volume data, which confirmed the correct extraction of the voids over the entire dimension contained in the original data.

  17. Wavelet-based image analysis system for soil texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun; Long, Zhiling; Jang, Ping-Rey; Plodinec, M. John

    2003-05-01

    Soil texture is defined as the relative proportion of clay, silt and sand found in a given soil sample. It is an important physical property of soil that affects such phenomena as plant growth and agricultural fertility. Traditional methods used to determine soil texture are either time consuming (hydrometer), or subjective and experience-demanding (field tactile evaluation). Considering that textural patterns observed at soil surfaces are uniquely associated with soil textures, we propose an innovative approach to soil texture analysis, in which wavelet frames-based features representing texture contents of soil images are extracted and categorized by applying a maximum likelihood criterion. The soil texture analysis system has been tested successfully with an accuracy of 91% in classifying soil samples into one of three general categories of soil textures. In comparison with the common methods, this wavelet-based image analysis approach is convenient, efficient, fast, and objective.

  18. Practical steganalysis of digital images: state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrich, Jessica; Goljan, Miroslav

    2002-04-01

    Steganography is the art of hiding the very presence of communication by embedding secret messages into innocuous looking cover documents, such as digital images. Detection of steganography, estimation of message length, and its extraction belong to the field of steganalysis. Steganalysis has recently received a great deal of attention both from law enforcement and the media. In our paper, we classify and review current stego-detection algorithms that can be used to trace popular steganographic products. We recognize several qualitatively different approaches to practical steganalysis - visual detection, detection based on first order statistics (histogram analysis), dual statistics methods that use spatial correlations in images and higher-order statistics (RS steganalysis), universal blind detection schemes, and special cases, such as JPEG compatibility steganalysis. We also present some new results regarding our previously proposed detection of LSB embedding using sensitive dual statistics. The recent steganalytic methods indicate that the most common paradigm in image steganography - the bit-replacement or bit substitution - is inherently insecure with safe capacities far smaller than previously thought.

  19. Image analysis software and sample preparation demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Karl n.; Wenzelides, Knut; Wolf, Guenter; Hufnagl, Peter

    1990-11-01

    Image analysis offers the opportunity to analyse many processes in medicine, biology and engeneering in a quantitative manner. Experience shows that it is only by awareness of preparation methods and attention to software design that full benefit can be reaped from a picture processing system in the fields of cytology and histology. Some examples of special stains for automated analysis are given here and the effectiveness of commercially available software packages is investigated. The application of picture processing and development of related special hardware and software has been increasing within the last years. As PC-based picture processing systems can be purchased at reasonable costs more and more users are confronted with these problems. Experience shows that the quality of commercially available software packages differ and the requirements on the sample preparation needed for successful problem solutions are often underestimated. But as always, sample preparation is still the key to success in automated image analysis for cells and tissues. Hence, a problem solution requires the permanent interaction between sample preparation methods and algorithm development.

  20. State-space formulations for flutter analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, S. J.; Tseng, K.; Morino, L.

    1976-01-01

    Various methods are presented and assessed for approximating the aerodynamic forces so that the State Space formulation and off-the-imaginary axis analysis are retained. The advantages of retaining these features are considerable, not only in simplifying the flutter analysis, but especially for more advanced applications such as optimal design of active control in which the flutter is merely a constraint to the optimization problem.

  1. Research on automatic human chromosome image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Delie; Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Jian

    2007-11-01

    Human chromosome karyotyping is one of the essential tasks in cytogenetics, especially in genetic syndrome diagnoses. In this thesis, an automatic procedure is introduced for human chromosome image analysis. According to different status of touching and overlapping chromosomes, several segmentation methods are proposed to achieve the best results. Medial axis is extracted by the middle point algorithm. Chromosome band is enhanced by the algorithm based on multiscale B-spline wavelets, extracted by average gray profile, gradient profile and shape profile, and calculated by the WDD (Weighted Density Distribution) descriptors. The multilayer classifier is used in classification. Experiment results demonstrate that the algorithms perform well.

  2. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Habib

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases.

  3. Cell tracking for cell image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bise, Ryoma; Sato, Yoichi

    2017-04-01

    Cell image analysis is important for research and discovery in biology and medicine. In this paper, we present our cell tracking methods, which is capable of obtaining fine-grain cell behavior metrics. In order to address difficulties under dense culture conditions, where cell detection cannot be done reliably since cell often touch with blurry intercellular boundaries, we proposed two methods which are global data association and jointly solving cell detection and association. We also show the effectiveness of the proposed methods by applying the method to the biological researches.

  4. AUTOMATIC DIRT TRAIL ANALYSIS IN DERMOSCOPY IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Beibei; Stanley, R. Joe; Stoecker, William V.; Osterwise, Christopher T.P.; Stricklin, Sherea M.; Hinton, Kristen A.; Moss, Randy H.; Oliviero, Margaret; Rabinovitz, Harold S.

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in the U.S. Dermatoscopes are devices used by physicians to facilitate the early detection of these cancers based on the identification of skin lesion structures often specific to BCCs. One new lesion structure, referred to as dirt trails, has the appearance of dark gray, brown or black dots and clods of varying sizes distributed in elongated clusters with indistinct borders, often appearing as curvilinear trails. In this research, we explore a dirt trail detection and analysis algorithm for extracting, measuring, and characterizing dirt trails based on size, distribution, and color in dermoscopic skin lesion images. These dirt trails are then used to automatically discriminate BCC from benign skin lesions. For an experimental data set of 35 BCC images with dirt trails and 79 benign lesion images, a neural network-based classifier achieved a 0.902 area under a receiver operating characteristic curve using a leave-one-out approach, demonstrating the potential of dirt trails for BCC lesion discrimination. PMID:22233099

  5. Sparse Superpixel Unmixing for Hyperspectral Image Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castano, Rebecca; Thompson, David R.; Gilmore, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Software was developed that automatically detects minerals that are present in each pixel of a hyperspectral image. An algorithm based on sparse spectral unmixing with Bayesian Positive Source Separation is used to produce mineral abundance maps from hyperspectral images. A superpixel segmentation strategy enables efficient unmixing in an interactive session. The algorithm computes statistically likely combinations of constituents based on a set of possible constituent minerals whose abundances are uncertain. A library of source spectra from laboratory experiments or previous remote observations is used. A superpixel segmentation strategy improves analysis time by orders of magnitude, permitting incorporation into an interactive user session (see figure). Mineralogical search strategies can be categorized as supervised or unsupervised. Supervised methods use a detection function, developed on previous data by hand or statistical techniques, to identify one or more specific target signals. Purely unsupervised results are not always physically meaningful, and may ignore subtle or localized mineralogy since they aim to minimize reconstruction error over the entire image. This algorithm offers advantages of both methods, providing meaningful physical interpretations and sensitivity to subtle or unexpected minerals.

  6. Soil Surface Roughness through Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Valencia, J. L.; Moratiel, R.; Paz-Gonzalez, A.; Agro-Environmental Modeling

    2011-12-01

    Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon involving the detachment and transport of soil particles, storage and runoff of rainwater, and infiltration. The relative magnitude and importance of these processes depends on several factors being one of them surface micro-topography, usually quantified trough soil surface roughness (SSR). SSR greatly affects surface sealing and runoff generation, yet little information is available about the effect of roughness on the spatial distribution of runoff and on flow concentration. The methods commonly used to measure SSR involve measuring point elevation using a pin roughness meter or laser, both of which are labor intensive and expensive. Lately a simple and inexpensive technique based on percentage of shadow in soil surface image has been developed to determine SSR in the field in order to obtain measurement for wide spread application. One of the first steps in this technique is image de-noising and thresholding to estimate the percentage of black pixels in the studied area. In this work, a series of soil surface images have been analyzed applying several de-noising wavelet analysis and thresholding algorithms to study the variation in percentage of shadows and the shadows size distribution. Funding provided by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010- 21501/AGR and by Xunta de Galicia through project no INCITE08PXIB1621 are greatly appreciated.

  7. Monotonic correlation analysis of image quality measures for image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Burks, Stephen D.; Moore, Richard K.; Nguyen, Quang

    2008-04-01

    The next generation of night vision goggles will fuse image intensified and long wave infra-red to create a hybrid image that will enable soldiers to better interpret their surroundings during nighttime missions. Paramount to the development of such goggles is the exploitation of image quality (IQ) measures to automatically determine the best image fusion algorithm for a particular task. This work introduces a novel monotonic correlation coefficient to investigate how well possible IQ features correlate to actual human performance, which is measured by a perception study. The paper will demonstrate how monotonic correlation can identify worthy features that could be overlooked by traditional correlation values.

  8. GRETNA: a graph theoretical network analysis toolbox for imaging connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinhui; Wang, Xindi; Xia, Mingrui; Liao, Xuhong; Evans, Alan; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the brain’s structural and functional networks (i.e., connectomics) can be constructed by various imaging technologies (e.g., EEG/MEG; structural, diffusion and functional MRI) and further characterized by graph theory. Given the huge complexity of network construction, analysis and statistics, toolboxes incorporating these functions are largely lacking. Here, we developed the GRaph thEoreTical Network Analysis (GRETNA) toolbox for imaging connectomics. The GRETNA contains several key features as follows: (i) an open-source, Matlab-based, cross-platform (Windows and UNIX OS) package with a graphical user interface (GUI); (ii) allowing topological analyses of global and local network properties with parallel computing ability, independent of imaging modality and species; (iii) providing flexible manipulations in several key steps during network construction and analysis, which include network node definition, network connectivity processing, network type selection and choice of thresholding procedure; (iv) allowing statistical comparisons of global, nodal and connectional network metrics and assessments of relationship between these network metrics and clinical or behavioral variables of interest; and (v) including functionality in image preprocessing and network construction based on resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) data. After applying the GRETNA to a publicly released R-fMRI dataset of 54 healthy young adults, we demonstrated that human brain functional networks exhibit efficient small-world, assortative, hierarchical and modular organizations and possess highly connected hubs and that these findings are robust against different analytical strategies. With these efforts, we anticipate that GRETNA will accelerate imaging connectomics in an easy, quick and flexible manner. GRETNA is freely available on the NITRC website.1 PMID:26175682

  9. Dynamic and still microcirculatory image analysis for quantitative microcirculation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiaoyou; Xiu, Rui-juan

    1994-05-01

    Based on analyses of various types of digital microcirculatory image (DMCI), we summed up the image features of DMCI, the digitizing demands for digital microcirculatory imaging, and the basic characteristics of the DMCI processing. A dynamic and still imaging separation processing (DSISP) mode was designed for developing a DMCI workstation and the DMCI processing. Original images in this study were clinical microcirculatory images from human finger nail-bed and conjunctiva microvasculature, and intravital microvascular network images from animal tissue or organs. A series of dynamic and still microcirculatory image analysis functions were developed in this study. The experimental results indicate most of the established analog video image analysis methods for microcirculatory measurement could be realized in a more flexible way based on the DMCI. More information can be rapidly extracted from the quality improved DMCI by employing intelligence digital image analysis methods. The DSISP mode is very suitable for building a DMCI workstation.

  10. Improved dark blood imaging of the heart using radial balanced steady-state free precession.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Robert R; Botelho, Marcos; Pursnani, Amit; Giri, Shivraman; Koktzoglou, Ioannis

    2016-10-19

    Dark blood imaging of the heart is conventionally performed using a breath-hold, dual-inversion Cartesian fast spin-echo pulse sequence. Our aim was to develop a faster, more flexible approach that would be less motion-sensitive and provide better image quality. For this purpose, we implemented a prototype radial balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) pulse sequence. The study was approved by the institutional review board. Six healthy volunteers and 27 subjects undergoing clinically-indicated cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) were imaged using dark blood Cartesian fast spin-echo and radial bSSFP. For patient studies, overall image quality, fat suppression and blood nulling were scored on a 5-point Likert scale. The quality of visualization of the right and left ventricular free walls and septum were individually scored. Streaking and ghosting artifacts were noted, as well as signal dropout in the free wall of the left ventricle. In volunteer studies, radial bSSFP showed less degradation by cardiac or respiratory motion than fast spin-echo as indicated by visual analysis and calculation of the temporal signal-to-noise ratio. The least motion sensitivity and maximal imaging efficiency were achieved with a single-shot radial bSSFP acquisition using only 35 views (temporal resolution = 95 ms). In patient studies, radial bSSFP images showed fewer motion artifacts and were judged to provide better myocardial visibility, including depiction of the right ventricular free wall, than fast spin-echo. Dual-inversion radial bSSFP provides the benefits of diminished sensitivity to image artifacts from respiratory or cardiac motion, better myocardial visibility, and improved imaging efficiency compared with standard-of-care Cartesian fast spin-echo for dark blood imaging of the heart.

  11. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis and imaging in plant stress and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, P.F.

    1994-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence transients and quenching has evolved rapidly in the last decade. Instrumentation capable of fluorescence detection in bright actinic light has been used in conjunction with gas exchange analysis to build an empirical foundation relating quenching parameters to photosynthetic electron transport, the state of the photoapparatus, and carbon fixation. We have developed several instruments that collect video images of chlorophyll fluorescence. Digitized versions of these images can be manipulated as numerical data arrays, supporting generation of quenching maps that represent the spatial distribution of photosynthetic activity in leaves. We have applied this technology to analysis of fluorescence quenching during application of stress hormones, herbicides, physical stresses including drought and sudden changes in humidity of the atmosphere surrounding leaves, and during stomatal oscillations in high CO{sub 2}. We describe a recently completed portable fluorescence imaging system utilizing LED illumination and a consumer-grade camcorder, that will be used in long-term, non-destructive field studies of plant virus infections.

  12. Integrated Colony Imaging, Analysis, and Selection Device for Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kwee, Edward; Herderick, Edward E; Adams, Thomas; Dunn, James; Germanowski, Robert; Krakosh, Frank; Boehm, Cynthia; Monnich, James; Powell, Kimerly; Muschler, George

    2017-04-01

    Stem and progenitor cells derived from human tissues are being developed as cell sources for cell-based assays and therapies. However, tissue-derived stem and progenitor cells are heterogeneous. Differences in observed clones of stem cells likely reflect important aspects of the underlying state of the source cells, as well as future potency for cell therapies. This paper describes a colony analysis and picking device that provides quantitative analysis of heterogeneous cell populations and precise tools for cell picking for research or biomanufacturing applications. We describe an integrated robotic system that enables image acquisition and automated image analysis to be coupled with rapid automated selection of individual colonies in adherent cell cultures. Other automated systems have demonstrated feasibility with picking from semisolid media or off feeder layers. We demonstrate the capability to pick adherent bone-derived stem cells from tissue culture plastic. Cells are efficiently picked from a target site and transferred to a recipient well plate. Cells demonstrate viability and adherence and maintain biologic potential for surface markers CD73 and CD90 based on phase contrast and fluorescence imaging 6 days after transfer. Methods developed here can be applied to the study of other stem cell types and automated culture of cells.

  13. Correlative feature analysis of FFDM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yading; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Sennett, Charlene

    2008-03-01

    Identifying the corresponding image pair of a lesion is an essential step for combining information from different views of the lesion to improve the diagnostic ability of both radiologists and CAD systems. Because of the non-rigidity of the breasts and the 2D projective property of mammograms, this task is not trivial. In this study, we present a computerized framework that differentiates the corresponding images from different views of a lesion from non-corresponding ones. A dual-stage segmentation method, which employs an initial radial gradient index(RGI) based segmentation and an active contour model, was initially applied to extract mass lesions from the surrounding tissues. Then various lesion features were automatically extracted from each of the two views of each lesion to quantify the characteristics of margin, shape, size, texture and context of the lesion, as well as its distance to nipple. We employed a two-step method to select an effective subset of features, and combined it with a BANN to obtain a discriminant score, which yielded an estimate of the probability that the two images are of the same physical lesion. ROC analysis was used to evaluate the performance of the individual features and the selected feature subset in the task of distinguishing between corresponding and non-corresponding pairs. By using a FFDM database with 124 corresponding image pairs and 35 non-corresponding pairs, the distance feature yielded an AUC (area under the ROC curve) of 0.8 with leave-one-out evaluation by lesion, and the feature subset, which includes distance feature, lesion size and lesion contrast, yielded an AUC of 0.86. The improvement by using multiple features was statistically significant as compared to single feature performance. (p<0.001)

  14. Resting-State Functional MR Imaging for Determining Language Laterality in Intractable Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Tanaka, Naoaki; Douw, Linda; Leveroni, Catherine L; Buchbinder, Bradley R; Greve, Douglas N; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To measure the accuracy of resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in determining hemispheric language dominance in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsies against the results of an intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all subjects gave signed informed consent. Data in 23 patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy were retrospectively analyzed. All 23 patients were candidates for epilepsy surgery and underwent both IAP and resting-state functional MR imaging as part of presurgical evaluation. Language dominance was determined from functional MR imaging data by calculating a laterality index (LI) after using independent component analysis. The accuracy of this method was assessed against that of IAP by using a variety of thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by using leave-one-out cross validation. Spatial maps of language components were qualitatively compared among each hemispheric language dominance group. Results Measurement of hemispheric language dominance with resting-state functional MR imaging was highly concordant with IAP results, with up to 96% (22 of 23) accuracy, 96% (22 of 23) sensitivity, and 96% (22 of 23) specificity. Composite language component maps in patients with typical language laterality consistently included classic language areas such as the inferior frontal gyrus, the posterior superior temporal gyrus, and the inferior parietal lobule, while those of patients with atypical language laterality also included non-classical language areas such as the superior and middle frontal gyri, the insula, and the occipital cortex. Conclusion Resting-state functional MR imaging can be used to measure language laterality in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  15. Wavelet Analysis of Space Solar Telescope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi-An; Jin, Sheng-Zhen; Wang, Jing-Yu; Ning, Shu-Nian

    2003-12-01

    The scientific satellite SST (Space Solar Telescope) is an important research project strongly supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Every day, SST acquires 50 GB of data (after processing) but only 10GB can be transmitted to the ground because of limited time of satellite passage and limited channel volume. Therefore, the data must be compressed before transmission. Wavelets analysis is a new technique developed over the last 10 years, with great potential of application. We start with a brief introduction to the essential principles of wavelet analysis, and then describe the main idea of embedded zerotree wavelet coding, used for compressing the SST images. The results show that this coding is adequate for the job.

  16. Atlas-assisted localization analysis of functional images.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, W L; Thirunavuukarasuu, A

    2001-09-01

    This paper introduces a method for localization analysis of functional images assisted by a brain atlas. The usefulness of the system developed, based on this method, is analyzed for human brain mapping and neuroradiology. We use an enhanced and extended electronic Talairach-Tournoux brain atlas, containing segmented and labeled subcortical structures, Brodmann's areas, and gyri. The brain atlas serves as a tool for anatomy referencing, segmentation, labeling, registration, and providing 3D anatomical relationships. The process of localization analysis is decomposed into five steps: data loading, feature extraction, data normalization, identification and editing of loci, and getting labels and values. This analysis is supported by near real-time data-to-atlas warping based on the Talairach transformation. Metanalysis is enabled by merging the current and external lists of activation loci. We have designed, developed, tested, and deployed a commercial system for atlas-assisted localization analysis of functional images. This is the first system where an electronic version of the Talairach-Tournoux brain atlas is used interactively for analysis of functional images. This system runs on personal computers and provides functions for a rapid normalization of anatomical and functional volumetric data, data segmentation and labeling, readout of Talairach coordinates, and data display. It also is empowered with several unique features including: interactive warping facilitating fine tuning of the data-to-atlas fit, a backtracking mechanism to compensate for missing landmarks and enhancing the outcome of the overall process of data analysis, navigation on the triplanar formed by the data and the atlas, multiple-images-in-one display with atlas-anatomy-function blending, a fast locus-controlled generation of results, editing of loci, multiple label display, and saving and reading of loci. The system normalizes a single image in near real-time (0.7 s), so analysis of

  17. Percent area coverage through image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chung M.; Hong, Sung M.; Liu, De-Ling

    2016-09-01

    The notion of percent area coverage (PAC) has been used to characterize surface cleanliness levels in the spacecraft contamination control community. Due to the lack of detailed particle data, PAC has been conventionally calculated by multiplying the particle surface density in predetermined particle size bins by a set of coefficients per MIL-STD-1246C. In deriving the set of coefficients, the surface particle size distribution is assumed to follow a log-normal relation between particle density and particle size, while the cross-sectional area function is given as a combination of regular geometric shapes. For particles with irregular shapes, the cross-sectional area function cannot describe the true particle area and, therefore, may introduce error in the PAC calculation. Other errors may also be introduced by using the lognormal surface particle size distribution function that highly depends on the environmental cleanliness and cleaning process. In this paper, we present PAC measurements from silicon witness wafers that collected fallouts from a fabric material after vibration testing. PAC calculations were performed through analysis of microscope images and compare them to values derived through the MIL-STD-1246C method. Our results showed that the MIL-STD-1246C method does provide a reasonable upper bound to the PAC values determined through image analysis, in particular for PAC values below 0.1.

  18. The Scientific Image in Behavior Analysis.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Mickey

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the history of science, the scientific image has played a significant role in communication. With recent developments in computing technology, there has been an increase in the kinds of opportunities now available for scientists to communicate in more sophisticated ways. Within behavior analysis, though, we are only just beginning to appreciate the importance of going beyond the printing press to elucidate basic principles of behavior. The aim of this manuscript is to stimulate appreciation of both the role of the scientific image and the opportunities provided by a quick response code (QR code) for enhancing the functionality of the printed page. I discuss the limitations of imagery in behavior analysis ("Introduction"), and I show examples of what can be done with animations and multimedia for teaching philosophical issues that arise when teaching about private events ("Private Events 1 and 2"). Animations are also useful for bypassing ethical issues when showing examples of challenging behavior ("Challenging Behavior"). Each of these topics can be accessed only by scanning the QR code provided. This contingency has been arranged to help the reader embrace this new technology. In so doing, I hope to show its potential for going beyond the limitations of the printing press.

  19. An Expert Image Analysis System For Chromosome Analysis Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Suetens, P.; Oosterlinck, A.; Van den Berghe, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports a recent study on applying a knowledge-based system approach as a new attempt to solve the problem of chromosome classification. A theoretical framework of an expert image analysis system is proposed, based on such a study. In this scheme, chromosome classification can be carried out under a hypothesize-and-verify paradigm, by integrating a rule-based component, in which the expertise of chromosome karyotyping is formulated with an existing image analysis system which uses conventional pattern recognition techniques. Results from the existing system can be used to bring in hypotheses, and with the rule-based verification and modification procedures, improvement of the classification performance can be excepted.

  20. Natural Language Processing Versus Content-Based Image Analysis for Medical Document Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Névéol, Aurélie; Deserno, Thomas M.; Darmoni, Stéfan J.; Güld, Mark Oliver; Aronson, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most significant recent advances in health information systems has been the shift from paper to electronic documents. While research on automatic text and image processing has taken separate paths, there is a growing need for joint efforts, particularly for electronic health records and biomedical literature databases. This work aims at comparing text-based versus image-based access to multimodal medical documents using state-of-the-art methods of processing text and image components. A collection of 180 medical documents containing an image accompanied by a short text describing it was divided into training and test sets. Content-based image analysis and natural language processing techniques are applied individually and combined for multimodal document analysis. The evaluation consists of an indexing task and a retrieval task based on the “gold standard” codes manually assigned to corpus documents. The performance of text-based and image-based access, as well as combined document features, is compared. Image analysis proves more adequate for both the indexing and retrieval of the images. In the indexing task, multimodal analysis outperforms both independent image and text analysis. This experiment shows that text describing images can be usefully analyzed in the framework of a hybrid text/image retrieval system. PMID:19633735

  1. Natural Language Processing Versus Content-Based Image Analysis for Medical Document Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Névéol, Aurélie; Deserno, Thomas M; Darmoni, Stéfan J; Güld, Mark Oliver; Aronson, Alan R

    2008-09-18

    One of the most significant recent advances in health information systems has been the shift from paper to electronic documents. While research on automatic text and image processing has taken separate paths, there is a growing need for joint efforts, particularly for electronic health records and biomedical literature databases. This work aims at comparing text-based versus image-based access to multimodal medical documents using state-of-the-art methods of processing text and image components. A collection of 180 medical documents containing an image accompanied by a short text describing it was divided into training and test sets. Content-based image analysis and natural language processing techniques are applied individually and combined for multimodal document analysis. The evaluation consists of an indexing task and a retrieval task based on the "gold standard" codes manually assigned to corpus documents. The performance of text-based and image-based access, as well as combined document features, is compared. Image analysis proves more adequate for both the indexing and retrieval of the images. In the indexing task, multimodal analysis outperforms both independent image and text analysis. This experiment shows that text describing images can be usefully analyzed in the framework of a hybrid text/image retrieval system.

  2. Imaging electronic states on topological semimetals using scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Gyenis, András; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Jeon, Sangjun; ...

    2016-10-18

    Following the intense studies on topological insulators, significant efforts have recently been devoted to the search for gapless topological systems. These materials not only broaden the topological classification of matter but also provide a condensed matter realization of various relativistic particles and phenomena previously discussed mainly in high energy physics. Weyl semimetals host massless, chiral, low-energy excitations in the bulk electronic band structure, whereas a symmetry protected pair of Weyl fermions gives rise to massless Dirac fermions.Weemployed scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy to explore the behavior of electronic states both on the surface and in the bulk of topological semimetal phases. Bymore » mapping the quasiparticle interference (QPI) and emerging Landau levels at high magnetic field in Dirac semimetals Cd3As2 and Na3Bi, we observed extended Dirac-like bulk electronic bands. QPI imaged on Weyl semimetal TaAs demonstrated the predicted momentum dependent delocalization of Fermi arc surface states in the vicinity of the surface projected Weyl nodes.« less

  3. Imaging electronic states on topological semimetals using scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenis, András; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Jeon, Sangjun; Zhou, Brian B.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Jian; Jiang, Shan; Gibson, Quinn D.; Kushwaha, Satya K.; Krizan, Jason W.; Ni, Ni; Cava, Robert J.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Yazdani, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Following the intense studies on topological insulators, significant efforts have recently been devoted to the search for gapless topological systems. These materials not only broaden the topological classification of matter but also provide a condensed matter realization of various relativistic particles and phenomena previously discussed mainly in high energy physics. Weyl semimetals host massless, chiral, low-energy excitations in the bulk electronic band structure, whereas a symmetry protected pair of Weyl fermions gives rise to massless Dirac fermions. We employed scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy to explore the behavior of electronic states both on the surface and in the bulk of topological semimetal phases. By mapping the quasiparticle interference (QPI) and emerging Landau levels at high magnetic field in Dirac semimetals Cd3As2 and Na3Bi, we observed extended Dirac-like bulk electronic bands. QPI imaged on Weyl semimetal TaAs demonstrated the predicted momentum dependent delocalization of Fermi arc surface states in the vicinity of the surface-projected Weyl nodes.

  4. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging of excited state relaxation dynamics in phenol, catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingstone, Ruth A.; Thompson, James O. F.; Iljina, Marija; Donaldson, Ross J.; Sussman, Benjamin J.; Paterson, Martin J.; Townsend, Dave

    2012-11-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron imaging was used to investigate the dynamical evolution of the initially prepared S1 (ππ*) excited state of phenol (hydroxybenzene), catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene), and hydroquinone (1,4-dihydroxybenzene) following excitation at 267 nm. Our analysis was supported by ab initio calculations at the coupled-cluster and CASSCF levels of theory. In all cases, we observe rapid (<1 ps) intramolecular vibrational redistribution on the S1 potential surface. In catechol, the overall S1 state lifetime was observed to be 12.1 ps, which is 1-2 orders of magnitude shorter than in the other three molecules studied. This may be attributed to differences in the H atom tunnelling rate under the barrier formed by a conical intersection between the S1 state and the close lying S2 (πσ*) state, which is dissociative along the O-H stretching coordinate. Further evidence of this S1/S2 interaction is also seen in the time-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectron angular distributions we have observed. Our data analysis was assisted by a matrix inversion method for processing photoelectron images that is significantly faster than most other previously reported approaches and is extremely quick and easy to implement.

  5. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging of excited state relaxation dynamics in phenol, catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Ruth A; Thompson, James O F; Iljina, Marija; Donaldson, Ross J; Sussman, Benjamin J; Paterson, Martin J; Townsend, Dave

    2012-11-14

    Time-resolved photoelectron imaging was used to investigate the dynamical evolution of the initially prepared S(1) (ππ*) excited state of phenol (hydroxybenzene), catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene), and hydroquinone (1,4-dihydroxybenzene) following excitation at 267 nm. Our analysis was supported by ab initio calculations at the coupled-cluster and CASSCF levels of theory. In all cases, we observe rapid (<1 ps) intramolecular vibrational redistribution on the S(1) potential surface. In catechol, the overall S(1) state lifetime was observed to be 12.1 ps, which is 1-2 orders of magnitude shorter than in the other three molecules studied. This may be attributed to differences in the H atom tunnelling rate under the barrier formed by a conical intersection between the S(1) state and the close lying S(2) (πσ*) state, which is dissociative along the O-H stretching coordinate. Further evidence of this S(1)/S(2) interaction is also seen in the time-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectron angular distributions we have observed. Our data analysis was assisted by a matrix inversion method for processing photoelectron images that is significantly faster than most other previously reported approaches and is extremely quick and easy to implement.

  6. Application of automatic image analysis in wood science

    Treesearch

    Charles W. McMillin

    1982-01-01

    In this paper I describe an image analysis system and illustrate with examples the application of automatic quantitative measurement to wood science. Automatic image analysis, a powerful and relatively new technology, uses optical, video, electronic, and computer components to rapidly derive information from images with minimal operator interaction. Such instruments...

  7. Analysis of HST WFPC-2 Images of NGC 7635

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, B. D.; Hester, J. J.; Scowen, P. A.; Walter, D. K.; Dufour, R. J.; Hartigan, P. M.; Buckalew, B.

    1999-12-01

    Wind-blown bubbles are formed by the interaction of stellar ionizing radiation and winds on the circumstellar material. The ram pressure of the confined wind sweeps up the ambient enivronment into a shell made visible by virtue of its ionization state, maintained by shock-heating and the UV flux of the star. Depending on the mass-loss history of the central star, this material can composed of material processed by the central star, material evaporated from a surrounding HII region, or both. We analyze recent narrow-band WFPC2 images of NGC 7635, the nebula formed by the wind of the central star BD +60 2522. The morphology of the nebula is described in another poster at this meeting (Walter et al.). Our work focuses on the modeling of the nearby ionized knots utilizing the high spatial resolution afforded by the HST images to construct photoionization models of the region. We also discuss the material comprising the shell, presumed to be comprised solely of the material photoevaporated into the surrounding HII region cavity. We compare these results with ground-based spectroscopy of positions within the image using traditional methods of nebular analysis. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by STScI grant G0075150396A and NASA/JPL contract 959329-012 at Arizona State University.

  8. Digital Image Correlation: Metrological Characterization in Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrella, Orsola; Signore, Davide; Caramuta, Pietro; Toscano, Cinzia; Ferraiuolo, Michele

    2017-04-01

    The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a newly developed optical technique that is spreading in all engineering sectors because it allows the non-destructive estimation of the entire surface deformation without any contact with the component under analysis. These characteristics make the DIC very appealing in all the cases the global deformation state is to be known without using strain gages, which are the most used measuring device. The DIC is applicable to any material subjected to distortion caused by either thermal or mechanical load, allowing to obtain high-definition mapping of displacements and deformations. That is why in the civil and the transportation industry, DIC is very useful for studying the behavior of metallic materials as well as of composite materials. DIC is also used in the medical field for the characterization of the local strain field of the vascular tissues surface subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. DIC can be carried out in the two dimension mode (2D DIC) if a single camera is used or in a three dimension mode (3D DIC) if two cameras are involved. Each point of the test surface framed by the cameras can be associated with a specific pixel of the image and the coordinates of each point are calculated knowing the relative distance between the two cameras together with their orientation. In both arrangements, when a component is subjected to a load, several images related to different deformation states can be are acquired through the cameras. A specific software analyzes the images via the mutual correlation between the reference image (obtained without any applied load) and those acquired during the deformation giving the relative displacements. In this paper, a Metrological Characterization of the Digital Image Correlation is performed on aluminum and composite targets both in static and dynamic loading conditions by comparison between DIC and strain gauges measures. In the static test, interesting results have been obtained thanks

  9. High speed image correlation for vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Wood, R.; Splitthof, K.

    2009-08-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  10. Linear Covariance Analysis and Epoch State Estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2012-01-01

    This paper extends in two directions the results of prior work on generalized linear covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. The first is an improved treatment of process noise in the batch, or epoch state, estimator with an epoch time that may be later than some or all of the measurements in the batch. The second is to account for process noise in specifying the gains in the epoch state estimator. We establish the conditions under which the latter estimator is equivalent to the Kalman filter.

  11. Linear Covariance Analysis and Epoch State Estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends in two directions the results of prior work on generalized linear covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. The first is an improved treatment of process noise in the batch, or epoch state, estimator with an epoch time that may be later than some or all of the measurements in the batch. The second is to account for process noise in specifying the gains in the epoch state estimator. We establish the conditions under which the latter estimator is equivalent to the Kalman filter.

  12. Cellular Image Analysis and Imaging by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Basiji, David A.; Ortyn, William E.; Liang, Luchuan; Venkatachalam, Vidya; Morrissey, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Imaging flow cytometry combines the statistical power and fluorescence sensitivity of standard flow cytometry with the spatial resolution and quantitative morphology of digital microscopy. The technique is a good fit for clinical applications by providing a convenient means for imaging and analyzing cells directly in bodily fluids. Examples are provided of the discrimination of cancerous from normal mammary epithelial cells and the high throughput quantitation of FISH probes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The FISH application will be further enhanced by the integration of extended depth of field imaging technology with the current optical system. PMID:17658411

  13. Learning Discriminative Subspaces on Random Contrasts for Image Saliency Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shu; Li, Jia; Tian, Yonghong; Huang, Tiejun; Chen, Xiaowu

    2017-05-01

    In visual saliency estimation, one of the most challenging tasks is to distinguish targets and distractors that share certain visual attributes. With the observation that such targets and distractors can sometimes be easily separated when projected to specific subspaces, we propose to estimate image saliency by learning a set of discriminative subspaces that perform the best in popping out targets and suppressing distractors. Toward this end, we first conduct principal component analysis on massive randomly selected image patches. The principal components, which correspond to the largest eigenvalues, are selected to construct candidate subspaces since they often demonstrate impressive abilities to separate targets and distractors. By projecting images onto various subspaces, we further characterize each image patch by its contrasts against randomly selected neighboring and peripheral regions. In this manner, the probable targets often have the highest responses, while the responses at background regions become very low. Based on such random contrasts, an optimization framework with pairwise binary terms is adopted to learn the saliency model that best separates salient targets and distractors by optimally integrating the cues from various subspaces. Experimental results on two public benchmarks show that the proposed approach outperforms 16 state-of-the-art methods in human fixation prediction.

  14. Histopathological image analysis for centroblasts classification through dimensionality reduction approaches.

    PubMed

    Kornaropoulos, Evgenios N; Niazi, M Khalid Khan; Lozanski, Gerard; Gurcan, Metin N

    2014-03-01

    We present two novel automated image analysis methods to differentiate centroblast (CB) cells from noncentroblast (non-CB) cells in digital images of H&E-stained tissues of follicular lymphoma. CB cells are often confused by similar looking cells within the tissue, therefore a system to help their classification is necessary. Our methods extract the discriminatory features of cells by approximating the intrinsic dimensionality from the subspace spanned by CB and non-CB cells. In the first method, discriminatory features are approximated with the help of singular value decomposition (SVD), whereas in the second method they are extracted using Laplacian Eigenmaps. Five hundred high-power field images were extracted from 17 slides, which are then used to compose a database of 213 CB and 234 non-CB region of interest images. The recall, precision, and overall accuracy rates of the developed methods were measured and compared with existing classification methods. Moreover, the reproducibility of both classification methods was also examined. The average values of the overall accuracy were 99.22% ± 0.75% and 99.07% ± 1.53% for COB and CLEM, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that both proposed methods provide better classification accuracy of CB/non-CB in comparison with the state of the art methods.

  15. 3D imaging of particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionizing decay products is known to cause lung cancer in human. In the U.K., it has been suggested that 3 to 5 % of total lung cancer deaths can be linked to elevated radon concentrations in the home and/or workplace. Radon monitoring in buildings is therefore routinely undertaken in areas of known risk. Indeed, some organisations such as the Radon Council in the UK and the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA, advocate a ‘to test is best' policy. Radon gas occurs naturally, emanating from the decay of 238U in rock and soils. Its concentration can be measured using CR?39 plastic detectors which conventionally are assessed by 2D image analysis of the surface; however there can be some variation in outcomes / readings even in closely spaced detectors. A number of radon measurement methods are currently in use (for examples, activated carbon and electrets) but the most widely used are CR?39 solid state nuclear track?etch detectors (SSNTDs). In this technique, heavily ionizing alpha particles leave tracks in the form of radiation damage (via interaction between alpha particles and the atoms making up the CR?39 polymer). 3D imaging of the tracks has the potential to provide information relating to angle and energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high resolution 3D imaging of SSNTDs. A ‘LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR?39 plastic detectors. 3D visualisation and image analysis enabled characterisation of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of SSNTDs. Keywords: Radon; SSNTDs; confocal laser scanning microscope; 3D imaging; LEXT

  16. Electron transfer reactions for image and image-derived states in dielectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Jensen, E T; Sanche, L

    2008-08-21

    We have studied the cross section for electron trapping that occurs at the surfaces and interfaces of a variety of thin dielectric films (n-octane, methanol, n-butanol, and difluoromethane) that are grown on Kr buffer films. When such films are bombarded with electrons of very low incident energies (E less, similar 300 meV), charging cross sections up to the order of 10(-14) cm(2) are measured for submonolayer quantities of a variety of coadsorbed molecules: CH(3)I, CH(3)Br, CH(3)Cl, and CO(2). These huge cross sections are ascribed to the formation of image states at the dielectric film interfaces, which trap incoming electrons and, via coupling to the adsorbate electron affinity levels, dramatically enhance the capture probability. We have also shown that thin film dielectric layer structures can be created which display image-derived states, such as a "quantum well" in a sandwich structure with two "electron barrier" layers surrounding a Kr and adsorbate spacer film. These phenomena are shown to be of a general nature, occurring for a wide variety of molecular thin films, and depend on the dielectric constant and electron affinity of the selected species. We also report the absolute cross section for dissociative electron attachment of submonolayer CH(3)I adsorbed on Kr thin films.

  17. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging for surgical planning in pediatric patients: a preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Roland, Jarod L; Griffin, Natalie; Hacker, Carl D; Vellimana, Ananth K; Akbari, S Hassan; Shimony, Joshua S; Smyth, Matthew D; Leuthardt, Eric C; Limbrick, David D

    2017-09-29

    OBJECTIVE Cerebral mapping for surgical planning and operative guidance is a challenging task in neurosurgery. Pediatric patients are often poor candidates for many modern mapping techniques because of inability to cooperate due to their immature age, cognitive deficits, or other factors. Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) is uniquely suited to benefit pediatric patients because it is inherently noninvasive and does not require task performance or significant cooperation. Recent advances in the field have made mapping cerebral networks possible on an individual basis for use in clinical decision making. The authors present their initial experience translating rs-fMRI into clinical practice for surgical planning in pediatric patients. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed cases in which the rs-fMRI analysis technique was used prior to craniotomy in pediatric patients undergoing surgery in their institution. Resting-state analysis was performed using a previously trained machine-learning algorithm for identification of resting-state networks on an individual basis. Network maps were uploaded to the clinical imaging and surgical navigation systems. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics, including need for sedation during imaging and use of task-based fMRI, were also recorded. RESULTS Twenty patients underwent rs-fMRI prior to craniotomy between December 2013 and June 2016. Their ages ranged from 1.9 to 18.4 years, and 12 were male. Five of the 20 patients also underwent task-based fMRI and one underwent awake craniotomy. Six patients required sedation to tolerate MRI acquisition, including resting-state sequences. Exemplar cases are presented including anatomical and resting-state functional imaging. CONCLUSIONS Resting-state fMRI is a rapidly advancing field of study allowing for whole brain analysis by a noninvasive modality. It is applicable to a wide range of patients and effective even under general anesthesia. The nature of resting-state

  18. Vector processing enhancements for real-time image analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Shoaf, S.; APS Engineering Support Division

    2008-01-01

    A real-time image analysis system was developed for beam imaging diagnostics. An Apple Power Mac G5 with an Active Silicon LFG frame grabber was used to capture video images that were processed and analyzed. Software routines were created to utilize vector-processing hardware to reduce the time to process images as compared to conventional methods. These improvements allow for more advanced image processing diagnostics to be performed in real time.

  19. Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging for breast cancer analysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Polarized light has many applications in biomedical imaging. The interaction of a biological sample with polarized light reveals information about its biological composition, both structural and functional. The most comprehensive type of polarimetry analysis is to measure the Mueller matrix, a polarization transfer function that completely describes how a sample interacts with polarized light. However, determination of the Mueller matrix requires tissue analysis under many different states of polarized light; a time consuming and measurement intensive process. Here we address this limitation with a new rapid polarimetry system, and use this polarimetry platform to investigate a variety of tissue changes associated with breast cancer. We have recently developed a rapid polarimetry imaging platform based on four photoelastic modulators (PEMs). The PEMs generate fast polarization modulations that allow the complete sample Mueller matrix to be imaged over a large field of view, with no moving parts. This polarimetry system is then demonstrated to be sensitive to a variety of tissue changes that are relevant to breast cancer. Specifically, we show that changes in depolarization can reveal tumor margins, and can differentiate between viable and necrotic breast cancer metastasized to the lymph nodes. Furthermore, the polarimetric property of linear retardance (related to birefringence) is dependent on collagen organization in the extracellular matrix. These findings indicate that our polarimetry platform may have future applications in fields such as breast cancer diagnosis, improving the speed and efficacy of intraoperative pathology, and providing prognostic information that may be beneficial for guiding treatment.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of activation state in functional brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenghui; Ni, Pengyu; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-10-01

    Neuronal activity can evoke the hemodynamic change that gives rise to the observed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal. These increases are also regulated by the resting blood volume fraction (V (0)) associated with regional vasculature. The activation locus detected by means of the change in the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity thereby may deviate from the actual active site due to varied vascular density in the cortex. Furthermore, conventional detection techniques evaluate the statistical significance of the hemodynamic observations. In this sense, the significance level relies not only upon the intensity of the BOLD signal change, but also upon the spatially inhomogeneous fMRI noise distribution that complicates the expression of the results. In this paper, we propose a quantitative strategy for the calibration of activation states to address these challenging problems. The quantitative assessment is based on the estimated neuronal efficacy parameter [Formula: see text] of the hemodynamic model in a voxel-by-voxel way. It is partly immune to the inhomogeneous fMRI noise by virtue of the strength of the optimization strategy. Moreover, it is easy to incorporate regional vascular information into the activation detection procedure. By combining MR angiography images, this approach can remove large vessel contamination in fMRI signals, and provide more accurate functional localization than classical statistical techniques for clinical applications. It is also helpful to investigate the nonlinear nature of the coupling between synaptic activity and the evoked BOLD response. The proposed method might be considered as a potentially useful complement to existing statistical approaches.

  1. Myocardial Perfusion Imaging with a Solid State Camera: Simulation of a Very Low Dose Imaging Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S.; Hayes, Sean W.; Fish, Mathews; Padgett, Richard; Xu, Yuan; Lemley, Mark; Baavour, Rafael; Roth, Nathaniel; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2012-01-01

    High sensitivity dedicated cardiac systems cameras provide an opportunity to lower injected doses for SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), but the exact limits for lowering doses have not been determined. List mode data acquisition allows for reconstruction of various fractions of acquired counts, allowing a simulation of gradually lower administered dose. We aimed to determine the feasibility of very low dose MPI by exploring the minimal count level in the myocardium for accurate MPI. Methods Seventy nine patients were studied (mean body mass index 30.0 ± 6.6, range 20.2–54.0 kg/m2) who underwent 1-day standard dose 99mTc-sestamibi exercise or adenosine rest/stress MPI for clinical indications employing a Cadmium Zinc Telluride dedicated cardiac camera. Imaging time was 14-min with 803 ± 200 MBq (21.7 ± 5.4mCi) of 99mTc injected at stress. To simulate clinical scans with lower dose at that imaging time, we reframed the list-mode raw data to have count fractions of the original scan. Accordingly, 6 stress equivalent datasets were reconstructed corresponding to each fraction of the original scan. Automated QPS/QGS software was used to quantify total perfusion deficit (TPD) and ejection fraction (EF) for all 553 datasets. Minimal acceptable count was determined based on previous report with repeatability of same-day same-injection Anger camera studies. Pearson correlation coefficients and SD of differences with TPD for all scans were calculated. Results The correlations of quantitative perfusion and function analysis were excellent for both global and regional analysis on all simulated low-counts scans (all r ≥0.95, p<0.0001). Minimal acceptable count was determined to be 1.0 million counts for the left ventricular region. At this count level, SD of differences was 1.7% for TPD and 4.2% for EF. This count level would correspond to a 92.5 MBq (2.5 mCi) injected dose for the 14 min acquisition. Conclusion 1.0 million myocardial count images appear to be

  2. Thermal image analysis for detecting facemask leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdall, Jonathan B.; Pavlidis, Ioannis T.; Levine, James

    2005-03-01

    Due to the modern advent of near ubiquitous accessibility to rapid international transportation the epidemiologic trends of highly communicable diseases can be devastating. With the recent emergence of diseases matching this pattern, such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), an area of overt concern has been the transmission of infection through respiratory droplets. Approved facemasks are typically effective physical barriers for preventing the spread of viruses through droplets, but breaches in a mask"s integrity can lead to an elevated risk of exposure and subsequent infection. Quality control mechanisms in place during the manufacturing process insure that masks are defect free when leaving the factory, but there remains little to detect damage caused by transportation or during usage. A system that could monitor masks in real-time while they were in use would facilitate a more secure environment for treatment and screening. To fulfill this necessity, we have devised a touchless method to detect mask breaches in real-time by utilizing the emissive properties of the mask in the thermal infrared spectrum. Specifically, we use a specialized thermal imaging system to detect minute air leakage in masks based on the principles of heat transfer and thermodynamics. The advantage of this passive modality is that thermal imaging does not require contact with the subject and can provide instant visualization and analysis. These capabilities can prove invaluable for protecting personnel in scenarios with elevated levels of transmission risk such as hospital clinics, border check points, and airports.

  3. Image analysis of nucleated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, G; Shohat, M; Melnik, Y; Yeger, A

    1983-08-01

    Bone marrow smears stained with Giemsa were scanned with a video camera under computer control. Forty-two cells representing the six differentiation classes of the red bone marrow were sampled. Each cell was digitized into 70 X 70 pixels, each pixel representing a square area of 0.4 micron2 in the original image. The pixel gray values ranged between 0 and 255. Zero stood for white, 255 represented black, while the numbers in between stood for the various shades of gray. After separation and smoothing the images were processed with a Sobel operator outlining the points of steepest gray level change in the cell. These points constitute a closed curve denominated as inner cell boundary, separating the cell into an inner and an outer region. Two types of features were extracted from each cell: form features, e.g., area and length, and gray level features. Twenty-two features were tested for their discriminative merit. After selecting 16, the discriminant analysis program classified correctly all 42 cells into the 6 classes.

  4. Vision-sensing image analysis for GTAW process control

    SciTech Connect

    Long, D.D.

    1994-11-01

    Image analysis of a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process was completed using video images from a charge coupled device (CCD) camera inside a specially designed coaxial (GTAW) electrode holder. Video data was obtained from filtered and unfiltered images, with and without the GTAW arc present, showing weld joint features and locations. Data Translation image processing boards, installed in an IBM PC AT 386 compatible computer, and Media Cybernetics image processing software were used to investigate edge flange weld joint geometry for image analysis.

  5. Image analysis by integration of disparate information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoigne, Jacqueline

    1993-01-01

    Image analysis often starts with some preliminary segmentation which provides a representation of the scene needed for further interpretation. Segmentation can be performed in several ways, which are categorized as pixel based, edge-based, and region-based. Each of these approaches are affected differently by various factors, and the final result may be improved by integrating several or all of these methods, thus taking advantage of their complementary nature. In this paper, we propose an approach that integrates pixel-based and edge-based results by utilizing an iterative relaxation technique. This approach has been implemented on a massively parallel computer and tested on some remotely sensed imagery from the Landsat-Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor.

  6. Optical imaging of resting-state functional connectivity in a novel arterial stiffness model.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Edgar; Sadekova, Nataliya; Girouard, Hélène; Lesage, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of unilateral increases in carotid stiffness on cortical functional connectivity measures in the resting state. Using a novel animal model of induced arterial stiffness combined with optical intrinsic signals and laser speckle imaging, resting state functional networks derived from hemodynamic signals are investigated for their modulation by isolated changes in stiffness of the right common carotid artery. By means of seed-based analysis, results showed a decreasing trend of homologous correlation in the motor and cingulate cortices. Furthermore, a graph analysis indicated a randomization of the cortex functional networks, suggesting a loss of connectivity, more specifically in the motor cortex lateral to the treated carotid, which however did not translate in differentiated metabolic activity.

  7. Computerised anthropomorphometric analysis of images: case report.

    PubMed

    Ventura, F; Zacheo, A; Ventura, A; Pala, A

    2004-12-02

    The personal identification of living subjects through video filmed images can occasionally be necessary, particularly in the following circumstances: (1) the need to identify unknown subjects by comparing two-dimensional images of someone of known identity with the subject. (2) The need to identify subjects taken in photographs or recorded on video camera by using a comparison with individuals of known identity. The final aim of our research was that of analysing a video clip of a bank robbery and to determine whether one of the subjects was identifiable with one of the suspects. Following the correct methodology for personal identification, the original videotape was first analysed, relating to the robbery carried out in the bank so as to study the characteristics of the criminal action and to pinpoint the best scenes for an antropomorphometrical analysis. The scene of the crime was therefore reconstructed by bringing the suspect back to the bank where the robbery took place, who was then filmed with the same closed circuit video cameras and made to assume positions as close as possible to those of the bank robber to be identified. Taking frame no. 17, points of comparable similarity were identified on the face and right ear of the perpetrator of the crime and the same points of similarity identified on the face of the suspect: right and left eyebrows, right and left eyes, "glabella", nose, mouth, chin, fold between nose and upper lip, right ear, elix, tragus,"fossetta", "conca" and lobule. After careful comparative morphometric computer analysis, it was concluded that none of the 17 points of similarity showed the same anthropomorphology (points of negative similarity). It is reasonable to sustain that 17 points of negative similarity (or non coincidental points) is sufficient to exclude the identity of the person compared with the other.

  8. Multidimensional Image Analysis for High Precision Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Soufi, Mazen; Haekal, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    High precision radiation therapy (HPRT) has been improved by utilizing conventional image engineering technologies. However, different frameworks are necessary for further improvement of HPRT. This review paper attempted to define the multidimensional image and what multidimensional image analysis is, which may be feasible for increasing the accuracy of HPRT. A number of researches in radiation therapy field have been introduced to understand the multidimensional image analysis. Multidimensional image analysis could greatly assist clinical staffs in radiation therapy planning, treatment, and prediction of treatment outcomes.

  9. APPLICATION OF PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS TO RELAXOGRAPHIC IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    STOYANOVA,R.S.; OCHS,M.F.; BROWN,T.R.; ROONEY,W.D.; LI,X.; LEE,J.H.; SPRINGER,C.S.

    1999-05-22

    Standard analysis methods for processing inversion recovery MR images traditionally have used single pixel techniques. In these techniques each pixel is independently fit to an exponential recovery, and spatial correlations in the data set are ignored. By analyzing the image as a complete dataset, improved error analysis and automatic segmentation can be achieved. Here, the authors apply principal component analysis (PCA) to a series of relaxographic images. This procedure decomposes the 3-dimensional data set into three separate images and corresponding recovery times. They attribute the 3 images to be spatial representations of gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) content.

  10. High resolution ultraviolet imaging spectrometer for latent image analysis.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Hang; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Hongsong; Wu, Wenmin

    2016-03-21

    In this work, we present a close-range ultraviolet imaging spectrometer with high spatial resolution, and reasonably high spectral resolution. As the transmissive optical components cause chromatic aberration in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range, an all-reflective imaging scheme is introduced to promote the image quality. The proposed instrument consists of an oscillating mirror, a Cassegrain objective, a Michelson structure, an Offner relay, and a UV enhanced CCD. The finished spectrometer has a spatial resolution of 29.30μm on the target plane; the spectral scope covers both near and middle UV band; and can obtain approximately 100 wavelength samples over the range of 240~370nm. The control computer coordinates all the components of the instrument and enables capturing a series of images, which can be reconstructed into an interferogram datacube. The datacube can be converted into a spectrum datacube, which contains spectral information of each pixel with many wavelength samples. A spectral calibration is carried out by using a high pressure mercury discharge lamp. A test run demonstrated that this interferometric configuration can obtain high resolution spectrum datacube. The pattern recognition algorithm is introduced to analyze the datacube and distinguish the latent traces from the base materials. This design is particularly good at identifying the latent traces in the application field of forensic imaging.

  11. Macroscopic assessment of pulmonary emphysema by image analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gevenois, P A; Zanen, J; de Maertelaer, V; De Vuyst, P; Dumortier, P; Yernault, J C

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To propose a computerised image analysis based method for measuring, on paper mounted lung sections, the area macroscopically occupied by emphysema. METHODS--The study was based on the assessment of 69 lung sections prepared following a modified Gough-Wentworth technique. The results obtained from image analysis, point counting, and panel grading methods were compared, as was the repeatability of image analysis and panel grading. RESULTS--The results from image analysis and from point counting were not significantly different (p = 0.609) and significant quadratic regressions (r = 0.96, p < 0.001) were found between measurements from image analysis and from panel grading, the computerised technique being shown to be the most reproducible. CONCLUSIONS--Image analysis is a valuable and reproducible method to measure the area of lung macroscopically involved by emphysema. PMID:7615849

  12. ASCA solid state imaging spectrometer observations of O stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W. L.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Chen, W.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Torrii, K.; Kitamoto, S.; Muira, N.; Egoshi, M.; Ohno, Y.

    1995-01-01

    We report ASCA Solid State Imaging Spectrometer (SIS) x-ray observations of the O stars delta Ori and lambda Ori. The energy resolution of the SIS allows us to resolve features in the O star x-ray spectra which are not apparent in spectra obtained by x-ray spectrometers with lower energy resolution. SIS spectra from both stars show evidence of line emission, suggesting the thermal nature of the x-ray source. However, the observed line strengths are different for the two stars. The observed stellar x-ray spectra are not well described by isothermal models although absorbed thermal emission models with two or more temperatures can provide an adequate fit to the data. For both stars we present evidence of absorbing columns significantly larger than the known ISM columns, indicative of absorption by a circumstellar medium, presumably the stellar winds. In addition, the lambda Ori spectrum shows the presence of emission at energies greater than 3 keV which is not seen in the delta Ori spectrum.

  13. Perfusion information extracted from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yunjie; Lindsey, Kimberly P; Hocke, Lia M; Vitaliano, Gordana; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Frederick, Blaise deB

    2017-02-01

    It is widely known that blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an indirect measure for neuronal activations through neurovascular coupling. The BOLD signal is also influenced by many non-neuronal physiological fluctuations. In previous resting state (RS) fMRI studies, we have identified a moving systemic low frequency oscillation (sLFO) in BOLD signal and were able to track its passage through the brain. We hypothesized that this seemingly intrinsic signal moves with the blood, and therefore, its dynamic patterns represent cerebral blood flow. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by performing Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC) MRI scans (i.e. bolus tracking) following the RS scans on eight healthy subjects. The dynamic patterns of sLFO derived from RS data were compared with the bolus flow visually and quantitatively. We found that the flow of sLFO derived from RS fMRI does to a large extent represent the blood flow measured with DSC. The small differences, we hypothesize, are largely due to the difference between the methods in their sensitivity to different vessel types. We conclude that the flow of sLFO in RS visualized by our time delay method represents the blood flow in the capillaries and veins in the brain.

  14. ASCA solid state imaging spectrometer observations of O stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W. L.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Chen, W.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Torii, K.; Kitamoto, S.; Miura, N.; Egoshi, M.; Ohno, Y.

    1994-01-01

    We report ASCA Solid State Imaging Spectrometer (SIS) X-ray observations of the O stars delta Ori and lambda Ori. The energy resolution of the SIS allows us to resolve features in the O star X-ray spectra which are not apparent in spectra obtained by X-ray spectrometers with lower energy resolution. SIS spectra from both stars show evidence of line emission, suggesting the thermal nature of the X-ray source. However, the observed line strengths are different for the two stars. The observed stellar X-ray spectra are not well described by isothermal models although absorbed thermal emission models with two or more temperatures can provide an adequate fit to the data. For both stars we present evidence of absorbing columns significantly larger than the known Interstellar Medium (ISM) columns, indicative of absorption by a circumstellar medium, presumably the stellar winds. In addition, the lambda Ori spectrum shows the presence of emission at energies greater than 3 keV which is not seen in the delta Ori spectrum.

  15. DETERMINING TITAN'S SPIN STATE FROM CASSINI RADAR IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, Bryan W.; Hensley, Scott; Ostro, Steven J.; Callahan, Philip S.; Gim, Yonggyu; Hamilton, Gary; Johnson, William T. K.; West, Richard D.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lee, Ella; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Allison, Michael D.; Iess, Luciano; Del Marmo, Paolo Perci

    2008-05-15

    For some 19 areas of Titan's surface, the Cassini RADAR instrument has obtained synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images during two different flybys. The time interval between flybys varies from several weeks to two years. We have used the apparent misregistration (by 10-30 km) of features between separate flybys to construct a refined model of Titan's spin state, estimating six parameters: north pole right ascension and declination, spin rate, and these quantities' first time derivatives We determine a pole location with right ascension of 39.48 degrees and declination of 83.43 degrees corresponding to a 0.3 degree obliquity. We determine the spin rate to be 22.5781 deg day{sup -1} or 0.001 deg day{sup -1} faster than the synchronous spin rate. Our estimated corrections to the pole and spin rate exceed their corresponding standard errors by factors of 80 and 8, respectively. We also found that the rate of change in the pole right ascension is -30 deg century{sup -1}, ten times faster than right ascension rate of change for the orbit normal. The spin rate is increasing at a rate of 0.05 deg day{sup -1} per century. We observed no significant change in pole declination over the period for which we have data. Applying our pole correction reduces the feature misregistration from tens of km to 3 km. Applying the spin rate and derivative corrections further reduces the misregistration to 1.2 km.

  16. Determining titan's spin state from cassini radar images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stiles, B.W.; Kirk, R.L.; Lorenz, R.D.; Hensley, S.; Lee, E.; Ostro, S.J.; Allison, M.D.; Callahan, P.S.; Gim, Y.; Iess, L.; Del Marmo, P.P.; Hamilton, G.; Johnson, W.T.K.; West, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    For some 19 areas of Titan's surface, the Cassini RADAR instrument has obtained synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images during two different flybys. The time interval between flybys varies from several weeks to two years. We have used the apparent misregistration (by 10-30 km) of features between separate flybys to construct a refined model of Titan's spin state, estimating six parameters: north pole right ascension and declination, spin rate, and these quantities' first time derivatives We determine a pole location with right ascension of 39.48 degrees and declination of 83.43 degrees corresponding to a 0.3 degree obliquity. We determine the spin rate to be 22.5781 deg day -1 or 0.001 deg day-1 faster than the synchronous spin rate. Our estimated corrections to the pole and spin rate exceed their corresponding standard errors by factors of 80 and 8, respectively. We also found that the rate of change in the pole right ascension is -30 deg century-1, ten times faster than right ascension rate of change for the orbit normal. The spin rate is increasing at a rate of 0.05 deg day -1 per century. We observed no significant change in pole declination over the period for which we have data. Applying our pole correction reduces the feature misregistration from tens of km to 3 km. Applying the spin rate and derivative corrections further reduces the misregistration to 1.2 km. ?? 2008. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

  17. State analysis of nonlinear systems using local canonical variate analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, N.F.

    1997-01-01

    There are many instances in which time series measurements are used to derive an empirical model of a dynamical system. State space reconstruction from time series measurement has applications in many scientific and engineering disciplines including structural engineering, biology, chemistry, climatology, control theory, and physics. Prediction of future time series values from empirical models was attempted as early as 1927 by Yule, who applied linear prediction methods to the sunspot values. More recently, efforts in this area have centered on two related aspects of time series analysis, namely prediction and modeling. In prediction future time series values are estimated from past values, in modeling, fundamental characteristics of the state model underlying the measurements are estimated, such as dimension and eigenvalues. In either approach a measured time series, [{bold y}(t{sub i})], i= 1,... N is assumed to derive from the action of a smooth dynamical system, s(t+{bold {tau}})=a(s(t)), where the bold notation indicates the (potentially ) multivariate nature of the time series. The time series is assumed to derive from the state evolution via a measurement function c. {bold y}(t)=c(s(t)) In general the states s(t), the state evolution function a and the measurement function c are In unknown, and must be inferred from the time series measurements. We approach this problem from the standpoint of time series analysis. We review the principles of state space reconstruction. The specific model formulation used in the local canonical variate analysis algorithm and a detailed description of the state space reconstruction algorithm are included. The application of the algorithm to a single-degree-of- freedom Duffing-like Oscillator and the difficulties involved in reconstruction of an unmeasured degree of freedom in a four degree of freedom nonlinear oscillator are presented. The advantages and current limitations of state space reconstruction are summarized.

  18. Designing Image Analysis Pipelines in Light Microscopy: A Rational Approach.

    PubMed

    Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Andrey, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    With the progress of microscopy techniques and the rapidly growing amounts of acquired imaging data, there is an increased need for automated image processing and analysis solutions in biological studies. Each new application requires the design of a specific image analysis pipeline, by assembling a series of image processing operations. Many commercial or free bioimage analysis software are now available and several textbooks and reviews have presented the mathematical and computational fundamentals of image processing and analysis. Tens, if not hundreds, of algorithms and methods have been developed and integrated into image analysis software, resulting in a combinatorial explosion of possible image processing sequences. This paper presents a general guideline methodology to rationally address the design of image processing and analysis pipelines. The originality of the proposed approach is to follow an iterative, backwards procedure from the target objectives of analysis. The proposed goal-oriented strategy should help biologists to better apprehend image analysis in the context of their research and should allow them to efficiently interact with image processing specialists.

  19. Multifractal analysis of 2D gray soil images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Torres, Ivan; Losada, Juan Carlos; Heck, Richard; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure, understood as the spatial arrangement of soil pores, is one of the key factors in soil modelling processes. Geometric properties of individual and interpretation of the morphological parameters of pores can be estimated from thin sections or 3D Computed Tomography images (Tarquis et al., 2003), but there is no satisfactory method to binarized these images and quantify the complexity of their spatial arrangement (Tarquis et al., 2008, Tarquis et al., 2009; Baveye et al., 2010). The objective of this work was to apply a multifractal technique, their singularities (α) and f(α) spectra, to quantify it without applying any threshold (Gónzalez-Torres, 2014). Intact soil samples were collected from four horizons of an Argisol, formed on the Tertiary Barreiras group of formations in Pernambuco state, Brazil (Itapirema Experimental Station). The natural vegetation of the region is tropical, coastal rainforest. From each horizon, showing different porosities and spatial arrangements, three adjacent samples were taken having a set of twelve samples. The intact soil samples were imaged using an EVS (now GE Medical. London, Canada) MS-8 MicroCT scanner with 45 μm pixel-1 resolution (256x256 pixels). Though some samples required paring to fit the 64 mm diameter imaging tubes, field orientation was maintained. References Baveye, P.C., M. Laba, W. Otten, L. Bouckaert, P. Dello, R.R. Goswami, D. Grinev, A. Houston, Yaoping Hu, Jianli Liu, S. Mooney, R. Pajor, S. Sleutel, A. Tarquis, Wei Wang, Qiao Wei, Mehmet Sezgin. Observer-dependent variability of the thresholding step in the quantitative analysis of soil images and X-ray microtomography data. Geoderma, 157, 51-63, 2010. González-Torres, Iván. Theory and application of multifractal analysis methods in images for the study of soil structure. Master thesis, UPM, 2014. Tarquis, A.M., R.J. Heck, J.B. Grau; J. Fabregat, M.E. Sanchez and J.M. Antón. Influence of Thresholding in Mass and Entropy Dimension of 3-D

  20. Multi-dimensional color image storage and retrieval for a normal arbitrary quantum superposition state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Sheng; Zhu, Qingxin; Zhou, Ri-Gui; Song, Lan; Yang, Xing-jiang

    2014-04-01

    Multi-dimensional color image processing has two difficulties: One is that a large number of bits are needed to store multi-dimensional color images, such as, a three-dimensional color image of needs bits. The other one is that the efficiency or accuracy of image segmentation is not high enough for some images to be used in content-based image search. In order to solve the above problems, this paper proposes a new representation for multi-dimensional color image, called a -qubit normal arbitrary quantum superposition state (NAQSS), where qubits represent colors and coordinates of pixels (e.g., represent a three-dimensional color image of only using 30 qubits), and the remaining 1 qubit represents an image segmentation information to improve the accuracy of image segmentation. And then we design a general quantum circuit to create the NAQSS state in order to store a multi-dimensional color image in a quantum system and propose a quantum circuit simplification algorithm to reduce the number of the quantum gates of the general quantum circuit. Finally, different strategies to retrieve a whole image or the target sub-image of an image from a quantum system are studied, including Monte Carlo sampling and improved Grover's algorithm which can search out a coordinate of a target sub-image only running in where and are the numbers of pixels of an image and a target sub-image, respectively.

  1. A framework for joint image-and-shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen; Bouix, Sylvain

    2014-03-01

    Techniques in medical image analysis are many times used for the comparison or regression on the intensities of images. In general, the domain of the image is a given Cartesian grids. Shape analysis, on the other hand, studies the similarities and differences among spatial objects of arbitrary geometry and topology. Usually, there is no function defined on the domain of shapes. Recently, there has been a growing needs for defining and analyzing functions defined on the shape space, and a coupled analysis on both the shapes and the functions defined on them. Following this direction, in this work we present a coupled analysis for both images and shapes. As a result, the statistically significant discrepancies in both the image intensities as well as on the underlying shapes are detected. The method is applied on both brain images for the schizophrenia and heart images for atrial fibrillation patients.

  2. Sensor for real-time determining the polarization state distribution in the object images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilosanidze, Barbara; Kakauridze, George; Kvernadze, Teimuraz; Kurkhuli, Georgi

    2015-10-01

    An innovative real-time polarimetric method is presented based on the integral polarization-holographic diffraction element developed by us. This element is suggested to be used for real time analysis of the polarization state of light, to help highlight military equipment in a scene. In the process of diffraction, the element decomposes light incoming on them onto orthogonal circular and linear basis. The simultaneous measurement of the intensities of four diffracted beams by means of photodetectors and the appropriate software enable the polarization state of an analyzable light (all the four Stokes parameters) and its change to be obtained in real time. The element with photodetectors and software is a sensor of the polarization state. Such a sensor allows the point-by-point distribution of the polarization state in the images of objects to be determined. The spectral working range of such an element is 530 - 1600 nm. This sensor is compact, lightweight and relatively cheap, and it can be easily installed on any space and airborne platforms. It has no mechanically moving or electronically controlled elements. The speed of its operation is limited only by computer processing. Such a sensor is proposed to be use for the determination of the characteristics of the surface of objects at optical remote sensing by means of the determination of the distribution of the polarization state of light in the image of recognizable object and the dispersion of this distribution, which provides additional information while identifying an object. The possibility of detection of a useful signal of the predetermined polarization on a background of statistically random noise of an underlying surface is also possible. The application of the sensor is also considered for the nondestructive determination of the distribution of stressed state in different constructions based on the determination of the distribution of the polarization state of light reflected from the object under

  3. Resting-state functional MR imaging shed insights into the brain of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun Fei; Ji, Xue Man; Lu, Guang Ming; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disease which is associated with increasing risk for multiple cognitive declines. Alterations in brain functional connectivity are believed to be the mechanisms underlying the cognitive function impairments. During the past decade, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has been developed as a major tool to study brain functional connectivity in vivo. This paper briefly reviews the diabetes-associated cognitive impairment, analysis algorithms and clinical applications of rs-fMRI. We also provide future perspectives of rs-fMRI in diabetes.

  4. Image based SAR product simulation for analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.

    1987-01-01

    SAR product simulation serves to predict SAR image gray values for various flight paths. Input typically consists of a digital elevation model and backscatter curves. A new method is described of product simulation that employs also a real SAR input image for image simulation. This can be denoted as 'image-based simulation'. Different methods to perform this SAR prediction are presented and advantages and disadvantages discussed. Ascending and descending orbit images from NASA's SIR-B experiment were used for verification of the concept: input images from ascending orbits were converted into images from a descending orbit; the results are compared to the available real imagery to verify that the prediction technique produces meaningful image data.

  5. SAR Image Texture Analysis of Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Long; Li, Ying; Liu, Yu

    Oil spills are seriously affecting the marine ecosystem and cause political and scientific concern since they have serious affect on fragile marine and coastal ecosystem. In order to implement an emergency in case of oil spills, it is necessary to monitor oil spill using remote sensing. Spaceborne SAR is considered a promising method to monitor oil spill, which causes attention from many researchers. However, research in SAR image texture analysis of oil spill is rarely reported. On 7 December 2007, a crane-carrying barge hit the Hong Kong-registered tanker "Hebei Spirit", which released an estimated 10,500 metric tons of crude oil into the sea. The texture features on this oil spill were acquired based on extracted GLCM (Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix) by using SAR as data source. The affected area was extracted successfully after evaluating capabilities of different texture features to monitor the oil spill. The results revealed that the texture is an important feature for oil spill monitoring. Key words: oil spill, texture analysis, SAR

  6. LANDSAT-4 image data quality analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anuta, P. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Work done on evaluating the geometric and radiometric quality of early LANDSAT-4 sensor data is described. Band to band and channel to channel registration evaluations were carried out using a line correlator. Visual blink comparisons were run on an image display to observe band to band registration over 512 x 512 pixel blocks. The results indicate a .5 pixel line misregistration between the 1.55 to 1.75, 2.08 to 2.35 micrometer bands and the first four bands. Also a four 30M line and column misregistration of the thermal IR band was observed. Radiometric evaluation included mean and variance analysis of individual detectors and principal components analysis. Results indicate that detector bias for all bands is very close or within tolerance. Bright spots were observed in the thermal IR band on an 18 line by 128 pixel grid. No explanation for this was pursued. The general overall quality of the TM was judged to be very high.

  7. A virtual laboratory for medical image analysis.

    PubMed

    Olabarriaga, Sílvia D; Glatard, Tristan; de Boer, Piter T

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, and usage of a virtual laboratory for medical image analysis. It is fully based on the Dutch grid, which is part of the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE (EGEE) production infrastructure and driven by the gLite middleware. The adopted service-oriented architecture enables decoupling the user-friendly clients running on the user's workstation from the complexity of the grid applications and infrastructure. Data are stored on grid resources and can be browsed/viewed interactively by the user with the Virtual Resource Browser (VBrowser). Data analysis pipelines are described as Scufl workflows and enacted on the grid infrastructure transparently using the MOTEUR workflow management system. VBrowser plug-ins allow for easy experiment monitoring and error detection. Because of the strict compliance to the grid authentication model, all operations are performed on behalf of the user, ensuring basic security and facilitating collaboration across organizations. The system has been operational and in daily use for eight months (December 2008), with six users, leading to the submission of 9000 jobs/month in average and the production of several terabytes of data.

  8. A blind dual color images watermarking based on IWT and state coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qingtang; Niu, Yugang; Liu, Xianxi; Zhu, Yu

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, a state-coding based blind watermarking algorithm is proposed to embed color image watermark to color host image. The technique of state coding, which makes the state code of data set be equal to the hiding watermark information, is introduced in this paper. When embedding watermark, using Integer Wavelet Transform (IWT) and the rules of state coding, these components, R, G and B, of color image watermark are embedded to these components, Y, Cr and Cb, of color host image. Moreover, the rules of state coding are also used to extract watermark from the watermarked image without resorting to the original watermark or original host image. Experimental results show that the proposed watermarking algorithm cannot only meet the demand on invisibility and robustness of the watermark, but also have well performance compared with other proposed methods considered in this work.

  9. Image pattern recognition supporting interactive analysis and graphical visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggins, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Image Pattern Recognition attempts to infer properties of the world from image data. Such capabilities are crucial for making measurements from satellite or telescope images related to Earth and space science problems. Such measurements can be the required product itself, or the measurements can be used as input to a computer graphics system for visualization purposes. At present, the field of image pattern recognition lacks a unified scientific structure for developing and evaluating image pattern recognition applications. The overall goal of this project is to begin developing such a structure. This report summarizes results of a 3-year research effort in image pattern recognition addressing the following three principal aims: (1) to create a software foundation for the research and identify image pattern recognition problems in Earth and space science; (2) to develop image measurement operations based on Artificial Visual Systems; and (3) to develop multiscale image descriptions for use in interactive image analysis.

  10. Ripening of salami: assessment of colour and aspect evolution using image analysis and multivariate image analysis.

    PubMed

    Fongaro, Lorenzo; Alamprese, Cristina; Casiraghi, Ernestina

    2015-03-01

    During ripening of salami, colour changes occur due to oxidation phenomena involving myoglobin. Moreover, shrinkage due to dehydration results in aspect modifications, mainly ascribable to fat aggregation. The aim of this work was the application of image analysis (IA) and multivariate image analysis (MIA) techniques to the study of colour and aspect changes occurring in salami during ripening. IA results showed that red, green, blue, and intensity parameters decreased due to the development of a global darker colour, while Heterogeneity increased due to fat aggregation. By applying MIA, different salami slice areas corresponding to fat and three different degrees of oxidised meat were identified and quantified. It was thus possible to study the trend of these different areas as a function of ripening, making objective an evaluation usually performed by subjective visual inspection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  12. Forensic Analysis of Digital Image Tampering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    will pave the way for Chapter 3, which deals with the methodology of an experimental design for image forgery detection . 2.2 Digital Watermarking ...example is presented to determine what effects an invisible watermark has on the results of each detection method. The host image is similar to that in...Digital Watermarking ............................................................................................... 7 2.3 Unknown Image Origin

  13. Image analysis driven single-cell analytics for systems microbiology.

    PubMed

    Balomenos, Athanasios D; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Aspridou, Zafiro; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P; Manolakos, Elias S

    2017-04-04

    Time-lapse microscopy is an essential tool for capturing and correlating bacterial morphology and gene expression dynamics at single-cell resolution. However state-of-the-art computational methods are limited in terms of the complexity of cell movies that they can analyze and lack of automation. The proposed Bacterial image analysis driven Single Cell Analytics (BaSCA) computational pipeline addresses these limitations thus enabling high throughput systems microbiology. BaSCA can segment and track multiple bacterial colonies and single-cells, as they grow and divide over time (cell segmentation and lineage tree construction) to give rise to dense communities with thousands of interacting cells in the field of view. It combines advanced image processing and machine learning methods to deliver very accurate bacterial cell segmentation and tracking (F-measure over 95%) even when processing images of imperfect quality with several overcrowded colonies in the field of view. In addition, BaSCA extracts on the fly a plethora of single-cell properties, which get organized into a database summarizing the analysis of the cell movie. We present alternative ways to analyze and visually explore the spatiotemporal evolution of single-cell properties in order to understand trends and epigenetic effects across cell generations. The robustness of BaSCA is demonstrated across different imaging modalities and microscopy types. BaSCA can be used to analyze accurately and efficiently cell movies both at a high resolution (single-cell level) and at a large scale (communities with many dense colonies) as needed to shed light on e.g. how bacterial community effects and epigenetic information transfer play a role on important phenomena for human health, such as biofilm formation, persisters' emergence etc. Moreover, it enables studying the role of single-cell stochasticity without losing sight of community effects that may drive it.

  14. Fan fault diagnosis based on symmetrized dot pattern analysis and image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaogang; Liu, Haixiao; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Songling

    2016-07-01

    To detect the mechanical failure of fans, a new diagnostic method based on the symmetrized dot pattern (SDP) analysis and image matching is proposed. Vibration signals of 13 kinds of running states are acquired on a centrifugal fan test bed and reconstructed by the SDP technique. The SDP pattern templates of each running state are established. An image matching method is performed to diagnose the fault. In order to improve the diagnostic accuracy, the single template, multiple templates and clustering fault templates are used to perform the image matching.

  15. Medical Image Analysis by Cognitive Information Systems - a Review.

    PubMed

    Ogiela, Lidia; Takizawa, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    This publication presents a review of medical image analysis systems. The paradigms of cognitive information systems will be presented by examples of medical image analysis systems. The semantic processes present as it is applied to different types of medical images. Cognitive information systems were defined on the basis of methods for the semantic analysis and interpretation of information - medical images - applied to cognitive meaning of medical images contained in analyzed data sets. Semantic analysis was proposed to analyzed the meaning of data. Meaning is included in information, for example in medical images. Medical image analysis will be presented and discussed as they are applied to various types of medical images, presented selected human organs, with different pathologies. Those images were analyzed using different classes of cognitive information systems. Cognitive information systems dedicated to medical image analysis was also defined for the decision supporting tasks. This process is very important for example in diagnostic and therapy processes, in the selection of semantic aspects/features, from analyzed data sets. Those features allow to create a new way of analysis.

  16. Image Retrieval: Theoretical Analysis and Empirical User Studies on Accessing Information in Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    Discusses indexing and retrieval for effective searches of digitized images. Reports on an empirical study about criteria for analysis and indexing digitized images, and the different types of user queries done in newspaper image archives in Denmark. Concludes that it is necessary that the indexing represent both a factual and an expressional…

  17. Image Retrieval: Theoretical Analysis and Empirical User Studies on Accessing Information in Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    Discusses indexing and retrieval for effective searches of digitized images. Reports on an empirical study about criteria for analysis and indexing digitized images, and the different types of user queries done in newspaper image archives in Denmark. Concludes that it is necessary that the indexing represent both a factual and an expressional…

  18. Analysis of southwest propagating TIDs in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, E. A.; Bhatt, A.

    2016-12-01

    The MANGO network of 630 nm all-sky imagers in the continental United States has observed a number of westward propagating traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). These TIDs include southwestward waves typically associated with Perkins electrodynamic instability, and also northwestward waves of unknown cause. A peak in the wave activity was observed during the summer of 2016 in the western US. Many of the observed structures evolve during their passage through the camera field of view. The southwestward propagating TIDs observed over California are often tilted westward or slightly northward, which may be a function of magnetic field declination. We will present analysis of MANGO network data along with GPS TEC data. This analysis will include shapes and sizes of the observed structures along with their velocities. We will present results from geomagnetic, seasonal and local time variations associated with observed TIDs. Wherever possible, we will include data from the broader MANGO network that is now taking data over the continental United States and compare with data from Boston University imagers in Massachusetts and Texas.

  19. A guide to human in vivo microcirculatory flow image analysis.

    PubMed

    Massey, Michael J; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2016-02-10

    Various noninvasive microscopic camera technologies have been used to visualize the sublingual microcirculation in patients. We describe a comprehensive approach to bedside in vivo sublingual microcirculation video image capture and analysis techniques in the human clinical setting. We present a user perspective and guide suitable for clinical researchers and developers interested in the capture and analysis of sublingual microcirculatory flow videos. We review basic differences in the cameras, optics, light sources, operation, and digital image capture. We describe common techniques for image acquisition and discuss aspects of video data management, including data transfer, metadata, and database design and utilization to facilitate the image analysis pipeline. We outline image analysis techniques and reporting including video preprocessing and image quality evaluation. Finally, we propose a framework for future directions in the field of microcirculatory flow videomicroscopy acquisition and analysis. Although automated scoring systems have not been sufficiently robust for widespread clinical or research use to date, we discuss promising innovations that are driving new development.

  20. State Leadership for School Improvement: An Analysis of Three States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louis, Karen Seashore; Thomas, Emanda; Gordon, Molly F.; Febey, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Extant reports on states' policy differences are mostly descriptive and largely ignore the pervasive role of political culture on their educational policy-making processes. This article examines the effect of policy culture on states' policy-making mechanisms. There is evidence that a state's political culture is a significant mediating…

  1. State Leadership for School Improvement: An Analysis of Three States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louis, Karen Seashore; Thomas, Emanda; Gordon, Molly F.; Febey, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Extant reports on states' policy differences are mostly descriptive and largely ignore the pervasive role of political culture on their educational policy-making processes. This article examines the effect of policy culture on states' policy-making mechanisms. There is evidence that a state's political culture is a significant mediating…

  2. Working to make an image: an analysis of three Philip Morris corporate image media campaigns

    PubMed Central

    Szczypka, Glen; Wakefield, Melanie A; Emery, Sherry; Terry‐McElrath, Yvonne M; Flay, Brian R; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe the nature and timing of, and population exposure to, Philip Morris USA's three explicit corporate image television advertising campaigns and explore the motivations behind each campaign. Methods : Analysis of television ratings from the largest 75 media markets in the United States, which measure the reach and frequency of population exposure to advertising; copies of all televised commercials produced by Philip Morris; and tobacco industry documents, which provide insights into the specific goals of each campaign. Findings Household exposure to the “Working to Make a Difference: the People of Philip Morris” averaged 5.37 ads/month for 27 months from 1999–2001; the “Tobacco Settlement” campaign averaged 10.05 ads/month for three months in 2000; and “PMUSA” averaged 3.11 ads/month for the last six months in 2003. The percentage of advertising exposure that was purchased in news programming in order to reach opinion leaders increased over the three campaigns from 20%, 39% and 60%, respectively. These public relations campaigns were designed to counter negative images, increase brand recognition, and improve the financial viability of the company. Conclusions Only one early media campaign focused on issues other than tobacco, whereas subsequent campaigns have been specifically concerned with tobacco issues, and more targeted to opinion leaders. The size and timing of the advertising buys appeared to be strategically crafted to maximise advertising exposure for these population subgroups during critical threats to Philip Morris's public image. PMID:17897994

  3. Wave-Optics Analysis of Pupil Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Bos, Brent J.

    2006-01-01

    Pupil imaging performance is analyzed from the perspective of physical optics. A multi-plane diffraction model is constructed by propagating the scalar electromagnetic field, surface by surface, along the optical path comprising the pupil imaging optical system. Modeling results are compared with pupil images collected in the laboratory. The experimental setup, although generic for pupil imaging systems in general, has application to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) optical system characterization where the pupil images are used as a constraint to the wavefront sensing and control process. Practical design considerations follow from the diffraction modeling which are discussed in the context of the JWST Observatory.

  4. Image segmentation by iterative parallel region growing with application to data compression and image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Image segmentation can be a key step in data compression and image analysis. However, the segmentation results produced by most previous approaches to region growing are suspect because they depend on the order in which portions of the image are processed. An iterative parallel segmentation algorithm avoids this problem by performing globally best merges first. Such a segmentation approach, and two implementations of the approach on NASA's Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) are described. Application of the segmentation approach to data compression and image analysis is then described, and results of such application are given for a LANDSAT Thematic Mapper image.

  5. ImageJ-MATLAB: a bidirectional framework for scientific image analysis interoperability.

    PubMed

    Hiner, Mark C; Rueden, Curtis T; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2017-02-15

    ImageJ-MATLAB is a lightweight Java library facilitating bi-directional interoperability between MATLAB and ImageJ. By defining a standard for translation between matrix and image data structures, researchers are empowered to select the best tool for their image-analysis tasks. Freely available extension to ImageJ2 ( http://imagej.net/Downloads ). Installation and use instructions available at http://imagej.net/MATLAB_Scripting. Tested with ImageJ 2.0.0-rc-54 , Java 1.8.0_66 and MATLAB R2015b. eliceiri@wisc.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Image analysis for dental bone quality assessment using CBCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprijanto; Epsilawati, L.; Hajarini, M. S.; Juliastuti, E.; Susanti, H.

    2016-03-01

    Cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) is one of X-ray imaging modalities that are applied in dentistry. Its modality can visualize the oral region in 3D and in a high resolution. CBCT jaw image has potential information for the assessment of bone quality that often used for pre-operative implant planning. We propose comparison method based on normalized histogram (NH) on the region of inter-dental septum and premolar teeth. Furthermore, the NH characteristic from normal and abnormal bone condition are compared and analyzed. Four test parameters are proposed, i.e. the difference between teeth and bone average intensity (s), the ratio between bone and teeth average intensity (n) of NH, the difference between teeth and bone peak value (Δp) of NH, and the ratio between teeth and bone of NH range (r). The results showed that n, s, and Δp have potential to be the classification parameters of dental calcium density.

  7. Profiling stem cell states in three-dimensional biomaterial niches using high content image informatics.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Anandika; Brenner, Matthew; Wolujewicz, Paul; Zhang, Zheng; Mao, Yong; Batish, Mona; Kohn, Joachim; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2016-11-01

    A predictive framework for the evolution of stem cell biology in 3-D is currently lacking. In this study we propose deep image informatics of the nuclear biology of stem cells to elucidate how 3-D biomaterials steer stem cell lineage phenotypes. The approach is based on high content imaging informatics to capture minute variations in the 3-D spatial organization of splicing factor SC-35 in the nucleoplasm as a marker to classify emergent cell phenotypes of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were cultured in varied 3-D culture systems including hydrogels, electrospun mats and salt leached scaffolds. The approach encompasses high resolution 3-D imaging of SC-35 domains and high content image analysis (HCIA) to compute quantitative 3-D nuclear metrics for SC-35 organization in single cells in concert with machine learning approaches to construct a predictive cell-state classification model. Our findings indicate that hMSCs cultured in collagen hydrogels and induced to differentiate into osteogenic or adipogenic lineages could be classified into the three lineages (stem, adipogenic, osteogenic) with ⩾80% precision and sensitivity, within 72h. Using this framework, the augmentation of osteogenesis by scaffold design exerted by porogen leached scaffolds was also profiled within 72h with ∼80% high sensitivity. Furthermore, by employing 3-D SC-35 organizational metrics, differential osteogenesis induced by novel electrospun fibrous polymer mats incorporating decellularized matrix could also be elucidated and predictably modeled at just 3days with high precision. We demonstrate that 3-D SC-35 organizational metrics can be applied to model the stem cell state in 3-D scaffolds. We propose that this methodology can robustly discern minute changes in stem cell states within complex 3-D architectures and map single cell biological readouts that are critical to assessing population level cell heterogeneity.

  8. Biomedical image analysis using Markov random fields & efficient linear programing.

    PubMed

    Komodakis, Nikos; Besbes, Ahmed; Glocker, Ben; Paragios, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis through biomedical image analysis is increasingly considered in health sciences. This is due to the progress made on the acquisition side, as well as on the processing one. In vivo visualization of human tissues where one can determine both anatomical and functional information is now possible. The use of these images with efficient intelligent mathematical and processing tools allows the interpretation of the tissues state and facilitates the task of the physicians. Segmentation and registration are the two most fundamental tools in bioimaging. The first aims to provide automatic tools for organ delineation from images, while the second focuses on establishing correspondences between observations inter and intra subject and modalities. In this paper, we present some recent results towards a common formulation addressing these problems, called the Markov Random Fields. Such an approach is modular with respect to the application context, can be easily extended to deal with various modalities, provides guarantees on the optimality properties of the obtained solution and is computationally efficient.

  9. Imaging state-to-state reactive scattering in the Ar+ + H2 charge transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelsen, Tim; Bastian, Björn; Carrascosa, Eduardo; Meyer, Jennifer; Parker, David H.; Wester, Roland

    2017-07-01

    The charge transfer reaction of Ar+ with H2 and D2 has been investigated in an experiment combining crossed beams with three-dimensional velocity map imaging. Angle-differential cross sections for two collision energies have been obtained for both neutral species. We find that the product ions are highly internally excited. In the reaction with H2, the spin-orbit excited Ar+ state's coupling to the "resonant" vibrationally excited product H2+ (υ = 2) dominates for both investigated energies, in line with previous investigations. The observed angular distributions, however, show significantly less back-scattering than was found previously. Furthermore, we discovered that the product ions are highly rotationally excited. In the case of Ar+ reacting with D2, the energetically closest lying vibrational levels are not strictly preferred and higher-lying vibrational levels are also populated. For both species, the backward-scattered products show higher internal excitation.

  10. SIMULTANEOUS DUAL-RADIONUCLIDE MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION IMAGING WITH A SOLID-STATE DEDICATED CARDIAC CAMERA

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Haim, S.; Kacperski, K.; Hain, S.; Van Gramberg, D.; Hutton, B.F.; Waddington, W.A.; Sharir, T.; Roth, N.; Berman, D.S.; Ell, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    We compared simultaneous dual-radionuclide stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with a novel solid-state cardiac camera and a conventional SPECT camera with separate stress and rest acquisitions. Methods 24 consecutive patients (64.5 ± 11.8 years, 16 men) were injected with 74 MBq of 201Tl (rest) and 250 MBq 99mTc-MIBI (stress). Conventional MPI acquisition times for stress and rest were 21 min and 16 min, respectively. A simultaneous dual-radionuclide (DR) 15 minute list mode gated acquisition was performed on D-SPECT (Spectrum-dynamics, Caesarea, Israel). The DR D-SPECT data were processed using a spillover and scatter correction method. We compared DR D-SPECT images with conventional SPECT images by visual analysis employing the 17-segment model and a 5-point scale (0=normal, 4=absent) to calculate the summed stress and rest scores (SSS and SRS, respectively) and the % visual perfusion defect (TPD) at stress and rest, by dividing the stress and rest scores, respectively, by 68 and multiplying by 100. TPD <5% was considered normal. Image quality was assessed on a 4-point scale (1=poor, 4=very good) and gut activity was assessed on a 4-point scale (0=none, 3=high). Results Conventional MPI was abnormal at stress in 17 patients and at rest in 9 patients. In the 17 abnormal stress studies DR D-SPECT MPI was abnormal in 113 vs. 93 abnormal segments by conventional MPI. In the nine abnormal rest studies DR D-SPECT was abnormal in 45 vs. 48 segments abnormal by conventional MPI. SSS, SRS, TPD stress and TPD rest on conventional SPECT and DR D-SPECT highly correlated (r=0.9790, 0.9694, 0.9784, 0.9710, respectively; p<0.0001 for all). In addition, 6 patients had significantly larger perfusion defects on DR D-SPECT stress images, including five of 11 patients who were imaged earlier on D-SPECT than conventional SPECT. Conclusion D-SPECT enables fast and high quality simultaneous DR MPI in a single imaging session with comparable diagnostic performance and

  11. Towards native-state imaging in biological context in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Anne E.; Armer, Hannah E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Modern cell biology is reliant on light and fluorescence microscopy for analysis of cells, tissues and protein localisation. However, these powerful techniques are ultimately limited in resolution by the wavelength of light. Electron microscopes offer much greater resolution due to the shorter effective wavelength of electrons, allowing direct imaging of sub-cellular architecture. The harsh environment of the electron microscope chamber and the properties of the electron beam have led to complex chemical and mechanical preparation techniques, which distance biological samples from their native state and complicate data interpretation. Here we describe recent advances in sample preparation and instrumentation, which push the boundaries of high-resolution imaging. Cryopreparation, cryoelectron microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy strive to image samples in near native state. Advances in correlative microscopy and markers enable high-resolution localisation of proteins. Innovation in microscope design has pushed the boundaries of resolution to atomic scale, whilst automatic acquisition of high-resolution electron microscopy data through large volumes is finally able to place ultrastructure in biological context. PMID:19916039

  12. Image acquisitions, processing and analysis in the process of obtaining characteristics of horse navicular bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaborowicz, M.; Włodarek, J.; Przybylak, A.; Przybył, K.; Wojcieszak, D.; Czekała, W.; Ludwiczak, A.; Boniecki, P.; Koszela, K.; Przybył, J.; Skwarcz, J.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was investigate the possibility of using methods of computer image analysis for the assessment and classification of morphological variability and the state of health of horse navicular bone. Assumption was that the classification based on information contained in the graphical form two-dimensional digital images of navicular bone and information of horse health. The first step in the research was define the classes of analyzed bones, and then using methods of computer image analysis for obtaining characteristics from these images. This characteristics were correlated with data concerning the animal, such as: side of hooves, number of navicular syndrome (scale 0-3), type, sex, age, weight, information about lace, information about heel. This paper shows the introduction to the study of use the neural image analysis in the diagnosis of navicular bone syndrome. Prepared method can provide an introduction to the study of non-invasive way to assess the condition of the horse navicular bone.

  13. Analysis of state of vehicular scars on Arctic Tundra, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathram, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Identification on ERTS images of severe vehicular scars in the northern Alaska tundra suggests that, if such scars are of an intensity or have spread to a dimension such that they can be resolved by ERTS sensors (20 meters), they can be identified and their state monitored by the use of ERTS images. Field review of the state of vehicular scars in the Umiat area indicates that all are revegetating at varying rates and are approaching a stable state.

  14. Analysis of the First NIF Neutron Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Vinyard, N. S.; Volegov, P. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; McKenty, P.

    2011-10-01

    Neutron imaging at the National Igntion Facility obtained its first images from both directly laser driven and X-radiation driven implosions. A directly driven DT filled glass microballoon gave an oblate image (P2/P0 = -45%) whose size (P0 = 70 μm) fit within the X-ray images. Simulations using the polar direct drive laser pointing give a round image of P0 ~95 μm. However as the electron flux limiter is reduced from 0.06 to 0.03 the image becomes oblate. The observed asymmetry can be reproduced by transferring ~10% of the energy from the outer laser beams to the inner. Radiation driven implosions of ignition capsules with 20%D, and 50%D produced ~ 30 μm radius oblate images in 12-15 MeV neutrons. Images in 10-12 MeV neutrons, which have experienced one scattering in the fuel and number ~ 4% of the primaries, showed larger images (~44-56 μm). Image sizes indicate the compression of the fuel and are consistent with observed 10-12/13-15MeV yield ratios. Work funded by the USDOE at LANL, LLNL, NSTEC and LLE.

  15. Analysis of Anechoic Chamber Testing of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenigstein, David; Ruf, Chris; James, Mark; Simmons, David; Miller, Timothy; Buckley, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer System (HIRAD) is a new airborne passive microwave remote sensor developed to observe hurricanes. HIRAD incorporates synthetic thinned array radiometry technology, which use Fourier synthesis to reconstruct images from an array of correlated antenna elements. The HIRAD system response to a point emitter has been measured in an anechoic chamber. With this data, a Fourier inversion image reconstruction algorithm has been developed. Performance analysis of the apparatus is presented, along with an overview of the image reconstruction algorithm

  16. Detection of pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle by fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Rerkpattanapipat, Pairoj; Mazur, Wojciech; Link, Kerry M; Clark, Hollins P; Hundley, W Gregory

    2003-01-01

    This report highlights the importance of interpretating images throughout the course of a dobutamine MRI stress test. Upon review of the baseline images, the left ventricular (LV) endocardium was not well seen due to flow artifacts associated with low intracavitary blood-flow velocity resulting from a prior myocardial infarction. Physicians implemented a cine fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) technique that was not subject to low flow artifact within the LV cavity. With heightened image clarity, physicians unexpectedly identified a LV pseudoaneurysm.

  17. Feasibility test of a solid state spin-scan photo-imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverty, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using a solid-state photo-imaging system to obtain resolution imagery from a Pioneer-type spinning spacecraft in future exploratory missions to the outer planets is discussed. Evaluation of the photo-imaging system performance, based on electrical video signal analysis recorded on magnetic tape, shows that the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios obtained at low spatial frequencies exceed the anticipated performance and that measured modulation transfer functions exhibited some degradation in comparison with the estimated values, primarily owing to the difficulty in obtaining a precise focus of the optical system in the laboratory with the test patterns in close proximity to the objective lens. A preliminary flight model design of the photo-imaging system is developed based on the use of currently available phototransistor arrays. Image quality estimates that will be obtained are presented in terms of S/N ratios and spatial resolution for the various planets and satellites. Parametric design tradeoffs are also defined.

  18. Evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Vanessa Cristina Felippe Lopes; Seta, Marismary Horsth De; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares; Delamarque, Elizabete Vianna; de Azevedo, Ana Cecília Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro on the basis of parameters measured and analyzed during health surveillance inspections in the period from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods Descriptive study analyzing parameters connected with imaging quality of 52 mammography apparatuses inspected at least twice with a one-year interval. Results Amongst the 16 analyzed parameters, 7 presented more than 70% of conformity, namely: compression paddle pressure intensity (85.1%), films development (72.7%), film response (72.7%), low contrast fine detail (92.2%), tumor mass visualization (76.5%), absence of image artifacts (94.1%), mammography-specific developers availability (88.2%). On the other hand, relevant parameters were below 50% conformity, namely: monthly image quality control testing (28.8%) and high contrast details with respect to microcalcifications visualization (47.1%). Conclusion The analysis revealed critical situations in terms of compliance with the health surveillance standards. Priority should be given to those mammography apparatuses that remained non-compliant at the second inspection performed within the one-year interval. PMID:25987749

  19. A cerebellar window for intravital imaging of normal and disease states in mice.

    PubMed

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Badeaux, Mark; Roberge, Sylvie; Batista, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Ned; Snuderl, Matija; Amoozgar, Zohreh; Seano, Giorgio; Ferraro, Gino B; Chatterjee, Sampurna; Xu, Lei; Fukumura, Dai; Duda, Dan G; Jain, Rakesh K

    2017-11-01

    The cerebellum is a prominent part of the vertebrate hindbrain that is critically involved in the regulation of important body functions such as movement coordination, maintenance of balance and posture, and motor control. Here, we describe a cerebellar window that provides access to the mouse cerebellum for intravital imaging, thereby allowing for a detailed characterization of the dynamic processes in this region of the brain. First, the skull overlying the cerebellum is removed, and then the window is applied to the region of interest. Windows may be exchanged depending on the desired imaging modality. This technique has a variety of applications. In the setting of medulloblastoma, spontaneous or orthotopically implanted lesions can be imaged, and tumor morphology and size can be monitored using ultrasonography. Multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPLSM) or optical-frequency-domain imaging (OFDI) can be applied for in vivo visualization and analysis of cellular and vascular structures in a variety of disease states, including malignancies and ataxia telangiectasia. This protocol describes a novel and rapid method for cerebellar window construction that can be set up in under an hour.

  20. Resting-state functional MR imaging: a new window to the brain.

    PubMed

    Barkhof, Frederik; Haller, Sven; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2014-07-01

    Resting-state (RS) functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging constitutes a novel paradigm that examines spontaneous brain function by using blood oxygen level-dependent contrast in the absence of a task. Spatially distributed networks of temporal synchronization can be detected that can characterize RS networks (RSNs). With a short acquisition time of less than 10 minutes, RS functional MR imaging can be applied in special populations such as children and patients with dementia. Some RSNs are already present in utero, while others mature in childhood. Around 10 major RSNs are consistently found in adults, but their exact spatial extent and strength of coherence are affected by physiologic parameters and drugs. Though the acquisition and analysis methods are still evolving, new disease insights are emerging in a variety of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The default mode network is affected in Alzheimer disease and various other diseases of cognitive impairment. Alterations in RSNs have been identified in many diseases, in the absence of evident structural modifications, indicating a high sensitivity of the method. Moreover, there is evidence of correlation between RSN alterations and disease progression and severity. However, different diseases often affect the same RSN, illustrating the limited specificity of the findings. This suggests that neurologic and psychiatric diseases are characterized by altered interactions between RSNs and therefore the whole brain should be examined as an integral network (with subnetworks), for example, using graph analysis. A challenge for clinical applications of RS functional MR imaging is the potentially confounding effect of aging, concomitant vascular diseases, or medication on the neurovascular coupling and consequently the functional MR imaging response. Current investigation combines RS functional MR imaging and other methods such as electroencephalography or magnetoencephalography to better understand the vascular

  1. Time-resolved principal component imaging analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence induction for monitoring leaf water stress.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Hikaru; Tsuchikawa, Satoru

    2013-06-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence induction is widely applied to investigate plant growth conditions by calculating the ratio of its intensity at oxidized and reduced states. We examined the applicability of a time-resolved profile of chlorophyll fluorescence induction with the aid of multivariate analysis to monitor the leaf water stress. Principal component (PC) analysis of time-resolved images of chlorophyll fluorescence induction and their score images were reconstructed. Control leaves (non-stressed leaves) and water-stressed leaves could be classified by normalized PC3 score images. This technique has the potential to monitor the water stress condition of plants by using a simple device.

  2. Antenna trajectory error analysis in backprojection-based SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Yazıcı, Birsen; Yanik, H. Cagri

    2014-06-01

    We present an analysis of the positioning errors in Backprojection (BP)-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images due to antenna trajectory errors for a monostatic SAR traversing a straight linear trajectory. Our analysis is developed using microlocal analysis, which can provide an explicit quantitative relationship between the trajectory error and the positioning error in BP-based SAR images. The analysis is applicable to arbitrary trajectory errors in the antenna and can be extended to arbitrary imaging geometries. We present numerical simulations to demonstrate our analysis.

  3. Image analysis of neuropsychological test responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen L.; Hiller, Darren L.

    1996-04-01

    This paper reports recent advances in the development of an automated approach to neuropsychological testing. High performance image analysis algorithms have been developed as part of a convenient and non-invasive computer-based system to provide an objective assessment of patient responses to figure-copying tests. Tests of this type are important in determining the neurological function of patients following stroke through evaluation of their visuo-spatial performance. Many conventional neuropsychological tests suffer from the serious drawback that subjective judgement on the part of the tester is required in the measurement of the patient's response which leads to a qualitative neuropsychological assessment that can be both inconsistent and inaccurate. Results for this automated approach are presented for three clinical populations: patients suffering right hemisphere stroke are compared with adults with no known neurological disorder and a population comprising normal school children of 11 years is presented to demonstrate the sensitivity of the technique. As well as providing a more reliable and consistent diagnosis this technique is sufficiently sensitive to monitor a patient's progress over a period of time and will provide the neuropsychologist with a practical means of evaluating the effectiveness of therapy or medication administered as part of a rehabilitation program.

  4. Slide Set: Reproducible image analysis and batch processing with ImageJ.

    PubMed

    Nanes, Benjamin A

    2015-11-01

    Most imaging studies in the biological sciences rely on analyses that are relatively simple. However, manual repetition of analysis tasks across multiple regions in many images can complicate even the simplest analysis, making record keeping difficult, increasing the potential for error, and limiting reproducibility. While fully automated solutions are necessary for very large data sets, they are sometimes impractical for the small- and medium-sized data sets common in biology. Here we present the Slide Set plugin for ImageJ, which provides a framework for reproducible image analysis and batch processing. Slide Set organizes data into tables, associating image files with regions of interest and other relevant information. Analysis commands are automatically repeated over each image in the data set, and multiple commands can be chained together for more complex analysis tasks. All analysis parameters are saved, ensuring transparency and reproducibility. Slide Set includes a variety of built-in analysis commands and can be easily extended to automate other ImageJ plugins, reducing the manual repetition of image analysis without the set-up effort or programming expertise required for a fully automated solution.

  5. Slide Set: reproducible image analysis and batch processing with ImageJ

    PubMed Central

    Nanes, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Most imaging studies in the biological sciences rely on analyses that are relatively simple. However, manual repetition of analysis tasks across multiple regions in many images can complicate even the simplest analysis, making record keeping difficult, increasing the potential for error, and limiting reproducibility. While fully automated solutions are necessary for very large data sets, they are sometimes impractical for the small- and medium-sized data sets that are common in biology. This paper introduces Slide Set, a framework for reproducible image analysis and batch processing with ImageJ. Slide Set organizes data into tables, associating image files with regions of interest and other relevant information. Analysis commands are automatically repeated over each image in the data set, and multiple commands can be chained together for more complex analysis tasks. All analysis parameters are saved, ensuring transparency and reproducibility. Slide Set includes a variety of built-in analysis commands and can be easily extended to automate other ImageJ plugins, reducing the manual repetition of image analysis without the set-up effort or programming expertise required for a fully automated solution. PMID:26554504

  6. Hierarchical manifold learning for regional image analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Kanwal K; Rao, Anil; Price, Anthony N; Wolz, Robin; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rueckert, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel method of hierarchical manifold learning which aims to automatically discover regional properties of image datasets. While traditional manifold learning methods have become widely used for dimensionality reduction in medical imaging, they suffer from only being able to consider whole images as single data points. We extend conventional techniques by additionally examining local variations, in order to produce spatially-varying manifold embeddings that characterize a given dataset. This involves constructing manifolds in a hierarchy of image patches of increasing granularity, while ensuring consistency between hierarchy levels. We demonstrate the utility of our method in two very different settings: 1) to learn the regional correlations in motion within a sequence of time-resolved MR images of the thoracic cavity; 2) to find discriminative regions of 3-D brain MR images associated with neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Image and Data-analysis Tools For Paleoclimatic Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, M.

    It comes here proposed a directory of instruments and computer science resources chosen in order to resolve the problematic ones that regard the paleoclimatic recon- structions. They will come discussed in particular the following points: 1) Numerical analysis of paleo-data (fossils abundances, species analyses, isotopic signals, chemical-physical parameters, biological data): a) statistical analyses (uni- variate, diversity, rarefaction, correlation, ANOVA, F and T tests, Chi^2) b) multidi- mensional analyses (principal components, corrispondence, cluster analysis, seriation, discriminant, autocorrelation, spectral analysis) neural analyses (backpropagation net, kohonen feature map, hopfield net genetic algorithms) 2) Graphical analysis (visu- alization tools) of paleo-data (quantitative and qualitative fossils abundances, species analyses, isotopic signals, chemical-physical parameters): a) 2-D data analyses (graph, histogram, ternary, survivorship) b) 3-D data analyses (direct volume rendering, iso- surfaces, segmentation, surface reconstruction, surface simplification,generation of tetrahedral grids). 3) Quantitative and qualitative digital image analysis (macro and microfossils image analysis, Scanning Electron Microscope. and Optical Polarized Microscope images capture and analysis, morphometric data analysis, 3-D reconstruc- tions): a) 2D image analysis (correction of image defects, enhancement of image de- tail, converting texture and directionality to grey scale or colour differences, visual enhancement using pseudo-colour, pseudo-3D, thresholding of image features, binary image processing, measurements, stereological measurements, measuring features on a white background) b) 3D image analysis (basic stereological procedures, two dimen- sional structures; area fraction from the point count, volume fraction from the point count, three dimensional structures: surface area and the line intercept count, three dimensional microstructures; line length and the

  8. Quantitation of vital bleaching by computer analysis of photographic images.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C; Leonard, R H; Nelson, C F; Bentley, S A

    1999-06-01

    The authors investigated the use of computer processing of photographic images to monitor changes in tooth brightness after nightguard vital bleaching, or NGVB. Photographs of shade guides and clinical cases (patients' teeth) were taken on 35-millimeter film with electronic flash illumination and processed commercially. A slide scanner was used to digitize images as red, green and blue, or RGB, files, with constant brightness, contrast and linearity settings; the images were then analyzed with commercial software. Relevant image components (that is, teeth or shade guide tabs) were separated, and histograms of various numerical color descriptors were generated for each image component. Analysis of shade tab images showed that the mean pixel intensity for the RGB blue channel, or MPIb, was the most satisfactory brightness descriptor, with clear sequential MPIb increments from lighter to darker shades in each series of colors (A through D) and close correlation with the manufacturer's brightness scale (r = .83). Mathematical analysis of MPIb data for shade tabs in the same image yielded a brightness index that was reproducible and correlated well with the manufacturer's brightness scale. Sequential measurements of this index in three subjects whose teeth were bleached with carbamide peroxide for 14 days correlated well with assessments made by visual shade guide comparisons. The authors conclude that computer analysis of digitized photographic images with internal color controls provides an index of tooth brightness that is reproducible from image to image. A brightness index derived from computer analysis of digitized photographic images may be useful for monitoring the effectiveness of NGVB.

  9. MEG Source Imaging Method using Fast L1 Minimum-norm and its Applications to Signals with Brain Noise and Human Resting-state Source Amplitude Images

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Huang, Charles W.; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, AnneMarie; Nichols, Sharon L.; Baker, Dewleen G.; Song, Tao; Harrington, Deborah L.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Heister, David; Diwakar, Mithun; Canive, Jose M.; Edgar, J. Christopher; Chen, Yu-Han; Ji, Zhengwei; Shen, Max; El-Gabalawy, Fady; Levy, Michael; McLay, Robert; Webb-Murphy, Jennifer; Liu, Thomas T.; Drake, Angela; Lee, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    The present study developed a fast MEG source imaging technique based on Fast Vector-based Spatio-Temporal Analysis using a L1-minimum-norm (Fast-VESTAL) and then used the method to obtain the source amplitude images of resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals for different frequency bands. The Fast-VESTAL technique consists of two steps. First, L1-minimum-norm MEG source images were obtained for the dominant spatial modes of sensor-waveform covariance matrix. Next, accurate source time-courses with millisecond temporal resolution were obtained using an inverse operator constructed from the spatial source images of Step 1. Using simulations, Fast-VESTAL’s performance of was assessed for its 1) ability to localize multiple correlated sources; 2) ability to faithfully recover source time-courses; 3) robustness to different SNR conditions including SNR with negative dB levels; 4) capability to handle correlated brain noise; and 5) statistical maps of MEG source images. An objective pre-whitening method was also developed and integrated with Fast-VESTAL to remove correlated brain noise. Fast-VESTAL’s performance was then examined in the analysis of human mediannerve MEG responses. The results demonstrated that this method easily distinguished sources in the entire somatosensory network. Next, Fast-VESTAL was applied to obtain the first whole-head MEG source-amplitude images from resting-state signals in 41 healthy control subjects, for all standard frequency bands. Comparisons between resting-state MEG sources images and known neurophysiology were provided. Additionally, in simulations and cases with MEG human responses, the results obtained from using conventional beamformer technique were compared with those from Fast-VESTAL, which highlighted the beamformer’s problems of signal leaking and distorted source time-courses. PMID:24055704

  10. Global pattern analysis and classification of dermoscopic images using textons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Maryam; Lee, Tim K.; McLean, David; Lui, Harvey; Atkins, M. Stella

    2012-02-01

    Detecting and classifying global dermoscopic patterns are crucial steps for detecting melanocytic lesions from non-melanocytic ones. An important stage of melanoma diagnosis uses pattern analysis methods such as 7-point check list, Menzies method etc. In this paper, we present a novel approach to investigate texture analysis and classification of 5 classes of global lesion patterns (reticular, globular, cobblestone, homogeneous, and parallel pattern) in dermoscopic images. Our statistical approach models the texture by the joint probability distribution of filter responses using a comprehensive set of the state of the art filter banks. This distribution is represented by the frequency histogram of filter response cluster centers called textons. We have also examined other two methods: Joint Distribution of Intensities (JDI) and Convolutional Restricted Boltzmann Machine (CRBM) to learn the pattern specific features to be used for textons. The classification performance is compared over the Leung and Malik filters (LM), Root Filter Set (RFS), Maximum Response Filters (MR8), Schmid, Laws and our proposed filter set as well as CRBM and JDI. We analyzed 375 images of the 5 classes of the patterns. Our experiments show that the joint distribution of color (JDC) in the L*a*b* color space outperforms the other color spaces with a correct classification rate of 86.8%.

  11. Extending coherent state transforms to Clifford analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwin, William D.; Mourão, José; Nunes, João P.; Qian, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Segal-Bargmann coherent state transforms can be viewed as unitary maps from L2 spaces of functions (or sections of an appropriate line bundle) on a manifold X to spaces of square integrable holomorphic functions (or sections) on Xℂ. It is natural to consider higher dimensional extensions of X based on Clifford algebras as they could be useful in studying quantum systems with internal, discrete, degrees of freedom corresponding to nonzero spins. Notice that the extensions of X based on the Grassmann algebra appear naturally in the study of supersymmetric quantum mechanics. In Clifford analysis, the zero mass Dirac equation provides a natural generalization of the Cauchy-Riemann conditions of complex analysis and leads to monogenic functions. For the simplest but already quite interesting case of X = ℝ, we introduce two extensions of the Segal-Bargmann coherent state transform from L2(ℝ, dx) ⊗ ℝm to Hilbert spaces of slice monogenic and axial monogenic functions and study their properties. These two transforms are related by the dual Radon transform. Representation theoretic and quantum mechanical aspects of the new representations are studied.

  12. Quantification and description of fracture network by MRI image analysis.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, M; Nicula, S; Mattiello, D; Aliverti, E

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of fractures to total porosity and their geometrical descriptions have been studied by Image Analysis applied to 1H Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Reservoirs of different lithology were acquired with MSME 2D quantitative and 3D sequences. An image analysis procedure, developed ad hoc, was then applied to these acquisitions and the petrophysical parameters computed. These parameters range from fracture porosity to fracture density.

  13. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging: review of neurosurgical applications.

    PubMed

    Lang, Stefan; Duncan, Niall; Northoff, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Recent research in brain imaging has highlighted the role of different neural networks in the resting state (ie, no task) in which the brain displays spontaneous low-frequency neuronal oscillations. These can be indirectly measured with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, and functional connectivity can be inferred as the spatiotemporal correlations of this signal. This technique has proliferated in recent years and has allowed the noninvasive investigation of large-scale, distributed functional networks. In this review, we give a brief overview of resting-state networks and examine the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in neurosurgical contexts, specifically with respect to neurooncology, epilepsy surgery, and deep brain stimulation. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages compared with task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging, the limitations of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, and the emerging directions of this relatively new technology.

  14. Neural imaging to track mental states while using an intelligent tutoring system.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Betts, Shawn; Ferris, Jennifer L; Fincham, Jon M

    2010-04-13

    Hemodynamic measures of brain activity can be used to interpret a student's mental state when they are interacting with an intelligent tutoring system. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected while students worked with a tutoring system that taught an algebra isomorph. A cognitive model predicted the distribution of solution times from measures of problem complexity. Separately, a linear discriminant analysis used fMRI data to predict whether or not students were engaged in problem solving. A hidden Markov algorithm merged these two sources of information to predict the mental states of students during problem-solving episodes. The algorithm was trained on data from 1 day of interaction and tested with data from a later day. In terms of predicting what state a student was in during a 2-s period, the algorithm achieved 87% accuracy on the training data and 83% accuracy on the test data. The results illustrate the importance of integrating the bottom-up information from imaging data with the top-down information from a cognitive model.

  15. Holographic Interferometry and Image Analysis for Aerodynamic Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    tunnels, (2) development of automated image analysis techniques for reducing quantitative flow-field data from holographic interferograms, and (3...investigation and development of software for the application of digital image analysis to other photographic techniques used in wind tunnel testing.

  16. Online evaluation of a commercial video image analysis system (Computer Vision System) to predict beef carcass red meat yield and for augmenting the assignment of USDA yield grades. United States Department of Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Cannell, R C; Belk, K E; Tatum, J D; Wise, J W; Chapman, P L; Scanga, J A; Smith, G C

    2002-05-01

    Objective quantification of differences in wholesale cut yields of beef carcasses at plant chain speeds is important for the application of value-based marketing. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of a commercial video image analysis system, the Computer Vision System (CVS) to 1) predict commercially fabricated beef subprimal yield and 2) augment USDA yield grading, in order to improve accuracy of grade assessment. The CVS was evaluated as a fully installed production system, operating on a full-time basis at chain speeds. Steer and heifer carcasses (n = 296) were evaluated using CVS, as well as by USDA expert and online graders, before the fabrication of carcasses into industry-standard subprimal cuts. Expert yield grade (YG), online YG, CVS estimated carcass yield, and CVS measured ribeye area in conjunction with expert grader estimates of the remaining YG factors (adjusted fat thickness, percentage of kidney-pelvic-heart fat, hot carcass weight) accounted for 67, 39, 64, and 65% of the observed variation in fabricated yields of closely trimmed subprimals. The dual component CVS predicted wholesale cut yields more accurately than current online yield grading, and, in an augmentation system, CVS ribeye measurement replaced estimated ribeye area in determination of USDA yield grade, and the accuracy of cutability prediction was improved, under packing plant conditions and speeds, to a level close to that of expert graders applying grades at a comfortable rate of speed offline.

  17. Perceived calorie intake and state body-image satisfaction in women attempting weight loss: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Lattimore, Paul; Hutchinson, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    State body-image satisfaction levels (BIS) can be predicted by appearance concerns, eating attitudes and body mass index (BMI). Determinants of state BIS and its variability were examined in women attempting weight loss. Little is known about contextual cues that influence state BIS; therefore the effect of eating on BIS was examined. Forty-six females attending a commercial weight loss group completed measures of shape and weight concerns, appearance beliefs and dietary restraint, followed by completion of a diary that assessed state BIS, mood and perceived calorie intake immediately following evening meals. Regression analysis indicated that after controlling for mood, state BIS was associated with higher BMI and dietary restraint. Greater variability in state BIS was associated with greater variability in perceived calorie intake. This relationship was fully mediated by greater variability in mood. The findings imply that state BIS warrants investigation as a process that may influence weight loss management. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Computer-based image analysis in breast pathology.

    PubMed

    Gandomkar, Ziba; Brennan, Patrick C; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Whole slide imaging (WSI) has the potential to be utilized in telepathology, teleconsultation, quality assurance, clinical education, and digital image analysis to aid pathologists. In this paper, the potential added benefits of computer-assisted image analysis in breast pathology are reviewed and discussed. One of the major advantages of WSI systems is the possibility of doing computer-based image analysis on the digital slides. The purpose of computer-assisted analysis of breast virtual slides can be (i) segmentation of desired regions or objects such as diagnostically relevant areas, epithelial nuclei, lymphocyte cells, tubules, and mitotic figures, (ii) classification of breast slides based on breast cancer (BCa) grades, the invasive potential of tumors, or cancer subtypes, (iii) prognosis of BCa, or (iv) immunohistochemical quantification. While encouraging results have been achieved in this area, further progress is still required to make computer-based image analysis of breast virtual slides acceptable for clinical practice.

  19. Computer-based image analysis in breast pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gandomkar, Ziba; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Whole slide imaging (WSI) has the potential to be utilized in telepathology, teleconsultation, quality assurance, clinical education, and digital image analysis to aid pathologists. In this paper, the potential added benefits of computer-assisted image analysis in breast pathology are reviewed and discussed. One of the major advantages of WSI systems is the possibility of doing computer-based image analysis on the digital slides. The purpose of computer-assisted analysis of breast virtual slides can be (i) segmentation of desired regions or objects such as diagnostically relevant areas, epithelial nuclei, lymphocyte cells, tubules, and mitotic figures, (ii) classification of breast slides based on breast cancer (BCa) grades, the invasive potential of tumors, or cancer subtypes, (iii) prognosis of BCa, or (iv) immunohistochemical quantification. While encouraging results have been achieved in this area, further progress is still required to make computer-based image analysis of breast virtual slides acceptable for clinical practice. PMID:28066683

  20. The Current State and Path Forward For Enterprise Image Viewing: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Lannum, Louis M; Dennison, Donald K; Towbin, Alexander J

    2016-10-01

    Clinical specialties have widely varied needs for diagnostic image interpretation, and clinical image and video image consumption. Enterprise viewers are being deployed as part of electronic health record implementations to present the broad spectrum of clinical imaging and multimedia content created in routine medical practice today. This white paper will describe the enterprise viewer use cases, drivers of recent growth, technical considerations, functionality differences between enterprise and specialty viewers, and likely future states. This white paper is aimed at CMIOs and CIOs interested in optimizing the image-enablement of their electronic health record or those who may be struggling with the many clinical image viewers their enterprises may employ today.

  1. Low-cost image analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    The author has developed an Automatic Target Recognition system based on parallel processing using transputers. This approach gives a powerful, fast image processing system at relatively low cost. This system scans multi-sensor (e.g., several infrared bands) image data to find any identifiable target, such as physical object or a type of vegetation.

  2. Multimodal digital color imaging system for facial skin lesion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Youngwoo; Lee, Youn-Heum; Jung, Byungjo

    2008-02-01

    In dermatology, various digital imaging modalities have been used as an important tool to quantitatively evaluate the treatment effect of skin lesions. Cross-polarization color image was used to evaluate skin chromophores (melanin and hemoglobin) information and parallel-polarization image to evaluate skin texture information. In addition, UV-A induced fluorescent image has been widely used to evaluate various skin conditions such as sebum, keratosis, sun damages, and vitiligo. In order to maximize the evaluation efficacy of various skin lesions, it is necessary to integrate various imaging modalities into an imaging system. In this study, we propose a multimodal digital color imaging system, which provides four different digital color images of standard color image, parallel and cross-polarization color image, and UV-A induced fluorescent color image. Herein, we describe the imaging system and present the examples of image analysis. By analyzing the color information and morphological features of facial skin lesions, we are able to comparably and simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions. In conclusion, we are sure that the multimodal color imaging system can be utilized as an important assistant tool in dermatology.

  3. Chemical Imaging of Ambient Aerosol Particles: Observational Constraints on Mixing State Parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter A.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan

    2015-09-28

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy/near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on June 27th and 28th during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects (CARES) study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. Both microscopy imaging techniques showed more changes over these two days in the mixing state at the T0 site than at the T1 site. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a build-up of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this build-up. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations; the first was dominated by aged sea salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population), the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  4. Solid state proton imaging detected by quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Perlo, J; Casanova, F; Robert, H; Pusiol, D J

    2001-06-01

    A double resonance method for imaging of solid materials containing quadrupole nuclei via the coupled protons is reported. The technique uses a static field gradient to encode the position on the protons and the method of double resonance spin-echo to detect the occurrence of proton resonances by affecting the zero-field echo signal from the quadrupole system. The double resonance imaging method offers the advantages of higher spatial resolution and straightforward image reconstruction for powder samples compared with rotating-frame and Zeeman-perturbated nuclear quadrupole resonance encoding techniques. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. Analysis of Images from Experiments Investigating Fragmentation of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Hurricane, O

    2007-09-10

    Image processing techniques have been used extensively to identify objects of interest in image data and extract representative characteristics for these objects. However, this can be a challenge due to the presence of noise in the images and the variation across images in a dataset. When the number of images to be analyzed is large, the algorithms used must also be relatively insensitive to the choice of parameters and lend themselves to partial or full automation. This not only avoids manual analysis which can be time consuming and error-prone, but also makes the analysis reproducible, thus enabling comparisons between images which have been processed in an identical manner. In this paper, we describe our approach to extracting features for objects of interest in experimental images. Focusing on the specific problem of fragmentation of materials, we show how we can extract statistics for the fragments and the gaps between them.

  6. Dehazing method through polarimetric imaging and multi-scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lei; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liu, Fei; Wang, Lin

    2015-05-01

    An approach for haze removal utilizing polarimetric imaging and multi-scale analysis has been developed to solve one problem that haze weather weakens the interpretation of remote sensing because of the poor visibility and short detection distance of haze images. On the one hand, the polarization effects of the airlight and the object radiance in the imaging procedure has been considered. On the other hand, one fact that objects and haze possess different frequency distribution properties has been emphasized. So multi-scale analysis through wavelet transform has been employed to make it possible for low frequency components that haze presents and high frequency coefficients that image details or edges occupy are processed separately. According to the measure of the polarization feather by Stokes parameters, three linear polarized images (0°, 45°, and 90°) have been taken on haze weather, then the best polarized image min I and the worst one max I can be synthesized. Afterwards, those two polarized images contaminated by haze have been decomposed into different spatial layers with wavelet analysis, and the low frequency images have been processed via a polarization dehazing algorithm while high frequency components manipulated with a nonlinear transform. Then the ultimate haze-free image can be reconstructed by inverse wavelet reconstruction. Experimental results verify that the dehazing method proposed in this study can strongly promote image visibility and increase detection distance through haze for imaging warning and remote sensing systems.

  7. Object-based image analysis using multiscale connectivity.

    PubMed

    Braga-Neto, Ulisses; Goutsias, John

    2005-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for image analysis based on the notion of multiscale connectivity. We use the proposed approach to design several novel tools for object-based image representation and analysis which exploit the connectivity structure of images in a multiscale fashion. More specifically, we propose a nonlinear pyramidal image representation scheme, which decomposes an image at different scales by means of multiscale grain filters. These filters gradually remove connected components from an image that fail to satisfy a given criterion. We also use the concept of multiscale connectivity to design a hierarchical data partitioning tool. We employ this tool to construct another image representation scheme, based on the concept of component trees, which organizes partitions of an image in a hierarchical multiscale fashion. In addition, we propose a geometrically-oriented hierarchical clustering algorithm which generalizes the classical single-linkage algorithm. Finally, we propose two object-based multiscale image summaries, reminiscent of the well-known (morphological) pattern spectrum, which can be useful in image analysis and image understanding applications.

  8. Comparison of sonochemiluminescence images using image analysis techniques and identification of acoustic pressure fields via simulation.

    PubMed

    Tiong, T Joyce; Chandesa, Tissa; Yap, Yeow Hong

    2017-05-01

    One common method to determine the existence of cavitational activity in power ultrasonics systems is by capturing images of sonoluminescence (SL) or sonochemiluminescence (SCL) in a dark environment. Conventionally, the light emitted from SL or SCL was detected based on the number of photons. Though this method is effective, it could not identify the sonochemical zones of an ultrasonic systems. SL/SCL images, on the other hand, enable identification of 'active' sonochemical zones. However, these images often provide just qualitative data as the harvesting of light intensity data from the images is tedious and require high resolution images. In this work, we propose a new image analysis technique using pseudo-colouring images to quantify the SCL zones based on the intensities of the SCL images and followed by comparison of the active SCL zones with COMSOL simulated acoustic pressure zones.

  9. Analysis of cardiac interventricular septum motion in different respiratory states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Lennart; Feng, Li; Otazo, Ricardo; Hennemuth, Anja; Axel, Leon

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the left and right heart ventricles (LV and RV) depends on load and pressure conditions that are affected by cardiac contraction and respiration cycles. A novel MRI sequence, XD-GRASP, allows the acquisition of multi-dimensional, respiration-sorted and cardiac-synchronized free-breathing image data. In these data, effects of the cardiac and respiratory cycles on the LV/RV interaction can be observed independently. To enable the analysis of such data, we developed a semi-automatic exploration workflow. After tracking a cross-sectional line positioned over the heart, over all motion states, the septum and heart wall border locations are detected by analyzing the grey-value profile under the lines. These data are used to quantify septum motion, both in absolute units and as a fraction of the heart size, to compare values for different subjects. In addition to conventional visualization techniques, we used color maps for intuitive exploration of the variable values for this multi-dimensional data set. We acquired short-axis image data of nine healthy volunteers, to analyze the position and the motion of the interventricular septum in different breathing states and different cardiac cycle phases. The results indicate a consistent range of normal septum motion values, and also suggest that respiratory phase-dependent septum motion is greatest near end-diastolic phases. These new methods are a promising tool to assess LV/RV ventricle interaction and the effects of respiration on this interaction.

  10. A linear mixture analysis-based compression for hyperspectral image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    C. I. Chang; I. W. Ginsberg

    2000-06-30

    In this paper, the authors present a fully constrained least squares linear spectral mixture analysis-based compression technique for hyperspectral image analysis, particularly, target detection and classification. Unlike most compression techniques that directly deal with image gray levels, the proposed compression approach generates the abundance fractional images of potential targets present in an image scene and then encodes these fractional images so as to achieve data compression. Since the vital information used for image analysis is generally preserved and retained in the abundance fractional images, the loss of information may have very little impact on image analysis. In some occasions, it even improves analysis performance. Airborne visible infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data experiments demonstrate that it can effectively detect and classify targets while achieving very high compression ratios.

  11. Novel ultrafast tunable solid state lasers for real-world applications including medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Nicholas P.; Dainty, Christopher; Dowling, Keith; French, Paul M. W.; Hyde, Sam C. W.; Jones, Richard; Mellish, Richard; Sutherland, J. M.; Taylor, J. R.; Tong, Y. P.; Chai, Bruce H. T.; van den Poel, Carel J.; Valster, Adriaan

    1997-11-01

    This paper reviews ultrafast Kerr Lens Mode-locked solid- state lasers with particular emphasis on all-solid-state diode-pumped laser technology which has the potential to provide low-cost compact devices for ultrafast instrumentation, particularly for biomedical applications.We have demonstrated the use of ultrafast solid-state lasers for 3D imaging through turbid media using time-gated photorefractive holography, and for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

  12. Imaging of localized electronic states at a nonconducting surface by single-electron tunneling force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Ezra B; Zheng, Ning; Williams, Clayton C

    2006-11-01

    Localized electronic states near a nonconducting SiO(2) surface are imaged on a approximately 1 nm scale by single-electron tunneling between the states and a scanning probe tip. Each tunneling electron is detected by electrostatic force. The images represent the number of tunneling electrons at each spatial location. The spatial resolution of the single electron tunneling force microscope is determined by quantum mechanical tunneling, providing new atomic-scale access to electronic states in dielectric surfaces and nonconducting nanostructures.

  13. Coronary magnetic resonance imaging: current state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Evan; Botnar, René M; Yeon, Susan B; Manning, Warren J

    2005-09-01

    Over the past decade, coronary magnetic resonance imaging has been transformed from a scientific curiosity to a clinically useful imaging tool for patients with known or suspected anomalous coronary arteries or coronary artery aneurysms and for assessment of coronary artery bypass graft patency. Coronary magnetic resonance imaging also appears to be of clinical value for assessment of native vessel integrity in selected patients, especially those patients with suspected left main/multivessel disease. Among patients referred for X-ray angiography, a normal coronary magnetic resonance imaging strongly suggests the absence of severe multivessel disease. Technical and methodological advances in motion suppression, along with increasing clinical experience will no doubt facilitate improved visualization of the distal and branch vessel.

  14. Imaging of Brown Adipose Tissue: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Srihari C.; Sampath, Srinath C.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Cypess, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    The rates of diabetes, obesity, and metabolic disease have reached epidemic proportions worldwide. In recent years there has been renewed interest in combating these diseases not only by modifying energy intake and lifestyle factors, but also by inducing endogenous energy expenditure. This approach has largely been stimulated by the recent recognition that brown adipose tissue (BAT)—long known to promote heat production and energy expenditure in infants and hibernating mammals—also exists in adult humans. This landmark finding relied on the use of clinical fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, and imaging techniques continue to play a crucial and increasingly central role in understanding BAT physiology and function. Herein, the authors review the origins of BAT imaging, discuss current preclinical and clinical strategies for imaging BAT, and discuss imaging methods that will provide crucial insight into metabolic disease and how it may be treated by modulating BAT activity. © RSNA, 2016 PMID:27322970

  15. Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Language Preoperative Planning

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Paulo; Seixas, Daniela; Deprez, Sabine; Kovacs, Silvia; Peeters, Ronald; Castro, São L.; Sunaert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a well-known non-invasive technique for the study of brain function. One of its most common clinical applications is preoperative language mapping, essential for the preservation of function in neurosurgical patients. Typically, fMRI is used to track task-related activity, but poor task performance and movement artifacts can be critical limitations in clinical settings. Recent advances in resting-state protocols open new possibilities for pre-surgical mapping of language potentially overcoming these limitations. To test the feasibility of using resting-state fMRI instead of conventional active task-based protocols, we compared results from fifteen patients with brain lesions while performing a verb-to-noun generation task and while at rest. Task-activity was measured using a general linear model analysis and independent component analysis (ICA). Resting-state networks were extracted using ICA and further classified in two ways: manually by an expert and by using an automated template matching procedure. The results revealed that the automated classification procedure correctly identified language networks as compared to the expert manual classification. We found a good overlay between task-related activity and resting-state language maps, particularly within the language regions of interest. Furthermore, resting-state language maps were as sensitive as task-related maps, and had higher specificity. Our findings suggest that resting-state protocols may be suitable to map language networks in a quick and clinically efficient way. PMID:26869899

  16. REST: a toolkit for resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data processing.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Wei; Dong, Zhang-Ye; Long, Xiang-Yu; Li, Su-Fang; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Zhu, Chao-Zhe; He, Yong; Yan, Chao-Gan; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) has been drawing more and more attention in recent years. However, a publicly available, systematically integrated and easy-to-use tool for RS-fMRI data processing is still lacking. We developed a toolkit for the analysis of RS-fMRI data, namely the RESting-state fMRI data analysis Toolkit (REST). REST was developed in MATLAB with graphical user interface (GUI). After data preprocessing with SPM or AFNI, a few analytic methods can be performed in REST, including functional connectivity analysis based on linear correlation, regional homogeneity, amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF), and fractional ALFF. A few additional functions were implemented in REST, including a DICOM sorter, linear trend removal, bandpass filtering, time course extraction, regression of covariates, image calculator, statistical analysis, and slice viewer (for result visualization, multiple comparison correction, etc.). REST is an open-source package and is freely available at http://www.restfmri.net.

  17. Whole-slide imaging and automated image analysis: considerations and opportunities in the practice of pathology.

    PubMed

    Webster, J D; Dunstan, R W

    2014-01-01

    Digital pathology, the practice of pathology using digitized images of pathologic specimens, has been transformed in recent years by the development of whole-slide imaging systems, which allow for the evaluation and interpretation of digital images of entire histologic sections. Applications of whole-slide imaging include rapid transmission of pathologic data for consultations and collaborations, standardization and distribution of pathologic materials for education, tissue specimen archiving, and image analysis of histologic specimens. Histologic image analysis allows for the acquisition of objective measurements of histomorphologic, histochemical, and immunohistochemical properties of tissue sections, increasing both the quantity and quality of data obtained from histologic assessments. Currently, numerous histologic image analysis software solutions are commercially available. Choosing the appropriate solution is dependent on considerations of the investigative question, computer programming and image analysis expertise, and cost. However, all studies using histologic image analysis require careful consideration of preanalytical variables, such as tissue collection, fixation, and processing, and experimental design, including sample selection, controls, reference standards, and the variables being measured. The fields of digital pathology and histologic image analysis are continuing to evolve, and their potential impact on pathology is still growing. These methodologies will increasingly transform the practice of pathology, allowing it to mature toward a quantitative science. However, this maturation requires pathologists to be at the forefront of the process, ensuring their appropriate application and the validity of their results. Therefore, histologic image analysis and the field of pathology should co-evolve, creating a symbiotic relationship that results in high-quality reproducible, objective data.

  18. Image analysis of vocal fold histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Lou; Garrett, C. Gaelyn

    2001-05-01

    To visualize the concentration gradients of collagen, elastin and ground substance in histologic sections of vocal folds, an image enhancement scheme was devised. Slides stained with Movat's solution were viewed on a light microscope. The image was digitally photographed. Using commercially available software, all pixels within a color range are selected from the mucosa presented on the image. Using the Movat's pentachrome stain, yellow to yellow-brown pixels represented mature collagen, blue to blue-green pixels represented young collagen (collagen that is not fully cross-linked) and black to dark violet pixels represented elastin. From each of the color range selections, a black and white image was created. The pixels not within the color range were black. The selected pixels within the color range were white. The image was averaged and smoothed to produce 256 levels of gray with less spatial resolution. This new grey-scale image showed the concentration gradient. These images were further enhanced with contour lines surrounding equivalent levels of gray. This technique is helpful to compare the micro-anatomy of the vocal folds. For instance, we find large concentration of the collagen deep in the mucosa and adjacent to the vocalis muscle.

  19. Machine Learning Algorithms Implemented in Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Renner, L.; Neuringer, M.; Cornea, A.

    2014-01-01

    A typical core facility is faced with a wide variety of experimental paradigms, samples, and images to be analyzed. They typically have one thing in common: a need to segment features of interest from the rest of the image. In many cases, for example fluorescence images with good contrast and signal to noise, intensity segmentation may be successful. Often, however, images may not be acquired in optimum conditions, or features of interest are not distinguished by intensity alone. Examples we encountered are: retina fundus photographs, histological stains, DAB immunohistochemistry, etc. We used machine learning algorithms as implemented in FIJI to isolate specific features in longitudinal retinal photographs of non-human primates. Images acquired over several years with different technologies, cameras and skills were analyzed to evaluate small changes with precision. The protocol used includes: Scale-Invariant feature Transform (SIFT) registration, Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) and Weka training. Variance of results for different images of the same time point and for different raters of the same images was less than 10% in most cases.

  20. An image analysis system for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence lymph imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingdan; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Xiang, Xiaoyan; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of lymphatic function is crucial for understanding the lymphatic system and diagnosing the associated diseases. Recently, a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging system is developed for real-time imaging lymphatic propulsion by intradermal injection of microdose of a NIR fluorophore distal to the lymphatics of interest. However, the previous analysis software3, 4 is underdeveloped, requiring extensive time and effort to analyze a NIR image sequence. In this paper, we develop a number of image processing techniques to automate the data analysis workflow, including an object tracking algorithm to stabilize the subject and remove the motion artifacts, an image representation named flow map to characterize lymphatic flow more reliably, and an automatic algorithm to compute lymph velocity and frequency of propulsion. By integrating all these techniques to a system, the analysis workflow significantly reduces the amount of required user interaction and improves the reliability of the measurement.

  1. Digital imaging techniques in experimental stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. H.; Ranson, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    Digital imaging techniques are utilized as a measure of surface displacement components in laser speckle metrology. An image scanner which is interfaced to a computer records and stores in memory the laser speckle patterns of an object in a reference and deformed configuration. Subsets of the deformed images are numerically correlated with the references as a measure of surface displacements. Discrete values are determined around a closed contour for plane problems which then become input into a boundary integral equation method in order to calculate surface traction in the contour. Stresses are then calculated within this boundary. The solution procedure is illustrated by a numerical example of a case of uniform tension.

  2. MR brain image analysis in dementia: From quantitative imaging biomarkers to ageing brain models and imaging genetics.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Wiro J

    2016-10-01

    MR brain image analysis has constantly been a hot topic research area in medical image analysis over the past two decades. In this article, it is discussed how the field developed from the construction of tools for automatic quantification of brain morphology, function, connectivity and pathology, to creating models of the ageing brain in normal ageing and disease, and tools for integrated analysis of imaging and genetic data. The current and future role of the field in improved understanding of the development of neurodegenerative disease is discussed, and its potential for aiding in early and differential diagnosis and prognosis of different types of dementia. For the latter, the use of reference imaging data and reference models derived from large clinical and population imaging studies, and the application of machine learning techniques on these reference data, are expected to play a key role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  4. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Avi C.; Campbell, Malachy T.; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R.; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  5. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Trajectory analysis for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Knopp, T; Biederer, S; Sattel, T; Weizenecker, J; Gleich, B; Borgert, J; Buzug, T M

    2009-01-21

    Recently a new imaging technique called magnetic particle imaging was proposed. The method uses the nonlinear response of magnetic nanoparticles when a time varying magnetic field is applied. Spatial encoding is achieved by moving a field-free point through an object of interest while the field strength in the vicinity of the point is high. A resolution in the submillimeter range is provided even for fast data acquisition sequences. In this paper, a simulation study is performed on different trajectories moving the field-free point through the field of view. The purpose is to provide mandatory information for the design of a magnetic particle imaging scanner. Trajectories are compared with respect to density, speed and image quality when applied in data acquisition. Since simulation of the involved physics is a time demanding task, moreover, an efficient implementation is presented utilizing caching techniques.

  7. Introducing PLIA: Planetary Laboratory for Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, J.; Hueso, R.; Barrado, N.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    We present a graphical software tool developed under IDL software to navigate, process and analyze planetary images. The software has a complete Graphical User Interface and is cross-platform. It can also run under the IDL Virtual Machine without the need to own an IDL license. The set of tools included allow image navigation (orientation, centring and automatic limb determination), dynamical and photometric atmospheric measurements (winds and cloud albedos), cylindrical and polar projections, as well as image treatment under several procedures. Being written in IDL, it is modular and easy to modify and grow for adding new capabilities. We show several examples of the software capabilities with Galileo-Venus observations: Image navigation, photometrical corrections, wind profiles obtained by cloud tracking, cylindrical projections and cloud photometric measurements. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  8. Autonomous image data reduction by analysis and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi; Ritter, Niles

    1988-01-01

    Image data is a critical component of the scientific information acquired by space missions. Compression of image data is required due to the limited bandwidth of the data transmission channel and limited memory space on the acquisition vehicle. This need becomes more pressing when dealing with multispectral data where each pixel may comprise 300 or more bytes. An autonomous, real time, on-board image analysis system for an exploratory vehicle such as a Mars Rover is developed. The completed system will be capable of interpreting image data to produce reduced representations of the image, and of making decisions regarding the importance of data based on current scientific goals. Data from multiple sources, including stereo images, color images, and multispectral data, are fused into single image representations. Analysis techniques emphasize artificial neural networks. Clusters are described by their outlines and class values. These analysis and compression techniques are coupled with decision making capacity for determining importance of each image region. Areas determined to be noise or uninteresting can be discarded in favor of more important areas. Thus limited resources for data storage and transmission are allocated to the most significant images.

  9. 5-ALA induced fluorescent image analysis of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong-Jin; Bae, Youngwoo; Choi, Eung-Ho; Jung, Byungjo

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we quantitatively analyzed 5-ALA induced fluorescent images of actinic keratosis using digital fluorescent color and hyperspectral imaging modalities. UV-A was utilized to induce fluorescent images and actinic keratosis (AK) lesions were demarcated from surrounding the normal region with different methods. Eight subjects with AK lesion were participated in this study. In the hyperspectral imaging modality, spectral analysis method was utilized for hyperspectral cube image and AK lesions were demarcated from the normal region. Before image acquisition, we designated biopsy position for histopathology of AK lesion and surrounding normal region. Erythema index (E.I.) values on both regions were calculated from the spectral cube data. Image analysis of subjects resulted in two different groups: the first group with the higher fluorescence signal and E.I. on AK lesion than the normal region; the second group with lower fluorescence signal and without big difference in E.I. between two regions. In fluorescent color image analysis of facial AK, E.I. images were calculated on both normal and AK lesions and compared with the results of hyperspectral imaging modality. The results might indicate that the different intensity of fluorescence and E.I. among the subjects with AK might be interpreted as different phases of morphological and metabolic changes of AK lesions.

  10. Autonomous image data reduction by analysis and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi; Ritter, Niles

    Image data is a critical component of the scientific information acquired by space missions. Compression of image data is required due to the limited bandwidth of the data transmission channel and limited memory space on the acquisition vehicle. This need becomes more pressing when dealing with multispectral data where each pixel may comprise 300 or more bytes. An autonomous, real time, on-board image analysis system for an exploratory vehicle such as a Mars Rover is developed. The completed system will be capable of interpreting image data to produce reduced representations of the image, and of making decisions regarding the importance of data based on current scientific goals. Data from multiple sources, including stereo images, color images, and multispectral data, are fused into single image representations. Analysis techniques emphasize artificial neural networks. Clusters are described by their outlines and class values. These analysis and compression techniques are coupled with decision-making capacity for determining importance of each image region. Areas determined to be noise or uninteresting can be discarded in favor of more important areas. Thus limited resources for data storage and transmission are allocated to the most significant images.

  11. Radar images analysis for scattering surfaces characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Enrico

    1998-10-01

    According to the different problems and techniques related to the detection and recognition of airplanes and vehicles moving on the Airport surface, the present work mainly deals with the processing of images gathered by a high-resolution radar sensor. The radar images used to test the investigated algorithms are relative to sequence of images obtained in some field experiments carried out by the Electronic Engineering Department of the University of Florence. The radar is the Ka band radar operating in the'Leonardo da Vinci' Airport in Fiumicino (Rome). The images obtained from the radar scan converter are digitized and putted in x, y, (pixel) co- ordinates. For a correct matching of the images, these are corrected in true geometrical co-ordinates (meters) on the basis of fixed points on an airport map. Correlating the airplane 2-D multipoint template with actual radar images, the value of the signal in the points involved in the template can be extracted. Results for a lot of observation show a typical response for the main section of the fuselage and the wings. For the fuselage, the back-scattered echo is low at the prow, became larger near the center on the aircraft and than it decrease again toward the tail. For the wings the signal is growing with a pretty regular slope from the fuselage to the tips, where the signal is the strongest.

  12. Applications of Aptamers in Targeted Imaging: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Casey A.; Cai, Weibo; Hong, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides with high affinity and specificity to the target molecules or cells, thus they can serve as an important category of molecular targeting ligand. Since their discove1y, aptamers have been rapidly translated into clinical practice. The strong target affinity/selectivity, cost-effectivity, chemical versatility and safety of aptamers are superior to traditional peptides- or proteins-based ligands which make them unique choices for molecular imaging. Therefore, aptamers are considered to be extremely useful to guide various imaging contrast agents to the target tissues or cells for optical, magnetic resonance, nuclear, computed tomography, ultra sound and multimodality imaging. This review aims to provide an overview of aptamers' advantages as targeting ligands and their application in targeted imaging. Further research in synthesis of new types of aptamers and their conjugation with new categories of contrast agents is required to develop clinically translatable aptamer-based imaging agents which will eventually result in improved patient care. PMID:25866268

  13. Comparing methods for analysis of biomedical hyperspectral image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Sweat, Brenner; Abbott, Caitlyn; Favreau, Peter F.; Annamdevula, Naga S.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past 2 decades, hyperspectral imaging technologies have been adapted to address the need for molecule-specific identification in the biomedical imaging field. Applications have ranged from single-cell microscopy to whole-animal in vivo imaging and from basic research to clinical systems. Enabling this growth has been the availability of faster, more effective hyperspectral filtering technologies and more sensitive detectors. Hence, the potential for growth of biomedical hyperspectral imaging is high, and many hyperspectral imaging options are already commercially available. However, despite the growth in hyperspectral technologies for biomedical imaging, little work has been done to aid users of hyperspectral imaging instruments in selecting appropriate analysis algorithms. Here, we present an approach for comparing the effectiveness of spectral analysis algorithms by combining experimental image data with a theoretical "what if" scenario. This approach allows us to quantify several key outcomes that characterize a hyperspectral imaging study: linearity of sensitivity, positive detection cut-off slope, dynamic range, and false positive events. We present results of using this approach for comparing the effectiveness of several common spectral analysis algorithms for detecting weak fluorescent protein emission in the midst of strong tissue autofluorescence. Results indicate that this approach should be applicable to a very wide range of applications, allowing a quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of the combined biology, hardware, and computational analysis for detecting a specific molecular signature.

  14. Identifying radiotherapy target volumes in brain cancer by image analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Feng, Yang; Steel, Robin; Liao, Hanqing; McLaren, Duncan B; Erridge, Sara C; McLaughlin, Stephen; Nailon, William H

    2015-10-01

    To establish the optimal radiotherapy fields for treating brain cancer patients, the tumour volume is often outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images, where the tumour is clearly visible, and mapped onto computerised tomography images used for radiotherapy planning. This process requires considerable clinical experience and is time consuming, which will continue to increase as more complex image sequences are used in this process. Here, the potential of image analysis techniques for automatically identifying the radiation target volume on MR images, and thereby assisting clinicians with this difficult task, was investigated. A gradient-based level set approach was applied on the MR images of five patients with grades II, III and IV malignant cerebral glioma. The relationship between the target volumes produced by image analysis and those produced by a radiation oncologist was also investigated. The contours produced by image analysis were compared with the contours produced by an oncologist and used for treatment. In 93% of cases, the Dice similarity coefficient was found to be between 60 and 80%. This feasibility study demonstrates that image analysis has the potential for automatic outlining in the management of brain cancer patients, however, more testing and validation on a much larger patient cohort is required.

  15. Identifying radiotherapy target volumes in brain cancer by image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Feng, Yang; Steel, Robin; Liao, Hanqing; McLaren, Duncan B.; Erridge, Sara C.; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    To establish the optimal radiotherapy fields for treating brain cancer patients, the tumour volume is often outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images, where the tumour is clearly visible, and mapped onto computerised tomography images used for radiotherapy planning. This process requires considerable clinical experience and is time consuming, which will continue to increase as more complex image sequences are used in this process. Here, the potential of image analysis techniques for automatically identifying the radiation target volume on MR images, and thereby assisting clinicians with this difficult task, was investigated. A gradient-based level set approach was applied on the MR images of five patients with grades II, III and IV malignant cerebral glioma. The relationship between the target volumes produced by image analysis and those produced by a radiation oncologist was also investigated. The contours produced by image analysis were compared with the contours produced by an oncologist and used for treatment. In 93% of cases, the Dice similarity coefficient was found to be between 60 and 80%. This feasibility study demonstrates that image analysis has the potential for automatic outlining in the management of brain cancer patients, however, more testing and validation on a much larger patient cohort is required. PMID:26609418

  16. Pattern recognition software and techniques for biological image analysis.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Lior; Delaney, John D; Orlov, Nikita; Eckley, D Mark; Goldberg, Ilya G

    2010-11-24

    The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays.

  17. Pattern Recognition Software and Techniques for Biological Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Lior; Delaney, John D.; Orlov, Nikita; Eckley, D. Mark; Goldberg, Ilya G.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays. PMID:21124870

  18. Research of second harmonic generation images based on texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Li, Yan; Gong, Haiming; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan

    2014-09-01

    Texture analysis plays a crucial role in identifying objects or regions of interest in an image. It has been applied to a variety of medical image processing, ranging from the detection of disease and the segmentation of specific anatomical structures, to differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy as a potential noninvasive tool for imaging biological tissues has been widely used in medicine, with reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. In this paper, we clarified the principles of texture analysis including statistical, transform, structural and model-based methods and gave examples of its applications, reviewing studies of the technique. Moreover, we tried to apply texture analysis to the SHG images for the differentiation of human skin scar tissues. Texture analysis method based on local binary pattern (LBP) and wavelet transform was used to extract texture features of SHG images from collagen in normal and abnormal scars, and then the scar SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal ones. Compared with other texture analysis methods with respect to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, LBP combined with wavelet transform was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy. It can provide a new way for clinical diagnosis of scar types. At last, future development of texture analysis in SHG images were discussed.

  19. Decision-problem state analysis methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieterly, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A methodology for analyzing a decision-problem state is presented. The methodology is based on the analysis of an incident in terms of the set of decision-problem conditions encountered. By decomposing the events that preceded an unwanted outcome, such as an accident, into the set of decision-problem conditions that were resolved, a more comprehensive understanding is possible. All human-error accidents are not caused by faulty decision-problem resolutions, but it appears to be one of the major areas of accidents cited in the literature. A three-phase methodology is presented which accommodates a wide spectrum of events. It allows for a systems content analysis of the available data to establish: (1) the resolutions made, (2) alternatives not considered, (3) resolutions missed, and (4) possible conditions not considered. The product is a map of the decision-problem conditions that were encountered as well as a projected, assumed set of conditions that should have been considered. The application of this methodology introduces a systematic approach to decomposing the events that transpired prior to the accident. The initial emphasis is on decision and problem resolution. The technique allows for a standardized method of accident into a scenario which may used for review or the development of a training simulation.

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in oncology: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Schuch, Alice; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Chojniak, Rubens; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    In the investigation of tumors with conventional magnetic resonance imaging, both quantitative characteristics, such as size, edema, necrosis, and presence of metastases, and qualitative characteristics, such as contrast enhancement degree, are taken into consideration. However, changes in cell metabolism and tissue physiology which precede morphological changes cannot be detected by the conventional technique. The development of new magnetic resonance imaging techniques has enabled the functional assessment of the structures in order to obtain information on the different physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment, such as oxygenation levels, cellularity and vascularity. The detailed morphological study in association with the new functional imaging techniques allows for an appropriate approach to cancer patients, including the phases of diagnosis, staging, response evaluation and follow-up, with a positive impact on their quality of life and survival rate.

  1. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in oncology: state of the art*

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Schuch, Alice; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Chojniak, Rubens; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    In the investigation of tumors with conventional magnetic resonance imaging, both quantitative characteristics, such as size, edema, necrosis, and presence of metastases, and qualitative characteristics, such as contrast enhancement degree, are taken into consideration. However, changes in cell metabolism and tissue physiology which precede morphological changes cannot be detected by the conventional technique. The development of new magnetic resonance imaging techniques has enabled the functional assessment of the structures in order to obtain information on the different physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment, such as oxygenation levels, cellularity and vascularity. The detailed morphological study in association with the new functional imaging techniques allows for an appropriate approach to cancer patients, including the phases of diagnosis, staging, response evaluation and follow-up, with a positive impact on their quality of life and survival rate. PMID:25741058

  3. Network asymmetry of motor areas revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li-Rong; Wu, Yi-Bo; Hu, De-Wen; Qin, Shang-Zhen; Xu, Guo-Zheng; Zeng, Xiao-Hua; Song, Hua

    2012-02-01

    There are ample functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on functional brain asymmetries, and the asymmetry of cerebral network in the resting state may be crucial to brain function organization. In this paper, a unified schema of voxel-wise functional connectivity and asymmetry analysis was presented and the network asymmetry of motor areas was studied. Twelve healthy male subjects with mean age 29.8 ± 6.4 were studied. Functional network in the resting state was described by using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) analysis. Motor areas were selected as regions of interest (ROIs). Network asymmetry, including intra- and inter-network asymmetries, was formulated and analyzed. The intra-network asymmetry was defined as the difference between the left and right part of a particular functional network. The inter-network asymmetry was defined as the difference between the networks for a specific ROI in the left hemisphere and its homotopic ROI in the right hemisphere. Primary motor area (M1), primary sensory area (S1) and premotor area (PMA) exhibited higher functional correlation with the right parietal-temporal-occipital circuit and the middle frontal gyrus than they did with the left hemisphere. Right S1 and right PMA exhibited higher functional correlation with the ipsilateral precentral and supramarginal areas. There exist the large-scale hierarchical network asymmetries of the motor areas in the resting state. These asymmetries imply the right hemisphere dominance for predictive motor coding based on spatial attention and higher sensory processing load for the motor performance of non-dominant hemisphere.

  4. State Teacher Salary Schedules. Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the United States most teacher compensation issues are decided at the school district level. However, a group of states have chosen to play a role in teacher pay decisions by instituting statewide teacher salary schedules. Education Commission of the States has found that 17 states currently make use of teacher salary schedules. This education…

  5. The Image Acquisition and Analysis Program For PEEM Station

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, G.-C.; Wei, D.-H.; Hsu, Y.-J.; Tsang, K.-L.

    2004-05-12

    We have developed a data acquisition and analysis program for the PEEM station at NSRRC. This program system can handle several gigabytes of data flow generated by the newly commissioned PEEM station. The data acquisition system controls one CCD, five gratings, several Pico-am current meters, and the PEEM system through one PC computer. A multi-threaded programming technique is used in this system to manage all the hardware components systematically in the timing domain while recording the image data. The image data consists of individual energy spectrum for each of the 1035 x 1317 pixels of the CCD. By comparing the spectra with those stored in the database, we can identify, with a score of likelihood, the elements and their oxidation states in the sample system. An FET device composed of three different materials, Silicide, silicon oxide, and silicon, has been used to test the performance of the program system. The results are consistent with those obtained by the SPEM station.

  6. Energy minimization in medical image analysis: Methodologies and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Xie, Xianghua

    2016-02-01

    Energy minimization is of particular interest in medical image analysis. In the past two decades, a variety of optimization schemes have been developed. In this paper, we present a comprehensive survey of the state-of-the-art optimization approaches. These algorithms are mainly classified into two categories: continuous method and discrete method. The former includes Newton-Raphson method, gradient descent method, conjugate gradient method, proximal gradient method, coordinate descent method, and genetic algorithm-based method, while the latter covers graph cuts method, belief propagation method, tree-reweighted message passing method, linear programming method, maximum margin learning method, simulated annealing method, and iterated conditional modes method. We also discuss the minimal surface method, primal-dual method, and the multi-objective optimization method. In addition, we review several comparative studies that evaluate the performance of different minimization techniques in terms of accuracy, efficiency, or complexity. These optimization techniques are widely used in many medical applications, for example, image segmentation, registration, reconstruction, motion tracking, and compressed sensing. We thus give an overview on those applications as well.

  7. Technical guidance for the development of a solid state image sensor for human low vision image warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderspiegel, Jan

    1994-01-01

    This report surveys different technologies and approaches to realize sensors for image warping. The goal is to study the feasibility, technical aspects, and limitations of making an electronic camera with special geometries which implements certain transformations for image warping. This work was inspired by the research done by Dr. Juday at NASA Johnson Space Center on image warping. The study has looked into different solid-state technologies to fabricate image sensors. It is found that among the available technologies, CMOS is preferred over CCD technology. CMOS provides more flexibility to design different functions into the sensor, is more widely available, and is a lower cost solution. By using an architecture with row and column decoders one has the added flexibility of addressing the pixels at random, or read out only part of the image.

  8. [Evaluation of dental plaque by quantitative digital image analysis system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Z; Luan, Q X

    2016-04-18

    To analyze the plaque staining image by using image analysis software, to verify the maneuverability, practicability and repeatability of this technique, and to evaluate the influence of different plaque stains. In the study, 30 volunteers were enrolled from the new dental students of Peking University Health Science Center in accordance with the inclusion criteria. The digital images of the anterior teeth were acquired after plaque stained according to filming standardization.The image analysis was performed using Image Pro Plus 7.0, and the Quigley-Hein plaque indexes of the anterior teeth were evaluated. The plaque stain area percentage and the corresponding dental plaque index were highly correlated,and the Spearman correlation coefficient was 0.776 (P<0.01). Intraclass correlation coefficients of the tooth area and plaque area which two researchers used the software to calculate were 0.956 and 0.930 (P<0.01).The Bland-Altman analysis chart showed only a few spots outside the 95% consistency boundaries. The different plaque stains image analysis results showed that the difference of the tooth area measurements was not significant, while the difference of the plaque area measurements significant (P<0.01). This method is easy in operation and control,highly related to the calculated percentage of plaque area and traditional plaque index, and has good reproducibility.The different plaque staining method has little effect on image segmentation results.The sensitive plaque stain for image analysis is suggested.

  9. The Analysis of Image Segmentation Hierarchies with a Graph-based Knowledge Discovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Cooke, diane J.; Ketkar, Nikhil; Aksoy, Selim

    2008-01-01

    Currently available pixel-based analysis techniques do not effectively extract the information content from the increasingly available high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery data. A general consensus is that object-based image analysis (OBIA) is required to effectively analyze this type of data. OBIA is usually a two-stage process; image segmentation followed by an analysis of the segmented objects. We are exploring an approach to OBIA in which hierarchical image segmentations provided by the Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation (RHSEG) software developed at NASA GSFC are analyzed by the Subdue graph-based knowledge discovery system developed by a team at Washington State University. In this paper we discuss out initial approach to representing the RHSEG-produced hierarchical image segmentations in a graphical form understandable by Subdue, and provide results on real and simulated data. We also discuss planned improvements designed to more effectively and completely convey the hierarchical segmentation information to Subdue and to improve processing efficiency.

  10. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and neural network classified autism and control.

    PubMed

    Iidaka, Tetsuya

    2015-02-01

    Although the neurodevelopmental and genetic underpinnings of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been investigated, the etiology of the disorder has remained elusive, and clinical diagnosis continues to rely on symptom-based criteria. In this study, to classify both control subjects and a large sample of patients with ASD, we used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and a neural network. Imaging data from 312 subjects with ASD and 328 subjects with typical development was downloaded from the multi-center research project. Only subjects under 20 years of age were included in this analysis. Correlation matrices computed from rs-fMRI time-series data were entered into a probabilistic neural network (PNN) for classification. The PNN classified the two groups with approximately 90% accuracy (sensitivity = 92%, specificity = 87%). The accuracy of classification did not differ among the institutes, or with respect to experimental and imaging conditions, sex, handedness, or intellectual level. Medication status and degree of head movement did not affect accuracy values. The present study indicates that an intrinsic connectivity matrix produced from rs-fMRI data could yield a possible biomarker of ASD. These results support the view that altered network connectivity within the brain contributes to the neurobiology of ASD.

  11. Automatic Line Network Extraction from Aerial Imagery of Urban Areas through Knowledge-Based Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-19

    approach for the analysis of aerial images. In this approach image analysis is performed ast three levels of abstraction, namely iconic or low-level... image analysis , symbolic or medium-level image analysis , and semantic or high-level image analysis . Domain dependent knowledge about prototypical urban

  12. State-by-State Analysis of High School Feedback Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The best information to help stakeholders evaluate and strengthen their efforts to improve students' college and career readiness is actual information about students' success beyond high school, such as enrollment, remediation, degree and certification completion, and employment outcomes. States have a critical role to plan in providing…

  13. Analysis of live cell images: Methods, tools and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nketia, Thomas A; Sailem, Heba; Rohde, Gustavo; Machiraju, Raghu; Rittscher, Jens

    2017-02-15

    Advances in optical microscopy, biosensors and cell culturing technologies have transformed live cell imaging. Thanks to these advances live cell imaging plays an increasingly important role in basic biology research as well as at all stages of drug development. Image analysis methods are needed to extract quantitative information from these vast and complex data sets. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of available image analysis methods for live cell imaging, in particular required preprocessing image segmentation, cell tracking and data visualisation methods. The potential opportunities recent advances in machine learning, especially deep learning, and computer vision provide are being discussed. This review includes overview of the different available software packages and toolkits.

  14. Digital Image Analysis for DETCHIP(®) Code Determination.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Marcus; Wilson, Mark V; Rouhier, Kerry A; Symonsbergen, David J; Bastola, Kiran; Thapa, Ishwor; Holmes, Andrea E; Sikich, Sharmin M; Jackson, Abby

    2012-08-01

    DETECHIP(®) is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP(®) used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP(®). Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the measurement of red-green-blue (RGB) values using software such as GIMP, Photoshop and ImageJ. Several different techniques were used to evaluate these color changes. It was determined that the flatbed scanner produced in the clearest and more reproducible images. Furthermore, codes obtained using a macro written for use within ImageJ showed improved consistency versus pervious methods.

  15. Multiband multi-echo imaging of simultaneous oxygenation and flow timeseries for resting state connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Alexander D.; Nencka, Andrew S.; Lebel, R. Marc; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    A novel sequence has been introduced that combines multiband imaging with a multi-echo acquisition for simultaneous high spatial resolution pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) echo-planar imaging (MBME ASL/BOLD). Resting-state connectivity in healthy adult subjects was assessed using this sequence. Four echoes were acquired with a multiband acceleration of four, in order to increase spatial resolution, shorten repetition time, and reduce slice-timing effects on the ASL signal. In addition, by acquiring four echoes, advanced multi-echo independent component analysis (ME-ICA) denoising could be employed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and BOLD sensitivity. Seed-based and dual-regression approaches were utilized to analyze functional connectivity. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and BOLD coupling was also evaluated by correlating the perfusion-weighted timeseries with the BOLD timeseries. These metrics were compared between single echo (E2), multi-echo combined (MEC), multi-echo combined and denoised (MECDN), and perfusion-weighted (PW) timeseries. Temporal SNR increased for the MECDN data compared to the MEC and E2 data. Connectivity also increased, in terms of correlation strength and network size, for the MECDN compared to the MEC and E2 datasets. CBF and BOLD coupling was increased in major resting-state networks, and that correlation was strongest for the MECDN datasets. These results indicate our novel MBME ASL/BOLD sequence, which collects simultaneous high-resolution ASL/BOLD data, could be a powerful tool for detecting functional connectivity and dynamic neurovascular coupling during the resting state. The collection of more than two echoes facilitates the use of ME-ICA denoising to greatly improve the quality of resting state functional connectivity MRI. PMID:28253268

  16. Multiband multi-echo imaging of simultaneous oxygenation and flow timeseries for resting state connectivity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander D; Nencka, Andrew S; Lebel, R Marc; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    A novel sequence has been introduced that combines multiband imaging with a multi-echo acquisition for simultaneous high spatial resolution pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) echo-planar imaging (MBME ASL/BOLD). Resting-state connectivity in healthy adult subjects was assessed using this sequence. Four echoes were acquired with a multiband acceleration of four, in order to increase spatial resolution, shorten repetition time, and reduce slice-timing effects on the ASL signal. In addition, by acquiring four echoes, advanced multi-echo independent component analysis (ME-ICA) denoising could be employed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and BOLD sensitivity. Seed-based and dual-regression approaches were utilized to analyze functional connectivity. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and BOLD coupling was also evaluated by correlating the perfusion-weighted timeseries with the BOLD timeseries. These metrics were compared between single echo (E2), multi-echo combined (MEC), multi-echo combined and denoised (MECDN), and perfusion-weighted (PW) timeseries. Temporal SNR increased for the MECDN data compared to the MEC and E2 data. Connectivity also increased, in terms of correlation strength and network size, for the MECDN compared to the MEC and E2 datasets. CBF and BOLD coupling was increased in major resting-state networks, and that correlation was strongest for the MECDN datasets. These results indicate our novel MBME ASL/BOLD sequence, which collects simultaneous high-resolution ASL/BOLD data, could be a powerful tool for detecting functional connectivity and dynamic neurovascular coupling during the resting state. The collection of more than two echoes facilitates the use of ME-ICA denoising to greatly improve the quality of resting state functional connectivity MRI.

  17. Unsupervised analysis of small animal dynamic Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Boschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Clustering analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to dynamic Cerenkov luminescence images (dCLI). In order to investigate the performances of the proposed approaches, two distinct dynamic data sets obtained by injecting mice with 32P-ATP and 18F-FDG were acquired using the IVIS 200 optical imager. The k-means clustering algorithm has been applied to dCLI and was implemented using interactive data language 8.1. We show that cluster analysis allows us to obtain good agreement between the clustered and the corresponding emission regions like the bladder, the liver, and the tumor. We also show a good correspondence between the time activity curves of the different regions obtained by using CA and manual region of interest analysis on dCLIT and PCA images. We conclude that CA provides an automatic unsupervised method for the analysis of preclinical dynamic Cerenkov luminescence image data.

  18. Unsupervised analysis of small animal dynamic Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Boschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Clustering analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to dynamic Cerenkov luminescence images (dCLI). In order to investigate the performances of the proposed approaches, two distinct dynamic data sets obtained by injecting mice with 32P-ATP and 18F-FDG were acquired using the IVIS 200 optical imager. The k-means clustering algorithm has been applied to dCLI and was implemented using interactive data language 8.1. We show that cluster analysis allows us to obtain good agreement between the clustered and the corresponding emission regions like the bladder, the liver, and the tumor. We also show a good correspondence between the time activity curves of the different regions obtained by using CA and manual region of interest analysis on dCLIT and PCA images. We conclude that CA provides an automatic unsupervised method for the analysis of preclinical dynamic Cerenkov luminescence image data.

  19. Uncooled LWIR imaging: applications and market analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasawa, Satomi

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of infrared (IR) imaging sensor technology for defense market has played an important role in developing commercial market, as dual use of the technology has expanded. In particular, technologies of both reduction in pixel pitch and vacuum package have drastically evolved in the area of uncooled Long-Wave IR (LWIR; 8-14 μm wavelength region) imaging sensor, increasing opportunity to create new applications. From the macroscopic point of view, the uncooled LWIR imaging market is divided into two areas. One is a high-end market where uncooled LWIR imaging sensor with sensitivity as close to that of cooled one as possible is required, while the other is a low-end market which is promoted by miniaturization and reduction in price. Especially, in the latter case, approaches towards consumer market have recently appeared, such as applications of uncooled LWIR imaging sensors to night visions for automobiles and smart phones. The appearance of such a kind of commodity surely changes existing business models. Further technological innovation is necessary for creating consumer market, and there will be a room for other companies treating components and materials such as lens materials and getter materials and so on to enter into the consumer market.

  20. Tilted planes in 3D image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pargas, Roy P.; Staples, Nancy J.; Malloy, Brian F.; Cantrell, Ken; Chhatriwala, Murtuza

    1998-03-01

    Reliable 3D wholebody scanners which output digitized 3D images of a complete human body are now commercially available. This paper describes a software package, called 3DM, being developed by researchers at Clemson University and which manipulates and extracts measurements from such images. The focus of this paper is on tilted planes, a 3DM tool which allows a user to define a plane through a scanned image, tilt it in any direction, and effectively define three disjoint regions on the image: the points on the plane and the points on either side of the plane. With tilted planes, the user can accurately take measurements required in applications such as apparel manufacturing. The user can manually segment the body rather precisely. Tilted planes assist the user in analyzing the form of the body and classifying the body in terms of body shape. Finally, titled planes allow the user to eliminate extraneous and unwanted points often generated by a 3D scanner. This paper describes the user interface for tilted planes, the equations defining the plane as the user moves it through the scanned image, an overview of the algorithms, and the interaction of the tilted plane feature with other tools in 3DM.